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Sample records for ion loss-driven h-mode

  1. H-mode power threshold, grad-B drift direction and ion collisionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, H. M.; Shaing, K. C.

    2001-10-01

    An explanation on the dependence of the H-mode power threshold on the direction of the grad-B drift in diverted tokamaks is presented in the context of the H-mode theory based on the orbit loss and the subsequent turbulence suppression. Here, B is the magnetic field strength. It is shown using the results of a numerical calculation [ A. V. Chankin and G. M. McCracken, Nucl. Fusion 10, 1459(1993)] that ion collisionality that defines the onset of the orbit loss depends on the direction of the grad-B drift. The connection length is shorter when grad-B drift is toward the X-point than away from it. Judging from the sensitivity of the power threshold on the grad-B drift direction, we conclude that power threshold must be a simple function of ion collisionality among other dimensionless parameters.

  2. Edge ion dynamics in H-mode discharges in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Groebner, R.J.; Burrell, K.H.; Gohil, P.; Kim, J.; Seraydarian, R.P.

    1992-05-01

    The goal of this paper is to present detailed measurements of T{sub i} and E{sub r} at the plasma edge in L- and H-mode with high spatial resolution in order the study the edge ion dynamics. Of primary interest is the relationship between T{sub i} and E{sub r} and the behavior of the edge T{sub i} profile in H-mode. The principle findings are: there appears to be a threshold temperature for T{sub i} required for the transition to occur with T{sub i} at the LCFS in the range of 0.2--0.3 keV at the transition; a correlation between the edge E{sub r} profile and the edge T{sub i} profile has been observed; and values of T{sub i} of 2--3 keV within a few cm of the LCFS and of dT{sub i}/dr of up to 1 keV/cm are observed in the transport barrier in H-mode, with the scale length for T{sub i} being of the order of a poloidal gyroradius.

  3. H-mode accelerating structures with PMQ focusing for low-beta ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S; O' Hara, James F; Olivas, Eric R; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J

    2010-01-01

    We are developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Such IH-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications, e.g. a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the energy of several MeV. Results of combined 3-D modeling for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best beam propagation using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. A cold model of the IH-PMQ tank is being manufactured.

  4. MHD-induced Energetic Ion Loss during H-mode Discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. Medley; N.N. Gorelenkov; R. Andre; R.E. Bell; D.S. Darrow; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; A.L. Roquemore; and the NSTX Team

    2004-03-15

    MHD-induced energetic ion loss in neutral-beam-heated H-mode [high-confinement mode] discharges in NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] is discussed. A rich variety of energetic ion behavior resulting from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity is observed in the NSTX using a horizontally scanning Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) whose sightline views across the three co-injected neutral beams. For example, onset of an n = 2 mode leads to relatively slow decay of the energetic ion population (E {approx} 10-100 keV) and consequently the neutron yield. The effect of reconnection events, sawteeth, and bounce fishbones differs from that observed for low-n, low-frequency, tearing-type MHD modes. In this case, prompt loss of the energetic ion population occurs on a time scale of less than or equal to 1 ms and a precipitous drop in the neutron yield occurs. This paper focuses on MHD-induced ion loss during H-mode operation in NSTX. After H-mode onset, the NPA charge-exchange spectrum usually exhibits a significant loss of energetic ions only for E > E(sub)b/2 where E(sub)b is the beam injection energy. The magnitude of the energetic ion loss was observed to decrease with increasing tangency radius, R(sub)tan, of the NPA sightline, increasing toroidal field, B(sub)T, and increasing neutral-beam injection energy, E(sub)b. TRANSP modeling suggests that MHD-induced ion loss is enhanced during H-mode operation due to an evolution of the q and beam deposition profiles that feeds both passing and trapped ions into the region of low-n MHD activity. ORBIT code analysis of particle interaction with a model magnetic perturbation supported the energy selectivity of the MHD-induced loss observed in the NPA measurements. Transport analysis with the TRANSP code using a fast-ion diffusion tool to emulate the observed MHD-induced energetic ion loss showed significant modifications of the neutral- beam heating as well as the power balance, thermal diffusivities, energy confinement times

  5. High resolution main-ion charge exchange spectroscopy in the DIII-D H-mode pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Haskey, S. R.; Kaplan, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    A new high spatial resolution main-ion (deuterium) charge-exchange spectroscopy system covering the tokamak boundary region has been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Sixteen new edge main-ion charge-exchange recombination sightlines have been combined with nineteen impurity sightlines in a tangentially viewing geometry on the DIII-D midplane with an interleaving design that achieves 8 mm inter-channel radial resolution for detailed profiles of main-ion temperature, velocity, charge-exchange emission, and neutral beam emission. At the plasma boundary, we find a strong enhancement of the main-ion toroidal velocity that exceeds the impurity velocity by a factor of two. The unique combination of experimentally measured main-ion and impurity profiles provides a powerful quasi-neutrality constraint for reconstruction of tokamak H-mode pedestals.

  6. Full-f Neoclassical Simulations toward a Predictive Model for H-mode Pedestal Ion Energy, Particle and Momentum Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, D. J.; Boedo, J. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chang, C. S.; Canik, J. M.; deGrassie, J. S.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Maingi, Rajesh; Smith, S. P.

    2014-09-01

    Energy and particle transport rates are decoupled in the H-mode edge since the ion thermal transport rate is primarily set by the neoclassical transport of the deuterium ions in the tail of the thermal energy distribution, while the net particle transport rate is set by anomalous transport of the colder bulk ions. Ion orbit loss drives the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describes the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the Ti profile. Non-Maxwellian distributions also drive large intrinsic edge flows, and the interaction of turbulence at the top of the pedestal with the intrinsic edge flow can generate an intrinsic core torque. The primary driver of the radial electric field (Er) in the pedestal and scrapeoff layer (SOL) are kinetic neoclassical effects, such as ion orbit loss of tail ions and parallel electron loss to the divertor. This paper describes the first multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport calculations for ELM-free H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer on DIII-D using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. Quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles is achieved by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. This interpretative technique quantifies the role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall pedestal structure, and consequently illustrates the importance of including kinetic effects self-consistently in transport calculations around transport barriers.

  7. Lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating experiments in H-mode plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Zhao, Y. P.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Wukitch, S.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.

    2014-06-01

    An ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) system with power up to 6.0 MW and a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system up to 4 MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST). Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHCD for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. During 2010 and 2012 experimental campaigns, ICRF heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H minority heating (H-MH) mode. The H-MH mode produced good plasma performance, and realized H-mode using ICRF power alone in 2012. In 2010, H-modes were generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing near the mouth of the LH launcher were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas of H-modes. In 2012, the combination of LHCD and ICRH power extended the H-mode duration up to over 30 s. H-modes with various types of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been achieved with HIPB98(y, 2) ranging from 0.7 to over unity. A brief overview of LHCD and ICRF Heating experiment and their application in achieving H-mode operation during these two campaigns will be presented.

  8. Lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating experiments in H-mode plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N. Zhao, Y. P.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.

    2014-06-15

    An ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) system with power up to 6.0 MW and a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system up to 4 MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST). Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHCD for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. During 2010 and 2012 experimental campaigns, ICRF heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H minority heating (H-MH) mode. The H-MH mode produced good plasma performance, and realized H-mode using ICRF power alone in 2012. In 2010, H-modes were generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing near the mouth of the LH launcher were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas of H-modes. In 2012, the combination of LHCD and ICRH power extended the H-mode duration up to over 30 s. H-modes with various types of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been achieved with H{sub IPB98}(y, 2) ranging from 0.7 to over unity. A brief overview of LHCD and ICRF Heating experiment and their application in achieving H-mode operation during these two campaigns will be presented.

  9. Heat flux modeling using ion drift effects in DIII-D H-mode plasmas with resonant magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Wingen, A.; Schmitz, O.; Evans, T. E.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2014-01-15

    The heat flux patterns measured in low-collisionality DIII-D H-mode plasmas strongly deviate from simultaneously measured CII emission patterns, used as indicator of particle flux, during applied resonant magnetic perturbations. While the CII emission clearly shows typical striations, which are similar to magnetic footprint patterns obtained from vacuum field line tracing, the heat flux is usually dominated by one large peak at the strike point position. The vacuum approximation, which only considers applied magnetic fields and neglects plasma response and plasma effects, cannot explain the shape of the observed heat flux pattern. One possible explanation is the effect of particle drifts. This is included in the field line equations and the results are discussed with reference to the measurement. Electrons and ions show different drift motions at thermal energy levels in a guiding center approximation. While electrons hardly deviate from the field lines, ions can drift several centimetres away from field line flux surfaces. A model is presented in which an ion heat flux, based on the ion drift motion from various kinetic energies as they contribute to a thermal Maxwellian distribution, is calculated. The simulated heat flux is directly compared to measurements with a varying edge safety factor q{sub 95}. This analysis provides evidence for the dominate effect of high-energy ions in carrying heat from the plasma inside the separatrix to the target. High-energy ions are deposited close to the unperturbed strike line, while low-energy ions can travel into the striated magnetic topology.

  10. Characteristics of toroidal rotation and ion temperature pedestals between ELM bursts in KSTAR H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, S. H.; Kwon, J. M.; Ko, W. H.; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, H.; Terzolo, L.

    2016-06-01

    Steep pedestal profiles of ion temperature (Ti) and toroidal rotation ( V ϕ ) are routinely observed in neutral beam injection (NBI)-heated KSTAR H-mode plasmas [W. H. Ko et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 083013 (2015)]. In this work, we report a result of detailed analysis of pedestal characteristics. By analyzing a set of data with different experimental conditions, we show that Ti and V ϕ pedestals are coupled to each other and correlation between them becomes stronger when NBI-torque is lower. This suggests the existence of intrinsic toroidal torque in the pedestal. Based on a 1D transport analysis, we find that the prevalence of residual micro-turbulences is necessary to explain momentum transport in the pedestal. The estimated strength of intrinsic torque is shown to be comparable to that from a 2.7 MW NBI source. Finally, we show that non-diffusive momentum flux is indispensable to explain momentum transport in the pedestal, and a residual stress model fits the observed momentum flux reasonably.

  11. Effect of ion orbit loss on the structure in the H-mode tokamak edge pedestal profiles of rotation velocity, radial electric field, density, and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2013-09-15

    An investigation of the effect of ion orbit loss of thermal ions and the compensating return ion current directly on the radial ion flux flowing in the plasma, and thereby indirectly on the toroidal and poloidal rotation velocity profiles, the radial electric field, density, and temperature profiles, and the interpretation of diffusive and non-diffusive transport coefficients in the plasma edge, is described. Illustrative calculations for a high-confinement H-mode DIII-D [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] plasma are presented and compared with experimental results. Taking into account, ion orbit loss of thermal ions and the compensating return ion current is found to have a significant effect on the structure of the radial profiles of these quantities in the edge plasma, indicating the necessity of taking ion orbit loss effects into account in interpreting or predicting these quantities.

  12. High performance H modes in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Tanga, A.

    1990-01-01

    In JET the scientific properties and technical basis of good confinement regimes have been evaluated in the light of the potential extrapolation of such regimes to reactor requirements. In this paper the main experimental H-mode results are discussed highlighting global confinement scaling, low q regimes, the role of the target plate material, the density limit, and finally sawtooth suppression and hot-ion mode. 17 refs., 15 figs.

  13. Progress in understanding the enhanced pedestal H-mode in NSTX

    DOE PAGES

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Canik, J. M.; Maingi, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, R. E.; Guttenfelder, W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.; Sabbagh, S.

    2014-08-01

    The paper describes the enhanced pedestal (EP) H-mode observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The defining characteristics of EP H-mode are given, namely i)transition after the L- to H-mode transition, ii) region of very steep ion temperature gradient, and iii) associated region of strong rotational shear. A newly observed long-pulse EP H-mode example shows quiescent behavior for as long as the heating and current drive sources are maintained. Cases are shown where the region of steep ion temperature gradient is located at the very edge, and cases where it is shifted up to 10 cm inward from themore » plasma edge; these cases are united by a common dependence of the ion temperature gradient on the toroidal rotation frequency shear. EP H-mode examples have been observed across a wide range of q95 and pedestal collisionality. No strong changes in the fluctuation amplitudes have been observed following the eP H-mode transition, and transport analysis indicates that the ion t hermal transport is comparable to or less than anticipated from a simple neoclassical transport model. Cases are shown where EP H-modes were reliably generated, through these low-q95 examples were difficult to sustain. A case where an externally triggered ELM precipitates the transition to EP H-mode is also shown, though an initial experiment designed to trigger EP-H-modes in this fashion was successful.« less

  14. Progress In Understanding The Enhanced Petestal H-mode In NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Canik, J. M.; Maingi, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, R. E.; Guttenfelder, W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.; Sabbagh, S.

    2014-06-26

    ThIS paper describes the enhanced pedestal (EP) H-mode observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The defining characteristics of EP H-mode are given, namely i)transition after the L- to H-mode transition, ii) region of very steep ion temperature gradient, and iii) associated region of strong rotational shear. A newly observed long-pulse EP H-mode example shows quiescent behavior for as long as the heating and current drive sources are maintained. Cases are shown where the region of steep ion temperature gradient is located at the very edge, and cases where it is shifted up to 10 cm inward from the plasma edge; these cases are united by a common dependence of the ion temperature gradient on the toroidal rotation frequency shear. EP H-mode examples have been observed across a wide range of q95 and pedestal collisionality. No strong changes in the fluctuation amplitudes have been observed following the eP H-mode transition, and transport analysis indicates that the ion t hermal transport is comparable to or less than anticipated from a simple neoclassical transport model. Cases are shown where EP H-modes were reliably generated, through these low-q95 examples were difficult to sustain. A case where an externally triggered ELM precipitates the transition to EP H-mode is also shown, though an initial experiment designed to trigger EP-H-modes in this fashion was successful.

  15. Progress in understanding the enhanced pedestal H-mode in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Canik, J. M.; Maingi, R.; Battaglia, D.; Bell, R. E.; Guttenfelder, W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H.; Sabbagh, S.

    2014-08-01

    The paper describes the enhanced pedestal (EP) H-mode observed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The defining characteristics of EP H-mode are given, namely i)transition after the L- to H-mode transition, ii) region of very steep ion temperature gradient, and iii) associated region of strong rotational shear. A newly observed long-pulse EP H-mode example shows quiescent behavior for as long as the heating and current drive sources are maintained. Cases are shown where the region of steep ion temperature gradient is located at the very edge, and cases where it is shifted up to 10 cm inward from the plasma edge; these cases are united by a common dependence of the ion temperature gradient on the toroidal rotation frequency shear. EP H-mode examples have been observed across a wide range of q95 and pedestal collisionality. No strong changes in the fluctuation amplitudes have been observed following the eP H-mode transition, and transport analysis indicates that the ion t hermal transport is comparable to or less than anticipated from a simple neoclassical transport model. Cases are shown where EP H-modes were reliably generated, through these low-q95 examples were difficult to sustain. A case where an externally triggered ELM precipitates the transition to EP H-mode is also shown, though an initial experiment designed to trigger EP-H-modes in this fashion was successful.

  16. Semiempirical models of H-mode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.; Redi, M.; Boyd, D.; Cavallo, A.; Grek, B.; Heifetz, D.; Hulse, R.; Johnson, D.; Langer, W.; LeBlanc, B.

    1985-05-01

    The H-mode transition can lead to a rapid increase in tokamak plasma confinement. A semiempirical transport model was derived from global OH and L-mode confinement scalings and then applied to simulation of H-mode discharges. The radial diffusivities in the model also depend on local density and pressure gradients and satisfy an appropriate dimensional constraint. Examples are shown of the application of this and similar models to the detailed simulation of two discharges which exhibit an H-mode transition. The models reproduce essential features of plasma confinement in the ohmic heating, low and high confinement phases of these discharges. In particular, the evolution of plasma energy content through the H-mode transition can be reproduced without any sudden or ad hoc modification of the plasma transport formulation.

  17. H-mode confinement and fusion performance in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, D. J.; JET Team

    1997-05-01

    JET has conducted extensive experiments in H-mode plasmas focusing on two broad aims. The first, involving the characterization of reactor-relevant aspects of the regime, encompasses the study of steady-state H-modes at plasma currents of up to 6 MA. In these plasmas, energy confinement is typically a factor of 1.8 - 2 greater than predicted by L-mode scalings and local transport varies with the ion Larmor radius, at least for input powers well above the H-mode threshold power. Using nitrogen impurity seeding, a regime has been developed in which good core confinement, with an enhancement of 1.5 relative to L-mode scaling, is combined with radiated power fractions of up to 80%. The second major goal is to optimize fusion power production by exploiting high-confinement ELM-free H-modes, which exhibit energy confinement enhancement factors of three or more relative to L-mode plasmas. In this regime, fusion power quotients $Q_{DT} \\sim 1$SDO Delta H Mode Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Paul A.; Starin, Scott R.

    2007-01-01

    While on orbit, disturbance torques on a three axis stabilized spacecraft tend to increase the system momentum, which is stored in the reaction wheels. Upon reaching the predefined momentum capacity (or maximum wheel speed) of the reaction wheel, an external torque must be used to unload the momentum. The purpose of the Delta H mode is to manage the system momentum. This is accomplished by driving the reaction wheels to a target momentum state while the attitude thrusters, which provide an external torque, are used to maintain the attitude. The Delta H mode is designed to meet the mission requirements and implement the momentum management plan. Changes in the requirements or the momentum management plan can lead to design changes in the mode. The momentum management plan defines the expected momentum buildup trend, the desired momentum state and how often the system is driven to the desired momentum state (unloaded). The desired momentum state is chosen based on wheel capacity, wheel configuration, thruster layout and thruster sizing. For the Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, the predefined wheel momentum capacity is a function of the jitter requirements, power, and maximum momentum capacity. Changes in jitter requirements or power limits can lead to changes in the desired momentum state. These changes propagate into the changes in the momentum management plan and therefore the Delta H mode design. This paper presents the analysis and design performed for the Solar Dynamics Observatory Delta H mode. In particular, the mode logic and processing needed to meet requirements is described along with the momentum distribution formulation. The Delta H mode design is validated using the Solar Dynamics Observatory High Fidelity simulator. Finally, a summary of the design is provided along with concluding remarks.

  18. Characteristics of the First H-mode Discharges in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, S. W.; Ahn, J.W.; Jeon, Y. M.; Suzuki, T.; Hahn, S. H.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, K. D.; Chung, J. I.; Nam, Y. U.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, W. C.; Oh, Y. K.; Kwak, J. G.; Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Humphreys, D. A.; Na, Y. S.; Kim, K. M.; Yun, G. S.; Hyatt, A. W.; Gohil, P.; Bae, Y. S.; Yang, H. L.; Park, H.; Kwon, M.; Lee, G. S.

    2011-01-01

    Typical ELMy H-mode discharges have been obtained in the KSTAR tokamak with the combined auxiliary heating of neutral beam injection (NBI) and electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH). The minimum external heating power required for the L-H transition is about 0.9MW for a line-averaged density of similar to 2.0 x 10(19) m(-3). There is a clear indication of the increase in the L-H threshold power with decreasing density for densities lower than similar to 2 x 10(19) m(-3). The L-H transitions typically occurred shortly after the beginning of plasma current flattop (I(p) = 0.6 MA) period and after the fast shaping to a highly elongated double-null divertor configuration. The maximum heating power available was marginal for the L-H transition, which is also implied by the relatively slow transition time (>10 ms) and the synchronization of the transition with large sawtooth crashes. The initial analysis of thermal energy confinement time (tau(E)) indicates that tau(E) is higher than the prediction of multi-machine scaling laws by 10-20%. A clear increase in electron and ion temperature in the pedestal is observed in the H-mode phase but the core temperature does not change significantly. On the other hand, the toroidal rotation velocity increased over the whole radial range in the H-mode phase. The measured ELM frequency was around 10-30 Hz for the large ELM bursts and 50-100 Hz for the smaller ones. In addition, very small and high frequency (200-300 Hz) ELMs appeared between large ELM spikes when the ECRH is added to the NBI-heated H-mode plasmas. The drop of total stored energy during a large ELM is up to 5% in most cases.

  19. Characteristics of the first H-mode discharges in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S. W.; Ahn, J.-W.; Jeon, Y. M.; Suzuki, T.; Hahn, S. H.; Ko, W. H.; Lee, K. D.; Chung, J. I.; Nam, Y. U.; Kim, J.; Hong, S. H.; Kim, H.-S.; Kim, W. C.; Oh, Y. K.; Kwak, J. G.; Park, Y. S.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Humpreys, D.; Na, Y.-S.; Kim, K. M.; Yun, G. S.; Hyatt, A.; Gohil, P.; Bae, Y. S.; Yang, H. L.; Park, H. K.; Kwon, M.; Lee, G. S.; KSTAR Team

    2011-11-01

    Typical ELMy H-mode discharges have been obtained in the KSTAR tokamak with the combined auxiliary heating of neutral beam injection (NBI) and electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH). The minimum external heating power required for the L-H transition is about 0.9 MW for a line-averaged density of ~2.0 × 1019 m-3. There is a clear indication of the increase in the L-H threshold power with decreasing density for densities lower than ~2 × 1019 m-3. The L-H transitions typically occurred shortly after the beginning of plasma current flattop (Ip = 0.6 MA) period and after the fast shaping to a highly elongated double-null divertor configuration. The maximum heating power available was marginal for the L-H transition, which is also implied by the relatively slow transition time (>10 ms) and the synchronization of the transition with large sawtooth crashes. The initial analysis of thermal energy confinement time (τE) indicates that τE is higher than the prediction of multi-machine scaling laws by 10-20%. A clear increase in electron and ion temperature in the pedestal is observed in the H-mode phase but the core temperature does not change significantly. On the other hand, the toroidal rotation velocity increased over the whole radial range in the H-mode phase. The measured ELM frequency was around 10-30 Hz for the large ELM bursts and 50-100 Hz for the smaller ones. In addition, very small and high frequency (200-300 Hz) ELMs appeared between large ELM spikes when the ECRH is added to the NBI-heated H-mode plasmas. The drop of total stored energy during a large ELM is up to 5% in most cases.

  1. 'Snowflake' H Mode in a Tokamak Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Piras, F.; Coda, S.; Duval, B. P.; Labit, B.; Marki, J.; Moret, J.-M.; Pitzschke, A.; Sauter, O.; Medvedev, S. Yu.

    2010-10-08

    An edge-localized mode (ELM) H-mode regime, supported by electron cyclotron heating, has been successfully established in a 'snowflake' (second-order null) divertor configuration for the first time in the TCV tokamak. This regime exhibits 2 to 3 times lower ELM frequency and 20%-30% increased normalized ELM energy ({Delta}W{sub ELM}/W{sub p}) compared to an identically shaped, conventional single-null diverted H mode. Enhanced stability of mid- to high-toroidal-mode-number ideal modes is consistent with the different snowflake ELM phenomenology. The capability of the snowflake to redistribute the edge power on the additional strike points has been confirmed experimentally.

  2. H-modes studies in PDX

    SciTech Connect

    Fonck, R.J.; Beirsdorfer, P.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.; Boyd, D.; Buchenauer, D.; Budny, R.; Cavallo, A.; Couture, P.; Crowley, T.

    1984-07-01

    A regime of enhanced energy confinement during neutral beam heating has been obtained routinely in the PDX tokamak after modifications to form a closed divertor geometry. Plasma density profiles were broad and the electron temperature at the plasma edge reached values of approx. 400 eV in the H-mode phase of a discharge. A comparison of closed divertor discharges with moderate and intense gas puffing indicates that a requirement for obtaining high confinement times is the localization of the plasma fueling source in the divertor throat region. While high confinement was attained at moderate injected powers (P/sub INJ/ less than or equal to 3 MW), confinement was degraded at higher powers due to both increased edge instabilities and, especially, the intense gas puffing needed to prevent disruptions. Initial results with a particle scoop limiter indicate high particle confinement times and energy confinement times approaching those of diverted H-mode plasmas.

  3. LHCD and ICRF heating experiments in H-mode plasmas on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Wan, B. N.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.; Collaboration: EAST Team

    2014-02-12

    An ICRF system with power up to 6.0 MW and a LHCD system up to 4MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments on EAST. Intensive lithium wall coating was intensively used to reduce particle recycling and Hydrogen concentration in Deuterium plasma, which is needed for effective ICRF and LHCD power absorption in high density plasmas. Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHW current drive for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. In 2010, H-mode was generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing launcher mouth were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas at high density of H-modes. During the last two experimental campaigns, ICRF Heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H Minority Heating (H-MH) mode, where electrons are predominantly heated by collisions with high energy minority ions. The H-MH mode gave the best plasma performance, and realized H-mode alone in 2012. Combination of ICRF and LHW power injection generated the H-mode plasmas with various ELMy characteristics. The first successful application of the ICRF Heating in the D (He3) plasma was also achieved. The progress on ICRF heating, LHCD experiments and their application in achieving H-mode operation from last two years will be discussed in this report.

  4. [ital H] mode of the W 7-AS stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Erckmann, V.; Wagner, F.; Baldzuhn, J.; Brakel, R.; Burhenn, R.; Gasparino, U.; Grigull, P.; Hartfuss, H.J.; Hofmann, J.V.; Jaenicke, R.; Niedermeyer, H.; Ohlendorf, W.; Rudyj, A.; Weller, A.; Bogdanov, S.D.; Bomba, B.; Borschegovsky, A.A.; Cattanei, G.; Dodhy, A.; Dorst, D.; Elsner, A.; Endler, M.; Geist, T.; Giannone, L.; Hacker, H.; Heinrich, O.; Herre, G.; Hildebrandt, D.; Hiznyak, V.I.; Il'in, V.I.; Kasparek, W.; Karger, F.; Kick, M.; Kubo, S.; Kuftin, A.N.; Kurbatov, V.I.; Lazaros, A.; Malygin, S.A.; Malygin, V.I.; McCormick, K.; Mueller, G.A.; Orlov, V.B.; Pech, P.; Roi, I.N.; Sardei, F.; Sattler, S.; Schneider, F.; Schneider, U.; Schueller, P.G.; Siller, G.; Stroth, U.; Tutter, M.; Unger, E.; Wolff, H.; Wuersching, E.; Zoepfel, S. )

    1993-04-05

    In W 7-AS the [ital H] mode has been observed for the first time in a currentless stellarator plasma. [ital H] modes are achieved with 0.4 MW electron cyclotron resonance heating at 140 GHz at high density. The [ital H] phases display all characteristics known from tokamak [ital H] modes including edge localized modes (ELMs). The achievement of the [ital H] mode in a shear-free stellarator without toroidal current has consequences on [ital H]-mode transition and ELM theories.

  5. SPECIAL TOPIC: ITER H mode confinement database update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, K.; Campbell, D. J.; Cordey, J. G.; Kardaun, O. J. W. F.; Ryter, F.; Stroth, U.; Kus, A.; DeBoo, J. C.; Schissel, D. P.; Miura, Y.; Suzuki, N.; Mori, M.; Matsuda, T.; Tamai, H.; Takizuka, T.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.; Kaye, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an update of the H mode confinement database that has been assembled for the ITER project. Data were collected from six machines of different sizes and shapes: ASDEX, DIII-D, JET, JFT-2M, PBX-M and PDX. The updated database contains better estimates of fast ion energy content and thermal energy confinement times, discharges with RF heating, data using boronization, beryllium and pellets, more systematic parameter scans, and other features. The list of variables in the database has been expanded, and the selection criteria for the standard dataset have been modified. We also present simple scalings of the total and thermal energy confinement time to the new dataset

  6. Gyrokinetic Calculations of Microturbulence and Transport for NSTX and Alcator-CMOD H-modes

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; W. Dorland; R. Bell; P. Bonoli; C. Bourdelle; J. Candy; D. Ernst; C. Fiore; D. Gates; G. Hammett; K. Hill; S. Kaye; B. LeBlanc; J. Menard; D. Mikkelsen; G. Rewoldt; J. Rice; R. Waltz; S. Wukitch

    2003-07-08

    Recent H-mode experiments on NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] and experiments on Alcator-CMOD, which also exhibit internal transport barriers (ITB), have been examined with gyrokinetic simulations with the GS2 and GYRO codes to identify the underlying key plasma parameters for control of plasma performance and, ultimately, the successful operation of future reactors such as ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor]. On NSTX the H-mode is characterized by remarkably good ion confinement and electron temperature profiles highly resilient in time. On CMOD, an ITB with a very steep electron density profile develops following off-axis radio-frequency heating and establishment of H-mode. Both experiments exhibit ion thermal confinement at the neoclassical level. Electron confinement is also good in the CMOD core.

  7. Tokamak L/H mode transition

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, K. H.; Navia, C. E.

    2012-01-15

    Through the non field-aligned rotational tokamak equilibrium of a divergence-free plasma flow with a pair of transformed plasma variables w-vector{sub *}=({mu}{rho}){sup 1/2}{nu}-vector and {mu}p{sub *}=({mu}p+w{sub *}{sup 2}/2)[K. H. Tsui, Phys. Plasmas 18, 072502 (2011)], a preliminary understanding of the L/H equilibrium transition is proposed through a feedback cycle, where the higher plasma flux due to external drives enters the rotational Grad-Shafranov equation through the velocity dependent poloidal plasma {beta} to generate the H equilibrium. This H rotational mode has the characteristics of higher normal electric field and plasma pressure. Coupled to the transport properties of E-vector x B-vector drift transport barrier leading to a higher plasma pressure, this makes the H mode a self-sustained equilibrium. The higher plasma {beta} then feeds back to the equilibrium and completes the feedback loop.

  8. H-mode Edge Turbulence and Pedestal Measurements in Pegasus Plasmas using Langmuir Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriete, D. M.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Fonck, R. J.; Thome, K. E.; Thompson, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    In Pegasus discharges, L-H mode transitions are induced using Ohmic heating and high-field-side fueling. H-mode plasmas have energy confinement consistent with the ITER98pb(y,2) scaling law, indications of increased electron and ion temperature, and an increase in core rotation compared to L-mode plasmas. Electron density and temperature profiles have been measured in the edge region using a scannable triple Langmuir probe on a shot-by-shot basis. In H-mode, a pressure pedestal that has a hyperbolic tangent shape and a ~ 2 cm ∇pe scale length is observed, in contrast to a linear shape in L-mode. Autopower spectra of the collected ion saturation current in H-mode discharges show a factor of ~ 3 reduction in fluctuations in the 50-200 kHz band with respect to L-mode. Two Langmuir probes with 8 cm poloidal separation have been installed on Pegasus. The turbulence correlation length in the edge will be measured by radially scanning the probes. Knowledge of the correlation length will be used to inform the design of a future 8-channel radial multiprobe array. This system will simultaneously measure the dynamic ne (R , t) , Te (R , t) , and Φ (R , t) profiles and fluctuations across the L-H mode transition and be used to investigate nonlinear ELM dynamics. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  9. H-mode development in TEXT-U limiter plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. R.; Bravenec, R. V.; Bengtson, R. D.; Brower, D. L.; Cima, G.; Crowley, T. P.; Darbar, A.; Edmonds, P. H.; Gasquet, H.; Gentle, K. W.; Hallock, G. A.; Heard, J. W.; Hurwitz, P. D.; Jiang, Y.; Karzhavin, Y. Y.; Lierzer, J.; Nikitin, A.; Ouroua, A.; Patterson, D. M.; Phillips, P. E.; Reedy, S.; Richards, B.; Rowan, W. L.; Schoch, P. M.; Sing, D. C.; Solano, E. R.; Storek, D.; Watts, C.; Winslow, D.; Wootton, A. J.; Zeng, L.; Zhang, B.; Zheng, S.-B.

    1996-08-01

    H-mode transitions in TEXT-U limiter plasmas have been observed at 0741-3335/38/8/004/img12 and 0741-3335/38/8/004/img13 kA (0741-3335/38/8/004/img14 kW) with at least 300 kW of central electron-cyclotron heating (ECH). These are dithering transitions which are induced by sawtooth crashes and display the typical signatures of H-modes (0741-3335/38/8/004/img15 drop, spontaneous density increase, evidence of a transport barrier). However, they show only a slight improvement over L-mode energy confinement. The vessel walls are boronized and conditioned prior to experiments to achieve low-impurity influx and particle recycling. Discharges which undergo transitions are fuelled almost entirely on residual recycling. Transitions are observed when limited on a toroidally localized top or bottom limiter and, more often, when the limiter surface is `fresh', which is achieved by alternating between top and bottom limiters on successive shots. No strong dependence upon the distance from the low-field-side limiter has been found. Transitions are not yet observed when limited on the high-field-side wall tiles or in the case of TEXT-U diverted configurations. Preliminary measurements with the 2 MeV heavy-ion beam probe (HIBP) (in the core) and Langmuir probes (in the edge) indicate that the plasma potential drops outside the q = 1 radius while only small changes are observed in the density fluctuation level.

  10. Progress in GYRO validation studies of DIII-D H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, C.; Petty, C. C.; Schmitz, L.; Burrell, K. H.; McKee, G. R.; Rhodes, T. L.; Candy, J.

    2012-11-01

    The need for a validated predictive capability of turbulent transport in ITER is now widely recognized. However, to date most validation studies of nonlinear codes such as GYRO (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) have focused upon low power L-mode discharges, which have significant differences in key dimensionless parameters such as ρ* = ρs/a from more ITER-relevant H-mode discharges. In order to begin addressing this gap, comparisons of the turbulent transport and fluctuations predicted by nonlinear GYRO simulations for a number of DIII-D (Luxon 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 614) H-mode discharges to power balance analyses and experimental measurements are presented. The results of two H-mode studies are presented in this paper, this first of which investigates the importance of nonlocality at typical DIII-D H-mode ρ* values. Electrostatic global GYRO simulations of H-mode discharges at low and high rotation are shown to predict turbulence and transport levels lower than corresponding local simulations, and which are consistent with or slightly above experimental measurements and power balance analyses, even at ‘near-edge’ radii where gyrofluid and gyrokinetic models systematically underpredict turbulence and transport levels. The second study addresses the stabilizing effect of a significant density of energetic particles on turbulent transport. The results of local GYRO simulations of low-density QH-mode plasmas are presented, which model the fast beam ion population as a separate, dynamic ion species. The simulations show a significant reduction of transport with this fast ion treatment, which helps to understand previously reported results (Holland et al 2011 Phys. Plasmas 18 056113) in which GYRO simulations without this treatment significantly overpredicted (by a factor of 10 or more) power balance calculations. These results are contrasted with simulations of a high-density, low fast ion fraction QH-mode discharge, which predict transport levels

  11. Predictions of H-mode performance in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R. V.; Andre, R.; Bateman, G.; Halpern, F.; Kessel, C. E.; Kritz, A.; McCune, D.

    2008-03-03

    Time-dependent integrated predictive modeling is carried out using the PTRANSP code to predict fusion power and parameters such as alpha particle density and pressure in ITER H-mode plasmas. Auxiliary heating by negative ion neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron heating of He3 minority ions are modeled, and the GLF23 transport model is used in the prediction of the evolution of plasma temperature profiles. Effects of beam steering, beam torque, plasma rotation, beam current drive, pedestal temperatures, sawtooth oscillations, magnetic diffusion, and accumulation of He ash are treated self-consistently. Variations in assumptions associated with physics uncertainties for standard base-line DT H-mode plasmas (with Ip=15 MA, BTF=5.3 T, and Greenwald fraction=0.86) lead to a range of predictions for DT fusion power PDT and quasi-steady state fusion QDT (≡ PDT/Paux). Typical predictions assuming Paux = 50-53 MW yield PDT = 250- 720 MW and QDT = 5 - 14. In some cases where Paux is ramped down or shut off after initial flat-top conditions, quasi-steady QDT can be considerably higher, even infinite. Adverse physics assumptions such as existence of an inward pinch of the helium ash and an ash recycling coefficient approaching unity lead to very low values for PDT. Alternative scenarios with different heating and reduced performance regimes are also considered including plasmas with only H or D isotopes, DT plasmas with toroidal field reduced 10 or 20%, and discharges with reduced beam voltage. In full-performance D-only discharges, tritium burn-up is predicted to generate central tritium densities up to 1016/m3 and DT neutron rates up to 5×1016/s, compared with the DD neutron rates of 6×1017/s. Predictions with the toroidal field reduced 10 or 20% below the planned 5.3 T and keeping the same q98, Greenwald fraction, and Βη indicate that the fusion yield PDT and QDT will be lower by about a factor of two (scaling as B3.5).

