Science.gov

Sample records for ion flux activity

  1. Average energetic ion flux variations associated with geomagnetic activity from EPIC/STICS on Geotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Gloeckler, G.; Eastman, T. E.; McEntire, R. W.; Roelef, E. C.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Williams, D. J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Kokubun, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Kojima, H.; Mukai, T.; Saito, Y.; Yamamoto, T.

    1996-01-01

    The magnetotail ion flux measurements from the Geotail spacecraft are analyzed both with and without the application of selection criteria that identify the plasma regime in which an observation is obtained. The different results are compared with each other. The initial results on the changes of energetic ion flux and composition correlated to average substorm activity in different magnetotail plasma regimes are discussed. The energetic ions are measured using the energetic particles and ion composition (EPIC) experiment and the suprathermal ion composition spectrometer (STICS). The plasma, wave and field instruments of the Geotail satellite were used to identify the principle magnetotail plasma regimes of plasma sheet, lobe, and magnetospheric boundary layer, as well as the magnetosheath and solar wind. Energetic O and H ions were observed in all the plasma regimes.

  2. Ion flux profiles observed at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C. M.; Andersson, L.; Lundin, R. N.; Frahm, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    How Mars lost it's water and atmosphere is still an important question. Many studies have investigated high-energy ion fluxes (>10 eV) surrounding the planet and derived ion outflow rates in order to determine atmospheric loss. These rates suggest that the outflow from high-energy ions is not the dominant escape path for atmospheric loss. Over the years increasing evidence has indicated that the loss of low-energy ions are more important than the high-energy ion loss. In this presentation ion observations (down to the spacecraft potential) from the Mars Express (MEX) mission (2010/11), are used to describe the ion altitude distribution at Mars. The focus of this study is below the altitude of ~1000 km. Within the Mars environment, using the MEX electron observations different plasma regions was identified. Supported by electron identification, different altitude profiles of ion fluxes have been analyzed from the different plasma regions. One of the results from this study is that the altitude profile of the ion flux observed below the photoelectron boundary is different when comparing the northern and the southern hemispheres. The ion distributions, resulting altitude profile, the influence of the crustal magnetic field at Mars, and the implications relating to plasma outflow will be discussed in this presentation.

  3. The Empirical Low Energy Ion Flux Model for the Terrestrial Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, William C.; Minow, Joseph I.; Diekmann, Anne M.

    2007-01-01

    This document includes a viewgraph presentation plus the full paper presented at the conference. The Living With a Star Ion Flux Model (IFM) is a radiation environment risk mitigation tool that provides magnetospheric ion flux values for varying geomagnetic disturbance levels in the geospace environment. IFM incorporates flux observations from the Polar and Geotail spacecraft in a single statistical flux model. IFM is an engineering environment model which predicts the proton flux not only in the magnetosphere, but also in the solar wind and magnetosheath phenomenological regions. This paper describes the ion flux databases that allows for IFM output to be correlated with the geomagnetic activity level, as represented by the Kp index.

  4. Statistical study of enhanced ion fluxes in the outer plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Burch, J. L.; Williams, R. L.; Gallagher, D. L.; Waite, J. H., Jr.

    Statistical studies of outer plasmaspheric ions in the northern hemisphere have been made utilizing the High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) on board the Dynamics Explorer-1 satellite. The data were collected during equinox and winter seasons and during a period of solar maximum activity conditions. The data include approximately 40 dayside and over 50 nightside plasmaspheric passes covering a range of magnetic activities (0 < Kp < 7). A total of six magnetic storms and recovery periods and a number of quiet times are included in the sampling. The range of magnetic local times on the dayside is from about 6 hours to 12 hours, while the nightside range is from about 18 hours to 23 hours. Our results indicate a clear enhancement in the low energy (5 eV < E < 30 eV) number flux during periods of large magnetic activity in both the dayside and nightside outer plasmasphere (the inner plasmasphere was not observed). The dayside plasmaspheric fluxes were predominately upward (anti-parallel to B¯) while the nightside plasmaspheric fluxes were predominately downward (parallel to B¯). The net number fluxes sometimes reached a value of over 108cm sec-1 (assuming H+ as the predominate species). The largest flows up the field line occur in the outer plasmasphere and decrease in the plasma trough. The ion temperatures in the outer plasmasphere were typically lower than those in the plasma trough and auroral regions. Since the largest flows both parallel and anti-parallel to B¯ are observed at periods of high magnetic activity, enhanced outer plasmaspheric fluxes may be due to ionospheric ions expanding into depleted plasmaspheric flux tubes. The nightside fluxes may be due to expansion of the ionosphere in the magnetic conjugate hemisphere.

  5. Flux noise in ion-implanted nanoSQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tettamanzi, Giuseppe C.; Pakes, Christopher I.; Lam, Simon K. H.; Prawer, Steven

    2009-06-01

    Focused ion-beam (FIB) technology has been used to fabricate miniature Nb DC SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices) which incorporate resistively shunted microbridge junctions and a central loop with a hole diameter ranging from 1058 to 50 nm. The smallest device, with a 50 nm hole diameter, has a white flux noise level of 2.6 µΦ0 Hz-1/2 at 104 Hz. The scaling of the flux noise properties and focusing effect of the SQUID with the hole size were examined. The observed low frequency flux noises of different devices were compared with the contribution due to the spin fluctuation of defects introduced during FIB processing and of thermally activated flux hopping in the SQUID washer.

  6. Flux Estimates of Ions from the Lunar Exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarantos, M.; Hartle, R. E.; Killen, R. M.; Saito, Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Glocer, A.

    2012-01-01

    We compare estimates for the ion fluxes of twelve expected constituents of the lunar exosphere with estimates for the ion fluxes ejected from the lunar surface by solar wind ions and electrons. Our estimates demonstrate that measurements of lunar ions will help constrain the abundances of many undetected species in the lunar exosphere, particularly AI and Si, because the expected ion flux levels from the exosphere exceed those from the surface. To correctly infer the relative abundances of exospheric ions and neutrals from Kaguya Ion Mass Analyzer (IMA) measurements, we must take into account the velocity distributions of local ions. The predicted spectrum underestimates the measured levels of 0+ relative to other lunar ion species, a result that may suggest contributions by molecular ions to the measured 0+ rates.

  7. Ion flux dependent and independent functions of ion channels in the vertebrate heart: lessons learned from zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Keßler, Mirjam; Just, Steffen; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Ion channels orchestrate directed flux of ions through membranes and are essential for a wide range of physiological processes including depolarization and repolarization of biomechanical activity of cells. Besides their electrophysiological functions in the heart, recent findings have demonstrated that ion channels also feature ion flux independent functions during heart development and morphogenesis. The zebrafish is a well-established animal model to decipher the genetics of cardiovascular development and disease of vertebrates. In large scale forward genetics screens, hundreds of mutant lines have been isolated with defects in cardiovascular structure and function. Detailed phenotyping of these lines and identification of the causative genetic defects revealed new insights into ion flux dependent and independent functions of various cardiac ion channels.

  8. Implications of Saito's coronal density model on the polar solar wind flow and heavy ion abundances. [mathematical models of proton flux density and solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of polar solar wind proton flux upper limits derived using a coronal density model, with Lyman alpha measurements of the length of the neutral H tail of comet Bennet at high latitudes, shows that either extended heating beyond 2 solar radii is necessary some of the time or that the model's polar densities are too low. Whichever possibility is the case, the fact that the solar wind particle flux does not appear to decrease with increasing latitude indicates that the heavy element content of the high latitude wind may be similar to that observed in the ecliptic. It was then shown that solar wind heavy ion observations at high latitudes allow a determination of the electron temperature at heights which bracket the nominal location of the coronal temperature maximum thus providing information concerning the magnitude and extent of mechanical dissipation in the intermediate corona.

  9. Ion fluxes and neurotransmitters signaling in neural development.

    PubMed

    Andäng, Michael; Lendahl, Urban

    2008-06-01

    The brain develops and functions in a complex ionic milieu, which is a prerequisite for neurotransmitter function and neuronal signaling. Neurotransmitters and ion fluxes are, however, important not only in neuronal signaling, but also in the control of neural differentiation, and in this review, we highlight the recent advances in our understanding of how the gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) neurotransmitter and ion fluxes are relevant for cell cycle control and neural differentiation. Conversely, proteins previously associated with ion transport across membranes have been endowed with novel ion-independent functions, and we discuss this in the context of gap junctions in cell adhesion and of the neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter KCC2 in dendritic spine development. Collectively, these findings provide a richer and more complex picture of when ion fluxes are needed in neural development and when they are not.

  10. Predicting ion flux uniformity at the ion extraction plate in a 3D ICP reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Abhra; Bhoj, Ananth

    2016-09-01

    In order to achieve better control in processing the wafer surface, the ion fluxes in a remote plasma system are often focused through one or more ion extraction plates between the main plasma chamber and the downstream wafer plane. The ion extraction plates are typically of showerhead pattern with multiple holes. The focus of this particular study is to predict the ion flux uniformity over the ion extraction plate for a full 3D inductively coupled discharge reactor model using Argon chemistry. We will use the commercial modeling tool, CFD-ACE +, which can address such a process involving gas flow, heat transfer, plasma physics, reaction chemistry and electromagnetics in a coupled fashion. The plasma characteristics in the chamber and uniformity of the ion fluxes at ion extraction plate are discussed. Parametric studies varying the geometrical dimensions and process conditions to determine the effect on ion flux uniformity are presented. The showerhead-like ion extraction plate will be modeled as a porous media with a specified porosity. Further, a spatially varying porosity of the ion extraction plate is used to simulate ion recombination in order to reduce the ion flux non-uniformity. The goal is to optimize the system maximizing the ion flux while maintaining the uniformity.

  11. Nonturbulent stabilization of ion fluxes by the fan instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, C.; Volokitin, A.

    2013-07-01

    Resonant interactions between energetic ion fluxes and wave packets they excite through fan instability are studied using self-consistent 3D simulations to explain the nonlinear wave-particle mechanisms at work and to estimate the energy lost by the flux and its sharing between wave emission and particle heating. The saturation of waves and the relaxation of particles are studied over long time periods. The ions are not only diffusing in the waves but are also trapped simultaneously by several potential wells of large amplitude overlapping waves. Estimates of the ion heating energy and rate are given and compared with space observations.

  12. Characterization of ion fluxes and heat fluxes for PMI relevant conditions on Proto-MPEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beers, Clyde; Shaw, Guinevere; Biewer, Theodore; Rapp, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    Plasma characterization, in particular, particle flux and electron and ion temperature distributions nearest to an exposed target, are critical to quantifying Plasma Surface Interaction (PSI). In the Proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), the ion fluxes and heat fluxes are derived from double Langmuir Probes (DLP) and Thomson Scattering in front of the target assuming Bohm conditions at the sheath entrance. Power fluxes derived from ne and Te measurements are compared to heat fluxes measured with IR thermography. The comparison will allow conclusions on the sheath heat transmission coefficient to be made experimentally. Different experimental conditions (low and high density plasmas (0.5 - 6 x 1019 m-3) with different magnetic configuration are compared. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  13. Surface modification and deuterium retention in reduced-activation steels under low-energy deuterium plasma exposure. Part II: steels pre-damaged with 20 MeV W ions and high heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Zhou, Z.; Sugiyama, K.; Balden, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Gasparyan, Yu.; Efimov, V.

    2017-03-01

    The reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels including Eurofer (9Cr) and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels by the addition of Y2O3 particles investigated in Part I were pre-damaged either with 20 MeV W ions at room temperature at IPP (Garching) or with high heat flux at FZJ (Juelich) and subsequently exposed to low energy (~20-200 eV per D) deuterium (D) plasma up to a fluence of 2.9  ×  1025 D m-2 in the temperature range from 290 K to 700 K. The pre-irradiation with 20 MeV W ions at room temperature up to 1 displacement per atom (dpa) has no noticeable influence on the steel surface morphology before and after the D plasma exposure. The pre-irradiation with W ions leads to the same concentration of deuterium in all kinds of investigated steels, regardless of the presence of nanoparticles and Cr content. It was found that (i) both kinds of irradiation with W ions and high heat flux increase the D retention in steels compared to undamaged steels and (ii) the D retention in both pre-damaged and undamaged steels decreases with a formation of surface roughness under the irradiation of steels with deuterium ions with incident energy which exceeds the threshold of sputtering. The increase in the D retention in RAFM steels pre-damaged either with W ions (damage up to ~3 µm) or high heat flux (damage up to ~10 µm) diminishes with increasing the temperature. It is important to mention that the near surface modifications caused by either implantation of high energy ions or a high heat flux load, significantly affect the total D retention at low temperatures or low fluences but have a negligible impact on the total D retention at elevated temperatures and high fluences because, in these cases, the D retention is mainly determined by bulk diffusion.

  14. Evidence for ion heat flux in the light ion polar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biddle, A. P.; Moore, T. E.; Chappell, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    Cold flowing hydrogen and helium ions have been observed using the retarding ion mass spectrometer on board the Dynamics Explorer 1 spacecraft in the dayside magnetosphere at subauroral latitudes. The ions show a marked flux asymmetry with respect to the relative wind direction. The observed data are fitted by a model of drifting Maxwellian distributions perturbed by a first order-Spritzer-Haerm heat flux distribution function. It is shown that both ion species are supersonic just equatorward of the auroral zone at L = 14, and the shape of asymmetry and direction of the asymmetry are consistent with the presence of an upward heat flux. At L = 6, both species evolve smoothly into warmer subsonic upward flows with downward heat fluxes. In the case of subsonic flows the downward heat flux implies a significant heat source at higher altitudes. Spin curves of the spectrometer count rate versus the spin phase angle are provided.

  15. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  16. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Ranade, Sanjeev S; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-09-23

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is essential for various physiological processes such as the conscious sensations of touch and hearing, and the unconscious sensation of blood flow. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels.

  17. Ion flux and ion distribution function measurements in synchronously pulsed inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brihoum, Melisa; Cunge, Gilles; Darnon, Maxime; Joubert, Olivier; Gahan, David; Braithwaite, Nicholas St. J.

    2013-03-15

    Changes in the ion flux and the time-averaged ion distribution functions are reported for pulsed, inductively coupled RF plasmas (ICPs) operated over a range of duty cycles. For helium and argon plasmas, the ion flux increases rapidly after the start of the RF pulse and after about 50 {mu}s reaches the same steady state value as that in continuous ICPs. Therefore, when the plasma is pulsed at 1 kHz, the ion flux during the pulse has a value that is almost independent of the duty cycle. By contrast, in molecular electronegative chlorine/chlorosilane plasmas, the ion flux during the pulse reaches a steady state value that depends strongly on the duty cycle. This is because both the plasma chemistry and the electronegativity depend on the duty cycle. As a result, the ion flux is 15 times smaller in a pulsed 10% duty cycle plasma than in the continuous wave (CW) plasma. The consequence is that for a given synchronous RF biasing of a wafer-chuck, the ion energy is much higher in the pulsed plasma than it is in the CW plasma of chlorine/chlorosilane. Under these conditions, the wafer is bombarded by a low flux of very energetic ions, very much as it would in a low density, capacitively coupled plasma. Therefore, one can extend the operating range of ICPs through synchronous pulsing of the inductive excitation and capacitive chuck-bias, offering new means by which to control plasma etching.

  18. Energetic Ion Acceleration by Small-scale Solar Wind Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.; Zank, G. P.; Khabarova, O.

    2015-09-01

    We consider different limits of our recently developed kinetic transport theory to investigate the potential of supersonic solar wind regions containing several small-scale flux ropes to explain the acceleration of suprathermal ions to power-law spectra as observations show. Particle acceleration is modeled in response to flux-rope activity involving contraction, merging (reconnection), and collisions in the limit where the particle gyoradius is smaller than the characteristic flux-rope scale length. The emphasis is mainly on the statistical variance in the electric fields induced by flux-rope dynamics rather than on the mean electric field induced by multiple flux ropes whose acceleration effects are discussed elsewhere. Our steady-state analytical solutions suggest that ion drift acceleration by flux ropes, irrespective of whether displaying incompressible or compressible behavior, can yield power laws asymptotically at higher energies whereas an exponential spectral rollover results asymptotically when field-aligned guiding center motion acceleration occur by reconnection electric fields from merging flux ropes. This implies that at sufficiently high particle energies, drift acceleration might dominate. We also expect compressive flux ropes to yield harder power-law spectra than incompressible flux ropes.

  19. Experimental Studies of Ion Charge Ion Flux in Streaming Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    THIS PAGE (When Data Entered) L T R C I N CEflBIDOCUETATIONPDAGE BFRECMLTIGFR GOVTACCSOON O.3RECIPIENT’S C( 744,,OG NUMBER q v ]WERMENAL TUDIES OF ION...Controlling Office) IS. SECURITY CLASS. (of t )*r~g unclassified £ - 15.OECLASSIFICATION DOWNGRADING 16. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of this Report) qp...radiation, such as in our experiment, will decrease as the inverse square of the radius; blast wave theory then predicts(13) R~ t / t ccnh where n is

  20. AmeriFlux US-Var Vaira Ranch- Ione

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Var Vaira Ranch- Ione. Site Description - Located in the lower foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains on privately owned land, the Vaira Ranch site is classified as a grassland dominated by C3 annual grasses. Managed by local rancher, Fran Vaira, brush has been periodically removed for cattle grazing. Species include a variety of grasses and herbs, including purple false brome, smooth cat's ear, and rose clover. Growing season is confined to the wet season only, typically from October to early May.

  1. Cell-based potassium ion channel screening using the FluxOR assay.

    PubMed

    Beacham, Daniel W; Blackmer, Trillium; O' Grady, Michael; Hanson, George T

    2010-04-01

    FluxOR technology is a cell-based assay used for high-throughput screening measurements of potassium channel activity. Using thallium influx as a surrogate indicator of potassium ion channel activity, the FluxOR Potassium Ion Channel Assay is based on the activation of a novel fluorescent dye. This indicator reports channel activity with a large fluorogenic response and is proportional to the number of open potassium channels on the cell, making it extremely useful for studying K(+) channel targets. In contrast to BTC-AM ester, FluxOR dye is roughly 10-fold more thallium sensitive, requiring much lower thallium for a larger signal window. This also means that the assay is carried out in a physiological, normal-chloride saline. In this article, the authors describe how they used BacMam gene delivery to express Kv7.2 and 7.3 (KCNQ), Kir2.1, or Kv11.1 (hERG) potassium ion channels in U2-OS cells. Using these cells, they ran the FluxOR assay to identify and characterize channel-specific inhibitory compounds discovered within the library (Tocriscreen Mini 1200 and Sigma Sodium/Potassium Modulators Ligand set). The FluxOR assay was able to identify several known specific inhibitors of Kv7.2/7.3 or hERG, highlighting its potential to identify novel and more efficacious small-molecule modulators.

  2. Dual Active Surface Heat Flux Gage Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  3. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  4. The distribution of ion orbit loss fluxes of ions and energy from the plasma edge across the last closed flux surface into the scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, Weston M.; Schumann, Matthew T.

    2015-04-15

    A more detailed calculation strategy for the evaluation of ion orbit loss of thermalized plasma ions in the edge of tokamaks is presented. In both this and previous papers, the direct loss of particles from internal flux surfaces is calculated from the conservation of canonical angular momentum, energy, and magnetic moment. The previous result that almost all of the ion energy and particle fluxes crossing the last closed flux surface are in the form of ion orbit fluxes is confirmed, and the new result that the distributions of these fluxes crossing the last closed flux surface into the scrape-off layer are very strongly peaked about the outboard midplane is demonstrated. Previous results of a preferential loss of counter current particles leading to a co-current intrinsic rotation peaking just inside of the last closed flux surface are confirmed. Various physical details are discussed.

  5. Ion-selective self-referencing probes for measuring specific ion flux

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The metal vibrating probe developed in the 1970s to measure electric current is sensitive down to the micro-Amp range, but detects only net current due to flow of multiple ions and is too large to measure from single cells. Electrophysiological techniques which use glass microelectrodes such as voltage clamping can be used on single cells but are also non-specific. Ion-selective probes are glass microelectrodes containing at their tip a small amount of ionophore permeable to a particular ion. The electrode is therefore sensitive to changes in concentration of this ion. If the probe tip is moved at low frequency between two points in a concentration gradient of this ion then the electrochemical potential of the solution inside the electrode fluctuates in proportion to the size of the ion gradient. This fluctuation is amplified and recorded and is used to calculate the actual ion flux using Fick's law of diffusion. In this mini-review we describe the technique of ion-selective self-referencing microelectrodes to measure specific ion fluxes. We discuss the development of the technique and describe in detail the methodology and present some representative results. PMID:22046453

  6. An empirical model of electron and ion fluxes derived from observations at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M. H.; Thomsen, M. F.; Jordanova, V. K.; Henderson, M. G.; Borovsky, J. E.; Denton, J. S.; Pitchford, D.; Hartley, D. P.

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite-years of observations from the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local-times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bi-linear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ion flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local-time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3-hour Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied by the daily F10.7 index). Initial comparison of the electron flux from the model with data from a Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II (CEASE-II), also located at geosynchronous orbit, indicate a good match during both quiet and disturbed periods. The model is available for distribution as a FORTRAN code that can be modified to suit user-requirements.

  7. Temperature measurements during high flux ion beam irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Crespillo, Miguel L.; Graham, Joseph T.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2016-02-16

    A systematic study of the ion beam heating effect was performed in a temperature range of –170 to 900 °C using a 10 MeV Au3+ ion beam and a Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) sample at a flux of 5.5 × 1012 cm–2 s–1. Different geometric configurations of beam, sample, thermocouple positioning, and sample holder were compared to understand the heat/charge transport mechanisms responsible for the observed temperature increase. The beam heating exhibited a strong dependence on the background (initial) sample temperature with the largest temperature increases occurring at cryogenic temperatures and decreasing with increasing temperature. Comparison with numerical calculations suggests that the observed heating effect is, in reality, a predominantly electronic effect and the true temperature rise is small. Furthermore, a simple model was developed to explain this electronic effect in terms of an electrostatic potential that forms during ion irradiation. Such an artificial beam heating effect is potentially problematic in thermostated ion irradiation and ion beamanalysis apparatus, as the operation of temperature feedback systems can be significantly distorted by this effect.

  8. Temperature measurements during high flux ion beam irradiations

    DOE PAGES

    Crespillo, Miguel L.; Graham, Joseph T.; Zhang, Yanwen; ...

    2016-02-16

    A systematic study of the ion beam heating effect was performed in a temperature range of –170 to 900 °C using a 10 MeV Au3+ ion beam and a Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) sample at a flux of 5.5 × 1012 cm–2 s–1. Different geometric configurations of beam, sample, thermocouple positioning, and sample holder were compared to understand the heat/charge transport mechanisms responsible for the observed temperature increase. The beam heating exhibited a strong dependence on the background (initial) sample temperature with the largest temperature increases occurring at cryogenic temperatures and decreasing with increasing temperature. Comparison with numerical calculations suggestsmore » that the observed heating effect is, in reality, a predominantly electronic effect and the true temperature rise is small. Furthermore, a simple model was developed to explain this electronic effect in terms of an electrostatic potential that forms during ion irradiation. Such an artificial beam heating effect is potentially problematic in thermostated ion irradiation and ion beamanalysis apparatus, as the operation of temperature feedback systems can be significantly distorted by this effect.« less

  9. A survey of the cusp ion outflow's kinetic energy flux measured by Polar and FAST during conjunction events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, S.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Scudder, J. D.; McFadden, J. P.; Mozer, F.; Russell, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Polar and FAST conjunction events are selected from Polar cusp crossings in 1997. These conjunction events reveal a common pattern in which Polar observed significant ion kinetic energy flux in the upward direction at mid-altitudes (below 6 Re). Depending on the magnetic activity level, the maximum ion kinetic energy flux is on the order of 10-100 mW/m^2, when mapped to the ionosphere. It is an order of magnitude or more larger than the ion kinetic energy flux observed by FAST in conjunction at altitudes of <1 Re. Therefore, the ion outflows are significantly energized within the mid-latitude cusp. Also shown in the conjunction events is that the downward Poynting flux has enough wave energy to power the ion energization. The observed pattern suggests that the cusp at ionosphere altitudes is not a simple mapping of higher altitude particles. Instead, the mid-latitude cusp receives significant downward Poynting flux from higher altitude due to the solar wind/magnetosphere coupling. Within the mid-altitude cusp, the Poynting flux then supplies energy to power the ionosphere/magnetosphere coupling. Ion outflows are triggered and energized, forming a planetary wind that feeds the magnetosphere with ionospheric ions. During southward IMF, the wind convects anti-sunward and can affect the tail lobe, the nightside auroral region and the nightside plasma sheet.

  10. Potassium ion fluxes in corneal epithelial cells exposed to UVB

    PubMed Central

    Ubels, John L.; Van Dyken, Rachel E.; Louters, Julienne R.; Schotanus, Mark P.; Haarsma, Loren D.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the efflux of K+ from human corneal limbal epithelial cells (HCLE) exposed to ambient levels of UVB, which is known to cause apoptosis, and to examine the effect of K+ channel blockers on loss of potassium induced by UVB. HCLE cells were exposed to 100–200 mJ/cm2 UVB, followed by incubation in culture media with 5.5 – 100 mM K+, BDS-1, Ba2+ or ouabain. To measure intracellular cations, cells were washed in 280 mM sucrose and lysed in DI water. K+ and Na+ levels in lysates were measured by ion chromatography. HCLE cells showed maximal loss of [K+]i 10 minutes after exposure to UVB and 5.5 mM K+ media, with recovery of normal K+ levels after 90 minutes. Treatment with 1 µM BDS-1 following UVB exposure reduced the loss of [K+]i retained by HCLE cells. Exposure to 0.1–5 mM Ba2+ inhibited UVB-induced K+ loss in a time and dose dependent manner. These results confirm that blocking K+ channels in HCLE cells exposed to UVB prevents efflux of K+, confirming that UVB activates K+ channels in these cells. Electrophysiology data shows that K+ channels remain highly active at least 90 minutes after UVB exposure. HCLE cells exposed to UVB and incubated 0.01–1µM ouabain did not recover from UVB-induced K+ loss. These data suggest that the Na/K pump may act to restore [K+]i to control levels in HCLE cells following UVB exposure and that the pump is not damaged by exposure to UVB. Incubation of HCLE cells exposed to UVB in medium with 25–100mM K+ media prevented K+ efflux at extracellular concentrations as low as 25mM (the concentration in tear fluid), maintaining control levels of [K+]i. In all experiments inward fluxes and intracelluar Na+ levels mirrored K+ changes, albeit at the expected lower concentrations. The prevention of UVB-induced K+i loss by 25 mM K+o is consistent with the possible contribution of the relatively high K+ concentration in tears to protection of the corneal epithelium from ambient UVB. PMID:21377460

  11. Light-induced transient ion flux responses from maize leaves and their association with leaf growth and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zivanović, B D; Pang, J; Shabala, S

    2005-03-01

    Net fluxes of H+, K+ and Ca2+ ions from maize (Zea mays L.) isolated leaf segments were measured non-invasively using ion-selective vibrating microelectrodes (the MIFE technique). Leaf segments were isolated from the blade base, containing actively elongating cells (basal segments), and from non-growing tip regions (tip segments). Ion fluxes were measured in response to bright white light (2600 micromoles m-2 s-1) from either the leaf segments or the underlying mesophyll (after stripping the epidermis). Fluxes measured from the mesophyll showed no significant difference between basal and tip regions. In leaf segments (epidermis attached), light-induced flux kinetics of all ions measured (H+, Ca2+ and K+) were strikingly different between the two regions. It appears that epidermal K+ fluxes are required to drive leaf expansion growth, whereas in the mesophyll light-induced K+ flux changes are likely to play a charge balancing role. Light-stimulated Ca2+ influx was not directly attributable either to leaf photosynthetic performance or to leaf expansion growth. It is concluded that light-induced ion flux changes are associated with both leaf growth and photosynthesis.

  12. An empirical model of electron and ion fluxes derived from observations at geosynchronous orbit

    DOE PAGES

    Denton, M. H.; Thomsen, M. F.; Jordanova, V. K.; ...

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge of the plasma fluxes at geosynchronous orbit is important to both scientific and operational investigations. We present a new empirical model of the ion flux and the electron flux at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV. The model is based on a total of 82 satellite-years of observations from the Magnetospheric Plasma Analyzer instruments on Los Alamos National Laboratory satellites at GEO. These data are assigned to a fixed grid of 24 local-times and 40 energies, at all possible values of Kp. Bi-linear interpolation is used between grid points to provide the ionmore » flux and the electron flux values at any energy and local-time, and for given values of geomagnetic activity (proxied by the 3-hour Kp index), and also for given values of solar activity (proxied by the daily F10.7 index). Initial comparison of the electron flux from the model with data from a Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II (CEASE-II), also located at geosynchronous orbit, indicate a good match during both quiet and disturbed periods. The model is available for distribution as a FORTRAN code that can be modified to suit user-requirements.« less

  13. Ion flux, ion energy distribution and neutral density in an inductively coupled argon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevolleau, T.; Fukarek, W.

    2000-11-01

    The dependence of ion flux, ion energy distribution and neutral density of a planar radiofrequency (RF) driven inductively coupled plasma source on pressure and power is analysed using a plasma monitor and a Faraday cup. The ion flux is about 7 mA cm-2 at 5 Pa and 300 W and increases as RF power and argon pressure increase. The ion energy distribution consists of a single peak with a full width at half maximum of 3 eV for a discharge power in the range from 50 to 300 W and for a pressure in the range from 0.5 to 5 Pa. This indicates that inductive coupling mainly drives the discharge while capacitive coupling between coil and plasma is weak. A significant decrease in Ar neutral density is observed when the plasma is ignited. The Ar depletion increases with increasing RF power and increasing Ar base pressure and reaches 30% at 5 Pa and 300 W. The contributions of the different mechanisms resulting in an Ar depletion are estimated and compared. The decrease in neutral density cannot be explained by the ionization of Ar atoms only but is significantly attributed to the heating of Ar atoms by collisions with energetic particles. The increase in neutral gas temperature is estimated and found to be in reasonable agreement with measurements of the gas temperature reported previously by other groups.

  14. Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC.

    PubMed

    Gupta, D; Bolte, N; Gota, H; Hayashi, R; Kiyashko, V; Marsili, P; Morehouse, M; Primavera, S; Roche, T; Wessel, F

    2010-10-01

    One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

  15. Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, D.; Gota, H.; Hayashi, R.; Kiyashko, V.; Morehouse, M.; Primavera, S.; Bolte, N.; Marsili, P.; Roche, T.; Wessel, F.

    2010-10-15

    One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

  16. Backside calibration chronopotentiometry: using current to perform ion measurements by zeroing the transmembrane ion flux.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yida; Ngeontae, Wittaya; Pretsch, Ernö; Bakker, Eric

    2008-10-01

    A recent new direction in ion-selective electrode (ISE) research utilizes a stir effect to indicate the disappearance of an ion concentration gradient across a thin ion-selective membrane. This zeroing experiment allows one to evaluate the equilibrium relationship between front and backside solutions contacting the membrane by varying the backside solution composition. This method is attractive since the absolute potential during the measurement is not required, thus avoiding standard recalibrations from the sample solution and a careful control of the reference electrode potential. We report here on a new concept to alleviate the need to continuously vary the composition of the backside solution. Instead, transmembrane ion fluxes are counterbalanced at an imposed critical current. A theoretical model illustrates the relationship between the magnitude of this critical current and the concentration of analyte and countertransporting ions and is found to correspond well with experimental results. The approach is demonstrated with lead(II)-selective membranes and protons as dominating interference ions, and the concentration of Pb(2+) was successfully measured in tap water samples. The principle was further evaluated with calcium-selective membranes and magnesium as counterdiffusing species, with good results. Advantages and limitations arising from the kinetic nature of the perturbation technique are discussed.

  17. The spatial distribution of planetary ion fluxes near Mars observed by MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, D. A.; McFadden, J. P.; Halekas, J. S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Bougher, S. W.; Curry, S.; Dong, C. F.; Dong, Y.; Eparvier, F.; Fang, X.; Fortier, K.; Hara, T.; Harada, Y.; Jakosky, B. M.; Lillis, R. J.; Livi, R.; Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.; Modolo, R.; Seki, K.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an initial effort to statistically map the fluxes of planetary ions on a closed surface around Mars. Choosing a spherical shell ~1000 km above the planet, we map both outgoing and incoming ion fluxes (with energies >25 eV) over a 4 month period. The results show net escape of planetary ions behind Mars and strong fluxes of escaping ions from the northern hemisphere with respect to the solar wind convection electric field. Planetary ions also travel toward the planet, and return fluxes are particularly strong in the southern electric field hemisphere. We obtain a lower bound estimate for planetary ion escape of ~3 × 1024 s-1, accounting for the ~10% of ions that return toward the planet and assuming that the ~70% of the surface covered so far is representative of the regions not yet visited by Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN).

  18. Determination of auroral heat fluxes and thermal ion outflows using a numerical ionospheric model and incoherent-scatter radar data

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Q.L.; Watkins, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    A comprehensive one-dimensional model of the polar ionosphere has been used in conjunction with incoherent-scatter radar data from Sondrestrom, Greenland, to determine downward heat fluxes and thermal ion outflows at very high latitudes. For periods of very quiet geomagnetic activity the model closely simulates the observed time-dependent behavior of the electron density, ion and electron temperatures. To obtain this similarity between model and data, the upper boundary conditions of the model, namely downward heat flux, and magnetic field-aligned ion flows, are continually adjusted with time to provide a best fit with data. The heat fluxes and ion flows are determined indirectly from this fitting procedure. The technique has been applied to a 10-hour daytime data set for February 12, 1990, to search for enhanced downward heat fluxes and outward thermal ion fluxes associated with dayside auroral oval. Variations of heat flux ranged from about 2 x 10{sup 9} to 2 x 10{sup 10} eVcm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}, and vertical outward fluxes of ionization ranged from about zero to 8 x 10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. For both quantities the peak values occurred when the radar site was located under the dayside auroral oval. It is suggested that these marked upward thermal ion flows in the dayside auroral ionosphere may be associated with energetic O{sup +} ion outflows that have been observed at high altitudes with spacecraft. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Dust-ion acoustic cnoidal waves and associated nonlinear ion flux in a nonthermal dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur-Rehman, Hafeez; Mahmood, S.

    2016-09-01

    The dust-ion acoustic nonlinear periodic (cnoidal) waves and solitons are investigated in a dusty plasma containing dynamic cold ions, superthermal kappa distributed electrons and static charged dust particles. The massive dust particles can have positive or negative charge depending on the plasma environment. Using reductive perturbation method (RPM) with appropriate periodic boundary conditions, the evolution equations for the first and second order nonlinear potentials are derived. The first order potential is determined through Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation which gives dust-ion acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons structures. The solution of second order nonlinear potential is obtained through an inhomogeneous differential equation derived from collecting higher order terms of dynamic equations, which is linear for second order electrostatic potential. The nonlinear ion flux associated with the cnoidal waves is also found out numerically. The numerical plots of the dust-ion acoustic cnoidal wave and soliton structures for both positively and negatively charged dust particles cases and nonthermal electrons are also presented for illustration. It is found that only compressive nonlinear electrostatic structures are formed in case of positively dust charged particles while both compressive and rarefactive nonlinear structures are obtained in case of negatively charged particles depending on the negatively charged dust density in a nonthermal dusty plasma. The numerical results are obtained using data of the ionospheric region containing dusty plasma exist in the literature.

  20. A Self-Consistent Model of the Interacting Ring Current Ions and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves, Initial Results: Waves and Precipitating Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Jordanova, V. K.; Krivorutsky, E. N.

    2002-01-01

    Initial results from a newly developed model of the interacting ring current ions and ion cyclotron waves are presented. The model is based on the system of two kinetic equations: one equation describes the ring current ion dynamics, and another equation describes wave evolution. The system gives a self-consistent description of the ring current ions and ion cyclotron waves in a quasilinear approach. These equations for the ion phase space distribution function and for the wave power spectral density were solved on aglobal magnetospheric scale undernonsteady state conditions during the 2-5 May 1998 storm. The structure and dynamics of the ring current proton precipitating flux regions and the ion cyclotron wave-active zones during extreme geomagnetic disturbances on 4 May 1998 are presented and discussed in detail.

  1. Role of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition reactor wall conditions on radical and ion substrate fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Mark J.

    2014-01-15

    Chamber wall conditions, such as wall temperature and film deposits, have long been known to influence plasma source performance on thin film processing equipment. Plasma physical characteristics depend on conductive/insulating properties of chamber walls. Radical fluxes depend on plasma characteristics as well as wall recombination rates, which can be wall material and temperature dependent. Variations in substrate delivery of plasma generated species (radicals, ions, etc.) impact the resulting etch or deposition process resulting in process drift. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition is known to depend strongly on substrate radical flux, but film properties can be influenced by other plasma generated phenomena, such as ion bombardment. In this paper, the chamber wall conditions on a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process are investigated. The downstream oxygen radical and ion fluxes from an inductively coupled plasma source are indirectly monitored in temperature controlled (25–190 °C) stainless steel and quartz reactors over a range of oxygen flow rates. Etch rates of a photoresist coated quartz crystal microbalance are used to study the oxygen radical flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Plasma density estimates from Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements are used to study the ion flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Reactor temperature was not found to impact radical and ion fluxes substantially. Radical and ion fluxes were higher for quartz walls compared to stainless steel walls over all oxygen flow rates considered. The radical flux to ion flux ratio is likely to be a critical parameter for the deposition of consistent film properties. Reactor wall material, gas flow rate/pressure, and distance from the plasma source all impact the radical to ion flux ratio. These results indicate maintaining chamber wall conditions will be important for delivering consistent results from plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

  2. Control of Magnetic Field for Sustainment of Ion Production and Uniform Ion Flux to Substrate in Neutral Loop Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takuhei; Sakurai, Yohei; Sugawara, Hirotake; Murayama, Akihiro

    We simulated the electron and ion motions in a neutral loop discharge plasma under the control of the foot of separatrix sweeping over a substrate and the neutral loop moving within a short distance from the RF antenna by a Monte Carlo method. We analyzed the distributions of ion production and ion flux to the substrate. We revealed that ion production is sensitive to the gradient of magnetic field rather than the electric field strength. Moreover, by superposing the flux distributions weighted by the passage time of the foot of separatrix on the substrate, we obtained a uniform time-averaged distribution of ion flux to the substrate in a radius range of r = 4.0-14.0 cm with σ/m = 0.25% (m: the average, σ: the standard deviation).

  3. Calcium ion-gated proton fluxes in choroplast thylakoid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    Replacement of sucrose by 100 mM KCl in the choroplast thylakoid storage media, shifts proton gradients in thylakoids from a localized to a delocalized mode of energy coupling. This conversion appears to be regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions. Addition of divalent cations to the KCl containing medium maintained thylakoids in a localized coupling response. Inclusion of lipid soluble Ca{sup 2+} chelators to sucrose stored thylakoids normally displaying localized coupling behavior, resulted in a conversion to a delocalized pattern typical of KCl stored thylakoids. The Ca{sup 2+} antagonists directed towards calmodulin, chorpromazine and trifluoperazine, perturb the H{sup +} gating function in a way consistent with the Ca{sup 2+} gating action, involving a membrane protein analogous to a calmodulin-Ca{sup 2+} complex functioning as the closed gate structure. Chlorpromazine bound at the Ca{sup 2+} occupied sites causes partial blockage of the proton flux between the membrane domains and the lumen. ({sup 3}H)Chlorpromazine used as a photoaffinity probe, identified four membrane proteins of Mr 7-14 kDa, as possibly being part of the gating function. One of the proteins was identified as the 8 kDa CF{sub 0} subunit by its N-terminus amino acid sequence analysis of co-labeling with ({sup 14}C)DCCD. A 6 kDa protein also bound ({sup 3}H)CPZ similarly, from which a 10 amino acid peptide sequence was determined. This polypeptide may be part of a yet unidentified protein involved in the gating mechanism.

  4. Amyloid-β-Induced Ion Flux in Artificial Lipid Bilayers and Neuronal Cells: Resolving a Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Capone, Ricardo; Quiroz, Felipe Garcia; Prangkio, Panchika; Saluja, Inderjeet; Sauer, Anna M.; Bautista, Mahealani R.; Turner, Raymond S.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the pathogenicity of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides constitutes a major goal in research on Alzheimer’s disease (AD). One hypothesis entails that Aβ peptides induce uncontrolled, neurotoxic ion flux through cellular membranes. The exact biophysical mechanism of this ion flux is, however, a subject of an ongoing controversy which has attenuated progress toward understanding the importance of Aβ-induced ion flux in AD. The work presented here addresses two prevalent controversies regarding the nature of transmembrane ion flux induced by Aβ peptides. First, the results clarify that Aβ can induce stepwise ion flux across planar lipid bilayers as opposed to a gradual increase in transmembrane current; they show that the previously reported gradual thinning of membranes with concomitant increase in transmembrane current arises from residues of the solvent hexafluoroisopropanol, which is commonly used for the preparation of amyloid samples. Second, the results provide additional evidence suggesting that Aβ peptides can induce ion channel-like ion flux in cellular membranes that is independent from the postulated ability of Aβ to modulate intrinsic cellular ion channels or transporter proteins. PMID:19526294

  5. Spatial profiles of potential, ion concentration and flux in short unipolar and bipolar nanopores.

    PubMed

    Tajparast, Mohammad; Virdi, Gautam; Glavinović, Mladen I

    2015-10-01

    During release of vesicular content the resistance of the fusion pore sometimes changes rapidly and repeatedly. However, it is not clear why the pore 'flickers'. Engineered nanopores often rectify, but how different factors influence the rectification requires clarification. To better understand the ionic 'causes' of pore conductivity and its changes we simulated ion transport through a short nanopore using Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations, coupling it to the transport of water using Navier-Stokes equations. We extracted the potential, concentration, and ion flux profiles. In uniformly charged nanopores the voltage bias determines which counter-ion flux dominates, and it is carried by the counter-ions of the highest concentration. In unipolar nanopores this simple rule breaks down. The dominant counter-ion in the charged half is from the adjacent compartment, but the bias determines what counter-ion flux is dominant--the same ion (regular bias), or a different and smaller (reverse bias), and this difference determines the level of rectification. In bipolar nanopores the dominant counter-ions in each half are from the adjacent compartments, and the total ion concentration dips in the middle near the wall. With regular bias the total ion concentration peaks in the pore center; the ions that carry the current through the nanopore start as counter-ions and their fluxes are large. With reverse bias the total concentration dips near the wall and in the center, both dominant ion fluxes through the nanopore start as co-ions and are very small, whereas those starting as counter-ions do not go through.

  6. Ion-selective optodes measure extracellular potassium flux in excitable cells.

    PubMed

    Harjes, Daniel I; Dubach, J Matthew; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Das, Saumya; Clark, Heather A

    2010-01-18

    Optodes have been used for detection of ionic concentrations and fluxes for several years. However, their uses in biomedical applications have not yet been fully explored. This study investigates optodes as a potential sensor platform for monitoring cellular ion flux with attendant implications in the field of drug screening and toxicology. A prototype system was developed to quantitatively measure extracellular potassium flux from a monolayer of cardiomyocytes. Optodes were created and immobilized on a glass coverslip for fluorescent imaging. The system detected potassium (K(+) ) ion flux during the repolarization phase of the cardiac action potential and further detected a decrease in the magnitude of the flux in the presence of a known K(+) channel inhibitor by optically monitoring local K(+) ion concentrations during field stimulation of the cardiomyocyte monolayer.

  7. Ion fluxes across the pitcher walls of three Bornean Nepenthes pitcher plant species: flux rates and gland distribution patterns reflect nitrogen sequestration strategies.

    PubMed

    Moran, Jonathan A; Hawkins, Barbara J; Gowen, Brent E; Robbins, Samantha L

    2010-03-01

    Nepenthes pitcher plant species differ in their prey capture strategies, prey capture rates, and pitcher longevity. In this study, it is investigated whether or not interspecific differences in nutrient sequestration strategy are reflected in the physiology and microstructure of the pitchers themselves. Using a non-invasive technique (MIFE), ion fluxes in pitchers of Nepenthes ampullaria Jack, Nepenthes bicalcarata Hook.f., and Nepenthes rafflesiana Jack were measured. Scanning electron microscopy was also used to characterize the distribution of glandular and other structures on the inner pitcher walls. The results demonstrate that nutrient sequestration strategy is indeed mirrored in pitcher physiology and microstructure. Species producing long-lived pitchers with low prey capture rates (N. ampullaria, N. bicalcarata) showed lower rates of NH(4)(+) uptake than N. rafflesiana, a species producing short-lived pitchers with high capture rates. Crucially, species dependent upon aquatic commensals (N. ampullaria, N. bicalcarata) actively manipulated H(+) fluxes to maintain less acid pitcher fluid than found in 'typical' species; in addition, these species lacked the lunate cells and epicuticular waxes characteristic of 'typical' insectivorous congeners. An unexpected finding was that ion fluxes occurred in the wax-covered, non-glandular zones in N. rafflesiana. The only candidates for active transport of aqueous ions in these zones appear to be the epidermal cells lying beneath the lunate cells, as these are the only sites not visibly coated with epicuticular waxes.

  8. Light ion concentrations and fluxes in the polar regions during magnetically quiet times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.; Dodson, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    Ion concentrations, flow velocities, and fluxes, measured by the ion mass spectrometer on the Isis 2 satellite for periods around the solstices and equinoxes of 1971 and 1972, have been used in a study of the polar wind morphology during magnetically quiet times. The results confirm the major tenets of polar wind theories; namely, that an upward flow of both H(+) and He(+) ions exists at all times over the entire polar region; H(+) fluxes are of the order of 10 to the 8th ions/sq cm s in both summer and winter polar regions. O(+) is the dominant ion specie at 1400-km altitude in regions of strong H(+) flows, and H(+) is depleted over the entire region where the polar wind flows. H(+) fluxes tend to be lower in winter than in summer, whereas He(+) fluxes are a factor of 10 higher in winter and tend to follow the neutral helium concentration near the F2 maximum. The latter agree well with model calculations of flux in the winter but lie above the model values by a factor of 2 in the summer. H(+) fluxes also agree well with ion flow models.

  9. Light ion concentrations and fluxes in the polar regions during magnetically quiet times

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.H.; Dodson, W.H.

    1980-02-01

    Ion concentrations, flow velocities, and fluxes, measured by the ion mass spectrometer on the Isis 2 satellite for periods around the solstices and equinoxes of 1971 and 1972, have been used in a study of the polar wind morphology during magnetically quiet times. The results confirm the major tenets of polar wind theories; namely, that an upward flow of both H/sup +/ and He/sup +/ ions exists at all times over the entire polar region; H/sup +/ fluxes are of the order of 10/sup 8/ ions/cm/sup 2/ s in both summer and winter polar regions. O/sup +/ is the dominant ion specie at 1400-km altitude in regions of strong H/sup +/ flows, and H/sup +/ is depleted over the entire region where the polar wind flows. H/sup +/ fluxes tend to be lower in winter than in summer, whereas He/sup +/ fluxes are a factor of 10 higher in winter and tend to follow the neutral helium concentration near the F/sub 2/ maximum. The latter agree well with model calculations of flux in the winter but lie above the model values by a factor of 2 in the summer. H/sup +/ fluxes also agree well with ion flow models.

  10. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1993-04-27

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  11. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  12. Ion Flux and Energy Virtual Sensor for Measuring Ion Flux and Energy Distribution at a RF Biased Electrode in ICP Reactor (RIE-MODE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, Maria; Lopaev, Dmitriy; Zyryanov, Sergey

    2014-10-01

    The modern technology of micro- and nanoelectronics involves a great number of steps, e.g. pattern transfer, where Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) in rf plasma reactors is widely used. RIE is carried out placing samples on the surface of rf biased electrode, as rule in an asymmetric rf low-pressure discharge. In an effort to control the etching process, ion flux and energy distribution should be controlled precisely as much as possible. However, measurements of them during the process in the real-time operation mode are impossible. Nevertheless, if virtual sensor of ion flux and energy can be developed, such a sensor would allow monitoring ion energy spectrum without direct measurements during plasma processing. This virtual plasma diagnostics should include calculation of ion energy spectrum based on the simple physical model of ion motion in collisionless rf sheath. In addition the modeling has to be fulfilled in the real-time operation mode by using the set of external measurable parameters. This paper is just devoted to creation of such ion energy distribution virtual diagnostics. The reported study was supported by RFBR, research Project No. 14-02-31599.

  13. The role of plasma membrane H(+) -ATPase in jasmonate-induced ion fluxes and stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yan, Suli; McLamore, Eric S; Dong, Shanshan; Gao, Haibo; Taguchi, Masashige; Wang, Ningning; Zhang, Ting; Su, Xiaohua; Shen, Yingbai

    2015-08-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) elicits stomatal closure in many plant species. Stomatal closure is accompanied by large ion fluxes across the plasma membrane (PM). Here, we recorded the transmembrane ion fluxes of H(+) , Ca(2+) and K(+) in guard cells of wild-type (Col-0) Arabidopsis, the CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) mutant coi1-1 and the PM H(+) -ATPase mutants aha1-6 and aha1-7, using a non-invasive micro-test technique. We showed that MeJA induced transmembrane H(+) efflux, Ca(2+) influx and K(+) efflux across the PM of Col-0 guard cells. However, this ion transport was abolished in coi1-1 guard cells, suggesting that MeJA-induced transmembrane ion flux requires COI1. Furthermore, the H(+) efflux and Ca(2+) influx in Col-0 guard cells was impaired by vanadate pre-treatment or PM H(+) -ATPase mutation, suggesting that the rapid H(+) efflux mediated by PM H(+) -ATPases could function upstream of the Ca(2+) flux. After the rapid H(+) efflux, the Col-0 guard cells had a longer oscillation period than before MeJA treatment, indicating that the activity of the PM H(+) -ATPase was reduced. Finally, the elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the depolarized PM drive the efflux of K(+) from the cell, resulting in loss of turgor and closure of the stomata.

  14. The ISEE-3 ULEWAT: Flux tape description and heavy ion fluxes 1978-1984. [plasma diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Klecker, B.

    1985-01-01

    The ISEE ULEWAT FLUX tapes contain ULEWAT and ISEE pool tape data summarized over relatively long time intervals (1hr) in order to compact the data set into an easily usable size. (Roughly 3 years of data fit onto one 1600 BPI 9-track magnetic tape). In making the tapes, corrections were made to the ULEWAT basic data tapes in order to, remove rate spikes and account for changes in instrument response so that to a large extent instrument fluxes can be calculated easily from the FLUX tapes without further consideration of instrument performance.

  15. Direct ion flux measurements at high-pressure-depletion conditions for microcrystalline silicon deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bronneberg, A. C.; Kang, X.; Palmans, J.; Janssen, P. H. J.; Lorne, T.; Creatore, M.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de

    2013-08-14

    The contribution of ions to the growth of microcrystalline silicon thin films has been investigated in the well-known high-pressure-depletion (HPD) regime by coupling thin-film analysis with plasma studies. The ion flux, measured by means of a capacitive probe, has been studied in two regimes, i.e., the amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition regime and a low-to-high power regime; the latter regime had been investigated to evaluate the impact of the plasma power on the ion flux in collisional plasmas. The ion flux was found not to change considerably under the conditions where the deposited material undergoes a transition from the amorphous to the microcrystalline silicon phase; for solar-grade material, an ion-to-Si deposition flux of ∼0.30 has been determined. As an upper-estimation of the ion energy, a mean ion energy of ∼19 eV has been measured under low-pressure conditions (<1 mbar) by means of a retarding field energy analyzer. Combining this upper-estimate with an ion per deposited Si atom ratio of ∼0.30, it is concluded that less than 6 eV is available per deposited Si atom. The addition of a small amount of SiH{sub 4} to an H{sub 2} plasma resulted in an increase of the ion flux by about 30% for higher power values, whereas the electron density, deduced from optical emission spectroscopy analysis, decreased. The electron temperature, also deduced from optical emission spectroscopy analysis, reveals a slight decrease with power. Although the dominant ion in the HPD regime is SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, i.e., a change from H{sub 3}{sup +} in pure hydrogen HPD conditions, the measured larger ion loss can be explained by assuming steeper electron density profiles. These results, therefore, confirm the results reported so far: the ion-to-Si deposition flux is relatively large but has neither influence on the microcrystalline silicon film properties nor on the phase transition. Possible explanations are the reported high atomic hydrogen to deposition flux ratio

  16. Helium ion irradiation behavior of Ni-1wt.%SiCNP composite and the effect of ion flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. L.; Huang, H. F.; Xie, R.; Thorogood, G. J.; Yang, C.; Li, Z. J.; Xu, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    Silicon carbide nanoparticle-reinforced nickel metal (Ni-SiCNP composite) samples were bombarded by helium ions with fluences of 1 × 1016 and 3 × 1016 ions/cm2 at two different fluxes. The microstructural and mechanical changes were characterized via TEM and nanoindentation. Nano-scaled helium bubbles in the shape of spheres were observed in the samples irradiated at high flux and polygons at low flux. The number of helium bubbles increased with the fluence, whereas their mean size remained unaffected. In addition, the nanohardness of the damage layer also increased as the fluence increased. In addition this study suggests that a higher flux results in a higher number of smaller helium bubbles, while showing no obvious effect on the irradiation-induced hardening of the materials.

  17. Controlling ion fluxes during reactive sputter-deposition of SnO{sub 2}:F

    SciTech Connect

    Jäger, Timo Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.; Anders, André

    2014-07-21

    Magnetron sputtering of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) is a scalable deposition method for large-area transparent conducting films used in fenestration, photovoltaics, and other applications. The electrical conductivity of sputtered FTO is, however, lower than that of spray-pyrolized FTO because of the ion damage induced by high energy ions leading to a reduction of the crystal quality in sputtered FTO films. In this study, various ion species present during the reactive sputtering of a metallic tin target in a mixed Ar/O{sub 2}/CF{sub 4} atmosphere are systematically characterized by energy and mass spectrometry, and possible ways of controlling the ion fluxes are explored. Ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) of the negative ions F{sup −} and O{sup −} exhibit large peaks at an energy corresponding to the full target voltage. Although the applied partial pressure of CF{sub 4} is about 1/30 than that of O{sub 2}, the obtained IEDFs of F{sup −} and O{sup −} have comparable peak height, which can be attributed to a higher electronegativity of F. The IEDFs of positively charged O{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, and Sn{sup +} species have their peaks around 2–8 eV. To control ion fluxes a solenoid or permanent magnets were placed between the target and the mass spectrometer. The flux of positive ions could be varied by several orders of magnitude as a function of the applied current through the solenoid, whereas the high-energy (>100 eV) negative F{sup −} and O{sup −} ions were not notably deflected. By using permanent magnets with the B-field orthogonal to the ion trajectory, the flux of O{sup −} ions could be decreased by two orders and the exposure to the high-energy F{sup −} ions was completely suppressed.

  18. Ion flux asymmetry in radiofrequency capacitively-coupled plasmas excited by sawtooth-like waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneau, B.; Novikova, T.; Lafleur, T.; Booth, J. P.; Johnson, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    Using particle-in-cell simulations, we predict that it is possible to obtain a significant difference between the ion flux to the powered electrode and that to the grounded electrode—with about 50% higher ion flux on one electrode—in a geometrically symmetric, radiofrequency capacitively-coupled plasma reactor by applying a non-sinusoidal, ‘Tailored’ voltage waveform. This sawtooth-like waveform presents different rising and falling slopes over one cycle. We show that this effect is due to differing plasma sheath motion in front of each electrode, which induces a higher ionization rate in front of the electrode which has the fastest positive rising voltage. Together with the higher ion flux comes a lower voltage drop across the sheath, and therefore a reduced maximum ion bombardment energy; a result in contrast to typical process control mechanisms.

  19. Magnetized retarding field energy analyzer measuring the particle flux and ion energy distribution of both positive and negative ions.

    PubMed

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Dudin, Stanislav; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a magnetized retarding field energy analyzer (MRFEA) used for positive and negative ion analysis. The two-stage analyzer combines a magnetic electron barrier and an electrostatic ion energy barrier allowing both positive and negative ions to be analyzed without the influence of electrons (co-extracted or created downstream). An optimal design of the MRFEA for ion-ion beams has been achieved by a comparative study of three different MRFEA configurations, and from this, scaling laws of an optimal magnetic field strength and topology have been deduced. The optimal design consists of a uniform magnetic field barrier created in a rectangular channel and an electrostatic barrier consisting of a single grid and a collector placed behind the magnetic field. The magnetic barrier alone provides an electron suppression ratio inside the analyzer of up to 6000, while keeping the ion energy resolution below 5 eV. The effective ion transparency combining the magnetic and electrostatic sections of the MRFEA is measured as a function of the ion energy. It is found that the ion transparency of the magnetic barrier increases almost linearly with increasing ion energy in the low-energy range (below 200 eV) and saturates at high ion energies. The ion transparency of the electrostatic section is almost constant and close to the optical transparency of the entrance grid. We show here that the MRFEA can provide both accurate ion flux and ion energy distribution measurements in various experimental setups with ion beams or plasmas run at low pressure and with ion energies above 10 eV.

  20. Magnetized retarding field energy analyzer measuring the particle flux and ion energy distribution of both positive and negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane; Dudin, Stanislav

    2015-05-15

    This paper presents the development of a magnetized retarding field energy analyzer (MRFEA) used for positive and negative ion analysis. The two-stage analyzer combines a magnetic electron barrier and an electrostatic ion energy barrier allowing both positive and negative ions to be analyzed without the influence of electrons (co-extracted or created downstream). An optimal design of the MRFEA for ion-ion beams has been achieved by a comparative study of three different MRFEA configurations, and from this, scaling laws of an optimal magnetic field strength and topology have been deduced. The optimal design consists of a uniform magnetic field barrier created in a rectangular channel and an electrostatic barrier consisting of a single grid and a collector placed behind the magnetic field. The magnetic barrier alone provides an electron suppression ratio inside the analyzer of up to 6000, while keeping the ion energy resolution below 5 eV. The effective ion transparency combining the magnetic and electrostatic sections of the MRFEA is measured as a function of the ion energy. It is found that the ion transparency of the magnetic barrier increases almost linearly with increasing ion energy in the low-energy range (below 200 eV) and saturates at high ion energies. The ion transparency of the electrostatic section is almost constant and close to the optical transparency of the entrance grid. We show here that the MRFEA can provide both accurate ion flux and ion energy distribution measurements in various experimental setups with ion beams or plasmas run at low pressure and with ion energies above 10 eV.

  1. Geodesic mode instability driven by electron and ion fluxes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Elfimov, A. G. Camilo de Souza, F.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2015-11-15

    The effect of the parallel electron current and plasma flux on Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAM) in a tokamak is analyzed by kinetic theory taking into the account the ion Landau damping and diamagnetic drifts. It is shown that the electron current and plasma flow, modeled by shifted Maxwell distributions of electrons and ions, may overcome the ion Landau damping generating the GAM instability when the parallel electron current velocity is larger than the effective parallel GAM phase velocity of sidebands, Rqω. The instability is driven by the electron current and the parallel ion flux cross term. Possible applications to tokamak experiments are discussed. The existence of the geodesic ion sound mode due to plasma flow is shown.

  2. Effects of ion exchange on stream solute fluxes in a basin receiving highway deicing salts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    At Fever Brook, a 1260-ha forested basin in central Massachusetts, highway deicing salt application increased the solute flux in streamflow by 120% above background flux (equivalent basis) during a 2-yr period. Attempts to isolate the nonsalt component of stream solute fluxes have commonly subtracted salt contributions based on the net Cl flux (Cl output in streamflow minus Cl input in precipitation). In these studies, any net Na flux in excess of the amount needed to balance the net Cl flux has been attributed to weathering. At Fever Brook, however, the net output of Na was less than the net output of Cl, suggesting a loss of Na within the basin. The Na sink was inferred to be cation exchange of Na for Ca and Mg in the soil. A method was developed to quantify the exchange based on a Na budget, which included an independent estimate of the Na flux from weathering. The amount of exchange was apportioned to Ca and Mg based on their relative concentrations in the stream. The background fluxes of Ca and Mg (i.e., those that would occur in the absence of deicing salts) were calculated by subtracting the amounts from ion exchange plus the much smaller direct contributions in deicing salts from the observed fluxes. Ion exchange and direct salt contributions increased the net output fluxes of Ca and Mg, each by 44% above background. In basins that receive deicing salts, failure to account for cation exchange thus may result in an underestimate of the flux of Na from weathering and overestimates of the fluxes of Ca and Mg from weathering.

  3. Ultrafast active mixer using polyelectrolytic ion extractor.

    PubMed

    Chun, Honggu; Kim, Hee Chan; Chung, Taek Dong

    2008-05-01

    We report on a low voltage, straight/smooth surface, and efficient active micromixer. The mixing principle is based on alternative ion depletion-enrichment using a pair of positively charged polyelectrolytic gel electrodes (pPGEs), which face each other joined by a microchannel. This system has an external AC signal source electrically connected to the pPGEs via the respective 1 M KCl solutions and Ag/AgCl electrodes. When an electric bias is applied between the two pPGEs, anions are extracted through one of the pPGEs to create a local ion-deficient region. Simultaneously, an ion-rich area appears near the other pPGE due to an inward anionic flux. As the direction of the charge flow is periodically reversed by the AC signal source, the ion depletion-enrichment regions are alternately swapped with each other on the 'push-pull' basis. The turmoil between the pPGEs quickly mixes the solutions in the microchannel without any mechanical moving part or specially machined structures. In the proposed system, both AC frequency and current density can be easily and finely controlled so that one can quickly find the optimal conditions for a given sample. The micromixer as made showed a mixing efficiency higher than 90% for sample solutions of 1 mM Rhodamine 6G and PBS at pH 7.4 when the flow rate was under 6 mm s(-1). In addition to the solution-solution mixing, the micromixer can effectively mix suspended microparticles with solution. As a representative example, rapid and efficient lysis of human red blood cells was demonstrated allowing minimal damage of the white blood cells.

  4. Ion-scale secondary flux ropes generated by magnetopause reconnection as resolved by MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastwood, J. P.; Phan, T. D.; Cassak, P. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Haggerty, C.; Malakit, K.; Shay, M. A.; Mistry, R.; Øieroset, M.; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Argall, M. R.; Avanov, L. A.; Burch, J. L.; Chen, L. J.; Dorelli, J. C.; Ergun, R. E.; Giles, B. L.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Lavraud, B.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Moore, T. E.; Nakamura, R.; Paterson, W.; Pollock, C.; Strangeway, R. J.; Torbert, R. B.; Wang, S.

    2016-05-01

    New Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) observations of small-scale (~7 ion inertial length radius) flux transfer events (FTEs) at the dayside magnetopause are reported. The 10 km MMS tetrahedron size enables their structure and properties to be calculated using a variety of multispacecraft techniques, allowing them to be identified as flux ropes, whose flux content is small (~22 kWb). The current density, calculated using plasma and magnetic field measurements independently, is found to be filamentary. Intercomparison of the plasma moments with electric and magnetic field measurements reveals structured non-frozen-in ion behavior. The data are further compared with a particle-in-cell simulation. It is concluded that these small-scale flux ropes, which are not seen to be growing, represent a distinct class of FTE which is generated on the magnetopause by secondary reconnection.

  5. Ion-scale secondary flux ropes generated by magnetopause reconnection as resolved by MMS.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, J P; Phan, T D; Cassak, P A; Gershman, D J; Haggerty, C; Malakit, K; Shay, M A; Mistry, R; Øieroset, M; Russell, C T; Slavin, J A; Argall, M R; Avanov, L A; Burch, J L; Chen, L J; Dorelli, J C; Ergun, R E; Giles, B L; Khotyaintsev, Y; Lavraud, B; Lindqvist, P A; Moore, T E; Nakamura, R; Paterson, W; Pollock, C; Strangeway, R J; Torbert, R B; Wang, S

    2016-05-28

    New Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) observations of small-scale (~7 ion inertial length radius) flux transfer events (FTEs) at the dayside magnetopause are reported. The 10 km MMS tetrahedron size enables their structure and properties to be calculated using a variety of multispacecraft techniques, allowing them to be identified as flux ropes, whose flux content is small (~22 kWb). The current density, calculated using plasma and magnetic field measurements independently, is found to be filamentary. Intercomparison of the plasma moments with electric and magnetic field measurements reveals structured non-frozen-in ion behavior. The data are further compared with a particle-in-cell simulation. It is concluded that these small-scale flux ropes, which are not seen to be growing, represent a distinct class of FTE which is generated on the magnetopause by secondary reconnection.

  6. ION TRANSPORT IN ISOLATED RABBIT ILEUM. 3. CHLORIDE FLUXES.

    PubMed

    SCHULTZ, S G; ZALUSKY, R; GASS, A E

    1964-11-01

    Unidirectional Cl fluxes across in vitro segments of rabbit ileum have been determined both in the absence and in the presence of an electrochemical potential gradient. The results indicate that Cl transport in this preparation can be attributed to purely passive forces uninfluenced by solvent drag or exchange diffusion. Furthermore, on the basis of this and previous studies, it has been demonstrated that the sum of the partial ionic conductances of Na and Cl accounts for at least 90 per cent of the total tissue conductance.

  7. Study of storm time fluxes of heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, R. D.; Quinn, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Ion composition data sets from Lockheed instruments on a variety of spacecraft were used in combination with each other and with data from other instruments to address a variety of problems regarding plasma sources, energization and transport within the magnetosphere. The availability of data from several differing orbits has given a highly flexible approach to attacking the continually evolving questions of magnetospheric physics. This approach is very successful and should be continued in the future.

  8. Evolution of a typical ion-scale magnetic flux rope caused by thermal pressure enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, W.-L.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Russell, C. T.; Pollock, C.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Ergun, R. E.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.

    2017-02-01

    With high time-resolution field and plasma measurements by the Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft, interior fine structures of two ion-scale magnetic flux ropes ( 5 and 11 ion inertial length radius) separated by 14 s are resolved. These two ion-scale flux ropes (FR1 and FR2) show non-frozen-in ion behavior and consist of a strong axial magnetic field at the reversal of the negative-then-positive bipolar field component. The negative bipolar field component of the FR2 is found to be depressed, where magnetic pressure and total pressure decrease, but ion and electron thermal pressures increase, a feature akin to a crater-like flux rope. The pressure enhancement is due to the magnetosheath plasma feeding into the flux rope along the field lines. Magnetic field draping and energetic electrons are also observed in the trailing part of the FR2. The ratio of perpendicular and parallel currents indicates that the FR1 appears force-free but the FR2 seems not. Moreover, the FR2 is time-dependent as a result of a low correlation coefficient (CC = 0.75) for the derivation of the deHoffmann-Teller frame using the direct measured electric fields, while the FR1 is in quasi-steady conditions (CC = 0.94). It is concluded that the crater formation within the FR2 can be interpreted by the analytical flux rope simulation as the evolution of typical flux rope to crater-like one due to the thermal pressure enhancement, which could be induced by the depression of transverse magnetic fields of the flux rope.

  9. Cycle flux algebra for ion and water flux through the KcsA channel single-file pore links microscopic trajectories and macroscopic observables.

    PubMed

    Oiki, Shigetoshi; Iwamoto, Masayuki; Sumikama, Takashi

    2011-01-31

    In narrow pore ion channels, ions and water molecules diffuse in a single-file manner and cannot pass each other. Under such constraints, ion and water fluxes are coupled, leading to experimentally observable phenomena such as the streaming potential. Analysis of this coupled flux would provide unprecedented insights into the mechanism of permeation. In this study, ion and water permeation through the KcsA potassium channel was the focus, for which an eight-state discrete-state Markov model has been proposed based on the crystal structure, exhibiting four ion-binding sites. Random transitions on the model lead to the generation of the net flux. Here we introduced the concept of cycle flux to derive exact solutions of experimental observables from the permeation model. There are multiple cyclic paths on the model, and random transitions complete the cycles. The rate of cycle completion is called the cycle flux. The net flux is generated by a combination of cyclic paths with their own cycle flux. T.L. Hill developed a graphical method of exact solutions for the cycle flux. This method was extended to calculate one-way cycle fluxes of the KcsA channel. By assigning the stoichiometric numbers for ion and water transfer to each cycle, we established a method to calculate the water-ion coupling ratio (CR(w-i)) through cycle flux algebra. These calculations predicted that CR(w-i) would increase at low potassium concentrations. One envisions an intuitive picture of permeation as random transitions among cyclic paths, and the relative contributions of the cycle fluxes afford experimental observables.

  10. Comparisons of Earthward Poynting flux and the kinetic energy flux of up-flowing transversely heated ions from the Polar spacecraft on cusp magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, S.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Scudder, J. D.; Mozer, F.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents estimates of the Poynting flux flowing along magnetic field lines in the Earth's cusp region over altitudes from 0.8 Re to 7 Re using measurements during several passes from the Polar spacecraft. The Poynting flux is calculated from measurements of electric fields from the University of California, Berkeley double probe electric field instrument, and from magnetic field measurements from the U.C.L.A. fluxgate magnetometer. The estimates of Poynting flux are of special interest because the high altitude mapping of the cusp magnetic flux tubes may connect to newly reconnected field lines and the low altitude mapping of these field lines is the scene of powerful acceleration processes, most notably transverse heating and outflow of ions. The data show that the Poynting flux is predominantly downward over the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 Hz . This frequency range includes the Poynting flux due to steady state convection and field-aligned current systems, Alfven waves, and kinetic Alfven waves. Measurement of transversely heated ions over the energy ranges from 10 eV to several keV and their associated ion kinetic energy flux are presented from the University of Iowa Hydra instrument and compared to the values of the downward Poynting flux. Generally the downward Poynting flux exceeds the upward kinetic energy flux of the ions.

  11. Kinetics of active sodium transport in rat proximal tubules and its variation by cardiac glycosides at zero net volume and ion fluxes. Evidence for a multisite sodium transport system.

    PubMed Central

    Györy, A Z; Lingard, J M

    1976-01-01

    1. Transepithelial Na concentration difference, deltaCNa, across proximal tubules of rat kidney was measured at varying intraluminal Na concentrations (CNainfinity) under conditions of zero net volume and Na flux. Simultaneous stopped-flow intratubular and artificial peritubular capillary perfusion techniques were used together with intratubular raffinose to achieve zero net fluxes. Under these conditions in rat proximal tubules, deltaCNa represents active transport, JactNa, factored by permeability, PNa, plus an electrical factor depending on transepithelial potential difference. 2. The relationship between CNainfinity and deltaCNa appeared sigmoidal with saturation being reached when intratubular Na was above 80 m-mole/kg. In the presence of ouabain (10(-2)M) and scilliroside (10(-3)M) the relationship remained the same. The maximum deltaCNa was reduced by approximately 50% by cardiac glycoside inhibition whereas the half-saturation constant was essentially unchanged. These changes from the control represent simple non-competitive inhibition by the cardiac glycosides. 3. Absence of potential difference (p.d.) measurements precludes exact description of the relation between true active transport and substrate concentration but much evidence indicates that the apparently sigmoid relation in the presence and absence of cardiac glycoside inhibition, would be retained if correction of deltaCNa values were possible. Such results could then be explained if there are at least three or more sites for Na on the pump system, of which at least two are not cardiac glycoside sensitive. They would also unequivocally exclude the presence of a single-site single-pump system or the simple algebraic addition of two such units since the kinetic curves for both would be hyperbolic rather than sigmoidal. PMID:950594

  12. Energetic ion fluxes in the inner coma of Comet P/Halley

    SciTech Connect

    Eviatar, A.; Goldstein, R.; Young, D.T.; Balsiger, H.; Rosenbauer, H.

    1989-04-01

    The particle phenomenon observed inside the magnetic field-free cavity near the nucleus of Comet P/Halley by the Giotto Ion Mass Spectrometer High-Energy Range Spectrometer sensor is studied. The question of access to the cavity of particles ionized farther out in the coma is addressed. A quantitative model of a mechanism for creating the observed fast-ion fluxes in the cavity is presented. 23 refs.

  13. Energetic ion fluxes in the inner coma of Comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, Aharon; Goldstein, Raymond; Young, David T.; Balsiger, Hans; Rosenbauer, Helmut

    1989-01-01

    The particle phenomenon observed inside the magnetic field-free cavity near the nucleus of Comet P/Halley by the Giotto Ion Mass Spectrometer High-Energy Range Spectrometer sensor is studied. The question of access to the cavity of particles ionized farther out in the coma is addressed. A quantitative model of a mechanism for creating the observed fast-ion fluxes in the cavity is presented.

  14. Explosive Flux Compression: 50 Years of Los Alamos Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

    1998-10-18

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  15. Explosive Flux Compression:. 50 Years of LOS Alamos Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, C.; Thomson, D.; Garn, W.

    2004-11-01

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  16. SOL density profile formation and intermittent ion fluxes to the first wall in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkden, Nicholas; Militello, F.; Matthews, G.; Harrison, J.; Moulton, D.; Wynn, A.; Lipschultz, B.; Guillemaut, C.; JET Team

    2016-10-01

    The ion flux in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of a tokamak is highly non-diffusive due to the radial propagation of intermittent burst events known as filaments. As a result the formation of mean profiles in the SOL and the flux incident on the outer wall are strongly impacted by transient events. This has been investigated over a series of pulses in an Ohmic L-mode horizontal target configuration in JET. Broadening of the SOL density profile is reduced as plasma current is increased or the density is decreased. The mean and variance of the ion flux at the outer wall change concurrently with this broadening. Upon renormalization the PDFs of the ion flux at the outer-wall collapse indicating universality in the dynamics of their constituent fluctuations. This universality is shown to result from a balance between the duration and frequency of burst events which keeps the intermittency parameter constant. These measurements will be compared to synthetically produced measurements created using a stochastic framework based on filamentary dynamics. Through this comparison possible models of filamentary dynamics will be assessed and compared quantitatively to gain an understanding of the processes underlying density profile formation and fluxes to the outer wall of JET. This work has been carried out within the framework of the EURO- fusion Consortium.

  17. Ion flux and energy virtual sensor for measuring ion flux and energy distribution at a RF biased electrode in ICP reactor (RIE-mode)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanova, M. A.; Lopaev, D. V.; Zyryanov, S. M.

    2016-10-01

    The modern technology of micro- and nanoelectronics involves a great number of steps, such as pattern transfer, where Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) in rf plasma reactors is widely used. To control the etching process, the ion flux and ion energy distribution should be managed precisely. However, the measurements of these parameters during the process in the real-time operation are impossible. This paper is devoted to the construction of a virtual diagnostics of the Ion Energy Distribution (IED) function. This method for the determination of the ion energy spectrum on the surface of rf biased electrode is based on model calculations using in-situ measured discharge parameters. The results of IED virtual diagnostics were compared with data, obtained by Retarded Field Energy Analyzer (RFEA). This was done for Ar- and H2-plasmas operated under low-pressure rf plasma conditions. The good agreement between the model and the experimental justifies the conclusion that the IED virtual diagnostics can be applied successfully. This enables the in-situ monitoring of the IED at the electrode surface in RIE reactors.

  18. Ion flux enhancements and oscillations in spatially confined laser produced aluminum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. C. Fallon, C.; Hayden, P.; Yeates, P.; Costello, J. T.; Mujawar, M.

    2014-09-15

    Ion signals from laser produced plasmas (LPPs) generated inside aluminum rectangular cavities at a fixed depth d = 2 mm and varying width, x = 1.0, 1.6, and 2.75 mm were obtained by spatially varying the position of a negatively biased Langmuir probe. Damped oscillatory features superimposed on Maxwellian distributed ion signals were observed. Depending on the distance of the probe from the target surface, three to twelve fold enhancements in peak ion density were observed via confinement of the LPP, generated within rectangular cavities of varying width which constrained the plasma plume to near one dimensional expansion in the vertical plane. The effects of lateral spatial confinement on the expansion velocity of the LPP plume front, the temperature, density and expansion velocity of ions, enhancement of ion flux, and ion energy distribution were recorded. The periodic behavior of ion signals was analyzed and found to be related to the electron plasma frequency and electron-ion collision frequency. The effects of confinement and enhancement of various ion parameters and expansion velocities of the LPP ion plume are explained on the basis of shock wave theory.

  19. H- Ion Source And High Flux Neutral Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, A.; Lindenbaum, H.; Rostoker, N.; Wiswall, C. E.; Cartier, S. L.; Leader, J. C.

    1988-05-01

    Conventional dc sources of H- are limited to current densities of the order of 50 mA/cm2 for sources with area larger than a few cm2. Early work at UCI and more recent work at the Lebedev Institute have shown that pulsed magnetical)sy insulated ion diodes can produce current densities larger by factors of the order 10 - 10'±. The large current density and space charge required considerable development of diagnostics for reliable measurements of current density; the methods involve a biased Faraday cup, Etch pit counting on CR-39 film, and nuclear reactions. The diagnostic development was done mainly with a coaxial diode because most of the previous data, particularly from the Lebedev Institute was obtained for this diode design. Since this diode is .not suitable for applications, several other types of magnetically insulated diodes have been developed and studied. For example, the annular and race-track diodes are suitable for an ipn gun. High current densities of H- are obtained only when the cathode plasma is at suitable density and temperature. In previous experiments the plasma was produced by flashover of a dielectric surface driven by the pulse line prepulse. The H- current density was quite sensitive to the magnitude and duration of the prepulse. The prepulse is a property of the machine design about which there is limited control in existing machines. We therefore developed a flash-board plasma source that is placed inside the cathode shank of the APEX generator and can be controlled independently of the pulse line. This paper will present the most recent results with this plasma source, and comparisons with the previous prepulse results.

  20. Heavy-ion flux enhancement in the vicinity of the Martian ionosphere during CIR passage: Mars Express ASPERA-3 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, T.; Seki, K.; Futaana, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yagi, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Tokumaru, M.; Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S.

    2011-12-01

    Mars does not possess a global intrinsic magnetic field [e.g., Acuna et al., 1998]. The solar wind thus can directly interact with the Martian upper atmosphere. Atmospheric escape induced by the solar wind has been observed by Phobos-2 at the solar maximum, and recently by Mars Express (MEX) at the solar minimum. Escape rates of planetary ions estimated by both spacecraft indicate large dependence on the solar activity and the solar wind conditions [e.g., Lundin et al., 1989; Barabash et al., 2007]. Recently, it was reported by MEX measurements that the interplanetary disturbances, such as corotating interaction regions (CIRs) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), can enhance the escape rate [Dubinin et al., 2009; Edberg et al., 2010]. These studies focused on the change of the outflow flux, and the physical process responsible for the heavy-ion escape enhancement by CIRs is still an open question. Here we report on a characteristic heavy-ion signature observed in the vicinity of the Martian ionosphere during passages of CIR structure in the solar wind. We use data obtained by the ion mass analyzer (IMA), which is a part of plasma packages of ASPERA-3 onboard MEX from September to October 2007. We compared the solar wind velocity at Mars derived from IMA data and time-shifted ACE data considering the travel time from Earth to Mars. The solar wind velocity derived from both spacecraft shows the passages of CIR structure quasiperiodically. Coinciding with the CIR passages, IMA observed heavy-ion enhancement in the vicinity of the Martian ionosphere. Observed ion velocity distribution functions indicate that heavy ions are mostly precipitating toward the Martian upper atmosphere. We confirm that events locations where precipitation of heavy ions are detected by IMA distributes rather randomly, regardless of the Martian crustal magnetic field [e.g., Acuna et al., 1998; Connerney et al., 2005]. While the observed flux level is consistent with a previous model prediction of

  1. Ion Outflow in the Dayside Cusp Ionosphere and its Dependence on Soft Electron Energy Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchill, J. K.; Knudsen, D. J.; Clemmons, J. H.; Oksavik, K.; Pfaff, R. F.; Steigies, C. T.; Yau, A. W.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the origin of low energy (Ek<10 eV) ion upflows in Earth's low-altitude dayside cusp region. The Cusp-2002 sounding rocket flew from Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, on 14 December 2002, carrying plasma and field instrumentation to an altitude of 768 km. The Suprathermal Ion Imager, a two-dimensional energy/arrival-angle spectrograph, observed large (>500 m/s) O+ upflows within the cusp at altitudes between 640 km and 768 km. We report a significant association between ion upflow and precipitating magnetosheath electron energy flux in this altitude range, but no causal links between upflow and either wave power or the magnitude of the dc electric field. The correspondence between upflow and logarithm of the electron energy flux suggests a mechanism whereby ions are accelerated locally by ambipolar electric fields that are driven by the soft electrons. Significant ion upflows are not observed for electron energy fluxes below ˜1010 eV cm-2s-1, which suggests that any ambipolar fields present above 640 km must be in equilibrium with gravity and pressure gradients under this condition. The lack of correspondence between │E│ and upflow on the one hand, and wave power and upflow on the other, does not rule out these processes, but implies that, if operating, they are not local to the measurement region. We observe narrow regions of large downflow that imply either a re-balancing of the ionosphere toward a low-Te equilibrium during which gravity dominates the pressure gradients, or convection of the upflowing ions away from the precipitation region, outside of which the ions must fall back into equilibrium at lower altitudes.

  2. Luminal hydrochloric acid stimulates rapid transepithelial ion fluxes in rodent esophageal stratified squamous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lin, B R; Hsieh, H T; Lee, J M; Lai, I R; Chen, C F; Yu, L C H

    2008-09-01

    It remains unclear whether enhanced ion fluxes occur in the esophageal stratified squamous epithelium upon acid exposure. Rat esophageal tissues devoid of submucosal glands displayed basal short-circuit current (Isc) of 5.03 +/- 1.93 microA/cm(2) and lumen-negative potential difference (PD) in association with net absorption of Na+ and Cl-, and secretion of HCO3(-). Luminal hydrochloric acid (HCl) challenge (pH = 1.6) triggered an acute rise of the Isc and increment of negative PD to seven-fold of baseline, which was diminished in HCO3(-)-free, but not Na+- free buffer. The rise of Isc was inhibited by pretreatment with di-isothiocyanatostilbene-2, 2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (EIPA). Topical carbachol, capsaicin, forskolin or CFTR(inh)-172 had no effect on basal Isc.CFTR(inh)-172 did not reduce the acid-increased Isc. Functional ablation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves had no effect on the acid-induced Isc. The phenomenon of enhanced ion fluxes upon acid stimulation was confirmed in human esophageal specimens. Our results demonstrated that the mechanism of acid-induced rapid transepithelial ion fluxes is dependent on the presence of bicarbonate ions as well as functional anion transporters and Na+/H+ exchanger, but independent of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The capsaicin-sensitive and muscarinic-dependent nerve pathways did not play roles in the mechanism.

  3. High-flux source of low-energy neutral beams using reflection of ions from metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbertson, John W.; Motley, Robert W.; Langer, William D.

    1992-01-01

    Reflection of low-energy ions from surfaces can be applied as a method of producing high-flux beams of low-energy neutral particles, and is an important effect in several areas of plasma technology, such as in the edge region of fusion devices. We have developed a beam source based on acceleration and reflection of ions from a magnetically confined coaxial RF plasma source. The beam provides a large enough flux to allow the energy distribution of the reflected neutrals to be measured despite the inefficiency of detection, by means of an electrostatic cylindrical mirror analyzer coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Energy distributions have been measured for oxygen, nitrogen, and inert gas ions incident with from 15 to 70 eV reflected from amorphous metal surfaces of several compositions. For ions of lighter atomic mass than the reflecting metal, reflected beams have peaked energy distributions; beams with the peak at 4-32 eV have been measured. The energy and mass dependences of the energy distributions as well as measurements of absolute flux, and angular distribution and divergence are reported. Applications of the neutral beams produced are described.

  4. A unifying mechanism for cancer cell death through ion channel activation by HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Storm, Petter; Klausen, Thomas Kjaer; Trulsson, Maria; Ho C S, James; Dosnon, Marion; Westergren, Tomas; Chao, Yinxia; Rydström, Anna; Yang, Henry; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Svanborg, Catharina

    2013-01-01

    Ion channels and ion fluxes control many aspects of tissue homeostasis. During oncogenic transformation, critical ion channel functions may be perturbed but conserved tumor specific ion fluxes remain to be defined. Here we used the tumoricidal protein-lipid complex HAMLET as a probe to identify ion fluxes involved in tumor cell death. We show that HAMLET activates a non-selective cation current, which reached a magnitude of 2.74±0.88 nA within 1.43±0.13 min from HAMLET application. Rapid ion fluxes were essential for HAMLET-induced carcinoma cell death as inhibitors (amiloride, BaCl2), preventing the changes in free cellular Na(+) and K(+) concentrations also prevented essential steps accompanying carcinoma cell death, including changes in morphology, uptake, global transcription, and MAP kinase activation. Through global transcriptional analysis and phosphorylation arrays, a strong ion flux dependent p38 MAPK response was detected and inhibition of p38 signaling delayed HAMLET-induced death. Healthy, differentiated cells were resistant to HAMLET challenge, which was accompanied by innate immunity rather than p38-activation. The results suggest, for the first time, a unifying mechanism for the initiation of HAMLET's broad and rapid lethal effect on tumor cells. These findings are particularly significant in view of HAMLET's documented therapeutic efficacy in human studies and animal models. The results also suggest that HAMLET offers a two-tiered therapeutic approach, killing cancer cells while stimulating an innate immune response in surrounding healthy tissues.

  5. Prototype detectors for measuring poloidal magnetic flux with an ion beam probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, T. P.; Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P. J.; Kile, T. D.

    2016-10-01

    Development of a detector and associated techniques to determine the localized magnetic flux, and therefore poloidal magnetic field and current density profile, in an axisymmetric plasma device is underway. This will provide invaluable information on equilibrium, transport and stability studies of fusion plasmas. A singly charged ion beam is injected into the plasma and the detector located outside the plasma measures doubly charged ions created within a cm-scale sample volume of the plasma. The ions are split into beamlets at the detector. The toroidal angle of the beam's velocity is determined by measuring the fraction of the beamlets that strike detection plates and wires. The corresponding angle is used to determine the beam's toroidal velocity component. Due to canonical momentum conservation, that toroidal velocity is proportional to the poloidal flux function in the sample volume. We have built several prototype detectors and measured the angle of a 45 keV potassium ion beam. The cross-section of the plasma that can be studied will be maximized and system costs will be minimized if the detector has a direct view of the plasma and is operated close to it. However, this subjects the detector to noise due to UV-induced photoelectrons and plasma particles. We have conducted experiments that demonstrate reductions of this noise to facilitate measurement of ion beam signals. Experimental and design results will be presented. This work is supported by US DoE Award No. DE-SC0006077.

  6. Low flux and low energy helium ion implantation into tungsten using a dedicated plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentecoste, Lucile; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Melhem, Amer; Caillard, Amael; Cuynet, Stéphane; Lecas, Thomas; Brault, Pascal; Desgardin, Pierre; Barthe, Marie-France

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the first stages of defect formation in tungsten (W) due to the accumulation of helium (He) atoms inside the crystal lattice. To reach the required implantation conditions, i.e. low He ion fluxes (1011-1014 ions.cm2.s-1) and kinetic energies below the W atom displacement threshold (about 500 eV for He+), an ICP source has been designed and connected to a diffusion chamber. Implantation conditions have been characterized by means of complementary diagnostics modified for measurements in this very low density helium plasma. It was shown that lowest ion fluxes could only be reached for the discharge working in capacitive mode either in α or γ regime. Special attention was paid to control the energy gained by the ions by acceleration through the sheath at the direct current biased substrate. At very low helium pressure, in α regime, a broad ion energy distribution function was evidenced, whereas a peak centered on the potential difference between the plasma and the biased substrate was found at higher pressures in the γ mode. Polycrystalline tungsten samples were exposed to the helium plasma in both regimes of the discharge and characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy in order to detect the formed vacancy defects. It was found that W vacancies are able to be formed just by helium accumulation and that the same final implanted state is reached, whatever the operating mode of the capacitive discharge.

  7. Agonist-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Colquhoun, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper looks at ion channels as an example of the pharmacologist's stock in trade, the action of an agonist on a receptor to produce a response. Looked at in this way, ion channels have been helpful because they are still the only system which is simple enough for quantitative investigation of transduction mechanisms. A short history is given of attempts to elucidate what happens between the time when agonist first binds, and the time when the channel opens. PMID:16402101

  8. Energetic ion losses caused by magnetohydrodynamic activity resonant and non-resonant with energetic ions in Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kunihiro; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Toi, Kazuo; Shimizu, Akihiro; Spong, Donald A.; Osakabe, Masaki; Yamamoto, Satoshi; the LHD Experiment Group

    2014-09-01

    Experiments to reveal energetic ion dynamics associated with magnetohydrodynamic activity are ongoing in the Large Helical Device (LHD). Interactions between beam-driven toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) and energetic ions have been investigated. Energetic ion losses induced by beam-driven burst TAEs have been observed using a scintillator-based lost fast-ion probe (SLIP) in neutral beam-heated high β plasmas. The loss flux of co-going beam ions increases as the TAE amplitude increases. In addition to this, the expulsion of beam ions associated with edge-localized modes (ELMs) has been also recognized in LHD. The SLIP has indicated that beam ions having co-going and barely co-going orbits are affected by ELMs. The relation between ELM amplitude and ELM-induced loss has a dispersed structure. To understand the energetic ion loss process, a numerical simulation based on an orbit-following model, DELTA5D, that incorporates magnetic fluctuations is performed. The calculation result shows that energetic ions confined in the interior region are lost due to TAE instability, with a diffusive process characterizing their loss. For the ELM, energetic ions existing near the confinement/loss boundary are lost through a convective process. We found that the ELM-induced loss flux measured by SLIP changes with the ELM phase. This relation between the ELM amplitude and measured ELM-induced loss results in a more dispersed loss structure.

  9. SNS Sample Activation Calculator Flux Recommendations and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    McClanahan, Tucker C.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Iverson, Erik B.; Lu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses the Sample Activation Calculator (SAC) to calculate the activation of a sample after the sample has been exposed to the neutron beam in one of the SNS beamlines. The SAC webpage takes user inputs (choice of beamline, the mass, composition and area of the sample, irradiation time, decay time, etc.) and calculates the activation for the sample. In recent years, the SAC has been incorporated into the user proposal and sample handling process, and instrument teams and users have noticed discrepancies in the predicted activation of their samples. The Neutronics Analysis Team validated SAC by performing measurements on select beamlines and confirmed the discrepancies seen by the instrument teams and users. The conclusions were that the discrepancies were a result of a combination of faulty neutron flux spectra for the instruments, improper inputs supplied by SAC (1.12), and a mishandling of cross section data in the Sample Activation Program for Easy Use (SAPEU) (1.1.2). This report focuses on the conclusion that the SAPEU (1.1.2) beamline neutron flux spectra have errors and are a significant contributor to the activation discrepancies. The results of the analysis of the SAPEU (1.1.2) flux spectra for all beamlines will be discussed in detail. The recommendations for the implementation of improved neutron flux spectra in SAPEU (1.1.3) are also discussed.

  10. Conical pitch angle distributions of very low-energy ion fluxes observed by ISEE 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Shelley, E. G.; Young, D. T.

    1982-04-01

    Observations are presented of conical distributions of low-energy ion fluxes from throughout the magnetosphere. The data were provided by the plasma composition experiment (PCE) on ISEE 1. ISEE 1 was launched in October 1977 into a highly elliptical orbit with a 30 deg inclination to the equator and 22.5 earth radii apogee. Particular attention is given to data taken when the instrument was in its thermal plasma mode, sampling ions in the energy per charge range 0-100 eV/e. Attention is given to examples of conical distributions in 0- to 100-eV/e ions, the occurrence of conical distributions of 0- to 100-eV ions in local time-geocentric distance and latitude-geocentric distance coordinates, the cone angles in 0- to 100-eV ion conics, Kp distributions of 0- to 100-eV ion conics, and some compositional aspects of 0- to 100-eV ion conics.

  11. Conical pitch angle distributions of very low-energy ion fluxes observed by ISEE 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Baugher, C. R.; Chappell, C. R.; Shelley, E. G.; Young, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    Observations are presented of conical distributions of low-energy ion fluxes from throughout the magnetosphere. The data were provided by the plasma composition experiment (PCE) on ISEE 1. ISEE 1 was launched in October 1977 into a highly elliptical orbit with a 30 deg inclination to the equator and 22.5 earth radii apogee. Particular attention is given to data taken when the instrument was in its thermal plasma mode, sampling ions in the energy per charge range 0-100 eV/e. Attention is given to examples of conical distributions in 0- to 100-eV/e ions, the occurrence of conical distributions of 0- to 100-eV ions in local time-geocentric distance and latitude-geocentric distance coordinates, the cone angles in 0- to 100-eV ion conics, Kp distributions of 0- to 100-eV ion conics, and some compositional aspects of 0- to 100-eV ion conics.

  12. Study of Flux Ratio of C60 to Ar Cluster Ion for Hard DLC Film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, K.; Kitagawa, T.; Toyoda, N.; Kanda, K.; Matsui, S.; Yamada, I.

    2003-08-01

    To study the influence of the flux ratio of C60 molecule to Ar cluster ion on DLC film characteristics, DLC films deposited under various flux ratios were characterized with Raman spectrometry and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS). From results of these measurements, hard DLC films were deposited when the flux ratio of C60 to Ar cluster ion was between 0.7 and 4. Furthermore the DLC film with constant sp2 content was obtained in the range of the ratio from 0.7 to 4, which contents are lower values than that of conventional films such as RF plasma. DLC films deposited under the ratio from 1 to 4 had hardness from 40 to 45GPa. It was shown that DLC films with stable properties of low sp2 content and high hardness were formed even when the fluxes were varied from 1 to 4 during deposition. It was indicated that this process was useful in the view of industrial application.

  13. Ion flux from vacuum arc cathode spots in the absence and presence of a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, George Yu.

    2001-10-02

    Because plasma production at vacuum cathode spots is approximately proportional to the arc current, arc current modulation can be used to generate ion current modulation that can be detected far from the spot using a negatively biased ion collector. The drift time to the ion detector can used to determine kinetic ion energies. A very wide range of cathode materials have been used. It has been found that the kinetic ion energy is higher at the beginning of each discharge and approximately constant after 150 {micro}s. The kinetic energy is correlated with the arc voltage and the cohesive energy of the cathode material. The ion erosion rate has in inverse relation to the cohesive energy, enhancing the effect that the power input per plasma particle correlates with the cohesive energy of the cathode material. The influence of three magnetic field configurations on the kinetic energy has been investigated. Generally, a magnetic field increases the plasma impedance, arc burning voltage, and kinetic ion energy. However, if the plasma is produced in a region of low field strength and streaming into a region of higher field strength, the velocity may decrease due to the mirror effect. A magnetic field can increase the plasma temperature but may reduce the density gradients by preventing free expansion into vacuum. Therefore, depending on the configuration, a magnetic field may increase or decrease the kinetic energy of ions. Additionally, the angular distribution of the ion flux and ion kinetic energy has been investigated in the absence of an external magnetic field. The result can be fitted by a superposition of an isotropic and a cosine distribution.

  14. Unidirectional Flux Balance of Monovalent Ions in Cells with Na/Na and Li/Na Exchange: Experimental and Computational Studies on Lymphoid U937 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vereninov, Igor A.; Yurinskaya, Valentina E.; Model, Michael A.; Vereninov, Alexey A.

    2016-01-01

    Monovalent ion traffic across the cell membrane occurs via various pathways. Evaluation of individual fluxes in whole cell is hampered by their strong interdependence. This difficulty can be overcome by computational analysis of the whole cell flux balance. However, the previous computational studies disregarded ion movement of the self-exchange type. We have taken this exchange into account. The developed software allows determination of unidirectional fluxes of all monovalent ions via the major pathways both under the balanced state and during transient processes. We show how the problem of finding the rate coefficients can be solved by measurement of monovalent ion concentrations and some of the fluxes. Interdependence of fluxes due to the mandatory conditions of electroneutrality and osmotic balance and due to specific effects can be discriminated, enabling one to identify specific changes in ion transfer machinery under varied conditions. To test the effectiveness of the developed approach we made use of the fact that Li/Na exchange is known to be an analogue of the coupled Na/Na exchange. Thus, we compared the predicted and experimental data obtained on U937 cells under varied Li+ concentrations and following inhibition of the sodium pump with ouabain. We found that the coupled Na/Na exchange in U937 cells comprises a significant portion of the entire Na+ turnover. The data showed that the loading of the sodium pump by Li/Na exchange involved in the secondary active Li+ transport at 1–10 mM external Li+ is small. This result may be extrapolated to similar Li+ and Na+ flux relationships in erythrocytes and other cells in patients treated with Li+ in therapeutic doses. The developed computational approach is applicable for studying various cells and can be useful in education for demonstrating the effects of individual transporters and channels on ion gradients, cell water content and membrane potential. PMID:27159324

  15. Unidirectional Flux Balance of Monovalent Ions in Cells with Na/Na and Li/Na Exchange: Experimental and Computational Studies on Lymphoid U937 Cells.

    PubMed

    Vereninov, Igor A; Yurinskaya, Valentina E; Model, Michael A; Vereninov, Alexey A

    2016-01-01

    Monovalent ion traffic across the cell membrane occurs via various pathways. Evaluation of individual fluxes in whole cell is hampered by their strong interdependence. This difficulty can be overcome by computational analysis of the whole cell flux balance. However, the previous computational studies disregarded ion movement of the self-exchange type. We have taken this exchange into account. The developed software allows determination of unidirectional fluxes of all monovalent ions via the major pathways both under the balanced state and during transient processes. We show how the problem of finding the rate coefficients can be solved by measurement of monovalent ion concentrations and some of the fluxes. Interdependence of fluxes due to the mandatory conditions of electroneutrality and osmotic balance and due to specific effects can be discriminated, enabling one to identify specific changes in ion transfer machinery under varied conditions. To test the effectiveness of the developed approach we made use of the fact that Li/Na exchange is known to be an analogue of the coupled Na/Na exchange. Thus, we compared the predicted and experimental data obtained on U937 cells under varied Li+ concentrations and following inhibition of the sodium pump with ouabain. We found that the coupled Na/Na exchange in U937 cells comprises a significant portion of the entire Na+ turnover. The data showed that the loading of the sodium pump by Li/Na exchange involved in the secondary active Li+ transport at 1-10 mM external Li+ is small. This result may be extrapolated to similar Li+ and Na+ flux relationships in erythrocytes and other cells in patients treated with Li+ in therapeutic doses. The developed computational approach is applicable for studying various cells and can be useful in education for demonstrating the effects of individual transporters and channels on ion gradients, cell water content and membrane potential.

  16. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko H.; Chen, Allan X.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Jones, Glenn; Pantell, Richard H.

    2015-05-01

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3-5 · 107 n/cm2/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 1010 n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques.

  17. Neoclassical ion heat flux and poloidal flow in a tokamak pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Grigory; Catto, Peter J.

    2010-05-01

    In the core of a tokamak, turbulent transport normally dominates over neoclassical. The situation could be different in a high confinement (or H) mode pedestal, where the former may be suppressed by a strongly sheared equilibrium electric field. On the other hand, this very field makes conventional neoclassical results inapplicable in the pedestal by significantly modifying ion drift orbits. We present the first calculation of the banana regime neoclassical ion heat flux and poloidal flow in the pedestal accounting for the strong E × B drift inherent to this tokamak region. Interestingly, we find that due to the electric field the pedestal poloidal ion flow can change its direction as compared with its core counterpart. This result elucidates the discrepancy between the conventional banana regime predictions and recent experimental measurements of the impurity flow performed at Alcator C-Mod.

  18. Evidence of Twisted Flux-Tube Emergence in Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, M.; Mandrini, C. H.; Démoulin, P.; López Fuentes, M.

    2015-03-01

    Elongated magnetic polarities are observed during the emergence phase of bipolar active regions (ARs). These extended features, called magnetic tongues, are interpreted as a consequence of the azimuthal component of the magnetic flux in the toroidal flux-tubes that form ARs. We develop a new systematic and user-independent method to identify AR tongues. Our method is based on determining and analyzing the evolution of the AR main polarity inversion line (PIL). The effect of the tongues is quantified by measuring the acute angle [ τ] between the orientation of the PIL and the direction orthogonal to the AR main bipolar axis. We apply a simple model to simulate the emergence of a bipolar AR. This model lets us interpret the effect of magnetic tongues on parameters that characterize ARs ( e.g. the PIL inclination and the tilt angles, and their evolution). In this idealized kinematic emergence model, τ is a monotonically increasing function of the twist and has the same sign as the magnetic helicity. We systematically apply our procedure to a set of bipolar ARs (41 ARs) that were observed emerging in line-of-sight magnetograms over eight years. For most of the cases studied, the tongues only have a small influence on the AR tilt angle since tongues have a much lower magnetic flux than the more concentrated main polarities. From the observed evolution of τ, corrected for the temporal evolution of the tilt angle and its final value when the AR is fully emerged, we estimate the average number of turns in the subphotospherically emerging flux-rope. These values for the 41 observed ARs are below unity, except for one. This indicates that subphotospheric flux-ropes typically have a low amount of twist, i.e. highly twisted flux-tubes are rare. Our results demonstrate that the evolution of the PIL is a robust indicator of the presence of tongues and constrains the amount of twist in emerging flux-tubes.

  19. Ion heat flux and energy transport near the magnetotail neutral sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Richard L.; Paterson, William R.

    2008-05-01

    Ten-year averages of energy transport rates near the neutral sheet showed that the enthalpy flux density or thermal energy term QT = (5/2)PV was the largest, where P is the isotropic pressure and V is the bulk flow velocity. The ion heat flux, qi, was the next largest term. Sorting data using a magnetic flux transport parameter showed that qi could become dominant during periods of slow flow. Both qi and the ion bulk velocity Vi were duskward on the dusk side of the neutral sheet. This relationship is characteristic of cross-tail drift and a heat flux that can be attributed to the energy dependent gradient and curvature drifts. The qi and Vi vectors often pointed in different directions on the dawn side. The x component of qi on the dawn side pointed tailward, suggesting entry through the magnetopause of a suprathermal ion component. On the dusk side the qix plots that were sorted using a magnetic flux transport parameter showed evidence of plasma sheet reconnection. The long-term averaged x component of QT pointed earthward almost everywhere in the neutral sheet, and was attributed to periods of very fast plasma flow. The cross-tail component of QT was separated into two contributions. One part of QTy involved a common drift away from midnight during both earthward and tailward fast flows. This feature suggests that thermal energy and plasma flow from the outer plasma sheet toward the neutral sheet near midnight, and then toward the flanks. The other part of QTy involved a differential duskward drift during fast earthward flows and a dawnward drift during fast tailward flows. The incremental E fields that would produce such convection point tailward during the fastest earthward flows and earthward during the fastest tailward flows. The dependencies of Vi, qi and QT on the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) clock angle also were studied. Both Vi and QT were reduced when the IMF was northward and the neutral sheet plasma became cold and dense. However, no

  20. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and Chloride-Dependent Ion Fluxes of Ovine Vocal Fold Epithelium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leydon, Ciara; Fisher, Kimberly V.; Lodewyck-Falciglia, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Ion-driven transepithelial water fluxes participate in maintaining superficial vocal fold hydration, which is necessary for normal voice production. The authors hypothesized that Cl[superscript -] channels are present in vocal fold epithelial cells and that transepithelial Cl[superscript -] fluxes can be manipulated pharmacologically.…

  1. Aluminium-induced ion transport in Arabidopsis: the relationship between Al tolerance and root ion flux.

    PubMed

    Bose, Jayakumar; Babourina, Olga; Shabala, Sergey; Rengel, Zed

    2010-06-01

    Aluminium (Al) rhizotoxicity coincides with low pH; however, it is unclear whether plant tolerance to these two factors is controlled by the same mechanism. To address this question, the Al-resistant alr104 mutant, two Al-sensitive mutants (als3 and als5), and wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana were compared in long-term exposure (solution culture) and in short-term exposure experiments (H(+) and K(+) fluxes, rhizosphere pH, and plasma membrane potential, E(m)). Based on biomass accumulation, als5 and alr104 showed tolerance to low pH, whereas alr104 was tolerant to the combined low-pH/Al treatment. The sensitivity of the als5 and als3 mutants to the Al stress was similar. The Al-induced decrease in H(+) influx at the distal elongation zone (DEZ) and Al-induced H(+) efflux at the mature zone (MZ) were higher in the Al-sensitive mutants (als3 and als5) than in the wild type and the alr104 mutant. Under combined low-pH/Al treatment, alr104 and the wild type had depolarized plasma membranes for the entire 30 min measurement period, whereas in the Al-sensitive mutants (als3 and als5), initial depolarization to around -60 mV became hyperpolarization at -110 mV after 20 min. At the DEZ, the E(m) changes corresponded to the changes in K(+) flux: K(+) efflux was higher in alr104 and the wild type than in the als3 and als5 mutants. In conclusion, Al tolerance in the alr104 mutant correlated with E(m) depolarization, higher K(+) efflux, and higher H(+) influx, which led to a more alkaline rhizosphere under the combined low-pH/Al stress. Low-pH tolerance (als5) was linked to higher H(+) uptake under low-pH stress, which was abolished by Al exposure.

  2. Mars heavy ion precipitating flux as measured by Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, F.; Modolo, R.; Curry, S.; Luhmann, J.; Lillis, R.; Chaufray, J. Y.; Hara, T.; McFadden, J.; Halekas, J.; Eparvier, F.; Larson, D.; Connerney, J.; Jakosky, B.

    2015-11-01

    In the absence of an intrinsic dipole magnetic field, Mars' O+ planetary ions are accelerated by the solar wind. Because of their large gyroradius, a population of these planetary ions can precipitate back into Mars' upper atmosphere with enough energy to eject neutrals into space via collision. This process, referred to as sputtering, may have been a dominant atmospheric loss process during earlier stages of our Sun. Yet until now, a limited number of observations have been possible; Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms-3/Mars Express observed such a precipitation only during extreme conditions, suggesting that sputtering might be not as intense as theoretically predicted. Here we describe one example of precipitation of heavy ions during quiet solar conditions. Between November 2014 and April 2015, the average precipitating flux is significant and in agreement with predictions. From these measured precipitating fluxes, we estimate that a maximum of 1.0 × 1024 O/s could have been lost due to sputtering.

  3. Simultaneous bidirectional magnesium ion flux measurements in single barnacle muscle cells by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, J.G.; Sjodin, R.A.; Yergey, A.L.; Vieira, N.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Stable isotopes of Mg were used to measure bidirectional magnesium ion fluxes in single barnacle giant muscle fibers immersed in Ca- and Na-free, isosmotic media. Measurements were made using a mass spectrometric technique, thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), in conjunction with atomic absorption spectroscopy. Kinetic relations based on a first-order model were developed that permit the determination of unidirectional rate coefficients for Mg influx, ki, and efflux, ke, in the same experiment from knowledge of initial conditions and the initial and final ratios of 26Mg/24Mg and 25Mg/24Mg in ambient solutions (i.e., by isotope dilution). Such determinations were made for three values of the external Mg ion concentration: 5, 25, and 60 mM. At the concentration (Mg+2)o = 5 mM, ki and ke were about equal at a value of 0.01 min-1. At the higher values of (Mg+2)o, the values of ke increased along a curve suggesting saturation, whereas the values of ki remained essentially constant. As could be expected on the basis of a constant ki, the initial influx rate varied in direct linear proportion to (Mg+2)o, and was 11.8 pmol/cm2s when (Mg+2)o was 5 mM. However, the initial efflux rate appeared to increase nonlinearly with (Mg+2)o, varying from 13.4 pmol/cm2s (( Mg+2)o = 5 mM) to approximately 80 pmol/cm2s ((Mg+2)o = 60 mM). The results are consistent with a model that assumes Mg influx to be mainly an electrodiffusive inward leak with PMg = 0.07 cm/s and Mg efflux to be almost entirely by active transport processes. Where comparisons can be made, the rate coefficients determined from stable isotope measurements agree with those previously obtained using radioactive Mg. The rate coefficients can be used to correctly predict time-dependent changes in total fiber Mg content.

  4. Determination of Ion Content and Ion Fluxes in the Halotolerant Alga Dunaliella salina

    PubMed Central

    Pick, Uri; Karni, Leah; Avron, Mordhay

    1986-01-01

    A method to determine intracellular cation contents in Dunaliella by separation on cation-exchange minicolumns is described. The separation efficiency of cells from extracellular cations is over 99.9%; the procedure causes no apparent perturbation to the cells and can be applied to measure both fluxes and internal content of any desired cation. Using this technique it is demonstrated that the intracellular averaged Na+, K+, and Ca2+ concentrations in Dunaliella salina cultured at 1 to 4 molar NaCl, 5 millimolar K+, and 0.3 millimolar Ca2+ are 20 to 100 millimolar, 150 to 250 millimolar, and 1 to 3 millimolar, respectively. The intracellular K+ concentration is maintained constant over a wide range of media K+ concentrations (0.5-10 millimolar), leading to a ratio of K+ in the cells to K+ in the medium of 10 to 1,000. Severe limitation of external K+, induces loss of K+ and increase in Na+ inside the cells. The results suggest that Dunaliella cells possess efficient mechanisms to eliminate Na+ and accumulate K+ and that intracellular Na+ and K+ concentrations are carefully regulated. The contribution of the intracellular Na+ and K+ salts to the total osmotic pressure of cells grown at 1 to 4 molar NaCl, is 5 to 20%. PMID:16664814

  5. Modeling the Subsurface Evolution of Active-Region Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Y.

    2009-12-01

    I present results from a set of 3-D spherical-shell MHD simulations of the buoyant rise of active region flux tubes in the solar interior that put new constraints on the initial twist of the subsurface tubes in order for them to emerge with tilt angles consistent with the observed Joy's law for the mean tilt of solar active regions. Due to asymmetric stretching of the Ω-shaped tube by the Coriolis force, a field strength asymmetry develops with the leading side having a greater field strength and thus being more cohesive compared to the following side. Furthermore, the magnetic flux in the leading leg shows more coherent values of local twist α ≡ JB / B2, whereas the values in the following leg show large fluctuations and are of mixed signs.

  6. Direct evidence for a three-dimensional magnetic flux rope flanked by two active magnetic reconnection X lines at Earth's magnetopause.

    PubMed

    Øieroset, M; Phan, T D; Eastwood, J P; Fujimoto, M; Daughton, W; Shay, M A; Angelopoulos, V; Mozer, F S; McFadden, J P; Larson, D E; Glassmeier, K-H

    2011-10-14

    We report the direct detection by three THEMIS spacecraft of a magnetic flux rope flanked by two active X lines producing colliding plasma jets near the center of the flux rope. The observed density depletion and open magnetic field topology inside the flux rope reveal important three-dimensional effects. There was also evidence for nonthermal electron energization within the flux rope core where the fluxes of 1-4 keV superthermal electrons were higher than those in the converging reconnection jets. The observed ion and electron energizations differ from current theoretical predictions.

  7. Role of Ion Kinetic Physics in the Interaction of Magnetic Flux Ropes.

    PubMed

    Stanier, A; Daughton, W; Chacón, L; Karimabadi, H; Ng, J; Huang, Y-M; Hakim, A; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-10-23

    To explain many natural magnetized plasma phenomena, it is crucial to understand how rates of collisionless magnetic reconnection scale in large magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) scale systems. Simulations of isolated current sheets conclude such rates are independent of system size and can be reproduced by the Hall-MHD model, but neglect sheet formation and coupling to MHD scales. Here, it is shown for the problem of flux-rope merging, which includes this formation and coupling, that the Hall-MHD model fails to reproduce the kinetic results. The minimum sufficient model must retain ion kinetic effects, which set the ion diffusion region geometry and give time-averaged rates that reduce significantly with system size, leading to different global evolution in large systems.

  8. Role of Ion Kinetic Physics in the Interaction of Magnetic Flux Ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanier, A.; Daughton, W.; Chacón, L.; Karimabadi, H.; Ng, J.; Huang, Y.-M.; Hakim, A.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-10-01

    To explain many natural magnetized plasma phenomena, it is crucial to understand how rates of collisionless magnetic reconnection scale in large magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) scale systems. Simulations of isolated current sheets conclude such rates are independent of system size and can be reproduced by the Hall-MHD model, but neglect sheet formation and coupling to MHD scales. Here, it is shown for the problem of flux-rope merging, which includes this formation and coupling, that the Hall-MHD model fails to reproduce the kinetic results. The minimum sufficient model must retain ion kinetic effects, which set the ion diffusion region geometry and give time-averaged rates that reduce significantly with system size, leading to different global evolution in large systems.

  9. PFISR observation of intense ion upflow fluxes associated with an SED during the 1 June 2013 geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Shasha; Ridley, Aaron; Jia, Xianzhe; Boyd, Emma; Nicolls, Michael; Coster, Anthea; Thomas, Evan; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2017-02-01

    The Earth's ionosphere plays an important role in supplying plasma into the magnetosphere through ion upflow/outflow, particularly during periods of strong solar wind driving. An intense ion upflow flux event during the 1 June 2013 storm has been studied using observations from multiple instruments. When the open-closed field line boundary (OCB) moved into the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR) field of view, divergent ion fluxes were observed by PFISR with intense upflow fluxes reaching 1.9 × 1014 m-2 s-1 at 600 km altitude. Both ion and electron temperatures increased significantly within the ion upflow, and thus, this event has been classified as a type 2 upflow. We discuss factors contributing to the high electron density and intense ion upflow fluxes, including plasma temperature effect and preconditioning by storm-enhanced density (SED). Our analysis shows that the significantly enhanced electron temperature due to soft electron precipitation in the cusp can reduce the dissociative recombination rate of molecular ions above 400 km and contributed to the density increase. In addition, this intense ion upflow flux event is preconditioned by the lifted F region ionosphere due to northwestward convection flows in the SED plume. During this event, the OCB and cusp were detected by DMSP between 15 and 16 magnetic local times, unusually duskward. Results from a global magnetohydrodynamics simulation using the Space Weather Modeling Framework have been used to provide a global context for this event. This case study provides a more comprehensive mechanism for the generation of intense ion upflow fluxes observed in association with SEDs.

  10. Antibacterial activity of nanosilver ions and particles.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Georgios A; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2010-07-15

    The antibacterial activity of nanosilver against Gram negative Escherichia coli bacteria is investigated by immobilizing nanosilver on nanostructured silica particles and closely controlling Ag content and size. These Ag/SiO(2) nanoparticles were characterized by S/TEM, EDX spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction the exposed Ag surface area was measured qualitatively by O(2) chemisorption. Furthermore, the fraction of dissolved nanosilver was determined by measuring the released (leached) Ag(+) ion concentration in aqueous suspensions of such Ag/SiO(2) particles. The antibacterial effect of Ag(+) ions was distinguished from that of nanosilver particles by monitoring the growth of E. coli populations in the presence and absence of Ag/SiO(2) particles. The antibacterial activity of nanosilver was dominated by Ag(+) ions when fine Ag nanoparticles (less than about 10 nm in average diameter) were employed that release high concentrations of Ag(+) ions. In contrast, when relatively larger Ag nanoparticles were used, the concentration of the released Ag(+) ions was lower. Then the antibacterial activity of the released Ag(+) ions and nanosilver particles was comparable.

  11. Flux effect on the ion-beam nitriding of austenitic stainless-steel AISI 304L

    SciTech Connect

    Abrasonis, G.; Riviere, J.P.; Templier, C.; Pranevicius, L.; Barradas, N.P.

    2005-06-15

    The effect of flux and Ar pretreatment during ion-beam nitriding of austenitic stainless steel is investigated. The ion energy and temperature were 1.2 keV and 400 deg. C, respectively, the ion current densities were 0.5, 0.67, and 0.83 mA cm{sup -2}. The nitrogen distribution profiles were measured using nuclear reaction analysis. The obtained nitrogen distribution profiles were analyzed by the means of the nitrided layer thickness evolution due to sputtering and diffusion and the model of trapping-detrapping. Both approaches could fit well the experimental results, however, different diffusion coefficients have to be assumed for each current density. In addition, the diffusion coefficients are higher for higher current densities. On the other hand, it is shown that the pretreatment with Ar-ion beam at nitriding temperatures produces only a thermal effect without any other influence on the following nitrogen diffusion. The results are discussed in relation with surface and temperature effects and atomic transport mechanisms.

  12. Neoclassical ion heat flux and poloidal flow in a tokamak pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Grigory; Catto, Peter J.

    2009-11-01

    In the core of a tokamak, neoclassical transport normally dominates over classical while itself being dominated by turbulent transport. The situation may be different in a high confinement (or H) mode pedestal, where the latter is effectively suppressed by a strongly sheared equilibrium electric field. On the other hand, this very field makes conventional neoclassical results inapplicable in the pedestal by significantly modifying ion drift orbits. We present the first calculation of the banana regime neoclassical ion heat flux and poloidal flow in the pedestal accounting for the strong ExB drift inherent to this tokamak region. Interestingly, the fact that ion heat conductivity depends on the local values of the electric field and its shear allows us to hypothesize about possible shapes of the global electric field and density profiles in the pedestal. We also find that due to the electric field the pedestal poloidal ion flow is likely to change its direction as compared to its core counterpart. This result elucidates the discrepancy between the conventional banana regime predictions and recent experimental measurements of the impurity flow performed at Alcator C-Mod.

  13. Features of the planetary distribution of ion precipitation at different levels of magnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobjev, V. G.; Yagodkina, O. I.; Antonova, E. E.

    2015-09-01

    Observations from DMSP F6 and F7 spacecraft were used to examine the features of the planetary distribution of ion precipitation. Ion characteristics were defined within the boundaries of different types of auroral electron precipitation, which in accordance with the conclusions from (Starkov et al., 2002) were divided into a structured precipitation of an auroral oval (AOP) and zones of diffuse precipitation DAZ and SDP located equatorward and poleward of AOP, respectively. Analogous to electron precipitation, ion precipitation did not demonstrate dependences of the average energy and the average energy flux of precipitating particles on the Dst index value. In the diffuse precipitation zone (DAZ) equatorward of the auroral oval, ion energies clearly peaked in the sector of 1500-1800 MLT. The average energy value grows as magnetic activity increases from ~12 keV at AL =-1000 nT to ~18 keV at AL =-1000 nT. In the region of structured precipitation (AOP), the minimum of the average ion energy is observed in the dawn sector of 0600-0900 MLT. Ion energy fluxes ( F i ) are maximal in the nighttime MLT sectors. In the zone of soft diffuse precipitation (SDP) poleward of AOP, the highest ion energy fluxes are observed in the daytime sector, while the nightside F i values are insignificant. Ion energy fluxes in the SDP zone show an anticorrelation with the average ion energy in the same MLT sector. An ion precipitation model was created which yields a global distribution of both the average ion energies and the ion energy fluxes depending on the magnetic activity expressed by AL and Dst indices. Comparison of this model with the model of electron precipitation shows that the planetary power of ion precipitation at low magnetic activity (| AL| = 100 nT) is ~12% of the electron precipitation power and exponentially decreases to ~4% at | AL| > 1000 nT. The ion precipitation model was used to calculate the plasma pressure at the ionospheric altitudes. The planetary

  14. Numerical study of the plasma wall-bias effect on the ion flux through acceleration grid hole

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seung-Hoon; Chang, C. S.

    2010-07-15

    In the extraction of ion beams from a source plasma through a grid acceleration structure, one of the key improvement issues is the fluence of the ion flux. Theoretical research has usually been focused on the structure of the grid system and the distribution of the electrostatic voltages over the grid layers. In the present work, using a self-consistent computer simulation between the plasma source, sheath potential, and the grid system, the effect of the source-wall biasing on the fluence of the ion flux through a three-grid acceleration system has been examined. It is found that a strongly positive wall-biasing can significantly enhance the ion flux by improving the shape of the plasma sheath potential meniscus at the entrance to the grid hole structure.

  15. Active ion tracer experiments attempted in conjunction with the ion composition experiment on GEOS-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D. T.

    It is pointed out that to date six ion injection/tracer experiments have been attempted in conjunction with the GEOS-2 Ion Composition Experiment: three rocket borne Ba shaped-charge releases (Porcupine 3 and 4 and Ba-GEOS), one Li release, and two periods of operation of the Xe(+) accelerator on the SCATHA satellite. The characteristics of each of these six releases are outlined, and upper limits are placed on possible ion fluxes reaching GEOS-2. The order of magnitude of ion fluxes to be expected from each release is estimated, and it is shown that three of the experiments had no real chance of succeeding in the first place.

  16. Balance of unidirectional monovalent ion fluxes in cells undergoing apoptosis: why does Na+/K+ pump suppression not cause cell swelling?

    PubMed

    Yurinskaya, Valentina E; Rubashkin, Andrey A; Vereninov, Alexey A

    2011-05-01

    Cells dying according to the apoptotic program, unlike cells dying via an unprogrammed mode, are able to avoid swelling and osmotic bursting with membrane disruption.There are indications that apoptosis is accompanied by suppression of the Na+/K+ pump and changes in the K+ and Cl− channels. It remains unclear how ion fluxes through individual ion pathways are integrated so as to induce loss of intracellular ions and concomitant apoptotic volume decrease. A decrease in activity of the sodium pump during apoptosis should cause cell swelling rather than shrinkage. We have made the first systemic analysis of the monovalent ion flux balance in apoptotic cells. Experimental data were obtained for human U937 cells treated with staurosporine for 4–5 h, which is known to induce apoptosis. The data include cellular Cl− content and fluxes, K+, Na+, water content and ouabain-sensitive and -resistant Rb+ fluxes.Unidirectional monovalent ion fluxeswere calculated using these data and a cell model comprising the double Donnan system with the Na+/K+ pump, Cl−, K+, Na+ channels, the Na+–K+–2Cl−cotransporter (NKCC), the Na+–Cl− cotransporter (NC), and the equivalent Cl−/Cl− exchange.Apoptotic cell shrinkage was found to be caused, depending on conditions, either by an increase in the integral channel permeability of membrane for K+ or by suppression of the pump coupledwith a decrease in the integral channel permeability of membrane for Na+. The decrease in the channel permeability of membrane for Na+ plays a crucial role in cell dehydration in apoptosis accompanied by suppression of the pump. Supplemental Table S1 is given for easy calculating flux balance under specified conditions.

  17. Rapid oscillations of energetic ion flux near the Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamori, Takaya; Petrukovich, Anatoli

    This study investigated rapid oscillations of energetic ion flux near the Earth's Bow Shock that were found in the data obtained by MEP detectors in the Spektr-R/Plazma-F missions and Solid State Telescope (SST) in the THEMIS mission. In these data, we found several hundred oscillation events in the energy range from 50 to 200 keV in the periods of 10 - 30 seconds. SST data obtained in the SIF (Full Distributions) quick mode in the THEMIS mission provide energetic particle data with an energy range from 25 keV to 6 MeV, three seconds time resolution, and 360°x148° field-of-view with 64 separated observation fields, which allow detailed studies of the properties of the oscillations. In the poster presentation, we present some examples of the oscillations of energetic ion flux and results of the SST data analysis that shows relationships between the interplanetary magnetic field, parameters of the solar wind, and satellite positions in the oscillations.

  18. Optogenetics in Developmental Biology: using light to control ion flux-dependent signals in Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Spencer Adams, Dany; Lemire, Joan M; Kramer, Richard H; Levin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Developmental bioelectricity, electrical signaling among non-excitable cells, is now known to regulate proliferation, apoptosis, gene expression, and patterning during development. The extraordinary temporal and spatial resolution offered by optogenetics could revolutionize the study of bioelectricity the same way it has revolutionized neuroscience. There is, however, no guide to adapting optogenetics to patterning systems. To fill this gap, we used optogenetic reagents, both proteins and photochemical switches, to vary steady-state bioelectrical properties of non-spiking embryonic cells in Xenopus laevis. We injected mRNA for various proteins, including Channelrhodopsins and Archaerhodopsin, into 1-8 cell embryos, or soaked embryos in media containing photochemical switches, then examined the effect of light and dark on membrane voltage (Vmem) using both electrodes and fluorescent membrane voltage reporters. We also scored tadpoles for known effects of varying Vmem, including left-right asymmetry disruption, hyperpigmentation, and craniofacial phenotypes. The majority of reagents we tested caused a significant increase in the percentage of light-exposed tadpoles showing relevant phenotypes; however, the majority of reagents also induced phenotypes in controls kept in the dark. Experiments on this "dark phenotype" yielded evidence that the direction of ion flux via common optogenetic reagents may be reversed, or unpredictable in non-neural cells. When used in combination with rigorous controls, optogenetics can be a powerful tool for investigating ion-flux based signaling in non-excitable systems. Nonetheless, it is crucial that new reagents be designed with these non-neural cell types in mind.

  19. K(+) regulates Ca(2+) to drive inflammasome signaling: dynamic visualization of ion flux in live cells.

    PubMed

    Yaron, J R; Gangaraju, S; Rao, M Y; Kong, X; Zhang, L; Su, F; Tian, Y; Glenn, H L; Meldrum, D R

    2015-10-29

    P2X7 purinergic receptor engagement with extracellular ATP induces transmembrane potassium and calcium flux resulting in assembly of the NLRP3 inflammasome in LPS-primed macrophages. The role of potassium and calcium in inflammasome regulation is not well understood, largely due to limitations in existing methods for interrogating potassium in real time. The use of KS6, a novel sensor for selective and sensitive dynamic visualization of intracellular potassium flux in live cells, multiplexed with the intracellular calcium sensor Fluo-4, revealed a coordinated relationship between potassium and calcium. Interestingly, the mitochondrial potassium pool was mobilized in a P2X7 signaling, and ATP dose-dependent manner, suggesting a role for mitochondrial sensing of cytosolic ion perturbation. Through treatment with extracellular potassium we found that potassium efflux was necessary to permit sustained calcium entry, but not transient calcium flux from intracellular stores. Further, intracellular calcium chelation with BAPTA-AM indicated that P2X7-induced potassium depletion was independent of calcium mobilization. This evidence suggests that both potassium efflux and calcium influx are necessary for mitochondrial reactive oxygen generation upstream of NLRP3 inflammasome assembly and pyroptotic cell death. We propose a model wherein potassium efflux is necessary for calcium influx, resulting in mitochondrial reactive oxygen generation to trigger the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  20. Ion exchange membrane bioreactor for selective removal of nitrate from drinking water: control of ion fluxes and process performance.

    PubMed

    Velizarov, Svetlozar; Crespo, João G; Reis, Maria A

    2002-01-01

    An ion exchange membrane bioreactor (IEMB), consisting of a monoanion permselective membrane dialyzer coupled to a stirred anoxic vessel with an enriched mixed denitrifying culture, has been studied for nitrate removal from drinking water. The influence of nitrate and chloride concentrations on the selectivity of nitrate transport in the IEMB process was investigated. With appropriate dosing of chloride ions to the IEMB biocompartment, it was possible to regulate the net bicarbonate flux in the system, thus maintaining the bicarbonate concentration in the treated water at the desired level. The latter was not possible to achieve in Donnan dialysis, operated as a single process in which, besides the lower nitrate removal efficiency found, bicarbonate was co-extracted together with nitrate from the polluted water stream. Residual carbon source (ethanol) and nitrite were not detected in the treated water produced in the IEMB system. With a concentration of nitrate in the polluted water three times higher than the maximum contaminant level of 50 mg L(-1) allowed, the IEMB process was successfully operated for a period of 1 month before exceeding this limit.

  1. Activation of mammalian tyrosinase by ferrous ions.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, A; d'Ischia, M; Misuraca, G; Carratú, L; Prota, G

    1990-03-26

    Kinetic experiments are reported showing that mammalian tyrosinase from B16 mouse melanoma is significantly activated by catalytic amounts of ferrous ions. Monitoring of tyrosine oxidation by both dopachrome formation and oxygen consumption showed that ferrous ions at micromolar concentrations induce a marked enzymatic activity with 0.01 U/ml of highly purified tyrosinase, whereas no detectable reaction occurs in the absence of metal over a sufficiently prolonged period of time. The extent of the activating effect, which is specific for the reduced form of iron, is proportional to the concentration of the added metal with a typical saturation profile, no further effect being observed beyond a threshold value. Changing the buffer system from phosphate to hepes or tris results in a marked decrease of the Fe2(+)-induced activation. Scavengers of active oxygen species, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, formate and mannitol have no detectable effect on the tyrosinase activity. These results are accounted for in terms of an activation mechanism involving reduction of the cupric ions at the active site of the resting enzyme.

  2. Transition region fluxes in A-F Dwarfs: Basal fluxes and dynamo activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Boyd, William

    1988-01-01

    The transition region spectra of 87 late A and early F dwarfs and subgiants were analyzed. The emission line fluxes are uniformly strong in the early F stars, and drop off rapidly among the late A stars. The basal flux level in the F stars is consistent with an extrapolation of that observed among the G stars, while the magnetic component displays the same flux-flux relations seen among solar-like stars. Despite the steep decrease in transition region emission flux for B-V less than 0.28, C II emission is detected in alpha Aql (B-V = 0.22). The dropoff in emission is inconsistent with models of the mechanically generated acoustic flux available. It is concluded that, although the nonmagnetic basal heating is an increasingly important source of atmospheric heating among the early F stars, magnetic heating occurs in any star which has a sufficiently thick convective zone to generate acoustic heating.

  3. Correlations of magnetospheric ion composition with geomagnetic and solar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.T.; Balsiger, H.; Geiss, J.