  12. L-H Mode Transitions in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    S.M. Kaye; C.E. Bush; E. Fredrickson; B. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; S.A. Sabbagh

    2003-07-24

    Edge data from plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [S. Kaye et al., Fusion Technology 36 (1999) 16] have been compared to theories of transport suppression that have been used to develop a physics framework for low-confinement (L) to high-confinement (H) mode transitions. The NSTX data were obtained in low aspect ratio (R/a approximately equal to 1.3) discharges taken from a variety of discharge phases, including L-modes, L-H transitions, and H-modes with and without edge localized modes (ELMs). The comparisons show that the group of points taken just before the L-H mode transition are well mixed with the purely L-mode group to within the measurement uncertainties, indicating that changes in these parameters leading up to the transition are subtle. One of the theory parameters, alpha{sub MHD} = -R{sub q}{sup 2}dbeta{sub t/dr}, does show a clear threshold alpha{sub MHD} = 1 to 2 between the H-mode grouping of points and those remaining in the L-mode or taken just prior to the transition. Additionally, there is no evidence for an edge temperature threshold necessary for transitioning into the H-mode. NSTX data indicate further a possible connection between L-H transitions and non-ambipolar beam ion losses.

  13. HHFW Heating and Current Drive Studies of NSTX H-Mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor, P.T. Bonoli, D.L. Green, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, C.K. Phillips, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, and the NSTX Team

    2011-06-08

    30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive are being developed to assist fully non-inductive plasma current (I{sub p}) ramp-up in NSTX. The initial approach to achieving this goal has been to heat I{sub p} = 300 kA inductive plasmas with current drive antenna phasing in order to generate an HHFW H-mode with significant bootstrap and RF-driven current. Recent experiments, using only 1.4 MW of RF power (P{sub RF}), achieved a noninductive current fraction, f{sub NI} {approx} 0.65. Improved antenna conditioning resulted in the generation of I{sub p} = 650 kA HHFW H-mode plasmas, with f{sub NI} {approx} 0.35, when P{sub RF} {ge} 2.5 MW. These plasmas have little or no edge localized mode (ELM) activity during HHFW heating, a substantial increase in stored energy and a sustained central electron temperature of 5-6 keV. Another focus of NSTX HHFW research is to heat an H-mode generated by 90 keV neutral beam injection (NBI). Improved HHFW coupling to NBI-generated H-modes has resulted in a broad increase in electron temperature profile when HHFW heating is applied. Analysis of a closely matched pair of NBI and HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas revealed that about half of the antenna power is deposited inside the last closed flux surface (LCFS). Of the power damped inside the LCFS about two-thirds is absorbed directly by electrons and one-third accelerates fast-ions that are mostly promptly lost from the plasma. At longer toroidal launch wavelengths, HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas can have an RF power flow to the divertor outside the LCFS that significantly reduces RF power deposition to the core. ELMs can also reduce RF power deposition to the core and increase power deposition to the edge. Recent full wave modeling of NSTX HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas, with the model extended to the vessel wall, predicts a coaxial standing mode between the LCFS and the wall that can have large amplitudes at longer launch wavelengths. These simulation results qualitatively agree with HHFW

  14. Isotope scaling of the H mode power threshold on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, E.; Bartlett, D. V.; Christiansen, J. P.; Conway, G. D.; Cordey, J. G.; Eriksson, L.-G.; DeEsch, H. P. L.; Fishpool, G. M.; Gowers, C. W.; de Haas, J. C. M.; Harbour, P. J.; Hawkes, N. C.; Jacquinot, J.; Jones, T. T. C.; Kerner, W.; King, Q. A.; Lowry, C. G.; Monk, R. D.; Nielsen, P.; Rimini, F. G.; Saibene, G.; Sartori, R.; Schunke, B.; Sips, A. C. C.; Smith, R. J.; Stamp, M. F.; Start, D. F. H.; Thomsen, K.; Tubbing, B. J. D.; Zornig, N.

    1999-03-01

    Results are presented from a series of dedicated experiments carried out on JET in tritium, DT, deuterium and hydrogen plasmas to determine the dependence of the H mode power threshold on the plasma isotopic mass. The Pthr propto Aeff-1 scaling is established over the whole isotopic range. This result makes it possible for a fusion reactor with a 50:50 DT mixture to access the H mode regime with about 20% less power than that needed in a DD mixture. Results on the first systematic measurements of the power necessary for the transition of the plasma to the type I ELM regime, which occurs after the transition to H mode, are also in agreement with the Aeff-1 scaling. For a subset of discharges, measurements of Te and Ti at the top of the profile pedestal have been obtained, indicating a weak influence of the isotopic mass on the critical edge temperature thought to be necessary for the H mode transition.

  15. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-05-24

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability ismore » exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3×107 s-1.« less

  16. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability is exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3  ×  107 s‑1.

  17. LETTER: H-mode threshold and confinement in helium and deuterium in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryter, F.; Pütterich, T.; Reich, M.; Scarabosio, A.; Wolfrum, E.; Fischer, R.; Gemisic Adamov, M.; Hicks, N.; Kurzan, B.; Maggi, C.; Neu, R.; Rohde, V.; Tardini, G.; ASDEX Upgrade TEAM

    2009-06-01

    In 2008, experiments have been carried out in ASDEX Upgrade to compare H-mode power threshold and confinement time in helium and deuterium. A scan in magnetic field and a wide density variation indicate that the threshold power in the two gases is very similar. The density dependence of the threshold exhibits a clear minimum. Confinement in helium is about 30% lower than in deuterium, mainly due to the reduction in the ion density caused by Z = 2 in helium.

  18. H-mode accelerating structures with permanent-magnet quadrupole beam focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, S. S.; Rybarcyk, L. J.; O'Hara, J. F.; Olivas, E. R.; Wangler, T. P.

    2012-09-01

    We have developed high-efficiency normal-conducting rf accelerating structures by combining H-mode resonator cavities and a transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of interdigital H-mode (IH-PMQ) structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. Results of the combined 3D modeling—electromagnetic computations, multiparticle beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis—for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating-field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of electromagnetic and beam-dynamics modeling. Measurements of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank show a good agreement with the calculations. Examples of cross-bar H-mode structures with PMQ focusing for higher beam velocities are also presented. H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications.

  19. Burning plasma projections using drift-wave transport models and scalings for the H-mode pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, J. E.; Bateman, G.; Onjun, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Pankin, A.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R. E.

    2003-12-01

    The GLF23 and multi-mode core transport models are used along with models for the H-mode pedestal to predict the fusion performance for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, Fusion Ignition Research Experiment, and IGNITOR tokamak designs. Simulations using combinations of core and pedestal models have also been compared with experimental data for H-mode profiles in DIII-D, JET, and Alcator C-Mod. Power-independent (ballooning mode limit) and power-dependent pedestal scalings lead to very different predictions when used with the core models. Although the two drift-wave transport models reproduce the core profiles in a wide variety of tokamak discharges, they differ in their projections to burning plasma experiments for the same pedestal parameters. Differences in the core transport models in their response to the ion temperature gradient (i.e. their stiffness) and impact of the power dependence of the H-mode pedestal on fusion performance predictions are discussed.

  20. Predictions of Alpha Heating in ITER L-mode and H-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2011-01-06

    Predictions of alpha heating in L-mode and H-mode DT plasmas in ITER are generated using the PTRANSP code. The baseline toroidal field of 5.3 T, plasma current ramped to 15 MA and a flat electron density profile ramped to Greenwald fraction 0.85 are assumed. Various combinations of external heating by negative ion neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron resonance, and electron cyclotron resonance are assumed to start half-way up the density ramp. The time evolution of plasma temperatures and, for some cases, toroidal rotation are predicted assuming GLF23 and boundary parameters. Significant toroidal rotation and flow-shearing rates are predicted by GLF23 even in the L-mode phase with low boundary temperatures, and the alpha heating power is predicted to be significant if the power threshold for the transition to H-mode is higher than the planned total heating power. The alpha heating is predicted to be 8-76 MW in L-mode at full density. External heating mixes with higher beam injection power have higher alpha heating power. Alternatively if the toroidal rotation is predicted assuming that the ratio of the momentum to thermal ion energy conductivity is 0.5, the flow-shearing rate is predicted to have insignificant effects on the GLF23- predicted temperatures, and alpha heating is predicted to be 8-20 MW. In H-mode plasmas the alpha heating is predicted to depend sensitively on the assumed pedestal temperatures. Cases with fusion gain greater than 10 are predicted to have alpha heating greater than 80 MW.

  1. THE ROLE OF NEUTRALS IN H-MODE PEDESTAL FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. GROEBNER; M.A. MAHDAVI; A.W. LEONARD; T.H. OSBORNE; G.D. PORTER; R.J. COLCHIN; L.W.OWEN

    2001-11-01

    An analytic model, derived from coupled continuity equations for the electron and neutral deuterium densities, is consistent with many features of edge electron density profiles in the DIII-D tokamak. For an assumed constant particle diffusion coefficient, the model shows that particle transport and neutral fueling produce electron and neutral density profiles that have the same characteristic scale lengths at the plasma edge. For systematic variations of density in H-mode discharges, the model predicts that the width of the electron density transport barrier decreases and the maximum gradient increases, as observed in the experiments. The widths computed from the model agree quantitatively with the experimental widths for conditions in which the model is valid. These results support models of transport barrier formation in which the H-mode particle barrier is driven by the edge particle flux and the width of the barrier is approximately the neutral penetration length.

  2. An emerging understanding of H-mode discharges in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Groebner, R.J.

    1992-12-01

    A remarkable degree of consistency of experimental results from tokamaks throughout the world has developed with regard to the phenomenology of the transition from L-mode to H-mode confinement in tokamaks. The transition is initiated in a narrow layer at the plasma periphery where density fluctuations are suppressed and steep gradients of temperature and density form in a region with large first and second radial derivatives in the [upsilon][sub E][sup [yields

  3. The Role of Neutrals in H-mode Pedestal Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groebner, R. J.

    2001-10-01

    Systematic experiments show that atomic physics is a major factor in determining the edge density scale length in DIII-D H-mode discharges. These experiments have been performed to study the physics that sets the height of the H-mode pressure pedestal. Although the pressure gradient of the pedestal is consistent with limits expected from MHD stability,(J.R. Ferron, Phys. Plasmas 7), 1976 (2000). an understanding of the physics that controls the width of this high gradient region remains elusive. However, both numerical(F.L. Hinton and G.M. Staebler, Phys. Fluids B 5), 1281 (1993). and analytic(V.B. Lebedev and P.H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 4), 1087 (1997). models of transport barriers suggest that the neutral penetration length is an important scale length for setting the width of the barrier. DIII-D experiments have been conducted to see if the width of the edge density profile in H-mode can be explained by neutral fueling. Data have been compared to predictions of a simple analytic model for the shape of the edge density profile.(M.A. Mahdavi et al., to appear in Nucl. Fusion.) The experimental data exhibit several features predicted by this model: 1) The edge density profile has a hyperbolic tangent shape in L-mode and H-mode plasmas; 2) The density scale length (width) is predicted within 50% or better for a wide range of data; 3) The density scale length decreases as the pedestal density increases. Preliminary evidence shows that at high density, the width of the electron temperature barrier is larger than that of the density barrier, indicating that additional physics controls the temperature barrier.

  4. Recent progress towards a physics-based understanding of the H-mode transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tynan, G. R.; Cziegler, I.; Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Terry, J. L.; Irby, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Results from recent experiment and numerical simulation point towards a picture of the L-H transition in which edge shear flows interacting with edge turbulence create the conditions needed to produce a non-zero turbulent Reynolds stress at and just inside the LCFS during L-mode discharges. This stress acts to reinforce the shear flow at this location and the flow drive gets stronger as heating is increased. The L-H transition ensues when the rate of work done by this stress is strong enough to drive the shear flow to large values, which then grows at the expense of the turbulence intensity. The drop in turbulence intensity momentarily reduces the heat flux across the magnetic flux surface, which then allows the edge plasma pressure gradient to build. A sufficiently strong ion pressure gradient then locks in the H-mode state. These results are in general agreement with previously published reduced 0D and 1D predator prey models. An extended predator-prey model including separate ion and electron heat channels yields a non-monotonic power threshold dependence on plasma density provided that the fraction of heat deposited on the ions increases with plasma density. Possible mechanisms to explain other macroscopic transition threshold criteria are identified. A number of open questions and unexplained observations are identified, and must be addressed and resolved in order to build a physics-based model that can yield predictions of the macroscopic conditions needed for accessing H-mode.

  5. An emerging understanding of H-mode discharges in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Groebner, R.J.

    1992-12-01

    A remarkable degree of consistency of experimental results from tokamaks throughout the world has developed with regard to the phenomenology of the transition from L-mode to H-mode confinement in tokamaks. The transition is initiated in a narrow layer at the plasma periphery where density fluctuations are suppressed and steep gradients of temperature and density form in a region with large first and second radial derivatives in the {upsilon}{sub E}{sup {yields}} = (E {times} B)/B{sup 2} flow velocity. These results are qualitatively consistent with theories which predict suppression of fluctuations by shear or curvature in {upsilon}E. The required {upsilon}E flow is generated very rapidly when the magnitude of the heating power or of an externally imposed radial current exceed threshold values and several theoretical models have been developed to explain the observed changes in the {upsilon}E flow. After the transition occurs, the altered boundary conditions enable the development of improved confinement in the plasma interior on a confinement time scale. The resulting H-mode discharge has typically twice the confinement of L-mode discharges and regimes of further improved confinement have been obtained in some H-mode scenarios.

  6. METHANE PENTRATION IN DIII-D ELMing H-MODE PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    W.P. WEST; C.J. LASNIER; D.G. WHYTE; R.C. ISLER; T.E. EVANS; G.L. JACKSON; D.L. RUDAKOV; M.R. WADE; J. STRACHAN

    2002-06-01

    Carbon penetration into the core plasma during midplane and divertor methane puffing has been measured for DIII-D ELMing H-mode plasmas. The methane puffs are adjusted to a measurable signal, but global plasma parameters are only weakly affected (line average density, increases by < 10%, energy confinement time, {tau}{sub E} drops by < 10%). The total carbon content is derived from C{sup +6} density profiles in the core measured as a function of time using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. The methane penetration factor is defined as the difference in the core content with the puff on and puff off, divided by the carbon confinement time and the methane puffing rate. In ELMing H-mode discharges with ion {del}B drift direction into the X-point, increasing the line averaged density from 5 to 8 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} dropped the penetration factor from 6.6% to 4.6% for main chamber puffing. The penetration factor for divertor puffing was below the detection limit (<1%). Changing the ion {del}B drift direction to away from the X-point decreased the penetration factor by more than a factor of five for main chamber puffing.

  7. Nonlinear Turbulence Simulations for NSTX H-modes

    SciTech Connect

    M. H. Redi; S. Kaye; W. Dorland; R. Bell; C. Bourdelle; S. Ethier; D. Gates; G. Hammett; K. Hill; B. LeBlanc; D. McCune; J. Menard; D. Mikkelsen; G. Rewoldt; E. Synakowski

    2004-06-22

    Present evidence points to remarkably resilient electron temperature profiles in high-density H-mode plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), suggesting that the underlying electron thermal transport mechanisms respond in a highly nonlinear fashion to changes in the gradients. This paper uses measured plasma profiles as input to linear gyrokinetic analysis to identify candidate micro-instabilities that may be responsible for the electron thermal transport. The criteria for useful nonlinear micro-stability analyses are discussed along with necessary approximations and computational issues.

  8. Configuration and Heating Power Dependence of Edge Parameters and H-mode Dynamics in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Bush; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J. Boedo; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; S. Kubota; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; R.J. Maqueda; S.A. Sabbagh; V.A. Soukhanovskii; D. Stutman; D.W. Swain; J.B. Wilgen; S.J. Zweben; W.M. Davis; D.A. Gates; D.W. Johnson; R. Kaita; H.W. Kugel; D. Mastrovito; S. Medley; J.E. Menard; D. Mueller; M. Ono; F. Paoletti; S.J. Paul; Y-K.M. Peng; R. Raman; P.G. Roney; A.L. Roquemore; C.H. Skinner; E.J. Synakowski; G. Taylor; the NSTX Team

    2003-01-09

    Edge parameters play a critical role in H-mode (high-confinement mode) access, which is a key component of plasma discharge optimization in present-day toroidal confinement experiments and the design of next-generation devices. Because the edge magnetic topology of a spherical torus (ST) differs from a conventional aspect ratio tokamak, H-modes in STs exhibit important differences compared with tokamaks. The dependence of the NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) edge plasma on heating power, including the L-H transition requirements and the occurrence of edge-localized modes (ELMs), and on divertor configuration is quantified. Comparisons between good L-modes (low-confinement modes) and H-modes show greater differences in the ion channel than the electron channel. The threshold power for the H-mode transition in NSTX is generally above the predictions of a recent ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) scaling. Correlations of transition and ELM phenomena with turbulent fluctuations revealed by Gas Puff Imaging (GPI) and reflectometry are observed. In both single-null and double-null divertor discharges, the density peaks off-axis, sometimes developing prominent ''ears'' which can be sustained for many energy confinement times, tau subscript ''E'', in the absence of ELMs. A wide variety of ELM behavior is observed, and ELM characteristics depend on configuration and fueling.

  9. Dependence of various SOL widths on plasma current and density in NSTX H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J; Maingi, R; Boedo, J; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-02-12

    The dependence of various SOL widths on the line-averaged density ({ovr n}{sub e}) and plasma current (l{sub p}) for the quiescent H-mode plasmas with Type-V ELMs in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) was investigated. It is found that the heat flux SOL width ({lambda}{sub q}), measured by the IR camera, is virtually insensitive to {ovr n}{sub e} and has a strong negative dependence on l{sub p}. This insensitivity of {lambda}{sub q} to {ovr n}{sub e} is consistent with the scaling law from JET H-mode plasmas that shows a very weak dependence on the upstream density. The electron temperature, ion saturation current density, electron density, and electron pressure decay lengths ({lambda}{sub Te}, {lambda}{sub jsat}, {lambda}{sub ne}, and {lambda}{sub pe}, respectively) measured by the probe showed that {lambda}{sub Te} and {lambda}{sub jsat} have strong negative dependence on l{sub p}, whereas {lambda}{sub ne} and {lambda}{sub pe} revealed only a little or no dependence. The dependence of {lambda}{sub Te} on l{sub p} is consistent with the scaling law in the literature while {lambda}{sub ne} and {lambda}{sub pe} dependence shows a different trend.

  10. Accounting of the Power Balance for Neutral-beam-heated H-Mode Plasmas in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    S.F. Paul; R. Maingi; V. Soukhanovskii; S.M. Kaye; H. Kugel; the NSTX Research Team

    2004-08-09

    A survey of the dependence of power balance on input power, shape, and plasma current was conducted for neutral-beam-heated plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Measurements of heat to the divertor strike plates and divertor and core radiation were taken over a wide range of plasma conditions. The different conditions were obtained by inducing a L-mode to H-mode transition, changing the divertor configuration [lower single null (LSN) vs. double-null (DND)] and conducting a NBI power scan in H-mode. 60-70% of the net input power is accounted for in the LSN discharges with 20% of power lost as fast ions, 30-45% incident on the divertor plates, up to 10% radiated in the core, and about 12% radiated in the divertor. In contrast, the power accountability in DND is 85-90%. A comparison of DND and LSN data show that the remaining power in the LSN is likely to be directed to the upper divertor

  11. ECE-imaging of the H-mode pedestal (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, B. J.; Nazikian, R.; Austin, M. E.; Boom, J. E.; Classen, I. G. J.; Burrell, K. H.; Snyder, P. B.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.

    2012-10-15

    A synthetic diagnostic has been developed that reproduces the highly structured electron cyclotron emission (ECE) spectrum radiated from the edge region of H-mode discharges. The modeled dependence on local perturbations of the equilibrium plasma pressure allows for interpretation of ECE data for diagnosis of local quantities. Forward modeling of the diagnostic response in this region allows for improved mapping of the observed fluctuations to flux surfaces within the plasma, allowing for the poloidal mode number of coherent structures to be resolved. In addition, other spectral features that are dependent on both T{sub e} and n{sub e} contain information about pedestal structure and the electron energy distribution of localized phenomena, such as edge filaments arising during edge-localized mode (ELM) activity.

  12. Analysis of the ITER H-mode confinement database

    SciTech Connect

    Schissel, D.P.; Kardaun, O.J.W.F.; Ryter, F.; Stroth, U.

    1993-05-01

    In order to predict the global energy confinement time in the next generation of large tokamaks it is essential to have data from machines of different sizes and operating parameter regimes. This data can also be used to construct dimensionless scalings and thereby attempt to differentiate between Bohm and gyro-Bohm based transport models. Previously, at the request of the ITER project, H-mode global confinement data was assembled from six machines ASDEX, DIII-D, JET, JFT-2M, PBX-M, and PDX into a single database. This collaboration has continued with the initial database being expanded by extending the plasma parameter space as well as by improving the precision of some of the relevant calculated plasma parameters. This paper summarizes work that has been performed on the newest version (ITERH.DB2) of the confinement database.

  13. Analysis of the ITER H-mode confinement database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schissel, D. P.; Kardaun, O.; Ryter, F.; Stroth, U.

    1993-05-01

    In order to predict the global energy confinement time in the next generation of large tokamaks it is essential to have data from machines of different sizes and operating parameter regimes. This data can also be used to construct dimensionless scalings and thereby attempt to differentiate between Bohm and gyro-Bohm based transport models. Previously, at the request of the ITER project, H-mode global confinement data was assembled from six machines, ASDEX, DIII-D, JET, JFT-2M, PBX-M, and PDX, into a single database. This collaboration has continued with the initial database being expanded by extending the plasma parameter space as well as by improving the precision of some of the relevant calculated plasma parameters. This paper summarizes work that has been performed on the newest version (ITERH.DB2) of the confinement database.

  14. ELMs and the H-Mode Pedestal in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Maingi, R; Sabbagh, S; Bush, C; Fredrickson, E; Menard, J; Stutman, D; Tritz, K; Bell, M; Bell, R; Boedo, J; Gates, D; Johnson, D; Kaita, R; Kaye, S; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B; Mueller, D; Raman, R; Roquemore, A; Soukhanovskii, V; Stevenson, T

    2004-06-04

    We report on the behavior of ELMs in NBI-heated H-mode plasmas in NSTX. It is observed that the size of Type I ELMs, characterized by the change in plasma energy, decreases with increasing density, as observed at conventional aspect ratio. It is also observed that the Type I ELM size decreases as the plasma equilibrium is shifted from a symmetric double-null toward a lower single-null configuration. Type III ELMs have also been observed in NSTX, as well as a high-performance regime with small ELMs which we designate Type V. These Type V ELMs are consistent with high bootstrap current operation and density approaching Greenwald scaling. The Type V ELMs are characterized by an intermittent n=1 MHD mode rotating counter to the plasma current. Without active pumping, the density rises continuously through the Type V phase. However, efficient in-vessel pumping should allow density control, based on particle containment time estimates.

  15. ELMs and the H-mode Pedestal in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    R. Maingi; S.A. Sabbagh; C.E. Bush; E.D. Fredrickson; J.E. Menard; D. Stutman; K. Tritz; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; J.A. Boedo; D.A. Gates; D.W. Johnson; R. Kaita; S.M. Kaye; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; D. Mueller; R. Raman; A.L. Roquemore; V.A. Soukhanovskii; T. Stevenson

    2004-07-16

    We report on the behavior of ELMs in NBI-heated H-mode plasmas in NSTX. It is observed that the size of Type I ELMs, characterized by the change in plasma energy, decreases with increasing density, as observed at conventional aspect ratio. It is also observed that the Type I ELM size decreases as the plasma equilibrium is shifted from a symmetric double-null toward a lower single-null configuration. Type III ELMs have also been observed in NSTX, as well as a high-performance regime with small ELMs which we designate Type V. These Type V ELMs are consistent with high bootstrap current operation and density approaching Greenwald scaling. The Type V ELMs are characterized by an intermittent n=1 MHD mode rotating counter to the plasma current. Without active pumping, the density rises continuously through the Type V phase. However, efficient in-vessel pumping should allow density control, based on particle containment time estimates.

  16. Advances in High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating of NSTX H-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Philip Michael; Ahn, Joonwook; Bell, R. E.; Bonoli, P.; Chen, Guangye; Green, David L; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Kaye, S.; LeBlanc, B; Maingi, Rajesh; Phillips, Cynthia; Podesta, M.; Taylor, G.; Wilgen, John B; Wilson, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    High-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive is being developed in NSTX to provide bulk electron heating and q(0) control during non-inductively sustained Hmode plasmas fuelled by deuterium neutral-beam injection (NBI). In addition, it is used to assist the plasma current ramp-up. A major modification to increase the RF power limit was made in 2009; the original end-grounded, single end-powered current straps of the 12- element array were replaced with center-grounded, double end-powered straps. Greater than 3 MW have been coupled into NBI-driven, ELMy H-mode plasmas with this upgraded antenna. Improved core HHFW heating, particularly at longer wavelengths and during low-density start-up and plasma current ramp-up, has been obtained by lowering the edge density with lithium wall conditioning, thereby moving the critical density for fast-wave propagation away from the vessel wall [1]. Significant core electron heating of NBI-fuelled H-modes has been observed for the first time over a range of launched wavelengths and H-modes can be accessed by HHFW alone. Visible and IR camera images of the antenna and divertor indicate that fast wave interactions can deposit considerable RF energy on the outboard divertor plate, especially at longer wavelengths that begin to propagate closer to the vessel walls. Edge power loss can also arise from HHFWgenerated parametric decay instabilities; edge ion heating is observed that is wavelength dependent. During plasmas where HHFW is combined with NBI, there is a significant enhancement in neutron rate, and fast-ion D-alpha (FIDA) emission measurements clearly show broadening of the fast-ion profile in the plasma core. Large edge localized modes (ELMs) have been observed immediately following the termination of RF power, whether the power turn off is programmed or due to antenna arcing. Causality has not been established but new experiments are planned and will be reported. Fast digitization of the reflected power signal

  17. NIMROD modeling of quiescent H-mode: Reconstruction considerations and saturation mechanism

    DOE PAGES

    King, J. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Kruger, S. E.; Pankin, A. Y.; Snyder, P. B.

    2016-09-30

    The extended-MHD NIMROD code (Sovinec and King 2010 J. Comput. Phys. 229 5803) models broadband-MHD activity from a reconstruction of a quiescent H-mode shot on the DIII-D tokamak (Luxon 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 614). Computations with the reconstructed toroidal and poloidal ion flows exhibit low-nΦ perturbations (nΦ ≃1–5) that grow and saturate into a turbulent-like MHD state. The workflow used to project the reconstructed state onto the NIMROD basis functions re-solves the Grad–Shafranov equation and extrapolates profiles to include scrape-off-layer currents. In conclusion, evaluation of the transport from the turbulent-like MHD state leads to a relaxation of the density andmore » temperature profiles.« less

  18. Fusion power production in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor baseline H-mode scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Kessel, C. E.; Pankin, A. Y.

    2015-04-15

    Self-consistent simulations of 15 MA ITER H-mode DT scenarios, from ramp-up through flat-top, are carried out. Electron and ion temperatures, toroidal angular frequency, and currents are evolved, in simulations carried out using the predictive TRANSPort and integrated modeling code starting with initial profiles and equilibria obtained from tokamak simulation code studies. Studies are carried out examining the dependence and sensitivity of fusion power production on electron density, argon impurity concentration, choice of radio frequency heating, pedestal temperature without and with E × B flow shear effects included, and the degree of plasma rotation. The goal of these whole-device ITER simulations is to identify dependencies that might impact ITER fusion performance.

  19. Simulations of tungsten transport in the edge of JET ELMy H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järvinen, A.; Groth, M.; Moulton, D.; Strachan, J.; Wiesen, S.; Belo, P.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Corrigan, G.; Eich, T.; Giroud, C.; Havlickova, E.; Jachmich, S.; Lehnen, M.; Lönnroth, J.; Tskhakaya, D.; JET EFDA Contributors

    2013-07-01

    Tungsten contamination can significantly impact the performance of future fusion reactors via fuel dilution and radiation in the plasma centre. Therefore, understanding tungsten sputtering and divertor retention is essential for optimising the core performance in tokamaks operating with tungsten. This study investigates these issues numerically in JET high-triangularity, type-I ELMy H-mode plasmas with the Monte-Carlo code DIVIMP used on background plasmas dynamically evolved with the multi-fluid code EDGE2D/EIRENE. During the ELM, the simulations show target temperatures in excess of a few 100 eV, causing two orders of magnitude increase in the tungsten core contamination rate. During the ELM recovery, target densities of five times the pre-ELM values are obtained at the low field side, which strongly enhance divertor retention via increased friction with the main ions. Therefore, the core contamination is determined here dominantly by the intra-ELM divertor plasma characteristics.

  20. Comparison of hybrid and baseline ELMy H-mode confinement in JET with the carbon wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beurskens, M. N. A.; Frassinetti, L.; Challis, C.; Osborne, T.; Snyder, P. B.; Alper, B.; Angioni, C.; Bourdelle, C.; Buratti, P.; Crisanti, F.; Giovannozzi, E.; Giroud, C.; Groebner, R.; Hobirk, J.; Jenkins, I.; Joffrin, E.; Leyland, M. J.; Lomas, P.; Mantica, P.; McDonald, D.; Nunes, I.; Rimini, F.; Saarelma, S.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; de Vries, P.; Zarzoso, D.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-01-01

    The confinement in JET baseline type I ELMy H-mode plasmas is compared to that in so-called hybrid H-modes in a database study of 112 plasmas in JET with the carbon fibre composite (CFC) wall. The baseline plasmas typically have βN ˜ 1.5-2, H98 ˜ 1, whereas the hybrid plasmas have βN ˜ 2.5-3, H98 < 1.5. The database study contains both low- (δ ˜ 0.2-0.25) and high-triangularity (δ ˜ 0.4) hybrid and baseline H-mode plasmas from the last JET operational campaigns in the CFC wall from the period 2008-2009. Based on a detailed confinement study of the global as well as the pedestal and core confinement, there is no evidence that the hybrid and baseline plasmas form separate confinement groups; it emerges that the transition between the two scenarios is of a gradual kind rather than demonstrating a bifurcation in the confinement. The elevated confinement enhancement factor H98 in the hybrid plasmas may possibly be explained by the density dependence in the τ98 scaling as n0.41 and the fact that the hybrid plasmas operate at low plasma density compared to the baseline ELMy H-mode plasmas. A separate regression on the confinement data in this study shows a reduction in the density dependence as n0.09±0.08. Furthermore, inclusion of the plasma toroidal rotation in the confinement regression provides a scaling with the toroidal Alfvén Mach number as Mach_A^{0.41+/- 0.07} and again a reduced density dependence as n0.15±0.08. The differences in pedestal confinement can be explained on the basis of linear MHD stability through a coupling of the total and pedestal poloidal pressure and the pedestal performance can be improved through plasma shaping as well as high β operation. This has been confirmed in a comparison with the EPED1 predictive pedestal code which shows a good agreement between the predicted and measured pedestal pressure within 20-30% for a wide range of βN ˜ 1.5-3.5. The core profiles show a strong degree of pressure profile consistency. No

  1. Role of density gradient driven trapped electron mode turbulence in the H-mode inner core with electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Guttenfelder, W.; Rhodes, T. L.; Dimits, A. M.; Bravenec, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Holland, C.; Lohr, J.; Marinoni, A.; McKee, G. R.; Petty, C. C.; Rost, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zemedkun, S.; Zeng, L.

    2016-05-01

    A series of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] low torque quiescent H-mode experiments show that density gradient driven trapped electron mode (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-mode plasmas during strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te/Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear DGTEM critical density gradient, locally reducing density peaking, while transport in all channels displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. This suggests that fusion α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-mode plasmas with moderate density peaking and low collisionality, with equal electron and ion temperatures, key conditions expected in burning plasmas. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] (and GENE [Jenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000)]) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes but also density fluctuation spectra from Doppler backscattering (DBS), with and without ECH. Inner core DBS density fluctuations display discrete frequencies with adjacent toroidal mode numbers, which we identify as DGTEMs. GS2 [Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)] predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0>qmin>1 .

  2. Ideal Stability of the Tokamak H--mode Edge Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, H. R.

    1998-11-01

    Tokamak performance is often controlled by stability of the edge plasma. Consistent with ``stiff'' transport models, the confinement in tokamak discharges is strongly correlated with the magnitude of the edge pressure pedestal which is limited by MHD stability. Furthermore, the high performance ELM-free H--modes are terminated by low toroidal mode number n, MHD modes driven by high edge pressure gradient, and edge current. We have evaluated low n modes using the δ W code GATO, and both high edge pressure gradient and high edge current density are found to destabilize the n=1, 2, and 3 ideal modes. We have included the self-consistent bootstrap current in the equilibria generation, and have completed a thorough survey of the effects of plasma shape and edge pressure profiles on the edge ballooning stability. The bootstrap current density helps to provide access to the second regime of stability, which is easier for: higher elongation, intermediate triangularity, larger aspect ratio, narrower pedestal width, and higher q_95. The intermediate n stability is being evaluated using a high-mode-number peeling/ ballooning mode model,(J.W. Connor, R.J. Hastie, H.R. Wilson, and R.L. Miller, Phys. Plasmas 5), 2687 (1998). where a critical role is played by the edge current density. This edge model describes the interaction of peeling mode (current driven) and ballooning mode (pressure driven) effects at high, but finite, mode number; a modified ballooning mode formalism is shown to be valid at the plasma edge. Based upon this edge model, a 2D eigenvalue code has been written to determine the stability of these modes for arbitrary shape cross sections, and edge pressure and current profiles including bootstrap current effects. This model suggests a power threshold for L--H transitions and provides a plausible explanation for an ELM cycle. Results will be presented for the pressure gradient and edge current density stability boundaries for a range of shapes and pedestal widths

  3. Advances in validating gyrokinetic turbulence models against L- and H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, C.; Schmitz, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Peebles, W. A.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L.; Doyle, E. J.; Smith, S. P.; Prater, R.; Burrell, K. H.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Kinsey, J. E.; Staebler, G. M.; DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; White, A. E.

    2011-05-15

    Robust validation of predictive turbulent transport models requires quantitative comparisons to experimental measurements at multiple levels, over a range of physically relevant conditions. Toward this end, a series of carefully designed validation experiments has been performed on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] to obtain comprehensive multifield, multipoint, multiwavenumber fluctuation measurements and their scalings with key dimensionless parameters. The results of two representative validation studies are presented: an elongation scaling study performed in beam heated L-mode discharges and an electron heating power scan performed in quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) discharges. A 50% increase in the elongation {kappa} is observed to lead to a {approx}50% increase in energy confinement time {tau}{sub e} and accompanying decrease in fluctuation levels, qualitatively consistent with a priori theoretical predictions and nonlinear GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] simulations. However, these simulations exhibit clear quantitative differences from experiment in the predicted magnitudes and trends with radius of turbulent fluxes and fluctuation levels which cannot be fully accounted for by uncertainties due to transport stiffness. In the QH-mode study, local nonlinear GYRO simulations that neglect fast ion effects show a similar proportional response to the applied electron cyclotron heating as the experiment, but overpredict the magnitudes of transport and fluctuation levels by a factor of 10 or more. Possible sources of this overprediction, namely nonlocal effects and self-consistent fast beam ions, are identified and discussed.

  4. Advances in validating gyrokinetic turbulence models against L- and H-mode plasmas a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, C.; Schmitz, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Peebles, W. A.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Wang, G.; Zeng, L.; Doyle, E. J.; Smith, S. P.; Prater, R.; Burrell, K. H.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Kinsey, J. E.; Staebler, G. M.; DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; White, A. E.

    2011-05-01

    Robust validation of predictive turbulent transport models requires quantitative comparisons to experimental measurements at multiple levels, over a range of physically relevant conditions. Toward this end, a series of carefully designed validation experiments has been performed on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] to obtain comprehensive multifield, multipoint, multiwavenumber fluctuation measurements and their scalings with key dimensionless parameters. The results of two representative validation studies are presented: an elongation scaling study performed in beam heated L-mode discharges and an electron heating power scan performed in quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) discharges. A 50% increase in the elongation κ is observed to lead to a ˜50% increase in energy confinement time τe and accompanying decrease in fluctuation levels, qualitatively consistent with a priori theoretical predictions and nonlinear GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] simulations. However, these simulations exhibit clear quantitative differences from experiment in the predicted magnitudes and trends with radius of turbulent fluxes and fluctuation levels which cannot be fully accounted for by uncertainties due to transport stiffness. In the QH-mode study, local nonlinear GYRO simulations that neglect fast ion effects show a similar proportional response to the applied electron cyclotron heating as the experiment, but overpredict the magnitudes of transport and fluctuation levels by a factor of 10 or more. Possible sources of this overprediction, namely nonlocal effects and self-consistent fast beam ions, are identified and discussed.