    1982-11-01

    A large ion composition data set consisting of 1-month averages has been assembled for the energy per charge range 0.9--15.9 keV/e. It includes 48 months of data taken by the Ion Composition Experiments on the ESA/GEOS 1 and 2 satellites at or near geostationary orbit. Data were obtained during the rising and maximum phases of the current solar cycle from May 1977 through November 1981 inclusive. Five ion species are routinely identifiable: H/sup +/, He/sup + +/, He/sup +/, O/sup + +/, and O/sup +/, above a limiting density approx.10/sup -3/ ions cm/sup -3/. Ion densities exhibit a number of very striking statistical correlations with one another and with both Kp and solar EUV as measured by F/sub 10.7/. One principal result is that increases in the densities of magnetospheric He/sup +/, O/sup + +/, and O/sup +/ are observed that are apparently due entirely to increased solar EUV fluxes associated with the ring phase of the current solar cycle. There is a marked rise in O/sup +/ density by a factor of approx.8 with increasing geomagnetic activity, but no correpsonding increase in either He/sup +/ or O/sup + +/ and only a small increase in H/sup +/. The He/sup + +//H/sup +/ ratio is found to be remarkably constant at roughly-equal0.01. Contrary to ion density results, little or no variation is found in mean energy. These observations are interpreted in terms of the composition and dynamics of two sources of magnetospheric plasma: the solar wind and the high-latitude topside ionosphere.

  4. NADPH oxidases as electrochemical generators to produce ion fluxes and turgor in fungi, plants and humans

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The NOXs are a family of flavocytochromes whose basic structure has been largely conserved from algae to man. This is a very simple system. NADPH is generally available, in plants it is a direct product of photosynthesis, and oxygen is a largely ubiquitous electron acceptor, and the electron-transporting core of an FAD and two haems is the minimal required to pass electrons across the plasma membrane. These NOXs have been shown to be essential for diverse functions throughout the biological world and, lacking a clear mechanism of action, their effects have generally been attributed to free radical reactions. Investigation into the function of neutrophil leucocytes has demonstrated that electron transport through the prototype NOX2 is accompanied by the generation of a charge across the membrane that provides the driving force propelling protons and other ions across the plasma membrane. The contention is that the primary function of the NOXs is to supply the driving force to transport ions, the nature of which will depend upon the composition and characteristics of the local ion channels, to undertake a host of diverse functions. These include the generation of turgor in fungi and plants for the growth of filaments and invasion by appressoria in the former, and extension of pollen tubes and root hairs, and stomatal closure, in the latter. In neutrophils, they elevate the pH in the phagocytic vacuole coupled to other ion fluxes. In endothelial cells of blood vessels, they could alter luminal volume to regulate blood pressure and tissue perfusion. PMID:27249799

  5. Heavy-ion flux enhancement in the vicinity of the Martian ionosphere during CIR passage: Mars Express ASPERA-3 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, T.; Seki, K.; Futaana, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yagi, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Tokumaru, M.; Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S.

    2011-02-01

    A characteristic heavy-ion signature observed in the vicinity of the Martian ionosphere during passages of Corotating Interaction Region (CIR) structures in solar wind is reported. We analyzed data obtained by the IMA/ASPERA-3 onboard the Mars Express (MEX) from September to October 2007. We compared the solar wind velocity at Mars derived from a shifted Maxwellian fitting to the IMA data with time-shifted Advanced Composition Explorer satellite data taken at ˜1 AU to the Martian orbit. Using the derived solar wind velocity, we identified four CIR structures passing through Mars quasiperiodically. Coinciding with the CIR passages, the IMA observed heavy-ion flux enhancement in the vicinity of the Martian ionosphere. The heavy-ion energies reach ≥100 eV and sometimes up to approximately several kiloelectron volts. Observed ion velocity distribution functions show that they are mainly precipitating toward the Martian ionosphere. The flux of the precipitating ions is typically 105-106 (104-105) cm-2 s-1 for the energy range of 50-500 eV (≥500 eV) and it becomes by one order of magnitude higher in one event. While the flux level is consistent with a previous model prediction of sputtering ions, the intermittent occurrence of the heavy-ion precipitation differs from conventional expectation of constant precipitation. These results suggest that the efficiency of the sputtering process in the Martian atmospheric escape is highly variable with dynamic solar wind variations.

  6. Salinity tolerance in plants. Quantitative approach to ion transport starting from halophytes and stepping to genetic and protein engineering for manipulating ion fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport is the fundamental factor determining salinity tolerance in plants. The Review starts from differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes. The comparison provides introductory information for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion fluxes. Further steps require knowledge about mechanisms of ion transport and individual genes of ion transport proteins. Initially, the Review describes methods to measure ion fluxes, the independent set of techniques ensures robust and reliable basement for quantitative approach. The Review briefly summarizes current data concerning Na+ and K+ concentrations in cells, refers to primary thermodynamics of ion transport and gives special attention to individual ion channels and transporters. Simplified scheme of a plant cell with known transport systems at the plasma membrane and tonoplast helps to imagine the complexity of ion transport and allows choosing specific transporters for modulating ion transport. The complexity is enhanced by the influence of cell size and cell wall on ion transport. Special attention is given to ion transporters and to potassium and sodium transport by HKT, HAK, NHX, and SOS1 proteins. Comparison between non-selective cation channels and ion transporters reveals potential importance of ion transporters and the balance between the two pathways of ion transport. Further on the Review describes in detail several successful attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to promising candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. Potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters using single point mutations is discussed and

  7. Salinity tolerance in plants. Quantitative approach to ion transport starting from halophytes and stepping to genetic and protein engineering for manipulating ion fluxes.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport is the fundamental factor determining salinity tolerance in plants. The Review starts from differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes. The comparison provides introductory information for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion fluxes. Further steps require knowledge about mechanisms of ion transport and individual genes of ion transport proteins. Initially, the Review describes methods to measure ion fluxes, the independent set of techniques ensures robust and reliable basement for quantitative approach. The Review briefly summarizes current data concerning Na(+) and K(+) concentrations in cells, refers to primary thermodynamics of ion transport and gives special attention to individual ion channels and transporters. Simplified scheme of a plant cell with known transport systems at the plasma membrane and tonoplast helps to imagine the complexity of ion transport and allows choosing specific transporters for modulating ion transport. The complexity is enhanced by the influence of cell size and cell wall on ion transport. Special attention is given to ion transporters and to potassium and sodium transport by HKT, HAK, NHX, and SOS1 proteins. Comparison between non-selective cation channels and ion transporters reveals potential importance of ion transporters and the balance between the two pathways of ion transport. Further on the Review describes in detail several successful attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to promising candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. Potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters using single point mutations is discussed and

  8. Copper ion fluxes through the floating water bridge under strong electric potential.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Livio; D'Emilia, Enrico; Lisi, Antonella; Grimaldi, Settimio; Brizhik, Larissa; Del Giudice, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    We have performed a series of experiments applying high voltage between two electrodes, immersed in two beakers containing bidistilled water in a way similar to experiments conducted by Fuchs and collaborators, which showed that a water bridge can be formed between the two containers. We also observed the formation of water bridge. Moreover, choosing different pairs of electrodes depending on the material they are made up of, we observed that copper ions flow can pass along the bridge if the negative electrode is made up of copper. We show that the direction of the flux not only depends on the applied electrostatic field but on the relative electronegativity of the electrodes too. These results open new perspectives in understanding the properties of water. We suggest a possible explanation of the obtained results.

  9. Mechanisms for the formation and transport of ion fluxes in the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A. N.; Zemchenkova, N. V.; Klyachin, N. A.; Prokhorovich, D. E.

    2010-09-15

    The processes of ion flux formation in the plasma of a high-current vacuum spark were investigated experimentally. It is shown that multicharged ions are generated in the neck formed in the erosion products of the inner electrode. The plasma escaping from the neck region plays a role of a piston dragging particles of the cold peripheral plasma into ambient space. As the discharge current increases, the flux of the evaporated electrode material grows, the degree of ionization of the plasma produced decreases, and the efficiency of plasma heating caused by the pinching effect is reduced.

  10. Effect of ion flux on helium retention in helium-irradiated tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, A.; Valles, G.; Caturla, M. J.; Martin-Bragado, I.

    2013-05-01

    Helium retention in irradiated tungsten leads to swelling, pore formation, sample exfoliation and embrittlement with deleterious consequences in many applications. In particular, the use of tungsten in future nuclear fusion plants is proposed due to its good refractory properties. However, serious concerns about tungsten survivability stems from the fact that it must withstand severe irradiation conditions. In magnetic fusion as well as in inertial fusion (particularly with direct drive targets), tungsten components will be exposed to low and high energy ion irradiation (helium), respectively. A common feature is that the most detrimental situations will take place in pulsed mode, i.e., high flux irradiation. There is increasing evidence of a correlation between a high helium flux and an enhancement of detrimental effects on tungsten. Nevertheless, the nature of these effects is not well understood due to the subtleties imposed by the exact temperature profile evolution, ion energy, pulse duration, existence of impurities and simultaneous irradiation with other species. Object Kinetic Monte Carlo is the technique of choice to simulate the evolution of radiation-induced damage inside solids in large temporal and space scales. We have used the recently developed code MMonCa (Modular Monte Carlo simulator), presented at COSIRES 2012 for the first time, to study He retention (and in general defect evolution) in tungsten samples irradiated with high intensity helium pulses. The code simulates the interactions among a large variety of defects and during the irradiation stage and the subsequent annealing steps. The results show that the pulsed mode leads to significantly higher He retention at temperatures higher than 700 K. In this paper we discuss the process of He retention in terms of trap evolution. In addition, we discuss the implications of these findings for inertial fusion.

  11. Radon-222 activity flux measurement using activated charcoal canisters: revisiting the methodology.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Sami H; Akber, Riaz A

    2014-03-01

    The measurement of radon ((222)Rn) activity flux using activated charcoal canisters was examined to investigate the distribution of the adsorbed (222)Rn in the charcoal bed and the relationship between (222)Rn activity flux and exposure time. The activity flux of (222)Rn from five sources of varying strengths was measured for exposure times of one, two, three, five, seven, 10, and 14 days. The distribution of the adsorbed (222)Rn in the charcoal bed was obtained by dividing the bed into six layers and counting each layer separately after the exposure. (222)Rn activity decreased in the layers that were away from the exposed surface. Nevertheless, the results demonstrated that only a small correction might be required in the actual application of charcoal canisters for activity flux measurement, where calibration standards were often prepared by the uniform mixing of radium ((226)Ra) in the matrix. This was because the diffusion of (222)Rn in the charcoal bed and the detection efficiency as a function of the charcoal depth tended to counterbalance each other. The influence of exposure time on the measured (222)Rn activity flux was observed in two situations of the canister exposure layout: (a) canister sealed to an open bed of the material and (b) canister sealed over a jar containing the material. The measured (222)Rn activity flux decreased as the exposure time increased. The change in the former situation was significant with an exponential decrease as the exposure time increased. In the latter case, lesser reduction was noticed in the observed activity flux with respect to exposure time. This reduction might have been related to certain factors, such as absorption site saturation or the back diffusion of (222)Rn gas occurring at the canister-soil interface.

  12. Cardiac Spliced BIN1 Folds T-tubule Membrane, Controlling Ion Flux and Limiting Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Hong, TingTing; Yang, Huanghe; Zhang, Shan-Shan; Cho, Hee Cheol; Kalashnikova, Mariya; Sun, Baiming; Zhang, Hao; Bhargava, Anamika; Grabe, Michael; Olgin, Jeffrey; Gorelik, Julia; Marbán, Eduardo; Jan, Lily Y.; Shaw, Robin M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte T-tubules are important for regulating ionic flux. Bridging Integrator 1 (BIN1) is a T-tubule protein associated with calcium channel trafficking that is down-regulated in failing hearts. Here we find that cardiac T-tubules normally contain dense protective inner membrane folds that are formed by a cardiac spliced isoform of BIN1. In mice with cardiac Bin1 deletion, T-tubule folding is decreased which does not change overall cardiomyocyte morphology, but frees diffusion of local extracellular calcium and potassium ions, prolonging action potential duration, and increasing susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We also find that T-tubule inner folds are rescued only by the BIN1 isoform BIN1+13+17, which promotes N-WASP dependent actin polymerization to stabilize T-tubule membrane at cardiac Z-discs. In conclusion, BIN1+13+17 recruits actin to fold T-tubule membrane, creating a fuzzy space that protectively restricts ionic flux. When BIN1+13+17 is decreased, as occurs in acquired cardiomyopathy, T-tubule morphology is altered and arrhythmias can result. PMID:24836577

  13. Strong periodic flux pinning in oxygen-ion-irradiated high-TC superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas, Javier; Swiecicki, I.; Briatico, J.; Bernard, R.; Crassous, A.; Wolf, T.; Bergeal, N.; Lesueur, J.; Ulysse, C.; Faini, G.; Hallet, X.; Piraux, L.

    2012-02-01

    We used oxygen ion irradiation to transfer into high-TC superconducting thin films the nanoscale pattern of different types of masks (alumina [1] and [2] PMMA templates with ordered arrays of holes). This causes a nanoscale spatial modulation of superconductivity, and strongly affects the magneto-transport in the mixed-state. By tuning the irradiation dose and the array parameters, it is possible to engineer vortex energy landscapes sufficiently strong to govern flux dynamics. This is evidenced by a periodic series of strong magneto-resistance oscillations, the well-known fingerprint of periodic flux pinning. Interestingly, this irradiation technique allows tuning the geometry and the strength of the pinning potential wells at the nanoscale. This allows the observation of unusually strong matching effects at relatively high fields (up to several kOe). We show that the amplitude of the magneto-resistance oscillations is intimately connected with vortex channeling effects. [1] J.E. Villegas et al. Nanotechnology 22 075302 (2011). [2] I. Swiecicki et al. submitted

  14. Compact steady-state and high-flux Falcon ion source for tests of plasma-facing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Girka, O.; Bizyukov, I.; Sereda, K.; Bizyukov, A.; Gutkin, M.; Sleptsov, V.

    2012-08-15

    This paper describes the design and operation of the Falcon ion source. It is based on conventional design of anode layer thrusters. This ion source is a versatile, compact, affordable, and highly functional in the research field of the fusion materials. The reversed magnetic field configuration of the source allows precise focusing of the ion beam into small spot of Almost-Equal-To 3 mm and also provides the limited capabilities for impurity mass-separation. As the result, the source generates steady-state ion beam, which irradiates surface with high heat (0.3 - 21 MW m{sup -2}) and particle fluxes (4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21}- 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} m{sup -2}s{sup -1}), which approaches the upper limit for the flux range expected in ITER.

  15. [EFfect of quinazolone-alkyl-carboxylic acid derivatives on the transmembrane Ca2+ ion flux mediated by AMPA receptors].

    PubMed

    Szárics, Eva; LaszTóczi, Bálint; Nyikos, Lajos; Barabás, Péter; Kovács, Ilona; Skuban, Nina; Nagy, Péter I; Kökösi, József; Takácsné, Novák Krisztina; Kardos, Julianna

    2002-01-01

    The excitatory neurotransmitter, Glu, plays a crucial role in many sensory and motor functions as well as in brain development, learning and memory and it is also involved in the pathogenesis of a number of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Therefore, the study of Glu receptors (GluRs) is of therapeutical importance. We showed here by fluorescence monitoring of transmembrane Ca2+ ion fluxes in response to (S)-alpha-amino-3-hidroxi-5-metil-4-izoxazol propionic acid ((S)-AMPA) on the time scale of 0.00004-10 s that Ca2+ ion influx proceeds through faster and slower desensitizing receptors. Pharmacological isolation of the slower and faster desensitizing AMPA receptor was possible by fluorescence monitoring of Ca2+ ion translocation in response to (S)-AMPA in the presence and absence of various 2-methyl-4-oxo-3H-quinazoline-3-alkyl-carboxilic acid derivatives (Qxs): the acetic acid Q1 inhibits the slower desensitizing receptor response specifically, while the acetyl-piperidine Q5 is a more potent inhibitor of the faster desensitizing receptor response. In addition, spontaneous interictal activity, as induced by high [K+] conditions in hippocampal slices, was reduced significantly by Q5, suggesting a possible anticonvulsant property of Q5. Substitutions of Qxs into the GluR2 S1S2 binding core were consistent with their effect by causing variable degree of S1S2 bridging interaction as one of the main determinants of AMPA receptor agonist activity. The exploitation of differences between similar receptors will be important in the development and use of drugs with high pharmacological specificity.

  16. Statistical analysis of the ion flux to the JET outer wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkden, N. R.; Wynn, A.; Militello, F.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G.; Guillemaut, C.; Harrison, J.; Moulton, D.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    Statistical analysis of the ion flux to the JET outer-wall is conducted in outer-wall limiter mounted Langmuir probe (OLP) time-series across a wide range of plasma current and line-averaged density during Ohmically heated horizontal target L-mode plasmas. The mean, μ, and the standard deviation, σ, of the ion-saturation current measured by the OLP show systematic variation with plasma current and density. Both increase as either plasma current decreases and/or density increases. Upon renormalization, achieved by subtraction of μ and rescaling by σ, the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of each signal collapse approximately onto a single curve. The shape of the curve deviates from a Γ distribution in the tail of the PDF and is better described by a log-normal distribution. The invariance in the shape of the PDF, which occurs over approximately four decades of the ordinate, is shown to be the result of a balance between the duration time of the average burst wave-form, {τd} and the waiting time between bursts, {τw} . This implies that the intermittency parameter, {τd}/{τw} , can be considered constant at the JET outer wall during horizontal target Ohmic L-mode operation. This result may be important both for model validation and prediction.

  17. Observations of Plasma Waves in the Colliding Jet Region of a 3D Magnetic Flux Rope Flanked by Two Active Reconnection X Lines at the Subsolar Magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oieroset, M.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Phan, T. D.; Mozer, F.; McFadden, J. P.; Angelopoulos, V.; Andersson, L.; Eastwood, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    We have performed a detailed analysis of plasma and wave observations in a 3D magnetic flux rope encountered by the THEMIS spacecraft at the subsolar magnetopause. The extent of the flux rope was ˜270 ion skin depths in the outflow direction, and it was flanked by two active reconnection X lines producing colliding plasma jets in the flux rope core where ion heating and suprathermal electrons were observed. The colliding jet region was highly dynamic and characterized by the presence of high-frequency waves such as ion acoustic-like waves, electron holes, and whistler mode waves near the flux rope center and low-frequency kinetic Alfvén waves over a larger region. We will discuss possible links between these waves and particle heating.

  18. High-flux ionic diodes, ionic transistors and ionic amplifiers based on external ion concentration polarization by an ion exchange membrane: a new scalable ionic circuit platform.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gongchen; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2016-04-07

    A microfluidic ion exchange membrane hybrid chip is fabricated using polymer-based, lithography-free methods to achieve ionic diode, transistor and amplifier functionalities with the same four-terminal design. The high ionic flux (>100 μA) feature of the chip can enable a scalable integrated ionic circuit platform for micro-total-analytical systems.

  19. High-flux ionic diodes, ionic transistors and ionic amplifiers based on external ion concentration polarization by an ion exchange membrane: a new scalable ionic circuit platform†

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Gongchen; Senapati, Satyajyoti

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic-ion exchange membrane hybrid chip is fabricated by polymer-based, lithography-free methods to achieve ionic diode, transistor and amplifier functionalities with the same four-terminal design. The high ionic flux (> 100 μA) feature of the chip can enable a scalable integrated ionic circuit platform for micro-total-analytical systems. PMID:26960551

  20. Generation of large-amplitude electric field and subsequent enhancement of O+ ion flux in the inner magnetosphere during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-06-01

    Energetic O+ ions are rapidly enhanced in the inner magnetosphere because of abrupt intensification of the dawn-to-dusk electric field and significantly contribute to the ring current during substorms. Here we examine the generation mechanism of the dawn-to-dusk electric field that accelerates the O+ ions and the spatial and temporal evolution of the differential flux of the O+ ions by using a test particle simulation in the electric and magnetic fields that are provided by a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation. In the MHD simulation, strong dawn-to-dusk electric field appears in the near-Earth tail region by a joint action of the earthward tension force and pileup of magnetic flux near an onset of substorm expansion. The peak of the electric field is ~9-13 mV/m and is located ~1-2 RE earthward of the peak of the plasma bulk speed because of the pileup. O+ ions coming from the lobe are accelerated from ~eV to >100 keV in ~10 min. The reconstructed flux of the O+ ions shows that at ~7 RE near midnight, the flux has a peak near a few tens of keV and the flux below ~10 keV is small. This structure, called a "void" structure, is consistent with the Polar observation and can be regarded as a manifestation of the acceleration of unmagnetized ions perpendicular to the magnetic field. In the inner magnetosphere (at 6.0 RE), reconstructed energy-time spectrograms show the nose dispersion structure that is also consistent with satellite observations.

  1. High active nitrogen flux growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McSkimming, Brian M. Speck, James S.; Chaix, Catherine

    2015-09-15

    In the present study, the authors report on a modified Riber radio frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma source that provides active nitrogen fluxes more than 30 times higher than those commonly used for plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) and thus a significantly higher growth rate than has been previously reported. GaN films were grown using N{sub 2} gas flow rates between 5 and 25 sccm while varying the plasma source's RF forward power from 200 to 600 W. The highest growth rate, and therefore the highest active nitrogen flux, achieved was ∼7.6 μm/h. For optimized growth conditions, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 × 3 μm) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy impurity analysis demonstrates oxygen and hydrogen incorporation of 1 × 10{sup 16} and ∼5 × 10{sup 17}, respectively. In addition, the authors have achieved PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ∼100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. This growth temperature corresponds to GaN decomposition in vacuum of more than 20 nm/min; a regime previously unattainable with conventional nitrogen plasma sources. Arrhenius analysis of the decomposition rate shows that samples with a flux ratio below stoichiometry have an activation energy greater than decomposition of GaN in vacuum while samples grown at or above stoichiometry have decreased activation energy. The activation energy of decomposition for GaN in vacuum was previously determined to be ∼3.1 eV. For a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼1.5, this activation energy was found to be ∼2.8 eV, while for a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼0.5, it was found to be ∼7.9 eV.

  2. Rhinovirus-induced calcium flux triggers NLRP3 and NLRC5 activation in bronchial cells.

    PubMed

    Triantafilou, Kathy; Kar, Satwik; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Triantafilou, Martha

    2013-12-01

    Human rhinoviruses have been linked with underlying lung disorders, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, in children and adults. However, the mechanism of virus-induced airway inflammation is poorly understood. In this study, using virus deletion mutants and silencing for nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs), we show that the rhinovirus ion channel protein 2B triggers NLRP3 and NLRC5 inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion in bronchial cells. 2B protein targets the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi and induces Ca(2+) reduction in these organelles, thereby disturbing the intracellular calcium homeostasis. NLRP3 and NLRC5 act in a cooperative manner during the inflammasome assembly by sensing intracellular Ca(2+) fluxes and trigger IL-1β secretion. These results reveal for the first time that human rhinovirus infection in primary bronchial cells triggers inflammasome activation.

  3. Triggering an Eruptive Flare by Emerging Flux in a Solar Active-Region Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, Rohan E.; Kliem, Bernhard; Ravindra, B.; Chintzoglou, Georgios

    2015-12-01

    A flare and fast coronal mass ejection originated between solar active regions NOAA 11514 and 11515 on 2012 July 1 (SOL2012-07-01) in response to flux emergence in front of the leading sunspot of the trailing region 11515. Analyzing the evolution of the photospheric magnetic flux and the coronal structure, we find that the flux emergence triggered the eruption by interaction with overlying flux in a non-standard way. The new flux neither had the opposite orientation nor a location near the polarity inversion line, which are favorable for strong reconnection with the arcade flux under which it emerged. Moreover, its flux content remained significantly smaller than that of the arcade ({≈} 40 %). However, a loop system rooted in the trailing active region ran in part under the arcade between the active regions, passing over the site of flux emergence. The reconnection with the emerging flux, leading to a series of jet emissions into the loop system, caused a strong but confined rise of the loop system. This lifted the arcade between the two active regions, weakening its downward tension force and thus destabilizing the considerably sheared flux under the arcade. The complex event was also associated with supporting precursor activity in an enhanced network near the active regions, acting on the large-scale overlying flux, and with two simultaneous confined flares within the active regions.

  4. [Hydrogen ion activity in the cell].

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Z A

    1976-07-01

    Literature data and results of our experiments evidence for a heterogenous hydrogen distribution in cells. Intracellular pH should be regarded as a mean activity of hydrogen ions which is the sum of activities in different phases of a cell. Intracellular pH value does not depend on the transmembrane action potential difference, and is resistant to respiratory and metabolic disorders of acid-base equilibrium in the body. It also slightly changes with changing the electrolyte composition and pH of the medium and is not influenced by metabolic inhibitors. A low hydrogen activity in the cell has a certain functional significance. The pH stability is ensured by a number of regulatory mechanism: the buffer properties of the protoplasm itself, and the active hydrogen transport into the medium. Hydrogen released from cells is supposed to be connected with functioning of a specific respiratory chain of superficial protoplasmic membranes.

  5. Capacitively coupled hydrogen plasmas sustained by tailored voltage waveforms: excitation dynamics and ion flux asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneau, B.; Diomede, P.; Economou, D. J.; Longo, S.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.; Greb, A.; Johnson, E.; Booth, J.-P.

    2016-08-01

    Parallel plate capacitively coupled plasmas in hydrogen at relatively high pressure (~1 Torr) are excited with tailored voltage waveforms containing up to five frequencies. Predictions of a hybrid model combining a particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions and a fluid model are compared to phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy measurements, yielding information on the dynamics of the excitation rate in these discharges. When the discharge is excited with amplitude asymmetric waveforms, the discharge becomes electrically asymmetric, with different ion energies at each of the two electrodes. Unexpectedly, large differences in the \\text{H}2+ fluxes to each of the two electrodes are caused by the different \\text{H}3+ energies. When the discharge is excited with slope asymmetric waveforms, only weak electrical asymmetry of the discharge is observed. In this case, electron power absorption due to fast sheath expansion at one electrode is balanced by electron power absorption at the opposite electrode due to a strong electric field reversal.

  6. Ion signatures of magnetic flux ropes in the Venusian ionosphere as observed by APSERA-4 and MAG onboard Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guymer, G.; Grande, M.; Whittaker, I.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract Venus has a negligible intrinsic magnetic moment with an upper limit a factor 10-5 of earth's [1]. This entails that the ionosphere is vulnerable to scavenging by the solar wind. However, magnetic fields may be induced in the ionosphere by interaction with the interplanetary magnetic field frozen-in to the solar wind. The presence of small scale magnetic structures in the dayside ionosphere of the planet Venus has been long established and were first observed in Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) data in 1979 [2] during the run up to solar maximum. These ionospheric `flux ropes' were observed in over 70% of passes in which the orbit of PVO intersected the dayside ionosphere [3]. Magnetic flux ropes are identified as brief, discrete disturbances from any background magnetic field, lasting a few seconds with a magnitude of up to many 10's of nano-Teslas in strength [3, 4]. Flux ropes have a strong central, axial field, that is wrapped with field lines of weakening strength and increased helical angle with distance from the central field lines [4]. Due to this particular structure, flux ropes present a specific signature in the three variance projections (also known as a hodogram) when minimum variance analysis is applied to the magnetic data set [2]. With Venus Express now in operational orbit around the planet, flux ropes are being observed in the data retrieved by the magnetometers (MAG [5]) onboard. The magnetic data used in this analysis is the 1Hz data set provided by H. Wei (of UCLA). Variance projections have been produced for several structures in 2006, revealing them to be flux ropes (see figure 1). Using the Ion Mass Analyser (IMA; part of the ASPERA-4 package [6]) and MAG, the ion composition within the ropes and the effect of such magnetic structures upon ionospheric erosion is being studied. Where flux ropes have been evident in the magnetic data, ion spectra have been produced in an attempt to deduce any compositional differences between a flux rope

  7. Effective control of ion fluxes over large areas by magnetic fields: From narrow beams to highly uniform fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, O.; Romanov, M.; Ostrikov, Kostya

    2009-05-15

    An effective control of the ion current distribution over large-area (up to 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2}) substrates with the magnetic fields of a complex structure by using two additional magnetic coils installed under the substrate exposed to vacuum arc plasmas is demonstrated. When the magnetic field generated by the additional coils is aligned with the direction of the magnetic field generated by the guiding and focusing coils of the vacuum arc source, a narrow ion density distribution with the maximum current density 117 A m{sup -2} is achieved. When one of the additional coils is set to generate the magnetic field of the opposite direction, an area almost uniform over the substrate of 10{sup 3} cm{sup 2} ion current distribution with the mean value of 45 A m{sup -2} is achieved. Our findings suggest that the system with the vacuum arc source and two additional magnetic coils can be effectively used for the effective, high throughput, and highly controllable plasma processing.

  8. Updates on AmeriFlux Network Data Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Boden, T.; Krassovski, M.; Jackson, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory serves as the central data repository for the AmeriFlux network. The currently available datasets include hourly or half-hourly meteorological and flux observations, biological measurement records, and synthesis data products. In this presentation, we provide an update on this network database including the recent release of gap-filled meteorological records and progress in generating value-added high level products for the flux measurements. We will also discuss our plans in developing and producing other high-level products, such as uncertainty estimates for flux measurement and derivation of phenology from the available measurements at flux sites.

  9. Metal interactions with voltage- and receptor-activated ion channels.

    PubMed Central

    Vijverberg, H P; Oortgiesen, M; Leinders, T; van Kleef, R G

    1994-01-01

    Effects of Pb and several other metal ions on various distinct types of voltage-, receptor- and Ca-activated ion channels have been investigated in cultured N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. Experiments were performed using the whole-cell voltage clamp and single-channel patch clamp techniques. External superfusion of nanomolar to submillimolar concentrations of Pb causes multiple effects on ion channels. Barium current through voltage-activated Ca channels is blocked by micromolar concentrations of Pb, whereas voltage-activated Na current appears insensitive. Neuronal type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-activated ion current is blocked by nanomolar concentrations of Pb and this block is reversed at micromolar concentrations. Serotonin 5-HT3 receptor-activated ion current is much less sensitive to Pb. In addition, external superfusion with micromolar concentrations of Pb as well as of Cd and aluminum induces inward current, associated with the direct activation of nonselective cation channels by these metal ions. In excised inside-out membrane patches of neuroblastoma cells, micromolar concentrations of Ca activate small (SK) and big (BK) Ca-activated K channels. Internally applied Pb activates SK and BK channels more potently than Ca, whereas Cd is approximately equipotent to Pb with respect to SK channel activation, but fails to activate BK channels. The results show that metal ions cause distinct, selective effects on the various types of ion channels and that metal ion interaction sites of ion channels may be highly selective for particular metal ions. PMID:7531139

  10. Boron Accelerates Cultured Osteoblastic Cell Activity through Calcium Flux.

    PubMed

    Capati, Mark Luigi Fabian; Nakazono, Ayako; Igawa, Kazunari; Ookubo, Kensuke; Yamamoto, Yuya; Yanagiguchi, Kajirou; Kubo, Shisei; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    A low concentration of boron (B) accelerates the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian osteoblasts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 0.1 mM of B on the membrane function of osteoblastic cells in vitro. Genes involved in cell activity were investigated using gene expression microarray analyses. The Ca(2+) influx and efflux were evaluated to demonstrate the activation of L-type Ca(2+) channel for the Ca(2+) influx, and that of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase for the Ca(2+) efflux. A real-time PCR analysis revealed that the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of four mineralization-related genes was clearly increased after 3 days of culture with a B-supplemented culture medium. Using microarray analyses, five genes involved in cell proliferation and differentiation were upregulated compared to the control group. Regarding the Ca(2+) influx, in the nifedipine-pretreated group, the relative fluorescence intensity for 1 min after adding B solution did not increase compared with that for 1 min before addition. In the control group, the relative fluorescence intensity was significantly increased compared with the experimental group (P < 0.05). Regarding the Ca(2+) efflux, in the experimental group cultured in 0.1 mM of B-supplemented medium, the relative fluorescence intensity for 10 min after ouabain treatment revealed a significantly lower slope value compared with the control group (P < 0.01). This is the first study to demonstrate the acceleration of Ca(2+) flux by B supplementation in osteoblastic cells. Cell membrane stability is related to the mechanism by which a very low concentration of B promotes the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian osteoblastic cells in vitro.

  11. Determination of the entropy change profile of a cylindrical lithium-ion battery by heat flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashko, K. A.; Mityakov, A. V.; Mityakov, V. Y.; Sapozhnikov, S. Z.; Jokiniemi, J.; Pyrhönen, J.

    2016-10-01

    The popularity of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries has increased over the recent years. Because of the strong dependence of the Li-ion battery operation characteristics on temperature, heat generation in the battery has to be taken into account. The entropy change of a Li-ion battery has a significant influence on heat generation, especially at a low C-rate current. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the entropy change profile in the estimation of heat generation. In the paper, a method to determine the entropy change (ΔS) profile by heat flux measurements of a cylindrical Li-ion cell is proposed. The method allows simultaneous measurements of the thermal diffusivity and ΔS of the cylindrical cell. The thermal diffusivity and ΔS measurements are carried out by a gradient heat flux sensor (GHFS). The comparison between the ΔS profile determined by the GHFS method with that obtained using a standard potentiometric method clearly shows that the entropy change measurements could be made by using a GHFS. Even though the uncertainty of the reported method is higher than that of the potentiometric method, a significant decrease in the experiment time compared with the potentiometric method is a major advantage of this method.

  12. Modeling of the solar cycle modulated interstellar He, Ne, and O pick-up ion flux along the Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzowski, M.; Sokol, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Moebius, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interstellar pick-up ions (PUIs) are used to study in-situ the interstellar flow through the heliosphere. The locations of the peaks of the downwind focusing cone and the upwind crescent as observed in the PUI flux have been used as signatures for the flow direction of neutral interstellar (ISN) gas into the heliosphere. We study the modulation of interstellar He, Ne, and O PUI along the Earth orbit over almost the entire solar activity cycle from 2002 to 2013. We present the expected density of ISN atoms and the resulting PUI fluxes with their modulation due to varying ionization over the solar cycle. Considering the important role of the finite injection speed of ISN atoms and of adiabatic PUI cooling, we show that Ne and O always form an upwind crescent in the PUI flux, but that the crescent formation for He PUIs strongly depends on the integration boundaries for the PUI distribution. Because the crescent has been observed for all three species, we find that the classical model of PUI evolution by Vasyliunas & Siscoe (1976) may not be sufficient to reproduce the upwind structure of He PUIs. We also find that ecliptic longitude of the PUI peak in the focusing cone is a good proxy for the inflow direction of ISN He and Ne during solar minimum, but not for ISN O, which exhibits a systematic shift in the model. On the other hand, the peak location derived from the crescent may not be a good proxy to determine the inflow longitude because it is highly modulated by short-time (few months) variations in the ionization losses. These lead to a corrugated crescent structure and may shift the fitted position of the crescent peak used to determine the inflow direction by up to 10°, with the strongest effects for the species that are heavily affected by ionization, i.e., O and Ne. These findings are in a qualitative agreement with results of in-situ PUI measurements, which showed that the location of PUI maximum varies.

  13. AmeriFlux Network Data Activities: updates, progress and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Boden, T.; Krassovski, M.; Song, X.

    2013-12-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory serves as the long-term data repository for the AmeriFlux network. Datasets currently available include hourly or half-hourly meteorological and flux observations, biological measurement records, and synthesis data products. In this presentation, we provide an update of this network database including a comprehensive review and evaluation of the biological data from about 70 sites, development of a new product for flux uncertainty estimates, and re-formatting of Level-2 standard files. In 2013, we also provided data support to two synthesis studies --- 2012 drought synthesis and FACE synthesis. Issues related to data quality and solutions in compiling datasets for these synthesis studies will be discussed. We will also present our work plans in developing and producing other high-level products, such as derivation of phenology from the available measurements at flux sites.

  14. Charged particle's flux measurement from PMMA irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Agodi, C; Battistoni, G; Bellini, F; Cirrone, G A P; Collamati, F; Cuttone, G; De Lucia, E; De Napoli, M; Domenico, A Di; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Gauzzi, P; Iarocci, E; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Muraro, S; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Romano, F; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Vitale, E; Voena, C

    2012-09-21

    Hadrontherapy is an emerging technique in cancer therapy that uses beams of charged particles. To meet the improved capability of hadrontherapy in matching the dose release with the cancer position, new dose-monitoring techniques need to be developed and introduced into clinical use. The measurement of the fluxes of the secondary particles produced by the hadron beam is of fundamental importance in the design of any dose-monitoring device and is eagerly needed to tune Monte Carlo simulations. We report the measurements carried out with charged secondary particles produced from the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, with a poly-methyl methacrylate target. Charged secondary particles, produced at 90° with respect to the beam axis, have been tracked with a drift chamber, while their energy and time of flight have been measured by means of a LYSO scintillator. Secondary protons have been identified exploiting the energy and time-of-flight information, and their emission region has been reconstructed backtracking from the drift chamber to the target. Moreover, a position scan of the target indicates that the reconstructed emission region follows the movement of the expected Bragg peak position. Exploiting the reconstruction of the emission region, an accuracy on the Bragg peak determination in the submillimeter range has been obtained. The measured differential production rate for protons produced with E(Prod)(kin) > 83 MeV and emitted at 90° with respect to the beam line is dN(P)/(dN(C)dΩ) (E(Prod)(kin) > 83 MeV, θ = 90°) = (2.69 ± 0.08(stat) ± 0.12(sys)) × 10⁻⁴ sr⁻¹.

  15. Thomson scattering measurements of heat flux from ion-acoustic waves in laser-produced aluminum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Yu, Q Z; Zhang, J; Li, Y T; Lu, X; Hawreliak, J; Wark, J; Chambers, D M; Wang, Z B; Yu, C X; Jiang, X H; Li, W H; Liu, S Y; Zheng, Z J

    2005-04-01

    Thomson scattering (TS) measurements are performed at different locations in a laser-produced aluminum plasma. Variations of the separation, wavelength shift, and asymmetric distribution of the two ion-acoustic waves are investigated from their spectral-time-resolved TS images. Detailed information on the space-time evolution of the plasma parameters is obtained. Electron distribution and variation of the heat flux in the plasma are also obtained for a steep temperature gradient.

  16. Variability of the Lyman alpha flux with solar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lean, J.L.; Skumanich, A.

    1983-07-01

    A three-component model of the solar chromosphere, developed from ground based observations of the Ca II K chromospheric emission, is used to calculate the variability of the Lyman alpha flux between 1969 and 1980. The Lyman alpha flux at solar minimum is required in the model and is taken as 2.32 x 10/sup 11/ photons/cm/sup 2//s. This value occurred during 1975 as well as in 1976 near the commencement of solar cycle 21. The model predicts that the Lyman alpha flux increases to as much as 5 x 10/sup 11/ photons/cm/sup 2//s at the maximum of the solar cycle. The ratio of the average fluxes for December 1979 (cycle maximum) and July 1976 (cycle minimum) is 1.9. During solar maximum the 27-day solar rotation is shown to cause the Lyman alpha flux to vary by as much as 40% or as little as 5%. The model also shows that the Lyman alpha flux varies over intermediate time periods of 2 to 3 years, as well as over the 11-year sunspot cycle. We conclude that, unlike the sunspot number and the 10.7-cm radio flux, the Lyman alpha flux had a variability that was approximately the same during each of the past three cycles. Lyman alpha fluxes calculated by the model are consistent with measurements of the Lyman alpha flux made by 11 of a total of 14 rocket experiments conducted during the period 1969--1980. The model explains satisfactorily the absolute magnitude, long-term trends, and the cycle variability seen in the Lyman alpha irradiances by the OSO 5 satellite experiment. The 27-day variability observed by the AE-E satellite experiment is well reproduced. However, the magntidue of the AE-E 1 Lyman alpha irradiances are higher than the model calculations by between 40% and 80%. We suggest that the assumed calibration of the AE-E irradiances is in error.

  17. Heat generation rate measurement in a Li-ion cell at large C-rates through temperature and heat flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, S. J.; Martin, M.; Wetz, D. A.; Ostanek, J. K.; Miller, S. P.; Heinzel, J. M.; Jain, A.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the rate of heat generation in a Li-ion cell is critical for safety and performance of Li-ion cells and systems. Cell performance, cycle life, and system safety all depend on temperature distribution in the cell, which, in turn, depends on heat generation rate within the cell and on heat removal rate at the cell surface. Despite the existence of a number of theoretical models to predict heat generation rate, there is not much literature on experimental measurement at high C-rates. This paper reports measurement of heat generation rate from a Li-ion cell at high discharge rates, up to 9.6C, using measurements of cell temperature and surface heat flux. As opposed to calorimetry-based approaches, this method can be applied in situ to yield measurements of heat generation rate in laboratory or field use provided that at least one a priori test is performed to measure the temperature gradient within a cell in the same ambient condition. This method is based on simultaneous determination of heat stored and heat lost from the cell through heat flux and temperature measurements. A novel method is established for measurement of the internal temperature of the cell. Heat generation measurements are shown to agree with well-established theoretical models. The effect of actively cooling the cell is briefly discussed.

  18. Superthermal Ion Transport and Acceleration in Multiple Contracting and Reconnecting Inertial-scale Flux Ropes in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, Jakobus; Zank, Gary; Webb, Gary

    2014-10-01

    MHD turbulence simulations with a strong large-scale magnetic field show that the turbulence is filled with quasi-2D inertial-scale flux ropes that intermittently reconnect. Solar wind observations indicate that the statistical properties of the turbulence agree well with the MHD turbulence simulations, while particle simulations stress how ions can be efficiently accelerated to produce power law spectra when traversing multiple flux ropes. Recent observations show the presence of different size inertial-scale magnetic islands in the slow solar wind near the heliospheric current sheet, evidence of island merging, and of heating of ions and electrons in the vicinity. We will present a new statistical transport theory designed to model the acceleration and transport of superthermal ions traversing multiple contracting and reconnecting inertial-scale quasi-2D flux ropes in the supersonic slow solar wind. A steady-state solution for the accelerated particle spectrum in a radially expanding solar wind will discussed, showing that the theory potentially can explain naturally the existence of superthermal power-law spectra observed during quiet solar wind conditions.

  19. Suprathermal Ion Acceleration in Multiple Contracting and Reconnecting Inertial-scale Flux Ropes in the Supersonic Solar Wind.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Roux, J. A.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    3D and 2D MHD turbulence simulations with a strong large-scale magnetic field show that the turbulence is filled with quasi-2D inertial-scale flux ropes that intermittently reconnect, while test particle simulations stress how suprathermal particles can be efficiently accelerated to produce power law spectra (kappa distributions) when traversing multiple flux ropes. Solar wind observations indicate that the statistical properties of the turbulence agree well with the MHD turbulence simulation. In addition, recent observations show the presence of different size inertial-scale magnetic islands in the slow solar wind near the heliospheric current sheet, evidence of island merging, and of heating of ions and electrons in their vicinity. At the same time, observations in the supersonic solar wind suggest the existence of suprathermal ion spectra in the solar wind frame where the distribution function is a power law in momentum with a -5 exponent. We present a new statistical transport theory to model the acceleration of superthermal ions traversing multiple contracting and reconnecting inertial-scale quasi-2D flux ropes in the supersonic solar wind. Steady-state analytical solutions for the accelerated suprathermal particle spectrum in a radially expanding solar wind will be explored to show under what conditions one can reproduce the observed superthermal power-law slope.

  20. Gyrokinetic study of turbulent convection of heavy impurities in tokamak plasmas at comparable ion and electron heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angioni, C.; Bilato, R.; Casson, F. J.; Fable, E.; Mantica, P.; Odstrcil, T.; Valisa, M.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Contributors, JET

    2017-02-01

    In tokamaks, the role of turbulent transport of heavy impurities, relative to that of neoclassical transport, increases with increasing size of the plasma, as clarified by means of general scalings, which use the ITER standard scenario parameters as reference, and by actual results from a selection of discharges from ASDEX Upgrade and JET. This motivates the theoretical investigation of the properties of the turbulent convection of heavy impurities by nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in the experimentally relevant conditions of comparable ion and electron heat fluxes. These conditions also correspond to an intermediate regime between dominant ion temperature gradient turbulence and trapped electron mode turbulence. At moderate plasma toroidal rotation, the turbulent convection of heavy impurities, computed with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations, is found to be directed outward, in contrast to that obtained by quasi-linear calculations based on the most unstable linear mode, which is directed inward. In this mixed turbulence regime, with comparable electron and ion heat fluxes, the nonlinear results of the impurity transport can be explained by the coexistence of both ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes in the turbulent state, both contributing to the turbulent convection and diffusion of the impurity. The impact of toroidal rotation on the turbulent convection is also clarified.

  1. Resting state respiration of mitochondria: Reappraisal of the role of passive ion fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Zolkiewska, A.; Zablocka, B.; Duszynski, J.; Wojtczak, L. )

    1989-12-01

    Rat liver mitochondria respiring under resting state conditions in the presence of oligomycin were rapidly blocked with cyanide and the dissipation of the membrane potential, measured with a tetraphenylphosphonium-sensitive electrode, was followed over time. The plot of the rate of membrane potential dissipation versus the actual value of the membrane potential was nonlinear and identical to the plot of resting state respiration (titrated with small amounts of a respiratory inhibitor) versus the membrane potential. The relationship between the respiratory chain activity and the proton-motive force in mitochondria oxidizing succinate with either oxygen or ferricyanide as electron acceptors was also found to be identical. These results are interpreted as an indication that the passive permeability of the inner mitochondrial membrane toward ions is far more significant in maintaining resting state respiration than is the molecular slippage of the pumps in the respiratory chain. These results also confirm the non-ohmic characteristics of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  2. Resting state respiration of mitochondria: reappraisal of the role of passive ion fluxes.

    PubMed

    Zółkiewska, A; Zabłocka, B; Duszyński, J; Wojtczak, L

    1989-12-01

    Rat liver mitochondria respiring under resting state conditions in the presence of oligomycin were rapidly blocked with cyanide and the dissipation of the membrane potential, measured with a tetraphenylphosphonium-sensitive electrode, was followed over time. The plot of the rate of membrane potential dissipation versus the actual value of the membrane potential was nonlinear and identical to the plot of resting state respiration (titrated with small amounts of a respiratory inhibitor) versus the membrane potential. The relationship between the respiratory chain activity and the proton-motive force in mitochondria oxidizing succinate with either oxygen or ferricyanide as electron acceptors was also found to be identical. These results are interpreted as an indication that the passive permeability of the inner mitochondrial membrane toward ions is far more significant in maintaining resting state respiration than is the molecular slippage of the pumps in the respiratory chain. These results also confirm the non-ohmic characteristics of the inner mitochondrial membrane.

  3. Use of the Ramsay Assay to Measure Fluid Secretion and Ion Flux Rates in the Drosophila melanogaster Malpighian Tubule

    PubMed Central

    Schellinger, Jeffrey N.; Rodan, Aylin R.

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of renal epithelial ion transport allows organisms to maintain ionic and osmotic homeostasis in the face of varying external conditions. The Drosophila melanogaster Malpighian (renal) tubule offers an unparalleled opportunity to study the molecular mechanisms of epithelial ion transport, due to the powerful genetics of this organism and the accessibility of its renal tubules to physiological study. Here, we describe the use of the Ramsay assay to measure fluid secretion rates from isolated fly renal tubules, with the use of ion-specific electrodes to measure sodium and potassium concentrations in the secreted fluid. This assay allows study of transepithelial fluid and ion fluxes of ~20 tubules at a time, without the need to transfer the secreted fluid to a separate apparatus to measure ion concentrations. Genetically distinct tubules can be analyzed to assess the role of specific genes in transport processes. Additionally, the bathing saline can be modified to examine the effects of its chemical characteristics, or drugs or hormones added. In summary, this technique allows the molecular characterization of basic mechanisms of epithelial ion transport in the Drosophila tubule, as well as regulation of these transport mechanisms. PMID:26650886

  4. Active spacecraft potential control: An ion emitter experiment. [Cluster mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Goldstein, R.; Hamelin, M.; Maehlum, B. N.; Troim, J.; Olsen, R. C.; Pedersen, A.; Grard, R. J. L.; Schmidt, R.; Rudenauer, F.

    1988-01-01

    The cluster spacecraft are instrumented with ion emitters for charge neutralization. The emitters produce indium ions at 6 keV. The ion current is adjusted in a feedback loop with instruments measuring the spacecraft potential. The system is based on the evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. The design of the active spacecraft potential control instruments, and the ion emitters is presented.

  5. Measurements of Ion Energy and Ion Flux Distributions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas in CF4/O2/Ar Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Kim, J. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, Surendra; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We report mass spectrometric studies of energy distributions and absolute concentrations of ions generated in CF4/O2/Ar inductively coupled rf plasmas. The ions were collected through a 100 mm orifice in the grounded and water cooled lower electrode in a GEC cell configuration. The measurements were made at gas pressures in the 10-50 mTorr range and rf coil power in the 100-300 W range. The observed ions are CF3(+), CF2(+), CF(+), C(+), F(+), COF(+), CO(+), O2(+), and O(+). The relative abundance of these ions varies with pressure and rf power. The energy distribution and absolute concentrations are correlated with electron number density and floating plasma potential measured by a compensated Langmuir probe.

  6. Collisional activation of ions by off-resonance irradiation in ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seung Koo; Han, Seung-Jin; Seo, Jongcheol

    2009-06-01

    Collisional activation of ions in the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell by short off-resonance burst irradiation (ORBI) was studied by time-resolved photodissociation of the meta-bromotoluene radical cation. Off-resonance chirp or single-frequency burst was applied for 2 ms to the probe ion in the presence of Ar buffer gas. The amount of internal energy imparted to the probe ion by collision under ORBI was precisely determined by time-resolved photodissociation spectroscopy. The rate of unimolecular dissociation of the probe ion following the photolysis at 532 nm was measured by monitoring the real-time appearance of the C7H7+ product ion. The internal energy of the probe ion was extracted from the known rate-energy curve. To help understand the collisional activation of an ion under ORBI, we simulated the radial trajectory of the ion using Green's method. The calculated radial kinetic energy was converted to the collision energy in the center-of-mass frame, and the collision frequency was estimated by using a reactive hard-sphere collision model with an ion-induced dipole potential. Both experiments and trajectory simulations suggest that chirp irradiation leads to less collisional activation of ions than other waveforms.

  7. Increased abscisic acid levels in transgenic maize overexpressing AtLOS5 mediated root ion fluxes and leaf water status under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Yu, Haiyue; Zhang, Yushi; Wang, Yubing; Li, Maoying; Zhang, Jiachang; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Li, Zhaohu

    2016-03-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a vital cellular signal in plants, and effective ABA signalling is pivotal for stress tolerance. AtLOS5 encoding molybdenum cofactor sulphurase is a key regulator of ABA biosynthesis. Here, transgenic AtLOS5 plants were generated to explore the role of AtLOS5 in salt tolerance in maize. AtLOS5 overexpression significantly up-regulated the expression of ZmVp14-2, ZmAO, and ZmMOCO, and increased aldehyde oxidase activities, which enhanced ABA accumulation in transgenic plants under salt stress. Concurrently, AtLOS5 overexpression induced the expression of ZmNHX1, ZmCBL4, and ZmCIPK16, and enhanced the root net Na(+) efflux and H(+) influx, but decreased net K(+) efflux, which maintained a high cytosolic K(+)/Na(+) ratio in transgenic plants under salt stress. However, amiloride or sodium orthovanadate could significantly elevate K(+) effluxes and decrease Na(+) efflux and H(+) influx in salt-treated transgenic roots, but the K(+) effluxes were inhibited by TEA, suggesting that ion fluxes regulated by AtLOS5 overexpression were possibly due to activation of Na(+)/H(+) antiport and K(+) channels across the plasma membrane. Moreover, AtLOS5 overexpression could up-regulate the transcripts of ZmPIP1:1, ZmPIP1:5, and ZmPIP2:4, and enhance root hydraulic conductivity. Thus transgenic plants had higher leaf water potential and turgor, which was correlated with greater biomass accumulation under salt stress. Thus AtLOS5 overexpression induced the expression of ABA biosynthetic genes to promote ABA accumulation, which activated ion transporter and PIP aquaporin gene expression to regulate root ion fluxes and water uptake, thus maintaining high cytosolic K(+) and Na(+) homeostasis and better water status in maize exposed to salt stress.

  8. Increased abscisic acid levels in transgenic maize overexpressing AtLOS5 mediated root ion fluxes and leaf water status under salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Juan; Yu, Haiyue; Zhang, Yushi; Wang, Yubing; Li, Maoying; Zhang, Jiachang; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Li, Zhaohu

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a vital cellular signal in plants, and effective ABA signalling is pivotal for stress tolerance. AtLOS5 encoding molybdenum cofactor sulphurase is a key regulator of ABA biosynthesis. Here, transgenic AtLOS5 plants were generated to explore the role of AtLOS5 in salt tolerance in maize. AtLOS5 overexpression significantly up-regulated the expression of ZmVp14-2, ZmAO, and ZmMOCO, and increased aldehyde oxidase activities, which enhanced ABA accumulation in transgenic plants under salt stress. Concurrently, AtLOS5 overexpression induced the expression of ZmNHX1, ZmCBL4, and ZmCIPK16, and enhanced the root net Na+ efflux and H+ influx, but decreased net K+ efflux, which maintained a high cytosolic K+/Na+ ratio in transgenic plants under salt stress. However, amiloride or sodium orthovanadate could significantly elevate K+ effluxes and decrease Na+ efflux and H+ influx in salt-treated transgenic roots, but the K+ effluxes were inhibited by TEA, suggesting that ion fluxes regulated by AtLOS5 overexpression were possibly due to activation of Na+/H+ antiport and K+ channels across the plasma membrane. Moreover, AtLOS5 overexpression could up-regulate the transcripts of ZmPIP1:1, ZmPIP1:5, and ZmPIP2:4, and enhance root hydraulic conductivity. Thus transgenic plants had higher leaf water potential and turgor, which was correlated with greater biomass accumulation under salt stress. Thus AtLOS5 overexpression induced the expression of ABA biosynthetic genes to promote ABA accumulation, which activated ion transporter and PIP aquaporin gene expression to regulate root ion fluxes and water uptake, thus maintaining high cytosolic K+ and Na+ homeostasis and better water status in maize exposed to salt stress. PMID:26743432

  9. An improved empirical model of electron and ion fluxes at geosynchronous orbit based on upstream solar wind conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Denton, M. H.; Henderson, M. G.; Jordanova, V. K.; ...

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a new empirical model of the electron fluxes and ion fluxes at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) is introduced, based on observations by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) satellites. The model provides flux predictions in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV, as a function of local time, energy, and the strength of the solar wind electric field (the negative product of the solar wind speed and the z component of the magnetic field). Given appropriate upstream solar wind measurements, the model provides a forecast of the fluxes at GEO with a ~1 h lead time. Model predictionsmore » are tested against in-sample observations from LANL satellites and also against out-of-sample observations from the Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II detector on the AMC-12 satellite. The model does not reproduce all structure seen in the observations. However, for the intervals studied here (quiet and storm times) the normalized root-mean-square deviation < ~0.3. It is intended that the model will improve forecasting of the spacecraft environment at GEO and also provide improved boundary/input conditions for physical models of the magnetosphere.« less

  10. An improved empirical model of electron and ion fluxes at geosynchronous orbit based on upstream solar wind conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M. H.; Henderson, M. G.; Jordanova, V. K.; Thomsen, M. F.; Borovsky, J. E.; Woodroffe, J.; Hartley, D. P.; Pitchford, D.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a new empirical model of the electron fluxes and ion fluxes at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) is introduced, based on observations by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) satellites. The model provides flux predictions in the energy range ~1 eV to ~40 keV, as a function of local time, energy, and the strength of the solar wind electric field (the negative product of the solar wind speed and the z component of the magnetic field). Given appropriate upstream solar wind measurements, the model provides a forecast of the fluxes at GEO with a ~1 h lead time. Model predictions are tested against in-sample observations from LANL satellites and also against out-of-sample observations from the Compact Environmental Anomaly Sensor II detector on the AMC-12 satellite. The model does not reproduce all structure seen in the observations. However, for the intervals studied here (quiet and storm times) the normalized root-mean-square deviation < ~0.3. It is intended that the model will improve forecasting of the spacecraft environment at GEO and also provide improved boundary/input conditions for physical models of the magnetosphere.

  11. INVESTIGATION OF HELICITY AND ENERGY FLUX TRANSPORT IN THREE EMERGING SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.

    2015-06-20

    We report the results of an investigation of helicity and energy flux transport from three emerging solar active regions (ARs). Using time sequence vector magnetic field observations obtained from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager, the velocity field of plasma flows is derived by the differential affine velocity estimator for vector magnetograms. In three cases, the magnetic fluxes evolve to pump net positive, negative, and mixed-sign helicity flux into the corona. The coronal helicity flux is dominantly coming from the shear term that is related to horizontal flux motions, whereas energy flux is dominantly contributed by the emergence term. The shear helicity flux has a phase delay of 5–14 hr with respect to absolute magnetic flux. The nonlinear curve of coronal energy versus relative helicity identifies the configuration of coronal magnetic fields, which is approximated by a fit of linear force-free fields. The nature of coronal helicity related to the particular pattern of evolving magnetic fluxes at the photosphere has implications for the generation mechanism of two kinds of observed activity in the ARs.

  12. Seasonal fluxes of some ions through the overstory, underbrush, and organic soil horizons of an aspen-birch forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Anthony G.; Watters, Robert J.

    1988-03-01

    A study was made of the water and chemical fluxes in a predominantly deciduous forest at Chalk River, Ontario. The chemistry of water moving to the soil through trembling aspen, large-tooth aspen and paper birch is strongly modified by interaction with all major components in the system: the overstory leaves and trunks, the underbrush stems and leaves, and the organic plus upper mineral soil horizon. The dominant controls on the chemistry of water reaching the forest floor are those exerted by the overstory. Hydrochemical changes through the underbrush are, generally, of the same type as those through the overstory, but of a smaller size. A significant, positive relationship was found between the hydrogen ion flux imposed on the overstory, and the net loss of calcium, magnesium, and potassium from the canopy, showing that acid deposition is having an effect on the export of these nutrients from the canopy.

  13. Recent Activities at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Fred W; Bannister, Mark E; Hale, Jerry W; Havener, C C; Krause, Herbert F; Vane, C Randy; Deng, Shihu; Draganic, Ilija N; Harris, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Recent activities at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) are summarized. A brief summary of the MIRF high voltage (HV) platform and floating beam line upgrade is provided. An expansion of our research program to the use of molecular ion beams in heavy-particle and electron collisions, as well as in ion-surface interactions is described, and a brief description is provided of the most recently added Ion Cooling and Characterization End-station (ICCE) trap. With the expansion to include molecular ion beams, the acronym MIRF for the facility, however, remains unchanged: M can now refer to either Multicharged or Molecular.

  14. Antibacterial, Antifungal and Nematicidal Activities of Rare Earth Ions.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Tokumitsu; Ymamoto, Ayumi; Kazaana, Akira; Nakano, Yuta; Nojiri, Yui; Kashiwazaki, Moeko

    2016-12-01

    Despite the name, rare earth elements are relatively abundant in soil. Therefore, these elements might interact with biosphere during the history of life. In this study, we have examined the effect of rare earth ions on the growth of bacteria, fungi and soil nematode. All rare earth ions, except radioactive promethium that we have not tested, showed antibacterial and antifungal activities comparable to that of copper ions, which is widely used as antibacterial metals in our daily life. Rare earth ions also have nematicidal activities as they strongly perturb the embryonic development of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Interestingly, the nematicidal activity increased with increasing atomic number of lanthanide ions. Since the rare earth ions did not show high toxicity to the human lymphoblastoid cell line or even stimulate the growth of the cultured cells at 1 mM, it raised the possibility that we can substitute rare earth elements for the antibacterial metals usually used because of their safety.

  15. Ion Flux Impingement on the Cathode Surface in an Axisymmetric Electron Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masaya; Kusumoto, Yoshiro

    The flow of the residual gas ion generated by a collision with high-energy electron in an axisymmetric gun was numerically investigated. Since the lifetime of the gun is dominated by the cathode damage induced by the ion bombardment, it is of industrial importance to reveal how the ions impinge on the cathode and how the inflow can be repelled. Under the normal operating condition of the electron gun (40 kV, 6 A), we determined the inflow basin, i.e. the region where the gas ions were born there and finally reached to the cathode. The basin consisted of four separated zones characterized by the potential distribution on the beam axis. To eliminate the downstream zones, it was useful to append a positive voltage imposed electrode behind the anode. The voltage necessary for repelling the ion inflow was found to be 300 V being less than 1% of the electron acceleration voltage.

  16. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McLuckey, S A; Goeringer, D E; Glish, G L

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly pronated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap.

  17. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly protonated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  18. NEW VACUUM SOLAR TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF A FLUX ROPE TRACKED BY A FILAMENT ACTIVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Zhong; Xiang, Yongyuan E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2014-04-01

    One main goal of the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) which is located at the Fuxian Solar Observatory is to image the Sun at high resolution. Based on the high spatial and temporal resolution NVST Hα data and combined with the simultaneous observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory for the first time, we investigate a flux rope tracked by filament activation. The filament material is initially located at one end of the flux rope and fills in a section of the rope; the filament is then activated by magnetic field cancellation. The activated filament rises and flows along helical threads, tracking the twisted flux rope structure. The length of the flux rope is about 75 Mm, the average width of its individual threads is 1.11 Mm, and the estimated twist is 1π. The flux rope appears as a dark structure in Hα images, a partial dark and partial bright structure in 304 Å, and as a bright structure in 171 Å and 131 Å images. During this process, the overlying coronal loops are quite steady since the filament is confined within the flux rope and does not erupt successfully. It seems that, for the event in this study, the filament is located and confined within the flux rope threads, instead of being suspended in the dips of twisted magnetic flux.

  19. Enzymatically active high-flux selectively gas-permeable membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ying-Bing; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Rempe, Susan; FU, Yaqin; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2016-01-26

    An ultra-thin, catalyzed liquid transport medium-based membrane structure fabricated with a porous supporting substrate may be used for separating an object species such as a carbon dioxide object species. Carbon dioxide flux through this membrane structures may be several orders of magnitude higher than traditional polymer membranes with a high selectivity to carbon dioxide. Other gases such as molecular oxygen, molecular hydrogen, and other species including non-gaseous species, for example ionic materials, may be separated using variations to the membrane discussed.

  20. The Solar Connection of Enhanced Heavy Ion Charge States in the Interplanetary Medium: Implications for the Flux-Rope Structure of CMEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Akiyama, S.; Xie, H.; Yashiro, S.; Reinard, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated a set of 54 interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) events whose solar sources are very close to the disk center (within +/- 15deg from the central meridian). The ICMEs consisted of 23 magnetic-cloud (MC) events and 31 non-MC events. Our analyses suggest that the MC and non-MC ICMEs have more or less the same eruption characteristics at the Sun in terms of soft X-ray flares and CMEs. Both types have significant enhancements in ion charge states, although the non-MC structures have slightly lower levels of enhancement. The overall duration of charge-state enhancement is also considerably smaller than that in MCs as derived from solar wind plasma and magnetic signatures. We find very good correlation between the Fe and O charge-state measurements and the flare properties such as soft X-ray flare intensity and flare temperature for both MCs and non-MCs. These observations suggest that both MC and non-MC ICMEs are likely to have a flux-rope structure and the unfavorable observational geometry may be responsible for the appearance of non-MC structures at 1 AU. We do not find any evidence for an active region expansion resulting in ICMEs lacking a flux-rope structure because the mechanism of producing high charge states and the flux-rope structure at the Sun is the same for MC and non-MC events.

  1. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolicpathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using GasChromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Fourier Transform-Ion CyclotronResonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yinjie; Pingitore, Francesco; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Phan,Richard; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-03-15

    Flux distribution in central metabolic pathways ofDesulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was examined using 13C tracerexperiments. Consistent with the current genome annotation andindependent evidence from enzyme activity assays, the isotopomer resultsfrom both GC-MS and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance massspectrometry (FT-ICR MS) indicate the lack of oxidatively functional TCAcycle and an incomplete pentose phosphate pathway. Results from thisstudy suggest that fluxes through both pathways are limited tobiosynthesis. The data also indicate that>80 percent of the lactatewas converted to acetate and the reactions involved are the primary routeof energy production (NAD(P)H and ATP production). Independent of the TCAcycle, direct cleavage of acetyl-CoA to CO and 5,10-methyl-THF also leadsto production of NADH and ATP. Although the genome annotation implicatesa ferredoxin-dependentoxoglutarate synthase, isotopic evidence does notsupport flux through this reaction in either the oxidative or reductivemode; therefore, the TCA cycle is incomplete. FT-ICR MS was used tolocate the labeled carbon distribution in aspartate and glutamate andconfirmed the presence of an atypical enzyme for citrate formationsuggested in previous reports (the citrate synthesized by this enzyme isthe isotopic antipode of the citrate synthesized by the (S)-citratesynthase). These findings enable a better understanding of the relationbetween genome annotation and actual metabolic pathways in D. vulgaris,and also demonstrate FT-ICR MS as a powerful tool for isotopomeranalysis, overcoming problems in both GC-MS and NMRspectroscopy.

  2. Active experiments and single ion motion in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothwell, P. L.; Yates, G. K.

    1983-07-01

    Analytic solutions to the Lorentz equation which indicate that the magnetic field in the plasma sheet focuses selected ions from the plasma sheet boundaries on the neutral sheet are obtained. The kinetic energy of these ions usually exceeds the threshold energy required for the ion tearing mode instability. Two active experiments based on this effect are proposed. Heavy ions injected towards dusk on the plasma sheet boundary would become focused on the neutral sheet and perhaps trigger the ion tearing mode. A boundary perturbation, such as a thermal chemical release, that locally enhances the boundary turbulence level could be introduced, causing sufficient ksq = 1 ions to be focused on the neutral sheet to trigger the ion tearing mode.

  3. Ion exchange defines the biological activity of titanate nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rónavári, Andrea; Kovács, Dávid; Vágvölgyi, Csaba; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiricsi, Mónika; Pfeiffer, Ilona

    2016-05-01

    One-dimensional titanate nanotubes (TiONTs) were subjected to systematic ion exchange to determine the impact of these modifications on biological activities. Ion exchanged TiONTs (with Ag, Mg, Bi, Sb, Ca, K, Sr, Fe, and Cu ions) were successfully synthesized and the presence of the substituted ions was verified by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). A complex screening was carried out to reveal differences in toxicity to human cells, as well as in antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities between the various modified nanotubes. Our results demonstrated that Ag ion exchanged TiONTs exerted potent antibacterial and antifungal effects against all examined microbial species but were ineffective on viruses. Surprisingly, the antibacterial activity of Cu/TiONTs was restricted to Micrococcus luteus. Most ion exchanged TiONTs did not show antimicrobial activity against the tested bacterial and fungal species. Incorporation of various ions into nanotube architectures lead to mild, moderate, or even to a massive loss of human cell viability; therefore, this type of biological effect exerted by TiONTs can be greatly modulated by ion exchange. These findings further emphasize the contribution of ion exchange in determining not only the physical and chemical characteristics but also the bioactivity of TiONT against different types of living cells.

  4. Effect of high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation on Ta as a plasma-facing material

    PubMed Central

    Novakowski, T. J.; Tripathi, J. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work is to assess Ta as a potential plasma-facing material for future fusion reactors in terms of its response to high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation. Ta samples were irradiated with 100 eV He+ ions at various fluences up to 3.5 × 1025 ions m−2 while simultaneously heated at constant temperatures in the range 823–1223 K. SEM studies show that irradiated Ta surfaces undergo significant morphology changes that have a strong dependence on both ion fluence and sample temperature. Optical reflectivity complements SEM and demonstrates a vertical growth of surface structures with increasing fluence. Ex situ XPS and XRD both show significant oxidation of the irradiated Ta surfaces, giving further qualitative information on the extent of surface modification. Overall, these irradiation-induced structures on Ta are similar to early-stage “fuzz” structures observed in W. However, Ta exhibits a higher fluence threshold for structure formation. While Ta may have less desirable bulk properties (e.g., thermal conductivity) when compared to W, its higher resilience to He+ ion-induced surface modification suggests that surface thermal and mechanical properties may not degrade as quickly in extreme fusion environments; this quality may be a redeeming factor for Ta as a plasma-facing material. PMID:28008976

  5. Effect of high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation on Ta as a plasma-facing material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakowski, T. J.; Tripathi, J. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this work is to assess Ta as a potential plasma-facing material for future fusion reactors in terms of its response to high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation. Ta samples were irradiated with 100 eV He+ ions at various fluences up to 3.5 × 1025 ions m‑2 while simultaneously heated at constant temperatures in the range 823–1223 K. SEM studies show that irradiated Ta surfaces undergo significant morphology changes that have a strong dependence on both ion fluence and sample temperature. Optical reflectivity complements SEM and demonstrates a vertical growth of surface structures with increasing fluence. Ex situ XPS and XRD both show significant oxidation of the irradiated Ta surfaces, giving further qualitative information on the extent of surface modification. Overall, these irradiation-induced structures on Ta are similar to early-stage “fuzz” structures observed in W. However, Ta exhibits a higher fluence threshold for structure formation. While Ta may have less desirable bulk properties (e.g., thermal conductivity) when compared to W, its higher resilience to He+ ion-induced surface modification suggests that surface thermal and mechanical properties may not degrade as quickly in extreme fusion environments; this quality may be a redeeming factor for Ta as a plasma-facing material.

  6. Strong ambipolar-driven ion upflow within the cleft ion fountain during low geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yangyang; Knudsen, David J.; Burchill, Johnathan K.; Howarth, Andrew; Yau, Andrew; Redmon, Robert J.; Miles, David M.; Varney, Roger H.; Nicolls, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate low-energy (<10 eV) ion upflows (mainly O+) within the cleft ion fountain (CIF) using conjunctions of the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) satellite, the DMSP F16 satellite, the SuperDARN radar, and the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar North (RISR-N). The SEI instrument on board e-POP enables us to derive ion upflow velocities from the 2-D images of ion distribution functions with a frame rate of 100 images per second, and with a velocity resolution of the order of 25 m/s. We identify three cleft ion fountain events with very intense (>1.6 km/s) ion upflow velocities near 1000 km altitude during quiet geomagnetic activity (Kp < 3). Such large ion upflow velocities have been reported previously at or below 1000 km, but only during active periods. Analysis of the core ion distribution images allows us to demonstrate that the ion temperature within the CIF does not rise by more than 0.3 eV relative to background values, which is consistent with RISR-N observations in the F region. The presence of soft electron precipitation seen by DMSP and lack of significant ion heating indicate that the ion upflows we observe near 1000 km altitude are primarily driven by ambipolar electric fields. DC field-aligned currents (FACs) and convection velocity gradients accompany these events. The strongest ion upflows are associated with downward current regions, which is consistent with some (although not all) previously published results. The moderate correlation coefficient (0.51) between upflow velocities and currents implies that FACs serve as indirect energy inputs to the ion upflow process.

  7. Multi-component ion fluxes in the near-earth magnetotail: Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, R.; Semkova, J.; Smirnov, V.; Fedorov, A.

    We study the characteristics of the ion population encountered in the high latitude magnetosphere in the vicinity of the terminator for two passes of the INTERBALL-1 satellite. Analysis of data from the Low Energy Plasma Composition Experiment (AMEI-2) reveals the coexisting of ions with different origin: 1) from composition point of view - Solar wind and ionospheric plasmas; 2) from spectral poi of view - plasma sheet-like ions with energy-per-charge above 4 keV/q, together with magnetosheath-like plasma in the mantle part of the region and accelerated up to ~ 2 keV/q and heated isotropic Solar wind plasma. A remarkable phenomenon is the accelerated to equal energy-per-charge (2.35 - 4.64 keV/q) both SW and ionospheric ions observed on mantle field lines.

  8. Magnetic Flux Transport and the Long-term Evolution of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Upton, Lisa; Warren, Harry P.; Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-01

    With multiple vantage points around the Sun, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory imaging observations provide a unique opportunity to view the solar surface continuously. We use He ii 304 Å data from these observatories to isolate and track ten active regions and study their long-term evolution. We find that active regions typically follow a standard pattern of emergence over several days followed by a slower decay that is proportional in time to the peak intensity in the region. Since STEREO does not make direct observations of the magnetic field, we employ a flux-luminosity relationship to infer the total unsigned magnetic flux evolution. To investigate this magnetic flux decay over several rotations we use a surface flux transport model, the Advective Flux Transport model, that simulates convective flows using a time-varying velocity field and find that the model provides realistic predictions when information about the active region's magnetic field strength and distribution at peak flux is available. Finally, we illustrate how 304 Å images can be used as a proxy for magnetic flux measurements when magnetic field data is not accessible.

  9. MAGNETIC FLUX TRANSPORT AND THE LONG-TERM EVOLUTION OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Upton, Lisa; Warren, Harry P.; Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-20

    With multiple vantage points around the Sun, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory imaging observations provide a unique opportunity to view the solar surface continuously. We use He ii 304 Å data from these observatories to isolate and track ten active regions and study their long-term evolution. We find that active regions typically follow a standard pattern of emergence over several days followed by a slower decay that is proportional in time to the peak intensity in the region. Since STEREO does not make direct observations of the magnetic field, we employ a flux-luminosity relationship to infer the total unsigned magnetic flux evolution. To investigate this magnetic flux decay over several rotations we use a surface flux transport model, the Advective Flux Transport model, that simulates convective flows using a time-varying velocity field and find that the model provides realistic predictions when information about the active region's magnetic field strength and distribution at peak flux is available. Finally, we illustrate how 304 Å images can be used as a proxy for magnetic flux measurements when magnetic field data is not accessible.

  10. Active and passive Na+ fluxes across the basolateral membrane of rabbit urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Eaton, D C; Frace, A M; Silverthorn, S U

    1982-01-01

    The apical membrane of rabbit urinary bladder can be functionally removed by application of nystatin at high concentration if the mucosal surface of the tissue is bathed in a saline which mimics intracellular ion concentrations. Under these conditions, the tissue is as far as the movement of univalent ions no more than a sheet of basolateral membrane with some tight junctional membrane in parallel. In this manner the Na+ concentration at the inner surface of the basolateral membrane can be varied by altering the concentration in the mucosal bulk solution. When this was done both mucosal-to-serosal 22Na flux and net change in basolateral current were measured. The flux and the current could be further divided into the components of each that were either blocked by ouabain or insensitive to ouabain. Ouabain-insensitive mucosal-to-serosal Na+ flux was a linear function of mucosal Na+ concentration. Ouabain-sensitive Na+ flux and ouabain-sensitive, Na+-induced current both display a saturating relationship which cannot be accounted for by the presence of unstirred layers. If the interaction of Na+ with the basolateral transport process is assumed to involve the interaction of some number of Na+ ions, n, with a maximal flux, MMAX, then the data can be fit by assuming 3.2 equivalent sites for interaction and a value for MMAX of 287.8 pM cm-2 sec-1 with an intracellular Na concentration of 2.0 mM Na+ at half-maximal saturation. By comparing these values with the ouabain-sensitive, Na+-induced current, we calculate a Na+ to K+ coupling ratio of 1.40 +/- 0.07 for the transport process.

  11. Flow-activated ion channels in vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mamta; Gojova, Andrea; Barakat, Abdul I

    2006-01-01

    The ability of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) to respond to fluid mechanical forces associated with blood flow is essential for flow-mediated vasoregulation and arterial wall remodeling. Abnormalities in endothelial responses to flow also play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Although our understanding of the endothelial signaling pathways stimulated by flow has greatly increased over the past two decades, the mechanisms by which ECs sense flow remain largely unknown. Activation of flow-sensitive ion channels is among the fastest known endothelial responses to flow; therefore, these ion channels have been proposed as candidate flow sensors. This review focuses on: 1) describing the various types of flow-sensitive ion channels that have been reported in ECs, 2) discussing the implications of activation of these ion channels for endothelial function, and 3) proposing candidate mechanisms for activation of flow-sensitive ion channels.

  12. Flux pinning properties in YBCO films with growth-controlled nano-dots and heavy-ion irradiation defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueyoshi, T.; Kotaki, T.; Uraguchi, Y.; Suenaga, M.; Makihara, T.; Fujiyoshi, T.; Ishikawa, N.

    2016-11-01

    In order to clarify the influence of size and spatial distribution of three-dimensional pinning centres (3D-PCs) on hybrid flux pinning, columnar defects (CDs) were installed by using 200 MeV Xe ions along the c-axis direction into quasi-multilayered films consisting of YBa2Cu3Oy layers and pseudo layers of BaSnO3. The positive effect of the BaSnO3 doping on the hybrid flux pinning stands out for the critical current density Jc around B || c in high magnetic field and/or inclined magnetic field off the c-axis, which is more remarkable for the multilayered film grown at higher temperature, possibly due to larger BaSnO3 nano-dots. In the case of the in-plane distributed BaSnO3 nano-dots, the Jc around B || ab is remarkably enhanced, whereas there is a detrimental effect on the Jc around B || c. These imply that the tuning of 3D-PCs is one of the keys to improve the Jc at all magnetic field orientations for the hybrid flux pinning.

  13. Altered swelling and ion fluxes in articular cartilage as a biomarker in osteoarthritis and joint immobilization: a computational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, Sara; Manzano, Raquel; Doblaré, Manuel; Doweidar, Mohamed Hamdy

    2015-01-01

    In healthy cartilage, mechano-electrochemical phenomena act together to maintain tissue homeostasis. Osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative diseases disrupt this biological equilibrium by causing structural deterioration and subsequent dysfunction of the tissue. Swelling and ion flux alteration as well as abnormal ion distribution are proposed as primary indicators of tissue degradation. In this paper, we present an extension of a previous three-dimensional computational model of the cartilage behaviour developed by the authors to simulate the contribution of the main tissue components in its behaviour. The model considers the mechano-electrochemical events as concurrent phenomena in a three-dimensional environment. This model has been extended here to include the effect of repulsion of negative charges attached to proteoglycans. Moreover, we have studied the fluctuation of these charges owning to proteoglycan variations in healthy and pathological articular cartilage. In this sense, standard patterns of healthy and degraded tissue behaviour can be obtained which could be a helpful diagnostic tool. By introducing measured properties of unhealthy cartilage into the computational model, the severity of tissue degeneration can be predicted avoiding complex tissue extraction and subsequent in vitro analysis. In this work, the model has been applied to monitor and analyse cartilage behaviour at different stages of OA and in both short (four, six and eight weeks) and long-term (11 weeks) fully immobilized joints. Simulation results showed marked differences in the corresponding swelling phenomena, in outgoing cation fluxes and in cation distributions. Furthermore, long-term immobilized patients display similar swelling as well as fluxes and distribution of cations to patients in the early stages of OA, thus, preventive treatments are highly recommended to avoid tissue deterioration. PMID:25392400

  14. A semi-synthetic ion channel platform for detection of phosphatase and protease activity.

    PubMed

    Macrae, Michael X; Blake, Steven; Jiang, Xiayun; Capone, Ricardo; Estes, Daniel J; Mayer, Michael; Yang, Jerry

    2009-11-24

    Sensitive methods to probe the activity of enzymes are important for clinical assays and for elucidating the role of these proteins in complex biochemical networks. This paper describes a semi-synthetic ion channel platform for detecting the activity of two different classes of enzymes with high sensitivity. In the first case, this method uses single ion channel conductance measurements to follow the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of a phosphate group attached to the C-terminus of gramicidin A (gA, an ion channel-forming peptide) in the presence of alkaline phosphatase (AP). Enzymatic hydrolysis of this phosphate group removes negative charges from the entrance of the gA pore, resulting in a product with measurably reduced single ion channel conductance compared to the original gA-phosphate substrate. This technique employs a standard, commercial bilayer setup and takes advantage of the catalytic turnover of enzymes and the amplification characteristics of ion flux through individual gA pores to detect picomolar concentrations of active AP in solution. Furthermore, this technique makes it possible to study the kinetics of an enzyme and provides an estimate for the observed rate constant (k(cat)) and the Michaelis constant (K(M)) by following the conversion of the gA-phosphate substrate to product over time in the presence of different concentrations of AP. In the second case, modification of gA with a substrate for proteolytic cleavage by anthrax lethal factor (LF) afforded a sensitive method for detection of LF activity, illustrating the utility of ion channel-based sensing for detection of a potential biowarfare agent. This ion channel-based platform represents a powerful, novel approach to monitor the activity of femtomoles to picomoles of two different classes of enzymes in solution. Furthermore, this platform has the potential for realizing miniaturized, cost-effective bioanalytical assays that complement currently established assays.

  15. Dynamics of double layers, ion acceleration, and heat flux suppression during solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2014-09-20

    Observations of flare-heated electrons in the corona typically suggest confinement of electrons. The confinement mechanism, however, remains unclear. The transport of coronal hot electrons into ambient plasma was recently investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Electron transport was significantly suppressed by the formation of a highly localized, nonlinear electrostatic potential in the form of a double layer (DL). In this work large-scale PIC simulations are performed to explore the dynamics of DLs in larger systems where, instead of a single DL, multiple DLs are generated. The primary DL accelerates return current electrons, resulting in high velocity electron beams that interact with ambient ions. This forms a Buneman unstable system that spawns more DLs. Trapping of heated return current electrons between multiple DLs strongly suppresses electron transport. DLs also accelerate ambient ions and produce strong ion flows over an extended region. This clarifies the mechanism by which hot electrons in the corona couple to and accelerate ions to form the solar wind. These new dynamics in larger systems reveal a more likely picture of DL development and their impact on the ambient plasma in the solar corona. They are applicable to the preparation for in situ coronal space missions like the Solar Probe Plus.

  16. Active transport, ion movements, and pH changes : I. The chemistry of pH changes.

    PubMed

    Good, N E

    1988-10-01

    The transport of substances across cell membranes may be the most fundamental activity of living things. When the substance transported is any ion there can be a change in the concentration of hydrogen ions on the two sides of the membrane. These hydrogen ion concentration changes are not caused by fluxes of hydrogen ions although fluxes of hydrogen ions may sometimes be involved. The reason for the apparent contradiction is quite simple. All aqueous systems are subject to two constraints: (1) to maintain the charge balance, the sum of the cationic charges must equal the sum of the anionic charges and (2) the product of the molar concentration of H(+) and the molar concentration of OH(-), established and maintained by the association and the dissociation of water, remains always at 10(-14). As a consequence the concentrations of H(+) and OH(-) are determined uniquely by differences between the concentrations of the other cations and anions, with [H(+)] and [OH(-)] being dependent variables. Hydrogen ions and hydroxyl ions can be produced or consumed in local reactions whereas any strong ions such as Cl(-), Mg(2+), or K(+) can be neither produced nor consumed in biological reactions. Further consequences of these truisms are outlined here in terms of the chemistry of the kinds of reactions which can lead to pH changes.

  17. Active membrane having uniform physico-chemically functionalized ion channels

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E; Ruscic, Katarina J; Sears, Devin N; Smith, Luis J; Klingler, Robert J; Rathke, Jerome W

    2012-09-24

    The present invention relates to a physicochemically-active porous membrane for electrochemical cells that purports dual functions: an electronic insulator (separator) and a unidirectional ion-transporter (electrolyte). The electrochemical cell membrane is activated for the transport of ions by contiguous ion coordination sites on the interior two-dimensional surfaces of the trans-membrane unidirectional pores. One dimension of the pore surface has a macroscopic length (1 nm-1000 .mu.m) and is directed parallel to the direction of an electric field, which is produced between the cathode and the anode electrodes of an electrochemical cell. The membrane material is designed to have physicochemical interaction with ions. Control of the extent of the interactions between the ions and the interior pore walls of the membrane and other materials, chemicals, or structures contained within the pores provides adjustability of the ionic conductivity of the membrane.

  18. Characterization of Beta-leptinotarsin-h and the Effects of Calcium Flux Antagonists on its Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    observation eliminated non-selective cation channels such as nicotinic, glutamatergic, purinergic P2X, and serotoni- nergic 5 - HT3 ligand-operated Ca 2C...Characterization of b-leptinotarsin-h and the effects of calcium flux antagonists on its activity Richard D. Croslanda,*, Richard W. Fitchb,1, Harry...presynaptic nerve terminals. We tested antagonists of Ca2C flux for their effects on b-leptinotarsin-h-stimulated Ca2C uptake in rat brain synaptosomes

  19. Light-Induced Changes in Hydrogen, Calcium, Potassium, and Chloride Ion Fluxes and Concentrations from the Mesophyll and Epidermal Tissues of Bean Leaves. Understanding the Ionic Basis of Light-Induced Bioelectrogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Shabala, Sergey; Newman, Ian

    1999-01-01

    Noninvasive, ion-selective vibrating microelectrodes were used to measure the kinetics of H+, Ca2+, K+, and Cl− fluxes and the changes in their concentrations caused by illumination near the mesophyll and attached epidermis of bean (Vicia faba L.). These flux measurements were related to light-induced changes in the plasma membrane potential. The influx of Ca2+ was the main depolarizing agent in electrical responses to light in the mesophyll. Changes in the net fluxes of H+, K+, and Cl− occurred only after a significant delay of about 2 min, whereas light-stimulated influx of Ca2+ began within the time resolution of our measurements (5 s). In the absence of H+ flux, light caused an initial quick rise of external pH near the mesophyll and epidermal tissues. In the mesophyll this fast alkalinization was followed by slower, oscillatory pH changes (5–15 min); in the epidermis the external pH increased steadily and reached a plateau 3 min later. We explain the initial alkalinization of the medium as a result of CO2 uptake by photosynthesizing tissue, whereas activation of the plasma membrane H+ pump occurred 1.5 to 2 min later. The epidermal layer seems to be a substantial barrier for ion fluxes but not for CO2 diffusion into the leaf. PMID:10069851

  20. Flux rope proxies and fan-spine structures in active region NOAA 11897

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y. J.; Li, T.; Zhang, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Flux ropes are composed of twisted magnetic fields and are closely connected with coronal mass ejections. The fan-spine magnetic topology is another type of complex magnetic fields. It has been reported by several authors, and is believed to be associated with null-point-type magnetic reconnection. Aims: We try to determine the number of flux rope proxies and reveal fan-spine structures in the complex active region (AR) NOAA 11897. Methods: Employing the high-resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we statistically investigated flux rope proxies in NOAA AR 11897 from 14 November 2013 to 19 November 2013 and display two fan-spine structures in this AR. Results: For the first time, we detect flux rope proxies of NOAA 11897 for a total of 30 times in four different locations during this AR's transference from solar east to west on the disk. Moreover, we notice that these flux rope proxies were tracked by active or eruptive material of filaments 12 times, while for the remaining 18 times they appeared as brightenings in the corona. These flux rope proxies were either tracked in both lower and higher temperature wavelengths or only detected in hot channels. None of these flux rope proxies was observed to erupt; they faded away gradually. In addition to these flux rope proxies, we detect for the first time a secondary fan-spine structure. It was covered by dome-shaped magnetic fields that belong to a larger fan-spine topology. Conclusions: These new observations imply that many flux ropes can exist in an AR and that the complexity of AR magnetic configurations is far beyond our imagination. Movies 1-8 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Ion Flux in Roots of Chinese Fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook) under Aluminum Stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhihui; Huang, Binlong; Xu, Shanshan; Chen, Yu; Cao, Guangqiu; Ding, Guochang; Lin, Sizu

    2016-01-01

    Chinese fir is a tall, fast-growing species that is unique to southern China. In Chinese fir plantations, successive plantings have led to a decline in soil fertility, and aluminum toxicity is thought to be one of the main reasons for this decline. In this study, Non-invasive Micro-test Technology was used to study the effect of aluminum stress on the absorption of 4 different ions in the roots of the Chinese fir clone FS01. The results are as follows: with increased aluminum concentration and longer periods of aluminum stress, the H+ ion flow gradually changed from influx into efflux; there was a large variation in the K+ efflux, which gradually decreased with increasing duration of aluminum stress; and 1 h of aluminum stress uniformly resulted in Ca2+ influx, but it changed from influx to efflux after a longer period of aluminum stress. Changes in the different concentrations of aluminum had the largest influence on Mg2+.

  2. The dependence of stress in IBAD films on the ion-irradiation energy and flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitz, K. O.; Arndt, J.; Bøttiger, J.; Chevallier, J.

    1997-05-01

    Systematic experimental studies of the stress build-up during e-gun deposition of Ni with simultaneous bombardment by energetic Ar + ions (IBAD) have been carried out. The ion energy E was varied from 60 to 800 eV, and the ratio of the arrival rates of Ni atoms and Ar + ions, {R}/{J}, was varied from 0.5 to 6.4. The Ni-deposition rate was in the range from 0.5 to 2.0 Å/s, with all the depositions carried out near room temperature in a chamber with the base pressure of 5 × 10 -6 Pa. The film stress was measured by use of profilometry and the application of Stoney's equation. The experimental results were compared with predictions of a simple model proposed by Davis. This model assumes that the compressive stress build-up, due to knock-on implantation of film atoms being proportional to E {1}/{2}, is balanced by relaxation by collision-cascade-excited atom migration proportional to E {5}/{3}. To obtain agreement between model and experiment in the investigated ranges of E and {R}/{J}, an additional model parameter had to be added which takes into account that without irradiation, tensile stresses arise.

  3. Auroral precipitation flux of ions and electrons in Saturn's outer magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1990-10-01

    This paper examines particles and fields data obtained by Voyager in Saturn's outer magnetosphere with a view toward assessing the role that medium-energy ions and electrons have in stimulating the UV aurora. The magnetic field displays a high level of fluctuation of two characteristic types: large-scale coherent depressions in the field strength associated with the plumes of Titan and a small-scale incoherent turbulence presumed to be a consequence of the high-beta plasma environment. Electrons are assumed to interact strongly with lower hybrid waves and are accelerated to energies of a few kiloelectron volts. The available energy input to the aurora by protons is 5 x 10 to the 9th W, while an upper bound to that of N(+) ions is about 2 x 10 to the 10th W. Electrons in the range 1-10 keV can contribute upward of 5 x 10 to the 10th W and perhaps more if a field-aligned potential drop above the aurora is present. It is concluded that electrons are most likely the primary precipitation energy source for the aurora as a result of energy transfer from Titanogenic N(+) pickup ions in a corotation-dominated magnetosphere.

  4. Enhancing the catalytic activity of hydronium ions through constrained environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanshuai; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Eckstein, Sebastian; Camaioni, Donald M.; Mei, Donghai; Baráth, Eszter; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2017-03-01

    The dehydration of alcohols is involved in many organic conversions but has to overcome high free-energy barriers in water. Here we demonstrate that hydronium ions confined in the nanopores of zeolite HBEA catalyse aqueous phase dehydration of cyclohexanol at a rate significantly higher than hydronium ions in water. This rate enhancement is not related to a shift in mechanism; for both cases, the dehydration of cyclohexanol occurs via an E1 mechanism with the cleavage of Cβ-H bond being rate determining. The higher activity of hydronium ions in zeolites is caused by the enhanced association between the hydronium ion and the alcohol, as well as a higher intrinsic rate constant in the constrained environments compared with water. The higher rate constant is caused by a greater entropy of activation rather than a lower enthalpy of activation. These insights should allow us to understand and predict similar processes in confined spaces.

  5. Enhancing the catalytic activity of hydronium ions through constrained environments

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanshuai; Vjunov, Aleksei; Shi, Hui; Eckstein, Sebastian; Camaioni, Donald M.; Mei, Donghai; Baráth, Eszter; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2017-01-01

    The dehydration of alcohols is involved in many organic conversions but has to overcome high free-energy barriers in water. Here we demonstrate that hydronium ions confined in the nanopores of zeolite HBEA catalyse aqueous phase dehydration of cyclohexanol at a rate significantly higher than hydronium ions in water. This rate enhancement is not related to a shift in mechanism; for both cases, the dehydration of cyclohexanol occurs via an E1 mechanism with the cleavage of Cβ–H bond being rate determining. The higher activity of hydronium ions in zeolites is caused by the enhanced association between the hydronium ion and the alcohol, as well as a higher intrinsic rate constant in the constrained environments compared with water. The higher rate constant is caused by a greater entropy of activation rather than a lower enthalpy of activation. These insights should allow us to understand and predict similar processes in confined spaces. PMID:28252021

  6. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    SciTech Connect

    Flippo, Kirk A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Offermann, Dustin; Cobble, James A.; Gautier, Donald; Kline, John; Workman, Jonathan; Archuleta, Fred; Gonzales, Raymond; Hurry, Thomas; Johnson, Randall; Letzring, Samuel; Montgomery, David; Reid, Sha-Marie; Shimada, Tsutomu; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bussman, Michael; Kluge, Thomas; Cowan, Thomas E.; Rassuchine, Jenny M.; Lowenstern, Mario E.; Mucino, J. Eduardo; Gall, Brady; Korgan, Grant; Malekos, Steven; Adams, Jesse; Bartal, Teresa; Chawla, Surgreev; Higginson, Drew; Beg, Farhat; Nilson, Phil; Mac Phee, Andrew; Le Pape, Sebastien; Hey, Daniel; Mac Kinnon, Andy; Geissel, Mattias; Schollmeier, Marius; Stephens, Rich

    2009-12-02

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  7. ACTIVE: a program to calculate and plot reaction rates from ANISN calculated fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    The ACTIVE code calculates spatial heating rates, tritium production rates, neutron reaction rates, and energy spectra from particle fluxes calculated by ANISN. ACTIVE has a variety of input options including the capability to plot all calculated spatial distributions. The code was primarily designed for use with fusion first wall/blanket systems, but could be applied to any one-dimensional problem.

  8. Identities in flux: cognitive network activation in times of change.

    PubMed

    Menon, Tanya; Smith, Edward Bishop

    2014-05-01

    Using a dynamic cognitive model, we experimentally test two competing hypotheses that link identity and cognitive network activation during times of change. On one hand, affirming people's sense of power might give them confidence to think beyond the densest subsections of their social networks. Alternatively, if such power affirmations conflict with people's more stable status characteristics, this could create tension, deterring people from considering their networks' diversity. We test these competing hypotheses experimentally by priming people at varying levels of status with power (high/low) and asking them to report their social networks. We show that confirming identity-not affirming power-cognitively prepares people to broaden their social networks when the world is changing around them. The emotional signature of having a confirmed identity is feeling comfortable and in control, which mediates network activation. We suggest that stable, confirmed identities are the foundation from which people can exhibit greater network responsiveness.

  9. Improved thrust calculations of active magnetic bearings considering fringing flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Kim, Kwan-Ho; Ko, Kyoung-Jin; Choi, Ji-Hwan; Sung, So-Young; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2012-04-01

    A methodology for deriving fringing permeance in axisymmetric devices such as active thrust magnetic bearings (ATMBs) is presented. The methodology is used to develop an improved equivalent magnetic circuit (EMC) for ATMBs, which considers the fringing effect. This EMC was used to characterize the force between the housing and mover and the dependence of thrust and inductance on the air gap and input current, respectively. These characteristics were validated by comparison with those obtained by the finite element method and in experiments.

  10. Hybridization-modulated ion fluxes through peptide-nucleic-acid- functionalized gold nanotubes. A new approach to quantitative label-free DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Jágerszki, Gyula; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E; Höfler, Lajos; Pretsch, Ernö

    2007-06-01

    The inner walls of gold nanotubes, prepared by template synthesis in the nanopores of polycarbonate track etch membranes, have been chemically modified with peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and used for label-free quantification of complementary DNA sequences. Selective binding of DNA to the PNA-modified nanotubes is shown to decrease the flux of optically detected anionic markers through the nanotubes in a concentration-dependent manner. The strong dependence of the biorecognition-modulated ion transport through the nanopores on the ionic strength suggests a dominantly electrostatic exclusion mechanism of the ion flux decrease as a result of DNA binding to the PNA-modified nanopores.

  11. Solar Flux Effect on the Reproducibility of Global/Local-Time Variations of Ion Density Structure at Low-Latitude Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shin-Yi

    Longitudinal/seasonal (l/s) variations of ion density structures at the 600-km low-latitude ionosphere observed by ROCSAT-1 between two similar solar activity years of 2000 and 2002 are examined at four different local-time (LT) regions. The gross feature of l/s density structure is almost identical to each other at the four LT regions examined. A complete reproducibility of density structure can be assumed, including the shape of equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), for identical solar flux input that also implicitly affect other atmospheric components such as the neutral O/N2 ratio and neutral wind variation. The fact that the solar variability effect is thought as the ultimate driver to shape the global ionospheric structure can be confirmed with the reproduction of ROCSAT observations with the simulation results of the TIEGCM model runs using the observed solar flux inputs for various seasons. However, the EIA crestto-valley ratio or no-valley signature in this background density structure can not be used to infer the post-sunset irregularity occurrence rates because the l/s variation of the magnetic declination effect that determines the post-sunset ionospheric conductivity for the ionospheric electrodynamics can not be readily obtained from this ionospheric background structure.

  12. Decrease in T Cell Activation and Calcium Flux during Clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence; Holtzclaw, J. David

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of altered gravitational environments on T cell activation. We isolated human, naive T cells (CD3+CD14-CD19-CD16-CD56-CD25-CD69-CD45RA-) following IRB approved protocols. These purified T cells were then incubated with 6 mm polystyrene beads coated with OKT3 (Ortho Biotech, Raritan, NJ) and antiCD28 (Becton Dickinson (BD), San Jose, CA) at 37 C for 24 hours. Antibodies were at a 1:1 ratio and the bead-to-cell ratio was 2:1. Four incubation conditions existed: 1) static or "1g"; 2) centrifugation at 10 relative centrifugal force (RCF) or "10g"; 3) clinorotation at 25 RPM (functional weightlessness or "0g"); and 4) clinorotation at 80 RPM ("1g" plus net shear force approx.30 dynes/sq cm). Following incubation, T cells were stained for CD25 expression (BD) and intracellular calcium (ratio of Fluo4 to Fura Red, Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and analyzed by flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL, Miami, FL). Results: Static or "1g" T cells had the highest level of CD25 expression and intracellular calcium. T cells centrifuged at 10 RCF ("10g") had lower CD25 expression and calcium levels compared to the static control. However, cells centrifuged at 10 RCF had higher CD25 expression and calcium levels than those exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation ("0g"). T cells exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation had lower CD25 expression, but the approximately the same calcium levels than T cells exposed to 80 RPM clinorotation. These data suggest that stress-activated calcium channel exist in T cells and may play a role during T cell activation.

  13. Activation of accelerator construction materials by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrík, P.; Mustafin, E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Pavlovič, M.; Strašík, I.

    2015-12-01

    Activation data for an aluminum target irradiated by 200 MeV/u 238U ion beam are presented in the paper. The target was irradiated in the stacked-foil geometry and analyzed using gamma-ray spectroscopy. The purpose of the experiment was to study the role of primary particles, projectile fragments, and target fragments in the activation process using the depth profiling of residual activity. The study brought information on which particles contribute dominantly to the target activation. The experimental data were compared with the Monte Carlo simulations by the FLUKA 2011.2c.0 code. This study is a part of a research program devoted to activation of accelerator construction materials by high-energy (⩾200 MeV/u) heavy ions at GSI Darmstadt. The experimental data are needed to validate the computer codes used for simulation of interaction of swift heavy ions with matter.

  14. Ion Flux in Roots of Chinese Fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook) under Aluminum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhihui; Huang, Binlong; Xu, Shanshan; Chen, Yu; Cao, Guangqiu; Ding, Guochang; Lin, Sizu

    2016-01-01

    Chinese fir is a tall, fast-growing species that is unique to southern China. In Chinese fir plantations, successive plantings have led to a decline in soil fertility, and aluminum toxicity is thought to be one of the main reasons for this decline. In this study, Non-invasive Micro-test Technology was used to study the effect of aluminum stress on the absorption of 4 different ions in the roots of the Chinese fir clone FS01. The results are as follows: with increased aluminum concentration and longer periods of aluminum stress, the H+ ion flow gradually changed from influx into efflux; there was a large variation in the K+ efflux, which gradually decreased with increasing duration of aluminum stress; and 1 h of aluminum stress uniformly resulted in Ca2+ influx, but it changed from influx to efflux after a longer period of aluminum stress. Changes in the different concentrations of aluminum had the largest influence on Mg2+. PMID:27270726

  15. Shuttle program. Solar activity prediction of sunspot numbers, predicted solar radio flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. G.; Newman, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    A solar activity prediction technique for monthly mean sunspot numbers over a period of approximately ten years from February 1979 to January 1989 is presented. This includes the predicted maximum epoch of solar cycle 21, approximately January 1980, and the predicted minimum epoch of solar cycle 22, approximately March 1987. Additionally, the solar radio flux 10.7 centimeter smooth values are included for the same time frame using a smooth 13 month empirical relationship. The incentive for predicting solar activity values is the requirement of solar flux data as input to upper atmosphere density models utilized in mission planning satellite orbital lifetime studies.

  16. Description of Light Ion Production Cross Sections and Fluxes on the Mars Surface using the QMSFRG Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee; Schneider, Irene; Hassler, Donald M.

    2006-01-01

    The atmosphere of Mars significantly attenuates the heavy ion component of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), however increases the fluence of secondary light ions (neutrons, and hydrogen and helium isotopes) because of particle production processes. We describe results of the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model for the production of light nuclei through the distinct mechanisms of nuclear abrasion and ablation, coalescence, and cluster knockout. The QMSFRG model is shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections. We use the QMSFRG model and the space radiation transport code, HZETRN to make predictions of the light particle environment on the Martian surface at solar minimum and maximum. The radiation assessment detector (RAD) experiment will be launched in 2009 as part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). We make predictions of the expected results for time dependent count-rates to be observed by RAD experiment. Finally, we consider sensitivity assessments of the impact of the Martian atmospheric composition on particle fluxes at the surface.

  17. Description of light ion production cross sections and fluxes on the Mars surface using the QMSFRG model.

    PubMed

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee; Schneider, Susana I; Hassler, Donald M

    2007-06-01

    The atmosphere of Mars significantly attenuates the heavy ion component of the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR), however, increases the fluence of secondary light ions (neutrons, and hydrogen and helium isotopes) because of particle production processes. We describe results of the quantum multiple scattering fragmentation (QMSFRG) model for the production of light nuclei through the distinct mechanisms of nuclear abrasion and ablation, coalescence, and cluster knockout. The QMSFRG model is shown to be in excellent agreement with available experimental data for nuclear fragmentation cross sections. We use the QMSFRG model and the space radiation transport code, HZETRN to make predictions of the light particle environment on the Martian surface at solar minimum and near maximum. The radiation assessment detector (RAD) experiment will be launched in 2009 as part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). We make predictions of the expected results for time dependent count-rates to be observed by the RAD experiment. Finally, we consider sensitivity assessments of the impact of the Martian atmospheric composition on particle fluxes at the surface.

  18. Interaction between neoclassical effects and ion temperature gradient turbulence in gradient- and flux-driven gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberparleiter, M.; Jenko, F.; Told, D.; Doerk, H.; Görler, T.

    2016-04-01

    Neoclassical and turbulent transport in tokamaks has been studied extensively over the past decades, but their possible interaction remains largely an open question. The two are only truly independent if the length scales governing each of them are sufficiently separate, i.e., if the ratio ρ* between ion gyroradius and the pressure gradient scale length is small. This is not the case in particularly interesting regions such as transport barriers. Global simulations of a collisional ion-temperature-gradient-driven microturbulence performed with the nonlinear global gyrokinetic code Gene are presented. In particular, comparisons are made between systems with and without neoclassical effects. In fixed-gradient simulations, the modified radial electric field is shown to alter the zonal flow pattern such that a significant increase in turbulent transport is observed for ρ*≳1 /300 . Furthermore, the dependency of the flux on the collisionality changes. In simulations with fixed power input, we find that the presence of neoclassical effects decreases the frequency and amplitude of intermittent turbulent transport bursts (avalanches) and thus plays an important role for the self-organisation behaviour.

  19. Control of glycolytic flux in Zymomonas mobilis by glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Snoep, J.L. |; Arfman, N.; Yomano, L.P.; Ingram, L.O.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Conway, T.

    1996-07-20

    Alycolytic genes in Zymomonas mobilis are highly expressed and constitute half of the cytoplasmic protein. The first four genes (glf, zwf, edd, glk) in this pathway form an operon encoding a glucose permease, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-P dehydrogenase), 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, and glucokinase, respectively. Each gene was overexpressed from a tac promoter to investigate the control of glycolysis during the early stages of batch fermentation when flux (qCO{sub 2}) is highest. Almost half of flux control appears to reside with G6-P dehydrogenase (C{sub G6-P dehydrogenase}{sup J} = 0.4). Although Z. mobilis exhibits one of the highest rates of glycolysis known, recombinants with elevated G6-P dehydrogenase had a 10% to 13% higher glycolytic flux than the native organism. A small increase in flux was also observed for recombinants expressing glf. Results obtained did not allow a critical evaluation of glucokinase and this enzyme may also represent an important control point. 6-Phosphogluconate dehydratase appears to be saturating at native levels. With constructs containing the full operon, growth rate and flux were both reduced, complicating interpretations. However, results obtained were also consistent with G6-P dehydrogenase as a primary site of control. Flux was 17% higher in operon constructs which exhibited a 17% increase in G6-P dehydrogenase specific activity, relative to the average of other operon constructs which contain a frameshift mutation in zwf.

  20. Application of an online ion-chromatography-based instrument for gradient flux measurements of speciated nitrogen and sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, Ian C.; Walker, John T.

    2016-06-01

    The dry component of total nitrogen and sulfur atmospheric deposition remains uncertain. The lack of measurements of sufficient chemical speciation and temporal extent make it difficult to develop accurate mass budgets and sufficient process level detail is not available to improve current air-surface exchange models. Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the development of continuous air sampling measurement techniques, resulting with instruments of sufficient sensitivity and temporal resolution to directly quantify air-surface exchange of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. However, their applicability is generally restricted to only one or a few of the compounds within the deposition budget. Here, the performance of the Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA 2S), a commercially available online ion-chromatography-based analyzer is characterized for the first time as applied for air-surface exchange measurements of HNO3, NH3, NH4+, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-. Analytical accuracy and precision are assessed under field conditions. Chemical concentrations gradient precision are determined at the same sampling site. Flux uncertainty measured by the aerodynamic gradient method is determined for a representative 3-week period in fall 2012 over a grass field. Analytical precision and chemical concentration gradient precision were found to compare favorably in comparison to previous studies. During the 3-week period, percentages of hourly chemical concentration gradients greater than the corresponding chemical concentration gradient detection limit were 86, 42, 82, 73, 74 and 69 % for NH3, NH4+, HNO3, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-, respectively. As expected, percentages were lowest for aerosol species, owing to their relatively low deposition velocities and correspondingly smaller gradients relative to gas phase species. Relative hourly median flux uncertainties were 31, 121, 42, 43, 67 and 56 % for NH3, NH4+, HNO3, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-, respectively. Flux

  1. A novel heat flux study of a geothermally active lake - Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Tontini, Fabio Caratori; Walker, Sharon L.; Fornari, Daniel J.

    2016-03-01

    A new technique for measuring conductive heat flux in a lake was adapted from the marine environment to allow for multiple measurements to be made in areas where bottom sediment cover is sparse, or even absent. This thermal blanket technique, pioneered in the deep ocean for use in volcanic mid-ocean rift environments, was recently used in the geothermally active Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand. Heat flow from the lake floor propagates into the 0.5 m diameter blanket and establishes a thermal gradient across the known blanket thickness and thereby provides an estimate of the conductive heat flux of the underlying terrain. This approach allows conductive heat flux to be measured over a spatially dense set of stations in a relatively short period of time. We used 10 blankets and deployed them for 1 day each to complete 110 stations over an 11-day program in the 6 × 3 km lake. Results show that Lake Rotomahana has a total conductive heat flux of about 47 MW averaging 6 W/m2 over the geothermally active lake. The western half of the lake has two main areas of high heat flux; 1) a high heat flux area averaging 21.3 W/m2 along the western shoreline, which is likely the location of the pre-existing geothermal system that fed the famous Pink Terraces, mostly destroyed during the 1886 eruption 2) a region southwest of Patiti Island with a heat flux averaging 13.1 W/m2 that appears to be related to the explosive rift that formed the lake in the 1886 Tarawera eruption. A small rise in bottom water temperature over the survey period of 0.01 °C/day suggests the total thermal output of the lake is ~ 112-132 MW and when compared to the conductive heat output suggests that 18-42% of the total thermal energy is by conductive heat transfer.

  2. Actively cooled plasma electrode for long pulse operations in a cesium-seeded negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Yoshikazu; Trainham, Rusty; Jacquot, Claude

    2005-01-01

    An actively cooled plasma electrode has been developed for long pulse operation in a cesium-seeded negative ion source. To keep the electrode temperature at about 300°C, which is the optimum range of temperature to enhance cesium effects, the electrode cooling structure has been designed using three-dimensional numerical simulation assuming that the heat flux from the source plasma was 15W/cm2. Water cooling tubes were brazed to the plasma electrode substrate with spacers made of stainless steel, which acts as a thermal resistance. The fabricated plasma electrode has been tested in a cesium-seeded volume negative ion source called Kamaboko source. The temperature of the electrode reached 280°C for the arc power of 41kW, which is the operating condition required for producing D- beams with current densities exceeding 20mA/cm2. It was demonstrated that the actively cooled plasma electrode is applicable to long pulse operations, meeting the temperature requirement for optimizing the surface-production process of negative ions in the cesium-seeded ion source.

  3. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  4. Investigation on the electron flux to the wall in the VENUS ion source.

    PubMed

    Thuillier, T; Angot, J; Benitez, J Y; Hodgkinson, A; Lyneis, C M; Todd, D S; Xie, D Z

    2016-02-01

    The long-term operation of high charge state electron cyclotron resonance ion sources fed with high microwave power has caused damage to the plasma chamber wall in several laboratories. Porosity, or a small hole, can be progressively created in the chamber wall which can destroy the plasma chamber over a few year time scale. A burnout of the VENUS plasma chamber is investigated in which the hole formation in relation to the local hot electron power density is studied. First, the results of a simple model assuming that hot electrons are fully magnetized and strictly following magnetic field lines are presented. The model qualitatively reproduces the experimental traces left by the plasma on the wall. However, it is too crude to reproduce the localized electron power density for creating a hole in the chamber wall. Second, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation, following a population of scattering hot electrons, indicate a localized high power deposited to the chamber wall consistent with the hole formation process. Finally, a hypervapotron cooling scheme is proposed to mitigate the hole formation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma chamber wall.

  5. Investigation on the electron flux to the wall in the VENUS ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, T. Angot, J.

    2016-02-15

    The long-term operation of high charge state electron cyclotron resonance ion sources fed with high microwave power has caused damage to the plasma chamber wall in several laboratories. Porosity, or a small hole, can be progressively created in the chamber wall which can destroy the plasma chamber over a few year time scale. A burnout of the VENUS plasma chamber is investigated in which the hole formation in relation to the local hot electron power density is studied. First, the results of a simple model assuming that hot electrons are fully magnetized and strictly following magnetic field lines are presented. The model qualitatively reproduces the experimental traces left by the plasma on the wall. However, it is too crude to reproduce the localized electron power density for creating a hole in the chamber wall. Second, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation, following a population of scattering hot electrons, indicate a localized high power deposited to the chamber wall consistent with the hole formation process. Finally, a hypervapotron cooling scheme is proposed to mitigate the hole formation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma chamber wall.

  6. Investigation on the electron flux to the wall in the VENUS ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, T.; Angot, J.; Benitez, J. Y.; Hodgkinson, A.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Xie, D. Z.

    2016-02-01

    The long-term operation of high charge state electron cyclotron resonance ion sources fed with high microwave power has caused damage to the plasma chamber wall in several laboratories. Porosity, or a small hole, can be progressively created in the chamber wall which can destroy the plasma chamber over a few year time scale. A burnout of the VENUS plasma chamber is investigated in which the hole formation in relation to the local hot electron power density is studied. First, the results of a simple model assuming that hot electrons are fully magnetized and strictly following magnetic field lines are presented. The model qualitatively reproduces the experimental traces left by the plasma on the wall. However, it is too crude to reproduce the localized electron power density for creating a hole in the chamber wall. Second, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation, following a population of scattering hot electrons, indicate a localized high power deposited to the chamber wall consistent with the hole formation process. Finally, a hypervapotron cooling scheme is proposed to mitigate the hole formation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma chamber wall.

  7. Minimum activation martensitic alloys for surface disposal after exposure to neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Steel alloys for long-term exposure to neutron flux have a martensitic microstructure and contain chromium, carbon, tungsten, vanadium and preferably titanium. Activation of the steel is held to within acceptable limits for eventual surface disposal by stringently controlling the impurity levels of Ni, Mo, Cu, N, Co, Nb, Al and Mn.

  8. Regeneration of spent powdered activated carbon saturated with inorganic ions by cavitation united with ion exchange method.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Gao, Hong; Li, Yansheng; Yang, Huixin

    2011-06-01

    Using ion exchange resin as transfer media, regenerate powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbed inorganic ions by cavitation to enhance the transfer; we studied how the regeneration time and the mass ratio of resin and PAC influence the regeneration rate respectively through re-adsorption. The result showed that the effective regeneration of PAC saturated with inorganic ions was above 90% using ion exchange resin as media and transfer carrier, the quantity of PAC did not reduced but activated in the process.

  9. Influence of ionisation zone motion in high power impulse magnetron sputtering on angular ion flux and NbO x film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Robert; Clavero, César; Kolbeck, Jonathan; Anders, André

    2016-02-01

    The ion energies and fluxes in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma from a Nb target were analysed angularly resolved along the tangential direction of the racetrack. A reactive oxygen-containing atmosphere was used as such discharge conditions are typically employed for the synthesis of thin films. Asymmetries in the flux distribution of the recorded ions as well as their energies and charge states were noticed when varying the angle between mass-energy analyser and target surface. More positively charged ions with higher count rates in the medium energy range of their distributions were detected in +\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} than in -\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} direction, thus confirming the notion that ionisation zones (also known as spokes or plasma bunches) are associated with moving potential humps. The motion of the recorded negatively charged high-energy oxygen ions was unaffected. Nb{{\\text{O}}x} thin films at different angles and positions were synthesised and analysed as to their structure and properties in order to correlate the observed plasma properties to the film growth conditions. The chemical composition and the film thickness varied with changing deposition angle, where the latter, similar to the ion fluxes, was higher in +\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} than in -\\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} direction.

  10. Tailored-waveform collisional activation of peptide ion electron transfer survivor ions in cation transmission mode ion/ion reaction experiments.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongling; Londry, Frank A; Erickson, David E; McLuckey, Scott A

    2009-04-01

    Broadband resonance excitation via a tailored waveform in a high pressure collision cell (Q2) on a hybrid quadrupole/time-of-flight (QqTOF) tandem mass spectrometer has been implemented for cation transmission mode electron transfer ion/ion reactions of tryptic polypeptides. The frequency components in the broadband waveform were defined to excite the first generation intact electron transfer products for relatively large tryptic peptides. The optimum amplitude of the arbitrary waveform applied has been determined empirically to be 3.0 V(p-p), which is effective for relatively high mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio precursor ions with little elimination of sequence information for low m/z ions. The application of broadband activation during the transmission mode ion/ion reaction obviates frequency and amplitude tuning normally associated with ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). This approach has been demonstrated with triply and doubly charged tryptic peptides with and without post-translational modifications. Enhanced structural information was achieved by production of a larger number of informative c- and z-type fragments using the tailored waveform on unmodified and modified (phosphorylated and glycosylated) peptides when the first generation intact electron transfer products fell into the defined frequency range. This approach can be applied to a wide range of tryptic peptide ions, making it attractive as a rapid and general approach for ETD LC-MS/MS of tryptic peptides in a QqTOF instrument.

  11. Tailored-waveform Collisional Activation of Peptide Ion Electron Transfer Survivor Ions in Cation Transmission Mode Ion/Ion Reaction Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hongling; Londry, Frank A.; Erickson, David E.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Broad-band resonance excitation via a tailored waveform in a high pressure collision cell (Q2) on a hybrid quadrupole/time-of-flight (QqTOF) tandem mass spectrometer has been implemented for cation transmission mode electron transfer ion/ion reactions of tryptic polypeptides. The frequency components in the broadband waveform were defined to excite the first generation intact electron transfer products for relatively large tryptic peptides. The optimum amplitude of the arbitrary waveform applied has been determined empirically to be 3.0 Vp-p, which is effective for relatively high mass-to-charge (m/z) ratio precursor ions with little elimination of sequence information for low m/z ions. The application of broadband activation during the transmission mode ion/ion reaction obviates frequency and amplitude tuning normally associated with ion trap collision induced dissociation (CID). This approach has been demonstrated with triply and doubly charged tryptic peptides with and without post-translational modifications. Enhanced structural information was achieved by production of a larger number of informative c- and z-type fragments using the tailored waveform on unmodified and modified (phosphorylated and glycosylated) peptides when the first generation intact electron transfer products fell into the defined frequency range. This approach can be applied to a wide range of tryptic peptide ions, making it attractive as a rapid and general approach for ETD LC-MS/MS of tryptic peptides in a QqTOF instrument. PMID:19305916

  12. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  13. Niacin alleviates TRAIL-mediated colon cancer cell death via autophagy flux activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin M.D.; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinamide is a water-soluble vitamin that is present in black beans and rice among other foods. Niacin is well known as an inhibitor of metastasis in human breast carcinoma cells but the effect of niacin treatment on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis is unknown. Here, we show that niacin plays an important role in the regulation of autophagic flux and protects tumor cells against TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Our results indicated that niacin activated autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells and the autophagic flux activation protected tumor cells from TRAIL-induced dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential and tumor cell death. We also demonstrated that ATG5 siRNA and autophagy inhibitor blocked the niacin-mediated inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our study is the first report demonstrating that niacin inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells. And our results also suggest that autophagy inhibitors including genetic and pharmacological tools may be a successful therapeutics during anticancer therapy using TRAIL. PMID:26517672

  14. High Resolution Simulations of Tearing and Flux-Rope Formation in Active Region Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, P. F.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of coronal jets increasingly suggest that local fragmentation and the generation of small-scale structure plays an important role in the dynamics of these events. In the magnetically closed corona, jets most often occur near active regions and are associated with an embedded-bipole topology consisting of a 3D magnetic null point atop a domed fan separatrix surface at the base of a coronal loop. Impulsive reconnection in the vicinity of the null point between the magnetic fluxes inside and outside the dome launches the jet along the loop. Wyper & Pontin 2014 showed that the 3D current layers that facilitate such reconnection are explosively unstable to tearing, generating complex flux-rope structures. Utilizing the adaptive mesh capabilities of the Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver, we investigate the generation of such fine-scale structure in high-resolution simulations of active-region jets. We observe the formation of multiple flux-rope structures forming across the fan separatrix surface and discuss the photospheric signatures of these flux ropes and the associated local topology change. We also introduce a new way of identifying such flux ropes in the magnetic field, based on structures observed in the magnetic squashing factor calculated on the photosphere. By tracking the position and number of new null points produced by the fragmentation, we also show that the formation of flux ropes can occur away from the main null region on the flanks of the separatrix dome and that the jet curtain has a highly complex magnetic structure. This work was funded through an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program and by NASA's Living With a Star TR&T program.

  15. Major ion chemistry of the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system: Weathering processes and fluxes to the Bay of Bengal

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, M.M.; Krishnaswami, S.; Dilli, K.; Somayajulu, B.L.K. ); Moore, W.S. )

    1989-05-01

    The Ganga-Brahmaputra, one of the worlds's largest river systems, is first in terms of sediment transport and fourth in terms of water discharge. A detailed and systematic study of the major ion chemistry of these rivers and their tributaries, as well as the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments has been conducted. The chemistry of the highland rivers are all dominated by carbonate weathering; (Ca + Mg) and HCO{sub 3} account for about 80% of the cations and anions. In the lowland rivers, HCO{sub 3} excess over (Ca + Mg) and a relatively high contribution of (Na + K) to the total cations indicate that silicate weathering and/or contributions from alkaline/saline soils and ground waters could be important sources of major ions to these waters. The chemistry of the Ganga and the Yamuna in the lower reaches is by and large dictated by the chemistry of their tributaries and their mixing proportions. The highland rivers weather acidic rocks, whereas the others flow initially through basic effusives. The Ganga-Brahmaputra river system transports about 130 million tons of dissolved salts to the Bay of Bengal, which is nearly 3% of the global river flux to the oceans. The chemical denudation rates for the Ganga and the Brahmaputra basins are about 72 and 105 tons{center dot}km{sup {minus}2}{center dot}yr{sup {minus}1}, respectively, which are factors of 2 to 3 higher than the global average. The high denudation rate, particularly in the Brahmaputra, is attributable to high relief and heavy rainfall.

  16. The study of variations of low energy cosmic helium's flux (up to 6 MeV) due to solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayan, M.; Davoudifar, P.; Bagheri, Z.

    2017-04-01

    In General, the flux of low energy cosmic rays varies with time due to solar activities. The cosmic particle fluxes were studied using data of satellites near the Earth. In this work, first we studied the variations of particle fluxes from 1 Jan to 31 Dec 2000 and 35 events were selected. Then we proposed a relation for cosmic particle flux as a function of time and rigidity in the time of approaching ejecta to the Earth. The coefficients of the relation were calculated using experimental data of particle fluxes from ACE satellite. Finally, we compare time variations of these coefficients for different events.

  17. Light-Activated Ion Channels for Remote Control of Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, James J.; Kramer, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Light-activated ion channels provide a new opportunity to precisely and remotely control neuronal activity for experimental applications in neurobiology. In the past few years, several strategies have arisen that allow light to control ion channels and therefore neuronal function. Light-based triggers for ion channel control include caged compounds, which release active neurotransmitters when photolyzed with light, and natural photoreceptive proteins, which can be expressed exogenously in neurons. More recently, a third type of light trigger has been introduced: a photoisomerizable tethered ligand that directly controls ion channel activity in a light-dependent manner. Beyond the experimental applications for light-gated ion channels, there may be clinical applications in which these light-sensitive ion channels could prove advantageous over traditional methods. Electrodes for neural stimulation to control disease symptoms are invasive and often difficult to reposition between cells in tissue. Stimulation by chemical agents is difficult to constrain to individual cells and has limited temporal accuracy in tissue due to diffusional limitations. In contrast, ion channels that can be directly activated with light allow control with unparalleled spatial and temporal precision. The goal of this chapter is to describe light-regulated ion channels and how they have been tailored to control different aspects of neural activity, and how to use these channels to manipulate and better understand development, function, and plasticity of neurons and neural circuits. PMID:19195553

  18. Hydrogen ions control synaptic vesicle ion channel activity in Torpedo electromotor neurones.

    PubMed

    Ahdut-Hacohen, Ronit; Duridanova, Dessislava; Meiri, Halina; Rahamimoff, Rami

    2004-04-15

    During exocytosis the synaptic vesicle fuses with the surface membrane and undergoes a pH jump. When the synaptic vesicle is inside the presynaptic nerve terminal its internal pH is about 5.5 and after fusion, the inside of the vesicle comes in contact with the extracellular medium with a pH of about 7.25. We examined the effect of such pH jump on the opening of the non-specific ion channel in the synaptic vesicle membrane, in the context of the post-fusion hypothesis of transmitter release control. The vesicles were isolated from Torpedo ocellata electromotor neurones. The pH dependence of the opening of the non-specific ion channel was examined using the fused vesicle-attached configuration of the patch clamp technique. The rate of opening depends on both pH and voltage. Increasing the pH from 5.5 to 7.25 activated dramatically the non-specific ion channel of the vesicle membrane. The single channel conductance did not change significantly with the alteration in the pH, and neither did the mean channel open time. These results support the hypothesis that during partial fusion of the vesicle with the surface membrane, ion channels in the vesicle membrane open, admit ions and thus help in the ion exchange process mechanism, leading to the release of the transmitter from the intravesicular ion exchange matrix. This process may have also a pathophysiological significance in conditions of altered pH.

  19. Correlative Aspects of the Solar Electron Neutrino Flux and Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    Between 1970 and 1994, the Homestake Solar Neutrino Detector obtained 108 observations of the solar electron neutrino flux (less than 0.814 MeV). The "best fit" values derived from these observations suggest an average daily production rate of about 0.485 Ar-37 atom per day, a rate equivalent to about 2.6 SNU (solar neutrino units) or about a factor of 3 below the expected rate from the standard solar model. In order to explain, at least, a portion of this discrepancy, some researchers have speculated that the flux of solar neutrinos is variable, possibly being correlated with various markers of the solar cycle (e.g., sunspot number, the Ap index, etc.). In this paper, using the larger "standard data set," the issue of correlative behavior between solar electron neutrino flux and solar activity is re-examined. The results presented here clearly indicate that no statistically significant association exists between any of the usual markers of solar activity and the solar electron neutrino flux.

  20. Evaluation of CETP activity in vivo under non-steady-state conditions: influence of anacetrapib on HDL-TG flux[S

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, David G.; Previs, Stephen F.; Phair, Robert D.; Stout, Steven J.; Xie, Dan; Chen, Ying; Salituro, Gino M.; Xu, Suoyu S.; Castro-Perez, Jose M.; Opiteck, Gregory J.; Akinsanya, Karen O.; Cleary, Michele A.; Dansky, Hayes M.; Johns, Douglas G.; Roddy, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in lipoprotein kinetics almost exclusively rely on steady-state approaches to modeling. Herein, we have used a non-steady-state experimental design to examine the role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in mediating HDL-TG flux in vivo in rhesus macaques, and therefore, we developed an alternative strategy to model the data. Two isotopomers ([2H11] and [13C18]) of oleic acid were administered (orally and intravenously, respectively) to serve as precursors for labeling TGs in apoB-containing lipoproteins. The flux of a specific TG (52:2) from these donor lipoproteins to HDL was used as the measure of CETP activity; calculations are also presented to estimate total HDL-TG flux. Based on our data, we estimate that the peak total postprandial TG flux to HDL via CETP is ∼13 mg·h−1·kg−1 and show that this transfer was inhibited by 97% following anacetrapib treatment. Collectively, these data demonstrate that HDL TG flux can be used as a measure of CETP activity in vivo. The fact that the donor lipoproteins can be labeled in situ using well-established stable isotope tracer techniques suggests ways to measure this activity for native lipoproteins in free-living subjects under any physiological conditions. PMID:26658238

  1. Release of extracellular purines from plant roots and effect on ion fluxes.

    PubMed

    Dark, Adeeba; Demidchik, Vadim; Richards, Siân L; Shabala, Sergey; Davies, Julia M

    2011-11-01

    Extracellular purine nucleotides appear capable of regulating plant development, defence and stress responses by acting in part as agonists of plasma membrane calcium channels. Factors stimulating ATP release include wounding, osmotic stress and elicitors. Here we show that exogenous abscisic acid and L-glutamate can also cause ATP accumulation around Arabidopsis thaliana roots. Release of ADP from root epidermis would trigger ionotropic receptor-like activity in the plasma membrane, resulting in transient elevation of cytosolic free calcium. Root epidermal protoplasts (expressing aequorin as a cytosolic free calcium reporter) can support an extracellular ADP-induced cytosolic calcium elevation in the presence of an extracellular reductant. This confirms that ADP could elicit calcium-based responses distinct to those of ATP, which have been shown previously to involve production of extracellular reactive oxygen species.

  2. Relationship between the photospheric Poynting flux and the active region luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Canfield, Richard C.; Fisher, George H.; Hudson, Hugh S.; Welsch, Brian

    2014-06-01

    How does energy radiated by active regions compare with magnetic energy that propagates lower across the photosphere? This is a fundamental question for energy storage and release in active regions, yet it is presently poorly understood. In this work we quantify and compare both energy terms using SDO observations of the active region (AR) 11520. To quantify the magnetic energy crossing the photosphere, or the Poynting flux, we need to know both the magnetic field vector B and electric field vector E as well. Our current electric field inversion technique, PDFI, combines the Poloidal-Toroidal-Decomposition method with information from Doppler measurements, Fourier local correlation tracking (FLCT) results, and the ideal MHD constraint, to determine the electric field from vector magnetic field and Doppler data. We apply the PDFI method to a sequence of Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI/SDO) vector magnetogram data, to find the electric-field and hence the Poynting-flux evolution in AR 11520. We find that most of the magnetic energy in this AR is injected in the range of $10^7$ to $10^8$ $ergs/{cm^2 s}$, with the largest fluxes reaching $10^{10}$ $ergs/{cm^2 s}$. Integrating over the active region this yields a total energy of order $10^{28}$ ergs/s. To quantify the active region luminosity, we use EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) spectrally resolved observations. We find the active region luminosity of order $10^{28}$ ergs/s. We compare derived magnetic and radiated energy fluxes on different temporal and spatial scales and estimate their uncertainties. We also discuss the roles that potential/non-potential and emerging/shearing terms play in the total magnetic energy budget.

  3. Effects of high-flux low-energy ion bombardment on the low-temperature growth morphology of TiN(001) epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, Brian W.; Cahill, David G.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2000-06-15

    Ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is used to characterize the surface morphology of TiN(001) epitaxial layers grown by dc reactive magnetron sputtering at growth temperatures of T{sub s}=650 and T{sub s}=750 degree sign C. An auxiliary anode is used to bias the N{sub 2} plasma and produce a large flux of low-energy N{sub 2}{sup +} ions that bombard the film surface during growth: the ratio of the N{sub 2}{sup +} flux to the Ti growth flux is {approx_equal}25. At ion energies E{sub i} near the threshold for the production of bulk defects (E{sub i}=43 eV and T{sub s}=650 degree sign C), ion bombardment decreases the amplitude of the roughness, decreases the average distance between growth mounds, and reduces the sharpness of grooves between growth mounds. The critical island radius for second layer nucleation R{sub c} is approximately 12 and 17 nm at growth temperatures of 650 and 750 degree sign C respectively; at 650 degree sign C, R{sub c} is reduced to (approx =)10 nm by ion bombardment. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence: From spot formation to decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rempel, M.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2014-04-20

    We present numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence covering a time span of up to 6 days. Flux emergence is driven by a bottom boundary condition that advects a semi-torus of magnetic field with 1.7 × 10{sup 22} Mx flux into the computational domain. The simulations show that, even in the absence of twist, the magnetic flux is able the rise through the upper 15.5 Mm of the convection zone and emerge into the photosphere to form spots. We find that spot formation is sensitive to the persistence of upflows at the bottom boundary footpoints, i.e., a continuing upflow would prevent spot formation. In addition, the presence of a torus-aligned flow (such flow into the retrograde direction is expected from angular momentum conservation during the rise of flux ropes through the convection zone) leads to a significant asymmetry between the pair of spots, with the spot corresponding to the leading spot on the Sun being more axisymmetric and coherent, but also forming with a delay relative to the following spot. The spot formation phase transitions directly into a decay phase. Subsurface flows fragment the magnetic field and lead to intrusions of almost field free plasma underneath the photosphere. When such intrusions reach photospheric layers, the spot fragments. The timescale for spot decay is comparable to the longest convective timescales present in the simulation domain. We find that the dispersal of flux from a simulated spot in the first two days of the decay phase is consistent with self-similar decay by turbulent diffusion.