  5. Kinetic neoclassical transport in the H-mode pedestal

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, D. J.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Grassie, J. S. de

    2014-07-15

    Multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport through the QH-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer on DIII-D is calculated using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. Quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density, and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles is achieved by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. The radial electric field (E{sub r}) that maintains ambipolar transport across flux surfaces and to the wall is computed self-consistently on closed and open magnetic field lines and is in excellent agreement with experiment. The E{sub r} inside the separatrix is the unique solution that balances the outward flux of thermal tail deuterium ions against the outward neoclassical electron flux and inward pinch of impurity and colder deuterium ions. Particle transport in the pedestal is primarily due to anomalous transport, while the ion heat and momentum transport are primarily due to the neoclassical transport. The full-f treatment quantifies the non-Maxwellian energy distributions that describe a number of experimental observations in low-collisionallity pedestals on DIII-D, including intrinsic co-I{sub p} parallel flows in the pedestal, ion temperature anisotropy, and large impurity temperatures in the scrape-off layer.

  6. L-H transition studies on DIII-D to determine H-mode access for operational scenarios in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Gohil, P.; Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M; Ferron, J.R.; Osborne, T.H.; Schmitz, O.; Scoville, J. T.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive set of L-H transition experiments has been performed on DIII-D to determine the requirements for access to H-mode plasmas in ITER's first (non-nuclear) operational phase with H and He plasmas and the second (activated) operational phase with D plasmas. The H-mode power threshold, P(TH), was evaluated for different operational configurations and auxiliary heating methods for the different main ion species. Helium plasmas have significantly higher P(TH) than deuterium plasmas at low densities for all heating schemes, but similar P(TH) as deuterium plasmas at high densities except for H-neutral beam injection-heated discharges, which are still higher. Changes in P(TH) are observed when helium concentration levels in deuterium plasmas exceed 40%. There is a strong dependence of P(TH) on the magnetic geometry in the vicinity of the divertor. The trend of decreasing P(TH) with decreasing X-point height is observed for all of the main ion species irrespective of the heating method, which appears to indicate that there is a common physics process behind this effect for all of the ion species. Helium and deuterium plasmas exhibit a significant increase in P(TH) for strong resonant magnetic perturbations. The application of a local magnetic ripple of 3% from test blanket module mock-up coils did not change P(TH) in deuterium plasmas.

  7. The H-mode Pedestal and Edge Localized Modes in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    R. Maingi; E.D. Fredrickson; J.E. Menard; N. Nishino; A.L. Roquemore; S.A. Sabbagh; K. Tritz; the NSTX Team

    2004-07-16

    The research program of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) routinely utilizes the H-mode confinement regime to test and extend beta and pulse length limits. As in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks, NSTX observes a variety of edge localized modes (ELMs) in H-mode. Hence a significant part of the research program is dedicated to ELMs studies.

  8. High-Harmonic Fast Wave Driven H-mode Plasmas on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    B.P. LeBlanc; R.E. Bell; S.I. Bernabei; K. Indireshkumar; S.M. Kaye; R. Maingi; T.K. Mau; D.W. Swain; G. Taylor; P.M. Ryan; J.B Wilgen; J.R. Wilson

    2003-05-01

    The launch of High-Harmonic Fast Waves (HHFW) routinely provides auxiliary power to NSTX plasmas, where it is used to heat electrons and pursue drive current. H-mode transitions have been observed in deuterium discharges, where only HHFW and ohmic heating, and no neutral beam injection (NBI), were applied to the plasma. The usual H-mode signatures are observed. A drop of the Da light marks the start of a stored energy increase, which can double the energy content. These H-mode plasmas also have the expected kinetic profile signatures with steep edge density and electron temperature pedestal. Similar to its NBI driven counterpart--also observed on NSTX-- the HHFW H mode have density profiles that features ''ears'' in the peripheral region. These plasmas are likely candidates for long pulse operation because of the combination of bootstrap current, associated with H-mode kinetic profiles, and active current drive, which can be generated with HHFW power.

  9. Gyrokinetic Stability Studies of the Microtearing Mode in the National Spherical Torus Experiment H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Redi, M. H.; Budny, R. V.; Rewoldt, G.; Dorland, W.

    2005-10-19

    Insight into plasma microturbulence and transport is being sought using linear simulations of drift waves on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), following a study of drift wave modes on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak. Microturbulence is likely generated by instabilities of drift waves, which cause transport of heat and particles. Understanding this transport is important because the containment of heat and particles is required for the achievement of practical nuclear fusion. Microtearing modes may cause high heat transport through high electron thermal conductivity. It is hoped that microtearing will be stable along with good electron transport in the proposed low collisionality International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Stability of the microtearing mode is investigated for conditions at mid-radius in a high density NSTX high performance (H-mode) plasma, which is compared to the proposed ITER plasmas. The microtearing mode is driven by the electron temperature gradient, and believed to be mediated by ion collisions and magnetic shear. Calculations are based on input files produced by TRXPL following TRANSP (a time-dependent transport analysis code) analysis. The variability of unstable mode growth rates is examined as a function of ion and electron collisionalities using the parallel gyrokinetic computational code GS2. Results show the microtearing mode stability dependence for a range of plasma collisionalities. Computation verifies analytic predictions that higher collisionalities than in the NSTX experiment increase microtearing instability growth rates, but that the modes are stabilized at the highest values. There is a transition of the dominant mode in the collisionality scan to ion temperature gradient character at both high and low collisionalities. The calculations suggest that plasma electron thermal confinement may be greatly improved in the low-collisionality ITER.

  10. H-mode Accelerating Structures with PMQ Focusing for Low-Beta Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.; Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on results of the project developing high-efficiency normal-conducting RF accelerating structures based on inter-digital H-mode (IH) cavities and the transverse beam focusing with permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ), for beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. The shunt impedance of IH-PMQ structures is 10-20 times higher than that of a conventional drift-tube linac, while the transverse size is 4-5 times smaller. The H-PMQ accelerating structures following a short RFQ can be used both in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications. Results of the combined 3-D modeling -- electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations with high currents, and thermal-stress analysis -- for a full IH-PMQ accelerator tank are presented. The accelerating field profile in the tank is tuned to provide the best propagation of a 50-mA deuteron beam using coupled iterations of EM and beamdynamics modeling. Multi-particle simulations withParmela and CST Particle Studio have been used to confirm the design. Measurement results of a cold model of the IH-PMQ tank are presented.

  11. Plasma interaction with tungsten samples in the COMPASS tokamak in ohmic ELMy H-modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, M.; Weinzettl, V.; Matejicek, J.; Popov, Tsv; Marinov, S.; Costea, S.; Dejarnac, R.; Stöckel, J.; Havlicek, J.; Panek, R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports experimental results on plasma interaction with tungsten samples with or without pre-grown He fuzz. Under the experimental conditions, arcing was observed on the fuzzy tungsten samples, resulting in localized melting of the fuzz structure that did not extend into the bulk. The parallel power flux densities were obtained from the data measured by Langmuir probes embedded in the divertor tiles on the COMPASS tokamak. Measurements of the current-voltage probe characteristics were performed during ohmic ELMy H-modes reached in deuterium plasmas at a toroidal magnetic field BT = 1.15 T, plasma current Ip = 300 kA and line-averaged electron density ne = 5×1019 m-3. The data obtained between the ELMs were processed by the recently published first-derivative probe technique for precise determination of the plasma potential and the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The spatial profile of the EEDF shows that at the high-field side it is Maxwellian with a temperature of 5 -- 10 eV. The electron temperatures and the ion-saturation current density obtained were used to evaluate the radial distribution of the parallel power flux density as being in the order of 0.05 -- 7 MW/m2.

  12. Comparisons between global and local gyrokinetic simulations of an ASDEX Upgrade H-mode plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Alejandro Bañón; Told, Daniel; Jenko, Frank; Görler, Tobias; Happel, Tim

    2016-04-01

    We investigate by means of local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic GENE simulations an ASDEX Upgrade H-mode plasma. We find that for the outer core positions (i.e., ρ tor ≈ 0.5 - 0.7 ), nonlocal effects are important. For nominal input parameters local simulations over-predict the experimental heat fluxes by a large factor, while a good agreement is found with global simulations. This was a priori not expected, since the values of 1 / ρ ⋆ were large enough that global and local simulations should have been in accordance. Nevertheless, due to the high sensitivity of the heat fluxes with respect to the input parameters, it is still possible to match the heat fluxes in local simulations with the experimental and global results by varying the ion temperature gradient within the experimental uncertainties. In addition to that, once an agreement in the transport quantities between local (flux-matched) and global simulations is achieved, an agreement for other quantities, such as density and temperature fluctuations, is also found. The case presented here clearly shows that even in the presence of global size-effects, the local simulation approach is still a valid and accurate approach.

  13. L to H mode transition: Parametric dependencies of the temperature threshold

    DOE PAGES

    Bourdelle, C.; Chone, L.; Fedorczak, N.; Garbet, Xavier; Beyer, P.; Citrin, J.; Fuhr, G.; Loarte, A.; Maggi, C. F.; Militello, F.; et al

    2015-06-15

    The L to H mode transition occurs at a critical power which depends on various parameters, such as the magnetic field, the density, etc. Experimental evidence on various tokamaks (JET, ASDEX-Upgrade, DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod) points towards the existence of a critical temperature characterizing the transition. This criterion for the L-H transition is local and is therefore easier to be compared to theoretical approaches. In order to shed light on the mechanisms of the transition, simple theoretical ideas are used to derive a temperature threshold (Tth). They are based on the stabilization of the underlying turbulence by a mean radial electricmore » field shear. The nature of the turbulence varies as the collisionality decreases, from resistive ballooning modes to ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes. The obtained parametric dependencies of the derived Tth are tested versus magnetic field, density, effective charge. Furthermore, various robust experimental observations are reproduced, in particular Tth increases with magnetic field B and increases with density below the density roll-over observed on the power threshold.« less

  14. L to H mode transition: Parametric dependencies of the temperature threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdelle, C.; Chone, L.; Fedorczak, N.; Garbet, Xavier; Beyer, P.; Citrin, J.; Fuhr, G.; Loarte, A.; Maggi, C. F.; Militello, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Vermare, L.; Delabie, E.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-06-15

    The L to H mode transition occurs at a critical power which depends on various parameters, such as the magnetic field, the density, etc. Experimental evidence on various tokamaks (JET, ASDEX-Upgrade, DIII-D, Alcator C-Mod) points towards the existence of a critical temperature characterizing the transition. This criterion for the L-H transition is local and is therefore easier to be compared to theoretical approaches. In order to shed light on the mechanisms of the transition, simple theoretical ideas are used to derive a temperature threshold (Tth). They are based on the stabilization of the underlying turbulence by a mean radial electric field shear. The nature of the turbulence varies as the collisionality decreases, from resistive ballooning modes to ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes. The obtained parametric dependencies of the derived Tth are tested versus magnetic field, density, effective charge. Furthermore, various robust experimental observations are reproduced, in particular Tth increases with magnetic field B and increases with density below the density roll-over observed on the power threshold.

  15. Application of divertor cryopumping to H-mode density control in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdavi, M.A.; Ferron, J.R.; Hyatt, A.W.

    1993-11-01

    In this paper we describe the method and the results of experiments where a unique in-vessel cryopump-baffle system was used to control density of H-mode plasmas. We were able to independently regulate current and density of ELMing H-mode plasmas, each over a range of factor two, and measure the H-mode confinement scaling with plasma density and current. With a modest pumping speed of {approx}40 kl/s, particle exhaust rates as high as 2 {times} 10{sup 22} atom/s{sup {minus}1} have been observed.

  16. Effect of Gas Fueling Location on H-mode Access in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    R. Maingi; M. Bell; R. Bell; T. Biewer; C. Bush; C.S. Chang; D. Gates; S. Kaye; H. Kugel; B. LeBlanc; R. Maqueda; J. Menard; D. Mueller; R. Raman; S. Sabbagh; V. Soukhanovskii; the NSTX Team

    2003-10-09

    The dependence of H-mode access on the poloidal location of the gas injection source has been investigated in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). We find that gas fueling from the center stack midplane area produces the most reproducible H-mode access with generally the lowest L-H threshold power in lower single-null configuration. The edge toroidal rotation velocity is largest (in direction of the plasma current) just before the L-H transition with center stack midplane fueling, and then reverses direction after the L-H transition. Simulation of these results with a 2-D guiding-center Monte Carlo neoclassical transport code is qualitatively consistent with the trends in the measured velocities. Double-null discharges exhibit H-mode access with gas fueling from either the center stack midplane or center stack top locations, indicating a reduced sensitivity of H-mode access on fueling location in that shape.

  17. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Discharges in the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D; Menard, J

    2008-12-31

    Experiments conducted in high-performance 1.0 MA and 1.2 MA 6 MW NBI-heated H-mode discharges with a high magnetic flux expansion radiative divertor in NSTX demonstrate that significant divertor peak heat flux reduction and access to detachment may be facilitated naturally in a highly-shaped spherical torus (ST) configuration. Improved plasma performance with high {beta}{sub t} = 15-25%, a high bootstrap current fraction f{sub BS} = 45-50%, longer plasma pulses, and an H-mode regime with smaller ELMs has been achieved in the strongly-shaped lower single null configuration with elongation {kappa} = 2.2-2.4 and triangularity {delta} = 0.6-0.8. Divertor peak heat fluxes were reduced from 6-12 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-2 MW/m{sup 2} in ELMy H-mode discharges using the inherently high magnetic flux expansion f{sub m} = 16-25 and the partial detachment of the outer strike point at several D{sub 2} injection rates. A good core confinement and pedestal characteristics were maintained, while the core carbon concentration and the associated Z{sub eff} were reduced. The partially detached divertor regime was characterized by an increase in divertor radiated power, a reduction of ion flux to the plate, and a large neutral compression ratio. Spectroscopic measurements indicated a formation of a high-density, low temperature region adjacent to the outer strike point, where substantial increases in the volume recombination rate and CII, CIII emission rates was measured.

  18. Measurement of deuterium density profiles in the H-mode steep gradient region using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskey, S. R.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H.; Pablant, N. A.; Stagner, L.

    2016-11-01

    Recent completion of a thirty two channel main-ion (deuterium) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] enables detailed comparisons between impurity and main-ion temperature, density, and toroidal rotation. In a H-mode DIII-D discharge, these new measurement capabilities are used to provide the deuterium density profile, demonstrate the importance of profile alignment between Thomson scattering and CER diagnostics, and aid in determining the electron temperature at the separatrix. Sixteen sightlines cover the core of the plasma and another sixteen are densely packed towards the plasma edge, providing high resolution measurements across the pedestal and steep gradient region in H-mode plasmas. Extracting useful physical quantities such as deuterium density is challenging due to multiple photoemission processes. These challenges are overcome using a detailed fitting model and by forward modeling the photoemission using the FIDASIM code, which implements a comprehensive collisional radiative model.

  19. Progress in GYRO Validation Studies of DIII-D H-mode Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Petty, C. C.; Candy, J.; Holcomb, C. T.

    2011-10-01

    The need for a validated predictive capability of turbulent transport in ITER is now widely recognized. However, to date most validation studies of nonlinear codes such as GYRO have focused upon low power L-mode discharges, which have significant differences in key dimensionless parameters such as β and ρ* =ρs / a from more ITER-relevant H-mode discharges. In order to address this gap, the results of nonlinear GYRO simulations of a range of DIII-D H-mode discharges (including quiescent H-mode, hybrid, and steady state discharges) are presented. These H-mode studies focus upon three physics effects, motivated by key differences between L- and H-mode plasmas. The first is the linear and nonlinear effects of finite β in plasmas where βN = β /(I / aB) varies from 1.5-2.5, 3-5 times higher than typical L-mode values. Second is the impact of nonlocality at typical DIII-D H-mode ρ* values, which in contrast to typical L-modes can be non-negligible. Third is the stabilizing effect of a significant density of energetic particles. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-95ER54309, and DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Electron temperature profile invariance on OH, L- and H-mode plasmas and consequences for the anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1992-01-01

    The shapes of the electron temperature and electron density profiles in the OH, L- and H-mode confinement regimes of ASDEX are explored by statistical analysis. It is shown that the shape of Te(r) is conserved in the outer half of the plasma in these regimes and that it is invariant with respect to heating power, heating profile, density, density scale length, q value and ion mass. These results suggest that microturbulence constrains the shape of the temperature profile by adjusting the electron heat diffusivity χe(r). No such invariance is found for the temperature profile in the inner half of the plasma and for the density profile over the whole cross-section. Properties of the empirical electron heat diffusivity and the diffusion coefficient in different regimes can be described by Te profile invariance. The improved confinement with peaked density profiles, the reduction of χe in the bulk of H-mode plasmas and the power dependence of χe in the L-regime are discussed

  1. Development of long pulse RF heating and current drive for H-mode scenarios with metallic walls in WEST

    SciTech Connect

    Ekedahl, Annika Bourdelle, Clarisse; Artaud, Jean-François; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Bufferand, Hugo; Colas, Laurent; Decker, Joan; Delpech, Léna; Dumont, Rémi; Goniche, Marc; Helou, Walid; Hillairet, Julien; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Mollard, Patrick; Nardon, Eric; Peysson, Yves; Tsitrone, Emmanuelle

    2015-12-10

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra team in long pulse heating and current drive with radiofrequency (RF) systems will now be exploited in the WEST device (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) [1]. WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m{sup 2}), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW / 30 s at I{sub P} = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW / 1000 s at I{sub P} = 0.6 MA) [2], all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). This paper gives a description of the ICRH and LHCD systems in WEST, together with the modelling of the power deposition of the RF waves in the WEST-scenarios.

  2. Development of long pulse RF heating and current drive for H-mode scenarios with metallic walls in WEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekedahl, Annika; Bourdelle, Clarisse; Artaud, Jean-François; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Bufferand, Hugo; Colas, Laurent; Decker, Joan; Delpech, Léna; Dumont, Rémi; Goniche, Marc; Helou, Walid; Hillairet, Julien; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Mollard, Patrick; Nardon, Eric; Peysson, Yves; Tsitrone, Emmanuelle

    2015-12-01

    The longstanding expertise of the Tore Supra team in long pulse heating and current drive with radiofrequency (RF) systems will now be exploited in the WEST device (tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) [1]. WEST will allow an integrated long pulse tokamak programme for testing W-divertor components at ITER-relevant heat flux (10-20 MW/m2), while treating crucial aspects for ITER-operation, such as avoidance of W-accumulation in long discharges, monitoring and control of heat fluxes on the metallic plasma facing components (PFCs) and coupling of RF waves in H-mode plasmas. Scenario modelling using the METIS-code shows that ITER-relevant heat fluxes are compatible with the sustainment of long pulse H-mode discharges, at high power (up to 15 MW / 30 s at IP = 0.8 MA) or high fluence (up to 10 MW / 1000 s at IP = 0.6 MA) [2], all based on RF heating and current drive using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) and Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD). This paper gives a description of the ICRH and LHCD systems in WEST, together with the modelling of the power deposition of the RF waves in the WEST-scenarios.

  3. Access to and Characterization of Ohmic H-mode Plasmas at Near-Unity Aspect Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonck, R. J.; Bongard, M. W.; Thome, K. E.; Burke, M. G.; Peguero, L. M.; Perry, J. M.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Shriwise, P. C.; Thompson, D. S.

    2013-10-01

    The low H-mode transition power threshold at near-unity aspect ratio allows access to H-mode in the PEGASUS experiment with only Ohmic heating. Ohmic H-mode plasmas are achieved in both a limited and a new separatrix-limited magnetic configuration. H-mode is attained with high-field-side centerstack fueling, with densities from 1 to > 3 × 1019 m-3 and Greenwald fractions ~ 0.2-0.7 for Ip ~ 0 . 13 MA. Compared to L-mode plasmas, H-modes show: a doubling of the stored energy; reduced D- α emission; edge current pedestal with characteristic width of ~ 2 cm, with 6 cm for L-mode; reversal of the edge toroidal flow from counter-current to co-current; reduced V-sec consumption due to increased temperatures; and ELM excitation. Operation at A ~1.15 results in strong particle trapping, fT ~ 0.7 - 0.9, and associated neoclassical effects even at modest plasma temperatures so that POH ~ 0.4 MW, which readily surpasses the estimated threshold power of <0.1 MW. Low-field-side fueling appears to degrade access to and quality of the H-mode plasma. Characterization of H-mode access in PEGASUS will provide unique data at near-unity A and guide detailed studies of ELM dynamics, as well as provide a critical tool for exploring the extremely high-βT regime at A ~ 1. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  4. Density limit of H-mode plasmas on JET-ILW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Sergienko, G.; Groth, M.; de Vries, P. C.; Aho-Mantila, L.; Arnoux, G.; Bernert, M.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Calabro, G.; Clever, M.; Esser, H. G.; Guillemaut, C.; Jachmich, S.; Järvinen, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A. G.; Mertens, Ph.; Philipps, V.; Stamp, M.; Wischmeier, M.; Wiesen, S.

    2015-08-01

    High-density discharges on JET with ITER-like Wall (ILW) have been analysed with the aim of establishing a mechanism for the H-mode density limit (DL) and compared with experiments in the JET carbon material configuration. The density limit is up to 20% higher in the JET-ILW than in the JET-C machine. The observed H-mode density limit is found close to the Greenwald limit. It is sensitive to the main plasma shape and is almost independent of the heating power. It has been observed that the transition from H-mode to L-mode is not always an abrupt event but may exhibit a series of H-L-H transitions, the so-called "dithering H-mode". It was observed that detachment, as well as the X-point MARFE itself, does not trigger the H-L transition and thus does not present a limit on the plasma density and that it is the plasma confinement which is ultimately responsible for the H-mode DL.

  5. Observation of pedestal turbulence in edge localized mode-free H-mode on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, X.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, S. B.; Wang, Y. M.; Shi, T. H.; Liu, Z. X.; Kong, D. F.; Qu, H.; Gao, X.

    2014-10-01

    Two different pedestal turbulence structures have been observed in edge localized mode-free phase of H-mode heated by lower hybrid wave and RF wave in ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. When the fraction of ICRF power PICRF/Ptotal exceeds 0.7, coherent mode is observed. The mode is identified as an electromagnetic mode, rotating in electron diamagnetic direction with a frequency around 50 kHz and toroidal mode number n = -3. Whereas when PICRF/Ptotal is less than 0.7, harmonic mode with frequency f = 40-300 kHz appears instead. The characteristics of these two modes are demonstrated preliminarily. The threshold value of heating power and also the plasma parameters are distinct.

  6. Observation of pedestal turbulence in edge localized mode-free H-mode on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Han, X. Zhang, T.; Zhang, S. B.; Wang, Y. M.; Shi, T. H.; Liu, Z. X.; Kong, D. F.; Qu, H.; Gao, X.

    2014-10-15

    Two different pedestal turbulence structures have been observed in edge localized mode-free phase of H-mode heated by lower hybrid wave and RF wave in ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. When the fraction of ICRF power P{sub ICRF}/P{sub total} exceeds 0.7, coherent mode is observed. The mode is identified as an electromagnetic mode, rotating in electron diamagnetic direction with a frequency around 50 kHz and toroidal mode number n = −3. Whereas when P{sub ICRF}/P{sub total} is less than 0.7, harmonic mode with frequency f = 40–300 kHz appears instead. The characteristics of these two modes are demonstrated preliminarily. The threshold value of heating power and also the plasma parameters are distinct.

  7. Gyrokinetic study of impurity transport from neoclassical and turbulent mechanisms in and across H-mode pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyuho; Chang, C. S.; Ku, Seunghoe; Hager, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The edge gyrokinetic code XGC1 has been used to study impurity transport from combined neoclassical and turbulent mechanisms in and across a steep H-mode pedestal, in realistic magnetic separatrix geometry. Both low-Z and high-Z impurity transport are studied.. The effect on the turbulence and transport is found to be different whether the impurity radial profile gradient is in the same or opposite direction to the main ion profile gradient. Co-existence of the low- and high-Z impurities also makes difference in the transport of each species. Edge impurity behavior in NSTX, JET, and DIII-D tokamak plasma will be discussed. Work funded by National Research Foundation of Korea and US DOE. Computing time was supported by NERSC.

  8. Divertor pumping and other reactor application issues for H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Stambaugh, R.D.; Brooks, N.H.; Allen, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    We summarize results from DIII-D in regard to issues for reactor application of H-mode. Recently, DIII-D has begun to operate a cryopump (D{sub 2} pumping speed = 31,000 {ell}/s at a pressure of 2 mTorr). Initial results are very favorable for density control in H-mode. The plasma density could be reduced by 50%. Energy confinement is unchanged so the temperature rises in proportion to the density drop. Ability to access these less collisional plasmas in H-mode is favorable to current drive application. With the all-graphite wall, impurity accumulation has been eliminated. The exceedingly good confinement of VH-mode offers the possibility of retaining good confinement while radiating copious power from the plasma edge using injected noble gas impurities.

  9. Projection of ITER performance using the multi-machine L- and H- mode databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    An overview of recent analyses of H- and L-mode confinement and L- to H-mode threshold data is presented. The standard subset of the H-mode database, consisting of about 1600 time slices from six tokamaks, leads to power law scalings for ELMy and ELM-free discharges, both of which predict a confinement time for ITER of approximately 5.5 sec. The analysis indicates a strong dependence of confinement time scaling and prediction on the neutral penetration from the divertor into the main chamber. Consideration of dimensionless variables suggest scaling expressions for the H-mode threshold which predict threshold powers for ITER of between 100 and 200 MW. Finally, the L-mode database has been updated to contain over 1500 time-slices from eleven tokamaks. A preliminary empirical scaling based on the total confinement time has been developed.

  10. Edge Profiles during Quiescent H-mode on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, W. P.; Burrell, K. H.; Snyder, P. B.; Turnbull, A. D.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; Casper, T. A.; Lasnier, C. J.

    2003-10-01

    The quiescent H-mode is a stationary, ELM-free regime with high confinement, in which the edge electron density and temperature profiles exhibit a sharp pedestal, just as in standard ELMing H-mode discharges. The measured profiles of n_e, T_e, and Ti will be presented and compared with those in ELMing and standard ELM-free discharges. Edge current profiles calculated with the CORSICA code will be combined with measured pressure profiles to assess edge stability against medium-n peeling and balloon modes using the ELITE code, and against low-n ballooning modes using the GATO code.

  11. New Fluctuation Phenomena in the H-Mode Regime of Poloidal-Diverter Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slusher, R. E.; Surko, C. M.; Valley, J. F.; Crowley, T.; Mazzucato, E.; McGuire, K.

    1984-08-01

    A new kind of fluctuation is observed near the edge of plasmas in the PDX tokamak operating in the "H-mode" (improved-confinement) regime. These fluctuations are evidenced as vacuum-uv and density-fluctuation bursts at well-defined frequencies (Δωω<~0.1) in the range between 50 and 180 kHz. The bursts are correlated, both in space and in time, with changes in the temperature-density product near the plasma edge where large density and temperature gradients develop during the H mode.

  12. New fluctuation phenomena in the H-mode regime of poloidal-divertor tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Slusher, R.E.; Surko, C.M.; Valley, J.F.; Crowley, T.; Mazzucato, E.; McGuire, K.

    1984-08-13

    A new kind of fluctuation is observed near the edge of plasmas in the PDX tokamak operating in the ''H-mode'' (improved-confinement) regime. These fluctuations are evidenced as vacuum-UV and density-fluctuation bursts at well-defined frequencies (..delta omega../..omega..< or approx. =0.1) in the range between 50 and 180 kHz. The bursts are correlated, both in space and in time, with changes in the temperature-density product near the plasma edge where large density and temperature gradients develop during the H mode.

  13. L to H mode transitions and associated phenomena in divertor tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punjabi, A.

    1990-09-01

    This is the final report for the research project titled, L to H Mode Transitions and Associated Phenomena in Divertor Tokamaks. The period covered by this project is the fiscal year 1990. This report covers the development of Advanced Two Chamber Model.

  14. PROGRESS IN QUANTIFYING THE EDGE PHYSICS OF H-MODE REGIME IN DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    R.J. GROEBNER; D.R. BAKER; J.A. BOEDO; K.H. BURRELL; T.N. CARLSTROM; R.D. DERANIAN; E.J. DOYLE; J.R. FERRON; P. GOHIL; G.R. MOYER; C.L. RETTIG; T.L. RHODES; D.M. THOMAS; T.H. OSBORNE; W.P. WEST

    2000-10-01

    Edge conditions in DIII-D are being quantified in order to provide insight into the physics of the H-mode regime. Electron temperature is not the key parameter that controls the L-H transition. Gradients of edge temperature and pressure are much more promising candidates for such parameters. The quality of H-mode confinement is strongly correlated with the height of the H-mode pedestal for the pressure. The gradient of the pressure appears to be controlled by MHD modes, in particular by kink-ballooning modes with finite mode number n. For a wide variety of discharges, the width of the barrier is well described with a relationship that is proportional to ({beta}{sub p}{sup ped}){sup 1/2}. An attractive regime of confinement has been discovered which provides steady-state operation with no ELMs, low impurity content and normal H-mode confinement. A coherent edge MHD-mode evidently provides adequate particle transport to control the plasma density and impurity content while permitting the pressure pedestal to remain almost identical to that observed in ELMing discharges.

  15. LETTER: Empirical scaling law for the effective heat diffusivity in ELMy H mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    1996-04-01

    Predictive code simulations of high density scenarios of ITER and other reactor-grade devices require an experimentally validated scaling relation for the one-fluid effective heat diffusivity chi in the ELMy H mode regime. A comprehensive empirical chi scaling compatible with the ITERH92-P ELMy H mode scaling of the thermal energy confinement time is presented. It follows from a power law ansatz for chi and integration of the single-fluid energy equation and recovers all the exponents of the global confinement law. The numerical factor of the global scaling is used to calibrate the heat diffusivity. The dependences of chi on the temperature and temperature gradient, connected with the power degradation of confinement, are inferred from profile information of a high density H mode discharge. The scaling law obtained is successfully tested against JET, ASDEX and ASDEX Upgrade H mode discharges covering a wide parameter range. It is found to predict the strong rise of the experimental chi profiles with increasing effective radius

  16. CORRELATION OF H-MODE BARRIER WIDTH AND NEUTRAL PENETRATION LENGTH

    SciTech Connect

    GROEBNER,RJ; MAHDAVI,MA; LEONARD,AW; OSBORNE,TH; WOLF,NS; PORTER,GD; STANGEBY,PC; BROOKS,NH; COLCHIN,RJ; HEIDBRINK,WW; LUCE,TC; MCKEE,GR; OWEN,LW; WANG,G; WHYTE,DG

    2002-09-01

    OAK A271 CORRELATION OF H-MODE BARRIER WIDTH AND NEUTRAL PENETRATION LENGTH. Pedestal studies in DIII-D find a good correlation between the width of the H-mode density barrier and the neutral penetration length. These results are obtained by comparing experimental density profiles to the predictions of an analytic model for the profile, obtained from the particle continuity equations for electrons and deuterium atoms. In its range of validity (edge temperature between 40-500 eV), the analytic model quantitatively predicts the observed decrease of the width as the pedestal density increases, the observed strong increase of the gradient of the density as the pedestal density increases and the observation that L-mode and H-mode profiles with the same pedestal density have very similar shapes. The width of the density barrier, measured from the edge of the electron temperature barrier, is the lower limit for the observed width of the temperature barrier. These results support the hypothesis that particle fueling provides the dominant control for the size of the H-mode transport barrier.

  17. CORRELATION OF H-MODE BARRIER WIDTH AND NEUTRAL PENTRATION LENGTH

    SciTech Connect

    GROEBNER,RJ; MAHDAVI,MA; LEONARD,AW; OSBORNE,TH; WOLF,NS; PORTER,GD; STANGEBY,PC; BROOKS,NH; COLCHIN,RJ; HEIDBRINK,WW; LUCE,TC; MCKEE,GR; OWEN,LW; WANG,G; WHYTE,DG

    2002-09-01

    OAK A271 CORRELATION OF H-MODE BARRIER WIDTH AND NEUTRAL PENTRATION LENGTH. Pedestal studies in DIII-D find a good correlation between the width of the region of steep gradient in the H-mode density and the neutral penetration length. These results are obtained by comparing experimental density profiles to the predictions of an analytic model for the profile, obtained from the particle continuity equations for electrons and deuterium atoms. In its range of validity (edge temperature between 40-500 eV), the analytic model quantitatively predicts the observed decrease of the width as the pedestal density increases, the observed strong increase of the gradient of the density as the pedestal density increases and the observation that L-mode and H-mode profiles with the same pedestal density have very similar shapes. The width of the density barrier, measured from the edge of the electron temperature barrier, is the lower limit for the observed width of the temperature barrier. These results support the hypothesis that particle fueling provides a dominant control for the size of the H-mode transport barrier.

  18. The Effect of Plasma Shape on H-Mode Pedestal Characteristics on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    T.H. Osborne; J.R. Ferron; R.J. Groebner; L.L. Lao; A.W. Leonard; R. Maingi; R.L. Miller; A.D. Turnbull; M.R. Wade; J.G. Watkins

    1999-12-01

    The characteristics of the H-mode are studied in discharges with varying triangularity and squareness. The pressure at the top of the H-mode pedestal increases strongly with triangularity primarily due to an increase in the margin by which the edge pressure gradient exceeds the ideal ballooning mode first stability limit. Two models are considered for how the edge may exceed the ballooning mode limit. In one model [1], access to the ballooning mode second stable regime allows the edge pressure gradient and associated bootstrap current to continue to increase until an edge localized, low toroidal mode number, ideal kink mode is destabilized. In the second model [2], the finite width of the H-mode transport barrier, and diamagnetic effects raise the pressure gradient limit above the ballooning mode limit. We observe a weak inverse dependence of the width of the H-mode transport barrier, {Delta}, on triangularity relative to the previously obtained [3] scaling {Delta} {infinity} ({beta}{sub P}{sup PED}){sup 1/2}. The energy loss for Type I ELMs increases with triangularity in proportion to the pedestal energy increase. The temperature profile is found to respond stiffly to changes in T{sup PED} at low temperature, while at high temperature the response is additive. The response of the density profile is also found to play a role in the response of the total stored energy to changes in the W{sup PED}.

  19. Impurity Screening in Ohmic and H-Mode Plasmas in the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCracken, G. M.

    1996-11-01

    The impurity density in the confined plasma is determined not only by the impurity production rate but also by screening, i.e. the balance between the perpendicular and parallel transport in the SOL. The relative importance of screening has been studied by injecting gaseous recycling (Ne, Ar) and non-recycling impurities (N, C) into various poloidal positions of the SOL and divertor in C-Mod. The density of the non-recycling impurities in the core is a function of the poloidal position of injection, while the screening of recycling impurities is not. In both cases screening is significantly worse ( ~3x) during divertor detachment. For a given injection rate of N2 gas into H-mode discharges, the number of impurities in the core is typically a factor of 3 greater than for ohmic discharges. Optical imaging of low charge states of the injected non-recycling impurities using a camera and spectral filters shows a directed plume, indicating flow of impurities towards the divertor target at all positions studied, even at the inboard midplane. This implies that the friction force due to plasma flow dominates the parallel ion temperature gradient force. The spatial distribution of low charge states in the divertor has been studied using a multichord visible spectrometer, and the distribution of the nitrogen radiation has been been studied using a 20 chord bolometer array. The results show that for attached discharges the nitrogen radiation is predominantly in the SOL below the X-point. The position of the radiation is not strongly dependent on the position of nitrogen injection. The screening has been compared with calculations using the DIVIMP Monte Carlo code [1] and with an analytical model of the impurity transport. Work supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-78ET51013. În collaboration with B Lipschultz, B LaBombard, J A Goetz, R Granetz, D Jablonski, H Ohkawa, J Terry, MIT, S Lisgo, P C Stangeby, University of Toronto, ^1P.C. Stangeby and D. Elder, J. Nucl. Mater

  20. H-Mode Turbulence, Power Threshold, ELM, and Pedestal Studies in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    R. Maingi; C.E. Bush; E.D. Fredrickson; D.A. Gates; S.M. Kaye; B.P. LeBlanc; J.E. Menard; H. Meyer; D. Mueller; N. Nishino; A.L. Roquemore; S.A. Sabbagh; K. Tritz; S.J. Zweben; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; T. Biewer; J.A. Boedo; D.W. Johnson; R. Kaita; H.W. Kugel; R.J. Maqueda; T. Munsat; R. Raman; V.A. Soukhanovskii; T. Stevenson; D. Stutman

    2004-10-28

    High-confinement mode (H-mode) operation plays a crucial role in NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] research, allowing higher beta limits due to reduced plasma pressure peaking, and long-pulse operation due to high bootstrap current fraction. Here, new results are presented in the areas of edge localized modes (ELMs), H-mode pedestal physics, L-H turbulence, and power threshold studies. ELMs of several other types (as observed in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks) are often observed: (1) large, Type I ELMs, (2) ''medium'' Type II/III ELMs, and (3) giant ELMs which can reduce stored energy by up to 30% in certain conditions. In addition, many high-performance discharges in NSTX have tiny ELMs (newly termed Type V), which have some differences as compared with ELM types in the published literature. The H-mode pedestal typically contains between 25-33% of the total stored energy, and the NSTX pedestal energy agrees reasonably well with a recent international multi-machine scaling. We find that the L-H transition occurs on a {approx}100 {micro}sec timescale as viewed by a gas puff imaging diagnostic, and that intermittent quiescent periods precede the final transition. A power threshold identity experiment between NSTX and MAST shows comparable loss power at the L-H transition in balanced double-null discharges. Both machines require more power for the L-H transition as the balance is shifted toward lower single null. High field side gas fueling enables more reliable H-mode access, but does not always lead to a lower power threshold e.g., with a reduction of the duration of early heating. Finally the edge plasma parameters just before the L-H transition were compared with theories of the transition. It was found that while some theories can separate well-developed L- and H-mode data, they have little predictive value.

  1. Comparisons of Predicted Plasma Performance in ITER H-mode Plasmas with Various Mixes of External He

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2009-03-20

    Performance in H-mode DT plasmas in ITER with various choices of heating systems are predicted and compared. Combinations of external heating by Negative Ion Neutral Beam Injection (NNBI), Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF), and Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) are assumed. Scans with a range of physics assumptions about boundary temperatures in the edge pedestal, alpha ash transport, and toroidal momentum transport are used to indicate effects of uncertainties. Time-dependent integrated modeling with the PTRANSP code is used to predict profiles of heating, beam torque, and plasma profiles. The GLF23 model is used to predict temperature profiles. Either GLF23 or the assumption of a constant ratio for χø/χi is used to predict toroidal rotation profiles driven by the beam torques. Large differences for the core temperatures are predicted with different mixes of the external heating during the density and current ramp-up phase, but the profiles are similar during the flattop phase. With χø/χi = 0.5, the predicted toroidal rotation is relatively slow and the flow shear implied by the pressure, toroidal rotation, and neoclassical poloidal rotation are not sufficient to cause significant changes in the energy transport or steady state temperature profiles. The GLF23-predicted toroidal rotation is faster by a factor of six, and significant flow shear effects are predicted.

  2. A drift-magnetohydrodynamical fluid model of helical magnetic island equilibria in the pedestals of H-mode tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, R.; Waelbroeck, F. L.

    2010-06-15

    A drift-magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) fluid model is developed for an isolated, steady-state, helical magnetic island chain, embedded in the pedestal of a large aspect ratio, low-beta, circular cross section, H-mode tokamak plasma, to which an externally generated, multiharmonic, static magnetic perturbation whose amplitude is sufficiently large to fully relax the pedestal toroidal ion flow is applied. The model is based on a set of single helicity, reduced, drift-MHD fluid equations which take into account neoclassical poloidal and toroidal flow damping, the perturbed bootstrap current, diamagnetic flows, anomalous cross-field diffusion, average magnetic-field line curvature, and coupling to drift-acoustic waves. These equations are solved analytically in a number of different ordering regimes by means of a systematic expansion in small quantities. For the case of a freely rotating island chain, the main aims of the calculation are to determine the chain's phase velocity, and the sign and magnitude of the ion polarization term appearing in its Rutherford radial width evolution equation. For the case of a locked island chain, the main aims of the calculation are to determine the sign and magnitude of the polarization term.

  3. Attainment of quasi steady-state H-mode plasmas in the DIII-D tokomak

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdavi, M.A.; Kellman, A.G.; Gohil, P.; Brooks, N.; Burrell, K.H.; Groebner, R.J.; Haas, G.; Hill, D.; Jackson, G.; Janeschitz, G.

    1989-01-01

    We report the results of experiments on DIII-D where quasi steady-state H-mode plasma with low amplitude Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) were maintained for 5 seconds. Within one second from the onset of the H-mode, most plasma parameters reach their asymptotic values (/bar n//sub e/ approx. 7 /times/ 10/sup 13/ cm/sup /minus/3/, /tau//sub E/ approx. = 100 ms, Z/sub eff/ = 1.7) and the electron density and temperature profiles are no longer evolving. By this time, frequent ELMs and effective helium wall conditioning limit the rate of increase of /bar n//sub e/ (less than or equal to10% of the beam fueling rate) and maintain the total radiated power form impurities at a constant level. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  4. New fluctuation phenomena in the H-mode regime of PDX tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Slusher, R.E.; Surko, C.M.; Valley, J.F.; Crowley, T.; Mazzucato, E.; McGuire, K.

    1984-05-01

    A new kind of quasi-coherent fluctuation is observed near the edge of plasmas in the PDX tokamak during H-mode operation. (The H-mode occurs in neutral beam heated divertor plasmas and is characterized by improved energy containment as well as large density and temperature gradients near the plasma edge.) These fluctuations are evidenced as VUV and density fluctuation bursts at well-defined frequencies (..delta omega../..omega.. less than or equal to 0.1) in the frequency range between 50 and 180 kHz. They affect the edge temperature-density product, and therefore they may be important for understanding the relationship between the large edge density and temperature gradients and the improved energy confinement.

  5. Electron Gyro-scale Fluctuation Measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment H-mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D R; Lee, W; Mazzucato, E; Park, H K; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Levinton, F M; Luhmann, N C; Menard, J E

    2009-08-10

    A collective scattering system has measured electron gyro-scale fluctuations in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-mode plasmas to investigate electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. Observations and results pertaining to fluctuation measurements in ETGstable regimes, the toroidal field scaling of fluctuation amplitudes, the relation between between fluctuation amplitudes and transport quantities, and fluctuation magnitudes and k-spectra are presented. Collectively, the measurements provide insight and guidance for understanding ETG turbulence and anomalous electron thermal transport.

  6. Investigation of physical processes limiting plasma density in H-mode on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Maingi, R.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Jernigan, T.C.

    1996-12-01

    A series of experiments was conducted on the DIII-D tokamak to investigate the physical processes which limit density in high confinement mode (H-mode) discharges. The typical H-mode to low confinement mode (L-mode) transition limit at high density near the empirical Greenwald density limit was avoided by divertor pumping, which reduced divertor neutral pressure and prevented formation of a high density, intense radiation zone (MARFE) near the X-point. It was determined that the density decay time after pellet injection was independent of density relative to the Greenwald limit and increased non-linearly with the plasma current. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity in pellet-fueled plasmas was observed at all power levels, and often caused unacceptable confinement degradation, except when the neutral beam injected (NBI) power was {le} 3 MW. Formation of MARFEs on closed field lines was avoided with low safety factor (q) operation but was observed at high q, qualitatively consistent with theory. By using pellet fueling and optimizing discharge parameters to avoid each of these limits, an operational space was accessed in which density {approximately} 1.5 {times} Greenwald limit was achieved for 600 ms, and good H-mode confinement was maintained for 300 ms of the density flattop. More significantly, the density was successfully increased to the limit where a central radiative collapse was observed, the most fundamental density limit in tokamaks.

  7. Exploration of the Super H-mode regime on DIII-D and potential advantages for burning plasma devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, W. M.; Snyder, P. B.; Bortolon, A.; Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Loarte, A.; Leonard, A. W.; Meneghini, O.; Nazikian, R.; Osborne, T. H.; Petty, C. C.; Poli, F.

    2016-05-01

    A new high pedestal regime ("Super H-mode") has been predicted and accessed on DIII-D. Super H-mode was first achieved on DIII-D using a quiescent H-mode edge, enabling a smooth trajectory through pedestal parameter space. By exploiting Super H-mode, it has been possible to access high pedestal pressures at high normalized densities. While elimination of Edge localized modes (ELMs) is beneficial for Super H-mode, it may not be a requirement, as recent experiments have maintained high pedestals with ELMs triggered by lithium granule injection. Simulations using TGLF for core transport and the EPED model for the pedestal find that ITER can benefit from the improved performance associated with Super H-mode, with increased values of fusion power and gain possible. Similar studies demonstrate that the Super H-mode pedestal can be advantageous for a steady-state power plant, by providing a path to increasing the bootstrap current while simultaneously reducing the demands on the core physics performance.

  8. Exploration of the Super H-mode regime on DIII-D and potential advantages for burning plasma devices

    DOE PAGES

    Solomon, W. M.; Snyder, P. B.; Bortolon, A.; Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Loarte, A.; Leonard, A. W.; Meneghini, O.; et al

    2016-03-25

    In a new high pedestal regime ("Super H-mode") we predicted and accessed DIII-D. Super H-mode was first achieved on DIII-D using a quiescent H-mode edge, enabling a smooth trajectory through pedestal parameter space. By exploiting Super H-mode, it has been possible to access high pedestal pressures at high normalized densities. And while elimination of Edge localized modes (ELMs) is beneficial for Super H-mode, it may not be a requirement, as recent experiments have maintained high pedestals with ELMs triggered by lithium granule injection. Simulations using TGLF for core transport and the EPED model for the pedestal find that ITER canmore » benefit from the improved performance associated with Super H-mode, with increased values of fusion power and gain possible. In similar studies demonstrate that the Super H-mode pedestal can be advantageous for a steady-state power plant, by providing a path to increasing the bootstrap current while simultaneously reducing the demands on the core physics performance.« less

  9. Impact of localized gas injection on ICRF coupling and SOL parameters in JET-ILW H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerche, E.; Goniche, M.; Jacquet, P.; Van Eester, D.; Bobkov, V.; Colas, L.; Czarnecka, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Brix, M.; Crombe, K.; Graham, M.; Groth, M.; Monakhov, I.; Mathurin, T.; Matthews, G.; Meneses, L.; Noble, C.; Petrzilka, V.; Rimini, F.; Shaw, A.

    2015-08-01

    Recent JET-ILW [1,2] experiments reiterated the importance of tuning the plasma fuelling in order to optimize ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating in high power H-mode discharges. By fuelling the plasma from gas injection modules (GIMs) located in the mid-plane and on the top of the machine instead of adopting the more standardly used divertor GIMs, a considerable increase of the ICRF antenna coupling resistances was achieved with moderate gas injection rates (<1.5 × 1022 e/s). This effect is explained by an increase of the scrape-off-layer density in front of the antennas when mid-plane and top fuelling is used. By distributing the gas injection to optimize the coupling of all ICRF antenna arrays simultaneously, a substantial increase in the ICRF power capability and reliability was attained. Although similar core/pedestal plasma properties were observed for the different injection cases, the experiments indicate that the RF-induced impurity sources are reduced when switching from divertor to main chamber gas injection.

  10. Turbulent transport analysis of JET H-mode and hybrid plasmas using QuaLiKiz and Trapped Gyro Landau Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiocchi, B.; Garcia, J.; Beurskens, M.; Bourdelle, C.; Crisanti, F.; Giroud, C.; Hobirk, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Nunes, I.; Contributors, JET; EU-ITM ITER Scenario Modelling Group

    2015-03-01

    The physical transport processes at the basis of JET typical inductive H-mode scenarios and advanced hybrid regimes, with improved thermal confinement, are analyzed by means of some of the newest and more sophisticated quasi-linear transport models: trapped gyro Landau fluid (TGLF) and QuaLiKiz. The temporal evolution of JET pulses is modelled by CRONOS where the turbulent transport is modelled by either QuaLiKiz or TGLF. Both are first principle models with a more comprehensive physics than the models previously developed and therefore allow the analysis of the physics at the basis of the investigated scenarios. For H-modes, ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes are found to be dominant and the transport models are able to properly reproduce temperature profiles in self-consistent simulations. However, for hybrid regimes, in addition to ITG trapped electron modes (TEM) are also found to be important and different physical mechanisms for turbulence reduction play a decisive role. Whereas E × B flow shear and plasma geometry have a limited impact on turbulence, the presence of a large population of fast ions, quite important in low density regimes, can stabilize core turbulence mainly when the electromagnetic effects are taken into account. The TGLF transport model properly captures these mechanisms and correctly reproduces temperatures.

  11. Effect of Aspect Ratio on H-mode and ELM Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K. E.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Kriete, D. M.

    2015-11-01

    The H-mode confinement regime is achieved at near-unity aspect ratio (A < 1 . 2) in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment via high-field-side fueling and low edge recycling. Ohmic H-mode is attained in both limited and diverted magnetic topologies. This regime is characterized by: reduced Dα emissions; increased core rotation; increased central heating; formation of edge current and pressure pedestals; and measured energy confinement consistent with the ITER98pb(y,2) scaling. The H-mode power threshold, PLH , behaves quite differently at low- A when compared with high- A operations. PLH /PLH_ITPA 08 increases sharply as A is lowered and no difference in PLH for limited and diverted plasmas is observed at A ~ 1 . 2 . No minimum in PLH with density is observed. Some of these results are consistent with the FM3 model for the L-H transition. Two classes of ELMs have been observed. Small, Type III-like ELMs are present at low input power and have n <= 4 . At POH >>PLH , they transition to large, Type-I-like ELMs with intermediate 5 < n < 15 . The Type III ELM magnetic structures behave opposite that of high- A plasmas, with n much higher, presumably due to the naturally higher J / B peeling mode drive at low- A . Long-sought measurements of the Jedge (R , t) pedestal collapse during an ELM event show a complex, multimodal pedestal collapse and the subsequent ejection of a current-carrying filament. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  12. Interdigital H -mode drift-tube linac design with alternative phase focusing for muon linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otani, M.; Mibe, T.; Yoshida, M.; Hasegawa, K.; Kondo, Y.; Hayashizaki, N.; Iwashita, Y.; Iwata, Y.; Kitamura, R.; Saito, N.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed an interdigital H-mode (IH) drift-tube linac (DTL) design with an alternative phase focusing (APF) scheme for a muon linac, in order to measure the anomalous magnetic moment and electric dipole moment (EDM) of muons at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). The IH-DTL accelerates muons from β =v /c =0.08 to 0.28 at an operational frequency of 324 MHz. The output beam emittances are calculated as 0.315 π and 0.195 π mm mrad in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, which satisfies the experimental requirement.

  13. SPECIAL TOPIC: Global energy confinement H-mode database for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, J. P.; Cordey, J. G.; Thomsen, K.; Tanga, A.; DeBoo, J. C.; Schissel, D. P.; Taylor, T. S.; Kardaun, O. J. W. F.; Wagner, F.; Ryter, F.; Kaye, S. M.; Miura, Y.; Suzuki, N.; Mori, M.; Matsuda, T.; Tamai, H.; Takizuka, T.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    1992-02-01

    Describes the content of an H-mode confinement database that has been assembled for the ITER project. Data were collected from six machines of different sizes and shapes: ASDEX, DIII-D, JET, JFT-2M, PBX-M and PDX. A detailed description of the criteria used in the selection of the data and the definition of each of the variables is given. The authors also present an analysis of the conditions of the database, the scalings (power law and offset linear) of the data with both dimensional and dimensionless variables, and predictions of the expected confinement time for ITER

  14. Characterization of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified peptides by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using data-dependent acquisition: neutral loss-driven MS3 versus neutral loss-driven electron capture dissociation.

    PubMed

    Rauniyar, Navin; Stevens, Stanley M; Prokai-Tatrai, Katalin; Prokai, Laszlo

    2009-01-15

    Reactive oxygen species generated during oxidative stress can lead to unfavorable cellular consequences, predominantly due to formation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) during lipid peroxidation. Data-dependent and neutral loss (NL)-driven MS(3) acquisition have been reported for the identification of HNE adducts by mass spectrometry-based proteomics. However, the limitation associated with this method is the ambiguity in correct assignment of the HNE modification site when more than one candidate site is present as MS(3) is triggered on the neutral loss ion. We introduce NL-triggered electron capture dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (NL-ECD-MS/MS) for the characterization of HNE-modification sites in peptides. With this method performed using a hybrid linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer, ECD in the FTICR unit of the instrument is initiated on precursor ions of peptides showing the neutral loss of 156 Da corresponding to an HNE molecule in the prescan acquired via collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry in the linear ion trap. In addition to manifold advantages associated with the ECD method of backbone fragmentation, including extensive sequence fragments, ECD tends to retain the HNE group during MS/MS of the precursor ion, facilitating the correct localization of the modification site. The results also suggest that predisposition of a peptide molecular ion to lose HNE during collision-induced dissociation-based fragmentation is independent of its charge state (2+ or 3+). In addition, we have demonstrated that coupling of solid-phase enrichment of HNE-modified peptides facilitates the detection of this posttranslational modification by NL-driven strategies for low-abundance proteins that are susceptible to substoichiometric carbonylation during oxidative stress.

  15. Dependence of the L- to H-mode Power Threshold on Toroidal Rotation and the Link to Edge Turbulence Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, G; Gohil, P; Schlossberg, D; Boedo, J; Burrell, K; deGrassie, J; Groebner, R; Makowski, M; Moyer, R; Petty, C; Rhodes, T; Schmitz, L; Shafer, M; Solomon, W; Umansky, M; Wang, G; White, A; Xu, X

    2008-10-13

    The injected power required to induce a transition from L-mode to H-mode plasmas is found to depend strongly on the injected neutral beam torque and consequent plasma toroidal rotation. Edge turbulence and flows, measured near the outboard midplane of the plasma (0.85 < r/a < 1.0) on DIII-D with the high-sensitivity 2D beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system, likewise vary with rotation and suggest a causative connection. The L-H power threshold in plasmas with the ion {del}B drift away from the X-point decreases from 4-6 MW with co-current beam injection, to 2-3 MW with near zero net injected torque, and to <2 MW with counter injection. Plasmas with the ion {del}B drift towards the X-point exhibit a qualitatively similar though less pronounced power threshold dependence on rotation. 2D edge turbulence measurements with BES show an increasing poloidal flow shear as the L-H transition is approached in all conditions. At low rotation, the poloidal flow of turbulent eddies near the edge reverses prior to the L-H transition, generating a significant poloidal flow shear that exceeds the measured turbulence decorrelation rate. This increased poloidal turbulence velocity shear may facilitate the L-H transition. No such reversal is observed in high rotation plasmas. The poloidal turbulence velocity spectrum exhibits a transition from a Geodesic Acoustic Mode zonal flow to a higher-power, lower frequency, zero-mean-frequency zonal flow as rotation varies from co-current to balanced during a torque scan at constant injected neutral beam power, perhaps also facilitating the L-H transition. This reduced power threshold at lower toroidal rotation may benefit inherently low-rotation plasmas such as ITER.

  16. Microturbulent Drift Mode Stability before Internal Transport Barrier Formation in the Alcator C-Mod Radio Frequency Heated H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; W. Dorland; C.L. Fiore; P.T. Bonoli; M.J. Greenwald; J.E. Rice; J.A. Baumgaertel; T.S. Hahm; G.W. Hammett; K. Hill; D.C. McCune; D.R. Mikkelsen; G. Rewoldt

    2004-09-01

    H-mode experiments on Alcator C-Mod [I.H. Hutchinson, et al., Phys. Plasma 1 (1994) 1511] which exhibit an internal transport barrier (ITB), have been examined with gyrokinetic simulations, near the ITB onset time. Linear simulations support the picture of ion and electron temperature gradient (ITG, ETG) microturbulence driving high {chi}{sub i} and {chi}{sub e}, respectively, and that stable ITG correlates with reduced particle transport and improved ion thermal confinement on C-Mod. In the barrier region ITG is weakly unstable, with a critical temperature gradient higher than expected from standard models. Nonlinear calculations and the role of E x B shear suppression of turbulence outside the plasma core are discussed in light of recent profile measurements for the toroidal velocity. The gyrokinetic model benchmarks successfully against experiment in the plasma core.

  17. BURNING PLASMA PROJECTIONS USING DRIFT WAVE TRANSPORT MODELS AND SCALINGS FOR THE H-MODE PEDESTAL

    SciTech Connect

    KINSEY,JE; ONJUN,T; BATEMAN,G; KRITZ,A; PANKIN,A; STAEBLER,GM; WALTZ,RE

    2002-10-01

    OAK-B135 The GLF23 and Multi-Mode (MM95) transport models are used along with a model for the H-mode pedestal to predict the fusion performance for the ITER, FIRE, and IGNITOR tokamak designs. The drift-wave predictive transport models reproduce the core profiles in a wide variety of tokamak discharges, yet they differ significantly in their response to temperature gradient (stiffness). Recent gyro-kinetic simulations of ITG/TEM and ETG modes motivate the renormalization of the GLF23 model. The normalizing coefficients for the ITG/TEM modes are reduced by a factor of 3.7 while the ETG mode coefficient is increased by a factor of 4.8 in comparison with the original model. A pedestal temperature model is developed for type I ELMy H-mode plasmas based on ballooning mode stability and a theory-motivated scaling for the pedestal width. In this pedestal model, the pedestal density is proportional to the line-averaged density and the pedestal temperature is inversely related to the pedestal density.

  18. Steady-state ELM-suppressed H-modes from KSTAR to ITER and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in, Yongkyoon; Kwak, J. G.; KSTAR Team

    2014-10-01

    Long-pulse, steady-state high-performance plasma is not only an important mission in KSTAR, but also directly relevant to ITER. While demonstrating the pulse-length of more than 20 sec H-mode flat-top in 2013, KSTAR has been exploring various means to achieve and sustain steady-state, ELM-suppressed/mitigated H-modes using versatile in-vessel control coils (IVCC), ECCD/ECH, and/or SMBI. In particular, taking advantage of the versatile 3-rows of IVCC, KSTAR accomplished both n = 1 and n = 2 RMP-driven, ELM-suppressed regimes that lasted up to 4 sec so far (limited by the discharge pulse length, not by any physics constraints, and will be extended up to 10 sec in 2014.) We also found the use of n = 2 RMP has prevented a locked-mode from being disruptive (at least within the RMP phase). To cope with run-away electrons and/or off-normal events, a soft landing algorithm has been developed and confirmed capable of ramping down the plasma current safely. The enhanced understanding and demonstration of steady-state, high-performance plasmas in KSTAR will elevate the level of confidence about the success of ITER and beyond. Supported by Ministry of Science, ICT, and Future Planning in Korea.

  19. Gyrokinetic Calculations of Microinstabilities and Transport During RF H-Modes on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; C. Fiore; P. Bonoli; C. Bourdelle; R. Budny; W.D. Dorland; D. Ernst; G. Hammett; D. Mikkelsen; J. Rice; S. Wukitch

    2002-06-18

    Physics understanding for the experimental improvement of particle and energy confinement is being advanced through massively parallel calculations of microturbulence for simulated plasma conditions. The ultimate goal, an experimentally validated, global, non-local, fully nonlinear calculation of plasma microturbulence is still not within reach, but extraordinary progress has been achieved in understanding microturbulence, driving forces and the plasma response in recent years. In this paper we discuss gyrokinetic simulations of plasma turbulence being carried out to examine a reproducible, H-mode, RF heated experiment on the Alcator CMOD tokamak3, which exhibits an internal transport barrier (ITB). This off axis RF case represents the early phase of a very interesting dual frequency RF experiment, which shows density control with central RF heating later in the discharge. The ITB exhibits steep, spontaneous density peaking: a reduction in particle transport occurring without a central particle source. Since the central temperature is maintained while the central density is increasing, this also suggests a thermal transport barrier exists. TRANSP analysis shows that ceff drops inside the ITB. Sawtooth heat pulse analysis also shows a localized thermal transport barrier. For this ICRF EDA H-mode, the minority resonance is at r/a * 0.5 on the high field side. There is a normal shear profile, with q monotonic.

  20. Status of the COMPASS tokamak and characterization of the first H-mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pánek, R.; Adámek, J.; Aftanas, M.; Bílková, P.; Böhm, P.; Brochard, F.; Cahyna, P.; Cavalier, J.; Dejarnac, R.; Dimitrova, M.; Grover, O.; Harrison, J.; Háček, P.; Havlíček, J.; Havránek, A.; Horáček, J.; Hron, M.; Imríšek, M.; Janky, F.; Kirk, A.; Komm, M.; Kovařík, K.; Krbec, J.; Kripner, L.; Markovič, T.; Mitošinková, K.; Mlynář, J.; Naydenkova, D.; Peterka, M.; Seidl, J.; Stöckel, J.; Štefániková, E.; Tomeš, M.; Urban, J.; Vondráček, P.; Varavin, M.; Varju, J.; Weinzettl, V.; Zajac, J.; the COMPASS team

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the status of the COMPASS tokamak, its comprehensive diagnostic equipment and plasma scenarios as a baseline for the future studies. The former COMPASS-D tokamak was in operation at UKAEA Culham, UK in 1992–2002. Later, the device was transferred to the Institute of Plasma Physics of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (IPP AS CR), where it was installed during 2006–2011. Since 2012 the device has been in a full operation with Type-I and Type-III ELMy H-modes as a base scenario. This enables together with the ITER-like plasma shape and flexible NBI heating system (two injectors enabling co- or balanced injection) to perform ITER relevant studies in different parameter range to the other tokamaks (ASDEX-Upgrade, DIII-D, JET) and to contribute to the ITER scallings. In addition to the description of the device, current status and the main diagnostic equipment, the paper focuses on the characterization of the Ohmic as well as NBI-assisted H-modes. Moreover, Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) are categorized based on their frequency dependence on power density flowing across separatrix. The filamentary structure of ELMs is studied and the parallel heat flux in individual filaments is measured by probes on the outer mid-plane and in the divertor. The measurements are supported by observation of ELM and inter-ELM filaments by an ultra-fast camera.

  1. Particle confinement of pellet-fuelled H-mode plasmas in the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valovič, M.; Axon, K.; Garzotti, L.; Saarelma, S.; Thyagaraja, A.; Akers, R.; Gurl, C.; Kirk, A.; Lloyd, B.; Maddison, G. P.; Patel, A.; Shibaev, S.; Scannell, R.; Taylor, D.; Walsh, M.; MAST Team

    2008-07-01

    This paper quantifies the particle confinement of pellet-fuelled plasmas in the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST). The dataset is restricted mostly to neutral beam heated plasmas and to shallow pellets launched from the high field side. It is shown that the pellet deposition can be explained only by invoking the ∇B drift of the pellet ablatant. The pellet creates a zone with positive density gradient and increased temperature gradient. Simulations show that these changes could increase the level of micro-turbulence and thus enhance further the penetration of pellet-deposited particles towards the core. Post-pellet dynamics of the density profile is characterised by the pellet retention time τpel. It is shown that τpel correlates with the status of the edge transport barrier (L-mode or H-mode) and decreases rapidly for pellet deposition radius rpel approaching the plasma edge. For ELMy H-mode and ITER-like pellets, rpel ≈ 0.8a, the pellet retention time is about 20% of the energy confinement time. The fuelling requirement by the pellets for ITER is discussed.

  2. Divertor heat loads in RMP ELM controlled H-mode plasmas on DIII-D*

    SciTech Connect

    Jakubowski, M; Lasnier, C; Schmitz, O; Evans, T; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Watkins, J; Eich, T; Moyer, R; Wolf, R; Baylor, L; Boedo, J; Burrell, K; Frerichs, H; deGrassie, J; Gohil, P; Joseph, I; Lehnen, M; Leonard, A; Petty, C; Pinsker, R; Reiter, D; Rhodes, T; Samm, U; Snyder, P; Stoschus, H; Osborne, T; Unterberg, B; West, W

    2008-10-13

    In this paper the manipulation of power deposition on divertor targets at DIII-D by application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) is analyzed. It has been found that heat transport shows a different reaction to the applied RMP depending on the plasma pedestal collisionality. At pedestal electron collisionality above 0.5 the heat flux during the ELM suppressed phase is of the same order as the inter-ELM in the non-RMP phase. Below this collisionality value we observe a slight increase of the total power flux to the divertor. This can be caused by much more negative potential at the divertor surface due to hot electrons reaching the divertor surface from the pedestal area and/or so called pump out effect. In the second part we discuss modification of ELM behavior due to the RMP. It is shown, that the width of the deposition pattern in ELMy H-mode depends linearly on the ELM deposited energy, whereas in the RMP phase of the discharge those patterns seem to be controlled by the externally induced magnetic perturbation. D{sub 2} pellets injected into the plasma bulk during ELM-free RMP H-mode lead in some cases to a short term small transients, which have very similar properties to ELMs in the initial RMP-on phase.

  3. Resonant-magnetic-perturbation-induced plasma transport in H-mode pedestals

    SciTech Connect

    Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.; Cole, A. J.

    2012-11-15

    Plasma toroidal rotation reduces reconnection of externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields {delta}B on rational (q = m/n) magnetic flux surfaces. Hence, it causes radial perturbations {delta}B{sub {rho}m/n} to be small there, and thus inhibits magnetic island formation and stochasticity in the edge of high (H-) mode confinement tokamak plasmas. However, electron collisional damping combined with the spatial magnetic flutter {delta}B{sub {rho}m/n} induced by RMPs in the vicinity of rational surfaces causes a radial electron heat diffusivity in which {chi}{sub e Parallel-To }{sup eff}{approx}(v{sub Te}{sup 2}/{nu}{sub e})/(1+x{sup 2}/{delta}{sub Parallel-To }{sup 2}) is an effective parallel electron thermal diffusivity. These effects are reduced by magnetic shear effects at a distance x from rational surfaces for |x|>{delta}{sub Parallel-To} but amplified for {delta}B-caret{sub {rho}m/n}(x)>{delta}B-caret{sub {rho}m/n}(0). A kinetic, toroidal model of these RMP-flutter-induced plasma transport effects is developed and compared to a previously developed cylindrical model. The RMP-induced increases in plasma transport can be large enough to reduce plasma gradients in H-mode pedestals. Thus, they may contribute to suppressing edge localized modes in tokamak plasmas.

  4. Studies of turbulence and transport in Alcator C-Mod H-mode plasmas with phase contrast imaging and comparisons with GYRO

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.; Porkolab, M.; Edlund, E. M.; Rost, J. C.; Fiore, C. L.; Greenwald, M.; Lin, Y.; Tsujii, N.; Wukitch, S. J.; Mikkelsen, D. R.

    2009-01-15

    Recent advances in gyrokinetic simulation of core turbulence and associated transport requires an intensified experimental effort to validate these codes using state of the art synthetic diagnostics to compare simulations with experimental data. A phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic [M. Porkolab, J. C. Rost, N. Basse et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 34, 229 (2006)] is used to study H-mode plasmas in Alcator C-Mod [M. Greenwald, D. Andelin, N. Basse et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S109 (2005)]. The PCI system is capable of measuring density fluctuations with high temporal (2 kHz-5 MHz) and wavenumber (0.5-55 cm{sup -1}) resolution. Recent upgrades have enabled PCI to localize the short wavelength turbulence in the electron temperature gradient range and resolve the direction of propagation (i.e., electron versus ion diamagnetic direction) of the longer wavelength turbulence in the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron mode range. The studies focus on plasmas before and during internal transport barrier formation in an enhanced D{sub {alpha}} H-mode plasma assisted with ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating. Nonlinear GYRO simulations have also been performed [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 045001 (2003)] and the predicted fluctuation is compared against experimental measurements through a synthetic PCI diagnostic method. The simulated fluctuations from GYRO agree with experimental measurements in the ITG regime. GYRO also shows good agreement in transport predictions with experimental measurements after reducing the ion temperature gradient ({approx}15%) and adding ExB shear suppression, all within the experimental uncertainty.

  5. Helium ELMy H-modes in Alcator C-Mod in Support of ITER Helium Operating Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, C. E.; Wolfe, S. M.; Chilenski, M. A.; Hughes, J. W.; Lin, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Wukitch, S. J.; C-Mod Team

    2015-11-01

    ITER will operate helium majority plasmas in its earlier phases to shakedown the facility and provide plasmas in both L-mode and H-mode for commissioning and preparation for DT burning plasma operation. Part of this activity is to produce ELMy H-modes to test ELM mitigation schemes and observe the ELM impacts on the plasma facing components. It is of interest to characterize helium ELMy H-modes on present experiments to provide some basis to project to ITER and anticipate the plasma performance and ability to obtain H-modes with sufficient performance. ELMy H-mode is accessed in C-Mod by using LSN with an elongation of about 1.55, and with high lower triangularity and low upper triangularity. These regimes were produced with 1.5-4.0 MW of ICRF heating, and with H-mode line average densities of 2.0-3.2x1020 /m3, producing higher frequency repetitive to large infrequent ELMs, respectively. The infrequent ELM regime showed a cross between EDA and ELMy H-mode, with the EDA signature of a quasi-coherent mode at about 200 kHz. Tungsten laser blow-off was done. The pedestal features, energy confinement, ELM character, L-H threshold (1.7-2.5 MW) and W confinement will be discussed. Comparisons with deuterium ELMy H-modes will be made. Work supported by DOE DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  6. Observation of a high-confinement regime in a tokamak plasma with ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, K.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Wagner, F.; Wesner, F.; Bäumler, J.; Becker, G.; Bosch, H. S.; Brambilla, M.; Braun, F.; Brocken, H.; Eberhagen, A.; Fritsch, R.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; v. Gierke, G.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Hofmann, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Izvozchikov, A.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Keilhacker, M.; Klüber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lisitano, G.; van Mark, E.; Mast, F.; Mayer, H. M.; McCormick, K.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Müller, E. R.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Puri, S.; Rapp, H.; Röhr, H.; Ryter, F.; Schmitter, K.-H.; Schneider, F.; Setzensack, C.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Söldner, F.; Speth, E.; Steuer, K.-H.; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Zasche, D.

    1987-01-01

    The H mode in ion cyclotron-resonance-heated plasmas has been investigated with and without additional neutral beam injection. Ion cyclotron-resonance heating can cause the transition into a high-confinement regime (H mode) in combination with beam heating. The H mode, however, has also been realized-for the first time-with ion cyclotron-resonance heating alone in the D (H)-hydrogen minority scheme at an absorbed rf power of 1.1 MW.

  7. Multi-species particle transport in GYRO simulations of low-collisionality, peaked-density H-mode plasmas in C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, D. R.; Greenwald, M.; Waltz, R.; Candy, J.

    2009-11-01

    Experimental results from Alcator C-Mod have confirmed earlier AUG and JET findings that spontaneous peaking of the density profile in H-mode plasmas depends on collisionality. Previously reported nonlinear, 'full-radius' GYRO simulations [1] of low-collisionality, peaked-density H-mode plasmas in C-Mod generated a particle pinch that was produced exclusively by higher-k modes. Nonlinear simulations of AUG have a similar character [2], and recent detailed linear analyses [2,3] suggest that density peaking may be common in low collisionality plasmas. Here we increase the number of ion species in the simulations to determine whether impurity pinches are also expected, and whether the degree of density peaking is predicted to differ for the three hydrogen isotopes. These simulations include experimentally relevant levels of several impurities, and a range of H/D and D/T mixes.[4pt] [1] D.R. Mikkelsen, et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, (2007) No. 16, 221, NP8.71 [0pt] [2] C. Angioni, et al., Phys. Plasmas 16 (2009) 060702 [0pt] [3] M. Maslov, et al., Nucl. Fusion 49 (2009) 075037

  8. H-mode transitions and limit cycle oscillations from mean field transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, Gary M.; Groebner, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    The mean field toroidal and parallel momentum transport equations will be shown to admit both one-step transitions to suppressed transport (L/H) and limit cycle oscillations (LCO). Both types of transitions are driven by the suppression of turbulence by the mean field ExB velocity shear. Using experimental data to evaluate the coefficients of a reduced transport model, the observed frequency of the LCO can be matched. The increase in the H-mode power threshold above and below a minimum density agrees with the trends in the model. Both leading and lagging phase relations between the turbulent density fluctuation amplitude and the ExB velocity shear can occur depending on the evolution of the linear growth rate of the turbulence. The transport solutions match the initial phase of the L/H transition where the poloidal and ExB velocities are observed to change, and the density fluctuations drop, faster than the diamagnetic velocity.