  5. Effect of Cytoskeletal Reagents on Stretch Activated Ion Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-12

    transduction. Biophys J59: 1143-1145, 1991. 23. SACHS, F., W. SIGURDSON, A. RUKNUDIN, AND C. BOWMAN. Single- channel mechanosensitive currents. Science 253: 800... mechanosensitive ion channels . In: Advances in Comparative and Environmental Physiology, v0C, edited by F. Ito. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1992, p. 55-77. Report of Inventions: None 4 ...EFFECT OF CYTOSKELETAL REAGENTS ON STRETCH ACTIVATED ION CHANNELS b lfli..3-f-I’- o0*’t 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr.-Frederick Sachs DI 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME

  6. EVOLUTION OF SPINNING AND BRAIDING HELICITY FLUXES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindra, B.; Yoshimura, Keiji; Dasso, Sergio E-mail: yosimura@solar.physics.montana.edu

    2011-12-10

    The line-of-sight magnetograms from Solar Optical Telescope Narrowband Filter Imager observations of NOAA Active Region 10930 have been used to study the evolution of spinning and braiding helicities over a period of five days starting from 2006 December 9. The north (N) polarity sunspot was the follower and the south (S) polarity sunspot was the leader. The N-polarity sunspot in the active region was rotating in the counterclockwise direction. The rate of rotation was small during the first two days of observations and it increased up to 8 Degree-Sign hr{sup -1} on the third day of the observations. On the fourth and fifth days it remained at 4 Degree-Sign hr{sup -1} with small undulations in its magnitude. The sunspot rotated about 260 Degree-Sign in the last three days. The S-polarity sunspot did not complete more than 20 Degree-Sign in five days. However, it changed its direction of rotation five times over a period of five days and injected both the positive and negative type of spin helicity fluxes into the corona. Through the five days, both the positive and negative sunspot regions injected equal amounts of spin helicity. The total injected helicity is predominantly negative in sign. However, the sign of the spin and braiding helicity fluxes computed over all the regions were reversed from negative to positive five times during the five-day period of observations. The reversal in spinning helicity flux was found before the onset of the X3.4-class flare, too. Though, the rotating sunspot has been observed in this active region, the braiding helicity has contributed more to the total accumulated helicity than the spinning helicity. The accumulated helicity is in excess of -7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} Mx{sup 2} over a period of five days. Before the X3.4-class flare that occurred on 2006 December 13, the rotation speed and spin helicity flux increased in the S-polarity sunspot. Before the flare, the total injected helicity was larger than -6

  7. Is the solution activity derivative sufficient to parameterize ion-ion interactions in aqueous solution?-ions for TIP5P water.

    PubMed

    Satarifard, Vahid; Kashefolgheta, Sadra; Vila Verde, Ana; Grafmueller, Andrea

    2017-04-10

    Biomolecular processes involve hydrated ions, and thus molecular simulations of such processes require accurate force-field parameters for these ions. In the best force-fields, both ion-water and anion-cation interactions are explicitly parameterized. First, the ion Lennard-Jones parameters are optimized to reproduce, e.g., single ion solvation free energies; then ion-pair interactions are often adjusted to match experimental activity or activity derivatives. Here we apply this approach to derive optimized parameters for concentrated NaCl, KCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2 salt solutions, to be used with the TIP5P water model. These parameters are of interest because of a number of desirable properties of the TIP5P water model, especially for the simulation of carbohydrates. The results show, that this approach is insufficient, because the activity derivative often reaches a plateau near the target experimental value, for a wide range of parameter values. The plateau emerges from the interconversion between different types of ion pairs, so parameters leading to equally good agreement with the target solution activity or activity derivative yield very different solution structures. To resolve this indetermination, a second target property, such as the experimentally determined ion-ion coordination number, is required to uniquely determine anion-cation interactions. Simulations show that combining activity derivatives and coordination number as experimental target properties to parameterize ion-ion interactions, is a powerful method for reliable ion-water force field parameterization, and gives insight into the concentration of contact or solvent shared ion pairs in a wide range of salt concentrations. For the alkali and halide ions Li(+), Rb(+), Cs(+), F(-), Br(-), I(-), we present ion-water parameters appropriate at infinite dilution only.

  8. Analysis of the Flux Growth Rate in Emerging Active Regions on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramenko, V. I.; Kutsenko, A. S.; Tikhonova, O. I.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.

    2017-04-01

    We studied the emergence process of 42 active regions (ARs) by analyzing the time derivative, R(t), of the total unsigned flux. Line-of-sight magnetograms acquired by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were used. A continuous piecewise linear fitting to the R(t)-profile was applied to detect an interval, Δ t2, of nearly constant R(t) covering one or several local maxima. The magnitude of R(t) averaged over Δ t2 was accepted as an estimate of the maximum value of the flux growth rate, R_{MAX}, which varies in a range of (0.5 - 5)×10^{20} Mx hour^{-1} for ARs with a maximum total unsigned flux of (0.5 - 3)× 10^{22} Mx. The normalized flux growth rate, RN, was defined under the assumption that the saturated total unsigned flux, F_{MAX}, equals unity. Out of 42 ARs in our initial list, 36 events were successfully fitted, and they form two subsets (with a small overlap of eight events): the ARs with a short (<13 hours) interval Δ t2 and a high (>0.024 hour^{-1}) normalized flux emergence rate, RN, form the "rapid" emergence event subset. The second subset consists of "gradual" emergence events, and it is characterized by a long (>13 hours) interval Δ t2 and a low RN (<0.024 hour^{-1}). In diagrams of R_{MAX} plotted versus F_{MAX}, the events from different subsets do not overlap, and each subset displays an individual power law. The power-law index derived from the entire ensemble of 36 events is 0.69 ± 0.10. The rapid emergence is consistent with a two-step emergence process of a single twisted flux tube. The gradual emergence is possibly related to a consecutive rising of several flux tubes emerging at nearly the same location in the photosphere.

  9. Flux pinning enhancement in melt processed YBa2Cu3O7 - delta through rare-earth ion (Nd, La) substitutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, Chakrapani; McGinn, Paul J.; Blackstead, Howard A.; Pulling, David B.

    1995-08-01

    Stoichiometric YBa2Cu3O7-δ (Y123) samples doped with excess Nd2O3 and La2O3 additions were melt processed in air. Because decomposition and reformation of 123 occurs during melt processing, lighter rare-earth ion substitution in 123 takes place. As the lighter rare-earth ion sizes (Nd, La) are comparable to that of Ba2+, in addition to Y ion site substitution, partial substitution into the Ba2+ sites is also anticipated. The Tc and magnetic properties of lighter rare-earth oxide doped samples were analyzed and compared with undoped Y123 to investigate the flux pinning enhancement due to these substitutions. The lighter rare-earth oxide doped, melt processed 123 shows significant improvement in magnetization compared to undoped samples, which is likely due to point defects created by partial substitutions of the lighter rare-earth ions.

  10. THE RISE OF ACTIVE REGION FLUX TUBES IN THE TURBULENT SOLAR CONVECTIVE ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Maria A.; Fan Yuhong; Miesch, Mark S.

    2011-11-01

    We use a thin flux tube model in a rotating spherical shell of turbulent convective flows to study how active region scale flux tubes rise buoyantly from the bottom of the convection zone to near the solar surface. We investigate toroidal flux tubes at the base of the convection zone with field strengths ranging from 15 kG to 100 kG at initial latitudes ranging from 1{sup 0} to 40{sup 0} with a total flux of 10{sup 22} Mx. We find that the dynamic evolution of the flux tube changes from convection dominated to magnetic buoyancy dominated as the initial field strength increases from 15 kG to 100 kG. At 100 kG, the development of {Omega}-shaped rising loops is mainly controlled by the growth of the magnetic buoyancy instability. However, at low field strengths of 15 kG, the development of rising {Omega}-shaped loops is largely controlled by convective flows, and properties of the emerging loops are significantly changed compared to previous results in the absence of convection. With convection, rise times are drastically reduced (from years to a few months), loops are able to emerge at low latitudes, and tilt angles of emerging loops are consistent with Joy's law for initial field strengths of {approx}>40 kG. We also examine other asymmetries that develop between the leading and following legs of the emerging loops. Taking all the results together, we find that mid-range field strengths of {approx}40-50 kG produce emerging loops that best match the observed properties of solar active regions.

  11. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  12. Galactic cosmic ray flux in the mid of 1700 from 44Ti activity of Agen meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taricco, Carla; Sinha, Neeharika; Bhandari, Narendra; Colombetti, Paolo; Mancuso, Salvatore; Rubinetti, Sara; Barghini, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic isotopes produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in meteorites offer the opportunity to reveal the heliospheric magnetic field modulation in the interplanetary space between heliocentric distances of 1 and 3 AU. We present the gamma-activity measurement of Agen meteorite, a H5 chondrite that fell on September 5, 1814 in Aquitaine, France. Its 44Ti activity reflects GCR flux integrated since the mid of 1700 to the time of fall and confirms the decreasing trend of GCR flux that we previously suggested on the basis of measurements of other meteorites which fell in the last 250 years as well as the centennial modulation of GCR due to the Gleissberg solar cycle This result was obtained thanks to the high-efficiency and selective configuration of the gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe+NaI) operating at the underground Laboratory of Monte dei Cappuccini (OATo, INAF) in Torino, Italy.

  13. Flux-tube geometry and solar wind speed during an activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.; Rouillard, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The solar wind speed at 1 AU shows cyclic variations in latitude and in time which reflect the evolution of the global background magnetic field during the activity cycle. It is commonly accepted that the terminal (asymptotic) wind speed in a given magnetic flux-tube is generally anti-correlated with its total expansion ratio, which motivated the definition of widely used semi-empirical scaling laws relating one to the other. In practice, such scaling laws require ad hoc corrections (especially for the slow wind in the vicinities of streamer/coronal hole boundaries) and empirical fits to in situ spacecraft data. A predictive law based solely on physical principles is still missing. Aims: We test whether the flux-tube expansion is the controlling factor of the wind speed at all phases of the cycle and at all latitudes (close to and far from streamer boundaries) using a very large sample of wind-carrying open magnetic flux-tubes. We furthermore search for additional physical parameters based on the geometry of the coronal magnetic field which have an influence on the terminal wind flow speed. Methods: We use numerical magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of the corona and wind coupled to a dynamo model to determine the properties of the coronal magnetic field and of the wind velocity (as a function of time and latitude) during a whole 11-yr activity cycle. These simulations provide a large statistical ensemble of open flux-tubes which we analyse conjointly in order to identify relations of dependence between the wind speed and geometrical parameters of the flux-tubes which are valid globally (for all latitudes and moments of the cycle). Results: Our study confirms that the terminal (asymptotic) speed of the solar wind depends very strongly on the geometry of the open magnetic flux-tubes through which it flows. The total flux-tube expansion is more clearly anti-correlated with the wind speed for fast rather than for slow wind flows, and effectively controls the

  14. Influence of Photospheric Magnetic Conditions on the Catastrophic Behaviors of Flux Ropes in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quanhao; Wang, Yuming; Hu, Youqiu; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jiajia

    2017-02-01

    Since only the magnetic conditions at the photosphere can be routinely observed in current observations, it is of great significance to determine the influences of photospheric magnetic conditions on solar eruptive activities. Previous studies about catastrophe indicated that the magnetic system consisting of a flux rope in a partially open bipolar field is subject to catastrophe, but not if the bipolar field is completely closed under the same specified photospheric conditions. In order to investigate the influence of the photospheric magnetic conditions on the catastrophic behavior of this system, we expand upon the 2.5-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic model in Cartesian coordinates to simulate the evolution of the equilibrium states of the system under different photospheric flux distributions. Our simulation results reveal that a catastrophe occurs only when the photospheric flux is not concentrated too much toward the polarity inversion line and the source regions of the bipolar field are not too weak; otherwise no catastrophe occurs. As a result, under certain photospheric conditions, a catastrophe could take place in a completely closed configuration, whereas it ceases to exist in a partially open configuration. This indicates that whether the background field is completely closed or partially open is not the only necessary condition for the existence of catastrophe, and that the photospheric conditions also play a crucial role in the catastrophic behavior of the flux rope system.

  15. HDAC6 activity is not required for basal autophagic flux in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Gregory W; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yufeng; Maier, Claudia S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Perez, Viviana I

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 is a multifunctional lysine deacetylase that is recently emerging as a central facilitator of response to stress and may play an important role in cancer cell proliferation. The histone deacetylase 6-inhibitor tubacin has been shown to slow the growth of metastatic prostate cancer cells and sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. However, the proteins histone deacetylase 6 interacts with, and thus its role in cancer cells, remains poorly characterized. Histone deacetylase 6 deacetylase activity has recently been shown to be required for efficient basal autophagic flux. Autophagy is often dysregulated in cancer cells and may confer stress resistance and allow for cell maintenance and a high proliferation rate. Tubacin may therefore slow cancer cell proliferation by decreasing autophagic flux. We characterized the histone deacetylase 6-interacting proteins in LNCaP metastatic prostate cancer cells and found that histone deacetylase 6 interacts with proteins involved in several cellular processes, including autophagy. Based on our interaction screen, we assessed the impact of the histone deacetylase 6-inhibitor tubacin on autophagic flux in two metastatic prostate cancer cell lines and found that tubacin does not influence autophagic flux. Histone deacetylase 6 therefore influences cell proliferation through an autophagy-independent mechanism. PMID:26643866

  16. Glucose-induced activation of rubidium transport and water flux in sunflower root systems.

    PubMed

    Quintero, J M; Molina, R; Fournier, J M; Benlloch, M; Ramos, J

    2001-01-01

    Excised 20-d-old sunflower roots (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Sun-Gro 393) were used to study the effect of different sugars on rubidium and water fluxes. The roots sensed and absorbed glucose from the external medium inducing the activation of rubidium accumulated in the root (Rb(+) root), the flux of exuded rubidium (J(Rb)) and, to a lesser degree, the exudation rate (J(v)). These effects were also triggered by fructose, but not by 6-deoxyglucose (6-dG), a glucose analogue which is not a substrate for hexokinase (HXK). The effect of 2-deoxyglucose (2-dG), an analogue that is phosphorylated but not further metabolized, was complex, suggesting an inhibitory effect on solute transport to the xylem. The amounts of glucose required to activate rubidium and water fluxes were similar to those previously reported to regulate different processes in other plants (0.5--10 mM). When sorbitol was used instead of glucose, neither rubidium uptake (Rb(+) root plus J(Rb)) nor J(v) was activated. It is proposed that glucose present in the root plays an important signalling role in the regulation of Rb(+) (K(+)) and water transport in plant roots.

  17. Measurement of surface mercury fluxes at active industrial gold mines in Nevada (USA).

    PubMed

    Eckley, C S; Gustin, M; Marsik, F; Miller, M B

    2011-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) may be naturally associated with the rock units hosting precious and base metal deposits. Active gold mines are known to have point source releases of Hg associated with ore processing facilities. The nonpoint source release of Hg to the air from the large area (hundreds to thousands of hectares) of disturbed and processed material at industrial open pit gold mines has not been quantified. This paper describes the field data collected as part of a project focused on estimating nonpoint source emissions of Hg from two active mines in Nevada, USA. In situ Hg flux data were collected on diel and seasonal time steps using a dynamic flux chamber from representative mine surfaces. Hg fluxes ranged from <1500 ng m(-2) day(-1) for waste rock piles (0.6-3.5 μg g(-1)) to 684,000 ng m(-2) day(-1) for tailings (2.8-58 μg g(-1)). Releases were positively correlated with material Hg concentrations, surface grain size, and moisture content. Highest Hg releases occurred from materials under active cyanide leaching and from tailings impoundments containing processed high-grade ore. Data collected indicate that as mine sites are reclaimed and material disturbance ceases, emissions will decline. Additionally local cycling of atmospheric Hg (deposition and re-emission) was found to occur.

  18. HADES RV Programme with HARPS-N at TNG . III. Flux-flux and activity-rotation relationships of early-M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J.; Scandariato, G.; Stelzer, B.; Biazzo, K.; Lanza, A. F.; Maggio, A.; Micela, G.; González-Álvarez, E.; Affer, L.; Claudi, R. U.; Cosentino, R.; Damasso, M.; Desidera, S.; González Hernández, J. I.; Gratton, R.; Leto, G.; Messina, S.; Molinari, E.; Pagano, I.; Perger, M.; Piotto, G.; Rebolo, R.; Ribas, I.; Sozzetti, A.; Suárez Mascareño, A.; Zanmar Sanchez, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Understanding stellar activity in M dwarfs is crucial for the physics of stellar atmospheres and for ongoing radial velocity exoplanet programmes. Despite the increasing interest in M dwarfs, our knowledge of the chromospheres of these stars is far from being complete. Aims: We test whether the relations between activity, rotation, and stellar parameters and flux-flux relationships previously investigated for main-sequence FGK stars and for pre-main-sequence M stars also hold for early-M dwarfs on the main-sequence. Although several attempts have been made so far, here we analyse a large sample of stars undergoing relatively low activity. Methods: We analyse in a homogeneous and coherent way a well-defined sample of 71 late-K/early-M dwarfs that are currently being observed in the framework of the HArps-N red Dwarf Exoplanet Survey (HADES). Rotational velocities are derived using the cross-correlation technique, while emission flux excesses in the Ca ii H & K and Balmer lines from Hα up to Hɛ are obtained by using the spectral subtraction technique. The relationships between the emission excesses and the stellar parameters (projected rotational velocity, effective temperature, kinematics, and age) are studied. Relations between pairs of fluxes of different chromospheric lines (flux-flux relationships) are also studied and compared with the literature results for other samples of stars. Results: We find that the strength of the chromospheric emission in the Ca ii H & K and Balmer lines is roughly constant for stars in the M0-M3 spectral range. Although our sample is likely to be biased towards inactive stars, our data suggest that a moderate but significant correlation between activity and rotation might be present, as well as a hint of kinematically selected young stars showing higher levels of emission in the calcium line and in most of the Balmer lines. We find our sample of M dwarfs to be complementary in terms of chromospheric and X-ray fluxes with

  19. Major ion chemistry of the Ganga-Brahmaputra river system: Weathering processes and fluxes to the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarin, M. M.; Krishnaswami, S.; Dilli, K.; Somayajulu, B. L. K.; Moore, W. S.

    1989-05-01

    The Ganga-Brahmaputra, one of the world's largest river systems, is first in terms of sediment transport and fourth in terms of water discharge. A detailed and systematic study of the major ion chemistry of these rivers and their tributaries, as well as the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments has been conducted. The chemistry of the highland rivers (upper reaches of the Ganga, the Yamuna, the Brahmaputra, the Gandak and the Ghaghra) are all dominated by carbonate weathering; (Ca + Mg) and HCO 3 account for about 80% of the cations and anions. In the lowland rivers (the Chambal, the Betwa and the Ken), HCO 3 excess over (Ca + Mg) and a relatively high contribution of (Na + K) to the total cations indicate that silicate weathering and/or contributions from alkaline/saline soils and groundwaters could be important sources of major ions to these waters. The chemistry of the Ganga and the Yamuna in the lower reaches is by and large dictated by the chemistry of their tributaries and their mixing proportions. Illite is the dominant clay mineral (about 80%) in the bedload sediments of the highland rivers. Kaolinite and chlorite together constitute the remaining 20% of the clays. In the Chambal, Betwa and Ken, smectite accounts for about 80% of the clays. This difference in the clay mineral composition of the bed sediments is a reflection of the differences in the geology of their drainage basins. The highland rivers weather acidic rocks, whereas the others flow initially through basic effusives. The Ganga-Brahmaputra river system transports about 130 million tons of dissolved salts to the Bay of Bengal, which is nearly 3% of the global river flux to the oceans. The chemical denudation rates for the Ganga and the Brahmaputra basins are about 72 and 105 tons· km -· yr -1, respectively, which are factors of 2 to 3 higher than the global average. The high denudation rate, particularly in the Brahmaputra, is attributable to high relief and heavy rainfall.

  20. Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide synthesized using alkali chloride flux: morphology and performance as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongseon

    2012-05-01

    Li(Ni(0.8)Co(0.1)Mn(0.1))O(2) (NCM811) was synthesized using alkali chlorides as a flux and the performance as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries was examined. Primary particles of the powder were segregated and grown separately in the presence of liquid state fluxes, which induced each particle to be composed of one primary particle with well-developed facet planes, not the shape of agglomerates as appears with commercial NCMs. The new NCM showed far less gas emission during high temperature storage at charged states, and higher volumetric capacity thanks to its high bulk density. The material is expected to provide optimal performances for pouch type lithium ion batteries, which require high volumetric capacity and are vulnerable to deformation caused by gas generation from the electrode materials.

  1. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongfang; Thelin, William R; Rogers, Troy D; Stutts, M Jackson; Randell, Scott H; Grubb, Barbara R; Boucher, Richard C

    2012-10-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expression was characterized by RT-PCR. ENaC proteins were measured by Western blot. Prespecified regions (palpebral, fornical, and bulbar) of freshly isolated conjunctival tissues and cell cultures were studied electrophysiologically with Ussing chambers. The transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) of the ocular surface was also measured in vivo. The effect of amiloride and UTP on the tear volume was evaluated in lacrimal gland excised rats. All selected genes were detected but with different expression patterns. We detected αENaC protein in all tissues, βENaC in palpebral and fornical conjunctiva, and γENaC in all tissues except lacrimal glands. Electrophysiological studies of conjunctival tissues and cell cultures identified functional ENaC, SLC5A1, CFTR, and TMEM16. Fornical conjunctiva exhibited the most active ion transport under basal conditions amongst conjunctival regions. PD measurements confirmed functional ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport on the ocular surface. Amiloride and UTP increased tear volume in lacrimal gland excised rats. This study demonstrated that the different regions of the conjunctiva exhibited a spectrum of ion transport activities. Understanding the specific functions of distinct regions of the conjunctiva may foster a better understanding of the physiology maintaining hydration of the ocular surface.

  2. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongfang; Thelin, William R.; Rogers, Troy D.; Stutts, M. Jackson; Randell, Scott H.; Grubb, Barbara R.

    2012-01-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expression was characterized by RT-PCR. ENaC proteins were measured by Western blot. Prespecified regions (palpebral, fornical, and bulbar) of freshly isolated conjunctival tissues and cell cultures were studied electrophysiologically with Ussing chambers. The transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) of the ocular surface was also measured in vivo. The effect of amiloride and UTP on the tear volume was evaluated in lacrimal gland excised rats. All selected genes were detected but with different expression patterns. We detected αENaC protein in all tissues, βENaC in palpebral and fornical conjunctiva, and γENaC in all tissues except lacrimal glands. Electrophysiological studies of conjunctival tissues and cell cultures identified functional ENaC, SLC5A1, CFTR, and TMEM16. Fornical conjunctiva exhibited the most active ion transport under basal conditions amongst conjunctival regions. PD measurements confirmed functional ENaC-mediated Na+ transport on the ocular surface. Amiloride and UTP increased tear volume in lacrimal gland excised rats. This study demonstrated that the different regions of the conjunctiva exhibited a spectrum of ion transport activities. Understanding the specific functions of distinct regions of the conjunctiva may foster a better understanding of the physiology maintaining hydration of the ocular surface. PMID:22814399

  3. YANA – a software tool for analyzing flux modes, gene-expression and enzyme activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland; Musch, Patrick; von Kamp, Axel; Engels, Bernd; Schirmer, Heiner; Schuster, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background A number of algorithms for steady state analysis of metabolic networks have been developed over the years. Of these, Elementary Mode Analysis (EMA) has proven especially useful. Despite its low user-friendliness, METATOOL as a reliable high-performance implementation of the algorithm has been the instrument of choice up to now. As reported here, the analysis of metabolic networks has been improved by an editor and analyzer of metabolic flux modes. Analysis routines for expression levels and the most central, well connected metabolites and their metabolic connections are of particular interest. Results YANA features a platform-independent, dedicated toolbox for metabolic networks with a graphical user interface to calculate (integrating METATOOL), edit (including support for the SBML format), visualize, centralize, and compare elementary flux modes. Further, YANA calculates expected flux distributions for a given Elementary Mode (EM) activity pattern and vice versa. Moreover, a dissection algorithm, a centralization algorithm, and an average diameter routine can be used to simplify and analyze complex networks. Proteomics or gene expression data give a rough indication of some individual enzyme activities, whereas the complete flux distribution in the network is often not known. As such data are noisy, YANA features a fast evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the prediction of EM activities with minimum error, including alerts for inconsistent experimental data. We offer the possibility to include further known constraints (e.g. growth constraints) in the EA calculation process. The redox metabolism around glutathione reductase serves as an illustration example. All software and documentation are available for download at . Conclusion A graphical toolbox and an editor for METATOOL as well as a series of additional routines for metabolic network analyses constitute a new user-friendly software for such efforts. PMID:15929789

  4. Charged particle’s flux measurement from PMMA irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agodi, C.; Battistoni, G.; Bellini, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Collamati, F.; Cuttone, G.; De Lucia, E.; De Napoli, M.; Di Domenico, A.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Fiore, S.; Gauzzi, P.; Iarocci, E.; Marafini, M.; Mattei, I.; Muraro, S.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Romano, F.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Vitale, E.; Voena, C.

    2012-09-01

    Hadrontherapy is an emerging technique in cancer therapy that uses beams of charged particles. To meet the improved capability of hadrontherapy in matching the dose release with the cancer position, new dose-monitoring techniques need to be developed and introduced into clinical use. The measurement of the fluxes of the secondary particles produced by the hadron beam is of fundamental importance in the design of any dose-monitoring device and is eagerly needed to tune Monte Carlo simulations. We report the measurements carried out with charged secondary particles produced from the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, with a poly-methyl methacrylate target. Charged secondary particles, produced at 90° with respect to the beam axis, have been tracked with a drift chamber, while their energy and time of flight have been measured by means of a LYSO scintillator. Secondary protons have been identified exploiting the energy and time-of-flight information, and their emission region has been reconstructed backtracking from the drift chamber to the target. Moreover, a position scan of the target indicates that the reconstructed emission region follows the movement of the expected Bragg peak position. Exploiting the reconstruction of the emission region, an accuracy on the Bragg peak determination in the submillimeter range has been obtained. The measured differential production rate for protons produced with EProdkin > 83 MeV and emitted at 90° with respect to the beam line is dNP/(dNCdΩ) (EProdkin > 83 MeV, θ = 90°) = (2.69 ± 0.08stat ± 0.12sys) × 10-4 sr-1.

  5. Controlling epileptiform activity with organic electronic ion pumps.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adam; Rivnay, Jonathan; Kergoat, Loïg; Jonsson, Amanda; Inal, Sahika; Uguz, Ilke; Ferro, Marc; Ivanov, Anton; Sjöström, Theresia Arbring; Simon, Daniel T; Berggren, Magnus; Malliaras, George G; Bernard, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    In treating epilepsy, the ideal solution is to act at a seizure's onset, but only in the affected regions of the brain. Here, an organic electronic ion pump is demonstrated, which directly delivers on-demand pure molecules to specific brain regions. State-of-the-art organic devices and classical pharmacology are combined to control pathological activity in vitro, and the results are verified with electrophysiological recordings.

  6. The effect of carbon impurities on molybdenum surface morphology evolution under high-flux low-energy helium ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Gonderman, S.; Bharadwaj, N.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the role of carbon (C) impurities, in molybdenum (Mo) fuzz evolutions on Mo surface during 100 eV He+ ion irradiations. In this study we considered 0.01, 0.05, and 0.5% C+ ion impurities in He+ ion irradiations. For introducing such tiny C+ ion impurities, gas mixtures of He and CH4 have been chosen in following ratios; 99.95: 0.05, 99.75: 0.25, and 97.5: 2.5. Apart from these three cases, two additional cases, 100% He+ ion (for Mo fuzz growth due to only He+ ions) and 100% H+ ion (for confirming the significance of tiny 0.04-2.0% H+ ions in terms of Mo fuzz evolutions on Mo surface, if any), have also been considered. Ion energy (100 eV), ion fluence (2.6 × 1024 ions m-2), and target temperature (923 K) were kept constant for each experiment and their selections were based on our previous studies [1,2]. Our study shows homogeneously populated and highly dense Mo fuzz evolutions on entire Mo surface for 100% He+ ion irradiation case. Enhancement of C+ ion impurities in He+ ions causes a sequential reduction in Mo fuzz evolutions, leading to almost complete prevention of Mo fuzz evolutions for 0.5% C+ ion impurity concentrations. Additionally, no fuzz formation for 100% H+ ion irradiation at all, were seen (apart from some tiny nano-structuring, in very limited regions). This indicates that there is no significant role of H+ ions in Mo fuzz evolutions (at least for such tiny amount, 0.04-2.0% H+ ions). The study is significant to understand the behavior of potential high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs), in the, presence of tiny amount of C impurities, for nuclear fusion relevant applications.

  7. Ion Heating Anisotropy during Dynamo Activity in the MST RFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    den Hartog, D. J.; Chapman, J. T.; Craig, D.; Fiksel, G.; Fontana, P. W.

    1999-11-01

    MHD dynamo activity is large in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch during sawtooth crashes, and small otherwise. During a sawtooth crash, ion temperature increases rapidly to a level several times as high as the temperature between sawteeth, which itself can be larger than the electron temperature. Several theories have been developed to explain this ion heating, some indicating a possible asymmetry in perpendicular to parallel heating [C. G. Gimblett, Europhys. Lett. 11, 541 (1990); Z. Yoshida, Nucl. Fusion 31, 386 (1991); N. Mattor, P. W. Terry, and S. C. Prager, Comments Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 15, 65 (1992)]. In standard MST discharges, impurity ion temperature measured perpendicular to the magnetic field (T_⊥) is higher than impurity ion temperature parallel to the magnetic field (T_allel) during a sawtooth crash. Throughout the rest of the sawtooth cycle, T_⊥ <= T_allel. This is in contrast to results obtained on the EXTRAP-T2 RFP which showed T_⊥ < T_allel throughout the discharge [K. Sasaki et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 39, 333 (1997)

  8. Quasi-biennial modulation of solar neutrino flux: connections with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchio, A.; Laurenza, M.; D'alessi, L.; Carbone, V.; Storini, M.

    2011-12-01

    A quasi-biennial periodicity has been recently found (Vecchio et al., 2010) in the solar neutrino flux, as detected at the Homestake experiment, as well as in the flux of solar energetic protons, by means of the Empirical Modes Decomposition technique. Moreover, both fluxes have been found to be significantly correlated at the quasi-biennial timescale, thus supporting the hypothesis of a connection between solar neutrinos and solar activity. The origin of this connection is investigated, by modeling how the standard Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect (the process for which the well-known neutrino flavor oscillations are modified in passing through the material) could be influenced by matter fluctuations. As proposed by Burgess et al., 2004, by introducing a background magnetic field in the helioseismic model, density fluctuations can be excited in the radiative zone by the resonance between helioseismic g-modes and Alfvén waves. In particular, with reasonable values of the background magnetic field (10-100 kG), the distance between resonant layers could be of the same order of neutrino oscillation length. We study the effect over this distance of a background magnetic field which is variable with a ~2 yr period, in agreement with typical variations of solar activity. Our findings suggest that the quasi-biennial modulation of the neutrino flux is theoretically possible as a consequence of the magnetic field variations in the solar interior. A. Vecchio, M. Laurenza, V. Carbone, M. Storini, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 709, L1-L5 (2010). C. Burgess, N. S. Dzhalilov, T. I. Rashba, V., B.Semikoz, J. W. F. Valle, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 348, 609-624 (2004).

  9. Rapid enhancement of low-energy (<100 eV) ion flux in response to interplanetary shocks based on two Van Allen Probes case studies: Implications for source regions and heating mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Chao; Li, Wen; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Zong, Qiugang; Ma, Qianli; Bortnik, Jacob; Thorne, Richard M.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Spence, Harlan E.; Kletzing, Craig A.; Wygant, John R.; Nicolls, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between interplanetary (IP) shocks and the Earth's magnetosphere manifest many important space physics phenomena including low-energy ion flux enhancements and particle acceleration. In order to investigate the mechanisms driving shock-induced enhancement of low-energy ion flux, we have examined two IP shock events that occurred when the Van Allen Probes were located near the equator while ionospheric and ground observations were available around the spacecraft footprints. We have found that, associated with the shock arrival, electromagnetic fields intensified, and low-energy ion fluxes, including H+, He+, and O+, were enhanced dramatically in both the parallel and perpendicular directions. During the 2 October 2013 shock event, both parallel and perpendicular flux enhancements lasted more than 20 min with larger fluxes observed in the perpendicular direction. In contrast, for the 15 March 2013 shock event, the low-energy perpendicular ion fluxes increased only in the first 5 min during an impulse of electric field, while the parallel flux enhancement lasted more than 30 min. In addition, ionospheric outflows were observed after shock arrivals. From a simple particle motion calculation, we found that the rapid response of low-energy ions is due to drifts of plasmaspheric population by the enhanced electric field. However, the fast acceleration in the perpendicular direction cannot solely be explained by E × B drift but betatron acceleration also plays a role. Adiabatic acceleration may also explain the fast response of the enhanced parallel ion fluxes, while ion outflows may contribute to the enhanced parallel fluxes that last longer than the perpendicular fluxes.

  10. Rapid enhancement of low energy (<100 eV) ion flux in response to interplanetary shocks based on two Van Allen Probes case studies: Implications for source regions and heating mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Chao; Li, Wen; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Zong, Qiugang; Ma, Qianli; Bortnik, Jacob; Thorne, Richard M.; Spence, Harlan E.; Kletzing, Craig A.; Wygant, John R.; Nicolls, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between interplanetary (IP) shocks and the Earth's magnetosphere manifest many important space physics phenomena including low-energy ion flux enhancements and particle acceleration. In order to investigate the mechanisms driving shock-induced enhancement of low-energy ion flux, we have examined two IP shock events that occurred when the Van Allen Probes were located near the equator while ionospheric and ground observations were available around the spacecraft footprints. We have found that, associated with the shock arrival, electromagnetic fields intensified, and low-energy ion fluxes, including H+, He+, and O+, were enhanced dramatically in both the parallel and perpendicular directions. During the 2 October 2013 shock event, both parallel and perpendicular flux enhancements lasted more than 20 min with larger fluxes observed in the perpendicular direction. In contrast, for the 15 March 2013 shock event, the low-energy perpendicular ion fluxes increased only in the first 5 min during an impulse of electric field, while the parallel flux enhancement lasted more than 30 min. In addition, ionospheric outflows were observed after shock arrivals. From a simple particle motion calculation, we found that the rapid response of low-energy ions is due to drifts of plasmaspheric population by the enhanced electric field. Furthermore, the fast acceleration in the perpendicular direction cannot solely be explained by E × B drift but betatron acceleration also plays a role. Adiabatic acceleration may also explain the fast response of the enhanced parallel ion fluxes, while ion outflows may contribute to the enhanced parallel fluxes that last longer than the perpendicular fluxes.

  11. Rapid enhancement of low energy (<100 eV) ion flux in response to interplanetary shocks based on two Van Allen Probes case studies: Implications for source regions and heating mechanisms

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Chao; Li, Wen; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; ...

    2016-07-01

    Interactions between interplanetary (IP) shocks and the Earth's magnetosphere manifest many important space physics phenomena including low-energy ion flux enhancements and particle acceleration. In order to investigate the mechanisms driving shock-induced enhancement of low-energy ion flux, we have examined two IP shock events that occurred when the Van Allen Probes were located near the equator while ionospheric and ground observations were available around the spacecraft footprints. We have found that, associated with the shock arrival, electromagnetic fields intensified, and low-energy ion fluxes, including H+, He+, and O+, were enhanced dramatically in both the parallel and perpendicular directions. During the 2more » October 2013 shock event, both parallel and perpendicular flux enhancements lasted more than 20 min with larger fluxes observed in the perpendicular direction. In contrast, for the 15 March 2013 shock event, the low-energy perpendicular ion fluxes increased only in the first 5 min during an impulse of electric field, while the parallel flux enhancement lasted more than 30 min. In addition, ionospheric outflows were observed after shock arrivals. From a simple particle motion calculation, we found that the rapid response of low-energy ions is due to drifts of plasmaspheric population by the enhanced electric field. Furthermore, the fast acceleration in the perpendicular direction cannot solely be explained by E × B drift but betatron acceleration also plays a role. Adiabatic acceleration may also explain the fast response of the enhanced parallel ion fluxes, while ion outflows may contribute to the enhanced parallel fluxes that last longer than the perpendicular fluxes.« less

  12. The Effect of Low-Energy High-Flux Ion Bombardment on the Nucleation and Growth of INDIUM(X)GALLIUM(1-X)ARSENIDE/GALLIUM Arsenide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millunchick, Joanna Mirecki

    The growth of In_{rm x}Ga_{rm1-x} As/GaAs using Ion-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy (IAMBE) was investigated to determine the effect of low energy (E < 100eV) high flux (0.1 < J < 0.75 mA/cm^2 ) ion irradiation on nucleation and strain relaxation as compared to conventional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Experiments were carried out to investigate the modification of nucleation as a result of E < 30 eV ion bombardment. It was found that the island densities of the IAMBE films fell into two temperature regimes. At low temperatures, nucleation parameters were altered by ion-induced island dissociation, whereas at high temperatures, ion-enhanced diffusion dominated. The effect of ion bombardment on the growth of highly strained thin films was examined. It was found that the rate of strain relaxation and the surface roughness decreased for 16 < E < 27 eV. Also, the IAMBE films were smoother than their MBE counterparts. Based on these results, it was inferred that surface roughening of large-mismatch MBE InGaAs films allows strain relaxation well before misfit dislocations are introduced. A Monte Carlo simulation was developed to model the growth of strained layers with and without ion bombardment. This simulation showed that the nucleation mechanism strongly depends on the adatom interaction with the second nearest neighbor E_{rm2nn}. Also, in the presence of ion bombardment, the simulated RHEED oscillation intensities improved for increasing ion energy and ion to atom ratio, in agreement with experimental results. Defect generation as a consequence of ion bombardment was also studied to ascertain whether IAMBE can be utilized in this regime without damage. IAMBE of In_ {rm x}Ga_{rm1 -x}As/GaAs showed improved crystalline quality compared to MBE-grown films, however, a significant amount of ion-injected point defects were found to be present. These point defects degraded optical properties, but no discernible effect was observed on electronic properties. Cross

  13. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide and calcium mediate root ion fluxes in two non-secretor mangrove species subjected to NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanjun; Li, Niya; Sun, Jian; Hou, Peichen; Jing, Xiaoshu; Zhu, Huipeng; Deng, Shurong; Han, Yansha; Huang, Xuxin; Ma, Xujun; Zhao, Nan; Zhang, Yuhong; Shen, Xin; Chen, Shaoliang

    2013-01-01

    Using 3-month-old seedlings of Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (L.) Savigny and Kandelia candel (L.) Druce, we compared species differences in ionic homeostasis control between the two non-secretor mangrove species. A high salinity (400 mM NaCl, 4 weeks) resulted in a decline of the K(+)/Na(+) ratio in root and leaf tissues, and the reduction was more pronounced in K. candel (41-66%) as compared with B. gymnorrhiza (5-36%). Salt-altered flux profiles of Na(+), K(+), H(+) and Ca(2+) in roots and effects of exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) on root ion fluxes were examined in seedlings that were hydroponically treated short term with 100 mM NaCl (ST, 24 h) and long term with 200 mM NaCl (LT, 7 days). Short term and LT salinity resulted in Na(+) efflux and a correspondingly increased H(+) influx in roots of both species, although a more pronounced effect was observed in B. gymnorrhiza. The salt-enhanced exchange of Na(+) with H(+) was obviously inhibited by amiloride (a Na(+)/H(+) antiporter inhibitor) or sodium orthovanadate (a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase inhibitor), indicating that the Na(+) efflux resulted from active Na(+) exclusion across the plasma membrane. Short term and LT salinity accelerated K(+) efflux in the two species, but K. candel exhibited a higher flux rate. The salt-induced K(+) efflux was markedly restricted by the K(+) channel blocker, tetraethylammonium chloride, indicating that the K(+) efflux is mediated by depolarization-activated channels, e.g., KORCs (outward rectifying K(+) channels) and NSCCs (non-selective cation channels). Exogenous H(2)O(2) application (10 mM) markedly increased the apparent Na(+) efflux and limited K(+) efflux in ST-treated roots, although H(2)O(2) caused a higher Na(+) efflux in B. gymnorrhiza roots. CaCl(2) (10 mM) reduced the efflux of K(+) in salinized roots of the two mangroves, but its enhancement of Na(+) efflux was found only in B. gymnorrhiza. Under ST treatment, sodium nitroprusside

  14. Sugar-activated ion transport in canine lingual epithelium. Implications for sugar taste transduction

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    There is good evidence indicating that ion-transport pathways in the apical regions of lingual epithelial cells, including taste bud cells, may play a role in salt taste reception. In this article, we present evidence that, in the case of the dog, there also exists a sugar- activated ion-transport pathway that is linked to sugar taste transduction. Evidence was drawn from two parallel lines of experiments: (a) ion-transport studies on the isolated canine lingual epithelium, and (b) recordings from the canine chorda tympani. The results in vitro showed that both mono- and disaccharides in the mucosal bath stimulate a dose-dependent increase in the short-circuit current over the concentration range coincident with mammalian sugar taste responses. Transepithelial current evoked by glucose, fructose, or sucrose in either 30 mM NaCl or in Krebs-Henseleit buffer (K-H) was partially blocked by amiloride. Among current carriers activated by saccharides, the current response was greater with Na than with K. Ion flux measurements in K-H during stimulation with 3-O-methylglucose showed that the sugar-evoked current was due to an increase in the Na influx. Ouabain or amiloride reduced the sugar-evoked Na influx without effect on sugar transport as measured with tritiated 3-O-methylglucose. Amiloride inhibited the canine chorda tympani response to 0.5 M NaCl by 70-80% and the response to 0.5 M KCl by approximately 40%. This agreed with the percent inhibition by amiloride of the short-circuit current supported in vitro by NaCl and KCl. Amiloride also partially inhibited the chorda tympani responses to sucrose and to fructose. The results indicate that in the dog: (a) the ion transporter subserving Na taste also subserves part of the response to K, and (b) a sugar-activated, Na- preferring ion-transport system is one mechanism mediating sugar taste transduction. Results in the literature indicate a similar sweet taste mechanism for humans. PMID:3171536

  15. Charge States of O Ions Injected at Substorm Onset and Estimation of the O+/O6+ Flux Ratio: Geotail/EPIC Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, T.; Nose, M.; Keika, K.; Christon, S. P.

    2004-12-01

    Oxygen ions in the Earth's magnetosphere are supplied from two sources, that is, the ionosphere and the solar wind. The charge states of oxygen from the ionosphere are generally low such as O+, while those from the solar wind are highly charged (mainly O6+). Investigating the amount of oxygen with each charge state in various energy ranges in the magnetosphere and its source region gives us information how it is energized during travel from its origin to the magnetosphere. This would be a clue to know the acceleration mechanisms of oxygen in the magnetosphere. However, only a few satellites carried instruments which can measure the ions' charge states. Furthermore, they are not sensitive enough in the high energy range (more than 100 keV) because the number of ions in this energy range is small. It is also difficult to analyze a phenomenon in a short time scale such as ion injection from the near-Earth tail into the inner magnetosphere at substorm onset. In this study, we estimate the charge state of injected oxygen in various energy ranges by using the method of Sibeck et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett., 15, 1287 - 1290, 1988] with the flux data from the EPIC/ICS instrument on Geotail; it can measure mass of ion in the energy range of 50 keV - 3 MeV but not charge state. This method uses the energy dispersion of flux enhancements of injected ions, which is dependent on the charge state of them. This dispersion is responsible for the drift velocity of ions in the inner magnetosphere depending on their energy and charge state. We analyzed the ICS data statistically to estimate charge state of oxygen ions for the period of 1996 and October 2000 to September 2001. We also used data from the Geotail/EPIC STICS sensor, which can measure charge state and ion mass, so that the O+/O6+ ratios were given for a few cases where STICS provided enough ion flux to be analyzed for these events. From the analysis we found that (1)In the 50 to 150 keV energy range, the amount of injected O

  16. Physiological mechanisms for high salt tolerance in wild soybean (Glycine soja) from Yellow River Delta, China: photosynthesis, osmotic regulation, ion flux and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Yan, Kun; Shao, Hongbo; Zhao, Shijie

    2013-01-01

    Glycine soja (BB52) is a wild soybean cultivar grown in coastal saline land in Yellow River Delta, China. In order to reveal the physiological mechanisms adapting to salinity, we examined photosynthesis, ion flux, antioxidant system and water status in Glycine soja under NaCl treatments, taking a cultivated soybean, ZH13, as control. Upon NaCl exposure, higher relative water content and water potential were maintained in the leaf of BB52 than ZH13, which might depend on the more accumulation of osmotic substances such as glycinebetaine and proline. Compared with ZH13, activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and contents of ascorbate, glutathione and phenolics were enhanced to a higher level in BB52 leaf under NaCl stress, which could mitigate the salt-induced oxidative damage in BB52. Consistently, lipid peroxidation indicated by malondialdehyde content was lower in BB52 leaf. Photosynthetic rate (Pn) was decreased by NaCl stress in BB52 and ZH13, and the decrease was greater in ZH13. The decreased Pn in BB52 was mainly due to stomatal limitation. The inhibited activation of rubisco enzyme in ZH13 due to the decrease of rubisco activase content became an important limiting factor of Pn, when NaCl concentration increased to 200 mM. Rubisco activase in BB52 was not affected by NaCl stress. Less negative impact in BB52 derived from lower contents of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the tissues, and non-invasive micro-test technique revealed that BB52 roots had higher ability to extrude Na(+) and Cl(-). Wild soybean is a valuable genetic resource, and our study may provide a reference for molecular biologist to improve the salt tolerance of cultivated soybean in face of farmland salinity.

  17. X-ray flux variability of active galactic nuclei observed using NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Priyanka; Stalin, C. S.; Rakshit, Suvendu

    2017-04-01

    We present results of a systematic study of flux variability on hourly time-scales in a large sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the 3-79 keV band using data from Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array. Our sample consists of four BL Lac objects (BL Lacs), three flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) 24 Seyfert 1, 42 Seyfert 2 and eight narrow line Seyfert 1 (NLSy1) galaxies. We find that in the 3-79 keV band, about 65 per cent of the sources in our sample show significant variations on hourly time-scales. Using the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, we find no difference in the variability behaviour between Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies. The blazar sources (FSRQs and BL Lacs) in our sample are more variable than Seyfert galaxies that include Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 in the soft (3-10 keV), hard (10-79 keV) and total (3-79 keV) bands. NLSy1 galaxies show the highest duty cycle of variability (87 per cent), followed by BL Lacs (82 per cent), Seyfert galaxies (56 per cent) and FSRQs (23 per cent). We obtained flux doubling/halving time in the hard X-ray band less than 10 min in 11 sources. The flux variations between the hard and soft bands in all the sources in our sample are consistent with zero lag.

  18. Optically active surfaces formed by ion implantation and thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Gea, L.A.; Boatner, L.A.; Evans, H.M.; Zuhr, R.

    1996-08-01

    Embedded VO{sub 2} precipitates have been formed in single-crystal sapphire by the ion co-implantation of vanadium and oxygen and subsequent thermal annealing. The embedded VO{sub 2} particles have been shown to exhibit an optical switching behavior that is comparable to that of continuous thin films. In this work, the mechanisms of formation of these optically active particles are investigated. It is shown that precipitation of the vanadium dioxide phase is favored when the thermal treatment is performed on an ion-damaged but still crystalline (rather than amorphized) Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate. The best optical switching behavior is observed in this case, and this behavior is apparently correlated with a more-favorable dispersion of VO{sub 2} small particles inside the matrix.

  19. INCLINATION-DEPENDENT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FLUX PROFILES FROM STRONG LENSING OF THE KERR SPACETIME

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, E.

    2013-01-10

    Recent quasar microlensing observations have constrained the X-ray emission sizes of quasars to be about 10 gravitational radii, one order of magnitude smaller than the optical emission sizes. Using a new ray-tracing code for the Kerr spacetime, we find that the observed X-ray flux is strongly influenced by the gravity field of the central black hole, even for observers at moderate inclination angles. We calculate inclination-dependent flux profiles of active galactic nuclei in the optical and X-ray bands by combining the Kerr lensing and projection effects for future reference. We further study the dependence of the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio on the inclination angle caused by differential lensing distortion of the X-ray and optical emission, assuming several corona geometries. The strong lensing X-ray-to-optical magnification ratio can change by a factor of {approx}10 for normal quasars in some cases, and a further factor of {approx}10 for broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and obscured quasars. Comparing our results with the observed distributions in normal and BAL quasars, we find that the inclination angle dependence of the magnification ratios can significantly change the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio distributions. In particular, the mean value of the spectrum slope parameter {alpha}{sub ox}, 0.3838log F {sub 2keV}/F {sub 2500A}, can differ by {approx}0.1-0.2 between normal and BAL quasars, depending on corona geometries, suggesting larger intrinsic absorptions in BAL quasars.

  20. What Ion Flow along Ion Channels Can Tell us about Their Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Becucci, Lucia; Guidelli, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    The functional activity of channel-forming peptides and proteins is most directly verified by monitoring the flow of physiologically relevant inorganic ions, such as Na+, K+ and Cl−, along the ion channels. Electrical current measurements across bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) interposed between two aqueous solutions have been widely employed to this end and are still extensively used. However, a major drawback of BLMs is their fragility, high sensitivity toward vibrations and mechanical shocks, and low resistance to electric fields. To overcome this problem, metal-supported tethered BLMs (tBLMs) have been devised, where the BLM is anchored to the metal via a hydrophilic spacer that replaces and mimics the water phase on the metal side. However, only mercury-supported tBLMs can measure and regulate the flow of the above inorganic ions, thanks to mercury liquid state and high hydrogen overpotential. This review summarizes the main results achieved by BLMs incorporating voltage-gated channel-forming peptides, interpreting them on the basis of a kinetic mechanism of nucleation and growth. Hg-supported tBLMs are then described, and their potential for the investigation of voltage-gated and ohmic channels is illustrated by the use of different electrochemical techniques. PMID:27983579

  1. Impacts of membrane flux enhancers on activated sludge respiration and nutrient removal in MBRs.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Vera; Koseoglu, Hasan; Yigit, Nevzat O; Drews, Anja; Kitis, Mehmet; Lesjean, Boris; Kraume, Matthias

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the findings of experimental investigations regarding the influence of 13 different flux enhancing chemicals (FeCl3, polyaluminium chloride, 2 chitosans, 5 synthetic polymers, 2 starches and 2 activated carbons) on respirometric characteristics and nitrification/denitrification performance of membrane bioreactor (MBR) mixed liquor. Flux enhancing chemicals are a promising method to reduce the detrimental effects of fouling phenomena via the modification of mixed liquor characteristics. However, potentially inhibiting effects of these chemicals on mixed liquor biological activity triggered the biokinetic studies (in jar tests) conducted in this work. The tested polyaluminium chloride (PACl) strongly impacted on nitrification (-16%) and denitrification rate (-43%). The biodegradable nature of chitosan was striking in endogenous and exogenous tests. Considering the relatively high costs of this chemical, an application for wastewater treatment does thus not seem to be advisable. Also, addition of one of the tested activated carbons strongly impacted on the oxygen uptake rate (-28%), nitrification (-90%) and denitrification rate (-43%), due to a decrease of pH. Results show that the changes in kLa values were mostly not significant, however, a decrease of 13% in oxygen transfer was found for sludge treated with PACl.

  2. On the area expansion of magnetic flux tubes in solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Dzifčáková, Elena; Cirtain, Jonathan W. E-mail: elena@asu.cas.cz

    2014-11-20

    We calculated the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the area expansion factors in a potential magnetic field, extrapolated from the high-resolution Hinode/SOT magnetogram of the quiescent active region NOAA 11482. Retaining only closed loops within the computational box, we show that the distribution of area expansion factors show significant structure. Loop-like structures characterized by locally lower values of the expansion factor are embedded in a smooth background. These loop-like flux tubes have squashed cross-sections and expand with height. The distribution of the expansion factors show an overall increase with height, allowing an active region core characterized by low values of the expansion factor to be distinguished. The area expansion factors obtained from extrapolation of the Solar Optical Telescope magnetogram are compared to those obtained from an approximation of the observed magnetogram by a series of 134 submerged charges. This approximation retains the general flux distribution in the observed magnetogram, but removes the small-scale structure in both the approximated magnetogram and the 3D distribution of the area expansion factors. We argue that the structuring of the expansion factor can be a significant ingredient in producing the observed structuring of the solar corona. However, due to the potential approximation used, these results may not be applicable to loops exhibiting twist or to active regions producing significant flares.

  3. Energy channeling from trapped to passing fast ions mediated by GAE/CAE activity in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medley, S. S.; Belova, E.; Kramer, G.; Podesta, M.; Liu, D.

    2013-10-01

    In the National Spherical Torus Experiment, an increased charge exchange neutral flux localized at the neutral beam full injection energy is measured by the E||B Neutral Particle Analyzer. Termed the High-Energy Feature (HEF), it appears on the beam-injected energetic ion spectrum in discharges where NTM or kink modes (f < 10 kHz) are absent, TAE activity (f ~ 10-150 kHz) is weak and CAE/GAE activity (f ~ 400 - 1200 kHz) is robust. The HEF exhibits a growth time of t ~ 20-80 ms and develops a slowing down distribution that continues to evolve over periods > 100 ms. HEFs are observed only in H-mode discharges with NB power Pb >= 4 MW and in the pitch range v||/v ~ 0.7 - 0.9. The HEF appears to be caused by a CAE/GAE wave-particle interaction that modifies the fast ion distribution, fi(E,v||/v,r). This mechanism was studied using the SPIRAL code that evolves an initial TRANSP-calculated fi(E,v||/v,r) distribution in the presence of background plasma profiles under drive from wave-particle resonances with CAE/GAE Alfvén eigenmodes. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Ion channel activity in lobster skeletal muscle membrane.

    PubMed

    Worden, M K; Rahamimoff, R; Kravitz, E A

    1993-09-01

    Ion channel activity in the sarcolemmal membrane of muscle fibers is critical for regulating the excitability, and therefore the contractility, of muscle. To begin the characterization of the biophysical properties of the sarcolemmal membrane of lobster exoskeletal muscle fibers, recordings were made from excised patches of membrane from enzymatically induced muscle fiber blebs. Blebs formed as evaginations of the muscle sarcolemmal membrane and were sufficiently free of extracellular debris to allow the formation of gigaohm seals. Under simple experimental conditions using bi-ionic symmetrical recording solutions and maintained holding potentials, a variety of single channel types with conductances in the range 32-380 pS were detected. Two of these ion channel species are described in detail, both are cation channels selective for potassium. They can be distinguished from each other on the basis of their single-channel conductance and gating properties. The results suggest that current flows through a large number of ion channels that open spontaneously in bleb membranes in the absence of exogenous metabolites or hormones.

  5. Characterization of cathodoluminescence activated by Mn ions in dolomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusano, N.; Nishido, H.; Makio, M.; Ninagawa, K.

    2011-12-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL), the light emission induced by electron irradiation, has been widely applied in mineralogical and petrological investigations, especially for carbonates. Dolomite usually emits a red CL emission related to an impurity center of divalent Mn, but of which each occupancy in Ca and/or Mg site has not been quantitatively estimated. In this study, we have characterized an emission center of CL and developed a method to evaluate site occupancy of Mn ions in dolomite lattice. Three dolomite samples from Hase, Japan (D-06), Binntal, Swiss (D-17) and Blackrock, USA (D-26) were selected for CL measurements after carbon-coating on their polished surfaces. These samples contain Mn ions as an activator, but too low for divalent Fe as a quencher. SEM-CL analysis was conducted using an SEM (JEOL: JSM-5410) combined with a grating monochromator (Oxford: Mono CL2) to measure CL spectra ranging from 300 to 800 nm in 1 nm steps with a temperature controlled stage from -190 to 45 degree C. The dispersed CL was collected by a photoncounting method using a photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu: R2228) and converted to digital data. All CL spectra were corrected for the total instrumental response. All samples exhibit a broad band in red region between 580 and 640 nm at room temperature, but having a complicated shape overlapped with several bands. It suggests that Mn ions as an activator can be located at deferent sites with deferent occupancies in dolomite lattice. Therefore, a Gaussian fit was conducted to quantitatively deconvolute the emission band in an energy unit. CL of D-06 and D-26 consists of two emission components at around 1.84 and 2.15 eV. The former corresponds to an emission center of impurity Mn ions substituted for Mg site, and the latter to an emission center of divalent Mn for Ca site, resulting in deferent crystal fields. If the concentration of Mn in dolomite is not so high (above 10000 ppm) to cause quenching effect, the intensity might be

  6. Complement activation of electrogenic ion transport in isolated rat colon.

    PubMed

    McCole, D F; Otti, B; Newsholme, P; Baird, A W

    1997-11-15

    The complement cascade is an important component in many immune and inflammatory reactions and may contribute to both the diarrhoea and inflammation associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Isolated rat colonic mucosae were voltage clamped in Ussing chambers. Basolateral addition of zymosan-activated whole human serum (ZAS) induced a rapid onset, transient inward short circuit current (SCC). This response was concentration dependent and was significantly attenuated by pre-heating ZAS at 60 degrees C for 30 min. Depletion of complement from normal human serum with cobra venom factor (CVF) significantly lowered SCC responses. Chloride was the primary charge carrying ion as responses to ZAS were abolished in the presence of the loop diuretic bumetanide. The complement component C3a stimulated ion transport but not to the same extent as whole serum. Exogenous C5 was without effect. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor piroxicam significantly attenuated the response to ZAS. These findings support the possibility that complement activation may contribute to the pathophysiology of secretory diarrhoea since activation of electrogenic chloride secretion converts intestinal epithelia to a state of net fluid secretion.

  7. Comparison of Simulated and Observed Ring Current Magnetic Field and Ion Fluxes and ENA Intensity during the 5 April 2010 Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Lemon, C.; Guild, T. B.; Schulz, M.; Lui, A.; Keesee, A. M.; Goldstein, J.; Rodriguez, J. V.

    2011-12-01

    In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities, proton flux spectra and ENA intensity for the 5 April 2010 storm (minimum Dst ≈ -73 nT) to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet using the magnetically and electrostatically self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a time-varying magnetopause driven by upstream solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. We use ion temperatures inferred from TWINS energetic neutral atom (ENA) images and THEMIS/ESA and SST ion data, and proton densities from the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003] to guide our specification of the plasma sheet at 10 RE, our plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. The oxygen to proton density ratio at the plasma boundary is specified from the empirical Young et al. [JGR, 1982] study. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous (GEO) altitude (6.6 Earth radii) and on THEMIS satellites. The simulated and observed proton spectra (GOES-14/MAGPD) at GEO and global ENA intensity (TWINS 1 and 2) are compared. We discuss the response of the ring current magnetic field and ion flux distribution to expansions and compressions of the magnetosphere associated with the dynamic solar wind pressure for this storm event.

  8. The dynamic evolution of active-region-scale magnetic flux tubes in the turbulent solar convective envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Maria Ann

    2014-12-01

    The Sun exhibits cyclic properties of its large-scale magnetic field on the order of sigma22 years, with a ˜11 year frequency of sunspot occurrence. These sunspots, or active regions, are the centers of magnetically driven phenomena such as flares and coronal mass ejections. Volatile solar magnetic events directed toward the Earth pose a threat to human activities and our increasingly technological society. As such, the origin and nature of solar magnetic flux emergence is a topic of global concern. Sunspots are observable manifestations of solar magnetic fields, thus providing a photospheric link to the deep-seated dynamo mechanism. However, the manner by which bundles of magnetic field, or flux tubes, traverse the convection zone to eventual emergence at the solar surface is not well understood. To provide a connection between dynamo-generated magnetic fields and sunspots, I have performed simulations of magnetic flux emergence through the bulk of a turbulent, solar convective envelope by employing a thin flux tube model subject to interaction with flows taken from a hydrodynamic convection simulation computed through the Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code. The convective velocity field interacts with the flux tube through the drag force it experiences as it traverses through the convecting medium. Through performing these simulations, much insight has been gained about the influence of turbulent solar-like convection on the flux emergence process and resulting active region properties. I find that the dynamic evolution of flux tubes change from convection dominated to magnetic buoyancy dominated as the initial field strength of the flux tubes increases from 15 kG to 100 kG. Additionally, active-region-scale flux tubes of 40 kG and greater exhibit properties similar to those of active regions on the Sun, such as: tilt angles, rotation rates, and morphological asymmetries. The joint effect of the Coriolis force and helical motions present in convective

  9. Ion and neutral energy flux distributions to the cathode in glow discharges in Ar/Ne and Xe/Ne mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdeville, H.; Pédoussat, C.; Pitchford, L. C.

    2002-02-01

    The work presented in the article is a study of the heavy particle (ion and neutral) energy flux distributions to the cathode in conditions typical of discharges used for luminous signs for advertising ("neon" signs). The purpose of this work is to evaluate the effect of the gas mixture on the sputtering of the cathode. We have combined two models for this study: a hybrid model of the electrical properties of the cathode region of a glow discharge and a Monte Carlo simulation of the heavy particle trajectories. Using known sputtering yields for Ne, Ar, and Xe on iron cathodes, we estimate the sputtered atom flux for mixtures of Ar/Ne and Xe/Ne as a function of the percent neon in the mixture.

  10. ALTERATIONS IN CALCIUM ION ACTIVITY BY ELF AND RF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Alterations in calcium ion activity by ELF and RF electromagnetic fields

    Introduction

    Calcium ions play many important roles in biological systems. For example, calcium ion activity can be used as an indicator of second-messenger signal-transduction processe...

  11. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-08

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators.

  12. Charged particles and cluster ions produced during cooking activities.

    PubMed

    Stabile, L; Jayaratne, E R; Buonanno, G; Morawska, L

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies showed that a significant number of the particles present in indoor air are generated by cooking activities, and measured particle concentrations and exposures have been used to estimate the related human dose. The dose evaluation can be affected by the particle charge level which is usually not considered in particle deposition models. To this purpose, in this paper we show, for the very first time, the electric charge of particles generated during cooking activities and thus extending the interest on particle charging characterization to indoor micro-environments, so far essentially focused on outdoors. Particle number, together with positive and negative cluster ion concentrations, was monitored using a condensation particle counter and two air ion counters, respectively, during different cooking events. Positively-charged particle distribution fractions during gas combustion, bacon grilling, and eggplant grilling events were measured by two Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer spectrometers, used with and without a neutralizer. Finally, a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer was used to measure the charge specific particle distributions of bacon and eggplant grilling experiments, selecting particles of 30, 50, 80 and 100 nm in mobility diameter. The total fraction of positively-charged particles was 4.0%, 7.9%, and 5.6% for gas combustion, bacon grilling, and eggplant grilling events, respectively, then lower than other typical outdoor combustion-generated particles.

  13. Distribution of the Effect of Solar Proton Flux And Geomagnetic Activity on the Stratospheric Ozone Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, P. I. Y.; Tassev, Y.; Yanev, T.; Tomova, D.

    Two-way MANOVA was used to examine the impact of two factors: 1) the proton flux intensity and 2) the geomagnetic activity on the dependant variable "ozone mixing ratio" which characterizes the stratospheric ozone profiles. The examination was carried out with fixed levels of two other factors: a) the heights at which the "ozone mixing ratio" was recorded, i,e, 35 km, 30.2 km, 24.5 km, 18.4 km, 15.6 km and b) the energetic intervals within which the proton flux was measured, i.e. =0,6-4,2 MeV; 4,2-8,7 MeV; 8,7-14,5 MeV; 15-44 MeV; 39-82 MeV; 84-200 MeV; 110-500 MeV. The analysis was performed for all combinations of levels of the factors a) and b) for which data was available. It was aimed at revealing which of the factors 1) and 2) were dominating with different combinations of the factors a) and b) with fixed levels. For this purpose a post hoc analysis was performed as well. The main results are as follows: factors 1) and 2) exert statistically significant impact on the dependant variable at all of the heights examined, but not for all of energetic intervals; increase of the ozone mixing ratio was observed as a main effect of the proton flux intensity at heights 24.5 km, 18.4 km, 15.6 km, but the analysis of the simultaneous acting of factors 1) and 2) revealed a decrease of the dependant variable at these heights; these effects possibly indicate the existence of two different mechanisms of impact on the ozone mixing ratio; the afore- discussed effects decrease with the height and therefore their graphical image was named "Christmas tree".

  14. EMERGENCE OF HELICAL FLUX AND THE FORMATION OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT CHANNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lites, B. W.; Kubo, M.; Berger, T.; Frank, Z.; Shine, R.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A.; Okamoto, T. J.; Otsuji, K.

    2010-07-20

    We present comprehensive observations of the formation and evolution of a filament channel within NOAA Active Region (AR) 10978 from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope and TRACE. We employ sequences of Hinode spectro-polarimeter maps of the AR, accompanying Hinode Narrowband Filter Instrument magnetograms in the Na I D1 line, Hinode Broadband Filter Instrument filtergrams in the Ca II H line and G-band, Hinode X-ray telescope X-ray images, and TRACE Fe IX 171 A image sequences. The development of the channel resembles qualitatively that presented by Okamoto et al. in that many indicators point to the emergence of a pre-existing sub-surface magnetic flux rope. The consolidation of the filament channel into a coherent structure takes place rapidly during the course of a few hours, and the filament form then gradually shrinks in width over the following two days. Particular to this filament channel is the observation of a segment along its length of horizontal, weak (500 G) flux that, unlike the rest of the filament channel, is not immediately flanked by strong vertical plage fields of opposite polarity on each side of the filament. Because this isolated horizontal field is observed in photospheric lines, we infer that it is unlikely that the channel formed as a result of reconnection in the corona, but the low values of inferred magnetic fill fraction along the entire length of the filament channel suggest that the bulk of the field resides somewhat above the low photosphere. Correlation tracking of granulation in the G band presents no evidence for either systematic flows toward the channel or systematic shear flows along it. The absence of these flows, along with other indications of these data from multiple sources, reinforces (but does not conclusively demonstrate) the picture of an emerging flux rope as the origin of this AR filament channel.

  15. Thermally activated flux flow in superconducting epitaxial FeSe0.6Te0.4 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, D.; Choi, W. J.; Seo, Y. I.; Seo, Sehun; Lee, Sanghan; Kwon, Yong Seung

    The thermally activated flux flow effect has been studied in epitaxial FeSe0.6Te0.4 thin film grown by a PLD method through the electrical resistivity measurement under various magnetic fields for B//c and B//ab. The results showed that the thermally activated flux flow effect is well described by the nonlinear temperature-dependent activation energy. The evaluated apparent activation energy U0 (B) is one order larger than the reported results and showed the double-linearity in both magnetic field directions. Furthermore, the FeSe0.6Te0.4 thin film shows the anisotropy of 5.6 near Tc and 2D-like superconducting behavior in thermally activated flux flow region. In addition, the vortex glass transition and the temperature dependence of the high critical fields were determined.

  16. Flux Tensor Constrained Geodesic Active Contours with Sensor Fusion for Persistent Object Tracking.

    PubMed

    Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Nath, Sumit Kumar; Seetharaman, Gunasekaran

    2007-08-01

    This paper makes new contributions in motion detection, object segmentation and trajectory estimation to create a successful object tracking system. A new efficient motion detection algorithm referred to as the flux tensor is used to detect moving objects in infrared video without requiring background modeling or contour extraction. The flux tensor-based motion detector when applied to infrared video is more accurate than thresholding "hot-spots", and is insensitive to shadows as well as illumination changes in the visible channel. In real world monitoring tasks fusing scene information from multiple sensors and sources is a useful core mechanism to deal with complex scenes, lighting conditions and environmental variables. The object segmentation algorithm uses level set-based geodesic active contour evolution that incorporates the fusion of visible color and infrared edge informations in a novel manner. Touching or overlapping objects are further refined during the segmentation process using an appropriate shape-based model. Multiple object tracking using correspondence graphs is extended to handle groups of objects and occlusion events by Kalman filter-based cluster trajectory analysis and watershed segmentation. The proposed object tracking algorithm was successfully tested on several difficult outdoor multispectral videos from stationary sensors and is not confounded by shadows or illumination variations.

  17. δ-SUNSPOT FORMATION IN SIMULATION OF ACTIVE-REGION-SCALE FLUX EMERGENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong

    2015-06-10

    δ-sunspots, with highly complex magnetic structures, are very productive in energetic eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region-scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope, following the approach of Toriumi et al. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact δ-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line. The formation of the δ-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging patterns similar to those formed in observations, e.g., the inverted polarity against Hale's law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, and strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the polarity inversion line (PIL). Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the δ-spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  18. δ-Sunspot Formation in Simulation of Active-region-scale Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong

    2015-06-01

    δ-sunspots, with highly complex magnetic structures, are very productive in energetic eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region-scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope, following the approach of Toriumi et al. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact δ-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line. The formation of the δ-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging patterns similar to those formed in observations, e.g., the inverted polarity against Hale's law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, and strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the polarity inversion line (PIL). Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the δ-spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  19. Formation of δ-Sunspot in Simulations of Active-Region-Scale Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong

    2015-04-01

    δ-sunspots, with highly complex magnetic structures, are very productive in energetic eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region-scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact δ-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line. The formation of the δ-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging pattherns similar to those formed in observations, e.g. the inverted polarity against Hale’s law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the PIL. Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the -spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  20. Energy spectrum of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes and its connection with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. J.; Feng, H. Q.; Chao, J. K.

    2008-03-01

    Context: Recent observations of the solar wind show that interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (IMFRs) have a continuous scale-distribution from small-scale flux ropes to large-scale magnetic clouds. Aims: In this work, we investigate the energy spectrum of IMFRs and its possible connection with solar activity. Methods: In consideration of the detectable probability of an IMFR to be proportional to its diameter, the actual energy spectrum of IMFRs can be obtained from the observed spectrum based on spacecraft observations in the solar wind. Results: It is found that IMFRs have a negative power-law spectrum with an index α = 1.36±0.03, which is similar to that of solar flares, and is probably representative of interplanetary energy spectrum of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), that is, the energy spectrum of interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). This indicates that the energy distribution of CMEs has a similar negative power-law spectrum. In particular, there are numerous small-scale CMEs in the solar corona, and their interplanetary consequences may be directly detected in situ by spacecraft in the solar wind as small-scale IMFRs, although they are too weak to appear clearly in current coronagraph observations. Conclusions: The presence of small-scale CMEs, especially the energy spectrum of CMEs is potentially important for understanding both the solar magneto-atmosphere and CMEs.

  1. Flux Tensor Constrained Geodesic Active Contours with Sensor Fusion for Persistent Object Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Nath, Sumit Kumar; Seetharaman, Gunasekaran

    2007-01-01

    This paper makes new contributions in motion detection, object segmentation and trajectory estimation to create a successful object tracking system. A new efficient motion detection algorithm referred to as the flux tensor is used to detect moving objects in infrared video without requiring background modeling or contour extraction. The flux tensor-based motion detector when applied to infrared video is more accurate than thresholding ”hot-spots”, and is insensitive to shadows as well as illumination changes in the visible channel. In real world monitoring tasks fusing scene information from multiple sensors and sources is a useful core mechanism to deal with complex scenes, lighting conditions and environmental variables. The object segmentation algorithm uses level set-based geodesic active contour evolution that incorporates the fusion of visible color and infrared edge informations in a novel manner. Touching or overlapping objects are further refined during the segmentation process using an appropriate shape-based model. Multiple object tracking using correspondence graphs is extended to handle groups of objects and occlusion events by Kalman filter-based cluster trajectory analysis and watershed segmentation. The proposed object tracking algorithm was successfully tested on several difficult outdoor multispectral videos from stationary sensors and is not confounded by shadows or illumination variations. PMID:19096530

  2. Control of Pitching Airfoil Aerodynamics by Vorticity Flux Modification using Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across a pitching airfoil is used to regulate the vorticity flux over the airfoil's surface and thereby to control aerodynamic loads in wind tunnel experiments. The range of pitch angles is varied beyond the static stall margin of the 2-D VR-7 airfoil at reduced pitching rates up to k = 0.42. Bleed is regulated dynamically using piezoelectric louvers between the model's pressure side near the trailing edge and the suction surface near the leading edge. The time-dependent evolution of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in the wake during the pitch cycle is investigated using high-speed PIV and the aerodynamic forces and moments are measured using integrated load cells. The timing of the dynamic stall vorticity flux into the near wake and its effect on the flow field are analyzed in the presence and absence of bleed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). It is shown that bleed actuation alters the production, accumulation, and advection of vorticity concentrations near the surface with significant effects on the evolution, and, in particular, the timing of dynamic stall vortices. These changes are manifested by alteration of the lift hysteresis and improvement of pitch stability during the cycle, while maintaining cycle-averaged lift to within 5% of the base flow level with significant implications for improvement of the stability of flexible wings and rotor blades. This work is supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  3. Trend of photospheric helicity flux in active regions generating halo CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyrli, Aimilia; Zuccarello, Francesco; Zuccarello, Francesca; Romano, Paolo; Guglielmino, Salvatore Luigi; Spadaro, Daniele; Hood, Alan; Mackay, Duncan

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are very energetic events initiated in the solar atmosphere, re-sulting in the expulsion of magnetized plasma clouds that propagate into interplanetary space. It has been proposed that CMEs can play an important role in shedding magnetic helicity, avoiding its endless accumulation in the corona. We therefore investigated the behavior of magnetic helicity accumulation in sites where the initiation of CMEs occurred, in order to de-termine whether and how changes in magnetic helicity accumulation are temporally correlated with CME occurrence. After identifying the active regions (AR) where the CMEs were ini-tiated by means of a double cross-check based on the flaring-eruptive activity and the use of SOHO/EIT difference images, we used MDI magnetograms to calculate magnetic flux evolu-tion, magnetic helicity injection rate and magnetic helicity injection in 10 active regions that gave rise to 12 halo CMEs observed during the period February 2000 -June 2003. No unique behavior in magnetic helicity injection accompanying halo CME occurrence is found. In fact, in some cases there is an abrupt change in helicity injection timely correlated with the CME event, while in some others no significant variation is recorded. However, our analysis show that the most significant changes in magnetic flux and magnetic helicity injection are associated with impulsive CMEs rather than gradual CMEs. Moreover, the most significant changes in mag-netic helicity are observed when X-class flares or eruptive filaments occur, while the occurrence of flares of class C or M seems not to affect significantly the magnetic helicity accumulation.

  4. On a novel rate theory for transport in narrow ion channels and its application to the study of flux optimization via geometric effects.

    PubMed

    Abad, E; Reingruber, J; Sansom, M S P

    2009-02-28

    We present a novel rate theory based on the notions of splitting probability and mean first passage time to describe single-ion conduction in narrow, effectively one-dimensional membrane channels. In contrast to traditional approaches such as transition state theory or Kramers theory, transitions between different conduction states in our model are governed by rates which depend on the full geometry of the potential of mean force (PMF) resulting from the superposition of an equilibrium free energy profile and a transmembrane potential induced by a nonequilibrium constraint. If a detailed theoretical PMF is available (e.g., from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations), it can be used to compute characteristic conductance curves in the framework of our model, thereby bridging the gap between the atomistic and the mesoscopic level of description. Explicit analytic solutions for the rates, the ion flux, and the associated electric current can be obtained by approximating the actual PMF by a piecewise linear potential. As illustrative examples, we consider both a theoretical and an experimental application of the model. The theoretical example is based on a hypothetical channel with a fully symmetric sawtooth equilibrium PMF. For this system, we explore how changes in the spatial extent of the binding sites affect the rate of transport when a linear voltage ramp is applied. Already for the case of a single binding site, we find that there is an optimum size of the site which maximizes the current through the channel provided that the applied voltage exceeds a threshold value given by the binding energy of the site. The above optimization effect is shown to arise from the complex interplay between the channel structure and the applied electric field, expressed by a nonlinear dependence of the rates with respect to the linear size of the binding site. In studying the properties of current-voltage curves, we find a double crossover between sublinear and superlinear

  5. Interrupting the flux of delocalized electrons on a dibenzo-18-crown-6-embedded graphite sheet and its relative counteraction in the presence of potassium ions.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Taherpour, Avat Arman; Pashabadi, Afshin

    2016-06-20

    Delocalized electrons are free to move throughout a graphite sheet. Based on the interruption of this flux, a new strategy has been developed to establish a highly sensitive impedimetric sensing device for K(+) ions. Here, we report on the successful application of a simple graphite paste incorporated into dibenzo-18-crown-6 (DB18C6), which effectively impedes the electron flux on the graphite sheet. Most importantly, this interruption can be selectively obviated in the presence of potassium ion. Our quantum mechanics-density functional theory (QM-DFT) calculations revealed that, among the possible surface-configurations of the ligand on the graphite surface, the "distorted concave" form is a more energy-favorable configuration and existed in a higher probability. This form is capable of impeding the passage of delocalized electrons over the graphite sheets. From modeling of the detecting processes, the surface configuration of DB18C6 in treating with K(+) was intensely changed to "convex", which facilitates the passage of electrons along the graphite sheet. Optimizations of the structures of DB18C6 and its 1 : 1 and 2 : 1 complexes with potassium ion were also performed using QM-DFT calculations. On the other hand, the modeling of the graphene sheet was performed using the molecular mechanics MMFF94 method, which was used to model the detecting process. The proposed sensor was found to quantify the potassium ion by faradaic impedance spectroscopy in the range of 50 to 1500 pM with a detection limit of 35 pM.

  6. Iontophoretic transport through porous membranes using scanning electrochemical microscopy: application to in vitro studies of ion fluxes through skin.

    PubMed

    Scott, E R; White, H S; Phipps, J B

    1993-06-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is used to map localized iontophoretic fluxes of electroactive species through porous membranes. A method is described that allows both the rate of transport of species from a microscopic pore and the pore's diameter to be measured. SECM images and analyses of synthetic porous membranes (track-etched polycarbonate and mica membranes) and hairless mouse skin are reported. Preliminary analysis of SECM images of the mouse skin indicates that a significant percentage of the iontophoretic flux occurs through pores associated with hair follicles.

  7. Nuclear pore ion channel activity in live syncytial nuclei.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Jose Omar

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are important nanochannels for the control of gene activity and expression. Most of our knowledge of NPC function has been derived from isolated nuclei and permeabilized cells in cell lysates/extracts. Since recent patch-clamp work has challenged the dogma that NPCs are freely permeable to small particles, a preparation of isolated living nuclei in their native liquid environment was sought and found: the syncytial nuclei in the water of the coconut Cocos nucifera. These nuclei have all properties of NPC-mediated macromolecular transport (MMT) and express foreign green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmids. They display chromatin movement, are created by particle aggregation or by division, can grow by throwing filaments to catch material, etc. This study shows, for the first time, that living NPCs engaged in MMT do not transport physiological ions - a phenomenon that explains observations of nucleocytoplasmic ion gradients. Since coconuts are inexpensive (less than US$1/nut per litre), this robust preparation may contribute to our understanding of NPCs and cell nucleus and to the development of biotechnologies for the production of DNA, RNA and proteins.

  8. Ligand-Gated Ion Channels: Permeation and Activation1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Joseph W.; Barry, Peter H.

    Ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) are fast-responding channels in which the receptor, which binds the activating molecule (the ligand), and the ion channel are part of the same nanomolecular protein complex. This chapter will describe the properties and functions of the nicotinic acetylcholine LGIC superfamily, which play a critical role in the fast chemical transmission of electrical signals between nerve cells at synapses and between nerve and muscle cells at endplates. All the processing functions of the brain and the resulting behavioral output depend on chemical transmission across such neuronal interconnections. To describe the properties of the channels of this LGIC superfamily,we will mainly use two examples of this family of channels: the excitatory nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR) channels. In the chemical transmission of electrical signals, the arrival of an electrical signal at the synaptic terminal of a nerve causes the release of a chemical signal—a neurotransmitter molecule (the ligand, also referred to as the agonist). The neurotransmitter rapidly diffuses across the very narrow 20-40 nm synaptic gap between the cells and binds to the LGIC receptors in the membrane of the target (postsynaptic) cell and generates a new electrical signal in that cell (e.g., Kandel et al., 2000). How this chemical signal is converted into an electrical one depends on the fundamental properties of LGICs and the ionic composition of the postsynaptic cell and its external solution.

  9. Activation of ion transport systems during cell volume regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eveloff, J.L.; Warnock, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    This review discusses the activation of transport pathways during volume regulation, including their characteristics, the possible biochemical pathways that may mediate the activation of transport pathways, and the relations between volume regulation and transepithelial transport in renal cells. Many cells regulate their volume when exposed to an anisotonic medium. The changes in cell volume are caused by activation of ion transport pathways, plus the accompanying osmotically driven water movement such that cell volume returns toward normal levels. The swelling of hypertonically shrunken cells is termed regulatory volume increase (RVI) and involves an influx of NaCl into the cell via either activation of Na-Cl, Na-K-2Cl cotransport systems, or Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchangers. The reshrinking of hypotonically swollen cells is termed regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and involves an efflux of KCl and water from the cell by activation of either separate K/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/ conductances, a K-Cl cotransport system, or parallel K/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchangers. The biochemical mechanisms involved in the activation of transport systems are largely unknown, however, the phosphoinositide pathway may be implicated in RVI; phorbol esters, cGMP, and Ca/sup 2 +/ affect the process of volume regulation. Renal tubular cells, as well as the blood cells that transverse the medulla, are subjected to increasing osmotic gradients from the corticomedullary junction to the papillary tip, as well as changing interstitial and tubule fluid osmolarity, depending on the diuretic state of the animal. Medullary cells from the loop of Henle and the papilla can volume regulate by activating Na-K-2Cl cotransport or Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchange systems.

  10. Interplanetary proton flux and solar wind conditions for different solar activities interacting with spacecraft and astronauts in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat, Cyrus

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research is to determine the interplanetary proton flux and solar wind conditions by using data from several satellites such as Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) in particular GOES 9, GOES 11, GOES 12, GOES 13, and Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) to determine proton flux in different solar wind conditions. The data from above satellites were used to determine space weather conditions in which the goals are to evaluate proton fluxes for four periods of solar cycle activity: a solar cycle 23/24 minimum (2008), close to a solar cycle 22/23 minimum (1997), with intermediate activity (2011) and for about maximum activity for the cycle 23 (2003), to compare data of two period of solar cycle in 2003 and 2008 (Max vs. Min), to compare data of two period of solar cycle in 1997 and 2008 (Min vs. Min), to compare soft X-ray flux from SOHO with proton 1-10 MeV flux from GOES 9 for strong flare in 1997. To conclude the above evaluations are being used to determine the interaction between the space weather conditions and the following consequences of these conditions important for astronautics and everyday human activity: 1- Satellite and Spacecraft charging, 2-Dangerous conditions for onboard electronics and astronauts during strong solar flare events, and 3- Total Electron Content (TEC), Global Positioning System (GPS), and radio communication problems related to solar activity.

  11. Formation of a double-decker magnetic flux rope in the sigmoidal solar active region 11520

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Guo, Y.; Sun, X. D.; Wang, Y. M.; Kliem, B.; Deng, Y. Y.

    2014-07-10

    In this paper, we address the formation of a magnetic flux rope (MFR) that erupted on 2012 July 12 and caused a strong geomagnetic storm event on July 15. Through analyzing the long-term evolution of the associated active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, it is found that the twisted field of an MFR, indicated by a continuous S-shaped sigmoid, is built up from two groups of sheared arcades near the main polarity inversion line a half day before the eruption. The temperature within the twisted field and sheared arcades is higher than that of the ambient volume, suggesting that magnetic reconnection most likely works there. The driver behind the reconnection is attributed to shearing and converging motions at magnetic footpoints with velocities in the range of 0.1-0.6 km s{sup –1}. The rotation of the preceding sunspot also contributes to the MFR buildup. Extrapolated three-dimensional non-linear force-free field structures further reveal the locations of the reconnection to be in a bald-patch region and in a hyperbolic flux tube. About 2 hr before the eruption, indications of a second MFR in the form of an S-shaped hot channel are seen. It lies above the original MFR that continuously exists and includes a filament. The whole structure thus makes up a stable double-decker MFR system for hours prior to the eruption. Eventually, after entering the domain of instability, the high-lying MFR impulsively erupts to generate a fast coronal mass ejection and X-class flare; while the low-lying MFR remains behind and continuously maintains the sigmoidicity of the active region.

  12. Formation of a Double-decker Magnetic Flux Rope in the Sigmoidal Solar Active Region 11520

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Sun, X. D.; Guo, Y.; Wang, Y. M.; Kliem, B.; Deng, Y. Y.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we address the formation of a magnetic flux rope (MFR) that erupted on 2012 July 12 and caused a strong geomagnetic storm event on July 15. Through analyzing the long-term evolution of the associated active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, it is found that the twisted field of an MFR, indicated by a continuous S-shaped sigmoid, is built up from two groups of sheared arcades near the main polarity inversion line a half day before the eruption. The temperature within the twisted field and sheared arcades is higher than that of the ambient volume, suggesting that magnetic reconnection most likely works there. The driver behind the reconnection is attributed to shearing and converging motions at magnetic footpoints with velocities in the range of 0.1-0.6 km s-1. The rotation of the preceding sunspot also contributes to the MFR buildup. Extrapolated three-dimensional non-linear force-free field structures further reveal the locations of the reconnection to be in a bald-patch region and in a hyperbolic flux tube. About 2 hr before the eruption, indications of a second MFR in the form of an S-shaped hot channel are seen. It lies above the original MFR that continuously exists and includes a filament. The whole structure thus makes up a stable double-decker MFR system for hours prior to the eruption. Eventually, after entering the domain of instability, the high-lying MFR impulsively erupts to generate a fast coronal mass ejection and X-class flare; while the low-lying MFR remains behind and continuously maintains the sigmoidicity of the active region.

  13. Energy Deposition and Escape Fluxes Induced by Energetic Solar Wind Ions and ENAs Precipitating into Mars Atmosphere: Accurate Consideration of Energy Transfer Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, V. A.; Lewkow, N.; Gacesa, M.

    2014-12-01

    Formation and evolution of neutral fluxes of atoms and molecules escaping from the Mars atmosphere have been investigated for the sputtering and photo-chemical mechanisms. Energy and momentum transfer in collisions between the atmospheric gas and fast atoms and molecules have been considered using our recently obtained angular and energy dependent cross sections[1]. We have showed that accurate angular dependent collision cross sections are critical for the description of the energy relaxation of precipitating keV energetic ions/ENAs and for computations of altitude profiles of the fast atom and molecule production rates in recoil collisions. Upward and escape fluxes of the secondary energetic He and O atoms and H2, N2, CO and CO2 molecules, induced by precipitating ENAs, have been determined and their non-thermal energy distribution functions have been computed at different altitudes for different solar conditions. Precipitation and energy deposition of the energetic H2O molecules and products of their dissociations into the Mars atmosphere in the Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) - Mars interaction have been modeled using accurate cross sections. Reflection of precipitating ENAs by the Mars atmosphere has been analyzed in detail. [1] N. Lewkow and V. Kharchenko, "Precipitation of Energetic Neutral Atoms and Escape Fluxes induced from the Mars Atmosphere, ApJ, v.790, p.98 (2014).

  14. Investigating Possible Links between Incoming Cosmic Ray Fluxes and Lightning Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chronis, Themis

    2010-05-01

    During the past two decades, particular scientific attention has been drawn to the potential cosmic ray-atmospheric coupling. Galactic cosmic rays reaching the upper troposphere are suggested as the key modulators of the global electric circuit with further implications on cloud microphysical processes. Unfortunately, the scarcity of the associated observations renders the evaluation of the theoritized mechanisms rather difficult. This contribution proposes a different approach by introducing observations provided by the National Lightning Detection Network for the period 1990-2005. The study area encompasses the greater part of continental U.S. and the surrounding waters. The results highlight a statistically significant positive trend between monthly lightning activity and galactic cosmic ray fluxes during the winter season. During the summer season the trend becomes statistically non-significant. In addition, the featured analysis introduces a technique to assess the potential impact of Forbush Events on daily lightning activity. Results illustrate that lightning activity may be responsive (minimized) 4-5 days following a Forbush Event.

  15. Modulation of divalent cation-activated chloride ion currents.

    PubMed

    Scott, R H; McGuirk, S M; Dolphin, A C

    1988-07-01

    1. Voltage-sensitive calcium channel currents carried by Ca2+ (ICa) or Ba2+ (IBa) were followed by tail currents carried by Cl- ions in approximately 45% of cultured dorsal root ganglion neurones. 2. Extracellular application of (-)-baclofen (100 microM) inhibited IBa and ICl(Ba). Bay K 8644 (5 microM) potentiated both currents. 3. Intracellular GTP-gamma-S increased the proportion of neurones in which ICl(Ba) was recorded. In addition, the activation by GTP-gamma-S of a pertussis toxin-sensitive GTP binding (G)-protein resulted in a steady increase in the Cl- tail current with time, despite a concurrent reduction in IBa. 4. Extracellular application of 10mM caffeine selectively reduced ICl(Ba) without significant change in IBa. When Ca2+ was the charge carrier, caffeine had little effect on ICl(Ca), and increased the inactivation of ICa. 5. We conclude that, in addition to being regulated by divalent cation entry through Ca2+ channels, the Cl- current is also regulated by G-protein activation. The mechanism of activation of ICl(Ba) may involve Ca2+ release from intracellular stores.

  16. Temperature Activated Diffusion of Radicals through Ion Implanted Polymers.

    PubMed

    Wakelin, Edgar A; Davies, Michael J; Bilek, Marcela M M; McKenzie, David R

    2015-12-02

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a promising technique for immobilizing biomolecules on the surface of polymers. Radicals generated in a subsurface layer by PIII treatment diffuse throughout the substrate, forming covalent bonds to molecules when they reach the surface. Understanding and controlling the diffusion of radicals through this layer will enable efficient optimization of this technique. We develop a model based on site to site diffusion according to Fick's second law with temperature activation according to the Arrhenius relation. Using our model, the Arrhenius exponential prefactor (for barrierless diffusion), D0, and activation energy, EA, for a radical to diffuse from one position to another are found to be 3.11 × 10(-17) m(2) s(-1) and 0.31 eV, respectively. The model fits experimental data with a high degree of accuracy and allows for accurate prediction of radical diffusion to the surface. The model makes useful predictions for the lifetime over which the surface is sufficiently active to covalently immobilize biomolecules and it can be used to determine radical fluence during biomolecule incubation for a range of storage and incubation temperatures so facilitating selection of the most appropriate parameters.

  17. X-ray diffraction study on residual stress and preferred orientation in thin titanium films subjected to a high ion flux during deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholz, M.; Genzel, C.; Jung, T.

    2004-12-15

    The structural properties of thin Ti films were studied by x-ray scattering techniques aiming at an improved understanding of residual stress and preferred orientation in thin metal films when subjected to a high ion flux during deposition. The samples were prepared by gas-flow sputtering and by subjecting the substrate to a midfrequency bias during deposition. Large arrival ratios of ions over deposited atoms, J{sub i}/J{sub a}, could be realized by this processing. Some hundred nanometers thin Ti layers were characterized by x-ray reflectometry, symmetric {theta}/2{theta} diffraction, pole figure analysis, and residual stress measurements by the sin{sup 2} {psi} and by the scattering vector technique, the latter method enabling a depth-resolved determination of stress fields. Whereas the stress state in an unbiased sample turned out to be tensile accompanied by a dominating (00.l) texture component, the biased samples were found to exhibit an overall compressive stress and a (h0.0) fiber texture. The results for the unbiased sample could be explained by a minimization of the elastic energy density which favors the preferred orientation of crystallographic c axes normal to the substrate plane. The biased samples closely resembled macroscopic Ti workpieces that were subjected to severe plastic deformation as was indicated by (i) the (h0.0) fiber texture along the load direction (ii) the large compressive in-plane residual stress {sigma}{sub perpendicular}, and (iii) the depth-resolved course of {sigma}{sub perpendicular}(z). It is concluded that a high ion flux onto a growing Ti film has the same effect as a uniaxial mechanical load stress would have.

  18. Decrease of keV electron and ion fluxes in the dayside magnetosphere during the early phase of magnetospheric disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultqvist, B.; Aparicio, B.; Borg, H.; Arnoldy, R.; Moore, T. E.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that a decrease of the keV particle fluxes in the dayside magnetosphere near the geosynchronous orbit is characteristic of the first several hours of magnetospheric disturbances. After some hours newly injected plasma from the nightside reaches the 'evacuated' regions of the dayside magnetosphere and strong flux increases are observed. The 'evacuation' of the dayside magnetosphere is interpreted in terms of a change in the convection pattern associated with an increase of the large scale electric field at the onset of the disturbance. The model presented is capable of accommodating all characteristics of the observational data, such as the temporal and spatial distributions, energy and pitch angle characteristics, and differences between electrons and protons.

  19. Enhancement of Ion Activation and Collision-Induced Dissociation by Simultaneous Dipolar Excitation of Ions in x- and y-Directions in a Linear Ion Trap.

    PubMed

    Dang, Qiankun; Xu, Fuxing; Xie, Xiaodong; Xu, Chongsheng; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2015-06-02

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) in linear ion traps is usually performed by applying a dipolar alternating current (AC) signal to one pair of electrodes, which results in ion excitation mainly in one direction. In this paper, we report simulation and experimental studies of the ion excitation in two coordinate directions by applying identical dipolar AC signals to two pairs of electrodes simultaneously. Theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate that the ion kinetic energy is higher than that using the conventional CID method. Experimental results show that more activation energy (as determined by the intensity ratio of the a4/b4 fragments from the CID of protonated leucine enkephalin) can be deposited into parent ions in this method. The dissociation rate constant in this method was about 3.8 times higher than that in the conventional method under the same experimental condition, at the Mathieu parameter qu (where u = x, y) value of 0.25. The ion fragmentation efficiency is also significantly improved. Compared with the conventional method, the smaller qu value can be used in this method to obtain the same internal energy deposited into ions. Consequently, the "low mass cut-off" is redeemed and more fragment ions can be detected. This excitation method can be implemented easily without changing any experimental parameters.

  20. INVESTIGATING TWO SUCCESSIVE FLUX ROPE ERUPTIONS IN A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Zhang, J.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.; Olmedo, O.; Sun, X. D.; Liu, Y.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate two successive flux rope (FR1 and FR2) eruptions resulting in two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2012 January 23. Both flux ropes (FRs) appeared as an EUV channel structure in the images of high temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly prior to the CME eruption. Through fitting their height evolution with a function consisting of linear and exponential components, we determine the onset time of the FR impulsive acceleration with high temporal accuracy for the first time. Using this onset time, we divide the evolution of the FRs in the low corona into two phases: a slow rise phase and an impulsive acceleration phase. In the slow rise phase of FR1, the appearance of sporadic EUV and UV brightening and the strong shearing along the polarity inverse line indicates that the quasi-separatrix-layer reconnection likely initiates the slow rise. On the other hand, for FR2, we mainly contribute its slow rise to the FR1 eruption, which partially opened the overlying field and thus decreased the magnetic restriction. At the onset of the impulsive acceleration phase, FR1 (FR2) reaches the critical height of 84.4 ± 11.2 Mm (86.2 ± 13.0 Mm) where the decline of the overlying field with height is fast enough to trigger the torus instability. After a very short interval (∼2 minutes), the flare emission began to enhance. These results reveal the compound activity involving multiple magnetic FRs and further suggest that the ideal torus instability probably plays the essential role of initiating the impulsive acceleration of CMEs.

  1. Adsorption of metal ions by pecan shell-based granular activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Bansode, R R; Losso, J N; Marshall, W E; Rao, R M; Portier, R J

    2003-09-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the adsorption effectiveness of pecan shell-based granular activated carbons (GACs) in removing metal ions (Cu(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+)) commonly found in municipal and industrial wastewater. Pecan shells were activated by phosphoric acid, steam or carbon dioxide activation methods. Metal ion adsorption of shell-based GACs was compared to the metal ion adsorption of a commercial carbon, namely, Calgon's Filtrasorb 200. Adsorption experiments were conducted using solutions containing all three metal ions in order to investigate the competitive effects of the metal ions as would occur in contaminated wastewater. The results obtained from this study showed that acid-activated pecan shell carbon adsorbed more lead ion and zinc ion than any of the other carbons, especially at carbon doses of 0.2-1.0%. However, steam-activated pecan shell carbon adsorbed more copper ion than the other carbons, particularly using carbon doses above 0.2%. In general, Filtrasorb 200 and carbon dioxide-activated pecan shell carbons were poor metal ion adsorbents. The results indicate that acid- and steam-activated pecan shell-based GACs are effective metal ion adsorbents and can potentially replace typical coal-based GACs in treatment of metal contaminated wastewater.

  2. Fossil fuel burning in Taylor Valley, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica: Estimating the role of scientific activities on carbon and nitrogen reservoirs and fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, W.B.; Nezat, C.A.; Welch, K.A.; Kottmeier, S.T.; Doran, P.T.

    2000-05-01

    Particulate organic and elemental carbon and nitrogen as well as NO{sub x} fluxes from scientific activities have been computed for Taylor Valley, Antarctica ({approximately}78{degree} S). These authropogenic fluxes have been compared to both the natural fluxes and landscape reservoirs as determined from Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) investigations in the valley. The anthropogenic, nongaseous carbon fluxes are minor compared to the natural fluxes, while the anthropogenic NO{sub x} flux may be potentially important over decadal time scales.

  3. Comparisons of Simulated and Observed Stormtime Magnetic Intensities, Ion Plasma Parameters, and ENA Proton Flux in the Ring Current During Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Lemon, C.; Guild, T. B.; Schulz, M.; Roeder, J. L.; Le, G.; Lui, T.; Goldstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities, proton flux spectra and/or ENA fluxes for two storm events to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet using the magnetically and electrostatically self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a time-varying magnetopause driven by upstream solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Using either in-situ data (e.g., LANL/MPA and SOPA) or the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003], we specify the plasma sheet pressure and density at 10 Earth radii as the plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous altitude (6.6 Earth radii) and any other available satellite. We simulate a larger (11 August 2000; minimum Dst = -106 nT) and a smaller (6 April 2010; minimum Dst = 73 nT) storm. For the 11 August 2000 storm, we compare simulated and observed proton spectra (LANL/MPA and SOPA and Polar/CAMMICE). For the more recent 6 April 2010 storm we compare simulated and observed proton spectra (THEMIS) and energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux (TWINS). We discuss the response of the ring current magnetic field and ion flux distribution to expansions and compressions of the magnetosphere associated with the dynamic solar wind pressure for these storm events.

  4. Characteristics of Ion Activation and Collision Induced Dissociation Using Digital Ion Trap Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fuxing; Dang, Qiankun; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Ding, Li; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2016-08-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) is one of the most established techniques for tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The CID of mass selected ion could be realized by ion resonance excitation with a digital rectangular waveform. The method is simple, and highly efficient CID result could be obtained by optimizing the experimental parameters, such as digital waveform voltage, frequency, and q value. In this work, the relationship between ion trapping waveform voltage and frequency at preselected q value, the relationship between waveform frequency and the q value at certain ion trapping voltage for optimum CID efficiency were investigated. Experiment results showed that the max CID efficiency of precursor reserpine ions can be obtained at different trapping waveform voltage and frequency when q and β are different. Based on systematic experimental analysis, the optimum experimental conditions for high CID efficiency can be calculated at any selected β or q. By using digital ion trap technology, the CID process and efficient fragmentation of parent ions can be realized by simply changing the trapping waveform amplitude, frequency, and the β values in the digital ion trap mass spectrometry. The technology and method are simple. It has potential use in ion trap mass spectrometry.

  5. High-resolution digital movies of emerging flux and horizontal flows in active regions on the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topka, K.; Ferguson, S.; Frank, Z.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution observations of active regions in many wavelength bands obtained at the Vacuum Tower Telescope of NSO/Sunspot (Sacramento Peak) are presented. The SOUP tunable filter, HRSO 1024 x 1024 CCD camera, and a sunspot tracker for image stabilization were used. Subarrays of 512 x 512 pixels were processed digitally and recorded on videodisk in movie format. The movies with 0.5 to 1 arcsecond resolution of the following simultaneous observations were shown: green continuum, longitudinal magnetogram, Doppler velocity, Fe I 5576 A line center, H alpha wings, and H alpha line center. The best set of movies show a 90 x 90 arcsecond field-of-view of an active region at S29, W11. When viewed at speeds of a few thousand times real-time, the photospheric movies clearly show the active region fields being distorted by a remarkable combination of systematic flows and small eruptions of new flux. Flux emergence is most easily discovered in line center movies: an elongated dark feature appears first, followed soon after by bright points at one or both ends. A brief, strong upflow is seen when the dark feature first appears; downflow in the bright points persists much longer. The magnetic flux appears to increase gradually over this extended period. Some of the flux emergence events were studied in detail, with measurements of horizontal and vertical velocities and magnetic flux versus time within one footpoint of the loop.

  6. Parallel determination of enzyme activities and in vivo fluxes in Brassica napus embryos grown on organic or inorganic nitrogen source.

    PubMed

    Junker, Björn H; Lonien, Joachim; Heady, Lindsey E; Rogers, Alistair; Schwender, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    After the completion of the genomic sequencing of model organisms, numerous post-genomic studies, integrating transcriptome and metabolome data, are aimed at developing a more complete understanding of cell physiology. Here, we measure in vivo metabolic fluxes by steady state labeling, and in parallel, the activity of enzymes in central metabolism in cultured developing embryos of Brassica napus. Embryos were grown on either the amino acids glutamine and alanine as an organic nitrogen source, or on ammonium nitrate as an inorganic nitrogen source. The type of nitrogen made available to developing embryos caused substantial differences in fluxes associated with the tricarboxylic acid cycle, including flux reversion. The changes observed in enzyme activity were not consistent with our estimates of metabolic flux. Furthermore, most extractable enzyme activities are in large surplus relative to the requirements for the observed in vivo fluxes. The results demonstrate that in this model system the metabolic response of central metabolism to changes in environmental conditions can be achieved largely without regulatory reprogramming of the enzyme machinery.

  7. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsang, Nuananong; Yu, LiangDeng

    2013-07-01

    Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29-60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 1016 ions cm-2. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  8. INITIATION AND ERUPTION PROCESS OF MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE FROM SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11719 TO EARTH-DIRECTED CME

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-20

    An eruption event launched from the solar active region (AR) NOAA 11719 is investigated based on coronal EUV observations and photospheric magnetic field measurements obtained from the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The AR consists of a filament channel originating from a major sunspot and its south section is associated with an inverse-S sigmoidal system as observed in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly passbands. We regard the sigmoid as the main body of the flux rope (FR). There also exists a twisted flux bundle crossing over this FR. This overlying flux bundle transforms in shape similar to kink-rise evolution, which corresponds with the rise motion of the FR. The emission measure and temperature along the FR exhibits an increasing trend with its rising motion, indicating reconnection in the thinning current sheet underneath the FR. Net magnetic flux of the AR, evaluated at north and south polarities, showed decreasing behavior whereas the net current in these fluxes exhibits an increasing trend. Because the negative (positive) flux has a dominant positive (negative) current, the chirality of AR flux system is likely negative (left handed) in order to be consistent with the chirality of inverse S-sigmoidal FR. This analysis of magnetic fields of the source AR suggests that the cancelling fluxes are prime factors of the monotonous twisting of the FR system, reaching to a critical state to trigger kink instability and rise motion. This rise motion may have led to the onset of the torus instability, resulting in an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection, and the progressive reconnection in the thinning current sheet beneath the rising FR led to the M6.5 flare.

  9. Development of a transparent, non-cytotoxic, silver ion-exchanged glass with antimicrobial activity and low ion elution.

    PubMed

    Shim, Gyu-In; Kim, Seong-Hwan; Eom, Hyung-Woo; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Se-Young

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial, cytotoxicity, skin irritation, and ion elution behaviors of glass doped with silver ions with respect to its application to electronic equipment such as phones and tablet screens. The microbes tested were Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Penicillium funiculosum. AgNO3 powder was spread on both sides of aluminosilicate glass, and it was heated to 250-280°C for 10min. Under optimized heating conditions (260°C, 10min), the antimicrobial activity of ion-exchanged glass against bacteria and fungi was over 99.9% after 24 weeks. The glass failed to irritate the skin of experimental animals and was considered non-cytotoxic. The maximum amount of Ag ions that were eluted from the ion-exchanged glass into drinking water was measured at 0.037±0.003μgL(-1), an amount which is several orders of magnitude below the standard limit of 0.1mgL(-1) in drinking water. Ag ion-exchanged glass had characteristics suitable for use as a display screen, such as a light transmittance of 90% and a surface roughness of 0.704nm. Our findings suggest that glass doped with silver ions is more hygienic than non-doped glass is, and should be applied to display screens and glassware.

  10. Localization of K⁺, H⁺, Na⁺ and Ca²⁺ fluxes to the excretory pore in Caenorhabditis elegans: application of scanning ion-selective microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Adlimoghaddam, Aida; Weihrauch, Dirk; O'Donnell, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Although Caenorhabditis elegans is commonly used as a model organism for studies of cell biology, development and physiology, the small size of the worm has impeded measurements of ion transport by the excretory cell and hypodermis. Here, we use the scanning ion-selective microelectrode technique to measure efflux and influx of K(+), H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) in intact worms. Transport of ions into, or out of, immobilized worms produces small gradients in ion concentration in the unstirred layer near the surface of the worm. These gradients are readily detectable with ion-selective microelectrodes and the corresponding ion fluxes can be estimated using the Fick equation. Our data show that effluxes of K(+), H(+), Na(+) and Ca(2+) are localized to the region of the excretory pore, consistent with release of these ions from the excretory cell, and that effluxes increase after experimental preloading with Na(+), K(+) or Ca(2+). In addition, the hypodermis is a site of Na(+) influx.

  11. Activated Ion Electron Capture Dissociation (AI ECD) of proteins: synchronization of infrared and electron irradiation with ion magnetron motion.

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, Victor A; Cooper, Helen J

    2009-05-01

    Here, we show that to perform activated ion electron capture dissociation (AI-ECD) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer equipped with a CO(2) laser, it is necessary to synchronize both infrared irradiation and electron capture dissociation with ion magnetron motion. This requirement is essential for instruments in which the infrared laser is angled off-axis, such as the Thermo Finnigan LTQ FT. Generally, the electron irradiation time required for proteins is much shorter (ms) than that required for peptides (tens of ms), and the modulation of ECD, AI ECD, and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) with ion magnetron motion is more pronounced. We have optimized AI ECD for ubiquitin, cytochrome c, and myoglobin; however the results can be extended to other proteins. We demonstrate that pre-ECD and post-ECD activation are physically different and display different kinetics. We also demonstrate how, by use of appropriate AI ECD time sequences and normalization, the kinetics of protein gas-phase refolding can be deconvoluted from the diffusion of the ion cloud and measured on the time scale longer than the period of ion magnetron motion.

  12. Plasma membrane calcium flux, protein kinase C activation and smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Forder, J; Scriabine, A; Rasmussen, H

    1985-11-01

    Isolated perfused rabbit ear arteries contract when treated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an activator of the calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase or C-kinase. Under conditions where the calcium concentration in the perfusate is 1.5 mM and the potassium concentration is 4.8 mM, there is a latent period of 70 +/- 19 min (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 10) between TPA addition and the onset of the contractile response. Once initiated, the contractile response is progressive and sustained. When perfusion conditions are altered in such a way as to modify calcium flux across the plasma membrane (i.e., raising the extracellular calcium concentration to 2.5 mM Ca++, raising the extracellular potassium concentration to 10 mM, and/or preincubating the tissues in media containing 100 nM Bay K 8644, a potent calcium channel agonist), the latency period between TPA addition and initiation of the contractile response is significantly reduced (2.5 mM Ca++, 37 +/- 7 min; 10 mM K+ and 2.5 mM Ca++, 11 +/- 3 min; 100 nM Bay K 8644 and 1.5 mM Ca++, 20 +/- 7 min; 100 nM Bay K 8644 and 2.5 mM Ca2+, 8.5 +/- 1.7 min; 10 mM K+ and 100 nM Bay K 8644, 11 +/- 5 min). Likewise, the combination of 2.5 mM calcium, 100 nM Bay K 8644, and 3.3 microM ouabain results in a contractile response 4.5 +/- 2.0 min after TPA addition (means +/- S.E.M., n = 4). Control tissues (absence of TPA addition) run simultaneously show no contractile responses to the various Ca++ flux regulators even after 90 min of incubation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Platelet activating factor raises intracellular calcium ion concentration in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Peritoneal cells from thioglycollate-stimulated mice were allowed to adhere to coverglasses for 2 h to give a dense monolayer of adherent cells greater than 95% of which were macrophages. After incubation with the tetra-acetoxymethyl ester of quin2, coverglasses were rinsed with Ca2+-free saline, oriented at a 45 degree angle in square cuvettes containing a magnetically driven stir bar, and analyzed for changes in quin2 fluorescence in a spectrofluorimeter. Such fluorescence, taken as an indication of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i), increased as exogenous calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]o) was raised to 1 mM. At [Ca2+]o approximately equal to 10 microM, [Ca2+]i = 72 +/- 14 nM (n = 26); at [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, [Ca2+]i = 140-220 nM, levels not increased by N, N, N', N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine, a membrane-permeant chelator of heavy metals than can quench quin2. Addition of mouse alpha + beta fibroblast interferon, lipopolysaccharide, thrombin, collagen, vasopressin, ADP, compound 48/80, or U46619 did not change [Ca2+]i. However, addition of platelet activating factor (PAF) (2-20 ng/ml) raised [Ca2+]i by 480 nM within 1 min if [Ca2+]o = 1 mM. In the presence of 5 mM EGTA, PAF raised [Ca2+]i by 25 nM. This suggests that PAF causes influx of exogenous Ca2+, as well as releasing some Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Consistent with these results, when PAF was added to 1 mM Ca2+ in the presence of 100 microM Cd2+ or Mn2+ to block Ca2+ influx, [Ca2+]i increased by only intermediate amounts; at the times of such dampened peak response, [Ca2+]i could be raised within 1 min to normal PAF-stimulated levels by chelation of the exogenous heavy metals with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Normal PAF responses were observed in the presence of indomethacin. The lowest dose of PAF observed to raise [Ca2+]i was 0.1 ng/ml. Response of [Ca2+]i to 2-20 ng/ml PAF was transient, and second applications had no effect. The PAF response also was seen in

  14. Inferring 222Rn soil fluxes from ambient 222Rn activity and eddy covariance measurements of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, Sander; Manohar, Swagath; Vermeulen, Alex; Bosveld, Fred; Meijer, Harro; Manning, Andrew; van der Molen, Michiel; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid

    2016-11-01

    We present a new methodology, which we call Single Pair of Observations Technique with Eddy Covariance (SPOT-EC), to estimate regional-scale surface fluxes of 222Rn from tower-based observations of 222Rn activity concentration, CO2 mole fractions and direct CO2 flux measurements from eddy covariance. For specific events, the regional (222Rn) surface flux is calculated from short-term changes in ambient (222Rn) activity concentration scaled by the ratio of the mean CO2 surface flux for the specific event to the change in its observed mole fraction. The resulting 222Rn surface emissions are integrated in time (between the moment of observation and the last prior background levels) and space (i.e. over the footprint of the observations). The measurement uncertainty obtained is about ±15 % for diurnal events and about ±10 % for longer-term (e.g. seasonal or annual) means. The method does not provide continuous observations, but reliable daily averages can be obtained. We applied our method to in situ observations from two sites in the Netherlands: Cabauw station (CBW) and Lutjewad station (LUT). For LUT, which is an intensive agricultural site, we estimated a mean 222Rn surface flux of (0.29 ± 0.02) atoms cm-2 s-1 with values > 0.5 atoms cm-2 s-1 to the south and south-east. For CBW we estimated a mean 222Rn surface flux of (0.63 ± 0.04) atoms cm-2 s-1. The highest values were observed to the south-west, where the soil type is mainly river clay. For both stations good agreement was found between our results and those from measurements with soil chambers and two recently published 222Rn soil flux maps for Europe. At both sites, large spatial and temporal variability of 222Rn surface fluxes were observed which would be impractical to measure with a soil chamber. SPOT-EC, therefore, offers an important new tool for estimating regional-scale 222Rn surface fluxes. Practical applications furthermore include calibration of process-based 222Rn soil flux models, validation

  15. Enhanced flux pinning in MOD YBa2Cu3O7-δ films by ion milling through anodic alumina templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Develos-Bagarinao, K.; Wimbush, S. C.; Matsui, H.; Yamaguchi, I.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.

    2012-06-01

    A straightforward and reproducible method has been developed for creating < 100 nm wide, 400-600 nm long c-axis columnar defects in fluorine-free MOD YBCO films (˜700 nm thick) using ion milling through free-standing nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide membranes positioned in contact with the films. At 77.3 K, a moderate Jc increase of ˜50% was achieved in self-field, whereas at 1 T a more than doubling of Jc was observed along ab, part of this enhancement coming from uncorrelated pinning effective over all field directions. X-ray analysis confirmed an additional in-plane microstrain component which can be attributed to oxygen disorder induced during the ion milling process.

  16. Fast-Ion Energy-Flux Enhancement from Ultrathin Foils Irradiated by Intense and High-Contrast Short Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, A.; Platonov, K.; Levy, A.; Ceccotti, T.; Thaury, C.; Loch, R. A.; Martin, Ph.

    2008-10-10

    Recent significant improvements of the contrast ratio of chirped pulse amplified pulses allows us to extend the applicability domain of laser accelerated protons to very thin targets. In this framework, we propose an analytical model particularly suitable to reproducing ion laser acceleration experiments using high intensity and ultrahigh contrast pulses. The model is based on a self-consistent solution of the Poisson equation using an adiabatic approximation for laser generated fast electrons which allows one to find the target thickness maximizing the maximum proton (and ion) energies and population as a function of the laser parameters. Model furnished values show a good agreement with experimental data and 2D particle-in-cell simulation results.

  17. Zooplankton diel vertical migration and contribution to deep active carbon flux in the NW Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isla, Alejandro; Scharek, Renate; Latasa, Mikel

    2015-03-01

    The diel vertical migration (DVM) of zooplankton contributes to the biological pump transporting material from surface to deep waters. We examined the DVM of the zooplankton community in different size fractions (53-200 μm, 200-500 μm, 500-1000 μm, 1000-2000 μm and > 2000 μm) during three cruises carried out in the open NW Mediterranean Sea. We assessed their metabolic rates from empirical published relationships and estimated the active fluxes of dissolved carbon to the mesopelagic zone driven by migrant zooplankton. Within the predominantly oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea, the NW region is one of the most productive ones, with a seasonal cycle characterized by a prominent spring bloom. The study area was visited at three different phases of the seasonal cycle: during the spring bloom, the post-bloom, and strongly stratified oligotrophic conditions. We found seasonal differences in DVM, less evident during the bloom. Changes in DVM intensity were related to the composition of the zooplanktonic assemblage, which also varied between cruises. Euphausiids appeared as the most active migrants in all seasons, and their life cycle conditioned the observed pattern. Immature stages, which are unable to perform large diel vertical movements, dominated during the bloom, in contrast to the higher relative importance of migrating adults in the other two sampling periods. The amount of dissolved carbon exported was determined by the migrant zooplankton biomass, being highest during the post-bloom (2.2 mmol C respired m- 2 d- 1, and up to 3.1 mmol C exported m- 2 d- 1 when DOC release estimations are added). The active transport by diel migrants represented a substantial contribution to total carbon export to deep waters, especially under stratified oligotrophic conditions, revealing the importance of zooplankton in the biological pump operating in the study area.

  18. Evidence for a hydroxide ion bridging two magnesium ions at the active site of the hammerhead ribozyme.

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, T; Auffinger, P; Scott, W G; Westhof, E

    1997-01-01

    In the presence of magnesium ions, cleavage by the hammerhead ribozyme RNA at a specific residue leads to 2'3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-OH extremities. In the cleavage reaction an activated ribose 2'-hydroxyl group attacks its attached 3'-phosphate. Molecular dynamics simulations of the crystal structure of the hammerhead ribozyme, obtained after flash-freezing of crystals under conditions where the ribozyme is active, provide evidence that a mu-bridging OH-ion is located between two Mg2+ions close to the cleavable phosphate. Constrained simulations show further that a flip from the C3'- endo to the C2'- endo conformation of the ribose at the cleavable phosphate brings the 2'-hydroxyl in proximity to both the attacked phosphorous atom and the mu-bridging OH-ion. Thus, the simulations lead to a detailed new insight into the mechanism of hammerhead ribozyme cleavage where a mu-hydroxo bridged magnesium cluster, located on the deep groove side, provides an OH-ion that is able to activate the 2'-hydroxyl nucleophile after a minor and localized conformational change in the RNA. PMID:9254698

  19. Types of spectra of ion flux fluctuations in the solar wind and magnetosheath at the interface between inertial and dissipative ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riazantseva, M. O.; Rakhmanova, L. S.; Zastenker, G. N.; Ermolaev, Yu. I.

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers the features of turbulent characteristics of ion flux variations in the solar wind and magnetosheath at the scale of 0.01-10 Hz based on measurements on the BMSW plasma spectrometer (Plasma-F experiment) mounted on the Spektr-R satellite. A variability of types of fluctuation frequency spectra is shown. Fluctuation spectra with certain features in the transition region from the inertial to the dissipative range are selected (a sharp knee in the fluctuation spectrum, plateau and peak in the knee, and a nonlinear spectrum bend at high frequencies). The degree of difference between the observed spectra and the spectra characteristic of the developed isotropic turbulence in the Kolmogorov model is determined. The probability of observation of the spectra of certain types is estimated. The features of fluctuation spectra in the solar wind and magnetosheath are compared for each type of spectra.

  20. Time-resolved ion flux, electron temperature and plasma density measurements in a pulsed Ar plasma using a capacitively coupled planar probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnon, Maxime; Cunge, Gilles; Braithwaite, Nicholas St. J.

    2014-04-01

    The resurgence of industrial interest in pulsed radiofrequency plasmas for etching applications highlights the fact that these plasmas are much less well characterized than their continuous wave counterparts. A capacitively coupled planar probe is used to determine the time variations of the ion flux, electron temperature (of the high-energy tail of the electron energy distribution function) and plasma density. For a pulsing frequency of 1 kHz or higher, the plasma never reaches a steady state during the on-time and is not fully extinguished during the off-time. The drop of plasma density during the off-time leads to an overshoot in the electron temperature at the beginning of each pulse, particularly at low frequencies, in good agreement with modeling results from the literature.

  1. Anti-biofilm activity of Fe heavy ion irradiated polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, R. P.; Hareesh, K.; Bankar, A.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Asokan, K.; Kanjilal, D.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.

    2016-10-01

    Polycarbonate (PC) polymers were investigated before and after high energy heavy ion irradiation for anti-bacterial properties. These PC films were irradiated by Fe heavy ions with two energies, viz, 60 and 120 MeV, at different fluences in the range from 1 × 1011 ions/cm2 to 1 × 1013 ions/cm2. UV-Visible spectroscopic results showed optical band gap decreased with increase in ion fluences due to chain scission mainly at carbonyl group of PC which is also corroborated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic results. X-ray diffractogram results showed decrease in crystallinity of PC after irradiation which leads to decrease in molecular weight. This is confirmed by rheological studies and also by differential scanning calorimetric results. The irradiated PC samples showed modification in their surfaces prevents biofilm formation of human pathogen, Salmonella typhi.

  2. STUDY OF THE POYNTING FLUX IN ACTIVE REGION 10930 USING DATA-DRIVEN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y. L.; Wang, H. N.; He, H.; Zhu, X. S.

    2011-08-10

    Powerful solar flares are closely related to the evolution of magnetic field configuration on the photosphere. We choose the Poynting flux as a parameter in the study of magnetic field changes. We use time-dependent multidimensional MHD simulations around a flare occurrence to generate the results, with the temporal variation of the bottom boundary conditions being deduced from the projected normal characteristic method. By this method, the photospheric magnetogram could be incorporated self-consistently as the bottom condition of data-driven simulations. The model is first applied to a simulation datum produced by an emerging magnetic flux rope as a test case. Then, the model is used to study NOAA AR 10930, which has an X3.4 flare, the data of which has been obtained by the Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope on 2006 December 13. We compute the magnitude of Poynting flux (S{sub total}), radial Poynting flux (S{sub z} ), a proxy for ideal radial Poynting flux (S{sub proxy}), Poynting flux due to plasma surface motion (S{sub sur}), and Poynting flux due to plasma emergence (S{sub emg}) and analyze their extensive properties in four selected areas: the whole sunspot, the positive sunspot, the negative sunspot, and the strong-field polarity inversion line (SPIL) area. It is found that (1) the S{sub total}, S{sub z} , and S{sub proxy} parameters show similar behaviors in the whole sunspot area and in the negative sunspot area. The evolutions of these three parameters in the positive area and the SPIL area are more volatile because of the effect of sunspot rotation and flux emergence. (2) The evolution of S{sub sur} is largely influenced by the process of sunspot rotation, especially in the positive sunspot. The evolution of S{sub emg} is greatly affected by flux emergence, especially in the SPIL area.

  3. Activating Molecules, Ions, and Solid Particles with Acoustic Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Pflieger, Rachel; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical and physical effects of ultrasound arise not from a direct interaction of molecules with sound waves, but rather from the acoustic cavitation: the nucleation, growth, and implosive collapse of microbubbles in liquids submitted to power ultrasound. The violent implosion of bubbles leads to the formation of chemically reactive species and to the emission of light, named sonoluminescence. In this manuscript, we describe the techniques allowing study of extreme intrabubble conditions and chemical reactivity of acoustic cavitation in solutions. The analysis of sonoluminescence spectra of water sparged with noble gases provides evidence for nonequilibrium plasma formation. The photons and the "hot" particles generated by cavitation bubbles enable to excite the non-volatile species in solutions increasing their chemical reactivity. For example the mechanism of ultrabright sonoluminescence of uranyl ions in acidic solutions varies with uranium concentration: sonophotoluminescence dominates in diluted solutions, and collisional excitation contributes at higher uranium concentration. Secondary sonochemical products may arise from chemically active species that are formed inside the bubble, but then diffuse into the liquid phase and react with solution precursors to form a variety of products. For instance, the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) in pure water provides an innovative synthetic route for monodispersed nanoparticles of metallic platinum without any templates or capping agents. Many studies reveal the advantages of ultrasound to activate the divided solids. In general, the mechanical effects of ultrasound strongly contribute in heterogeneous systems in addition to chemical effects. In particular, the sonolysis of PuO2 powder in pure water yields stable colloids of plutonium due to both effects. PMID:24747272

  4. Activating molecules, ions, and solid particles with acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Pflieger, Rachel; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2014-04-11

    The chemical and physical effects of ultrasound arise not from a direct interaction of molecules with sound waves, but rather from the acoustic cavitation: the nucleation, growth, and implosive collapse of microbubbles in liquids submitted to power ultrasound. The violent implosion of bubbles leads to the formation of chemically reactive species and to the emission of light, named sonoluminescence. In this manuscript, we describe the techniques allowing study of extreme intrabubble conditions and chemical reactivity of acoustic cavitation in solutions. The analysis of sonoluminescence spectra of water sparged with noble gases provides evidence for nonequilibrium plasma formation. The photons and the "hot" particles generated by cavitation bubbles enable to excite the non-volatile species in solutions increasing their chemical reactivity. For example the mechanism of ultrabright sonoluminescence of uranyl ions in acidic solutions varies with uranium concentration: sonophotoluminescence dominates in diluted solutions, and collisional excitation contributes at higher uranium concentration. Secondary sonochemical products may arise from chemically active species that are formed inside the bubble, but then diffuse into the liquid phase and react with solution precursors to form a variety of products. For instance, the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) in pure water provides an innovative synthetic route for monodispersed nanoparticles of metallic platinum without any templates or capping agents. Many studies reveal the advantages of ultrasound to activate the divided solids. In general, the mechanical effects of ultrasound strongly contribute in heterogeneous systems in addition to chemical effects. In particular, the sonolysis of PuO2 powder in pure water yields stable colloids of plutonium due to both effects.

  5. CoSi2 growth on Si(001) by reactive deposition epitaxy: Effects of high-flux, low-energy ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, C. W.; Greene, J. E.; Petrov, I.

    2006-07-01

    CoSi2 layers, <40nm thick, were grown on Si(001) by reactive deposition epitaxy (RDE) in which Co was deposited at 700°C by magnetically unbalanced ultrahigh vacuum magnetron sputtering. X-ray diffraction pole figures and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveal that the layers, which exhibit a cube-on-cube epitaxial relationship with the substrate, (001)CoSi2‖(001)Si and [100]CoSi2‖[100]Si, contain fourfold symmetric {111} twinned domains oriented such that {221}CoSi2‖(001)Si and ⟨110⟩CoSi2‖[110]Si. We demonstrate that high-flux low-energy (EAr+=9.6eV) Ar+ ion irradiation during deposition dramatically increases the area fraction fu of untwinned regions from 0.17 in films grown under standard magnetically balanced conditions in which the ratio JAr+/JCo of the incident Ar+ to Co fluxes is 1.4 to 0.72 with JAr+/JCo=13.3. TEM analyses show that the early stages of RDE CoSi2(001) film growth proceed via the Volmer-Weber mode with independent nucleation of both untwinned and twinned islands. Increasing JAr+/JCo results in larger values of both the number density and area of untwinned with respect to twinned islands. The intense Ar+ ion bombardment creates additional low-energy adsorption sites that favor the nucleation of untwinned islands while collisionally enhancing Co surface mobilities which, in turn, increases the probability of itinerant Co adatoms reaching these sites.

  6. AMPK activation protects cells from oxidative stress-induced senescence via autophagic flux restoration and intracellular NAD(+) elevation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaojuan; Tai, Haoran; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Jiao; Wei, Xiawei; Ding, Yi; Gong, Hui; Mo, Chunfen; Zhang, Jie; Qin, Jianqiong; Ma, Yuanji; Huang, Ning; Xiang, Rong; Xiao, Hengyi

    2016-06-01

    AMPK activation is beneficial for cellular homeostasis and senescence prevention. However, the molecular events involved in AMPK activation are not well defined. In this study, we addressed the mechanism underlying the protective effect of AMPK on oxidative stress-induced senescence. The results showed that AMPK was inactivated in senescent cells. However, pharmacological activation of AMPK by metformin and berberine significantly prevented the development of senescence and, accordingly, inhibition of AMPK by Compound C was accelerated. Importantly, AMPK activation prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced impairment of the autophagic flux in senescent cells, evidenced by the decreased p62 degradation, GFP-RFP-LC3 cancellation, and activity of lysosomal hydrolases. We also found that AMPK activation restored the NAD(+) levels in the senescent cells via a mechanism involving mostly the salvage pathway for NAD(+) synthesis. In addition, the mechanistic relationship of autophagic flux and NAD(+) synthesis and the involvement of mTOR and Sirt1 activities were assessed. In summary, our results suggest that AMPK prevents oxidative stress-induced senescence by improving autophagic flux and NAD(+) homeostasis. This study provides a new insight for exploring the mechanisms of aging, autophagy and NAD(+) homeostasis, and it is also valuable in the development of innovative strategies to combat aging.