  9. Characteristics of edge pedestals in LHW and NBI heated H-mode plasmas on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Q.; Wang, T.; Liang, Y.; Sun, Y.; Chen, H.; Xiao, S.; Han, X.; Hu, A.; Hsieh, C.; Zhou, H.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, T.; Gong, X.; Hu, L.; Liu, F.; Hu, C.; Gao, X.; Wan, B.; the EAST Team

    2016-10-01

    By using the recently developed Thomson scattering diagnostic, the pedestal structure of the H-mode with neutral beam injection (NBI) or/and lower hybrid wave (LHW) heating on EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) is analyzed in detail. We find that a higher ratio of the power of the NBI to the total power of the NBI and the lower hybrid wave (LHW) will produce a large and regular different edge-localized mode (ELM), and a lower ratio will produce a small and irregular ELM. The experiments show that the mean pedestal width has good correlation with β \\text{p,\\text{ped}}0.5 , The pedestal width appears to be wider than that on other similar machines, which could be due to lithium coating. However, it is difficult to draw any conclusion of correlation between ρ * and the pedestal width for limited ρ * variation and scattered distribution. It is also found that T e/\

  10. ELM Suppression in Low Edge Collisionality H-Mode Discharges Using n=3 Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, K H; Evans, T E; Doyle, E J; Fenstermacher, M E; Groebner, R J; Leonard, A W; Moyer, R A; Osborne, T H; Schaffer, M J; Snyder, P B; Thomas, P R; West, W P; Boedo, J A; Garofalo, A M; Gohil, P; Jackson, G L; La Haye, R J; Lasnier, C J; Reimerdes, H; Rhodes, T L; Scoville, J T; Solomon, W M; Thomas, D M; Wang, G; Watkins, J G; Zeng, L

    2005-07-11

    Using resonant magnetic perturbations with toroidal mode number n = 3, we have produced H-mode discharges without edge localized modes (ELMs) which run with constant density and radiated power for periods up to about 2550 ms (17 energy confinement times). These ELM suppression results are achieved at pedestal collisionalities close to those desired for next step burning plasma experiments such as ITER and provide a means of eliminating the rapid erosion of divertor components in such machines which could be caused by giant ELMs. The ELM suppression is due to an enhancement in the edge particle transport which reduces the edge pressure gradient and pedestal current density below the threshold for peeling-ballooning modes. These n = 3 magnetic perturbations provide a means of active control of edge plasma transport.

  11. Physics of the L-mode to H-mode transition in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, K.H.; Carlstrom, T.N.; Gohil, P.; Groebner, R.J.; Kim, J.; Osborne, T.H.; St. John, H.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Doyle, E.J.; Moyer, R.A.; Rettig, C.L.; Peebles, W.A.; Rhodes, T.L.; Finkenthal, D.; Hillis, D.L.; Wade, M.R.; Matsumoto, H.; Watkins, J.G.

    1992-07-01

    Combined theoretical and experimental work has resulted in the creation of a paradigm which has allowed semi-quantitative understanding of the edge confinement improvement that occurs in the H-mode. Shear in the E {times} B flow of the fluctuations in the plasma edge can lead to decorrelation of the fluctuations, decreased radial correlation lengths and reduced turbulent transport. Changes in the radial electric field, the density fluctuations and the edge transport consistent with shear stabilization of turbulence have been seen in several tokamaks. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the most recent data in the light of the basic paradigm of electric field shear stabilization and to critically compare the experimental results with various theories.

  12. LETTER: Scaling law for effective heat diffusivity in ELMy H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, G.

    2004-11-01

    Transport simulations of high density scenarios of ITER and other reactor-grade devices require a scaling law for the effective heat diffusivity, χ, in the ELMy H-mode regime. A comprehensive empirical scaling, χH98, compatible with the ITER reference scaling, ITERH-98P(y, 2), for the thermal energy confinement time has been set up. It follows from a power law ansatz for χ and integration of the single-fluid energy equation and recovers all the exponents of the global confinement law. The dependences on temperature and temperature gradient are consistent with the power degradation of confinement and the experimental χ profiles. The χH98 scaling is validated by JET, DIII-D, ASDEX Upgrade and ASDEX discharges covering a wide parameter range. Simulations of the inductive scenario of ITER with χH98 yield an energy confinement time which agrees with the global scaling prediction.

  13. E→H mode transition density and power in two types of inductively coupled plasma configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Du, Yin-chang; Zhang, Xiao; Zheng, Zhe; Liu, Yu; Xu, Liang; Wang, Pi; Cao, Jin-xiang

    2014-07-15

    E → H transition power and density were investigated at various argon pressures in inductively coupled plasma (ICP) in a cylindrical interlaid chamber. The transition power versus the pressure shows a minimum transition power at 4 Pa (ν/ω=1) for argon. Then the transition density hardly changes at low pressures (ν/ω≪1), but it increases clearly when argon pressure exceeds an appropriate value. In addition, both the transition power and transition density are lower in the re-entrant configuration of ICP compared with that in the cylindrical configuration of ICP. The result may be caused from the decrease of stochastic heating in the re-entrant configuration of ICP. This work is useful to understand E → H mode transition and control the transition points in real plasma processes.

  14. Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Rognlien, T. D.; Hollmann, E. M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, Ezekial A

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

  15. Multi-fluid transport code modeling of time-dependent recycling in ELMy H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Pigarov, A. Yu.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Hollmann, E. M.; Rognlien, T. D.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, E.

    2014-06-15

    Simulations of a high-confinement-mode (H-mode) tokamak discharge with infrequent giant type-I ELMs are performed by the multi-fluid, multi-species, two-dimensional transport code UEDGE-MB, which incorporates the Macro-Blob approach for intermittent non-diffusive transport due to filamentary coherent structures observed during the Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) and simple time-dependent multi-parametric models for cross-field plasma transport coefficients and working gas inventory in material surfaces. Temporal evolutions of pedestal plasma profiles, divertor recycling, and wall inventory in a sequence of ELMs are studied and compared to the experimental time-dependent data. Short- and long-time-scale variations of the pedestal and divertor plasmas where the ELM is described as a sequence of macro-blobs are discussed. It is shown that the ELM recovery includes the phase of relatively dense and cold post-ELM divertor plasma evolving on a several ms scale, which is set by the transport properties of H-mode barrier. The global gas balance in the discharge is also analyzed. The calculated rates of working gas deposition during each ELM and wall outgassing between ELMs are compared to the ELM particle losses from the pedestal and neutral-beam-injection fueling rate, correspondingly. A sensitivity study of the pedestal and divertor plasmas to model assumptions for gas deposition and release on material surfaces is presented. The performed simulations show that the dynamics of pedestal particle inventory is dominated by the transient intense gas deposition into the wall during each ELM followed by continuous gas release between ELMs at roughly a constant rate.

  16. Development of ITER 15 MA ELMy H-mode Inductive Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Kessel, C. E.; Campbell, D.; Gribov, Y.; Saibene, G.; Ambrosino, G.; Casper, T.; Cavinato, M.; Fujieda, H.; Hawryluk, R.; Horton, L. D.; Kavin, A.; Kharyrutdinov, R.; Koechl, F.; Leuer, J.; Loarte, A.; Lomas, P. J.; Luce, T.; Lukash, V.; Mattei, M.; Nunes, I.; Parail, V.; Polevoi, A.; Portone, A.; Sartori, R.; Sips, A. C.C.; Thomas, P. R.; Welander, A.; Wesley, J.

    2008-10-16

    The poloidal field (PF) coil system on ITER, which provides both feedforward and feedback control of plasma position, shape, and current, is a critical element for achieving mission performance. Analysis of PF capabilities has focused on the 15 MA Q = 10 scenario with a 300-500 s flattop burn phase. The operating space available for the 15 MA ELMy H-mode plasma discharges in ITER and upgrades to the PF coils or associated systems to establish confidence that ITER mission objectives can be reached have been identified. Time dependent self-consistent free-boundary calculations were performed to examine the impact of plasma variability, discharge programming, and plasma disturbances. Based on these calculations a new reference scenario was developed based upon a large bore initial plasma, early divertor transition, low level heating in L-mode, and a late H-mode onset. Equilibrium analyses for this scenario indicate that the original PF coil limitations do not allow low li (<0.8) operation or lower flux states, and the flattop burn durations were predicted to be less than the desired 400 s. This finding motivates the expansion of the operating space, considering several upgrade options to the PF coils. Analysis was also carried out to examine the feedback current reserve required in the CS and PF coils during a series of disturbances and a feasibility assessment of the 17 MA scenario was undertaken. Results of the studies show that the new scenario and modified PF system will allow a wide range of 15 MA 300-500 s operation and more limited but finite 17 MA operation.

  17. Advancing the Physics Basis of Quiescent H-mode through Exploration of ITER Relevant Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Loarte, A.; McKee, G. R.; Nazikian, R.; Snyder, B. P.

    2014-09-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have overcome a long-standing limitation in accessing quiescent H-mode (QH-mode), a high confinement state of the plasma that does not exhibit the explosive instabilities associated with edge localized modes (ELMs). In the past, QH-mode was associated with low density operation, but has now been extended to high normalized densities compatible with operation envisioned for ITER. Through the use of strong shaping, QH-mode plasmas have been maintained at high densities, both absolute (ηe ≈ 7 × 1019 m—3) and normalized Greenwald fraction (ηe/ηG > 0:7) . In these plasmas, the pedestal can evolve to very high pressures and current as the density is increased. Calculations of the pedestal height and width from the EPED model are quantitatively consistent with the experimental observed evolution with density. The comparison of the dependence of the maximum density threshold for QH-mode with plasma shape help validate the underlying theoretical peeling-ballooning models describing ELM stability. High density QH-mode operation with strong shaping has allowed stable access to a previously predicted regime of very high pedestal dubbed \\Super H-mode". In general, QH-mode is found to achieve ELM-stable operation while maintaining adequate impurity exhaust, due to the enhanced impurity transport from an edge harmonic oscillation, thought to be a saturated kink- peeling mode driven by rotation shear. In addition, the impurity confinement time is not affected by rotation, even though the energy confinement time and measured E Χ B shear is observed to increase at low toroidal rotation. Together with demonstrations of high beta, high confinement and low q95 for many energy confinement times, these results suggest QH-mode as a potentially attractive operating scenario for ITER's Q=10 mission.

  18. Stability of Microturbulent Drift Modes during Internal Transport Barrier Formation in the Alcator C-Mod Radio Frequency Heated H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; C.L. Fiore; W. Dorland; D.R. Mikkelsen; G. Rewoldt; P.T. Bonoli; D.R. Ernst; J.E. Rice; S.J. Wukitch

    2003-11-20

    Recent H-mode experiments on Alcator C-Mod [I.H. Hutchinson, et al., Phys. Plasmas 1 (1994) 1511] which exhibit an internal transport barrier (ITB), have been examined with flux tube geometry gyrokinetic simulations, using the massively parallel code GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther, G. Rewoldt, and W.M. Tang, Comput. Phys. Commun. 88 (1995) 128]. The simulations support the picture of ion/electron temperature gradient (ITG/ETG) microturbulence driving high xi/ xe and that suppressed ITG causes reduced particle transport and improved ci on C-Mod. Nonlinear calculations for C-Mod confirm initial linear simulations, which predicted ITG stability in the barrier region just before ITB formation, without invoking E x B shear suppression of turbulence. Nonlinear fluxes are compared to experiment, which both show low heat transport in the ITB and higher transport within and outside of the barrier region.

  19. Comparative analysis of core heat transport of JET high density H-mode plasmas in carbon wall and ITER-like wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Tae; Romanelli, M.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Koskela, T.; Conboy, J.; Giroud, C.; Maddison, G.; Joffrin, E.; contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    A consistent deterioration of global confinement in H-mode experiments has been observed in JET [1] following the replacement of all carbon plasma facing components (PFCs) with an all metal (‘ITER-like’) wall (ILW). This has been correlated to the observed degradation of the pedestal confinement, as lower electron temperature (Te) values are routinely measured at the top of the edge barrier region. A comparative investigation of core heat transport in JET-ILW and JET-CW (carbon wall) discharges has been performed, to assess whether core confinement has also been affected by the wall change. The results presented here have been obtained by analysing a set of discharges consisting of high density JET-ILW H-mode plasmas and comparing them against their counterpart discharges in JET-CW having similar global operational parameters. The set contains 10 baseline ({βN}=1.5∼ 2 ) discharge-pairs with 2.7 T toroidal magnetic field, 2.5 MA plasma current, and 14 to 17 MW of neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Based on a Te profile analysis using high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) data, the Te profile peaking (i.e. core Te (ρ = 0.3) / edge Te (ρ = 0.7)) is found to be similar, and weakly dependent on edge Te, for both JET-ILW and JET-CW discharges. When ILW discharges are seeded with N2, core and edge Te both increase to maintain a similar peaking factor. The change in core confinement is addressed with interpretative TRANSP simulations. It is found that JET-ILW H-mode plasmas have higher NBI power deposition to electrons and lower NBI power deposition to ions as compared to the JET-CW counterparts. This is an effect of the lower electron temperature at the top of the pedestal. As a result, the core electron energy confinement time is reduced in JET-ILW discharges, but the core ion energy confinement time is not decreased. Overall, the core energy confinement is found to be the same in the JET-ILW discharges compared to the JET-CW counterparts.

  20. Projected profile similarity in gyrokinetic simulations of Bohm and gyro-Bohm scaled DIII-D L and H modes

    SciTech Connect

    Waltz, R. E.; Candy, J.; Petty, C. C.

    2006-07-15

    Global gyrokinetic simulations of DIII-D [M. A. Mahdavi and J. L. Luxon, in 'DIII-D Tokamak Special Issue', Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 2 (2005)] L- and H-mode dimensionally similar discharge pairs are treated in detail. The simulations confirm the Bohm scaling of the well-matched L-mode pair. The paradoxical but experimentally apparent gyro-Bohm scaling of the H-mode pair at larger relative gyroradius (rho-star) and lower transport levels is due to poor profile similarity. Simulations of projected experimental plasma profiles with perfect similarity show both the L- and H-mode pairs to have Bohm scaling. A {rho}{sub *} stabilization rule for predicting the breakdown of gyro-Bohm scaling from simulations of a single discharge is presented.

  1. Transport and Deposition of 13c From Methane Injection into Detached H-Mode Plasmas in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Wampler, W R; McLean, A G; Allen, S L; Brooks, N H; Elder, J D; Fenstermacher, M E; Groth, M; Stangeby, P C; West, W P; Whyte, D G

    2006-06-01

    Experiments are described which examine the transport and deposition of carbon entering the main plasma scrape-off layer in DIII-D. {sup 13}CH{sub 4} was injected from a toroidally symmetric source into the crown of lower single-null detached ELMy H-mode plasmas. {sup 13}C deposition, mapped by nuclear reaction analysis of tiles, was high at the inner divertor but absent at the outer divertor, as found previously for low density L-mode plasmas. This asymmetry indicates that ionized carbon is swept towards the inner divertor by a fast flow in the scrape-off layer. In the private flux region between inner and outer strike points, carbon deposition was low for L-mode but high for the H-mode plasmas. OEDGE modeling reproduces observed deposition patterns and indicates that neutral carbon dominates deposition in the divertor from detached H-mode plasmas.

  2. Investigation of EBW Thermal Emission and Mode Conversion Physics in H-Mode Plasmas on NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Diem, S J; Efthimion, P C; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Phillips, C K; Caughman, J B; Wilgen, J B; Harvey, R W; Preinhaelter, J; Urban, J; Sabbagh, S A

    2008-03-20

    High β plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operate in the overdense regime, allowing the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) to propagate and be strongly absorbed/emitted at the electron cyclotron resonances. As such, EBWs may provide local electron heating and current drive. For these applications, efficient coupling between the EBWs and electromagnetic waves outside the plasma is needed. Thermal EBW emission (EBE) measurements, via oblique B-X-O double mode conversion, have been used to determine the EBW transmission efficiency for a wide range of plasma conditions on NSTX. Initial EBE measurements in H-mode plasmas exhibited strong emission before the L-H transition, but the emission rapidly decayed after the transition. EBE simulations show that collisional damping of the EBW prior to the mode conversion (MC) layer can significantly reduce the measured EBE for Te < 20 eV, explaining the observations. Lithium evaporation was used to reduce EBE collisional damping near the MC layer. As a result, the measured B-X-O transmission efficiency increased from < 10% (no Li) to 60% (with Li), consistent with EBE simulations.

  3. OEDGE Modeling of the DIII-D H-Mode 13CH4 Puffing Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J D; McLean, A G; Stangeby, P C; Allen, S L; Boedo, J C; Bray, B D; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Groth, M; Leonard, A W; Reiter, D; Rudakov, D L; Wampler, W R; Watkins, J G; West, W P; Whyte, D G

    2006-06-01

    Use of carbon in tokamaks leads to a serious tritium retention issue due to co-deposition. To further investigate the processes involved, a detached ELMy H-mode (6.5 MW NBI) experiment was performed on DIII-D in which {sup 13}CH{sub 4} was puffed into the main vessel through the toroidally symmetric pumping plenum at the top of lower single-null discharges. Subsequently, the {sup 13}C content of tiles taken from the vessel wall was measured. The interpretive OEDGE code was used to model the results. The {sup 13}C deposition pattern could be reproduced, in general shape and magnitude, by assuming in the code the existence of a parallel flow and a radial pinch in the scrape-off layer. Parallel flows of Mach {approx} 0.3 toward the inner divertor and a radial pinch {approx}10 to 20 m/s (+ R-direction) were found to yield {sup 13}C deposition comparable to the experiment.

  4. Structure, Stability and ELM Dynamics of the H-Mode Pedestal in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M E; Leonard, A W; Osborne, T H; Snyder, P B; Thomas, D M; Boedo, J A; Casper, T A; Colchin, R J; Groebner, R J; Groth, M; Kempenaars, M H; Loarte, A; Saibene, G; VanZeeland, M A; Zeng, L; Xu, X Q

    2004-10-13

    Experiments are described that have increased understanding of the transport and stability physics that set the H-mode edge pedestal width and height, determine the onset of Type-I edge localized modes (ELMs), and produce the nonlinear dynamics of the ELM perturbation in the pedestal and scrape-off layer (SOL). Predictive models now exist for the n{sub e} pedestal profile and the p{sub e} height at the onset of Type-I ELMs, and progress has been made toward predictive models of the T{sub e} pedestal width and nonlinear ELM evolution. Similarity experiments between DIII-D and JET suggested that neutral penetration physics dominates in the relationship between the width and height of the n{sub e} pedestal while plasma physics dominates in setting the T{sub e} pedestal width. Measured pedestal conditions including edge current at ELM onset agree with intermediate-n peeling-ballooning (P-B) stability predictions. Midplane ELM dynamics data show the predicted (P-B) structure at ELM onset, large rapid variations of the SOL parameters, and fast radial propagation in later phases, similar to features in nonlinear ELM simulations.

  5. Rotational shear effects on edge harmonic oscillations in DIII-D quiescent H-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Burrell, K. H.; Ferraro, N. M.; Osborne, T. H.; Austin, M. E.; Garofalo, A. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Kramer, G. J.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; McKee, G. R.; Muscatello, C. M.; Nazikian, R.; Ren, X.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, W. M.; Tobias, B. J.; Yan, Z.

    2016-07-01

    In the quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) regime, edge harmonic oscillations (EHOs) play an important role in avoiding transient edge localized mode (ELM) power fluxes by providing benign and continuous edge particle transport. A detailed theoretical, experimental and modeling comparison has been made of low-n (n  ⩽  5) EHO in DIII-D QH-mode plasmas. The calculated linear eigenmode structure from the extended magentoohydrodynamics (MHD) code M3D-C1 matches closely the coherent EHO properties from external magnetics data and internal measurements using the ECE, BES, ECE-Imaging and microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) diagnostics, as well as the kink/peeling mode properties found by the ideal MHD code ELITE. Numerical investigations indicate that the low-n EHO-like solutions from M3D-C1 are destabilized by rotation and/or rotational shear while high-n modes are stabilized. This effect is independent of the rotation direction, suggesting that EHOs can be destabilized in principle with rotation in either direction. The modeling results are consistent with observations of EHO, support the proposed theory of the EHO as a low-n kink/peeling mode destabilized by edge E  ×  B rotational shear, and improve our understanding and confidence in creating and sustaining QH-mode in present and future devices.

  6. Quiescent H-Mode 3D MHD Free-Boundary Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. Anthony; Graves, Jonathan P.; Duval, Basil P.; Porte, Laurie; Sauter, Olivier; Tran, Trach-Minh; Brunetti, Daniele; Pfefferle, David; Raghunathan, Madhusudan; Faustin, Jonathan M.; Patten, Hamish; Kleiner, Andreas; Reimerdes, Holger

    2015-11-01

    Free boundary magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states with spontaneous three dimensional deformations of the plasma-vacuum interface are computed with the 3D VMEC solver [Hirshman et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 43 (1986) 143]. The structures we have obtained have the appearance of saturated ideal external kink/peeling modes. Large edge pressure gradients yield toroidal mode number n = 1 corrugations when the edge bootstrap current is large and n = 4 distortions when this current is small. The deformations of the plasma boundary region induces a nonaxisymmetric Pfirsch-Schlüter current that drives a field-aligned current ribbon which is consistent with experimental observations reported. We claim that the equilibrium states we compute model the Edge Harmonic Oscillation [K.H. Burrell et al., Phys. Plasmas 22 (2005) 021805. W.M. Solomon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113 (2014) 135001] observed on DIII-D and the Outer Mode [E.R. Solano et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 (2014) 135001] found in JET during Quiescent H-mode operation. This work was supported in part by the Swiss National Science Foundation.

  7. Adapting 3D Equilibrium Reconstruction to Reconstruct Weakly 3D H-mode Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianciosa, M. R.; Hirshman, S. P.; Seal, S. K.; Unterberg, E. A.; Wilcox, R. S.; Wingen, A.; Hanson, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    The application of resonant magnetic perturbations for edge localized mode (ELM) mitigation breaks the toroidal symmetry of tokamaks. In these scenarios, the axisymmetric assumptions of the Grad-Shafranov equation no longer apply. By extension, equilibrium reconstruction tools, built around these axisymmetric assumptions, are insufficient to fully reconstruct a 3D perturbed equilibrium. 3D reconstruction tools typically work on systems where the 3D components of signals are a significant component of the input signals. In nominally axisymmetric systems, applied field perturbations can be on the order of 1% of the main field or less. To reconstruct these equilibria, the 3D component of signals must be isolated from the axisymmetric portions to provide the necessary information for reconstruction. This presentation will report on the adaptation to V3FIT for application on DIII-D H-mode discharges with applied resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). Newly implemented motional stark effect signals and modeling of electric field effects will also be discussed. Work supported under U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  8. Recent progress on the development and analysis of the ITPA global H-mode confinement database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, D. C.; Cordey, J. G.; Thomsen, K.; Kardaun, O. J. W. F.; Snipes, J. A.; Greenwald, M.; Sugiyama, L.; Ryter, F.; Kus, A.; Stober, J.; DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Bracco, G.; Romanelli, M.; Cui, Z.; Liu, Y.; Miura, Y.; Shinohara, K.; Tsuzuki, K.; Kamada, Y.; Takizuka, T.; Urano, H.; Valovic, M.; Akers, R.; Brickley, C.; Sykes, A.; Walsh, M. J.; Kaye, S. M.; Bush, C.; Hogewei, D.; Martin, Y. R.; Cote, A.; Pacher, G.; Ongena, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Hoang, G. T.; Lebedev, S.; Chudnovskiy, A.; Leonov, V.

    2007-03-01

    This paper describes the updates to and analysis of the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) Global H-Mode Confinement Database version 3 (DB3) over the period 1994-2004. Global data, for the energy confinement time and its controlling parameters, have now been collected from 18 machines of different sizes and shapes: ASDEX, ASDEX Upgrade, C-Mod, COMPASS-D, DIII-D, JET, JFT-2M, JT-60U, MAST, NSTX, PBX-M, PDX, START, T-10, TCV, TdeV, TFTR and TUMAN-3M. The database now contains 10382 data entries from 3762 plasma discharges, including data from deuterium-tritium experiments, low-aspect ratio plasmas, dimensionless parameter experiments and plasmas. DB3 also contains an increased amount of data from a range of diverted machines and further data at high triangularity, high density and high current. A wide range of physics studies has been performed on DB3 with particular progress made in the separation of core and edge behaviour, dimensionless parameter analyses and the comparison of the database with one-dimensional transport codes. The errors in the physics variables of the database have also been studied and this has led to the use of errors in variables fits. A key aim of the database has always been to provide a basis for estimating the energy confinement properties of next step machines such as ITER, and so the impact of the database and its analysis on such machines is also discussed.

  9. H-mode Characteristics and ELM Dynamics at Near-Unity Aspect Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thome, K. E.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2014-10-01

    Ohmic H-mode is achieved at near-unity aspect ratio in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment through the use of high-field-side fueling in both limited and diverted geometries. This regime is characterized by: increased edge rotation shear; increased central heating; and measured energy confinement consistent with the ITER98pb(y,2) scaling. In limited plasmas the power threshold is ~ 10 × higher than predicted by the high- A empirical tokamak scaling for nG = 0 . 1- 0 . 6 . No significant reduction in the power threshold has been observed in favorable ∇B SN plasma when compared to limited plasmas. Two classes of ELMs have been identified to date by their proximity to the power threshold and measured n spectra. Small, Type III-like ELMs are present at input power POH ~Pth and have n <= 4 . At POH >>Pth , they transition to large, Type-I-like ELMs with intermediate 5 < n < 15. These general mode numbers are opposite those seen at large A and reflect the increased peeling drive present at low A . The unique operating characteristics available at A ~ 1 in Pegasus allow long-sought measurements of the time evolution of the Jedge (R) pedestal collapse during an ELM event. They show a complex, multimodal pedestal collapse and the subsequent ejection of a current-carrying filament. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  10. PREFACE: 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizuka, Tomonori

    2008-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains papers based on invited talks and contributed posters presented at the 11th IAEA Technical Meeting on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers. This meeting was held at the Tsukuba International Congress Center in Tsukuba, Japan, on 26-28 September 2007, and was organized jointly by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tsukuba. The previous ten meetings in this series were held in San Diego (USA) 1987, Gut Ising (Germany) 1989, Abingdon (UK) 1991, Naka (Japan) 1993, Princeton (USA) 1995, Kloster Seeon (Germany) 1997, Oxford (UK) 1999, Toki (Japan) 2001, San Diego (USA) 2003, and St Petersburg (Russia) 2005. The purpose of the eleventh meeting was to present and discuss new results on H-mode (edge transport barrier, ETB) and internal transport barrier, ITB, experiments, theory and modeling in magnetic fusion research. It was expected that contributions give new and improved insights into the physics mechanisms behind high confinement modes of H-mode and ITBs. Ultimately, this research should lead to improved projections for ITER. As has been the tradition at the recent meetings of this series, the program was subdivided into six topics. The topics selected for the eleventh meeting were: H-mode transition and the pedestal-width Dynamics in ETB: ELM threshold, non-linear evolution and suppression, etc Transport relations of various quantities including turbulence in plasmas with ITB: rotation physics is especially highlighted Transport barriers in non-axisymmetric magnetic fields Theory and simulation on transport barriers Projections of transport barrier physics to ITER For each topic there was an invited talk presenting an overview of the topic, based on contributions to the meeting and on recently published external results. The six invited talks were: A Leonard (GA, USA): Progress in characterization of the H-mode pedestal and L-H transition N Oyama (JAEA, Japan): Progress and issues in

  11. Poloidal rotation near the edge of a tokamak plasma in [ital H] mode

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, F.L.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y.; Brizard, A.; Burrell, K.H. )

    1994-02-21

    Ion poloidal flow in tokamaks near the plasma edge has been calculated by extending neoclassical theory to include orbit squeezing, which is the reduction of the ion banana widths due to the gradient in the radial electric field. The calculated poloidal flow velocity is a significant fraction of the ion diamagnetic velocity, which can be much larger than the velocity predicted by neoclassical theory (proportional to the ion temperature gradient). The agreement with spectroscopic measurements of the poloidal rotation velocity in helium plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak is shown to be reasonably good very close to the plasma edge.

  12. Ballooning mode stability for self-consistent pressure and current profiles at the H-mode edge

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.L.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Osborne, T.H.; Taylor, T.S.

    1997-11-01

    The edge pressure gradient (H-mode pedestal) for computed equilibria in which the current density profile is consistent with the bootstrap current may not be limited by the first regime ballooning limit. The transition to second stability is easier for: higher elongation, intermediate triangularity, larger ratio, pedestal at larger radius, narrower pedestal width, higher q{sub 95}, and lower collisionality.

  13. H-mode pedestal and threshold studies over an expanded operating space on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Bespamyatnov, I. O.; Biewer, T.; Cziegler, I.; LaBombard, B.; Lin, Y.; McDermott, R.; Rice, J. E.; Rowan, W. L.; Snipes, J. A.; Terry, J. L.; Wolfe, S. M.; Wukitch, S.

    2007-05-01

    This paper reports on studies of the edge transport barrier and transition threshold of the high confinement (H) mode of operation on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)], over a wide range of toroidal field (2.6-7.86T) and plasma current (0.4-1.7MA). The H-mode power threshold and edge temperature at the transition increase with field. Barrier widths, pressure limits, and confinement are nearly independent of field at constant current, but the operational space at high B shifts toward higher temperature and lower density and collisionality. Experiments with reversed field and current show that scrape-off-layer flows in the high-field side depend primarily on configuration. In configurations with the B ×∇B drift away from the active X-point, these flows lead to more countercurrent core rotation, which apparently contributes to higher H-mode thresholds. In the unfavorable case, edge temperature thresholds are higher, and slow evolution of profiles indicates a reduction in thermal transport prior to the transition in particle confinement. Pedestal temperatures in this case are also higher than in the favorable configuration. Both high-field and reversed-field results suggest that parameters at the L-H transition are influencing the evolution and parameters of the H-mode pedestal.

  14. Public Data Set: H-mode Plasmas at Very Low Aspect Ratio on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    DOE Data Explorer

    Thome, Kathreen E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Oak Ridge Associated Universities] (ORCID:0000000248013922); Bongard, Michael W. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000231609746); Barr, Jayson L. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000177685931); Burke, Marcus G. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000176193724); Fonck, Raymond J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000294386762); Kriete, David M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000236572911); Perry, Justin M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000171228609); Reusch, Joshua A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000284249422); Schlossberg, David J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison] (ORCID:0000000287139448)

    2016-08-05

    This public data set contains openly-documented, machine readable digital research data accompanying 'H-mode Plasmas at Very Low Aspect Ratio on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment' by K.E. Thome et al., accepted for publication in Nuclear Fusion.

  15. Extending the physics basis of quiescent H-mode toward ITER relevant parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, W. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Loarte, A.; McKee, G. R.; Nazikian, R.; Osborne, T. H.; Snyder, P. B.

    2015-06-26

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have addressed several long-standing issues needed to establish quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) as a viable operating scenario for ITER. In the past, QH-mode was associated with low density operation, but has now been extended to high normalized densities compatible with operation envisioned for ITER. Through the use of strong shaping, QH-mode plasmas have been maintained at high densities, both absolute ($\\bar{n}$e ≈ 7 × 1019 m₋3) and normalized Greenwald fraction ($\\bar{n}$e/nG > 0.7). In these plasmas, the pedestal can evolve to very high pressure and edge current as the density is increased. High density QH-mode operation with strong shaping has allowed access to a previously predicted regime of very high pedestal dubbed “Super H-mode”. Calculations of the pedestal height and width from the EPED model are quantitatively consistent with the experimentally observed density evolution. The confirmation of the shape dependence of the maximum density threshold for QH-mode helps validate the underlying theoretical model of peeling- ballooning modes for ELM stability. In general, QH-mode is found to achieve ELM- stable operation while maintaining adequate impurity exhaust, due to the enhanced impurity transport from an edge harmonic oscillation, thought to be a saturated kink- peeling mode driven by rotation shear. In addition, the impurity confinement time is not affected by rotation, even though the energy confinement time and measured E×B shear are observed to increase at low toroidal rotation. Together with demonstrations of high beta, high confinement and low q95 for many energy confinement times, these results suggest QH-mode as a potentially attractive operating scenario for the ITER Q=10 mission.

  16. Extending the physics basis of quiescent H-mode toward ITER relevant parameters

    DOE PAGES

    Solomon, W. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Loarte, A.; McKee, G. R.; Nazikian, R.; Osborne, T. H.; Snyder, P. B.

    2015-06-26

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have addressed several long-standing issues needed to establish quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) as a viable operating scenario for ITER. In the past, QH-mode was associated with low density operation, but has now been extended to high normalized densities compatible with operation envisioned for ITER. Through the use of strong shaping, QH-mode plasmas have been maintained at high densities, both absolute (more » $$\\bar{n}$$e ≈ 7 × 1019 m₋3) and normalized Greenwald fraction ($$\\bar{n}$$e/nG > 0.7). In these plasmas, the pedestal can evolve to very high pressure and edge current as the density is increased. High density QH-mode operation with strong shaping has allowed access to a previously predicted regime of very high pedestal dubbed “Super H-mode”. Calculations of the pedestal height and width from the EPED model are quantitatively consistent with the experimentally observed density evolution. The confirmation of the shape dependence of the maximum density threshold for QH-mode helps validate the underlying theoretical model of peeling- ballooning modes for ELM stability. In general, QH-mode is found to achieve ELM- stable operation while maintaining adequate impurity exhaust, due to the enhanced impurity transport from an edge harmonic oscillation, thought to be a saturated kink- peeling mode driven by rotation shear. In addition, the impurity confinement time is not affected by rotation, even though the energy confinement time and measured E×B shear are observed to increase at low toroidal rotation. Together with demonstrations of high beta, high confinement and low q95 for many energy confinement times, these results suggest QH-mode as a potentially attractive operating scenario for the ITER Q=10 mission.« less

  17. Nonlinear MHD simulations of Quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Loarte, A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Solomon, W. M.; Snyder, P. B.; Hoelzl, M.; Zeng, L.

    2015-09-01

    In the Quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) regime, the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO), thought to be a saturated kink-peeling mode (KPM) driven unstable by current and rotation, is found in experiment to provide sufficient stationary edge particle transport to avoid the periodic expulsion of particles and energy by edge localized modes (ELMs). In this paper, both linear and nonlinear MHD modelling of QH-mode plasmas from the DIII-D tokamak have been investigated to understand the mechanism leading to the appearance of the EHO in QH-mode plasmas. For the first time nonlinear MHD simulations with low-n modes both with ideal wall and resistive wall boundary conditions have been carried out with the 3D non-linear MHD code JOREK. The results show, in agreement with the original conjectures, that in the non-linear phase, kink peeling modes are the main unstable modes in QH-mode plasmas of DIII-D and that the kink-peeling modes saturate non-linearly leading to a 3D stationary state. The characteristics of the kink-peeling modes, in terms of mode structure and associated decrease of the edge plasma density associated with them, are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the EHO in DIII-D. The effect of plasma resistivity, the role of plasma parallel rotation as well as the effect of the conductivity of the vacuum vessel wall on the destabilization and saturation of kink-peeling modes have been evaluated for experimental QH-mode plasma conditions in DIII-D.

  18. E-H mode transition in low-pressure inductively coupled nitrogen-argon and oxygen-argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Wook; Lee, Hye Lan; Chung, T. H.

    2011-06-01

    This work investigates the characteristics of the E-H mode transition in low-pressure inductively coupled N{sub 2}-Ar and O{sub 2}-Ar discharges using rf-compensated Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). As the ICP power increases, the emission intensities from plasma species, the electron density, the electron temperature, and the plasma potential exhibit sudden changes. The Ar content in the gas mixture and total gas pressure have been varied in an attempt to fully characterize the plasma parameters. With these control parameters varying, the changes of the transition threshold power and the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) are explored. In N{sub 2}-Ar and O{sub 2}-Ar discharges at low-pressures of several millitorr, the transition thresholds are observed to decrease with Ar content and pressure. It is observed that in N{sub 2}-Ar plasmas during the transition, the shape of the EEDF changes from an unusual distribution with a flat hole near the electron energy of 3 eV in the E mode to a Maxwellian distribution in the H mode. However, in O{sub 2} -Ar plasmas, the EEDFs in the E mode at low Ar contents show roughly bi-Maxwellian distributions, while the EEDFs in the H mode are observed to be nearly Maxwellian. In the E and H modes of O{sub 2}-Ar discharges, the dissociation fraction of O{sub 2} molecules is estimated using optical emission actinometry. During the E-H mode transition, the dissociation fraction of molecules is also enhanced.

  19. Alpha Heating in ITER L-mode and H-mode Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2011-07-18

    There are many uses of predictions of ITER plasma performance. One is assessing requirements of different plasma regimes. For instance, what current drive and control are needed for steady state. The heating, current drive, and torque systems planned for initial DT operation are negative ion neutral beam injection (NB), ion cyclotron resonance (IC), and electron cyclotron resonance (EC). Which combinations of heating are optimal. What are benefits of the torques, current drive, and fueling using NB. What are the shine-through power and optimum voltage for the NB? What are optimal locations and aiming of the EC launchers? Another application is nuclear licensing (e.g. System integrity, how many neutrons).

  20. The impact of poloidal asymmetries on tungsten transport in the core of JET H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Angioni, C.; Pütterich, T.; Bilato, R.; Casson, F. J.; Giroud, C.; Mantica, P.; Helander, P.

    2015-05-15

    Recent progress in the understanding and prediction of the tungsten behaviour in the core of JET H-mode plasmas with ITER-like wall is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the impact of poloidal asymmetries of the impurity density. In particular, it is shown that the predicted reduction of temperature screening induced by the presence of low field side localization of the tungsten density produced by the centrifugal force is consistent with the observed tungsten behaviour in a JET discharge in H-mode baseline scenario. This provides first evidence of the role of poloidal asymmetries in reducing the strength of temperature screening. The main differences between plasma parameters in JET baseline and hybrid scenario discharges which affect the impact of poloidally asymmetric density on the tungsten radial transport are identified. This allows the conditions by which tungsten accumulation can be avoided to be more precisely defined.

  1. ELMy H-mode linear simulation with 3-field model on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak using BOUT++

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z. X.; Gao, X.; Liu, S. C.; Ding, S. Y.; Li, J. G.; Xia, T. Y.; Xu, X. Q.; Hughes, J. W.

    2012-10-15

    H-mode plasmas with ELM (edge localized mode) have been realized on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) with 2.45 GHz low hybrid wave at P{sub LHW}{approx}1 MW in 2010. Data from EAST experiments including magnetic geometry, measured pressure profiles, and calculated current profiles are used to investigate the physics of ELM utilizing the BOUT++ code. Results from linear simulations show that the ELMs in EAST are dominated by resistive ballooning modes. When the Lundquist number (dimensionless ratio of the resistive diffusion time to the Alfven time) is equal to or less than 10{sup 7}, the resistive ballooning modes are found to become unstable in the ELMy H-mode plasma. For a fixed pedestal pressure profile, increasing plasma current generates more activities of low-n ELMs.

  2. Access to a New Plasma Edge State with High Density and Pressures using Quiescent H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, Wayne M.; Snyder, P. B.; Burrell, K. H.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Loarte, A.; McKee, G. R.; Nazikian, R; Osborne, T. H.

    2014-07-01

    A path to a new high performance regime has been discovered in tokamaks that could improve the attractiveness of a fusion reactor. Experiments on DIII-D using a quiescent H-mode edge have navigated a valley of improved edge peeling-ballooning stability that opens up with strong plasma shaping at high density, leading to a doubling of the edge pressure over standard edge localized mode (ELM)ing H-mode at these parameters. The thermal energy confinement time increases both as a result of the increased pedestal height and improvements in the core transport and reduced low-k turbulence. Calculations of the pedestal height and width as a function of density using constraints imposed by peeling-ballooning and kinetic-ballooning theory are in quantitative agreement with the measurements.

  3. Experimental results of H-mode power threshold with lower hybrid wave heating on the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Canbin; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Zixi; Han, Xiang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yumin; Zang, Shoubiao; Kong, Defeng; the EAST Team

    2016-07-01

    The density roll-over dependence on H-mode power threshold is observed on EAST for the first time. In campaign 2014 and 2015 shots with a toroidal field of 2.25 T have observed roll-over dependence with lower hybrid wave as the only auxiliary heating method, while shots with a toroidal field of 1.79 T and 1.9 T exhibit linear dependence consistent with scaling law. The density of minimum power for accessing H-mode on EAST has different plasma current values of 400 kA and 500 kA, and is better described in the normalized Greenwald fraction {{\\widehat{n}}\\text{e,min}}/{{n}\\text{G}}~≈ ~0.4 at {{B}\\text{T}}=2.35 \\text{T} . The absence of {{\\widehat{n}}\\text{e,min}} in 1.7 T and 1.8 T may be attributed to the positive dependence with toroidal field. Besides, correlation analysis of H-mode power threshold and divertor geometry in scanning X-point is summarized and compared. Outer leg length (distance from X-point to outer strike point) has the highest correlation coefficient with H-mode power threshold, which explains the data scattering within the same plasma parameters. A new equation of scaling law is proposed: {{P}\\text{th \\_\\text{EAST}}}=4.27\\text{OL}{{\\text{L}}1.4}× {{P}\\text{th \\_\\text{08}}}.~ Neutral particles are believed to be the hidden factor in different divertor geometry, and play a negative role in L-H transition via charge exchange damping.

  4. The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers (Oxford, UK, 2011) The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers (Oxford, UK, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saibene, G.

    2012-11-01

    The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers, held in Lady Margaret Hall College in Oxford in October 2011 continues the tradition of bi-annual international meetings dedicated to the study of transport barriers in fusion plasmas. The first meeting of this series took place in S Diego (CA, US) in 1987, and since then scientists in the fusion community studying the formation and effects of transport barriers in plasmas have been meeting at this small workshop to discuss progress, new experimental evidence and related theoretical studies. The first workshops were strongly focussed on the characterization and understanding of the H-mode plasma, discovered in ASDEX in 1982. Tokamaks throughout the entire world were able to reproduce the H-mode transition in the following few years and since then the H-mode has been recognised as a pervasive physics feature of toroidally confined plasmas. Increased physics understanding of the H-mode transition and of the properties of H-mode plasmas, together with extensive development of diagnostic capabilities for the plasma edge, led to the development of edge transport barrier studies and theory. The H-mode Workshop reflected this extension in interest, with more and more contributions discussing the phenomenology of edge transport barriers and instabilities (ELMs), L-H transition and edge transport barrier formation theory. In the last 15 years, in response to the development of fusion plasma studies, the scientific scope of the workshop has been broadened to include experimental and theoretical studies of both edge and internal transport barriers, including formation and sustainment of transport barriers for different transport channels (energy, particle and momentum). The 13th H-mode Workshop was organized around six leading topics, and, as customary for this workshop, a lead speaker was selected for each topic to present to the audience the state-of-the-art, new understanding and open issues, as well

  5. Application of the H-Mode, a Design and Interaction Concept for Highly Automated Vehicles, to Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Flemisch, Frank O.; Schutte, Paul C.; Williams, Ralph A.

    2006-01-01

    Driven by increased safety, efficiency, and airspace capacity, automation is playing an increasing role in aircraft operations. As aircraft become increasingly able to autonomously respond to a range of situations with performance surpassing human operators, we are compelled to look for new methods that help us understand their use and guide their design using new forms of automation and interaction. We propose a novel design metaphor to aid the conceptualization, design, and operation of highly-automated aircraft. Design metaphors transfer meaning from common experiences to less familiar applications or functions. A notable example is the "Desktop metaphor" for manipulating files on a computer. This paper describes a metaphor for highly automated vehicles known as the H-metaphor and a specific embodiment of the metaphor known as the H-mode as applied to aircraft. The fundamentals of the H-metaphor are reviewed followed by an overview of an exploratory usability study investigating human-automation interaction issues for a simple H-mode implementation. The envisioned application of the H-mode concept to aircraft is then described as are two planned evaluations.

  6. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D; Menard, J; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, R E; Bush, C; Kaita, R

    2008-09-22

    Experiments conducted in high-performance 1.0-1.2 MA 6 MW NBI-heated H-mode plasmas with a high flux expansion radiative divertor in NSTX demonstrate that significant divertor peak heat flux reduction and access to detachment may be facilitated naturally in a highly-shaped spherical torus (ST) configuration. Improved plasma performance with high {beta}{sub p} = 15-25%, a high bootstrap current fraction f{sub BS} = 45-50%, longer plasma pulses, and an H-mode regime with smaller ELMs has been achieved in the lower single null configuration with higher-end elongation 2.2-2.4 and triangularity 0.6-0.8. Divertor peak heat fluxes were reduced from 6-12 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-2 MW/m{sup 2} in ELMy H-mode discharges using high magnetic flux expansion and partial detachment of the outer strike point at several D{sub 2} injection rates, while good core confinement and pedestal characteristics were maintained. The partially detached divertor regime was characterized by a 30-60% increase in divertor plasma radiation, a peak heat flux reduction by up to 70%, measured in a 10 cm radial zone, a five-fold increase in divertor neutral pressure, and a significant volume recombination rate increase.

  7. Piloted Evaluation of the H-Mode, a Variable Autonomy Control System, in Motion-Based Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Schutte, Paul C.; Williams, Ralph A.

    2008-01-01

    As aircraft become able to autonomously respond to a range of situations with performance surpassing human operators, we are compelled to look for new methods that help understand their use and guide the design of new, more effective forms of automation and interaction. The "H-mode" is one such method and is based on the metaphor of a well-trained horse. The concept allows the pilot to manage a broad range of control automation functionality, from augmented manual control to FMS-like coupling and automation initiated actions, using a common interface system and easily learned set of interaction skills. The interface leverages familiar manual control interfaces (e.g., the control stick) and flight displays through the addition of contextually dependent haptic-multimodal elements. The concept is relevant to manned and remotely piloted vehicles. This paper provides an overview of the H-mode concept followed by a presentation of the results from a recent evaluation conducted in a motion-based simulator. The evaluation focused on assessing the overall usability and flying qualities of the concept with an emphasis on the effects of turbulence and cockpit motion. Because the H-mode results in interactions between traditional flying qualities and management of higher-level flight path automation, these effects are of particular interest. The results indicate that the concept may provide a useful complement or replacement to conventional interfaces, and retains the usefulness in the presence of turbulence and motion.

  8. Gyrokinetic studies of core turbulence features in ASDEX Upgrade H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, A. Bañón Told, D.; Happel, T.; Görler, T.; Abiteboul, J.; Bustos, A.; Doerk, H.; Jenko, F.

    2015-04-15

    Gyrokinetic validation studies are crucial for developing confidence in the model incorporated in numerical simulations and thus improving their predictive capabilities. As one step in this direction, we simulate an ASDEX Upgrade discharge with the GENE code, and analyze various fluctuating quantities and compare them to experimental measurements. The approach taken is the following. First, linear simulations are performed in order to determine the turbulence regime. Second, the heat fluxes in nonlinear simulations are matched to experimental fluxes by varying the logarithmic ion temperature gradient within the expected experimental error bars. Finally, the dependence of various quantities with respect to the ion temperature gradient is analyzed in detail. It is found that density and temperature fluctuations can vary significantly with small changes in this parameter, thus making comparisons with experiments very sensitive to uncertainties in the experimental profiles. However, cross-phases are more robust, indicating that they are better observables for comparisons between gyrokinetic simulations and experimental measurements.

  9. Experimental validation of non-uniformity effect of the radial electric field on the edge transport barrier formation in JT-60U H-mode plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, K; Itoh, K; Itoh, S-I

    2016-01-01

    The turbulent structure formation, where strongly-inhomogeneous turbulence and global electromagnetic fields are self-organized, is a fundamental mechanism that governs the evolution of high-temperature plasmas in the universe and laboratory (e.g., the generation of edge transport barrier (ETB) of the H-mode in the toroidal plasmas). The roles of inhomogeneities of radial electric field (Er) are known inevitable. In this mechanism, whether the first derivative of Er (shear) or the second derivative of Er (curvature) works most is decisive in determining the class of nontrivial solutions (which describe the barrier structure). Here we report the experimental identification of the essential role of the Er-curvature on the ETB formation, for the first time, based on the high-spatiotemporal resolution spectroscopic measurement. We found the decisive importance of Er-curvature on ETB formation during ELM-free phase, but there is only a low correlation with the Er-shear value at the peak of normalized ion temperature gradient. Furthermore, in the ELMing phase, the effect of curvature is also quantified in terms of the relationship between pedestal width and thickness of the layer of inhomogeneous Er. This is the fundamental basis to understand the structure of transport barriers in fusion plasmas. PMID:27480931

  10. Experimental validation of non-uniformity effect of the radial electric field on the edge transport barrier formation in JT-60U H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, K.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-08-01

    The turbulent structure formation, where strongly-inhomogeneous turbulence and global electromagnetic fields are self-organized, is a fundamental mechanism that governs the evolution of high-temperature plasmas in the universe and laboratory (e.g., the generation of edge transport barrier (ETB) of the H-mode in the toroidal plasmas). The roles of inhomogeneities of radial electric field (Er) are known inevitable. In this mechanism, whether the first derivative of Er (shear) or the second derivative of Er (curvature) works most is decisive in determining the class of nontrivial solutions (which describe the barrier structure). Here we report the experimental identification of the essential role of the Er-curvature on the ETB formation, for the first time, based on the high-spatiotemporal resolution spectroscopic measurement. We found the decisive importance of Er-curvature on ETB formation during ELM-free phase, but there is only a low correlation with the Er-shear value at the peak of normalized ion temperature gradient. Furthermore, in the ELMing phase, the effect of curvature is also quantified in terms of the relationship between pedestal width and thickness of the layer of inhomogeneous Er. This is the fundamental basis to understand the structure of transport barriers in fusion plasmas.

  11. Experimental validation of non-uniformity effect of the radial electric field on the edge transport barrier formation in JT-60U H-mode plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, K.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    The turbulent structure formation, where strongly-inhomogeneous turbulence and global electromagnetic fields are self-organized, is a fundamental mechanism that governs the evolution of high-temperature plasmas in the universe and laboratory (e.g., the generation of edge transport barrier (ETB) of the H-mode in the toroidal plasmas). The roles of inhomogeneities of radial electric field (Er) are known inevitable. In this mechanism, whether the first derivative of Er (shear) or the second derivative of Er (curvature) works most is decisive in determining the class of nontrivial solutions (which describe the barrier structure). Here we report the experimental identification of the essential role of the Er-curvature on the ETB formation, for the first time, based on the high-spatiotemporal resolution spectroscopic measurement. We found the decisive importance of Er-curvature on ETB formation during ELM-free phase, but there is only a low correlation with the Er-shear value at the peak of normalized ion temperature gradient. Furthermore, in the ELMing phase, the effect of curvature is also quantified in terms of the relationship between pedestal width and thickness of the layer of inhomogeneous Er. This is the fundamental basis to understand the structure of transport barriers in fusion plasmas. PMID:27480931

  12. Experimental validation of non-uniformity effect of the radial electric field on the edge transport barrier formation in JT-60U H-mode plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, K; Itoh, K; Itoh, S-I

    2016-08-02

    The turbulent structure formation, where strongly-inhomogeneous turbulence and global electromagnetic fields are self-organized, is a fundamental mechanism that governs the evolution of high-temperature plasmas in the universe and laboratory (e.g., the generation of edge transport barrier (ETB) of the H-mode in the toroidal plasmas). The roles of inhomogeneities of radial electric field (Er) are known inevitable. In this mechanism, whether the first derivative of Er (shear) or the second derivative of Er (curvature) works most is decisive in determining the class of nontrivial solutions (which describe the barrier structure). Here we report the experimental identification of the essential role of the Er-curvature on the ETB formation, for the first time, based on the high-spatiotemporal resolution spectroscopic measurement. We found the decisive importance of Er-curvature on ETB formation during ELM-free phase, but there is only a low correlation with the Er-shear value at the peak of normalized ion temperature gradient. Furthermore, in the ELMing phase, the effect of curvature is also quantified in terms of the relationship between pedestal width and thickness of the layer of inhomogeneous Er. This is the fundamental basis to understand the structure of transport barriers in fusion plasmas.

  13. Reduction of edge-localized mode intensity using high-repetition-rate pellet injection in tokamak H-mode plasmas.

    PubMed

    Baylor, L R; Commaux, N; Jernigan, T C; Brooks, N H; Combs, S K; Evans, T E; Fenstermacher, M E; Isler, R C; Lasnier, C J; Meitner, S J; Moyer, R A; Osborne, T H; Parks, P B; Snyder, P B; Strait, E J; Unterberg, E A; Loarte, A

    2013-06-14

    High repetition rate injection of deuterium pellets from the low-field side (LFS) of the DIII-D tokamak is shown to trigger high-frequency edge-localized modes (ELMs) at up to 12× the low natural ELM frequency in H-mode deuterium plasmas designed to match the ITER baseline configuration in shape, normalized beta, and input power just above the H-mode threshold. The pellet size, velocity, and injection location were chosen to limit penetration to the outer 10% of the plasma. The resulting perturbations to the plasma density and energy confinement time are thus minimal (<10%). The triggered ELMs occur at much lower normalized pedestal pressure than the natural ELMs, suggesting that the pellet injection excites a localized high-n instability. Triggered ELMs produce up to 12× lower energy and particle fluxes to the divertor, and result in a strong decrease in plasma core impurity density. These results show for the first time that shallow, LFS pellet injection can dramatically accelerate the ELM cycle and reduce ELM energy fluxes on plasma facing components, and is a viable technique for real-time control of ELMs in ITER.

  14. High frequency pacing of edge localized modes by injection of lithium granules in DIII-D H-mode discharges

    DOE PAGES

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jackson, G. L.; Gilson, E. P.; Lunsford, R.; et al

    2016-04-08

    A newly installed Lithium Granule Injector (LGI) was used to pace edge localized modes (ELM) in DIII-D. ELM pacing efficiency was studied injecting lithium granules of nominal diameter 0.3–0.9mm, speed of 50–120 m s-1 and average injection rates up to 100 Hz for 0.9mm granules and up to 700 Hz for 0.3mm granules. The efficiency of ELM triggering was found to depend strongly on size of the injected granules, with triggering efficiency close to 100% obtained with 0.9mm diameter granules, lower with smaller sizes, and weakly depending on granule velocity. Robust ELM pacing was demonstrated in ITER-like plasmas for themore » entire shot length, at ELM frequencies 3–5 times larger than the ‘natural’ ELM frequency observed in reference discharges. Within the range of ELM frequencies obtained, the peak ELM heat flux at the outer strike point was reduced with increasing pacing frequency. The peak heat flux reduction at the inner strike point appears to saturate at high pacing frequency. Lithium was found in the plasma core, with a concurrent reduction of metallic impurities and carbon. Altogether, high frequency ELM pacing using the lithium granule injection appears to be compatible with both H-mode energy confinement and attractive H-mode pedestal characteristics, but further assessment is need« less

  15. Scaling of the tokamak near the scrape-off layer H-mode power width and implications for ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eich, T.; Leonard, A. W.; Pitts, R. A.; Fundamenski, W.; Goldston, R. J.; Gray, T. K.; Herrmann, A.; Kirk, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Kardaun, O.; Kukushkin, A. S.; LaBombard, B.; Maingi, R.; Makowski, M. A.; Scarabosio, A.; Sieglin, B.; Terry, J.; Thornton, A.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2013-09-01

    A multi-machine database for the H-mode scrape-off layer power fall-off length, λq in JET, DIII-D, ASDEX Upgrade, C-Mod, NSTX and MAST has been assembled under the auspices of the International Tokamak Physics Activity. Regression inside the database finds that the most important scaling parameter is the poloidal magnetic field (or equivalently the plasma current), with λq decreasing linearly with increasing Bpol. For the conventional aspect ratio tokamaks, the regression finds \\lambda_{q} \\propto B_{tor}^{-0.8} \\cdot q_{95}^{1.1} \\cdot P_{SOL}^{0.1} \\cdot R_{geo}^{0} , yielding λq,ITER ≅ 1 mm for the baseline inductive H-mode burning plasma scenario at Ip = 15 MA. The experimental divertor target heat flux profile data, from which λq is derived, also yield a divertor power spreading factor (S) which, together with λq, allows an integral power decay length on the target to be estimated. There are no differences in the λq scaling obtained from all-metal or carbon dominated machines and the inclusion of spherical tokamaks has no significant influence on the regression parameters. Comparison of the measured λq with the values expected from a recently published heuristic drift based model shows satisfactory agreement for all tokamaks.

  16. High frequency pacing of edge localized modes by injection of lithium granules in DIII-D H-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolon, A.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D. K.; Nagy, A.; Roquemore, A. L.; Baylor, L. R.; Commaux, N.; Jackson, G. L.; Gilson, E. P.; Lunsford, R.; Parks, P. B.; Chrystal, C.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R.; Haskey, S. R.; Makowski, M. J.; Lasnier, C. J.; Nazikian, R.; Osborne, T.; Shiraki, D.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    A newly installed Lithium Granule Injector (LGI) was used to pace edge localized modes (ELM) in DIII-D. ELM pacing efficiency was studied injecting lithium granules of nominal diameter 0.3-0.9 mm, speed of 50-120 m s-1 and average injection rates up to 100 Hz for 0.9 mm granules and up to 700 Hz for 0.3 mm granules. The efficiency of ELM triggering was found to depend strongly on size of the injected granules, with triggering efficiency close to 100% obtained with 0.9 mm diameter granules, lower with smaller sizes, and weakly depending on granule velocity. Robust ELM pacing was demonstrated in ITER-like plasmas for the entire shot length, at ELM frequencies 3-5 times larger than the ‘natural’ ELM frequency observed in reference discharges. Within the range of ELM frequencies obtained, the peak ELM heat flux at the outer strike point was reduced with increasing pacing frequency. The peak heat flux reduction at the inner strike point appears to saturate at high pacing frequency. Lithium was found in the plasma core, with a concurrent reduction of metallic impurities and carbon. Overall, high frequency ELM pacing using the lithium granule injection appears to be compatible with both H-mode energy confinement and attractive H-mode pedestal characteristics, but further assessment is needed to determine whether the projected heat flux reduction required for ITER can be met.

  17. Heuristic Drift-based Model of the Power Scrape-off width in H-mode Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-04-29

    An heuristic model for the plasma scrape-off width in H-mode plasmas is introduced. Grad B and curv B drifts into the SOL are balanced against sonic parallel flows out of the SOL, to the divertor plates. The overall particle flow pattern posited is a modification for open field lines of Pfirsch-Shlüter flows to include sinks to the divertors. These assumptions result in an estimated SOL width of ~ 2aρp/R. They also result in a first-principles calculation of the particle confinement time of H-mode plasmas, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. It is next assumed that anomalous perpendicular electron thermal diffusivity is the dominant source of heat flux across the separatrix, investing the SOL width, defined above, with heat from the main plasma. The separatrix temperature is calculated based on a two-point model balancing power input to the SOL with Spitzer-Härm parallel thermal conduction losses to the divertor. This results in a heuristic closed-form prediction for the power scrape-off width that is in reasonable quantitative agreement both in absolute magnitude and in scaling with recent experimental data from deuterium plasmas. Further work should include full numerical calculations, including all magnetic and electric drifts, as well as more thorough comparison with experimental data.

  18. An Heuristic Drift-Based Model of the Power Scrape-Off Width in H-Mode Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-02-28

    An heuristic model for the plasma scrape-off width in H-mode plasmas is introduced. Grad B and curv B drifts into the SOL are balanced against sonic parallel flows out of the SOL, to the divertor plates. The overall mass flow pattern posited is a modification for open field lines of Pfirsch-Shlüter flows to include sinks to the divertors. These assumptions result in an estimated SOL width of 2aρp/R. They also result in a first-principles calculation of the particle confinement time of H-mode plasmas, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. It is next assumed that anomalous perpendicular electron thermal diffusivity is the dominant source of heat flux across the separatrix, investing the SOL width, defined above, with heat from the main plasma. The separatrix temperature is calculated based on a two-point model balancing power input to the SOL with Spitzer-Härm parallel thermal conduction losses to the divertor. This results in an heuristic closed-form prediction for the power scrape-off width that is in remarkable quantitative agreement both in absolute magnitude and in scaling with recent experimental data. Further work should include full numerical calculations, including all magnetic and electric drifts, as well as more thorough comparison with experimental data.

  19. E-H mode transition of a high-power inductively coupled plasma torch at atmospheric pressure with a metallic confinement tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenberend, Jochen; Chichignoud, Guy; Delannoy, Yves

    2012-08-01

    Inductively coupled plasma torches need high ignition voltages for the E-H mode transition and are therefore difficult to operate. In order to reduce the ignition voltage of an RF plasma torch with a metallic confinement tube the E-H mode transition was studied. A Tesla coil was used to create a spark discharge and the E-H mode transition of the plasma was then filmed using a high-speed camera. The electrical potential of the metallic confinement tube was measured using a high-voltage probe. It was found that an arc between the grounded injector and the metallic confinement tube is maintained by the electric field (E-mode). The transition to H-mode occurred at high magnetic fields when the arc formed a loop. The ignition voltage could be reduced by connecting the metallic confinement tube with a capacitor to the RF generator.

  20. The Dependence of H-mode Energy Confinement and Transport on Collisionality in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S. M.; Gerhardt, S.; Guttenfelder, W.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.

    2012-11-27

    Understanding the dependence of confi nement on collisionality in tokamaks is important for the design of next-step devices, which will operate at collisionalities at least one order of magnitude lower than in present generation. A wide range of collisionality has been obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) by employing two different wall conditioning techniques, one with boronization and between-shot helium glow discharge conditioning (HeGDC+B), and one using lithium evaporation (Li EVAP). Previous studies of HeGDC+B plasmas indicated a strong and favorable dependence of normalized con nement on collisionality. Discharges with lithium conditioning discussed in the present study gen- erally achieved lower collisionality, extending the accessible range of collisionality by almost an order of unity. While the confinement dependences on dimensional, engineering variables of the HeGDC+B and Li EVAP datasets differed, collisionality was found to unify the trends, with the lower collisionality lithium conditioned discharges extending the trend of increasing normalized confi nement time with decreasing collisionality when other dimension less variables were held as fi xed as possible. This increase of confi nement with decreasing collisionality was driven by a large reduction in electron transport in the outer region of the plasma. This result is consistent with gyrokinetic calculations that show microtearing and Electron Temperature Gradient modes to be more stable for the lower collisionality discharges. Ion transport, near neoclassical at high collisionality, became more anomalous at lower collisionality, possibly due to the growth of hybrid TEM/KBM modes in the outer regions of the plasma.

  1. The Dependence of H-mode Energy Confinement and Transport on Collisionality in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, S. M.; Gerhardt, S.; Guttenfelder, W.; Maingi, R.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podesta, M.

    2012-11-28

    Understanding the dependence of confi nement on collisionality in tokamaks is important for the design of next-step devices, which will operate at collisionalities at least one order of magnitude lower than in present generation. A wide range of collisionality has been obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) by employing two different wall conditioning techniques, one with boronization and between-shot helium glow discharge conditioning (HeGDC+B), and one using lithium evaporation (Li EVAP). Previous studies of HeGDC+B plasmas indicated a strong and favorable dependence of normalized con nement on collisionality. Discharges with lithium conditioning discussed in the present study gen- erally achieved lower collisionality, extending the accessible range of collisionality by almost an order of unity. While the confinement dependences on dimensional, engineering variables of the HeGDC+B and Li EVAP datasets differed, collisionality was found to unify the trends, with the lower collisionality lithium conditioned discharges extending the trend of increasing normalized confi nement time with decreasing collisionality when other dimension less variables were held as fi xed as possible. This increase of confi nement with decreasing collisionality was driven by a large reduction in electron transport in the outer region of the plasma. This result is consistent with gyrokinetic calculations that show microtearing and Electron Temperature Gradient modes to be more stable for the lower collisionality discharges. Ion transport, near neoclassical at high collisionality, became more anomalous at lower collisionality, possibly due to the growth of hybrid TEM/KBM modes in the outer regions of the plasma

  2. Design of an alternating phase focusing Interdigital H-mode Drift-Tube-Linac with low injection energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Pang, J.; He, X.; Ying, Z.; Shi, J.

    2016-01-01

    An Inter-digital H-mode (IH) Drift Tube Linac (DTL) was designed to accelerate a proton beam in the low energy region with high RF efficiency and high gradient. The IH DTL is 1.078 m long and operates at 200 MHz. Protons could be accelerated from 0.04 MeV to 2.4 MeV (the β range is from 0.0092 to 0.0714). The method of alternating phase focusing (APF) was applied for beam focusing. The simulation results show that the transmission is 38% and the longitudinal acceptance is approximately 140°. The shunt impedance of the entire cavity is 365 MΩ/m. Adjustments of the electric-field were performed, and the beam dynamics design was described. The beam loss and voltage sensitivity were calculated.

  3. Magnetic structure and frequency scaling of limit-cycle oscillations close to L- to H-mode transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkenmeier, G.; Cavedon, M.; Conway, G. D.; Manz, P.; Stroth, U.; Fischer, R.; Fuchert, G.; Happel, T.; Laggner, F. M.; Maraschek, M.; Medvedeva, A.; Nikolaeva, V.; Prisiazhniuk, D.; Pütterich, T.; Ryter, F.; Shao, L. M.; Willensdorfer, M.; Wolfrum, E.; Zohm, H.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-08-01

    Limit-cycle oscillations (LCOs) close to the power threshold of L- to H-mode transitions are investigated in plasmas of ASDEX Upgrade. During this phase, referred to as I-phase, a strong magnetic activity in the poloidal magnetic field {{\\overset{\\centerdot}{{B}} }θ} with an up–down asymmetry is found. In some cases, the regular LCOs during I-phase transition smoothly into a phase with intermittent bursts which have similar properties to type-III edge localised modes (ELMs). Indications of precursors during the intermittent phase as well as in the regular LCO phase point to a common nature of the I-phase and type-III ELMs. The LCO frequency measured in a set of discharges with different plasma currents and magnetic fields scales as f∼ ≤ft(B\\text{t}1/2I\\text{p}3/2\\right)/(nT) .

  4. Short wavelength turbulence generated by shear in the quiescent H-mode edge on DIII–D

    SciTech Connect

    Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Dorris, J.; Burrell, K. H.

    2014-06-15

    A region of turbulence with large radial wavenumber (k{sub r}ρ{sub s}>1) is found in the high-shear portion of the plasma edge in Quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) on DIII–D using the Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic. At its peak outside the minimum of the E{sub r} well, the turbulence exhibits large amplitude n{sup ~}/n∼40%, with large radial wavenumber |k{sup ¯}{sub r}/k{sup ¯}{sub θ}|∼11 and short radial correlation length L{sub r}/ρ{sub i}∼0.2. The turbulence inside the E{sub r} well minimum is characterized by the opposite sign in radial wavenumber from that of turbulence outside the minimum, consistent with the expected effects of velocity shear. The PCI diagnostic provides a line-integrated measurement of density fluctuations, so data are taken during a scan of plasma position at constant parameters to allow the PCI to sample a range in k{sub r}/k{sub θ}. Analysis of the Doppler shift and plasma geometry allows the turbulence to be localized to a narrow region 3 mm inside the last closed flux surface, outside the minimum of the E{sub r} well. The turbulence amplitude and radial wavenumber and correlation length are determined by fitting the PCI results with a simple non-isotropic turbulence model with two regions of turbulence. These PCI observations, made in QH-mode, are qualitatively similar to those made in standard edge localized modes (ELM)-free H-mode and between ELMs, suggesting a similar role for large k{sub r} turbulence there.

  5. Global Gyrokinetic Simulations of the Dominant High-n and Intermediate-n Instabilities in the H-Mode Tokamak Edge Pedestal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Scott

    2012-10-01

    Global electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations show the existence of near threshold conditions, for both a high-n Kinetic Ballooning Mode (KBM) and an intermediate-n kinetic version of Peeling-Ballooning Mode (PBM). The KBM and the PBM have been used to constrain the EPED model [1]. Global gyrokinetic simulations show that the H-mode pedestal, just prior to the onset of the Edge Localized Mode (ELM), is very near the KBM threshold. Two DIII-D experimental discharges are studied, one reporting KBM features in fluctuation measurements [2]. Simulations find that in addition to the high-n KBM, an intermediate-n electromagnetic mode is unstable. This kinetic version of the PBM has phase velocity in the electron diamagnetic direction, but otherwise has features similar to the MHD PBM. When the magnetic shear is reduced in a narrow region near the steep pressure gradient, the intermediate-n ``kinetic PBM'' is stabilized, while the high-n KBM becomes the most unstable mode. Global simulation results of the KBM compare favorably with flux tube simulations. The KBM transitions to an unstable electrostatic ion mode as the plasma beta is reduced. The intermediate-n ``kinetic peeling ballooning mode'' is sensitive to the q-profile and only seen in global electromagnetic simulations. Collisions increase the KBM critical beta and growth rate. These results indicate that an improved pedestal model should include, in detail, any corrections to the bootstrap current, and any other equilibrium effects that might reduce the local magnetic shear. It is known that the bootstrap current may flatten the q-profile in the steep gradient region [3]. Simulations are carried out using the global electromagnetic GEM code, including kinetic electrons, electron-ion collisions and the effects of realistic magnetic geometry. In addition to global linear analysis, nonlinear simulations will be reported showing that, while the equilibrium radial electric field has a weak effect on the linear growth

  6. Structure and Behavior of the Edge Harmonic Oscillation in Quiescent H-Mode Plasmas on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Solomon, W. M.

    2013-10-01

    The edge harmonic oscillation (EHO) is a steady-state, pedestal-localized instability that is observed in high-performance, ELM-free Quiescent H-mode plasmas. The spatiotemporal characteristics of the EHO have been measured in QH-mode plasmas with a 2D BES array that measures low-k density fluctuations. The skewness of the fluctuation distribution increases radially from -0.5 to +1 near the separatrix, consistent with the radially varying and highly non-sinusoidal harmonic structure. These fluctuation characteristics are qualitatively consistent with an outward particle transport driven by the EHO. The density fluctuation (ñ / n) profile peaks inside the pedestal, near ρ = 0.90-0.95, and is observed from ρ = 0 . 85 to the separatrix; the fundamental frequency is typically in the range of 5-15 kHz. The radial structure of the oscillation has a monotonically varying phase shift of approximately 180 degrees across the outer plasma region that changes direction with plasma current, suggesting that the mode structure is impacted by the high edge toroidal rotation velocity. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-08ER54999, DE-FC02-04ER54698, and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Turbulent particle transport as a function of toroidal rotation in DIII-D H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Mordijck, S.; Zeng, L.; Schmitz, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Doyle, E. J.; Groebner, R.; Meneghini, O.; Staebler, G. M.; Smith, S. P.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we show how changes in toroidal rotation, by controlling the injected torque, affect particle transport and confinement. The toroidal rotation is altered using the co- and counter neutral beam injection (NBI) in low collisionality H-mode plasmas on DIII-D (Luxon 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 614) with dominant electron cyclotron heating (ECH). We find that there is no correlation between the toroidal rotation shear and the inverse density gradient, which is observed on AUG when {{T}\\text{e}}/{{T}\\text{i}} is varied using ECH (Angioni et al 2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 215003). In DIII-D, we find that in a discharge with balanced torque injection, the E× B shear is smaller than the linear gyrokinetic growth rate for small {{k}θ}{ρs} for ρ =0.6 -0.85. This results in lower particle confinement. In the co- and counter- injected discharges the E× B shear is larger or close to the linear growth rate at the plasma edge and both configurations have higher particle confinement. In order to measure particle transport, we use a small periodic perturbative gas puff. This gas puff perturbs the density profiles and allows us to extract the perturbed diffusion and inward pinch coefficients. We observe a strong increase in the inward particle pinch in the counter-torque injected plasma. Finally, the calculated quasi-linear particle flux, nor the linear growth rates using TGLF (Staebler et al 2005 Phys. Plasmas 12 102508) agree with experimental observations.

  8. A semi-analytic power balance model for low (L) to high (H) mode transition power threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, R.; Jhang, Hogun; Kaw, P. K.; Diamond, P. H.; Nordman, H.; Bourdelle, C.

    2014-06-15

    We present a semi-analytic model for low (L) to high (H) mode transition power threshold (P{sub th}). Two main assumptions are made in our study. First, high poloidal mode number drift resistive ballooning modes (high-m DRBM) are assumed to be the dominant turbulence driver in a narrow edge region near to last closed flux surface. Second, the pre-transition edge profile and turbulent diffusivity at the narrow edge region pertain to turbulent equipartition. An edge power balance relation is derived by calculating the dissipated power flux through both turbulent conduction and convection, and radiation in the edge region. P{sub th} is obtained by imposing the turbulence quench rule due to sheared E × B rotation. Evaluation of P{sub th} shows a good agreement with experimental results in existing machines. Increase of P{sub th} at low density (i.e., the existence of roll-over density in P{sub th} vs. density) is shown to originate from the longer scale length of the density profile than that of the temperature profile.

  9. Non-power law scaling for access to the H-mode in tokamaks via symbolic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, A.; Lupelli, I.; Gelfusa, M.; Gaudio, P.

    2013-04-01

    The power threshold (PThresh) to access the H-mode in tokamaks remains a subject of active research, because up to now no theoretical relation has proved to be general enough to reliably interpret the L-H transition. Over the last few decades, much effort has therefore been devoted to deriving empirical scalings, assuming ‘a priori’ a power-law model structure. In this paper, an empirical scaling of PThresh without any a priori assumption about the model structure, i.e. about the functional form, is derived. Symbolic regression via genetic programming is applied to the latest version multi-machine International Tokamak Physics Activity International Global Power Threshold Data Base of validated ITER-like discharges. The derived model structure of the scaling for the global database is not in a power law form and includes a term that indicates saturation of PThresh with the strength of the toroidal field, plasma density and elongation. Furthermore, the single machine analysis of the database for the most representative machines of the international fusion scientific program demonstrates that the model structures are similar but the model parameters are different. The better extrapolation capability of the identified model structures with the proposed methodology is verified with a specific analysis of JET data at two different current regimes. The PThresh values extrapolated to ITER using the derived empirical model structures are a factor of two lower than those of traditional scaling laws and are predicted with a significantly better confidence.