  7. A highly potent agonist to protease-activated receptor-2 reveals apical activation of the airway epithelium resulting in Ca2+-regulated ion conductance

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Cara L.; Daines, Michael O.; Price, Theodore J.; Vagner, Josef

    2014-01-01

    The airway epithelium provides a barrier that separates inhaled air and its various particulates from the underlying tissues. It provides key physiological functions in both sensing the environment and initiating appropriate innate immune defenses to protect the lung. Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is expressed both apically and basolaterally throughout the airway epithelium. One consequence of basolateral PAR2 activation is the rapid, Ca2+-dependent ion flux that favors secretion in the normally absorptive airway epithelium. However, roles for apically expressed PAR2 activation have not been demonstrated, in part due to the lack of specific, high-potency PAR2 ligands. In the present study, we used the newly developed PAR2 ligand 2at-LIGRLO(PEG3-Pam)-NH2 in combination with well-differentiated, primary cultured airway epithelial cells from wild-type and PAR2−/− mice to examine the physiological role of PAR2 in the conducting airway after apical activation. Using digital imaging microscopy of intracellular Ca2+ concentration changes, we verified ligand potency on PAR2 in primary cultured airway cells. Examination of airway epithelial tissue in an Ussing chamber showed that apical activation of PAR2 by 2at-LIGRLO(PEG3-Pam)-NH2 resulted in a transient decrease in transepithelial resistance that was due to increased apical ion efflux. We determined pharmacologically that this increase in ion conductance was through Ca2+-activated Cl− and large-conductance K+ channels that were blocked with a Ca2+-activated Cl− channel inhibitor and clotrimazole, respectively. Stimulation of Cl− efflux via PAR2 activation at the airway epithelial surface can increase airway surface liquid that would aid in clearing the airway of noxious inhaled agents. PMID:25143347

  8. How high do ion fluxes go? A re-evaluation of the two-mechanism model of K(+) transport in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Devrim; Britto, Dev T; Kochian, Leon V; Kronzucker, Herbert J

    2016-02-01

    Potassium (K(+)) acquisition in roots is generally described by a two-mechanism model, consisting of a saturable, high-affinity transport system (HATS) operating via H(+)/K(+) symport at low (<1mM) external [K(+)] ([K(+)]ext), and a linear, low-affinity system (LATS) operating via ion channels at high (>1mM) [K(+)]ext. Radiotracer measurements in the LATS range indicate that the linear rise in influx continues well beyond nutritionally relevant concentrations (>10mM), suggesting K(+) transport may be pushed to extraordinary, and seemingly limitless, capacity. Here, we assess this rise, asking whether LATS measurements faithfully report transmembrane fluxes. Using (42)K(+)-isotope and electrophysiological methods in barley, we show that this flux is part of a K(+)-transport cycle through the apoplast, and masks a genuine plasma-membrane influx that displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Rapid apoplastic cycling of K(+) is corroborated by an absence of transmembrane (42)K(+) efflux above 1mM, and by the efflux kinetics of PTS, an apoplastic tracer. A linear apoplastic influx, masking a saturating transmembrane influx, was also found in Arabidopsis mutants lacking the K(+) transporters AtHAK5 and AtAKT1. Our work significantly revises the model of K(+) transport by demonstrating a surprisingly modest upper limit for plasma-membrane influx, and offers insight into sodium transport under salt stress.

  9. Inferring electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave intensity from low altitude POES proton flux measurements: A detailed case study with conjugate Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Shi, Run; Ni, Binbin; Gu, Xudong; Zhang, Xianguo; Zuo, Pingbing; Fu, Song; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Cao, Xing; Zou, Zhengyang

    2017-03-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play an important role in the magnetospheric particle dynamics and can lead to resonant pitch-angle scattering and ultimate precipitation of ring current protons. Commonly, the statistics of in situ EMIC wave measurements is adopted for quantitative investigation of wave-particle interaction processes, which however becomes questionable for detailed case studies especially during geomagnetic storms and substorms. Here we establish a novel technique to infer EMIC wave amplitudes from low-altitude proton measurements onboard the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). The detailed procedure is elaborated regarding how to infer the EMIC wave intensity for one specific time point. We then test the technique with a case study comparing the inferred root-mean-square (RMS) EMIC wave amplitude with the conjugate Van Allen Probes EMFISIS wave measurements. Our results suggest that the developed technique can reasonably estimate EMIC wave intensities from low-altitude POES proton flux data, thereby providing a useful tool to construct a data-based, near-real-time, dynamic model of the global distribution of EMIC waves once the proton flux measurements from multiple POES satellites are available for any specific time period.

  10. Eruption of the magnetic flux rope in a fast decayed active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shangbin

    2012-07-01

    An isolated and fast decayed active region was observed when passing through solar disk. There is only one CME related with it that give us a good opportunity to investigate the whole process of the CME. Filament in this active region rises up rapidly and then hesitates and disintegrates into flare loops. The rising filament from EIT images separates into two parts just before eruption. It is interesting that this filament rises up with positive kink which is opposite to the negative helicity according to the inverse S-shaped X-ray sigmoid and accumulated magnetic helicity. A new filament reforms several hours later after CME and the axis of this new one rotates clockwise about 22° comparing with that of the former one. We also observed a bright transient J-shaped X-ray sigmoid immediately appears after filament eruption. It quickly develops into a soft X-ray cusp and rises up firstly then drops down. We propose that field lines underneath bald-patch sparatrix surface (BPSS) where for the formation of a magnetic tangential discontinuity are locally rooted to the photosphere near the bald-patch (BP) inversion line. Field lines above the surface are detached from the photosphere to form this CME and partially open the field which make the filament loses equilibrium to rise quickly and then be drawn back by the tension force of magnetic field after eruption to form a new filament. Two magnetic cancelation regions have been observed clearly just before filament eruption that reflect the existence of BPs. On the other hand, the values of total magnetic helicity to the corona taken by emergence and differential rotation normalized by the square total magnetic flux implies the possibility of upper bound on the total magnetic helicity that a force-free field can contain.

  11. Links between methane flux and transcriptional activities of methanogens and methane oxidizers in a blanket peat bog.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Thomas E; Toet, Sylvia; Ineson, Phil; Prosser, James I

    2010-07-01

    The relationship between biogeochemical process rates and microbial functional activity was investigated by analysis of the transcriptional dynamics of the key functional genes for methanogenesis (methyl coenzyme M reductase; mcrA) and methane oxidation (particulate methane monooxygenase; pmoA) and in situ methane flux at two peat soil field sites with contrasting net methane-emitting and -oxidizing characteristics. qPCR was used to quantify the abundances of mcrA and pmoA genes and transcripts at two soil depths. Total methanogen and methanotroph transcriptional dynamics, calculated from mcrA and pmoA gene : transcript abundance ratios, were similar at both sites and depths. However, a linear relationship was demonstrated between surface mcrA and pmoA transcript dynamics and surface flux rates at the methane-emitting and methane-oxidizing sites, respectively. Results indicate that methanotroph activity was at least partially substrate-limited at the methane-emitting site and by other factors at the methane-oxidizing site. Soil depth also contributed to the control of surface methane fluxes, but to a lesser extent. Small differences in the soil water content may have contributed to differences in methanogen and methanotroph activities. This study therefore provides a first insight into the regulation of in situ, field-level surface CH(4) flux at the molecular level by an accurate reflection of gene : transcript abundance ratios for the key genes in methane generation and consumption.

  12. A DOUBLE-RING ALGORITHM FOR MODELING SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS: UNIFYING KINEMATIC DYNAMO MODELS AND SURFACE FLUX-TRANSPORT SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; Martens, Petrus C. H.; Nandy, Dibyendu; Yeates, Anthony R. E-mail: dnandi@iiserkol.ac.i E-mail: anthony@maths.dundee.ac.u

    2010-09-01

    The emergence of tilted bipolar active regions (ARs) and the dispersal of their flux, mediated via processes such as diffusion, differential rotation, and meridional circulation, is believed to be responsible for the reversal of the Sun's polar field. This process (commonly known as the Babcock-Leighton mechanism) is usually modeled as a near-surface, spatially distributed {alpha}-effect in kinematic mean-field dynamo models. However, this formulation leads to a relationship between polar field strength and meridional flow speed which is opposite to that suggested by physical insight and predicted by surface flux-transport simulations. With this in mind, we present an improved double-ring algorithm for modeling the Babcock-Leighton mechanism based on AR eruption, within the framework of an axisymmetric dynamo model. Using surface flux-transport simulations, we first show that an axisymmetric formulation-which is usually invoked in kinematic dynamo models-can reasonably approximate the surface flux dynamics. Finally, we demonstrate that our treatment of the Babcock-Leighton mechanism through double-ring eruption leads to an inverse relationship between polar field strength and meridional flow speed as expected, reconciling the discrepancy between surface flux-transport simulations and kinematic dynamo models.

  13. Formation of sunspots and active regions through the emergence of magnetic flux generated in a solar convective dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Rempel, Matthias D.; Fan, Yuhong

    2016-05-01

    We present a realistic numerical model of sunspot and active region formation through the emergence of flux tubes generated in a solar convective dynamo. The magnetic and velocity fields in a horizontal layer near the top boundary of the solar convective dynamo simulation are used as a time-dependent bottom boundary to drive the near surface layer radiation MHD simulations of magneto-convection and flux emergence with the MURaM code. The latter code simulates the emergence of the flux tubes through the upper most layer of the convection zone to the photosphere.The emerging flux tubes interact with the convection and break into small scale magnetic elements that further rise to the photosphere. At the photosphere, several bipolar pairs of sunspots are formed through the coalescence of the small scale magnetic elements. The sunspot pairs in the simulation successfully reproduce the fundamental observed properties of solar active regions, including the more coherent leading spots with a stronger field strength, and the correct tilts of the bipolar pairs. These asymmetries come most probably from the intrinsic asymmetries in the emerging fields imposed at the bottom boundary, where the horizontal fields are already tilted and the leading sides of the emerging flux tubes are usually up against the downdraft lanes of the giant cells. It is also found that penumbrae with numerous filamentary structures form in regions of strong horizontal magnetic fields that naturally comes from the ongoing flux emergence. In contrast to previous models, the penumbrae and umbrae are divided by very sharp boarders, which is highly consistent with observations.

  14. Design of an actively cooled plate calorimeter for the investigation of pool fire heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J. A.; Keltner, N. R.; Nicolette, V. F.; Wix, S. D.

    1992-01-01

    For final qualification of shipping containers for transport of hazardous materials, thermal testing in accordance with regulations such as 10CFR71 must be completed. Such tests typically consist of 30 minute exposures with the container fully engulfed in flames from a large, open pool of JP4 jet engine fuel. Despite careful engineering analyses of the container, testing often reveals design problems that must be solved by modification and expensive retesting of the container. One source of this problem is the wide variation in surface heat flux to the container that occurs in pool fires. Average heat fluxes of 50 to 60 kW/m{sup 2} are typical and close the values implied by the radiation model in 10CFR71, but peak fluxes up to 150 kW/m{sup 2} are routinely observed in fires. Heat fluxes in pool fires have been shown to be a function of surface temperature of the container, height above the pool, surface orientation, wind, and other variables. If local variations in the surface heat flux to the container could be better predicted, design analyses would become more accurate, and fewer problems will be uncovered during testing. The objective of the calorimeter design described in this paper is to measure accurately pool fire heat fluxes under controlled conditions, and to provide data for calibration of improved analytical models of local flame-surface interactions.

  15. Gravity wave activity in the thermosphere inferred from GOCE data, and its dependence on solar flux conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Raphael F.; Bruinsma, Sean; Doornbos, Eelco; Massarweh, Lotfi

    2016-04-01

    This study is focused on the effect of solar flux conditions on the dynamics of Gravity Waves (GW) in thermosphere. Air density and cross-wind in situ estimates from the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometers are analyzed for the whole mission duration. The analysis was performed in the Fourier spectral domain averaging spectral results over periods of 2 months close to solstices. First the Amplitude Spectral Density (ASD) and the Magnitude Squared Coherence (MSC) of physical parameters are linked to local gravity waves. Then, a new GW marker (called Cf3) was introduced here to constrain GWs activity under Low, Medium and High solar flux conditions, showing a clear solar dumping effect on GW activity. Most of GW signal has been found in a spectral range above 8 mHz in GOCE data, meaning a maximum horizontal wavelength around 1000 km. The level GW activity at GOCE altitude is strongly decreasing with increasing solar flux. Furthermore, a shift in the dominant frequency with solar flux conditions has been noted, leading to a larger horizontal wavelengths (from 200 to 500 km) during high solar flux conditions. The influence of correlated error sources, between air density and cross-winds, is discussed. Consistency of the spectral domain results has been verified in time-domain with a global mapping of high frequency perturbations along GOCE orbit. This analysis shows a clear dependence with geomagnetic latitude with strong perturbations at magnetic poles, and an extension to lower latitudes favoured by low solar activity conditions. Various possible causes of this spatial trend are discussed.

  16. Laser ion source activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro

    2015-07-31

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we have been developing laser ion sources for diverse accelerators. Tabletop Nd:YAG lasers with up to several Joules of energy are mainly used to create ablation plasmas for stable operations. The obtained charge states depend on laser power density and target species. Two types of ion extraction schemes, Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) and conventional static extraction, are used depending on application. We optimized and select a suitable laser irradiation condition and a beam extraction scheme to meet the requirement of the following accelerator system. We have demonstrated to accelerate more than 5 x 1010more » of C6+ ions using the DPIS. We successfully commissioned low charge ion beam provider to the user facilities in BNL. As a result, to achieve higher current, higher charge state and lower emittance, further studies will continue.« less

  17. Laser ion source activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro

    2015-07-31

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we have been developing laser ion sources for diverse accelerators. Tabletop Nd:YAG lasers with up to several Joules of energy are mainly used to create ablation plasmas for stable operations. The obtained charge states depend on laser power density and target species. Two types of ion extraction schemes, Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) and conventional static extraction, are used depending on application. We optimized and select a suitable laser irradiation condition and a beam extraction scheme to meet the requirement of the following accelerator system. We have demonstrated to accelerate more than 5 x 1010 of C6+ ions using the DPIS. We successfully commissioned low charge ion beam provider to the user facilities in BNL. As a result, to achieve higher current, higher charge state and lower emittance, further studies will continue.

  18. Impact of seabird activity on nitrous oxide and methane fluxes from High Arctic tundra in Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Renbin; Chen, Qingqing; Ding, Wei; Xu, Hua

    2012-12-01

    In this study, tundra N2O and CH4 fluxes were measured from one seabird sanctuary (SBT) and two non-seabird colonies (NST-I and NST-II) in Ny-Ålesund (79°55'N, 11°56'E), Svalbard during the summers of 2008 and 2009. N2O and CH4 fluxes from SBT showed large temporal and spatial variations depending on the intensity of seabird activity. High seabird activity sites showed large N2O and CH4 emissions while low N2O and CH4 emissions, even CH4 uptake occurred at medium and low seabird activity sites. Overall the mean fluxes were 18.3 ± 3.6 μg N2O m-2 h-1 and 53.5 ± 20.3 μg CH4 m-2 h-1 from tundra SBT whereas tundra NST-I and NST-II represented a relatively weak N2O source (8.3 ± 13.2 μg N2O m-2 h-1) and strong CH4 sink (-82.8 ± 22.3 μg CH4 m-2 h-1). Seabird activity was the strongest control of N2O and CH4 fluxes compared with soil temperature and moisture, and high N2O and CH4 emissions were created by soil physical and chemical processes (the sufficient supply of nutrients NH4+-N, NO3--N, total nitrogen, total phosphorus and total carbon from seabird guano, seabird tramp and appropriate water content) related to the seabird activity. Our work suggests that tundra ecosystems impacted by seabird activity are the potential "hotspots" for N2O and CH4 emissions although these sources have been largely neglected at present. Furthermore the combination of seabird activity and warming climate will likely further enhance N2O and CH4 emissions from the High Arctic tundra.

  19. Inhibitory effect of high concentrations of ferric ions on the activity of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshishige; Inoue, Chihiro; Suto, Koichi; Chida, Tadashi

    2003-01-01

    The influence of high concentrations of ferric ions on the biochemical activity of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was studied using intact cells. The specific oxidation rate of ferrous ions decreased with increasing ferric ion concentration. Lineweaver-Burk plots revealed typical competitive inhibition kinetics, because the slopes varied with the ferric ion concentration. A linear relationship between the slope and the square of the ferric ion concentration revealed that the iron-oxidizing enzyme system of A. ferrooxidans was competitively inhibited by about two molecules of ferric ion. The kinetic equation based on this inhibition model agreed with the experimental observation at a high ferric ion concentration where the bacterium is usually exposed in bioleaching and biooxidation plants.

  20. Fast ionospheric response to enhanced activity in geospace: Ion feeding of the inner magnetotail

    SciTech Connect

    Daglis, I.A.; Axford, I.A.

    1996-03-01

    The authors look at the question of the ionosphere feeding ions into the magnetosphere/magnetotail, in response to magnetic storm activity, or coupling of the solar wind into the system. They are concerned with fast response, not the question of whether the ionosphere feeds ions in general. The dynamics which results in the inner magnetosphere in response to the input of cold ions from the ionosphere is of interest to the authors. They review recent and older data which has shed light on this question. They look at outflow data, and heating mechanisms for these cold ions, as well as the impact such ions may have on the dynamics of magnetic storms. They observe that fast feeding of ions out of the ionosphere may leave the inner magnetosphere heavily populated with heavy ions such as O{sup +}, which can have a definite impact on the dynamic development of the magnetosphere.

  1. Relevance of Viroporin Ion Channel Activity on Viral Replication and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2015-07-03

    Modification of host-cell ionic content is a significant issue for viruses, as several viral proteins displaying ion channel activity, named viroporins, have been identified. Viroporins interact with different cellular membranes and self-assemble forming ion conductive pores. In general, these channels display mild ion selectivity, and, eventually, membrane lipids play key structural and functional roles in the pore. Viroporins stimulate virus production through different mechanisms, and ion channel conductivity has been proved particularly relevant in several cases. Key stages of the viral cycle such as virus uncoating, transport and maturation are ion-influenced processes in many viral species. Besides boosting virus propagation, viroporins have also been associated with pathogenesis. Linking pathogenesis either to the ion conductivity or to other functions of viroporins has been elusive for a long time. This article summarizes novel pathways leading to disease stimulated by viroporin ion conduction, such as inflammasome driven immunopathology.

  2. Effect of the thermal pressure on upward plasma fluxes due to ponderomotive force of Alfvén ion cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekrasov, Anatoly; Feygin, Felix

    2010-05-01

    In a number of papers devoted to the effect of the ponderomotive force of Alfvén ion cyclotron waves on plasma fluxes in the Earth's magnetosphere, it was shown that the plasma density increases in the vicinity of the equator (e.g. Guglielmi et al. 1993). The increase of density takes place as a result of plasma fluxes flowing upward along the magnetic field lines under the action of the ponderomotive force. This force emerges due to inhomogeneity of the background number density and magnetic field (Guglielmi et al. 1993, Nekrasov and Feygin 2005). However, the experimental data by Olsen (1992) show that the plasma density accumulation at the equator is not observed. On the contrary, the density at the equator is lower than outside of it. In the present paper, we show that the quasi-stationary density evolution always tends to decrease under the action of the ponderomotive force. This decrease is proportional to the local wave amplitude, i.e. it is deeper in regions, where the wave amplitude is larger. As a result, the thermal pressure prevents the flux from flowing upward and the stationary state is settled. A typical time of this process is the ratio of the wave amplitude inhomogeneity length to the sound speed. In the stationary state, the flux is equal to zero. As it is known, a part of the ponderomotive force is proportional to the nonlinear magnetic moment of the medium and gradient of the background magnetic field. We show that the well-known Pitayevsky's formula for the magnetic moment in the cold plasma (Pitayevsky 1960) is not complete. This formula does not take into account the part of the magnetic moment induced by the nonlinear current connected with the quasi-stationary velocities of charged species. References Guglielmi, A. V., O. A. Pokhotelov, L. Stenflo, and P. K. Shukla, Astrophys. Space Sci. 200, 91 (1993). Nekrasov, A. K. and F. Z. Feygin, Physica Scripta 71, 310 (2005). Olsen, R. C., J. Geophys. Res. 97, 1135 (1992). Pitayevsky, L. P

  3. River solute fluxes reflecting active hydrothermal chemical weathering of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, S.; Evans, William C.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    In the past few decades numerous studies have quantified the load of dissolved solids in large rivers to determine chemical weathering rates in orogenic belts and volcanic areas, mainly motivated by the notion that over timescales greater than ~100kyr, silicate hydrolysis may be the dominant sink for atmospheric CO2, thus creating a feedback between climate and weathering. Here, we report the results of a detailed study during water year 2007 (October 1, 2006 to September 30, 2007) in the major rivers of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) which hosts Earth's largest "restless" caldera and over 10,000 thermal features. The chemical compositions of rivers that drain thermal areas in the YPVF differ significantly from the compositions of rivers that drain non-thermal areas. There are large seasonal variations in river chemistry and solute flux, which increases with increasing water discharge. The river chemistry and discharge data collected periodically over an entire year allow us to constrain the annual solute fluxes and to distinguish between low-temperature weathering and hydrothermal flux components. The TDS flux from Yellowstone Caldera in water year 2007 was 93t/km2/year. Extensive magma degassing and hydrothermal interaction with rocks accounts for at least 82% of this TDS flux, 83% of the cation flux and 72% of the HCO3- flux. The low-temperature chemical weathering rate (17t/km2/year), calculated on the assumption that all the Cl- is of thermal origin, could include a component from low-temperature hydrolysis reactions induced by CO2 ascending from depth rather than by atmospheric CO2. Although this uncertainty remains, the calculated low-temperature weathering rate of the young rhyolitic rocks in the Yellowstone Caldera is comparable to the world average of large watersheds that drain also more soluble carbonates and evaporates but is slightly lower than calculated rates in other, less-silicic volcanic regions. Long-term average fluxes at

  4. Fe(2+) substrate transport through ferritin protein cage ion channels influences enzyme activity and biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Behera, Rabindra K; Torres, Rodrigo; Tosha, Takehiko; Bradley, Justin M; Goulding, Celia W; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2015-09-01

    Ferritins, complex protein nanocages, form internal iron-oxy minerals (Fe2O3·H2O), by moving cytoplasmic Fe(2+) through intracage ion channels to cage-embedded enzyme (2Fe(2+)/O2 oxidoreductase) sites where ferritin biomineralization is initiated. The products of ferritin enzyme activity are diferric oxy complexes that are mineral precursors. Conserved, carboxylate amino acid side chains of D127 from each of three cage subunits project into ferritin ion channels near the interior ion channel exits and, thus, could direct Fe(2+) movement to the internal enzyme sites. Ferritin D127E was designed and analyzed to probe properties of ion channel size and carboxylate crowding near the internal ion channel opening. Glu side chains are chemically equivalent to, but longer by one -CH2 than Asp, side chains. Ferritin D127E assembled into normal protein cages, but diferric peroxo formation (enzyme activity) was not observed, when measured at 650 nm (DFP λ max). The caged biomineral formation, measured at 350 nm in the middle of the broad, nonspecific Fe(3+)-O absorption band, was slower. Structural differences (protein X-ray crystallography), between ion channels in wild type and ferritin D127E, which correlate with the inhibition of ferritin D127E enzyme activity include: (1) narrower interior ion channel openings/pores; (2) increased numbers of ion channel protein-metal binding sites, and (3) a change in ion channel electrostatics due to carboxylate crowding. The contributions of ion channel size and structure to ferritin activity reflect metal ion transport in ion channels are precisely regulated both in ferritin protein nanocages and membranes of living cells.

  5. Impact of biochar application to a Mediterranean wheat crop on soil microbial activity and greenhouse gas fluxes.

    PubMed

    Castaldi, S; Riondino, M; Baronti, S; Esposito, F R; Marzaioli, R; Rutigliano, F A; Vaccari, F P; Miglietta, F

    2011-11-01

    Biochar has been recently proposed as a management strategy to improve crop productivity and global warming mitigation. However, the effect of such approach on soil greenhouse gas fluxes is highly uncertain and few data from field experiments are available. In a field trial, cultivated with wheat, biochar was added to the soil (3 or 6 kg m(-2)) in two growing seasons (2008/2009 and 2009/2010) so to monitor the effect of treatments on microbial parameters 3 months and 14 months after char addition. N(2)O, CH(4) and CO(2) fluxes were measured in the field during the first year after char addition. Biochar incorporation into the soil increased soil pH (from 5.2 to 6.7) and the rates of net N mineralization, soil microbial respiration and denitrification activity in the first 3 months, but after 14 months treated and control plots did not differ significantly. No changes in total microbial biomass and net nitrification rate were observed. In char treated plots, soil N(2)O fluxes were from 26% to 79% lower than N(2)O fluxes in control plots, excluding four sampling dates after the last fertilization with urea, when N(2)O emissions were higher in char treated plots. However, due to the high spatial variability, the observed differences were rarely significant. No significant differences of CH(4) fluxes and field soil respiration were observed among different treatments, with just few exceptions. Overall the char treatments showed a minimal impact on microbial parameters and GHG fluxes over the first 14 months after biochar incorporation.

  6. Electrochemical activation and inhibition of neuromuscular systems through modulation of ion concentrations with ion-selective membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Ak; Melik, Rohat; Rabie, Amr N.; Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Moses, David; Tan, Ara; Han, Jongyoon; Lin, Samuel J.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional functional electrical stimulation aims to restore functional motor activity of patients with disabilities resulting from spinal cord injury or neurological disorders. However, intervention with functional electrical stimulation in neurological diseases lacks an effective implantable method that suppresses unwanted nerve signals. We have developed an electrochemical method to activate and inhibit a nerve by electrically modulating ion concentrations in situ along the nerve. Using ion-selective membranes to achieve different excitability states of the nerve, we observe either a reduction of the electrical threshold for stimulation by up to approximately 40%, or voluntary, reversible inhibition of nerve signal propagation. This low-threshold electrochemical stimulation method is applicable in current implantable neuroprosthetic devices, whereas the on-demand nerve-blocking mechanism could offer effective clinical intervention in disease states caused by uncontrolled nerve activation, such as epilepsy and chronic pain syndromes.

  7. Ferroelectric active models of ion channels in biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Bystrov, V S; Lakhno, V D; Molchanov, M

    1994-06-21

    Ferroactive models of ion channels in the theory of biological membranes are presented. The main equations are derived and their possible solutions are shown. The estimates of some experimentally measured parameters are given. Possible physical consequences of the suggested models are listed and the possibility of their experimental finding is discussed. The functioning of the biomembrane's ion channel is qualitatively described on the basis of the suggested ferroactive models. The main directions and prospects for development of the ferroactive approach to the theory of biological membranes and their structures are indicated.

  8. Bismuth ions inhibit the biological activity of non-amidated gastrins in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Suzana; Loh, Su-Wen; Lachal, Shamilah; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S

    2012-02-15

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated gastrins in vitro and in vivo. Bi3+ ions also bind to glycine-extended gastrin17 (Ggly), but inhibit Ggly-induced cell proliferation and migration in gastrointestinal cell lines in vitro. The aims of the present study were firstly, to establish the mechanism by which Bi3+ ions inhibit the binding of Fe3+ ions to Ggly, and secondly, to test the effect of Bi3+ ions on the activity of non-amidated gastrins in vivo. The interaction between Bi3+ ions, Fe3+ ions and Ggly was investigated by ultraviolet spectroscopy. The effect of Bi3+ ions on colorectal mucosal proliferation was measured in three animal models. In vitro in the presence of Bi3+ ions the affinity of Fe3+ ions for Ggly was substantially reduced; the data was better fitted by a mixed, rather than a competitive, inhibition model. In rats treated with Ggly alone proliferation in the rectal mucosa was increased by 318%, but was reduced to control values (p < 0.001) in animals receiving oral bismuth plus Ggly. Proliferation in the colonic mucosa of mice overexpressing Ggly or progastrin was significantly greater than in wild-type mice, but was no greater than control (p < 0.01) in animals receiving oral bismuth. Thus a reduction in the binding of Fe3+ ions to Ggly and progastrin in the presence of Bi3+ ions is a likely explanation for the ability of oral bismuth to block the biological activity of non-amidated gastrins in vivo.

  9. Resonance activation and collision-induced-dissociation of ions using rectangular wave dipolar potentials in a digital ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fuxing; Wang, Liang; Dai, Xinhua; Fang, Xiang; Ding, Chuan-Fan

    2014-04-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of ions by resonance activation in a quadrupole ion trap is usually accomplished by resonance exciting the ions to higher kinetic energy, whereby the high kinetic energy ions collide with a bath gas, such as helium or argon, inside the trap and dissociate to fragments. A new ion activation method using a well-defined rectangular wave dipolar potential formed by dividing down the trapping rectangular waveform is developed and examined herein. The mass-selected parent ions are resonance excited to high kinetic energies by simply changing the frequency of the rectangular wave dipolar potential and dissociation proceeds. A relationship between the ion mass and the activation waveform frequency is also identified and described. This highly efficient (CID) procedure can be realized by simply changing the waveform frequency of the dipolar potential, which could certainly simplify tandem mass spectrometry analysis methods.

  10. Horizontal flow fields in and around a small active region. The transition period between flux emergence and decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Denker, C.; Balthasar, H.; Kuckein, C.; González Manrique, S. J.; Sobotka, M.; Bello González, N.; Hoch, S.; Diercke, A.; Kummerow, P.; Berkefeld, T.; Collados, M.; Feller, A.; Hofmann, A.; Kneer, F.; Lagg, A.; Löhner-Böttcher, J.; Nicklas, H.; Pastor Yabar, A.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Schubert, M.; Sigwarth, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Soltau, D.; Staude, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Volkmer, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Waldmann, T.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The solar magnetic field is responsible for all aspects of solar activity. Thus, emergence of magnetic flux at the surface is the first manifestation of the ensuing solar activity. Aims: Combining high-resolution and synoptic observations aims to provide a comprehensive description of flux emergence at photospheric level and of the growth process that eventually leads to a mature active region. Methods: The small active region NOAA 12118 emerged on 2014 July 17 and was observed one day later with the 1.5-m GREGOR solar telescope on 2014 July 18. High-resolution time-series of blue continuum and G-band images acquired in the blue imaging channel (BIC) of the GREGOR Fabry-Pérot Interferometer (GFPI) were complemented by synoptic line-of-sight magnetograms and continuum images obtained with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Horizontal proper motions and horizontal plasma velocities were computed with local correlation tracking (LCT) and the differential affine velocity estimator (DAVE), respectively. Morphological image processing was employed to measure the photometric and magnetic area, magnetic flux, and the separation profile of the emerging flux region during its evolution. Results: The computed growth rates for photometric area, magnetic area, and magnetic flux are about twice as high as the respective decay rates. The space-time diagram using HMI magnetograms of five days provides a comprehensive view of growth and decay. It traces a leaf-like structure, which is determined by the initial separation of the two polarities, a rapid expansion phase, a time when the spread stalls, and a period when the region slowly shrinks again. The separation rate of 0.26 km s-1 is highest in the initial stage, and it decreases when the separation comes to a halt. Horizontal plasma velocities computed at four evolutionary stages indicate a changing pattern of inflows. In LCT maps we find persistent flow patterns

  11. Effect of active-ion concentration on holmium fibre laser efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-08-03

    We have measured the fraction of holmium ions that relax nonradiatively to the ground level as a result of interaction at a metastable level in optical fibres with a silica-based core doped with holmium ions to 2 x 10{sup 19} - 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The percentage of such ions has been shown to depend on the absolute active-ion concentration. The fibres have been used to make a number of 2.05-{mu}m lasers, and their slope efficiency has been measured. The laser efficiency decreases with increasing holmium concentration in the fibres (lasers)

  12. Fog chemical composition and its feedback to fog water fluxes, water vapor fluxes, and microphysical evolution of two events near Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degefie, D. T.; El-Madany, T.-S.; Held, M.; Hejkal, J.; Hammer, E.; Dupont, J.-C.; Haeffelin, M.; Fleischer, E.; Klemm, O.

    2015-10-01

    The chemical composition of collected fog water and its temporal evolution was studied during the PARISFOG campaign in winter 2012/2013 at the SIRTA (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédétection Atmosphéric) atmospheric observatory outside Paris, France. A further development of the caltech active fog collector was applied, in which the collected fog water gets into contact with Teflon and polyether ether ketone (PEEK) material exclusively. The collector was operational whenever the visibility was below 1000 m. In addition, the turbulent and gravitational fluxes of fog water and water vapor flux were used to examine in detail the temporal evolution the chemical composition of two fogs. The technique was applied to two fog events, one representing a radiation fog and the other one representing a stratus lowering fog. The result revealed that the dominant inorganic species in the fog water were NH4+, NO3-, Ca2 + and SO42 -, which accounted for more than 85% of the ion balance. The pH ranged from 3.7 to 6.2. In the evolution the two fog events, the interaction among the turbulent fog water flux, gravitational fog water flux and water vapor flux controlled the major ion loads (amount of ions, dissolved in fog droplets per volume of air) and ion concentrations (amount dissolved per volume of liquid water) of the fog water. In the radiation fog event, an increase of ion loads and ion concentrations occurred when the direction of water vapor flux towards to the place where the condensation process occurred. A decrease of ion loads and ion concentrations mainly happened by gravitational fog water flux with a minor contribution from turbulent fog water flux. However, when the turbulent water vapor flux was oriented downward, it turned the turbulent fog water flux upward and offset the removal of ions in the fog. In the stratus lowering fog event, the turbulent fog water flux and the gravitational water flux together mainly contributed to the fog water deposition and

  13. Comparison of human Ether-à-go-go related gene screening assays based on IonWorks Quattro and thallium flux.

    PubMed

    Bridal, Terry R; Margulis, Michael; Wang, Xin; Donio, Michael; Sorota, Steve

    2010-12-01

    In vitro screens using cellular preparations expressing human Ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG) potassium channels have become an intrinsic tool for evaluating cardiac liability of compounds during early preclinical stage development. Although hERG channel blocking effects are most reliably evaluated using the low-throughput, manual patch clamp technique, methods and technologies that yield hERG activity data in multiwell format are required to address increased throughput requirements. In most cases, multiwell approaches to measuring hERG activity involve achieving a reasonable balance between throughput and data fidelity. Here we compared two functional multiwell hERG assays: a fluorescence-based fluorometric imaging plate reader (FLIPR(®)) screen measuring thallium (Tl(+)) influx through hERG channels and an automated patch clamp assay using an IonWorks Quattro(®). Mean Z' values for FLIPR-Tl(+) and IonWorks Quattro assays were similar, 0.57 ± 0.09 (±SD; n = 10) versus 0.63 ± 0.11 (n = 12), respectively. IC₅₀ determinations for a set of 17 reference compounds were used to evaluate potency shifts relative to conventional voltage clamp data. The reference compound set included members that are known to exert severe potency shifts in multiwell assays. Mean potency shift values for FLIPR-Tl(+) and IonWorks Quattro assays were 117- and 8-fold, respectively. On the basis of reduced potency shifts and low data variability, we conclude that the IonWorks Quattro screen was a better predictor of hERG activity in conventional whole-cell patch clamp than the Tl(+) influx assay.

  14. Fitting Transporter Activities to Cellular Drug Concentrations and Fluxes: Why the Bumblebee Can Fly

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Pedro; Oliver, Stephen G.; Kell, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal argued that reported expression levels, kcat and Km for drug transporters could be used to estimate the likelihood that drug fluxes through Caco-2 cells could be accounted for solely by protein transporters. It was in fact concluded that if five such transporters contributed ‘randomly’ they could account for the flux of the most permeable drug tested (verapamil) 35% of the time. However, the values of permeability cited for verapamil were unusually high; this and other drugs have much lower permeabilities. Even for the claimed permeabilities, we found that a single ‘random’ transporter could account for the flux 42% of the time, and that two transporters can achieve 10 · 10−6 cm·s−1 90% of the time. Parameter optimisation methods show that even a single transporter can account for Caco-2 drug uptake of the most permeable drug. Overall, the proposal that ‘phospholipid bilayer diffusion (of drugs) is negligible’ is not disproved by the calculations of ‘likely’ transporter-based fluxes. PMID:26538313

  15. Activation of autophagy flux by metformin downregulates cellular FLICE–like inhibitory protein and enhances TRAIL- induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Nazim, Uddin MD; Moon, Ji-Hong; Lee, Ju-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the TNF superfamily. TRAIL is regarded as one of the most promising anticancer agents, because it can destruct cancer cells without showing any toxicity to normal cells. Metformin is an anti-diabetic drug with anticancer activity by inhibiting tumor cell proliferation. In this study, we demonstrated that metformin could induce TRAIL-mediated apoptotic cell death in TRAIL-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Pretreatment of metformindownregulation of c-FLIP and markedly enhanced TRAIL-induced tumor cell death by dose-dependent manner. Treatment with metformin resulted in slight increase in the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein light chain LC3-II and significantly decreased the p62 protein levels by dose-dependent manner indicated that metformin induced autophagy flux activation in the lung cancer cells. Inhibition of autophagy flux using a specific inhibitor and genetically modified ATG5 siRNA blocked the metformin-mediated enhancing effect of TRAIL. These data demonstrated that downregulation of c-FLIP by metformin enhanced TRAIL-induced tumor cell death via activating autophagy flux in TRAIL-resistant lung cancer cells and also suggest that metformin may be a successful combination therapeutic strategy with TRAIL in TRAIL-resistant cancer cells including lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:26992204

  16. Plasma effects of active ion beam injections in the ionosphere at rocket altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnoldy, R. L.; Cahill, L. J., Jr.; Kintner, P. M.; Moore, T. E.; Pollock, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Data from ARCS rocket ion beam injection experiments are primarily discussed. There are three results from this series of active experiments that are of particular interest in space plasma physics. These are the transverse acceleration of ambient ions in the large beam volume, the scattering of beam ions near the release payload, and the possible acceleration of electrons very close to the plasma generator which produce intense high frequency waves. The ability of 100 ma ion beam injections into the upper E and F regions of the ionosphere to produce these phenomena appear to be related solely to the process by which the plasma release payload and the ion beam are neutralized. Since the electrons in the plasma release do not convect with the plasma ions, the neutralization of both the payload and beam must be accomplished by large field-aligned currents (milliamperes/square meter) which are very unstable to wave growth of various modes.

  17. Long-pulse production of high current negative ion beam by using actively temperature controlled plasma grid for JT-60SA negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, A.; Hanada, M.; Yoshida, M.; Umeda, N.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Grisham, L. R.

    2015-04-08

    The temperature control system of the large-size plasma grid has been developed to realize the long pulse production of high-current negative ions for JT-60SA. By using this prototype system for the JT-60SA ion source, 15 A negative ions has been sustained for 100 s for the first time, which is three times longer than that obtained in JT-60U. In this system, a high-temperature fluorinated fluid with a high boiling point of 270 degree Celsius is circulated in the cooling channels of the plasma grids (PG) where a cesium (Cs) coverage is formed to enhance the negative ion production. Because the PG temperature control had been applied to only 10% of the extraction area previously, the prototype PG with the full extraction area (110 cm × 45 cm) was developed to increase the negative ion current in this time. In the preliminary results of long pulse productions of high-current negative ions at a Cs conditioning phase, the negative ion production was gradually degraded in the last half of 100 s pulse where the temperature of an arc chamber wall was not saturated. From the spectroscopic measurements, it was found that the Cs flux released from the wall might affect to the negative ion production, which implied the wall temperature should be kept low to control the Cs flux to the PG for the long-pulse high-current production. The obtained results of long-pulse production and the PG temperature control method contributes the design of the ITER ion source.

  18. Ion dynamics during seizures

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Joseph V.; Burman, Richard J.; Katz, Arieh A.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in membrane voltage brought about by ion fluxes through voltage and transmitter-gated channels represent the basis of neural activity. As such, electrochemical gradients across the membrane determine the direction and driving force for the flow of ions and are therefore crucial in setting the properties of synaptic transmission and signal propagation. Ion concentration gradients are established by a variety of mechanisms, including specialized transporter proteins. However, transmembrane gradients can be affected by ionic fluxes through channels during periods of elevated neural activity, which in turn are predicted to influence the properties of on-going synaptic transmission. Such activity-induced changes to ion concentration gradients are a feature of both physiological and pathological neural processes. An epileptic seizure is an example of severely perturbed neural activity, which is accompanied by pronounced changes in intracellular and extracellular ion concentrations. Appreciating the factors that contribute to these ion dynamics is critical if we are to understand how a seizure event evolves and is sustained and terminated by neural tissue. Indeed, this issue is of significant clinical importance as status epilepticus—a type of seizure that does not stop of its own accord—is a life-threatening medical emergency. In this review we explore how the transmembrane concentration gradient of the six major ions (K+, Na+, Cl−, Ca2+, H+and HCO3−) is altered during an epileptic seizure. We will first examine each ion individually, before describing how multiple interacting mechanisms between ions might contribute to concentration changes and whether these act to prolong or terminate epileptic activity. In doing so, we will consider how the availability of experimental techniques has both advanced and restricted our ability to study these phenomena. PMID:26539081

  19. Ion density and temperature variations at altitude of 500 km during moderate seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Ananna; Khurana, M. S.; Bahal, B. M.; Aggarwal, Malini; Sharma, D. K.

    2017-02-01

    Ionospheric ions (O+ and H+) and temperature (Ti) as precursory parameters to seismic activity have been analysed from year 1995 till 1998, using SROSS-C2 (average altitude range of ∼500 km) satellite measurements for moderate magnitude earthquakes. The details of seismic events during this period are downloaded from United State Geological Survey (USGS) and National Earthquake Information Centre (NEIC) website. 13 seismic events of moderate magnitude (M = 4-5.5) from 1995 to 1998, using SROSS-C2 satellite measurements have been analysed. During seismic affected period, considerable decrease in the density of heavier ion - O+ and increase in the ion temperature (Ti) is observed during all the selected events. Lighter ion - H+ doesn't show any significant change. Electric field and electromagnetic emissions generated due to seismogenic activity could be the plausible initializing agents responsible for change in ion concentration and temperature values during these events.

  20. Zinc ions modulate protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B activity.

    PubMed

    Bellomo, Elisa; Massarotti, Alberto; Hogstrand, Christer; Maret, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) are key enzymes in cellular regulation. The 107 human PTPs are regulated by redox signalling, phosphorylation, dimerisation, and proteolysis. Recent findings of very strong inhibition of some PTPs by zinc ions at concentrations relevant in a cellular environment suggest yet another mechanism of regulation. One of the most extensively investigated PTPs is PTP1B (PTPN1). It regulates the insulin and leptin signalling pathway and is implicated in cancer and obesity/diabetes. The development of novel assay conditions to investigate zinc inhibition of PTP1B provides estimates of about 5.6 nM affinity for inhibitory zinc(II) ions. Analysis of three PTP1B 3D structures (PDB id: 2CM2, 3I80 and 1A5Y) identified putative zinc binding sites and supports the kinetic studies in suggesting an inhibitory zinc only in the closed and cysteinyl-phosphate intermediate forms of the enzyme. These observations gain significance with regard to recent findings of regulatory roles of zinc ions released from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  1. Determination of aluminum and phosphorus in biological materials by reactor activation analysis using germanium as integral flux monitor and comparator.

    PubMed

    Furnari, J C; Cohen, I M

    1994-01-01

    A method for determination of aluminum and phosphorus in biological materials, based on activation in a nuclear reactor and measurement of 28Al, produced by the 27Al(n, gamma)28Al and 31P(n, alpha)28Al reactions, is described. Irradiations in the undisturbed and epicadmium spectra provide a two-equation system in order to determine the contributions of aluminum and phosphorus to the total activities. Germanium is used as an integral flux monitor and comparator, through the reactions: 74Ge(n, gamma)75Ge, 76Ge(n, gamma)77Ge, and 72Ge(n,p)72Ga.

  2. Effect of the active-ion concentration on the lasing dynamics of holmium fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-12-09

    The lasing dynamics of fibre lasers with a core based on quartz glass doped with holmium ions to concentrations in the range of 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} is investigated. It is shown that fibre lasers with a high concentration of active holmium ions generate pulses, but a decrease in the holmium concentration changes the lasing from pulsed to cw regime. At the same time, a decrease in the active-ion concentration and the corresponding increase in the fibre length in the cavity reduce the lasing efficiency. (lasers)

  3. Characteristics of NH4+ and NO3− fluxes in tea (Camellia sinensis) roots measured by scanning ion-selective electrode technique

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Li; Wei, Kang; Wang, Liyuan; Cheng, Hao; Zhang, Fen; Wu, Liyun; Bai, Peixian; Zhang, Chengcai

    2016-01-01

    As a vital beverage crop, tea has been extensively planted in tropical and subtropical regions. Nitrogen (N) levels and forms are closely related to tea quality. Based on different N levels and forms, we studied changes in NO3− and NH4+ fluxes in tea roots utilizing scanning ion-selective electrode technique. Our results showed that under both single and mixed N forms, influx rates of NO3− were much lower than those of NH4+, suggesting a preference for NH4+ in tea. With the increase in N concentration, the influx rate of NO3− increased more than that of NH4+. The NH4+ influx rates in a solution without NO3− were much higher than those in a solution with NO3−, while the NO3− influx rates in a solution without NH4+ were much lower than those in a solution with NH4+. We concluded that (1) tea roots showed a preference for NH4+, (2) presence of NO3− had a negative effect on NH4+ influx, and (3) NH4+ had a positive effect on NO3− influx. Our findings not only may help advance hydroponic tea experiments but also may be used to develop efficient fertilization protocols for soil-grown tea in the future. PMID:27918495

  4. Chemical weathering in the plain and peninsular sub-basins of the Ganga: Impact on major ion chemistry and elemental fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Santosh K.; Singh, Sunil K.; Krishnaswami, S.

    2010-04-01

    Concentrations of major ions, Sr and 87Sr/ 86Sr have been measured in the Gomti, the Son and the Yamuna, tributaries of the Ganga draining its peninsular and plain sub-basins to determine their contribution to the water chemistry of the Ganga and silicate and carbonate erosion of the Ganga basin. The results show high concentrations of Na and Sr in the Gomti, the Yamuna and the Ganga (at Varanasi) with much of the Na in excess of Cl. The use of this 'excess Na' (Na∗ = Na riv - Cl riv) a common index of silicate weathering yield values of ˜18 tons km -2 yr -1 for silicate erosion rate (SER) in the Gomti and the Yamuna basins. There are however, indications that part of this Na∗ can be from saline/alkaline soils abundant in their basins, raising questions about its use as a proxy to determine SER of the Ganga plain. Independent estimation of SER based on dissolved Si as a proxy give an average value of ˜5 tons km -2 yr -1 for the peninsular and the plain drainages, several times lower than that derived using Na∗. The major source of uncertainty in this estimate is the potential removal of Si from rivers by biological and chemical processes. The Si based SER and CER (carbonate erosion rate) are also much lower than that in the Himalayan sub-basin of the Ganga. The lower relief, runoff and physical erosion in the peninsular and the plain basins relative to the Himalayan sub-basin and calcite precipitation in them all could be contributing to their lower erosion rates. Budget calculations show that the Yamuna, the Son and Gomti together account for ˜75% Na, 41% Mg and ˜53% Sr and 87Sr of their supply to the Ganga from its major tributaries, with the Yamuna dominating the contribution. The results highlight the important role of the plain and peninsular sub-basins in determining the solute and Sr isotope budgets of the Ganga. The study also shows that the anthropogenic contribution accounts for ⩽10% of the major ion fluxes of the Ganga at Rajmahal during high

  5. Measurement of the total active 8B solar neutrino flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory with enhanced neutral current sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S N; Anthony, A E; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Biller, S D; Boger, J; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Bullard, T V; Chan, Y D; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Doe, P J; Dosanjh, R S; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Fulsom, B G; Gagnon, N; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hall, J C; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Handler, W B; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hemingway, R J; Hime, A; Howe, M A; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Klein, J R; Kos, M S; Krumins, A V; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Labranche, H; Lange, R; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Luoma, S; MacLellan, R; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McGee, S; McGregor, G; Mifflin, C; Miknaitis, K K S; Miller, G G; Moffat, B A; Nally, C W; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Oblath, N S; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Ouellet, C; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Rosendahl, S S E; Rusu, V L; Schwendener, M H; Simard, O; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, M W E; Starinsky, N; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Tafirout, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tesić, G; Thomson, M; Thorman, M; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Waltham, C E; Tseung, H Wan Chan; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2004-05-07

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has precisely determined the total active (nu(x)) 8B solar neutrino flux without assumptions about the energy dependence of the nu(e) survival probability. The measurements were made with dissolved NaCl in heavy water to enhance the sensitivity and signature for neutral-current interactions. The flux is found to be 5.21 +/- 0.27(stat)+/-0.38(syst) x 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1), in agreement with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of these and other solar and reactor neutrino results yields Deltam(2)=7.1(+1.2)(-0.6) x 10(-5) eV(2) and theta=32.5(+2.4)(-2.3) degrees. Maximal mixing is rejected at the equivalent of 5.4 standard deviations.

  6. The polymodal ion channel TRPV4 modulates calcium flux, spiking rate and apoptosis of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Ryskamp, Daniel A.; Witkovsky, Paul; Barabas, Peter; Huang, Wei; Koehler, Christopher; Akimov, Nikolay P.; Lee, Suk Hee; Chauhan, Shiwani; Xing, Wei; Rentería, René C.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Krizaj, David

    2011-01-01

    Sustained increase in intraocular pressure represents a major risk factor for eye disease yet the cellular mechanisms of pressure transduction in the posterior eye are essentially unknown. Here we show that the mouse retina expresses mRNA and protein for the polymodal TRPV4 cation channel known to mediate osmo- and mechanotransduction. TRPV4 antibodies labeled perikarya, axons and dendrites of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and intensely immunostained the optic nerve head. Müller glial cells, but not retinal astrocytes or microglia, also expressed TRPV4 immunoreactivity. The selective TRPV4 agonists 4α-PDD and GSK1016790A elevated [Ca2+]i in dissociated RGCs in a dose-dependent manner whereas the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin had no effect on [Ca2+]RGC. Exposure to hypotonic stimulation evoked robust increases in [Ca2+]RGC. RGC responses to TRPV4-selective agonists and hypotonic stimulation were absent in Ca2+-free saline and were antagonized by the nonselective TRP channel antagonists Ruthenium Red and gadolinium, but were unaffected by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. TRPV4-selective agonists increased the spiking frequency recorded from intact retinas recorded with multielectrode arrays. Sustained exposure to TRPV4 agonists evoked dose-dependent apoptosis of RGCs. Our results demonstrate functional TRPV4 expression in RGCs and suggest that its activation mediates response to membrane stretch leading to elevated [Ca2+]i and augmented excitability. Excessive Ca2+ influx through TRPV4 predisposes RGCs to activation of Ca2+-dependent pro-apoptotic signaling pathways, indicating that TRPV4 is a component of the response mechanism to pathological elevations of intraocular pressure. PMID:21562271

  7. Anion channel sensitivity to cytosolic organic acids implicates a central role for oxaloacetate in integrating ion flux with metabolism in stomatal guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yizhou; Blatt, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells play a key role in gas exchange for photosynthesis and in minimizing transpirational water loss from plants by opening and closing the stomatal pore. The bulk of the osmotic content driving stomatal movements depends on ionic fluxes across both the plasma membrane and tonoplast, the metabolism of organic acids, primarily Mal (malate), and its accumulation and loss. Anion channels at the plasma membrane are thought to comprise a major pathway for Mal efflux during stomatal closure, implicating their key role in linking solute flux with metabolism. Nonetheless, little is known of the regulation of anion channel current (ICl) by cytosolic Mal or its immediate metabolite OAA (oxaloacetate). In the present study, we have examined the impact of Mal, OAA and of the monocarboxylic acid anion acetate in guard cells of Vicia faba L. and report that all three organic acids affect ICl, but with markedly different characteristics and sidedness to their activities. Most prominent was a suppression of ICl by OAA within the physiological range of concentrations found in vivo. These findings indicate a capacity for OAA to co-ordinate organic acid metabolism with ICl through the direct effect of organic acid pool size. The findings of the present study also add perspective to in vivo recordings using acetate-based electrolytes. PMID:21745184

  8. Use of Temperature and Surface Gas Flux as Novel Measures of Microbial Activity at a Crude Oil Spill Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekins, B. A.; Warren, E.; Sihota, N. J.; Hostettler, F. D.

    2012-12-01

    Degradation of crude oil in the subsurface has been studied for over 30 years at a spill site located near Bemidji, Minnesota, USA. The well-characterized site is being used to experiment with the use of surface gas flux and temperature measurements as novel methods for quantifying microbial activity. In the largest subsurface oil body, a 2-m-thick smear zone spans the water table 6-8 m below the surface. Methane produced from degradation of the oil diffuses upward and mixes with oxygen from the surface supporting aerobic methanotrophy at 2-4 m depth. The methane oxidation produces CO2 and heat at rates which are hypothetically proportional to other measures of subsurface microbial activity. To test this hypothesis, vertical profiles of temperature and microbial populations, surface CO2 flux, and oil degradation state were measured at three sites in the oil body and one background site. Temperature increases in the oil zone near the water table were 1-4°C above the background site. The site with the highest temperature increase at the water table also had the highest concentrations of gene copy numbers for methanogens (mcrA) and methanotrophs (pmoA) along with the most degraded oil. Surface CO2 flux over the oil sites averaged more than twice that at the background site but was not consistently highest over the site with the highest activity by other measures. One possible explanation for this discrepancy is variation in the effective diffusion coefficient of the vadose zone between the methanotrophic zone and the surface. At the level of the methanotrophic zone, temperatures were elevated 2-6°C over the background values but again the site with greatest average annual temperature increase was not at the most active site. This may be due to enhanced recharge at the most active site, which lies at the center of a local topographic depression where focused recharge occurs. Overall, the temperature and flux data showed significant increases at the oil sites compared

  9. Oxidative degradation of propachlor by ferrous and copper ion activated persulfate.

    PubMed

    Liu, C S; Shih, K; Sun, C X; Wang, F

    2012-02-01

    The process of in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) by persulfate (S(2)O(8)(2-)) can be accelerated by metal ion activation, which more effectively degrades subsurface pollutants by enhancing sulfate radical (SO(4)(-)) generation. This study compared the results of propachlor degradation by Cu(2+) and Fe(2+) activated persulfate and revealed differing degradation kinetics and mechanisms between the two types of activation system. The activation of persulfate by Fe(2+) ions generally resulted in rapid degradation in the early stage, but was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in efficiency due to the rapid depletion of Fe(2+) by the sulfate radicals generated. In contrast, the Cu(2+) activated persulfate had a longer lasting degradation effect and a proportionally greater degradation enhancement at elevated Cu(2+) concentrations. An optimal Fe(2+) concentration should be sought to activate the persulfate, as a high Fe(2+) concentration of 2.5mM or above, as was used in this study, may inhibit propachlor degradation due to the competitive consumption of sulfate radicals by the excess Fe(2+) ions. Higher temperatures (55°C compared with 30°C) resulted in enhanced metal activation, particularly with the Cu(2+) activated system. Furthermore, acidic conditions were found to be more favorable for propachlor degradation by metal activated persulfate. The ecotoxicity of degraded propachlor samples, which was indicated by average well color development (AWCD) for its microbial community activity, was confirmed to be decreased during the degradation processes with these two ions activated persulfate.

  10. Theorization on ion-exchange equilibria: activity of species in 2-D phases.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Hiroki

    2004-11-01

    the same as that in wide nanopores, but the suppression is smaller because of the absence oe of the absence of the across-pore interaction. Finally, this paper attempts a formulation of activity coefficients of exchanging sites and adsorbed ion-site pairs and compares the proposed activity coefficients of interphase species with that of solution species given by the Debye-Hückel equation.

  11. Effect of Erbium substitution on temperature and field dependence of thermally activated flux flow resistance in Bi-2212 superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paladhi, D.; Mandal, P.; Sahoo, R. C.; Giri, S. K.; Nath, T. K.

    2016-12-01

    Thermally activated flux flow (TAFF) regime of Er doped Bi2Sr2Ca1-xErxCu2O8+δ (x=0.0, 0.1, 0.3) polycrystalline systems have been investigated using magneto-transport measurements up to 70 kOe magnetic field. High quality single phase samples have been prepared by standard solid state reaction method. The activation energy or pinning strength (U0) have been calculated using thermally activated flux flow (TAFF) model by linear fitting from the semi-logarithmic curve of ln ρ vs 1/T. It has been observed that activation energy (U0) decreases with Er substitution and U0 follows power law dependence with magnetic field for all three samples. Irreversibility lines (IL) have been drawn from the magneto-transport data for all three samples and it is observed that IL shifts to lower temperature with higher Er concentration. It is confirmed from the above results that pinning strength becomes weaker with Er doping. Finally, the variation of U0 have been shown with temperature by re-plotting -T(ln (ρ/ρ100)) vs T for three samples showing non-linear dependence with temperature.

  12. Low-energy electron flux and its reaction to active experimentation of Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, K.

    1981-01-01

    An instrument capable of observing the natural electron flux in the energy range from 0.1 to 12.0 kiloelectron volts is discussed for use in an experiment intended as a forerunner of a method that will utilize artificially accelerated electrons as tracer particles for electron fields parallel to the magnetic field. Effects that are of importance either as means of detecting the echo beam or as causes of beam perturbations (e.g., spacecraft charging effects and electron background) are to be studied. The use of electron accelerators as a tool to probe magnetospheric processes rather than to modify them is planned.

  13. Meaning and Measurability of Single-Ion Activities, the Thermodynamic Foundations of pH, and the Gibbs Free Energy for the Transfer of Ions between Dissimilar Materials

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, Alan L

    2015-01-01

    Considering the relationship between concentration and vapor pressure (or the relationship between concentration and fugacity) single-ion activity coefficients are definable in purely thermodynamic terms. The measurement process involves measuring a contact potential between a solution and an external electrode. Contact potentials are measurable by using thermodynamically reversible processes. Extrapolation of an equation to zero concentration and ionic strength enables determination of single-ion activity coefficients. Single-ion activities can be defined and measured without using any extra-thermodynamic assumptions, concepts, or measurements. This method could serve as a gold standard for the validation of extra-thermodynamic methods for determining single-ion activities. Furthermore, it places the concept of pH on a thermodynamically solid foundation. Contact potential measurements can also be used to determine the Gibbs free energy for the transfer of ions between dissimilar materials. PMID:25919971

  14. Neutron flux measurement using activated radioactive isotopes at the Baksan underground scintillation telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochkarov, M. M.; Alikhanov, I. A.; Boliev, M. M.; Dzaparova, I. M.; Novoseltseva, R. V.; Novoseltsev, Yu. F.; Petkov, V. B.; Volchenko, V. I.; Volchenko, G. V.; Yanin, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    Preliminary results of a neutron background measurement at the Baksan underground scintillation telescope (BUST) are presented. The external planes of the BUST are fully covered with standard scintillation detectors shielding the internal planes and suppressing thus background events due to cosmogenic and local radioactivity. The shielded internal planes were used as target for the neutron flux registration. The experimental method is based on the delayed coincidences between signals from any of the BUST counters. It is assumed that the first signal is due to inelastic interaction of a neutron with the organic scintillator, while the second signal comes from the decay of an unstable radioactive isotope formed when the fast neutron interacts with the 12C nuclei. Using the Monte-Carlo method (GEANT4) we also simulated propagation of neutrons through a layer of scintillator. The experimentally found muon induced neutron flux is j =1.3 -0.3 +0.7 ×10-10cm-2s-1 for neutron energies E ≥ 22MeV, which is in a qualitative agreement with similar measurements of other underground laboratories as well as with predictions of the GEANT4.

  15. Mapping fluxes of radicals from the combination of electrochemical activation and optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Sorin; Roger, Jean Paul; Fedala, Yasmina; Amiot, Fabien; Combellas, Catherine; Tessier, Gilles; Kanoufi, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The coating of gold (Au) electrode surfaces with nitrophenyl (NP) layers is studied by combination of electrochemical actuation and optical detection. The electrochemical actuation of the reduction of the nitrobenzenediazonium (NBD) precursor is used to generate NP radicals and therefore initiate the electrografting. The electrografting process is followed in situ and in real time by light reflectivity microscopy imaging, allowing for spatio-temporal imaging with sub-micrometer lateral resolution and sub-nanometer thickness sensitivity of the local growth of a transparent organic coating onto a reflecting Au electrode. The interest of the electrochemical actuation resides in its ability to finely control the grafting rate of the NP layer through the electrode potential. Coupling the electrochemical actuation with microscopic imaging of the electrode surface allows quantitative estimates of the local grafting rates and subsequently a real time and in situ mapping of the reacting fluxes of NP radicals on the surface. Over the 2 orders of magnitude range of grafting rates (from 0.04 to 4 nm s(-1)), it is demonstrated that the edge of Au electrodes are grafted -1.3 times more quickly than their centre, illustrating the manifestation of edge-effects on flux distribution at an electrode. A model is proposed to explain the observed edge-effect, it relies on the short lifetime of the intermediate NP radical species.

  16. Validation of the MCNP computational model for neutron flux distribution with the neutron activation analysis measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiyapun, K.; Chimtin, M.; Munsorn, S.; Somchit, S.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the method for validating the predication of the calculation methods for neutron flux distribution in the irradiation tubes of TRIGA research reactor (TRR-1/M1) using the MCNP computer code model. The reaction rate using in the experiment includes 27Al(n, α)24Na and 197Au(n, γ)198Au reactions. Aluminium (99.9 wt%) and gold (0.1 wt%) foils and the gold foils covered with cadmium were irradiated in 9 locations in the core referred to as CT, C8, C12, F3, F12, F22, F29, G5, and G33. The experimental results were compared to the calculations performed using MCNP which consisted of the detailed geometrical model of the reactor core. The results from the experimental and calculated normalized reaction rates in the reactor core are in good agreement for both reactions showing that the material and geometrical properties of the reactor core are modelled very well. The results indicated that the difference between the experimental measurements and the calculation of the reactor core using the MCNP geometrical model was below 10%. In conclusion the MCNP computational model which was used to calculate the neutron flux and reaction rate distribution in the reactor core can be used for others reactor core parameters including neutron spectra calculation, dose rate calculation, power peaking factors calculation and optimization of research reactor utilization in the future with the confidence in the accuracy and reliability of the calculation.

  17. Investigation of Ion Channel Activities of Gramicidin A in the Presence of Ionic Liquids Using Model Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyunil; Lee, Hwankyu; Iwata, Seigo; Choi, Sangbaek; Ki Kim, Moon; Kim, Young-Rok; Maruta, Shinsaku; Min Kim, Sun; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are considered to be green solvents because of their non-volatility. Although ILs are relatively safe in the atmospheric environment, they may be toxic in other environments. Our previous research showed that the cytotoxicity of ILs to biological organisms is attributable to interference with cell membranes by IL insertion. However, the effects of ILs on ion channels, which play important roles in cell homeostasis, have not been comprehensively studied to date. In this work, we studied the interactions between ILs and lipid bilayer membranes with gramicidin A ion channels. We used two methods, namely electrical and fluorescence measurements of ions that permeate the membrane. The lifetimes of channels were increased by all the ILs tested in this work via stabilizing the compressed structure of the lipid bilayer and the rate of ion flux through gA channels was decreased by changing the membrane surface charge. The former effect, which increased the rate of ion flux, was dominant at high salt concentrations, whereas the latter, which decreased the rate of ion flux, was dominant at low salt concentrations. The effects of ILs increased with increasing concentration and alkyl chain length. The experimental results were further studied using molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26189604

  18. Investigation of Ion Channel Activities of Gramicidin A in the Presence of Ionic Liquids Using Model Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyunil; Lee, Hwankyu; Iwata, Seigo; Choi, Sangbaek; Kim, Moon Ki; Kim, Young-Rok; Maruta, Shinsaku; Kim, Sun Min; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2015-07-20

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are considered to be green solvents because of their non-volatility. Although ILs are relatively safe in the atmospheric environment, they may be toxic in other environments. Our previous research showed that the cytotoxicity of ILs to biological organisms is attributable to interference with cell membranes by IL insertion. However, the effects of ILs on ion channels, which play important roles in cell homeostasis, have not been comprehensively studied to date. In this work, we studied the interactions between ILs and lipid bilayer membranes with gramicidin A ion channels. We used two methods, namely electrical and fluorescence measurements of ions that permeate the membrane. The lifetimes of channels were increased by all the ILs tested in this work via stabilizing the compressed structure of the lipid bilayer and the rate of ion flux through gA channels was decreased by changing the membrane surface charge. The former effect, which increased the rate of ion flux, was dominant at high salt concentrations, whereas the latter, which decreased the rate of ion flux, was dominant at low salt concentrations. The effects of ILs increased with increasing concentration and alkyl chain length. The experimental results were further studied using molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Metabolic flux control at the pyruvate node in an anaerobic Escherichia coli strain with an active pyruvate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ou, Mark S; Kim, Y; Ingram, L O; Shanmugam, K T

    2010-04-01

    During anaerobic growth of Escherichia coli, pyruvate formate-lyase (PFL) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) channel pyruvate toward a mixture of fermentation products. We have introduced a third branch at the pyruvate node in a mutant of E. coli with a mutation in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH*) that renders the enzyme less sensitive to inhibition by NADH. The key starting enzymes of the three branches at the pyruvate node in such a mutant, PDH*, PFL, and LDH, have different metabolic potentials and kinetic properties. In such a mutant (strain QZ2), pyruvate flux through LDH was about 30%, with the remainder of the flux occurring through PFL, indicating that LDH is a preferred route of pyruvate conversion over PDH*. In a pfl mutant (strain YK167) with both PDH* and LDH activities, flux through PDH* was about 33% of the total, confirming the ability of LDH to outcompete the PDH pathway for pyruvate in vivo. Only in the absence of LDH (strain QZ3) was pyruvate carbon equally distributed between the PDH* and PFL pathways. A pfl mutant with LDH and PDH* activities, as well as a pfl ldh double mutant with PDH* activity, had a surprisingly low cell yield per mole of ATP (Y(ATP)) (about 7.0 g of cells per mol of ATP) compared to 10.9 g of cells per mol of ATP for the wild type. The lower Y(ATP) suggests the operation of a futile energy cycle in the absence of PFL in this strain. An understanding of the controls at the pyruvate node during anaerobic growth is expected to provide unique insights into rational metabolic engineering of E. coli and related bacteria for the production of various biobased products at high rates and yields.