  10. Investigation of Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) Coupling and its Critical Dependence on EBW Collisional Loss in High-β, H-mode ST Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Diem, S J; Caughman, J B; Efthimion, P C; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B P; Phillips, C K; Preinhaelter, J; Sabbagh, S A; Urban, J; Wilgen, J B

    2010-02-03

    High-β spherical tokamak (ST) plasma conditions cut off propagation of electron cyclotron (EC) waves used for heating and current drive in conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. The electron Bernstein wave (EBW) has no density cutoff and is strongly absorbed and emitted at the EC harmonics, allowing EBWs to be used for heating and current drive in STs. However, this application requires efficient EBW coupling in the high-β, H-mode ST plasma regime. EBW emission (EBE) diagnostics and modelling have been employed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study oblique EBW to O-mode (B–X–O) coupling and propagation in H-mode plasmas. Efficient EBW coupling was measured before the L–H transition, but rapidly decayed thereafter. EBE simulations show that EBW collisional damping prior to mode conversion (MC) in the plasma scrape off reduces the coupling efficiency during the H-mode phase when the electron temperature is less than 30 eV inside the MC layer. Lithium evaporation during H-mode plasmas was successfully used to reduce this EBW collisional damping by reducing the electron density and increase the electron temperature in the plasma scrape off. Lithium conditioning increased the measured B–X–O coupling efficiency from less than 10% to 60%, consistent with EBE simulations.

  11. Towards cooperative guidance and control of highly automated vehicles: H-Mode and Conduct-by-Wire.

    PubMed

    Flemisch, Frank Ole; Bengler, Klaus; Bubb, Heiner; Winner, Hermann; Bruder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a general ergonomic framework of cooperative guidance and control for vehicles with an emphasis on the cooperation between a human and a highly automated vehicle. In the twenty-first century, mobility and automation technologies are increasingly fused. In the sky, highly automated aircraft are flying with a high safety record. On the ground, a variety of driver assistance systems are being developed, and highly automated vehicles with increasingly autonomous capabilities are becoming possible. Human-centred automation has paved the way for a better cooperation between automation and humans. How can these highly automated systems be structured so that they can be easily understood, how will they cooperate with the human? The presented research was conducted using the methods of iterative build-up and refinement of framework by triangulation, i.e. by instantiating and testing the framework with at least two derived concepts and prototypes. This article sketches a general, conceptual ergonomic framework of cooperative guidance and control of highly automated vehicles, two concepts derived from the framework, prototypes and pilot data. Cooperation is exemplified in a list of aspects and related to levels of the driving task. With the concept 'Conduct-by-Wire', cooperation happens mainly on the guidance level, where the driver can delegate manoeuvres to the automation with a specialised manoeuvre interface. With H-Mode, a haptic-multimodal interaction with highly automated vehicles based on the H(orse)-Metaphor, cooperation is mainly done on guidance and control with a haptically active interface. Cooperativeness should be a key aspect for future human-automation systems. Especially for highly automated vehicles, cooperative guidance and control is a research direction with already promising concepts and prototypes that should be further explored. The application of the presented approach is every human-machine system that moves and includes high

  12. Towards cooperative guidance and control of highly automated vehicles: H-Mode and Conduct-by-Wire.

    PubMed

    Flemisch, Frank Ole; Bengler, Klaus; Bubb, Heiner; Winner, Hermann; Bruder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a general ergonomic framework of cooperative guidance and control for vehicles with an emphasis on the cooperation between a human and a highly automated vehicle. In the twenty-first century, mobility and automation technologies are increasingly fused. In the sky, highly automated aircraft are flying with a high safety record. On the ground, a variety of driver assistance systems are being developed, and highly automated vehicles with increasingly autonomous capabilities are becoming possible. Human-centred automation has paved the way for a better cooperation between automation and humans. How can these highly automated systems be structured so that they can be easily understood, how will they cooperate with the human? The presented research was conducted using the methods of iterative build-up and refinement of framework by triangulation, i.e. by instantiating and testing the framework with at least two derived concepts and prototypes. This article sketches a general, conceptual ergonomic framework of cooperative guidance and control of highly automated vehicles, two concepts derived from the framework, prototypes and pilot data. Cooperation is exemplified in a list of aspects and related to levels of the driving task. With the concept 'Conduct-by-Wire', cooperation happens mainly on the guidance level, where the driver can delegate manoeuvres to the automation with a specialised manoeuvre interface. With H-Mode, a haptic-multimodal interaction with highly automated vehicles based on the H(orse)-Metaphor, cooperation is mainly done on guidance and control with a haptically active interface. Cooperativeness should be a key aspect for future human-automation systems. Especially for highly automated vehicles, cooperative guidance and control is a research direction with already promising concepts and prototypes that should be further explored. The application of the presented approach is every human-machine system that moves and includes high

  13. Impact of E × B flow shear on turbulence and resulting power fall-off width in H-mode plasmas in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Q. Q. Zhong, F. C. E-mail: fczhong@dhu.edu.cn; Jia, M. N.; Xu, G. S. E-mail: fczhong@dhu.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Wang, H. Q.; Chen, R.; Yan, N.; Liu, S. C.; Chen, L.; Li, Y. L.; Liu, J. B.

    2015-06-15

    The power fall-off width in the H-mode scrape-off layer (SOL) in tokamaks shows a strong inverse dependence on the plasma current, which was noticed by both previous multi-machine scaling work [T. Eich et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 093031 (2013)] and more recent work [L. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 114002 (2014)] on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. To understand the underlying physics, probe measurements of three H-mode discharges with different plasma currents have been studied in this work. The results suggest that a higher plasma current is accompanied by a stronger E×B shear and a shorter radial correlation length of turbulence in the SOL, thus resulting in a narrower power fall-off width. A simple model has also been applied to demonstrate the suppression effect of E×B shear on turbulence in the SOL and shows relatively good agreement with the experimental observations.

  14. Impact of E × B flow shear on turbulence and resulting power fall-off width in H-mode plasmas in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q. Q.; Xu, G. S.; Zhong, F. C.; Wang, L.; Wang, H. Q.; Chen, R.; Yan, N.; Liu, S. C.; Chen, L.; Jia, M. N.; Li, Y. L.; Liu, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    The power fall-off width in the H-mode scrape-off layer (SOL) in tokamaks shows a strong inverse dependence on the plasma current, which was noticed by both previous multi-machine scaling work [T. Eich et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 093031 (2013)] and more recent work [L. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 114002 (2014)] on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. To understand the underlying physics, probe measurements of three H-mode discharges with different plasma currents have been studied in this work. The results suggest that a higher plasma current is accompanied by a stronger E × B shear and a shorter radial correlation length of turbulence in the SOL, thus resulting in a narrower power fall-off width. A simple model has also been applied to demonstrate the suppression effect of E × B shear on turbulence in the SOL and shows relatively good agreement with the experimental observations.

  15. Comparison of resonant magnetic perturbation-induced particle transport changes in H-mode (DIII-D) and L-mode (MAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordijck, S.; Moyer, R. A.; Kirk, A.; Tamain, P.; Temple, D.; McKee, G. R.; Nardon, E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent experiments show the impact of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on the density (Schmitz et al 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 124029, Evans et al 2008 Nucl. Fusion 48 024002, Kirk et al 2008 Nucl. Fusion 50 024002, Liang et al 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 265004), leading to a so-called density pump-out. Previous comparisons between DIII-D and TEXTOR have focused on the similarities of the deformation of the separatrix and the creation of striations at the intersection of the main chamber wall (Schmitz et al 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 124029; Schmitz et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 165005). In this paper, we compare the difference in magnitude of the experimentally observed density pump-out in L-mode with H-mode in two diverted tokamaks: MAST and DIII-D. In order to address the differences in magnetic field from the coils, plasma shape and q95 between the two devices, we compute a weighted magnetic diffusion coefficient with a vacuum field line tracing code. This allows us to compare the changes in density pump-out with the weighted magnetic diffusion coefficient, using a simple particle diffusion model. We find that the density pump-out is vastly different in the two confinement regimes, suggesting different particle transport mechanisms. Since one main difference in transport characteristics between L- and H-mode is turbulence, we compare turbulent particle characteristics. We find that in L-mode (MAST) the fluctuations and E × B shear increase at the plasma edge, whereas in H-mode (DIII-D) the fluctuations decrease at the plasma edge. Deeper inside the core, the E × B shear remains similar in L-mode (MAST), whereas a large decrease that quickly saturates with RMP strength is observed in H-mode (DIII-D). These results suggest that the RMP-induced particle transport at the plasma edge in L-mode (MAST) is the result from increases in turbulent particle transport, whereas the results in H-mode (DIII-D) suggest a decrease in turbulent

  16. In-out asymmetry of divertor particle flux in H-mode with edge localized modes on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. B.; Guo, H. Y.; Wang, L.; Xu, G. S.; Xia, T. Y.; Liu, S. C.; Xu, X. Q.; Li, Jie; Chen, L.; Yan, N.; Wang, H. Q.; Xu, J. C.; Feng, W.; Shao, L. M.; Deng, G. Z.; Liu, H.; EAST Probe Team

    2016-06-01

    The in-out divertor asymmetry in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), as manifested by particle fluxes measured by the divertor triple Langmuir probe arrays, is significantly enhanced during type-I edge localized modes (ELMs), favoring the inner divertor in lower single null (LSN) for the normal toroidal field (B t) direction, i.e. with the ion B  ×  \

  17. Observations of Reduced Electron Gyro-scale Fluctuations in National Spherical Torus Experiment H-mode Plasmas with Large E × B Flow Shear

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.; Kaye, S. M.; Lee, W.; Mazzucato, E.; Park, H. K.; Bell, R. E.; Domier, C. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Levinton, F. M.; Luhmann, Jr., N. C.; Menard, J. E.; Yu, H.

    2009-02-13

    Electron gyro-scale fluctuation measurements in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) H-mode plasmas with large toroidal rotation reveal fluctuations consistent with electron temper- ature gradient (ETG) turbulence. Large toroidal rotation in NSTX plasmas with neutral beam injection generates E × B flow shear rates comparable to ETG linear growth rates. Enhanced fluctuations occur when the electron temperature gradient is marginally stable with respect to the ETG linear critical gradient. Fluctuation amplitudes decrease when the E × B flow shear rate exceeds ETG linear growth rates. The observations indicate E × B flow shear can be an effective suppression mechanism for ETG turbulence.

  18. First observation of a new zonal-flow cycle state in the H-mode transport barrier of the experimental advanced superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G. S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Guo, H. Y.; Zhang, W.; Chang, J. F.; Wang, L.; Chen, R.; Liu, S. C.; Ding, S. Y.; Shao, L. M.; Xiong, H.; Naulin, V.; Diamond, P. H.; Tynan, G. R.; Xu, M.; Yan, N.; Zhao, H. L.

    2012-12-15

    A new turbulence-flow cycle state has been discovered after the formation of a transport barrier in the H-mode plasma edge during a quiescent phase on the EAST superconducting tokamak. Zonal-flow modulation of high-frequency-broadband (0.05-1 MHz) turbulence was observed in the steep-gradient region leading to intermittent transport events across the edge transport barrier. Good confinement (H{sub 98y,2} {approx} 1) has been achieved in this state, even with input heating power near the L-H transition threshold. A novel model based on predator-prey interaction between turbulence and zonal flows reproduced this state well.

  19. Long-distance correlation and zonal flow structures induced by mean ExB shear flows in the biasing H-mode at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Jachmich, S.; Weynants, R. R.; Schoor, M. van; Vergote, M.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Schmitz, O.; Unterberg, B.

    2009-11-15

    Long-distance toroidal correlations of potential and density fluctuations have been investigated at the TEXTOR tokamak [H. Soltwisch et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 26, 23 (1984)] in edge electrode-biasing experiments. During the biasing-induced H-mode, the dc ExB shear flow triggers a zonal flow structure and hence long-distance correlation in potential fluctuations, whereas for density fluctuations there is nearly no correlation. These results indicate an intimate interaction between the mean and zonal flows, and the significance of long range correlations in improved-confinement regimes.

  20. The transition mechanisms of the E to H mode and the H to E mode in an inductively coupled argon-mercury mixture discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao; Yu, Peng-Cheng; Liu, Yu; Zheng, Zhe; Xu, Liang; Wang, Pi; Cao, Jin-Xiang

    2015-10-15

    In our experiment, the transition points between the two operational modes of capacitive coupling (E mode) and inductive coupling (H mode) were investigated at a wide range of mercury vapor pressures in an inductively coupled plasma, varying with the input radio-frequency powers and the total filling pressures (10 Pa–30 Pa). The electron temperatures were calculated versus with the mercury vapor pressures for different values of the total filling pressures. The transition power points and electron density also were measured in this study. It is shown that the transition powers, whether the E to H mode transition or the H to E mode transition, are lower than that of the argon discharge, and these powers almost increase with the mercury vapor pressure rising. However, the transition electron density follows an inverse relationship with the mercury vapor pressures compared with the transition powers. In addition, at the lower pressures and higher mercury vapor pressures, an inverse hysteresis was observed clearly, which did not appear in the argon gas plasma. We suggest that all these results are attributed to the electron-neutral collision frequency changed with the additional mercury vapor pressures.

  1. Heuristic drift-based model of the power scrape-off width in low-gas-puff H-mode tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    A heuristic model for the plasma scrape-off width in low-gas-puff tokamak H-mode plasmas is introduced. Grad B and curv B drifts into the scrape-off layer (SOL) are balanced against near-sonic parallel flows out of the SOL, to the divertor plates. The overall particle flow pattern posited is a modification for open field lines of Pfirsch-Schlüter flows to include order-unity sinks to the divertors. These assumptions result in an estimated SOL width of ~2aρp/R. They also result in a first-principles calculation of the particle confinement time of H-mode plasmas, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. It is next assumed that anomalous perpendicular electron thermal diffusivity is the dominant source of heat flux across the separatrix, investing the SOL width, derived above, with heat from the main plasma. The separatrix temperature is calculated based on a two-point model balancing power input to the SOL with Spitzer-Härm parallel thermal conduction losses to the divertor. This results in a heuristic closed-form prediction for the power scrape-off width that is in reasonable quantitative agreement both in absolute magnitude and in scaling with recent experimental data. Further work should include full numerical calculations, including all magnetic and electric drifts, as well as more thorough comparison with experimental data.

  2. High-harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive Results for Deuterium H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, C.K. Phillisp, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, and the NSTX Team

    2012-07-25

    A critical research goal for the spherical torus (ST) program is to initiate, ramp-up, and sustain a discharge without using the central solenoid. Simulations of non-solenoidal plasma scenarios in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [1] predict that high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) [2] can play an important roll in enabling fully non-inductive (fNI {approx} 1) ST operation. The NSTX fNI {approx} 1 strategy requires 5-6 MW of HHFW power (PRF) to be coupled into a non-inductively generated discharge [3] with a plasma current, Ip {approx} 250-350 kA, driving the plasma into an HHFW H-mode with Ip {approx} 500 kA, a level where 90 keV deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI) can heat the plasma and provide additional CD. The initial approach on NSTX has been to heat Ip {approx} 300 kA, inductively heated, deuterium plasmas with CD phased HHFW power [2], in order to drive the plasma into an H-mode with fNI {approx} 1.

  3. Investigation of peeling-ballooning stability prior to transient outbursts accompanying transitions out of H-mode in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldon, D.; Boivin, R. L.; Groebner, R. J.; Osborne, T. H.; Snyder, P. B.; Turnbull, A. D.; Tynan, G. R.; Boedo, J. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Kolemen, E.; Schmitz, L.; Wilson, H. R.

    2015-05-01

    The H-mode transport barrier allows confinement of roughly twice as much energy as in an L-mode plasma. Termination of H-mode necessarily requires release of this energy, and the timescale of that release is of critical importance for the lifetimes of plasma facing components in next step tokamaks such as ITER. H-L transition sequences in modern tokamaks often begin with a transient outburst which appears to be superficially similar to and has sometimes been referred to as a type-I edge localized mode (ELM). Type-I ELMs have been shown to be consistent with ideal peeling ballooning instability and are characterized by significant (up to ˜50%) reduction of pedestal height on short (˜1 ms) timescales. Knowing whether or not this type of instability is present during H-L back transitions will be important of planning for plasma ramp-down in ITER. This paper presents tests of pre-transition experimental data against ideal peeling-ballooning stability calculations with the ELITE code and supports those results with secondary experiments that together show that the transient associated with the H-L transition is not triggered by the same physics as are type-I ELMs.

  4. Investigation of peeling-ballooning stability prior to transient outbursts accompanying transitions out of H-mode in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Eldon, D.; Boivin, R. L.; Groebner, R. J.; Osborne, T. H.; Snyder, P. B.; Turnbull, A. D.; Burrell, K. H.; Tynan, G. R.; Boedo, J. A.; Kolemen, E.; Schmitz, L.; Wilson, H. R.

    2015-05-15

    The H-mode transport barrier allows confinement of roughly twice as much energy as in an L-mode plasma. Termination of H-mode necessarily requires release of this energy, and the timescale of that release is of critical importance for the lifetimes of plasma facing components in next step tokamaks such as ITER. H-L transition sequences in modern tokamaks often begin with a transient outburst which appears to be superficially similar to and has sometimes been referred to as a type-I edge localized mode (ELM). Type-I ELMs have been shown to be consistent with ideal peeling ballooning instability and are characterized by significant (up to ∼50%) reduction of pedestal height on short (∼1 ms) timescales. Knowing whether or not this type of instability is present during H-L back transitions will be important of planning for plasma ramp-down in ITER. This paper presents tests of pre-transition experimental data against ideal peeling-ballooning stability calculations with the ELITE code and supports those results with secondary experiments that together show that the transient associated with the H-L transition is not triggered by the same physics as are type-I ELMs.

  5. Scaling of divertor power footprint width in RF-heated type-III ELMy H-mode on the EAST superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Guo, H. Y.; Xu, G. S.; Liu, S. C.; Gan, K. F.; Wang, H. Q.; Gong, X. Z.; Liang, Y.; Zou, X. L.; Hu, J. S.; Chen, L.; Xu, J. C.; Liu, J. B.; Yan, N.; Zhang, W.; Chen, R.; Shao, L. M.; Ding, S.; Hu, G. H.; Feng, W.; Zhao, N.; Xiang, L. Y.; Liu, Y. L.; Li, Y. L.; Sang, C. F.; Sun, J. Z.; Wang, D. Z.; Ding, H. B.; Luo, G. N.; Chen, J. L.; Gao, X.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J.; the EAST Team

    2014-11-01

    Dedicated experiments for the scaling of divertor power footprint width have been performed in the ITER-relevant radio-frequency (RF)-heated H-mode scheme under the lower single null, double null and upper single null divertor configurations in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) under lithium wall coating conditioning. A strong inverse scaling of the edge localized mode (ELM)-averaged power fall-off width with the plasma current (equivalently the poloidal field) has been demonstrated for the attached type-III ELMy H-mode as λq \\propto Ip-1.05 by various heat flux diagnostics including the divertor Langmuir probes (LPs), infra-red (IR) thermograph and reciprocating LPs on the low-field side. The IR camera and divertor LP measurements show that λq,IR ≈ {λq,div{-LPs}}/{1.3}=1.15Bp,omp-1.25 , in good agreement with the multi-machine scaling trend during the inter-ELM phase between type-I ELMs or ELM-free enhanced Dα (EDA). H-mode. However, the magnitude is nearly doubled, which may be attributed to the different operation scenarios or heating schemes in EAST, i.e., dominated by electron heating. It is also shown that the type-III ELMs only broaden the power fall-off width slightly, and the ELM-averaged width is representative for the inter-ELM period. Furthermore, the inverse Ip (Bp) scaling appears to be independent of the divertor configurations in EAST. The divertor power footprint integral width, fall-off width and dissipation width derived from EAST IR camera measurements follow the relation, λint ≅ λq + 1.64S, yielding λ_intEAST =(1.39+/- 0.03)λqEAST +(0.97+/- 0.35) mm . Detailed analysis of these three characteristic widths was carried out to shed more light on their extrapolation to ITER.

  6. Reduction of TEM/ETG-scale Density Fluctuations in the Core and Edge of H-mode DIII-D Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.

    2008-11-01

    Improved confinement during H-mode has been linked to ExB shear suppression of large-scale (kθρs<=0.3) turbulence within an edge transport barrier. While larger scale eddies are preferentially suppressed by increased shear flow in this paradigm, the effects on smaller scale (TEM/ETG-scale) turbulence are less certain. Recent results from DIII-D provide the first experimental evidence that intermediate-scale turbulence (1 < kθρs<=3) together with larger-scale electron temperature fluctuations [1] are also reduced promptly at the L-H transition. These reductions are not confined to the edge region. Intermediate-scale density fluctuations obtained via Doppler backscattering, are significantly reduced (30%-50%) over a range of normalized radii (0.5 <=r/a <=0.85) within a few ms of the L-H transition. A larger reduction (>=75%) is observed at the top of the pedestal (r/a ˜0.9) within 0.2 ms. In addition, low-k electron temperature fluctuations (kθρs<=0.3, from correlation ECE) are strongly reduced (>75%) at the L-H mode transition and during QH-mode (r/a ˜0.7). Gyrokinetic simulation results [2] predict that Te fluctuations contribute significantly to L-mode electron heat transport, hence, the observed reduction is likely an important factor in the observed improved H-mode electron heat confinement (χe^QH/χ3^L < 0.25). Doppler backscattering is also utilized to probe time-dependent shear flows (i.e. zonal flows). The results clearly indicate that zonal flow levels are anti-correlated with the amplitude of intermediate-scale density turbulence in L-mode, suggesting that zonal flows play an important role in turbulence/transport regulation. 3pt [1] L. Schmitz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 035002 (2008).[2] A.E. White et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 056116 (2008).

  7. The effects of neutral gas heating on H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2012-09-15

    The H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor are simulated for low pressure argon discharge range of 0.02-0.3 mbar with neutral gas heating and at ambient temperature. An experimentally fitted 3D power evolution plot for 0.02 mbar argon pressure is also shown to visualize the effects of hysteresis in the system. Comparisons between simulation and experimental measurements show good agreement in the pressure range of 0.02-0.3 mbar for transition currents and 0.02-0.1 mbar for maintenance currents only when neutral gas heating is considered. This suggests that neutral gas heating plays a non-negligible role in determining the mode transition points of a rf ICP system.

  8. Thermal instability explanation of similar density limits in gas fueled, DIII-D H-mode shots with different operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, W. M.; Petrie, T. W.; Leonard, A. W.

    2002-03-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, F. Batty, C. Baxi et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159] examined the effect of different operating conditions ("open" and "closed" divertor geometry, active pumping, fueling location) on the maximum achievable density in gas fueled H-mode (high confinement mode) discharges. Several phenomena observed at these higher densities (≈0.8 the Greenwald density)—degradation in energy confinement, detachment of the core plasma from the divertor plate, multifaceted asymmetric radiation from edge formation—are found to be correlated with the predicted onset of various thermal instabilities in the plasma edge or divertor regions. The similarity of the maximum achievable densities under the different operating conditions can be related to a similarity of edge thermal instability characteristics.

  9. Experimental Investigation of the Role of Fluid Turbulent Stresses and Edge Plasma Flows for Intrinsic Rotation Generation in DIII-D H-Mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S. H.; Solomon, W. M.

    2011-03-18

    The first measurements of turbulent stresses and flows inside the separatrix of a tokamak H-mode plasma are reported, using a reciprocating multitip Langmuir probe at the DIII-D tokamak. A strong co-current rotation layer at the separatrix is found to precede intrinsic rotation development in the core. The measured fluid turbulent stresses transport toroidal momentum outward against the velocity gradient and thus try to sustain the edge layer. However, large kinetic stresses must exist to explain the net inward momentum transport leading to co-current core plasma rotation. The importance of such kinetic stresses is corroborated by the success of a simple orbit loss model, representing a purely kinetic mechanism, in the prediction of features of the edge corotation layer.

  10. Generation Of High Non-inductive Plasma Current Fraction H-mode Discharges By High-harmonic Last Wave Heating In The National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G; Kessel, C E; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D; Phillips, D K; Valeo, E J; Wilson, J R; Ryan, P M; Bonoli, P T; Wright, J C

    2012-02-13

    1.4 MW of 30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating, with current drive antenna phasing, has generated a Ip = 300kA, BT (0) = 0.55T deuterium H-mode plasma in the National Spherical Torus Experiment that has a non-inductive plasma current fraction, fNI = 0.7-1. Seventy-five percent of the non-inductive current was generated inside an internal transport barrier that formed at a normalized minor radius, r/a {approx} 0.4 . Three quarters of the non-inductive current was bootstrap current and the remaining non-inductive current was generated directly by HHFW power inside r/a {approx} 0.2.

  11. High Non-inductive Fraction H-mode Discharges Generated by High-harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Hosea, J.; Kessel, C. E.; LeBlanc, B; Mueller, D.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Bonoli, P.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    A deuterium H-mode discharge with a plasma current of 300 kA, an axial toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T, and a calculated non-inductive plasma current fraction of 0.7 1 has been generated in the National Spherical Torus Experiment by 1.4MW of 30MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive. Seventy-five percent of the non-inductive current was generated inside an internal transport barrier that formed at a normalized minor radius 0.4. Three quarters of the non-inductive current was bootstrap current, and the remaining non-inductive current was generated directly by HHFW power inside a normalized minor radius 0.2. VC 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Recrystallization of bulk and plasma-coated tungsten with accumulated thermal energy relevant to Type-I ELM in ITER H-mode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Su; Lim, Sun-Taek; Jin, Younggil; Lee, Jin Young; Song, Jae-Min; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2015-08-01

    The recrystallization of bulk tungsten is investigated under various thermal loads that are relevant to the accumulation energy during Type-I ELM in ITER H-mode operation. A thermal plasma torch is used to examine only the thermal load effect on the material; therefore, the charge and atomic effects are ignored. In this condition, recrystallization is observed in bulk W with a surface temperature above 1700 °C. The effect becomes severe with a finite recrystallization thickness near the surface, which introduces vertical cracking along grain boundaries with increasing thermal load. However, plasma-sprayed tungsten (PS-W) is not crystallized because neighboring lamellas merge, destroying their interlayer and producing no vertical cracks. This is attributed to an annealing effect in PS-W. Therefore, these results suggest that a multilayer W structure is advantageous in the fabrication of W, especially for long pulse operation in a future fusion reactor.

  13. The effects of neutral gas heating on H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2012-09-01

    The H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor are simulated for low pressure argon discharge range of 0.02-0.3 mbar with neutral gas heating and at ambient temperature. An experimentally fitted 3D power evolution plot for 0.02 mbar argon pressure is also shown to visualize the effects of hysteresis in the system. Comparisons between simulation and experimental measurements show good agreement in the pressure range of 0.02-0.3 mbar for transition currents and 0.02-0.1 mbar for maintenance currents only when neutral gas heating is considered. This suggests that neutral gas heating plays a non-negligible role in determining the mode transition points of a rf ICP system.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic stability at the edge region in H-mode plasmas with long edge-localized-mode-free phases in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toi, K.; Ohdachi, S.; Ueda, R.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Nicolas, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Ogawa, K.; Tanaka, K.; Takemura, Y.; LHD Experiment Group

    2016-09-01

    Clear suppression of magnetic fluctuations associated with resistive interchange modes (RICs) is observed during long edge-localized-mode (ELM)-free phases of the H-mode plasma in an outward-shifted configuration of the Large Helical Decice, in which a steep pressure gradient is generated at the plasma edge in the magnetic hill. The ELM-free H-phase is interrupted by large amplitude ELMs which are thought to be induced through nonlinear evolution of the RICs having m  =  1/n  =  1 dominant component (m: poloidal mode number, n: toroidal one). The m  =  1/n  =  1 RIC amplitude is enhanced about 10 times compared with the H-phase level during each ELM. In most of the H-mode shots, the final ELM-free phase returns to L-phase by a large amplitude ELM. In the L-phase, the RIC amplitude is enhanced by a factor of ~3 compared with that in the H-phase, although the edge pressure gradient is reduced considerably. Linear resistive magnetohydrodynamic stability analysis is attempted using experimentally obtained equilibrium profiles. From the numerical analysis, the distance between the location of the steepest pressure gradient and the main mode resonance surface, i.e. the rotational transform ι  =  1, is found to be important for a large growth of the m  =  1/n  =  1 RIC in the H-phase.

  15. Implementation of a new atomic basis for the He I equilibrium line ratio technique for electron temperature and density diagnostic in the SOL for H-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz Burgos, J. M.; Schmitz, O.; Unterberg, E. A.; Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.

    2011-08-01

    Evaluating the ratio of selected helium lines allows for measurement of electron densities and temperatures. This technique is applied for L-mode plasmas at TEXTOR (O. Schmitz et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 (2008) 115004). We report our first efforts to extend it to H-mode plasma diagnostics in DIII-D. This technique depends on the accuracy of the atomic data used in the collisional radiative model (CRM). We present predictions for the electron temperatures and densities by using recently calculated R-Matrix With Pseudostates (RMPS) and Convergent Close-Coupling (CCC) electron-impact excitation and ionization data. We include contributions from higher Rydberg states by means of the projection matrix. These effects become significant for high electron density conditions, which are typical in H-mode. We apply a non-equilibrium model for the time propagation of the ionization balance to predict line emission profiles from experimental H-mode data from DIII-D.

  16. Contrasting H-mode behaviour with deuterium fuelling and nitrogen seeding in the all-carbon and metallic versions of JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddison, G. P.; Giroud, C.; Alper, B.; Arnoux, G.; Balboa, I.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Boboc, A.; Brezinsek, S.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coelho, R.; Coenen, J. W.; Coffey, I.; da Silva Aresta Belo, P. C.; Devaux, S.; Devynck, P.; Eich, T.; Felton, R. C.; Flanagan, J.; Frassinetti, L.; Garzotti, L.; Groth, M.; Jachmich, S.; Järvinen, A.; Joffrin, E.; Kempenaars, M. A. H.; Kruezi, U.; Lawson, K. D.; Lehnen, M.; Leyland, M. J.; Liu, Y.; Lomas, P. J.; Lowry, C. G.; Marsen, S.; Matthews, G. F.; McCormick, G. K.; Meigs, A. G.; Morris, A. W.; Neu, R.; Nunes, I. M.; Oberkofler, M.; Rimini, F. G.; Saarelma, S.; Sieglin, B.; Sips, A. C. C.; Sirinelli, A.; Stamp, M. F.; van Rooij, G. J.; Ward, D. J.; Wischmeier, M.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2014-07-01

    The former all-carbon wall on JET has been replaced with beryllium in the main torus and tungsten in the divertor to mimic the surface materials envisaged for ITER. Comparisons are presented between type I H-mode characteristics in each design by examining respective scans over deuterium fuelling and impurity seeding, required to ameliorate exhaust loads both in JET at full capability and in ITER. Attention is focused upon a common high-triangularity, single-null divertor configuration at 2.5 MA, q95 ≈ 3.5 yielding the most robust all-C performance. Contrasting results between the alternative linings are found firstly in unseeded plasmas, for which purity is improved and intrinsic radiation reduced in the ITER-like wall (ILW) but normalized energy confinement is ≈30% lower than in all-C counterparts, owing to a commensurately lower (electron) pedestal temperature. Divertor recycling is also radically altered, with slower, inboard-outboard asymmetric transients at ELMs and spontaneous oscillations in between them. Secondly, nitrogen seeding elicits opposite responses in the ILW to all-C experience, tending to raise plasma density, reduce ELM frequency, and above all to recover (electron) pedestal pressure, hence global confinement, almost back to previous levels. A hitherto unrecognized role of light impurities in pedestal stability and dynamics is consequently suggested. Thirdly, while heat loads on the divertor outboard target between ELMs are successfully reduced in proportion to the radiative cooling and ELM frequency effects of N in both wall environments, more surprisingly, average power ejected by ELMs also declines in the same proportion for the ILW. Detachment between transients is simultaneously promoted. Finally, inter-ELM W sources in the ILW divertor tend to fall with N input, although core accumulation possibly due to increased particle confinement still leads to significantly less steady conditions than in all-C plasmas. This limitation of ILW H-modes

  17. Three-dimensional simulation of H-mode plasmas with localized divertor impurity injection on Alcator C-Mod using the edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE

    SciTech Connect

    Lore, Jeremy D.; Reinke, M. L.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B. A.; Lipschultz, B.; Terry, J. L.; Pitts, R. A.; Feng, Y.

    2015-04-28

    We study experiments in Alcator C-Mod to assess the level of toroidal asymmetry in divertor conditions resulting from poloidally and toroidally localized extrinsic impurity gas seeding show a weak toroidal peaking (~1.1) in divertor electron temperatures for high-power enhanced D-alpha H-modeplasmas. This is in contrast to similar experiments in Ohmically heated L-modeplasmas, which showed a clear toroidal modulation in the divertor electron temperature. Modeling of these experiments using the 3D edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE [Y. Feng et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 241, 930 (1997)] qualitatively reproduces these trends, and indicates that the different response in the simulations is due to the ionization location of the injected nitrogen. Low electron temperatures in the private flux region (PFR) in L-mode result in a PFR plasma that is nearly transparent to neutral nitrogen, while in H-mode the impurities are ionized in close proximity to the injection location, with this latter case yielding a largely axisymmetric radiation pattern in the scrape-off-layer. In conclusion, the consequences for the ITER gas injection system are discussed. Quantitative agreement with the experiment is lacking in some areas, suggesting potential areas for improving the physics model in EMC3-EIRENE.

  18. Three-dimensional simulation of H-mode plasmas with localized divertor impurity injection on Alcator C-Mod using the edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE

    DOE PAGES

    Lore, Jeremy D.; Reinke, M. L.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B. A.; Lipschultz, B.; Terry, J. L.; Pitts, R. A.; Feng, Y.

    2015-04-28

    We study experiments in Alcator C-Mod to assess the level of toroidal asymmetry in divertor conditions resulting from poloidally and toroidally localized extrinsic impurity gas seeding show a weak toroidal peaking (~1.1) in divertor electron temperatures for high-power enhanced D-alpha H-modeplasmas. This is in contrast to similar experiments in Ohmically heated L-modeplasmas, which showed a clear toroidal modulation in the divertor electron temperature. Modeling of these experiments using the 3D edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE [Y. Feng et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 241, 930 (1997)] qualitatively reproduces these trends, and indicates that the different response in the simulations is due tomore » the ionization location of the injected nitrogen. Low electron temperatures in the private flux region (PFR) in L-mode result in a PFR plasma that is nearly transparent to neutral nitrogen, while in H-mode the impurities are ionized in close proximity to the injection location, with this latter case yielding a largely axisymmetric radiation pattern in the scrape-off-layer. In conclusion, the consequences for the ITER gas injection system are discussed. Quantitative agreement with the experiment is lacking in some areas, suggesting potential areas for improving the physics model in EMC3-EIRENE.« less

  19. Discovery of stationary operation of quiescent H-mode plasmas with net-zero neutral beam injection torque and high energy confinement on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrell, K. H.; Barada, K.; Chen, X.; Garofalo, A. M.; Groebner, R. J.; Muscatello, C. M.; Osborne, T. H.; Petty, C. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, W. M.; Yan, Z.; Zeng, L.