  20. Metal ion specificities for folding and cleavage activity in the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Boots, Jennifer L.; Canny, Marella D.; Azimi, Ehsan; Pardi, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The effects of various metal ions on cleavage activity and global folding have been studied in the extended Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer was used to probe global folding as a function of various monovalent and divalent metal ions in this ribozyme. The divalent metals ions Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, and Sr2+ have a relatively small variation (less than sixfold) in their ability to globally fold the hammerhead ribozyme, which contrasts with the very large difference (>10,000-fold) in apparent rate constants for cleavage for these divalent metal ions in single-turnover kinetic experiments. There is still a very large range (>4600-fold) in the apparent rate constants for cleavage for these divalent metal ions measured in high salt (2 M NaCl) conditions where the ribozyme is globally folded. These results demonstrate that the identity of the divalent metal ion has little effect on global folding of the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme, whereas it has a very large effect on the cleavage kinetics. Mechanisms by which the identity of the divalent metal ion can have such a large effect on cleavage activity in the Schistosoma hammerhead ribozyme are discussed. PMID:18755844

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Layered Double Hydroxides Containing Optically Active Transition Metal Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, S. B.; Kharkwal, Aneeta; Nitu; Kharkwal, Mamta; Sharma, Raghunandan

    2017-01-01

    The acetate intercalated layered double hydroxides of Zn and Mn, have been synthesized by chimie douce method. The materials were characterized by XRD, TGA, CHN, IR, XPS, SEM-EDX and UV-visible spectroscopy. The photoluminescence properties was also studied. The optical properties of layered hydroxides are active transition metal ion dependent, particularly d1-10 system plays an important role. Simultaneously the role of host - guest orientation has been considered the basis of photoluminescence. Acetate ion can be exchanged with iodide and sulphate ions. The decomposed product resulted the pure phase Mn doped zinc oxide are also reported.

  2. [Effects of brackish water irrigation on soil enzyme activity, soil CO2 flux and organic matter decomposition].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-qian; Wang, Fei; Liu, Tao; Chu, Gui-xin

    2015-09-01

    Brackish water irrigation utilization is an important way to alleviate water resource shortage in arid region. A field-plot experiment was set up to study the impact of the salinity level (0.31, 3.0 or 5.0 g · L(-1) NaCl) of irrigated water on activities of soil catalase, invertase, β-glucosidase, cellulase and polyphenoloxidase in drip irrigation condition, and the responses of soil CO2 flux and organic matter decomposition were also determined by soil carbon dioxide flux instrument (LI-8100) and nylon net bag method. The results showed that in contrast with fresh water irrigation treatment (CK), the activities of invertase, β-glucosidase and cellulase in the brackish water (3.0 g · L(-1)) irrigation treatment declined by 31.7%-32.4%, 29.7%-31.6%, 20.8%-24.3%, respectively, while soil polyphenoloxidase activity was obviously enhanced with increasing the salinity level of irrigated water. Compared to CK, polyphenoloxidase activity increased by 2.4% and 20.5%, respectively, in the brackish water and saline water irrigation treatments. Both soil microbial biomass carbon and microbial quotient decreased with increasing the salinity level, whereas, microbial metabolic quotient showed an increasing tendency with increasing the salinity level. Soil CO2 fluxes in the different treatments were in the order of CK (0.31 g · L(-1)) > brackish water irrigation (3.0 g · L(-1)) ≥ saline water irrigation (5.0 g · L(-1)). Moreover, CO2 flux from plastic film mulched soil was always much higher than that from no plastic film mulched soil, regardless the salinity of irrigated water. Compared with CK, soil CO2 fluxes in the saline water and brackish water treatments decreased by 29.8% and 28.2% respectively in the boll opening period. The decomposition of either cotton straw or alfalfa straw in the different treatments was in the sequence of CK (0.31 g · L(-1)) > brackish water irrigation (3.0 g · L(-1)) > saline water treatment (5.0 g · L(-1)). The organic matter

  3. Neutron activation analysis for reference determination of the implantation dose of cobalt ions

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, R.P.H.; Bubert, H.; Palmetshofer, L.

    1992-05-15

    The authors prepared depth profilling reference materials by cobalt ion implantation at an ion energy of 300 keV into n-type silicon. The implanted Co dose was then determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) giving an analytical dynamic range of almost 5 decades and uncertainty of 1.5%. This form of analysis allows sources of error (beam spreading, misalignment) to be corrected. 70 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. The inhibitory effect of metals and other ions on acid phosphatase activity from Vigna aconitifolia seeds.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pramod Kumar; Anand, Asha

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity of acid phosphatase from Vigna aconitifolia seeds to metal ions, fluoride, and phosphate was examined. All the effectors had different degree of inhibitory effect on the enzyme. Among metal ions, molybdate and ferric ion were observed to be most potent inhibitors and both exhibited mixed type of inhibition. Acid phosphatase activity was inhibited by Cu2+ in a noncompetitive manner. Zn and Mn showed mild inhibition on the enzyme activity. Inhibition kinetics analysis explored molybdate as a potent inhibitor for acid phosphatase in comparison with other effectors used in this study. Fluoride was the next most strong inhibitor for the enzyme activity, and caused a mixed type of inhibition. Phosphate inhibited the enzyme competitively, which demonstrates that inhibition due to phosphate is one of the regulatory factors for enzyme activity.

  5. Giant suppression of flux-flow resistivity in heavy-ion irradiated Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 films - Influence of linear defects on vortex transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budhani, R. C.; Suenaga, M.; Liou, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    A large shift of the onset of flux-flow resistivity and the irreversibility line H(irr)(T) to higher temperatures is observed in Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 films containing linear defects created by Ag(+21) ion irradiation. The H(irr)(T), which has a characteristic L shape in highly anisotropic Tl and Bi based cuprates, becomes more like that of YBa2Cu3O7 in the presence of these defects. The Jc at 77 K also shows a large increase as a result of flux localization at the defects. The transport data indicate that in the H-T plane above H(irr)(T) of the unirradiated material, an ensemble of unoccupied defects is required for effective pinning of each flux line in the system.

  6. Data-driven magnetohydrodynamic modelling of a flux-emerging active region leading to solar eruption

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Feng, Xuesheng; Hu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Solar eruptions are well-recognized as major drivers of space weather but what causes them remains an open question. Here we show how an eruption is initiated in a non-potential magnetic flux-emerging region using magnetohydrodynamic modelling driven directly by solar magnetograms. Our model simulates the coronal magnetic field following a long-duration quasi-static evolution to its fast eruption. The field morphology resembles a set of extreme ultraviolet images for the whole process. Study of the magnetic field suggests that in this event, the key transition from the pre-eruptive to eruptive state is due to the establishment of a positive feedback between the upward expansion of internal stressed magnetic arcades of new emergence and an external magnetic reconnection which triggers the eruption. Such a nearly realistic simulation of a solar eruption from origin to onset can provide important insight into its cause, and also has the potential for improving space weather modelling. PMID:27181846

  7. Increasing dust fluxes on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau linked with the Little Ice Age and recent human activity since the 1950s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Dejun; Jin, Zhangdong; Zhang, Fei; Song, Lei; Yang, Jinsong

    2016-12-01

    Arid and semi-arid areas in inner Asia contribute lots of mineral dust in the northern hemisphere, but dust flux evolution in the past is poorly constrained. Based on particle sizes and elemental compositions of a sediment core from Lake Qinghai on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau, dust fluxes during ∼1518-2011 A.D. were reconstructed based on 18-100 μm fractions of the lake sediment. The dust fluxes during the past ∼500 years ranged between 100 and 300 g/m2/yr, averaging 202 g/m2/yr, experiencing four stages: Stage 1 (∼1518-1590s), the flux was averaged 165 g/m2/yr, much lower than that in the Stage 2 (1590s-1730s, 254 g/m2/yr); similarly, an average flux of 169 g/m2/yr in the Stage 3 (1730s-1950s) was followed by an increased flux of 259 g/m2/yr in the Stage 4 (1950s-2011). During the first three stages the fluxes were dominated by natural dust activities in arid inner Asia, having a positive relation with wind intensity but a poor correlation with effective moisture (or precipitation) and temperature. The high dust flux in Stage 2 was due to relatively strong wind during the maximum Little Ice Age, whereas the remarkably high flux in 1950s-2011 was resulted from recent increasing human activities in northwestern China. The dust record not only documents past dust fluxes on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau but also reflects evolutions and mechanisms of dust activity/emission in inner Asia during the past ∼500 years.

  8. Role of hydrogen ions in standard and activation heap leaching of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubtsov, YuI

    2017-02-01

    The role of hydrogen ions in activation heap leaching of gold from rebellious ore has been studied, which has allowed enhancing gold recovery. The author puts forward a gold leaching circuit with the use of activated oxygen-saturated solutions acidified to pH = 6–9.

  9. Magnesium ions increase the activity of Bacillus deramificans pullulanase expressed by Brevibacillus choshinensis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chun; Duan, Xuguo; Wu, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Addition of MgCl2 to the culture medium has been found to dramatically increase the activity of Bacillus deramificans pullulanase expressed by Brevibacillus choshinensis. The specific activity of the pullulanase obtained from medium supplemented with MgCl2 was also higher than that obtained in culture medium without added magnesium ions. In this work, the mechanism of this increase was studied. When cultured in medium without added magnesium ions, B. choshinensis mainly produced a thermolabile, inactive form of pullulanase. The addition of magnesium ions led to the production of a thermostable, active form of pullulanase. Circular dichroism assays revealed considerable differences in secondary structure between the active and inactive pullulanase forms. Transmission electron microscopy suggested that magnesium ion addition inhibits the shedding of cell wall protein (HWP) layers from the cell surface. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that magnesium ion addition represses transcription of HWP. Because the pullulanase gene and HWP have identical promoters, pullulanase gene transcription was also inhibited. These results suggest that when pullulanase is expressed slowly, it tends to fold into an active form.

  10. Controls on gross fluxes of nitrous oxide and methane from an active agricultural ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, W. H.; Silver, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural soils can be a significant source of greenhouse gas emissions. Most research on the dynamics of these gases measure net fluxes across the soil-atmosphere interface. This approach limits our ability to determine driving variables because production and consumption processes occur simultaneously, and may be controlled by different factors. We used the trace gas stable isotope pool dilution technique to simultaneously measure field rates of gross production and consumption of N2O and CH4 during the growing season in a corn field located in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California. We also measured net nitrogen (N) mineralization and nitrification rates, soil temperature, soil moisture, and soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to explore their role as drivers of greenhouse gas fluxes. Across five sampling dates spanning from seeding to senescence, net N2O fluxes ranged from 0 - 4.5 mg N m-2 d-1 and averaged 1.6 × 0.2 mg N m-2 d-1 (n = 112). Gross N2O production ranged from 0.09 - 6.6 mg N m-2 d-1 and gross N2O reduction rates ranged from 0.00 - 0.95 mg N m-2 d-1. The N2O yield averaged 0.68 × 0.02 (n = 40). At peak growth (days after seeding 59 and 94), 89 % of the variability in gross N2O production rates was predicted by the combination of soil moisture, soil temperature, net N mineralization, and CO2 emissions (n = 15, p < 0.001); and 91 % of the variability in gross N2O reduction rates was predicted by net N mineralization and net nitrification together (n = 15, p < 0.001). When the corn was not at peak growth (days after seeding 11, 24, and 171), gross N2O production was most strongly correlated with soil temperature (R2 = 0.20, n = 24, p = 0.03), and gross N2O reduction rates were best predicted by CO2 emissions (R2 = 0.80, n =24, p < 0.001). Net CH4 fluxes ranged from -1.3 to 0.44 mg C m-2 d-1 but fluxes were not detectable for 94 out of 112 measurements. Overall net CH4 fluxes averaged -0.03 × 0.02 mg C m-2 d-1. Using the trace gas pool

  11. Modeling Extraction of VLF Energy from Localized Ion Ring Beams for Space Based Active Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scales, Wayne; Ganguli, Gurudas; Crabtree, Chris; Rudakov, Leonid; Mithaiwala, Manish

    2012-07-01

    Waves in the VLF range are of considerable interest in the magnetosphere since they are responsible for transporting energy and momentum and therefore impacting space weather. Ion ring beams can efficiently generate waves in the VLF frequency range between the electron and ion gyro-frequency (Mithaiwala et al., 2010). Generation of VLF waves by infinite extent ion ring beams have been extensively treated for a broad range of space plasma applications. However, ion ring distributions created by chemical release experiments in the ionosphere (Koons and Pongratz, 1981) and those that occur naturally during storms/substorms or solar-wind comet interactions are localized over a spatial extent. This presentation will consider a new computational model for the nonlinear evolution of VLF waves generated by a spatially localized ion ring beam. The model, though quite general, will have application to generation of VLF waves in the radiation belts by localized creation of an ion ring beam. The model includes the convective loss of energy through phenomenological electron-ion collisions, which models nonlinear scattering of electrostatic lower hybrid waves into large group velocity electromagnetic whistler/magnetosonic waves (Ganguli et al., 2010). Therefore the model, though electrostatic, includes critical electromagnetic effects in a computationally efficient fashion. An emphasis is placed on the determining the efficiency of extraction of VLF energy from the ion ring beam due to the spatial localization of the ion ring beam. It is shown that due to the convection of the VLF waves out of the source region, the efficiency of wave energy extraction is greatly enhanced. This is accompanied by a reduction in background and ion ring beam heating. The results will be used to highlight the importance of non-linear scattering to future active experiments in space. Mithaiwala et al. Phys. Plasma, doi.org/10.1063/1.3372842, 2010 Koons and Pongratz, JGR, 1981. Ganguli et al., Phys

  12. Superfine powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) coatings on microfiltration membranes: Effects of milling time on contaminant removal and flux.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Pauline; Partlan, Erin; Li, Mengfei; Lapolli, Flavio; Mefford, O Thompson; Karanfil, Tanju; Ladner, David A

    2016-09-01

    In microfiltration processes for drinking water treatment, one method of removing trace contaminants is to add powdered activated carbon (PAC). Recently, a version of PAC called superfine PAC (S-PAC) has been under development. S-PAC has a smaller particle size and thus faster adsorption kinetics than conventionally sized PAC. Membrane coating performance of various S-PAC samples was evaluated by measuring adsorption of atrazine, a model micropollutant. S-PACs were created in-house from PACs of three different materials: coal, wood, and coconut shell. Milling time was varied to produce S-PACs pulverized with different amounts of energy. These had different particles sizes, but other properties (e.g. oxygen content), also differed. In pure water the coal based S-PACs showed superior atrazine adsorption; all milled carbons had over 90% removal while the PAC had only 45% removal. With addition of calcium and/or NOM, removal rates decreased, but milled carbons still removed more atrazine than PAC. Oxygen content and specific external surface area (both of which increased with longer milling times) were the most significant predictors of atrazine removal. S-PAC coatings resulted in loss of filtration flux compared to an uncoated membrane and smaller particles caused more flux decline than larger particles; however, the data suggest that NOM fouling is still more of a concern than S-PAC fouling. The addition of calcium improved the flux, especially for the longer-milled carbons. Overall the data show that when milling S-PAC with different levels of energy there is a tradeoff: smaller particles adsorb contaminants better, but cause greater flux decline. Fortunately, an acceptable balance may be possible; for example, in these experiments the coal-based S-PAC after 30 min of milling achieved a fairly high atrazine removal (overall 80%) with a fairly low flux reduction (under 30%) even in the presence of NOM. This suggests that relatively short duration (low energy

  13. Logical regulation of the enzyme-like activity of gold nanoparticles by using heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Chia-Wen; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Chang, Huan-Tsung; Huang, Chih-Ching

    2013-08-01

    In this study we employed self-deposition and competitive or synergistic interactions between metal ions and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) to develop OR, AND, INHIBIT, and XOR logic gates through regulation of the enzyme-like activity of Au NPs. In the presence of various metal ions (Ag+, Bi3+, Pb2+, Pt4+, and Hg2+), we found that Au NPs (13 nm) exhibited peroxidase-, oxidase-, or catalase-like activity. After Ag+, Bi3+, or Pb2+ ions had been deposited on the Au NPs, the particles displayed strong peroxidase-like activity; on the other hand, they exhibited strong oxidase- and catalase-like activities after reactions with Ag+/Hg2+ and Hg2+/Bi3+ ions, respectively. The catalytic activities of these Au NPs arose mainly from the various oxidation states of the surface metal atoms/ions. Taking advantage of this behavior, we constructed multiplex logic operations--OR, AND, INHIBIT, and XOR logic gates--through regulation of the enzyme-like activity after the introduction of metal ions into the Au NP solution. When we deposited Hg2+ and/or Bi3+ ions onto the Au NPs, the catalase-like activities of the Au NPs were strongly enhanced (>100-fold). Therefore, we could construct an OR logic gate by using Hg2+/Bi3+ as inputs and the catalase-like activity of the Au NPs as the output. Likewise, we constructed an AND logic gate by using Pt4+ and Hg2+ as inputs and the oxidase-like activity of the Au NPs as the output; the co-deposition of Pt and Hg atoms/ions on the Au NPs was responsible for this oxidase-like activity. Competition between Pb2+ and Hg2+ ions for the Au NPs allowed us to develop an INHIBIT logic gate--using Pb2+ and Hg2+ as inputs and the peroxidase-like activity of the Au NPs as the output. Finally, regulation of the peroxidase-like activity of the Au NPs through the two inputs Ag+ and Bi3+ enabled us to construct an XOR logic gate.In this study we employed self-deposition and competitive or synergistic interactions between metal ions and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs

  14. Long-lived auroral structures and atmospheric losses through auroral flux tubes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Woch, J.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.

    2009-04-01

    The ASPERA-3 observations of electron and ion fluxes over the regions dominated by crustal magnetic fields show the existence of long-lived and active aurora-type magnetic flux tubes with a width of 20-150 km. The activity manifests itself by large electron energy fluxes (≥10-4 W/m2) and strong distortions in the upper (350-400 km) ionosphere. In some events the peaked electron energy distributions typical for Earth aurora are so pronounced that they are present in velocity distribution functions. A significant depletion of such auroral flux tubes is accompanied by the appearance of oxygen beams and a heating of the ions of ionospheric origin. Auroral activity was observed on several subsequent orbits of the Mars Express spacecraft during more than two weeks implying a stable existence of aurora on Mars. Atmospheric loss driven by energy deposition in the auroral flux tubes is estimated as ˜1023 s-1.

  15. Removing Fluoride Ions with Continously Fed Activated Alumina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yeun C.; Itemaking, Isara Cholapranee

    1979-01-01

    Discussed is the mathematical basis for determining fluoride removal during water treatment with activated alumina. The study indicates that decreasing particle size decreases the pore diffusion effect and increases fluoride removal. (AS)

  16. Activity-dependent branching ratios in stocks, solar x-ray flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elliot; Shreim, Amer; Paczuski, Maya

    2010-01-01

    We define an activity-dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series Xt . The branching ratio bx is defined as bx=E[ξx/x] . The random variable ξx is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to x , so ξx={Xt+1∣Xt=x} . If bx>1 , the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to x , while if bx<1 , it is subcritical. For stock prices we find bx=1 within statistical uncertainty, for all x , consistent with an “efficient market hypothesis.” For stock volumes, solar x-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, bx is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power-law behavior. For solar x-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where bx≃1 , which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. This is true despite different underlying probability distributions for Xt and for ξx . For the BTW model the distribution of ξx is Gaussian, for x sufficiently larger than 1, and its variance grows linearly with x . Hence, the activity in the BTW model obeys a central limit theorem when sampling over past histories. The broad region of activity where bx is close to one disappears once bulk dissipation is introduced in the BTW model—supporting our hypothesis that it is an indicator of criticality.

  17. Activity-dependent branching ratios in stocks, solar x-ray flux, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sandpile model.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elliot; Shreim, Amer; Paczuski, Maya

    2010-01-01

    We define an activity-dependent branching ratio that allows comparison of different time series X(t). The branching ratio b(x) is defined as b(x)=E[xi(x)/x]. The random variable xi(x) is the value of the next signal given that the previous one is equal to x, so xi(x)=[X(t+1) | X(t)=x]. If b(x)>1, the process is on average supercritical when the signal is equal to x, while if b(x)<1, it is subcritical. For stock prices we find b(x)=1 within statistical uncertainty, for all x, consistent with an "efficient market hypothesis." For stock volumes, solar x-ray flux intensities, and the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld (BTW) sandpile model, b(x) is supercritical for small values of activity and subcritical for the largest ones, indicating a tendency to return to a typical value. For stock volumes this tendency has an approximate power-law behavior. For solar x-ray flux and the BTW model, there is a broad regime of activity where b(x) approximately equal 1, which we interpret as an indicator of critical behavior. This is true despite different underlying probability distributions for X(t) and for xi(x). For the BTW model the distribution of xi(x) is Gaussian, for x sufficiently larger than 1, and its variance grows linearly with x. Hence, the activity in the BTW model obeys a central limit theorem when sampling over past histories. The broad region of activity where b(x) is close to one disappears once bulk dissipation is introduced in the BTW model-supporting our hypothesis that it is an indicator of criticality.

  18. Engineered Ionic Gates for Ion Conduction Based on Sodium and Potassium Activated Nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Xiao, Kai; Wen, Liping; Lu, Heng; Liu, Yahui; Kong, Xiang-Yu; Xie, Ganhua; Zhang, Zhen; Bo, Zhishan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-09-23

    In living systems, ion conduction plays a major role in numerous cellular processes and can be controlled by biological ion channels in response to specific environmental stimuli. This article describes biomimetic ionic gates for ion conduction based on sodium and potassium activated nanochannels. The Na(+) activated ionic gate and K(+) activated ionic gate were developed by immobilizing the alkali metal cation-responsive functional molecules, 4'-aminobenzo-15-crown-5 and 4'-aminobenzo-18-crown-6, respectively, onto the conical polyimide nanochannels. When the ionic gate was in the presence of the specific alkali metal cation, positively charged complexes formed between the crown ether and the alkali metal cation. On the basis of the resulting changes in surface charge, wettability and effective pore size, the nanochannel can achieve reversible switching. The switching behaviors of the two complexes differed due to the differences in binding strength between the two complexes. The Na(+) activated ionic gate is able to open and close to control the ion conduction through the nanochannel, and the K(+) activated ionic gate enables selective cation and anion conduction through the nanochannel. The Na(+) and K(+) activated ionic gates show great promise for use in clinical medicine, biosensors and drug delivery based on their high sensitivity and selectivity of being activated, and good stability.

  19. Study on preparation of Luffa activated carbon and its adsorption of metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Kuilu; Li, Zichao; Li, Qun

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, loofah was used as raw material and alkali and hydrogen peroxide were used to pre-oxidize. The activated carbon was activated by zinc chloride, and the activated carbon was used to desorb the heavy metal ions nickel and copper. The removal efficiency of heavy metal ions was studied under different conditions. The effects of retinervus Luffae Fructus active carbon adsorption of metal ions on process conditions, including metal ion concentration, reaction temperature, loofah activated carbon types and activated carbon dosage. In the present study, in different strain rate on the loofah sponge material compression tests in a wide range of density from 24 to 64 kg cubic meters. Luffa fibers and followed by carbonization to prepare MCAC KOH activation. MCAC has dense in parallel channels 10 mm in diameter and 4 - 0.3 - 1 mm wall thickness, which is inherited from the native structure of Luffa. Micro and middle holes are formed on the inner surface of the channel wall to form a hierarchical porous structure.

  20. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  1. Effect of surface property of activated carbon on adsorption of nitrate ion.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tatsuya; Amano, Yoshimasa; Machida, Motoi; Imazeki, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the removal of acidic functional groups and introduction of basic groups/sites on activated carbons (ACs) by outgassing and ammonia gas treatment were respectively carried out to enhance the nitrate ion adsorption in aqueous solution. Then, the relationships between nitrate ion adsorption and solution pH as well as surface charge of AC were investigated to understand the basic mechanisms of nitrate ion adsorption by AC. The result showed that the nitrate ion adsorption depended on the equilibrium solution pH (pHe) and the adsorption amount was promoted with decreasing pHe. The ACs treated by outgassing and ammonia gas treatment showed larger amount of nitrate ion adsorption than that by untreated AC. These results indicated that, since basic groups/sites could adsorb protons in the solution, the AC surface would be charged positively, and that the nitrate ion would be electrically interacted with positively charged carbon surface. Accordingly, it was concluded that basic groups/sites on the surface of AC could promote nitrate ion adsorption.

  2. Removal of Lead (II) Ions from Aqueous Solutions onto Activated Carbon Derived from Waste Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Murat; Ucar, Suat; Karagöz, Selhan; Tay, Turgay

    2013-01-01

    The removal of lead (II) ions from aqueous solutions was carried out using an activated carbon prepared from a waste biomass. The effects of various parameters such as pH, contact time, initial concentration of lead (II) ions, and temperature on the adsorption process were investigated. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis after adsorption reveals the accumulation of lead (II) ions onto activated carbon. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to analyze equilibrium data. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of activated carbon was found to be 476.2 mg g−1. The kinetic data were evaluated and the pseudo-second-order equation provided the best correlation. Thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process is endothermic and spontaneous. PMID:23853528

  3. Zinc activates damage-sensing TRPA1 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongzhen; Bandell, Michael; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhu, Michael X.; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2009-01-01

    Zinc is an essential biological trace element. It is required for the structure or function of over 300 proteins, and is increasingly recognized for its role in cell signaling. However, high concentrations of zinc have cytotoxic effects, and overexposure to zinc can cause pain and inflammation through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that zinc excites nociceptive somatosensory neurons and causes nociception in mice through TRPA1, a cation channel previously shown to mediate the pungency of wasabi and cinnamon through cysteine-modification. Zinc activates TRPA1 through a novel mechanism that requires zinc influx through TRPA1 channels and subsequent activation via specific intracellular cysteine and histidine residues. TRPA1 is highly sensitive to intracellular zinc, as low nanomolar concentrations activate TRPA1 and modulate its sensitivity. These findings identify TRPA1 as a major target for the sensory effects of zinc, and support an emerging role for zinc as a signaling molecule that can modulate sensory transmission. PMID:19202543

  4. Suprathermal Charged Particle Acceleration by Small-scale Flux Ropes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, G. P.; le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    We consider different limits of our recently developed kinetic transport theory to investigate the potential of super-Alvenic solar wind regions containing several small-scale flux ropes to explain the acceleration of suprathermal ions to power-law spectra as observations show. Particle acceleration is modeled in response to flux-rope activity involving contraction, merging (reconnection), and collisions in the limit where the particle gyoradius is smaller than the characteristic flux-rope scale length. The emphasis is mainly on the statistical variance in the electric fields induced by flux-rope dynamics rather than on the mean electric field induced by multiple flux ropes whose acceleration effects are discussed elsewhere. Our steady-state analytical solutions suggest that particle drift acceleration by flux ropes, irrespective of whether displaying incompressible or compressible behavior, can yield power laws asymptotically at higher energies whereas an exponential spectral rollover results asymptotically when field-aligned guiding center motion acceleration occur by reconnection electric fields from merging flux ropes. This implies that at sufficiently high particle energies, drift acceleration might dominate. We also expect compressive flux ropes to yield harder power-law spectra than incompressible flux ropes. Preliminary results will be discussed to illustrate how particle acceleration might be affected when both diffusive shock and small-scale flux acceleration occur simultaneously at interplanetary shocks.

  5. The Variation of Solar Fe 14 and Fe 10 Flux over 1.5 Solar Activity Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altrock, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A new source of data on the solar output, namely limb flux from the one- and two-million degree corona is presented. This parameter is derived from data obtained at the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak with the 40 cm coronagraph of the John W. Evans Solar Facility and the Emission Line Coronal Photometer. The limb flux is defined to be the latitude-averaged intensity in millionths of the brightness of disk center from an annulus of width 1.1 minutes centered at a height of 0.15 solar constant above the limb of emission from lines at 6374A (Fe X) or 5303A (Fe XIV). Fe XIV data have been obtained since 1973 and Fe X since 1984. Examination of the Fe XIV data shows that there is ambiguity in the definition of the last two solar activity minima, which can affect the determination of cycle rise times and lengths. There is an indication that a constant minimum or basal corona may exist at solar minimum. Cycle 22 has had a much faster onset than Cycle 21 and has now overtaken Cycle 21. The rise characteristics of the two cycles were very similar up until Jul. to Aug. 1989, at which time a long-term maximum occurred in Fe X and Fe XIV, which could possibly be the solar maximum. Another maximum is developing at the current time. Cycle 21 was characterized in Fe XIV by at least 4 major thrusts or bursts of activity, each lasting on the order of a year and all having similar maximum limb fluxes which indicates that coronal energy output is sustained over periods in which the sunspot number declines significantly. Dramatic increases in the limb fluxes occur from minimum to maximum, ranging from factors of 14 to 21 in the two lines. Two different techniques to predict the epoch of solar maximum have been applied to the Fe XIV data, resulting in estimates of April 1989 (plus or minus 1 mo) and May 1990 (plus or minus 2 mos).

  6. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  7. Observations of cold magnetospheric ions at geosynchronous orbit during times of high activity

    SciTech Connect

    Elphic, R.C.; Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Bame, S.J.

    1994-10-01

    Flowing, cold magnetospheric ions have been observed in conjunction with geosynchronous orbit magnetopause crossings since the earliest ATS and OGO missions. The authors have reported on the occurrence and convection of low-energy (10-100 eV) ions seen by multiple satellites in association with geosynchronous orbit magnetopause and low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) encounters. More generally, Los Alamos 3-D plasma instruments observe these ions following storm sudden commencements (SSCs), when activity levels are high. The ions appear to be convecting radially outward and usually westward at speeds of a few to several tens of kilometers per second. Often the energy spectra reveal peaks at energies appropriate for cold convecting H{sup +}, He{sup +} and O{sup +}. The occurrence frequency distribution of these dense cold ions is peaked near 1400 LT, with an overall range from 1000 to beyond 1800 LT. This local time distribution is greatly skewed from the overall plasmaspheric distribution, which peaks closer to 1800 LT. Multisatellite observations show that the ions are seen first at late afternoon local times and then at progressively earlier and earlier local times (though usually no earlier than 1000 LT). This apparent evolution in local time suggests that the late-afternoon plasmaspheric plasma moves out and dawnward during times of increased magnetospheric activity. The three-satellite observations also allow the authors to track cold plasma convection at multiple points in the magnetosphere, and potentially provide a glimpse of the large-scale convection pattern.

  8. Direct and indirect effects of ammonia, ammonium and nitrate on phosphatase activity and carbon fluxes from decomposing litter in peatland.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David; Moore, Lucy; Green, Samuel; Leith, Ian D; Sheppard, Lucy J

    2010-10-01

    Here we investigate the response of soils and litter to 5 years of experimental additions of ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and ammonia (NH3) to an ombrotrophic peatland. We test the importance of direct (via soil) and indirect (via litter) effects on phosphatase activity and efflux of CO2. We also determined how species representing different functional types responded to the nitrogen treatments. Our results demonstrate that additions of NO3, NH4 and NH3 all stimulated phosphatase activity but the effects were dependent on species of litter and mechanism (direct or indirect). Deposition of NH3 had no effect on efflux of CO2 from Calluna vulgaris litter, despite it showing signs of stress in the field, whereas both NO3 and NH4 reduced CO2 fluxes. Our results show that the collective impacts on peatlands of the three principal forms of nitrogen in atmospheric deposition are a result of differential effects and mechanisms on individual components.

  9. Metal Ion Activation of Clostridium sordellii Lethal Toxin and Clostridium difficile Toxin B

    PubMed Central

    Genth, Harald; Schelle, Ilona; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Lethal Toxin from Clostridium sordellii (TcsL) and Toxin B from Clostridium difficile (TcdB) belong to the family of the “Large clostridial glycosylating toxins.” These toxins mono-O-glucosylate low molecular weight GTPases of the Rho and Ras families by exploiting UDP-glucose as a hexose donor. TcsL is casually involved in the toxic shock syndrome and the gas gangrene. TcdB—together with Toxin A (TcdA)—is causative for the pseudomembranous colitis (PMC). Here, we present evidence for the in vitro metal ion activation of the glucosyltransferase and the UDP-glucose hydrolysis activity of TcsL and TcdB. The following rating is found for activation by divalent metal ions: Mn2+ > Co2+ > Mg2+ >> Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+. TcsL and TcdB thus require divalent metal ions providing an octahedral coordination sphere. The EC50 values for TcsL were estimated at about 28 µM for Mn2+ and 180 µM for Mg2+. TcsL and TcdB further require co-stimulation by monovalent K+ (not by Na+). Finally, prebound divalent metal ions were dispensible for the cytopathic effects of TcsL and TcdB, leading to the conclusion that TcsL and TcdB recruit intracellular metal ions for activation of the glucosyltransferase activity. With regard to the intracellular metal ion concentrations, TcsL and TcdB are most likely activated by K+ and Mg2+ (rather than Mn2+) in mammalian target cells. PMID:27089365

  10. Members of the chloride intracellular ion channel protein family demonstrate glutaredoxin-like enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Al Khamici, Heba; Brown, Louise J; Hossain, Khondker R; Hudson, Amanda L; Sinclair-Burton, Alxcia A; Ng, Jane Phui Mun; Daniel, Elizabeth L; Hare, Joanna E; Cornell, Bruce A; Curmi, Paul M G; Davey, Mary W; Valenzuela, Stella M

    2015-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel (CLIC) family consists of six evolutionarily conserved proteins in humans. Members of this family are unusual, existing as both monomeric soluble proteins and as integral membrane proteins where they function as chloride selective ion channels, however no function has previously been assigned to their soluble form. Structural studies have shown that in the soluble form, CLIC proteins adopt a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fold, however, they have an active site with a conserved glutaredoxin monothiol motif, similar to the omega class GSTs. We demonstrate that CLIC proteins have glutaredoxin-like glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase enzymatic activity. CLICs 1, 2 and 4 demonstrate typical glutaredoxin-like activity using 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide as a substrate. Mutagenesis experiments identify cysteine 24 as the catalytic cysteine residue in CLIC1, which is consistent with its structure. CLIC1 was shown to reduce sodium selenite and dehydroascorbate in a glutathione-dependent manner. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that the drugs IAA-94 and A9C specifically block CLIC channel activity. These same compounds inhibit CLIC1 oxidoreductase activity. This work for the first time assigns a functional activity to the soluble form of the CLIC proteins. Our results demonstrate that the soluble form of the CLIC proteins has an enzymatic activity that is distinct from the channel activity of their integral membrane form. This CLIC enzymatic activity may be important for protecting the intracellular environment against oxidation. It is also likely that this enzymatic activity regulates the CLIC ion channel function.

  11. Active and passive Ca2+ fluxes across cell membranes of the guinea-pig taenia coli.

    PubMed

    Casteels, R; Van Breemen, C

    1975-09-09

    The exchange of Ca between the extracellular fluid and the cellular compartment has been investigated in smooth muscle cells of taenia coli. It was found that during the initial phase of metabolic depletion by DNP + IAA, the net inwards flux of Ca amounts to 0.02 pmol cm(-2)-sec(-1). This increase might be proportional to the physiological calcium leak. The study of the relation between the inwardly directed Na gradient and the cellular Ca content has revealed that this Na gradient exerts no effect during prolonged exposure to K-free solution and a very limited effect during exposure to Na-deficient solutions. The cellular 45Ca release induced by metabolic inhibition is not affected by substituting Li or choline for Na. The supplementary calcium which enters the cells during exposure to a solution at low temperature is extruded on returning to a solution at 35 degrees C, even if the Na gradient is reversed. This finding and the effects of metabolic inhibition indicate that Ca extrusion in smooth muscle cells is a process which depends on metabolism and which is not affected by the inwardly directed Na gradient.

  12. Manufacturing and thermomechanical testing of actively cooled all beryllium high heat flux test pieces

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, N.N.; Sokolov, Yu.A.; Shatalov, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    One of the problems affiliated to ITER high heat flux elements development is a problem of interface of beryllium protection with heat sink routinely made of copper alloys. To get rid of this problem all beryllium elements could be used as heat receivers in places of enhanced thermal loads. In accordance with this objectives four beryllium test pieces of two types have been manufactured in {open_quotes}Institute of Beryllium{close_quotes} for succeeding thermomechanical testing. Two of them were manufactured in accordance with JET team design; they are round {open_quotes}hypervapotron type{close_quotes} test pieces. Another two ones are rectangular test sections with a twisted tape installed inside of the circular channel. Preliminary stress-strain analysis have been performed for both type of the test pieces. Hypervapotrons have been shipped to JET where they were tested on JET test bed. Thermomechanical testing of pieces of the type of {open_quotes}swirl tape inside of tube{close_quotes} have been performed on Kurchatov Institute test bed. Chosen beryllium grade properties, some details of manufacturing, results of preliminary stress-strain analysis and thermomechanical testing of the test pieces {open_quotes}swirl tape inside of tube{close_quotes} type are given in this report.

  13. Poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingxin; Qiu, Guannan; Song, Weiping

    2010-02-01

    Utilization of poultry litter as a precursor material to manufacture activated carbon for treating heavy metal-contaminated water is a value-added strategy for recycling the organic waste. Batch adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate kinetics, isotherms, and capacity of poultry litter-based activated carbon for removing heavy metal ions in water. It was revealed that poultry litter-based activated carbon possessed significantly higher adsorption affinity and capacity for heavy metals than commercial activated carbons derived from bituminous coal and coconut shell. Adsorption of metal ions onto poultry litter-based carbon was rapid and followed Sigmoidal Chapman patterns as a function of contact time. Adsorption isotherms could be described by different models such as Langmuir and Freundlich equations, depending on the metal species and the coexistence of other metal ions. Potentially 404 mmol of Cu2+, 945 mmol of Pb2+, 236 mmol of Zn2+, and 250-300 mmol of Cd2+ would be adsorbed per kg of poultry litter-derived activated carbon. Releases of nutrients and metal ions from litter-derived carbon did not pose secondary water contamination risks. The study suggests that poultry litter can be utilized as a precursor material for economically manufacturing granular activated carbon that is to be used in wastewater treatment for removing heavy metals.

  14. Regulation of airway surface liquid volume and mucus transport by active ion transport.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Mucus clearance is an important component of the lung's innate defense against disease, and the ability of the airways to clear mucus is strongly dependent on the volume of liquid on airway surfaces. Whether airway surface liquid (ASL) volume is maintained by passive surface forces or by active ion transport is controversial yet crucial to the understanding of how this system operates in both health and disease. In support of active ion transport being the major determinant of ASL volume, we have demonstrated that normal airway epithelia sense and autoregulate ASL height (volume) by adjusting the rates of Na+ absorption and Cl- secretion to maintain mucus transport.

  15. Activity of metazoa governs biofilm structure formation and enhances permeate flux during Gravity-Driven Membrane (GDM) filtration.

    PubMed

    Derlon, Nicolas; Koch, Nicolas; Eugster, Bettina; Posch, Thomas; Pernthaler, Jakob; Pronk, Wouter; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2013-04-15

    The impact of different feed waters in terms of eukaryotic populations and organic carbon content on the biofilm structure formation and permeate flux during Gravity-Driven Membrane (GDM) filtration was investigated in this study. GDM filtration was performed at ultra-low pressure (65 mbar) in dead-end mode without control of the biofilm formation. Different feed waters were tested (River water, pre-treated river water, lake water, and tap water) and varied with regard to their organic substrate content and their predator community. River water was manipulated either by chemically inhibiting all eukaryotes or by filtering out macrozoobenthos (metazoan organisms). The structure of the biofilm was characterized at the meso- and micro-scale using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM), respectively. Based on Total Organic Carbon (TOC) measurements, the river waters provided the highest potential for bacterial growth whereas tap water had the lowest. An increasing content in soluble and particulate organic substrate resulted in increasing biofilm accumulation on membrane surface. However, enhanced biofilm accumulation did not result in lower flux values and permeate flux was mainly influenced by the structure of the biofilm. Metazoan organisms (in particular nematodes and oligochaetes) built-up protective habitats, which resulted in the formation of open and spatially heterogeneous biofilms composed of biomass patches. In the absence of predation by metazoan organisms, a flat and compact biofilm developed. It is concluded that the activity of metazoan organisms in natural river water and its impact on biofilm structure balances the detrimental effect of a high biofilm accumulation, thus allowing for a broader application of GDM filtration. Finally, our results suggest that for surface waters with high particulate organic carbon (POC) content, the use of worms is suitable to enhance POC removal before ultrafiltration units.

  16. Observation-based modelling of permafrost carbon fluxes with accounting for deep carbon deposits and thermokarst activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider von Deimling, Thomas; Grosse, Guido; Strauss, Jens; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Morgenstern, Anne; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Meinshausen, Malte; Boike, Julia

    2015-04-01

    With rising global temperatures and consequent permafrost degradation a part of old carbon stored in high latitude soils will become available for microbial decay and eventual release to the atmosphere. To estimate the strength and timing of future carbon dioxide and methane fluxes from newly thawed permafrost carbon, we have developed a simplified, two-dimensional multi-pool model. As large amounts of soil organic matter are stored in depths below three meters, we have also simulated carbon release from deep deposits in Yedoma regions. For this purpose we have modelled abrupt thaw under thermokarst lakes which can unlock large amounts of soil carbon buried deep in the ground. The computational efficiency of our 2-D model allowed us to run large, multi-centennial ensembles of differing scenarios of future warming to express uncertainty inherent to simulations of the permafrost-carbon feedback. Our model simulations, which are constrained by multiple lines of recent observations, suggest cumulated CO2 fluxes from newly thawed permafrost until the year 2100 of 20-58 Pg-C under moderate warming (RCP2.6), and of 42-141Pg-C under strong warming (RCP8.5). Under intense thermokarst activity, our simulated methane fluxes proved substantial and caused up to 40 % of total permafrost-affected radiative forcing in the 21st century. By quantifying CH4 contributions from different pools and depth levels, we discuss the role of thermokarst dynamics in affecting future Arctic carbon release. The additional global warming through the release from newly thawed permafrost carbon proved only slightly dependent on the pathway of anthropogenic emission in our simulations and reached about 0.1°C by end of the century. The long-term, permafrost-affected global warming increased further in the 22nd and 23rd century, reaching a maximum of about 0.4°C in the year 2300.

  17. Electron heat flux instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  18. Modulation of bone remodeling via mechanically activated ion channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Randall L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A critical factor in the maintenance of bone mass is the physical forces imposed upon the skeleton. Removal of these forces, such as in a weightless environment, results in a rapid loss of bone, whereas application of exogenous mechanical strain has been shown to increase bone formation. Numerous flight and ground-based experiments indicate that the osteoblast is the key bone cell influenced by mechanical stimulation. Aside from early transient fluctuations in response to unloading, osteoclast number and activity seem unaffected by removal of strain. However, bone formation is drastically reduced in weightlessness and osteoblasts respond to mechanical strain with an increase in the activity of a number of second messenger pathways resulting in increased anabolic activity. Unfortunately, the mechanism by which the osteoblast converts physical stimuli into a biochemical message, a process we have termed biochemical coupling, remains elusive. Prior to the application of this grant, we had characterized a mechanosensitive, cation nonselective channel (SA-cat) in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells that we proposed is the initial signalling mechanism for mechanotransduction. During the execution of this grant, we have made considerable progress to further characterize this channel as well as to determine its role in the osteoblastic response to mechanical strain. To achieve these goals, we combined electrophysiologic techniques with cellular and molecular biology methods to examine the role of these channels in the normal function of the osteoblast in vitro.

  19. Improved thermostable α-amylase activity of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens by low-energy ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; Zhang, J L; Zhu, S W

    2011-09-23

    Thermostable α-amylase is of great importance in the starch fermentation industry; it is extensively used in the manufacture of beverages, baby foods, medicines, and pharmaceuticals. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens produces thermostable α-amylase; however, production of thermostable α-amylase is limited. Ion-beam implantation is an effective method for mutation breeding in microbes. We conducted ion-beam implantation experiments using two different ions, Ar(+) and N(+), to determine the survival rate of and dose effect on a high α-amylase activity strain of B. amyloliquefaciens that had been isolated from soil samples. N(+) implantation resulted in a higher survival rate than Ar(+) implantation. The optimum implantation dose was 2.08 × 10(15) ions/cm(2). Under this implantation condition, we obtained a thermally and genetically stable mutant α-amylase strain (RL-1) with high enzyme activity for degrading α-amylase. Compared to the parental strain (RL), the RL-1 strain had a 57.1% increase in α-amylase activity. We conclude that ion implantation in B. amyloliquefaciens can produce strains with increased production of thermostable α-amylase.

  20. Relationship between structure of phenothiazine analogues and their activity on platelet calcium fluxes.

    PubMed Central

    Enouf, J.; Lévy-Toledano, S.

    1984-01-01

    Phenothiazine analogues have been tested for their effect on calcium uptake into platelet membrane vesicles and on ionophore-induced platelet activation, both phenomena being Ca2+-dependent. Both calcium uptake into membrane vesicles and ionophore-induced platelet activation were inhibited by the drugs. Evidence for two inhibitors as potent as chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine was found. These drugs are apparently competitive inhibitors of calcium uptake. A structure-activity relationship has been established. The data suggest that the phenothiazines are able to inhibit calmodulin-insensitive calcium uptake of platelet membrane vesicles and that therefore they cannot be assumed to be selective inhibitors of calmodulin interactions under all circumstances. PMID:6697061

  1. Influence of several metal ions on the gelation activation energy of silicon tetraethoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of nine metal cations (Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Cu(2+), Al(3+), La(3+), and Y(3+) on silica gel formation has been investigated by studying the hydrolysis and polycondensation of silicon tetraethoxide (TEOS) in the presence of metal nitrates. The influence of water: TEOS mole ratio, metal ion concentration, and the reaction temperature has been investigated. The overall activation energy for gel formation has been determined from the temperature dependence of the time of gelation for each system. The activation energy for -Si-O-Si- network formation is found to be 54.5 kJ/mol. The gel formation time as well as the activation energy sharply increase in the presence of Cu(2+), Al(3+), La(3+) and Y(3+). In contrast, the presence of Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), or, Sr(2+) lowers the gelation time, but has no appreciable effect on the activation energy. This difference may be attributed to the participation or nonparticipation of the metal ions in the formation of the three-dimensional polymeric network during the polycondensation step. The concentration of metal ion (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Y(3+) or the water: TEOS mole ratio had no appreciable effect on the gelation activation energy. A simple test has been proposed to determine whether a metal ion would act as a network intermediate or modifier in silica and other glassy networks.

  2. Influence of several metal ions on the gelation activation energy of silicon tetraethoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of nine metal cations Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Cu(2+), Al(3+), La(3+), and Y(3+) on silica gel formation has been investigated by studying the hydrolysis and polycondensation of silicon tetraethoxide (TEOS) in the presence of metal nitrates. The influence of water:TEOS mole ratio, metal ion concentration, and the reaction temperature has been investigated. The overall activation energy for gel formation has been determined from the temperature dependence of the time of gelation for each system. The activation energy for -Si-O-Si- network formation is found to be 54.5 kJ/mol. The gel formation time as well as the activation energy sharply increase in the presence of Cu(2+), Al(3+), La(3+) and Y(3+). In contrast, the presence of Li(+), Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), or Sr(2+) lowers the gelation time, but has no appreciable effect on the activation energy. This difference may be attributed to the participation or nonparticipation of the metal ions in the formation of the three-dimensional polymeric network during the polycondensation step. The concentration of metal ion Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Y(3+) or the water:TEOS mole ratio had no appreaciable effect on the gelation activation energy. A simple test has been proposed to determine whether a metal ion would act as a network intermediate or modifier in silica and other glassy networks.

  3. Impact of Human Activities on the Flux of Terrestrial Sediments to the Coastal Ocean Offshore Northeastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tzu-Ting; Su, Chih-Chieh; Liu, Char-Shine; Huang, Chen-fen; Hsu, Ho-Han

    2016-04-01

    Land to ocean material fluxes play an important role in global biogeochemical cycles. Changes in sediment supply not only greatly influence the benthic environment of coastal estuaries but also might threaten human lives and properties. Artificial constructions, such as roads and reservoirs, could affect natural environments and change sediment discharges. Due to its high precipitation, steep slopes, small basin areas, and frequent flood events, Taiwan is characterized with rapid erosion rates and extremely high sediment yields. In northeastern Taiwan, the high mean annual precipitation lead to large amounts of sediments being delivered into the ocean through the Lanyang River. Since 1957, the road constructions along the Lanyang River greatly increased terrestrial sediment flux to the coastal ocean. However, its influence on offshore area is not yet clear. In this study, we combine geochemical and geophysical data to evaluate the modern sedimentation history and discuss the impact of human activities on the Ilan Shelf. The preliminary results of grain size and 210Pb analyses from five sediment cores taken from the upper South Guishan Channel indicate the existence of local differences on hydrodynamic conditions. In addition, we also applied similarity index which based on a quantitative analysis algorithm to the chirp sonar data on echo character classification and calculated continuous grain size variations of the seafloor surface sediments. By combining all geochemical and geophysical data, we may reconstruct the holistic picture of human impacts on offshore environment from sedimentology records.

  4. Characterization of flux-grown Trace-element-doped titanite using the high-mass-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP-RG)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazdab, F.K.

    2009-01-01

    Crystals of titanite can be readily grown under ambient pressure from a mixture of CaO, TiO2 and SiO2 in the presence of molten sodium tetraborate. The crystals produced are euhedral and prismatic, lustrous and transparent, and up to 5 mm in length. Titanite obtained by this method contains approximately 4300 ppm Na and 220 ppm B contributed from the flux. In addition to dopant-free material, titanite containing trace alkali and alkaline earth metals (K, Sr, Ba), transition metals (Sc, Cr, Ni, Y, Zr, Nb, Hf and Ta), rare-earth elements (REE), actinides (Th, U) and p-block elements (F, S, Cl, Ge, Sn and Pb) have been prepared using the same procedure. Back-scattered electron (BSE) imaging accompanied by ion-microprobe (SHRIMP-RG) analysis confirms significant incorporation of selected trace-elements at structural sites. Regardless of some zonation, the large size of the crystals and broad regions of chemical homogeneity make these crystals useful as experimental starting material, and as matrix-matched trace-element standards for a variety of microbeam analytical techniques where amorphous titanite glass, heterogeneous natural titanite or a non-titanite standard may be less than satisfactory. Trace-element-doped synthetic crystals can also provide a convenient proxy for a better understanding of trace-element incorporation in natural titanite. Comparisons with igneous, authigenic and high-temperature metasomatic titanite are examined. The use of high-mass-resolution SIMS also demonstrates the analytical challenges inherent to any in situ mass-spectrometry-based analysis of titanite, owing to the production of difficult-to-resolve molecular interferences. These interferences are dominated by Ca-Ca, Ca-Ti and Ti-Ti dimers that are significant in the mass range of 80-100, affecting all isotopes of Sr and Zr, as well as 89Y and 93Nb. Methods do exist for the evaluation of interferences by these dimers and of polyatomic interferences on the LREE.

  5. Solar activity prediction of sunspot numbers (verification). Predicted solar radio flux; predicted geomagnetic indices Ap and Kp. [space shuttle program: satellite orbital lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    Efforts to further verify a previously reported technique for predicting monthly sunspot numbers over a period of years (1979 to 1989) involved the application of the technique over the period for the maximum epoch of solar cycle 19. Results obtained are presented. Methods and results for predicting solar flux (F10.7 cm) based on flux/sunspot number models, ascent and descent, and geomagnetic activity indices as a function of sunspot number and solar cycle phase classes are included.

  6. GLYCOENGINEERING OF ESTERASE ACTIVITY THROUGH METABOLIC FLUX-BASED MODULATION OF SIALIC ACID.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mohit; Tan, Elaine; Labonte, Jason W; Shah, Shivam; Saeui, Christopher T; Liu, Lingshu; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Bovonratwet, Patawut; Gray, Jeffrey J; Yarema, Kevin

    2017-02-20

    This report describes the metabolic glycoengineering (MGE) of intracellular esterase activity in human colon cancer (LS174T) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In silico analysis of the carboxylesterases CES1 and CES2 suggested that these enzymes are modified with sialylated N-glycans, which are proposed to stabilize the active multimeric forms of these enzymes. This premise was supported by treating cells with butanolylated ManNAc to increase sialylation, which in turn increased esterase activity. By contrast, hexosamine analogs not targeted to sialic acid biosynthesis (e.g., butanoylated GlcNAc or GalNAc) had minimal impact. Measurement of mRNA and protein confirmed that esterase activity was controlled through glycosylation and not through transcription or translation. Azide-modified ManNAc analogs widely used in MGE also enhanced esterase activity and provided a way to enrich targeted "glycoengineered" proteins (such as CES2), thereby providing unambiguous evidence that the compounds were converted to sialosides and installed into the glycan structures of esterases as intended. Overall, this study provides a pioneering example of the modulation of intracellular enzyme activity through MGE, which expands the value of this technology from its current status as a labeling strategy and modulator of cell surface biological events.

  7. Effect of multi-ions on active flow regulation in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jeongeun; Ahn, Sungsook; Kim, Seung-Gon; Oh, Hwasuk; Kim, Taejoo; Lee, Sang Joon

    2012-11-01

    Plants have been known to regulate ion-mediated flows actively in xylem vessels. Pits, the porous structures in xylem vessels, are presumed to play a key role in the ion-mediated flow regulation based on dynamic swelling and shrinking of their pectic matrix. However, the autonomous flow regulation in plants has not been elucidated yet and the pectin-swelling hypothesis seems to be simply applied to account for dynamic modulation of xylem conductance. In this study, the effects of multiple ions and their concentration on the water transport in plants were experimentally investigated. In addition, the active regulation mechanism of xylem water flow was also examined with considering the ionic effect.

  8. High catalytic activity of anatase titanium dioxide for decomposition of electrolyte solution in lithium ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; He, Yan-Bing; Lv, Wei; Zhang, Chen; Du, Hongda; Li, Baohua; Yang, Quan-Hong; Kang, Feiyu

    2014-12-01

    It has been indicated that anatase TiO2 is a promising anode material for lithium ion power battery from many previous researches. Whereas, in this work, we find that the anatase TiO2, when used as an anode for lithium ion battery, has high catalytic activity to initiate the decarboxylation reaction of electrolyte solution, resulting in the large generation of sole gaseous component, CO2. The ROLi species and the new phase of flake-like Li2TiF6 material are the main reaction products between anatase TiO2 and LiPF6 based electrolyte solution. This work provides important and urgent information that the surface chemistry of anatase TiO2 used as the anode material of lithium ion battery must be modified to suppress its catalytic activity for the decomposition of solvents.

  9. Influence of air ions on brain activity induced by electrical stimulation in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivereau, J. M.; Lambert, J. F.; Truong-Ngoc, A.

    1981-03-01

    The brain induced activity was studied in 18 rats wearing chronically skull implanted electrodes. The stimulating factor was various electrical stimulations of the mesencephalic reticular activating formation, given during the slow wave state of sleep. The results of 300 stimulations were measured by amplitude and frequency changes in the EEG simultaneously recorded. Animals previously exposed to positive air ions (3 weeks 80,000 ions/ml) exhibited lowered excitability of the reticulocortical system. Significantly higher stimulations were necessary to induce arousal. Negative air ions induced more intricate effects: brain excitability was lowered when tested with weak stimulations, but normal when evaluated with medium high level stimilations. Sleep seems first more stable but as stimulation increases, arousal is soon as effective as in controls. These results are in agreement with others findings in behavioral fields and partly explains them.

  10. Activation energy-activation volume master plots for ion transport behavior in polymer electrolytes and supercooled molten salts.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Malcolm D; Imrie, Corrie T; Stoeva, Zlatka; Pas, Steven J; Funke, Klaus; Chandler, Howard W

    2005-09-08

    We demonstrate the use of activation energy versus activation volume "master plots" to explore ion transport in typical fragile glass forming systems exhibiting non-Arrhenius behavior. These systems include solvent-free salt complexes in poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and low molecular weight poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) and molten 2Ca(NO3)2.3KNO3 (CKN). Plots showing variations in apparent activation energy EA versus apparent activation volume VA are straight lines with slopes given by M = DeltaEA/DeltaVA. A simple ion transport mechanism is described where the rate determining step involves a dilatation (expressed as VA) around microscopic cavities and a corresponding work of expansion (EA). The slopes of the master plots M are equated to internal elastic moduli, which vary from 1.1 GPa for liquid PPO to 5.0 GPa for molten CKN on account of differing intermolecular forces in these materials.

  11. Control of Autophagosome Axonal Retrograde Flux by Presynaptic Activity Unveiled Using Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Martin, Sally; Papadopulos, Andreas; Harper, Callista B.; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Niranjan, Dhevahi; Glass, Nick R.; Cooper-White, Justin J.; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Choquet, Daniel; Davletov, Bazbek; Meunier, Frédéric A.

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) is a highly potent neurotoxin that elicits flaccid paralysis by enzymatic cleavage of the exocytic machinery component SNAP25 in motor nerve terminals. However, recent evidence suggests that the neurotoxic activity of BoNT/A is not restricted to the periphery, but also reaches the CNS after retrograde axonal transport. Because BoNT/A is internalized in recycling synaptic vesicles, it is unclear which compartment facilitates this transport. Using live-cell confocal and single-molecule imaging of rat hippocampal neurons cultured in microfluidic devices, we show that the activity-dependent uptake of the binding domain of the BoNT/A heavy chain (BoNT/A-Hc) is followed by a delayed increase in retrograde axonal transport of BoNT/A-Hc carriers. Consistent with a role of presynaptic activity in initiating transport of the active toxin, activity-dependent uptake of BoNT/A in the terminal led to a significant increase in SNAP25 cleavage detected in the soma chamber compared with nonstimulated neurons. Surprisingly, most endocytosed BoNT/A-Hc was incorporated into LC3-positive autophagosomes generated in the nerve terminals, which then underwent retrograde transport to the cell soma, where they fused with lysosomes both in vitro and in vivo. Blocking autophagosome formation or acidification with wortmannin or bafilomycin A1, respectively, inhibited the activity-dependent retrograde trafficking of BoNT/A-Hc. Our data demonstrate that both the presynaptic formation of autophagosomes and the initiation of their retrograde trafficking are tightly regulated by presynaptic activity. PMID:25878289

  12. Impact of Ion Implantation on Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch) Growth and Antioxidant Activity Under Drought Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingnan; Tong, Liping; Shen, Tongwei; Li, Jie; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Zengliang

    2007-06-01

    Low energy ion beams are known to have stimulation effects on plant generation and to improve plants' intrinsic quality. In the present study, the growth and physiological index of licorice implanted with 0, 8, 10, 12 and 14× (2.6×1015) ions/cm2 were investigated under well-watered and drought-stress conditions. The results showed that a proper dose of ion implantation was particularly efficient in stimulating the licorice growth and improving the plant biomass significantly in both the well-watered and drought-stress conditions. The physiological results of licorice measured by leaf water potential, lipid oxidation, soluble protein and antioxidant system showed a significant correlation between ion implantation and water regime except for leaf water potential. Therefore, the study indicated that ion implantation can enhance licorice's drought tolerance by increasing the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging ability to lower oxidative damage to lipids in plants. Ion beam implantation, therefore, provides an alternative method to enhance licorice drought tolerance.

  13. Rapidly Alternating Transmission Mode Electron Transfer Dissociation and Collisional Activation for the Characterization of Polypeptide Ions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hongling; Xia, Yu; Yang, Min; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Cation transmission/electron transfer reagent anion storage mode electron transfer ion/ion reactions and beam-type collisional activation of the polypeptide ions are performed in rapid succession in the high pressure collision cell (Q2) of a quadrupole/time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometer (QqTOF), where the electron transfer reagent anions are accumulated. Duty cycles for both electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments are improved relative to ion trapping approaches since there are no discrete ion storage and reaction steps for ETD experiments and no discrete ion storage step and frequency tuning for CID experiments. For this technique, moderately high resolution and mass accuracy are also obtained due to mass analysis via the TOF analyzer. This relatively simple approach has been demonstrated with a triply charged tryptic peptide, a triply charged tryptic phosphopeptide, and a triply charged tryptic N-linked glycopeptide. For the tryptic peptide, the sequence is identified with more certainty than would be available from a single method alone due to the complementary information provided by these two dissociation methods. Because of the complementary information derived from both ETD and CID dissociation methods, peptide sequence and post-translational modification (PTM) sites for the phosphopeptide are identified. This combined ETD and CID approach is particularly useful for characterizing glycopeptides because ETD generates information about both peptide sequence and locations of the glycosylation sites while CID provides information about the glycan structure. PMID:18396915

  14. Combined effects of water temperature and copper ion concentration on catalase activity in Crassostrea ariakensis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yang, Hongshuai; Liu, Jiahui; Li, Yanhong; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-07-01

    A central composite experimental design and response surface method were used to investigate the combined effects of water temperature (18-34°C) and copper ion concentration (0.1-1.5 mg/L) on the catalase (CAT) activity in the digestive gland of Crassostrea ariakensis. The results showed that the linear effects of temperature were significant ( P<0.01), the quadratic effects of temperature were significant ( P<0.05), the linear effects of copper ion concentration were not significant ( P>0.05), and the quadratic effects of copper ion concentration were significant ( P<0.05). Additionally, the synergistic effects of temperature and copper ion concentration were not significant ( P>0.05), and the effect of temperature was greater than that of copper ion concentration. A model equation of CAT enzyme activity in the digestive gland of C. ariakensis toward the two factors of interest was established, with R 2, Adj. R 2 and Pred. R 2 values as high as 0.943 7, 0.887 3 and 0.838 5, respectively. These findings suggested that the goodness of fit to experimental data and predictive capability of the model were satisfactory, and could be practically applied for prediction under the conditions of the study. Overall, the results suggest that the simultaneous variation of temperature and copper ion concentration alters the activity of the antioxidant enzyme CAT by modulating active oxygen species metabolism, which may be utilized as a biomarker to detect the effects of copper pollution.

  15. A Two-Metal-Ion-Mediated Conformational Switching Pathway for HDV Ribozyme Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Radak, Brian K.; Harris, Michael E.; York, Darrin M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA enzymes serve as a potentially powerful platform from which to design catalysts and engineer new biotechnology. A fundamental understanding of these systems provides insight to guide design. The hepatitis delta virus ribozyme (HDVr) is a small, self-cleaving RNA motif widely distributed in nature, that has served as a paradigm for understanding basic principles of RNA catalysis. Nevertheless, questions remain regarding the precise roles of divalent metal ions and key nucleotides in catalysis. In an effort to establish a reaction mechanism model consistent with available experimental data, we utilize molecular dynamics simulations to explore different conformations and metal ion binding modes along the HDVr reaction path. Building upon recent crystallographic data, our results provide a dynamic model of the HDVr reaction mechanism involving a conformational switch between multiple non-canonical G25:U20 base pair conformations in the active site. These local nucleobase dynamics play an important role in catalysis by modulating the metal binding environments of two Mg2+ ions that support catalysis at different steps of the reaction pathway. The first ion plays a structural role by inducing a base pair flip necessary to obtain the catalytic fold in which C75 moves towards to the scissile phosphate in the active site. Ejection of this ion then permits a second ion to bind elsewhere in the active site and facilitate nucleophile activation. The simulations collectively describe a mechanistic scenario that is consistent with currently available experimental data from crystallography, phosphorothioate substitutions, and chemical probing studies. Avenues for further experimental verification are suggested. PMID:27774349

  16. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) Data in the Cluster Active Archive (CAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I.; Barthe, A.; Penou, E.; Brunato, S.; Rème, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Bavassano-Cattaneo, M. B.; Blagau, A.

    The Cluster Active Archive (CAA) aims at preserving the four Cluster spacecraft data, so that they are usable in the long-term by the scientific community as well as by the instrument team PIs and Co-Is. This implies that the data are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the four Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0-40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 s) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. The CIS package consists of two different instruments, a Hot Ion Analyser (HIA) and a time-of-flight ion Composition Distribution Function (CODIF) analyser, plus a sophisticated dual-processor based instrument control and data processing system (DPS). For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CAA archival includes processed raw data (Level 1 data), moments of the ion distribution functions (Level 2 data), and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units (Level 3 data). The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions. In addition, a software package has been developed to allow the CAA user to interactively calculate partial or total moments of the ion distributions. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, and data caveats. Given the complexity of an ion spectrometer, and the variety of its operational modes, each one being optimised for a different magnetospheric region or measurement objective, consultation of the data caveats by the end user will always be a necessary step in the data analysis.

  17. High heat flux actively cooled honeycomb sandwich structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. C.; Pagel, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a program to design and fabricate an unshielded actively cooled structural panel for a hypersonic aircraft are presented. The design is an all-aluminum honeycomb sandwich with embedded cooling passages soldered to the inside of the outer moldline skin. The overall finding is that an actively cooled structure appears feasible for application on a hypersonic aircraft, but the fabrication process is complex and some material and manufacturing technology developments are required. Results from the program are summarized and supporting details are presented.

  18. Passive and active fragment ion mass defect labeling: distinct proteomics potential of iodine-based reagents.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Bajrami, Bekim; Yao, Xudong

    2009-08-01

    The exact mass of a peptide differs characteristically from its nominal mass by a value called t