    2016-05-01

    Recent experiments in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1996 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159] have led to the discovery of a means of modifying edge turbulence to achieve stationary, high confinement operation without Edge Localized Mode (ELM) instabilities and with no net external torque input. Eliminating the ELM-induced heat bursts and controlling plasma stability at low rotation represent two of the great challenges for fusion energy. By exploiting edge turbulence in a novel manner, we achieved excellent tokamak performance, well above the H98y2 international tokamak energy confinement scaling (H98y2 = 1.25), thus meeting an additional confinement challenge that is usually difficult at low torque. The new regime is triggered in double null plasmas by ramping the injected torque to zero and then maintaining it there. This lowers E × B rotation shear in the plasma edge, allowing low-k, broadband, electromagnetic turbulence to increase. In the H-mode edge, a narrow transport barrier usually grows until MHD instability (a peeling ballooning mode) leads to the ELM heat burst. However, the increased turbulence reduces the pressure gradient, allowing the development of a broader and thus higher transport barrier. A 60% increase in pedestal pressure and 40% increase in energy confinement result. An increase in the E × B shearing rate inside of the edge pedestal is a key factor in the confinement increase. Strong double-null plasma shaping raises the threshold for the ELM instability, allowing the plasma to reach a transport-limited state near but below the explosive ELM stability boundary. The resulting plasmas have burning-plasma-relevant βN = 1.6-1.8 and run without the need for extra torque from 3D magnetic fields. To date, stationary conditions have been produced for 2 s or 12 energy confinement times, limited only by external hardware constraints. Stationary operation with

  20. Implementation of a new atomic basis for the He I equilibrium line ratio technique for electron temperature and density diagnostic in the SOL for H-mode plasmas in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, JMM; Schmitz, O.; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Loch, S. D.; Ballance, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the ratio of selected helium lines allows for measurement of electron densities and temperatures. This technique is applied for L-mode plasmas at TEXTOR (O. Schmitz et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 (2008) 115004). We report our first efforts to extend it to H-mode plasma diagnostics in DIII-D. This technique depends on the accuracy of the atomic data used in the collisional radiative model (CRM). We present predictions for the electron temperatures and densities by using recently calculated R-Matrix With Pseudostates (RMPS) and Convergent Close-Coupling (CCC) electron-impact excitation and ionization data. We include contributions from higher Rydberg states by means of the projection matrix. These effects become significant for high electron density conditions, which are typical in H-mode. We apply a non-equilibrium model for the time propagation of the ionization balance to predict line emission profiles from experimental H-mode data from DIII-D. (C) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ion mobility and transport barriers in the tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H.; Hazeltine, R.D. ); Zhang, Y.Z. ); Valanju, P.M. )

    1993-12-01

    The character of charged particle motion in an axisymmetric toroidal system with a constant radial electric field is investigated both analytically and numerically. Ion radial mobility caused by the combined effects of the radial electric field and charge exchange is found. A simple moment argument in the banana regime matches the simulation results well. Relation of present work and high confinement (H-mode) experiment is also discussed.

  2. Ion mobility and transport barriers in the tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, H.; Hazeltine, R.D.; Valanju, P.M.; Zhang, Y.Z.

    1993-06-01

    The character of charged particle motion in an axisymmetric toroidal system with a constant radial electric field is investigated both analytically and numerically. Ion radial mobility caused by the combined effects of the radial electric field and charge exchange is found. A simple moment argument in the banana regime matches the simulation results well. Relation of present work and high confinement (H-mode) experiment is also discussed.

  3. The role of parallel heat transport in the relation between upstream scrape-off layer widths and target heat flux width in H-mode plasmas of NSTX.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J W; Boedo, J A; Maingi, R; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-01-05

    The physics of parallel heat transport was tested in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000) and S. M. Kaye, et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S168 (2005)] tokamak by comparing the upstream electron temperature (T{sub e}) and density (n{sub e}) profiles measured by the mid-plane reciprocating probe to the heat flux (q{sub {perpendicular}}) profile at the divertor plate measured by an infrared (IR) camera. It is found that electron conduction explains the near SOL width data reasonably well while the far SOL, which is in the sheath limited regime, requires an ion heat flux profile broader than the electron one to be consistent with the experimental data. The measured plasma parameters indicate that the SOL energy transport should be in the conduction-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} (radial distance from the separatrix location) < 2-3 cm. The SOL energy transport should transition to the sheath-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm. The T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and q{sub {perpendicular}} profiles are better described by an offset exponential function instead of a simple exponential. The conventional relation between mid plane electron temperature decay length ({lambda}{sub Te}) and target heat flux decay length ({lambda}{sub q}) is {lambda}{sub Te} = 7/2{lambda}{sub q}, whereas the newly-derived relation, assuming offset exponential functional forms, implies {lambda}{sub Te} = (2-2.5){lambda}{sub q}. The measured values of {lambda}{sub Te}/{lambda}{sub q} differ from the new prediction by 25-30%. The measured {lambda}{sub q} values in the far SOL (R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm) are 9-10cm, while the expected values are 2.7 < {lambda}{sub q} < 4.9 cm (for sheath-limited regime). We propose that the ion heat flux profile is substantially broader than the electron heat flux profile as an explanation for this discrepancy in the far SOL.

  4. The EPED pedestal model and edge localized mode-suppressed regimes: Studies of quiescent H-mode and development of a model for edge localized mode suppression via resonant magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, P. B.; Osborne, T. H.; Burrell, K. H.; Groebner, R. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Wade, M. R.; Nazikian, R.; Orlov, D. M.; Schmitz, O.; Wilson, H. R.

    2012-05-15

    The EPED model predicts the H-mode pedestal height and width based upon two fundamental and calculable constraints: (1) onset of non-local peeling-ballooning modes at low to intermediate mode number, (2) onset of nearly local kinetic ballooning modes at high mode number. We present detailed tests of the EPED model in discharges with edge localized modes (ELMs), employing new high resolution measurements, and finding good quantitative agreement across a range of parameters. The EPED model is then applied for the first time to quiescent H-mode (QH), finding a similar level of agreement between predicted and observed pedestal height and width, and suggesting that the model can be used to predict the critical density for QH-mode operation. Finally, the model is applied toward understanding the suppression of ELMs with 3D resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP). Combining EPED with plasma response physics, a new working model for RMP ELM suppression is developed. We propose that ELMs are suppressed when a 'wall' associated with the RMP blocks the inward penetration of the edge transport barrier. A calculation of the required location of this 'wall' with EPED is consistent with observed profile changes during RMP ELM suppression and offers an explanation for the observed dependence on safety factor (q{sub 95}).

  5. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  6. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  7. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Martina, E.F.

    1958-04-22

    An improved ion source particularly adapted to provide an intense beam of ions with minimum neutral molecule egress from the source is described. The ion source structure includes means for establishing an oscillating electron discharge, including an apertured cathode at one end of the discharge. The egress of ions from the source is in a pencil like beam. This desirable form of withdrawal of the ions from the plasma created by the discharge is achieved by shaping the field at the aperture of the cathode. A tubular insulator is extended into the plasma from the aperture and in cooperation with the electric fields at the cathode end of the discharge focuses the ions from the source,

  8. Ion Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulik, James D.; Sawicki, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Accurate for the analysis of ions in solution, this form of analysis enables the analyst to directly assay many compounds that previously were difficult or impossible to analyze. The method is a combination of the methodologies of ion exchange, liquid chromatography, and conductimetric determination with eluant suppression. (Author/RE)

  9. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  10. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Leland, W.T.

    1960-01-01

    The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

  11. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Blue, C.W.; Luce, J.S.

    1960-07-19

    An ion source is described and comprises an arc discharge parallel to the direction of and inside of a magnetic field. an accelerating electrode surrounding substantially all of the discharge except for ion exit apertures, and means for establishing an electric field between that electrode and the arc discharge. the electric field being oriented at an acute angle to the magnetic field. Ions are drawn through the exit apertures in the accelrating electrcde in a direction substantially divergent to the direction of the magnetic field and so will travel in a spiral orbit along the magnetic field such that the ions will not strike the source at any point in their orbit within the magnetic field.

  12. Ion focusing

    DOEpatents

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2015-11-10

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  13. Progress and future developments of high current ion source for neutral beam injector in the ASIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Chundong; Xie, Yahong Xie, Yuanlai; Liu, Sheng; Liu, Zhimin; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Sheng, Peng; Jiang, Caichao

    2015-04-08

    A high current hot cathode bucket ion source, which based on the US long pulse ion source is developed in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The ion source consists of a bucket plasma generator with multi-pole cusp fields and a set of tetrode accelerator with slit apertures. So far, four ion sources are developed and conditioned on the ion source test bed. 4 MW hydrogen beam with beam energy of 80 keV is extracted. In Aug. 2013, EAST NBI 1 with two ion source installed on the EAST, and achieved H-mode plasma with NBI injection for the first time. In order to achieve stable long pulse operation of high current ion source and negative ion source research, the RF ion source with 200 mm diameter and 120 mm depth driver is designed and developed. The first RF plasma generated with 2 kW power of 1 MHz frequency. More of the RF plasma tests and negative source relative research need to do in the future.

  14. Beam Ion Driven Instabilities in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; E. Belova; H.L. Berk; C.Z. Cheng; E. Fredrickson; W. Heidbrink; S. Kaye; G. Kramer

    2003-11-07

    A low-field, low-aspect-ratio device such as NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) is an excellent testbed to study the ITER-relevant physics of fast-particle confinement that is of major importance for burning plasmas. The low Alfvin speed in NSTX offers a window to the super-Alfvinic regime expected in ITER. Effects such as the large FLR, orbit width, strong shaping, and high thermal and fast-ion betas make this effort a greater challenge. We report on the linear stability of different Alfvin eigenmode (AE) branches and compare theory with experimental data. Low-frequency MHD activities, {approx}100 kHz, on NSTX are often observed and identified as the toroidicity-induced AEs (TAE) driven by beam ions. Sometimes they are accompanied by beam ion losses in H-mode, high q(0) plasmas. Numerical analysis using the NOVA-K code shows good agreement with the experimental data. The TAE instability was compared in experiments on NSTX and DIII-D. With very similar plasma conditions, we tested the theoretical prediction that the toroidal mode number of the most unstable TAEs scales with the machine minor radius, n {approx} a. In NSTX, TAEs are observed with n = 1-2, whereas in DIII-D n = 4-7. The confirmation of n scaling validates the predictive capabilities of theoretical tools (NOVA-K) for studying ITER plasmas. In the high-frequency range, recent observations of rich sub-ion cyclotron frequency MHD activities in NSTX suggest that new instabilities are excited, which we identify as Global shear AEs (GAEs). Similar to the compressional AEs (CAEs), GAEs are destabilized by the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance in the presence of 80 keV neutral-beam injection. To simulate GAE/CAEs in realistic NSTX plasma conditions, we have developed a nonlinear hybrid kinetic-MHD code, HYM, which is capable of computing the mode structure, saturation, and energetic particle transport.

  15. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bell, W.A. Jr.; Love, L.O.; Prater, W.K.

    1958-01-28

    An ion source is presented capable of producing ions of elements which vaporize only at exceedingly high temperatures, i.e.,--1500 degrees to 3000 deg C. The ion source utilizes beams of electrons focused into a first chamber housing the material to be ionized to heat the material and thereby cause it to vaporize. An adjacent second chamber receives the vaporized material through an interconnecting passage, and ionization of the vaporized material occurs in this chamber. The ionization action is produced by an arc discharge sustained between a second clectron emitting filament and the walls of the chamber which are at different potentials. The resultant ionized material egresses from a passageway in the second chamber. Using this device, materials which in the past could not be processed in mass spectometers may be satisfactorily ionized for such applications.

  16. ION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1961-01-01

    An ion pump and pumping method are given for low vacuum pressures in which gases introduced into a pumping cavity are ionized and thereafter directed and accelerated into a quantity of liquid gettering metal where they are absorbed. In the preferred embodiment the metal is disposed as a liquid pool upon one electrode of a Phillips ion gauge type pump. Means are provided for continuously and remotely withdrawing and degassing the gettering metal. The liquid gettering metal may be heated if desired, although various combinations of gallium, indium, tin, bismuth, and lead, the preferred metals, have very low melting points. A background pressure of evaporated gettering metal may be provided by means of a resistance heated refractory metal wick protruding from the surface of the pcol of gettering metal.

  17. First results and analysis of collective Thomson scattering (CTS) fast ion distribution measurements on ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meo, F.; Stejner, M.; Salewski, M.; Bindslev, H.; Eich, T.; Furtula, V.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leuterer, F.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Reiter, B.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D.; Woskov, P.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-05-01

    Experimental knowledge of the fast ion physics in magnetically confined plasmas is essential. The collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic is capable of measuring localized 1D ion velocity distributions and anisotropies dependent on the angle to the magnetic field. The CTS installed at ASDEX-Upgrade (AUG) uses mm-waves generated by the 1 MW dual frequency gyrotron. The successful commissioning the CTS at AUG enabled first scattering experiments and the consequent milestone of first fast ion distribution measurements on AUG presented in this paper. The first fast ion distribution results have already uncovered some physics of confined fast ions at the plasma centre with off-axis neutral beam heating. However, CTS experiments on AUG H-mode plasmas have also uncovered some unexpected signals not related to scattering that required additional analysis and treatment of the data. These secondary emission signals are generated from the plasma-gyrotron interaction therefore contain additional physics. Despite their existence that complicate the fast ion analysis, they do not prevent the diagnostic's capability to infer the fast ion distribution function on AUG.

  18. Fast-ion Energy Loss During TAE Avalanches in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E D; Darrow, D S; Gorelenkov, N N; Kramer, G J; Kubota, S; Podesta, M; White, R B; Bortolon, A; Gerhardt, S P; Bell, R E; Diallo, A; LeBlanc, B; Levinton, F M

    2012-07-11

    Strong TAE avalanches on NSTX, the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] are typically correlated with drops in the neutron rate in the range of 5% - 15%. In previous studies of avalanches in L-mode plasmas, these neutron drops were found to be consistent with modeled losses of fast ions. Here we expand the study to TAE avalanches in NSTX H-mode plasmas with improved analysis techniques. At the measured TAE mode amplitudes, simulations with the ORBIT code predict that fast ion losses are negligible. However, the simulations predict that the TAE scatter the fast ions in energy, resulting in a small (≈ 6%) drop in fast ion β. The net decrease in energy of the fast ions is sufficient to account for the bulk of the drop in neutron rate, even in the absence of fast ion losses. This loss of energy from the fast ion population is comparable to the estimated energy lost by damping from the Alfven wave during the burst. The previously studied TAE avalanches in L-mode are re-evaluated using an improved calculation of the potential fluctuations in the ORBIT code.

  19. Ion Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Lyon, Mary; Bennett, Aaron; Troxel, Daylin; Blaser, Kelvin J.; Harper, Stuart; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2010-03-01

    We report on the progress of an ion interferometer based on a laser-cooled ^87Sr^+ beam which will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions. This device will be used to implement an extremely precise electromagnetic field sensor. Design considerations and instrumentation development will be discussed. Possible practical and fundamental applications, including deviations from Coulomb's inverse-square law and the search for a possible photon rest mass, will be discussed.

  20. Controllable Laser Ion Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Kamiyama, D.; Ohtake, Y.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Gu, Y. J.; Wang, W. M.; Limpouch, J.; Andreev, A.; Bulanov, S. V.; Sheng, Z. M.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Li, X. F.; Yu, Q. S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper a future laser ion accelerator is discussed to make the laser-based ion accelerator compact and controllable. Especially a collimation device is focused in this paper. The future laser ion accelerator should have an ion source, ion collimators, ion beam bunchers, and ion post acceleration devices [Laser Therapy 22, 103(2013)]: the ion particle energy and the ion energy spectrum are controlled to meet requirements for a future compact laser ion accelerator for ion cancer therapy or for other purposes. The energy efficiency from the laser to ions is improved by using a solid target with a fine sub-wavelength structure or a near-critical density gas plasma. The ion beam collimation is performed by holes behind the solid target or a multi-layered solid target. The control of the ion energy spectrum and the ion particle energy, and the ion beam bunching would be successfully realized by a multistage laser-target interaction.

  1. Highly charged ion secondary ion mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hamza, Alex V.; Schenkel, Thomas; Barnes, Alan V.; Schneider, Dieter H.

    2001-01-01

    A secondary ion mass spectrometer using slow, highly charged ions produced in an electron beam ion trap permits ultra-sensitive surface analysis and high spatial resolution simultaneously. The spectrometer comprises an ion source producing a primary ion beam of highly charged ions that are directed at a target surface, a mass analyzer, and a microchannel plate detector of secondary ions that are sputtered from the target surface after interaction with the primary beam. The unusually high secondary ion yield permits the use of coincidence counting, in which the secondary ion stops are detected in coincidence with a particular secondary ion. The association of specific molecular species can be correlated. The unique multiple secondary nature of the highly charged ion interaction enables this new analytical technique.

  2. Instrumentation: Ion Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, James S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the importance of ion chromatography in separating and measuring anions. The principles of ion exchange are presented, along with some applications of ion chromatography in industry. Ion chromatography systems are described, as well as ion pair and ion exclusion chromatography, column packings, detectors, and programming. (TW)

  3. Hydrated Ions: From Individual Ions to Ion Pairs to Ion Clusters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Houyang; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2015-10-01

    The structure of hydrated ions plays a central role in chemical and biological sciences. In the present paper, five ions, namely, Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-), are examined using molecular dynamics simulations. In addition to hydrated individual ions and ion pairs identified previously, hydrated ion clusters containing 3, 4, 5, or more ions are identified in the present paper. The dependence of hydration numbers and mole fractions of individual ions, ion pairs, and larger ion clusters on the electrolyte concentration is determined. As the electrolyte concentration increases, the mole fraction of hydrated individual ions decreases, and the mole fraction of hydrated larger ion clusters increases. The results also reveal that the hydrogen bonding numbers of the H2O molecules of the first hydration shells of individual ions, ion pairs, and larger ion clusters are insensitive to the electrolyte concentration, but sensitive to the nature and conformation of ions. PMID:26358093

  4. Hydrated Ions: From Individual Ions to Ion Pairs to Ion Clusters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Houyang; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2015-10-01

    The structure of hydrated ions plays a central role in chemical and biological sciences. In the present paper, five ions, namely, Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-), are examined using molecular dynamics simulations. In addition to hydrated individual ions and ion pairs identified previously, hydrated ion clusters containing 3, 4, 5, or more ions are identified in the present paper. The dependence of hydration numbers and mole fractions of individual ions, ion pairs, and larger ion clusters on the electrolyte concentration is determined. As the electrolyte concentration increases, the mole fraction of hydrated individual ions decreases, and the mole fraction of hydrated larger ion clusters increases. The results also reveal that the hydrogen bonding numbers of the H2O molecules of the first hydration shells of individual ions, ion pairs, and larger ion clusters are insensitive to the electrolyte concentration, but sensitive to the nature and conformation of ions.

  5. Ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Tullis, Andrew M.

    1987-01-01

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  6. Improved ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-05-04

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species,

  7. Ion parking during ion/ion reactions in electrodynamic ion traps.

    PubMed

    McLuckey, Scott A; Reid, Gavin E; Wells, J Mitchell

    2002-01-15

    Under appropriate ion density conditions, it is possible to selectively inhibit rates of ion/ion reactions in a quadrupole ion trap via the application of oscillatory voltages to one or more electrodes of the ion trap. The phenomenon is demonstrated using dipolar resonance excitation applied to the end-cap electrodes of a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap. The application of a resonance excitation voltage tuned to inhibit the ion/ion reaction rate of a specific range of ion mass-to-charge ratios is referred to as "ion parking". The bases for rate inhibition are (i) an increase in the relative velocity of the ion/ion reaction pair, which reduces the cross section for ion/ion capture and, at least in some cases, (ii) reduction in the time of physical overlap of positively charged and negatively charged ion clouds. The efficiency and specificity of the ion parking experiment is highly dependent upon ion densities, trapping conditions, ion charge states, and resonance excitation conditions. The ion parking experiment is illustrated herein along with applications to the concentration of ions originally present over a range of charge states into a selected charge state and in the selection of a particular ion from a set of ions derived from a simple protein mixture.

  8. ION GUN

    DOEpatents

    Dandl, R.A.

    1961-10-24

    An ion gun is described for the production of an electrically neutral ionized plasma. The ion gun comprises an anode and a cathode mounted in concentric relationship with a narrow annulus between. The facing surfaces of the rear portions of the anode and cathode are recessed to form an annular manifold. Positioned within this manifold is an annular intermediate electrode aligned with the an nulus between the anode and cathode. Gas is fed to the manifold and an arc discharge is established between the anode and cathode. The gas is then withdrawn from the manifold through the annulus between the anode and cathode by a pressure differential. The gas is then ionized by the arc discharge across the annulus. The ionized gas is withdrawn from the annulus by the combined effects of the pressure differential and a collimating magnetic field. In a 3000 gauss magnetic field, an arc voltage of 1800 volts, and an arc current of 0.2 amp, a plasma of about 3 x 10/sup 11/ particles/cc is obtained. (AEC)

  9. Fast ion transport during applied 3D magnetic perturbations on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zeeland, M. A.; Ferraro, N. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Kramer, G. J.; Lasnier, C. J.; Pace, D. C.; Allen, S. L.; Chen, X.; Evans, T. E.; García-Muñoz, M.; Hanson, J. M.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lao, L. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Moyer, R. A.; Nazikian, R.; Orlov, D. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Wingen, A.

    2015-07-01

    Measurements show fast ion losses correlated with applied three-dimensional (3D) fields in a variety of plasmas ranging from L-mode to resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) edge localized mode (ELM) suppressed H-mode discharges. In DIII-D L-mode discharges with a slowly rotating n=2 magnetic perturbation, scintillator detector loss signals synchronized with the applied fields are observed to decay within one poloidal transit time after beam turn-off indicating they arise predominantly from prompt loss orbits. Full orbit following using M3D-C1 calculations of the perturbed fields and kinetic profiles reproduce many features of the measured losses and points to the importance of the applied 3D field phase with respect to the beam injection location in determining the overall impact on prompt beam ion loss. Modeling of these results includes a self-consistent calculation of the 3D perturbed beam ion birth profiles and scrape-off-layer ionization, a factor found to be essential to reproducing the experimental measurements. Extension of the simulations to full slowing down timescales, including fueling and the effects of drag and pitch angle scattering, show the applied n=3 RMPs in ELM suppressed H-mode plasmas can induce a significant loss of energetic particles from the core. With the applied n=3 fields, up to 8.4% of the injected beam power is predicted to be lost, compared to 2.7% with axisymmetric fields only. These fast ions, originating from minor radii ρ >0.7 , are predicted to be primarily passing particles lost to the divertor region, consistent with wide field-of-view infrared periscope measurements of wall heating in n=3 RMP ELM suppressed plasmas. Edge fast ion {{\\text{D}}α} (FIDA) measurements also confirm a large change in edge fast ion profile due to the n=3 fields, where the effect was isolated by using short 50 ms RMP-off periods during which ELM suppression was maintained yet the fast ion profile was allowed to recover. The role of resonances

  10. Ion Monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2003-11-18

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  11. ION MAGNETRON

    DOEpatents

    Gow, J.D.; Layman, R.W.

    1962-10-31

    A magnetohydrodynamic device or plasma generator of the ion magnetron class is described wherein a long central electrode is disposed along the axis of an evacuated cylinder. A radial electric field and an axial magnetic field are provided between the cylsnder and the electrode, forming a plasma trapping and heating region. For maximum effectiveness, neutral particles from the cylinder wall must be prevented from entering such region This is effected by forming a cylindrical sheath of electrons near the cylinder wall for ionizing undesired neutral particles, which are then trapped and removed by the magnetic field. An annular filament at one end of the device provides the electrons, which follow the axial magnetic field to a reflecting electrode at the opposite end of the device. (AEC)

  12. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.M.

    1959-04-14

    This patent deals with calutrons and more particularly to an arrangement therein whereby charged bottles in a calutron source unit may be replaced without admitting atmospheric air to the calutron vacuum chamber. As described, an ion unit is disposed within a vacuum tank and has a reservoir open toward a wall of the tank. A spike projects from thc source into the reservoir. When a charge bottle is placed in the reservoir, the spike breaks a frangible seal on the bottle. After the contents of the bottle are expended the bottle may be withdrawn and replaced with another charge bottle by a varuum lock arrangement in conjunction with an arm for manipulating the bottle.

  13. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W. M.

    1959-04-14

    This patent deals with calutrons and more particularly to an arrangement therein whereby charged bottles in a calutron source unit may be replaced without admitting atmospheric air to the calutron vacuum chamber. As described, an ion unit is disposed within a vacuum tank and has a reservoir open toward a wall of the tank. A spike projects from the source into the reservoir. When a charge bottle is placed in the reservoir, the spike breaks a frangible seal on the bottle. After the contents of the bottle are expended the bottle may be withdrawn and replaced with another charge bottle by a vacuum lock arrangement in conjunction with an arm for manipulating the bottle.

  14. Ion mobility sensor

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  15. Ion sources for use in ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Nicholas R.

    1989-02-01

    This paper reviews high current ion sources suitable for commercial use. Although the production of high currents of a variety of ions is a vital consideration, this paper focuses on other aspects of ion source performance. The modern ion implanter is a major item of expensive capital equipment, with the ion source being its least reliable component. So, the most critical issues today are reliability and lifetime, as well as safety, flexibility, and ease of service. The Freeman ion source has clearly dominated the field, yet a number of alternative sources have found commercial acceptance, including microwave sources. Factors affecting the ultimate usefulness of various sources in different implantation applications are discussed.

  16. Ion funnel ion trap and process

    DOEpatents

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA; Ibrahim, Yehia M [Richland, WA; Clowers, Biran H [West Richland, WA; Prior, David C [Hermiston, OR; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-02-15

    An ion funnel trap is described that includes a inlet portion, a trapping portion, and a outlet portion that couples, in normal operation, with an ion funnel. The ion trap operates efficiently at a pressure of .about.1 Torr and provides for: 1) removal of low mass-to-charge (m/z) ion species, 2) ion accumulation efficiency of up to 80%, 3) charge capacity of .about.10,000,000 elementary charges, 4) ion ejection time of 40 to 200 .mu.s, and 5) optimized variable ion accumulation times. Ion accumulation with low concentration peptide mixtures has shown an increase in analyte signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of a factor of 30, and a greater than 10-fold improvement in SNR for multiply charged analytes.

  17. Ion Temperature Measurements in the DIII--D Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, N. H.; Isler, R. C.; McKee, G. R.; Tugarinov, S.

    1996-11-01

    Doppler profile measurements of the D_α, He II, C II and C III line emission in the DIII--D divertor have been performed with two high resolution spectrometers: an instrument of Russian design with high optical throughput and 7 ms readout, and a conventional Czerny Turner spectrometer with slower response time, but greater dynamic range in its detector system. In continuous ELMing H--mode plasmas the Doppler profiles are usually single-gaussian, but during operation at low density or during large, discrete ELM events the profiles of the hydrogen-like species are often multi-gaussian. Comparison of ion temperatures inferred from the single-gaussian profiles and electron temperatures measured by Thomson scattering and by spectroscopic line ratio methods yields good agreement for the higher charge states, where equilibration of ion and electron temperatures is expected. When strong D2 puffing triggers the MARFE-like conditions of Partially Detached Divertor plasmas, the D_α line profile, usually a complex asymmetric profile with multiple components, evolves into a single-gaussian profile fitted by a very low temperature (<2 eV) similar to that measured for the electrons by Thomson scattering.

  18. Ion heating via turbulent ion acoustic waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. J.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1972-01-01

    The ion acoustic turbulence in the turbulent-heating experiment reported is excited by the ion-ion beam instability. Graphs are presented, showing the spatial evolution of the parallel ion beam energy and the spatial evolution of the ion acoustic turbulent wave spectrum. The observed characteristics of test waves in a turbulent beam-plasma imply that wave saturation is a dynamic balance between the emission of waves by the beam and the destruction or damping of wave coherence by the turbulent diffusion of particle orbits.

  19. Sputtering and ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on sputtering and ion plating are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) concepts and applications of ion plating, (2) sputtering for deposition of solid film lubricants, (3) commercial ion plating equipment, (4) industrial potential for ion plating and sputtering, and (5) fundamentals of RF and DC sputtering.

  20. Microfabricated ion frequency standard

    DOEpatents

    Schwindt, Peter; Biedermann, Grant; Blain, Matthew G.; Stick, Daniel L.; Serkland, Darwin K.; Olsson, III, Roy H.

    2010-12-28

    A microfabricated ion frequency standard (i.e. an ion clock) is disclosed with a permanently-sealed vacuum package containing a source of ytterbium (Yb) ions and an octupole ion trap. The source of Yb ions is a micro-hotplate which generates Yb atoms which are then ionized by a ultraviolet light-emitting diode or a field-emission electron source. The octupole ion trap, which confines the Yb ions, is formed from suspended electrodes on a number of stacked-up substrates. A microwave source excites a ground-state transition frequency of the Yb ions, with a frequency-doubled vertical-external-cavity laser (VECSEL) then exciting the Yb ions up to an excited state to produce fluorescent light which is used to tune the microwave source to the ground-state transition frequency, with the microwave source providing a precise frequency output for the ion clock.

  1. Ion sources for ion implantation technology (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Shigeki Hamamoto, Nariaki; Inouchi, Yutaka; Umisedo, Sei; Miyamoto, Naoki

    2014-02-15

    Ion sources for ion implantation are introduced. The technique is applied not only to large scale integration (LSI) devices but also to flat panel display. For LSI fabrication, ion source scheduled maintenance cycle is most important. For CMOS image sensor devices, metal contamination at implanted wafer is most important. On the other hand, to fabricate miniaturized devices, cluster ion implantation has been proposed to make shallow PN junction. While for power devices such as silicon carbide, aluminum ion is required. For doping processes of LCD fabrication, a large ion source is required. The extraction area is about 150 cm × 10 cm, and the beam uniformity is important as well as the total target beam current.

  2. Antarctic ice-sheet loss driven by basal melting of ice shelves.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, H D; Ligtenberg, S R M; Fricker, H A; Vaughan, D G; van den Broeke, M R; Padman, L

    2012-04-26

    Accurate prediction of global sea-level rise requires that we understand the cause of recent, widespread and intensifying glacier acceleration along Antarctic ice-sheet coastal margins. Atmospheric and oceanic forcing have the potential to reduce the thickness and extent of floating ice shelves, potentially limiting their ability to buttress the flow of grounded tributary glaciers. Indeed, recent ice-shelf collapse led to retreat and acceleration of several glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula. But the extent and magnitude of ice-shelf thickness change, the underlying causes of such change, and its link to glacier flow rate are so poorly understood that its future impact on the ice sheets cannot yet be predicted. Here we use satellite laser altimetry and modelling of the surface firn layer to reveal the circum-Antarctic pattern of ice-shelf thinning through increased basal melt. We deduce that this increased melt is the primary control of Antarctic ice-sheet loss, through a reduction in buttressing of the adjacent ice sheet leading to accelerated glacier flow. The highest thinning rates occur where warm water at depth can access thick ice shelves via submarine troughs crossing the continental shelf. Wind forcing could explain the dominant patterns of both basal melting and the surface melting and collapse of Antarctic ice shelves, through ocean upwelling in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas, and atmospheric warming on the Antarctic Peninsula. This implies that climate forcing through changing winds influences Antarctic ice-sheet mass balance, and hence global sea level, on annual to decadal timescales. PMID:22538614

  3. Antarctic ice-sheet loss driven by basal melting of ice shelves.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, H D; Ligtenberg, S R M; Fricker, H A; Vaughan, D G; van den Broeke, M R; Padman, L

    2012-04-25

    Accurate prediction of global sea-level rise requires that we understand the cause of recent, widespread and intensifying glacier acceleration along Antarctic ice-sheet coastal margins. Atmospheric and oceanic forcing have the potential to reduce the thickness and extent of floating ice shelves, potentially limiting their ability to buttress the flow of grounded tributary glaciers. Indeed, recent ice-shelf collapse led to retreat and acceleration of several glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula. But the extent and magnitude of ice-shelf thickness change, the underlying causes of such change, and its link to glacier flow rate are so poorly understood that its future impact on the ice sheets cannot yet be predicted. Here we use satellite laser altimetry and modelling of the surface firn layer to reveal the circum-Antarctic pattern of ice-shelf thinning through increased basal melt. We deduce that this increased melt is the primary control of Antarctic ice-sheet loss, through a reduction in buttressing of the adjacent ice sheet leading to accelerated glacier flow. The highest thinning rates occur where warm water at depth can access thick ice shelves via submarine troughs crossing the continental shelf. Wind forcing could explain the dominant patterns of both basal melting and the surface melting and collapse of Antarctic ice shelves, through ocean upwelling in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas, and atmospheric warming on the Antarctic Peninsula. This implies that climate forcing through changing winds influences Antarctic ice-sheet mass balance, and hence global sea level, on annual to decadal timescales.

  4. Ion specific effects: decoupling ion-ion and ion-water interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinsuk; Kang, Tae Hui; Kim, Mahn Won; Han, Songi

    2015-01-01

    Ion-specific effects in aqueous solution, known as the Hofmeister effect is prevalent in diverse systems ranging from pure ionic to complex protein solutions. The objective of this paper is to explicitly demonstrate how complex ion-ion and ion-water interactions manifest themselves in the Hofmeister effects, based on a series of recent experimental observation. These effects are not considered in the classical description of ion effects, such as the Deryaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory that, likely for that reason, fail to describe the origin of the phenomenological Hofmeister effect. However, given that models considering the basic forces of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions can offer rationalization for the core experimental observations, a universal interaction model stands a chance to be developed. In this perspective, we separately derive the contribution from ion-ion electrostatic interaction and ion-water interaction from second harmonic generation (SHG) data at the air-ion solution interface, which yields an estimate of ion-water interactions in solution. Hofmeister ion effects observed on biological solutes in solution should be similarly influenced by contributions from ion-ion and ion-water interactions, where the same ion-water interaction parameters derived from SHG data at the air-ion solution interface could be applicable. A key experimental data set available from solution systems to probe ion-water interaction is the modulation of water diffusion dynamics near ions in bulk ion solution, as well as near biological liposome surfaces. It is obtained from Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP), a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry technique. The surface water diffusivity is influenced by the contribution from ion-water interactions, both from localized surface charges and adsorbed ions, although the relative contribution of the former is larger on liposome surfaces. In this perspective, ion-water interaction

  5. PULSED ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.E.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1958-06-17

    An ion source is described for producing very short high density pulses of ions without bcam scattering. The ions are created by an oscillating electron discharge within a magnetic field. After the ions are drawn from the ionization chamber by an accelerating electrode the ion beam is under the influence of the magnetic field for separation of the ions according to mass and, at the same time, passes between two neutralizing plntes maintained nt equal negative potentials. As the plates are formed of a material having a high ratio of secondary electrons to impinging ions, the ion bombardment of the plntes emits electrons which neutralize the frirge space-charge of the beam and tend to prevent widening of the beam cross section due to the mutual repulsion of the ions.

  6. Design of a post linac for an energy upgrade of a heavy-ion injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Y.; Noda, K.

    2014-07-01

    A post linac is being designed for an energy upgrade of a heavy-ion injector. This post linac is to be installed downstream of the formerly developed compact injector, consisting of an Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Ion-Source (ECRIS), the Radio-Frequency-Quadrupole (RFQ) linac and the Alternating-Phase-Focused Interdigital H-mode Drift-Tube-Linac (APF IH-DTL). It is aimed to increase the output energy of a heavy-ion injector. Carbon ions are initially accelerated with the compact injector to 4 MeV/u, and further accelerated with the post linac up to 8 MeV/u. The three linacs have the same operating frequency of 200 MHz. For beam focusing of the post linac, the APF method is used. Iterative simulations of beam dynamics were performed to determine the optimum array of synchronous phases in each gap. The results of the simulations provided that the calculated efficiency of beam transmission through the post linac is as high as 98.4%. The total length of this APF post linac is estimated to be approximately 3 m. A design overview of the injector system including the post linac is presented.

  7. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  8. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  9. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE)

    EPA Science Inventory



    Ion Composition Elucidation (ICE) utilizes selected ion recording with a double focusing mass spectrometer to simultaneously determine exact masses and relative isotopic abundances from mass peak profiles. These can be determined more accurately and at higher sensitivity ...

  10. Applications of decelerated ions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.M.

    1985-03-01

    Many facilities whose sole purpose had been to accelerate ion beams are now becoming decelerators as well. The development and current status of accel-decel operations is reviewed here. Applications of decelerated ions in atomic physics experiments are discussed.

  11. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, Regan W.

    1984-01-01

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions.

  12. SEPARATION OF PLUTONYL IONS

    DOEpatents

    Connick, R.E.; McVey, Wm.H.

    1958-07-15

    A process is described for separating plutonyl ions from the acetate ions with which they are associated in certaln carrier precipitation methods of concentrating plutonium. The method consists in adding alkaline earth metal ions and subsequently alkalizing the solution, causing formation of an alkaltne earth plutonate precipitate. Barium hydroxide is used in a preferred embodiment since it provides alkaline earth metal ion and alkalizes the solution in one step forming insoluble barium platonate.

  13. Intense ion beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Humphries, Jr., Stanley; Sudan, Ravindra N.

    1977-08-30

    Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

  14. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, R.W.

    1984-05-08

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions. 8 figs.

  15. Active core profile and transport modification by application of Ion Bernstein Wave power in PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, B.; Bell, R.; Batha, S.

    1995-01-01

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large {triangledown}n{sub e}, {triangledown}T{sub e}, {triangledown}v{sub phi}, and {triangledown}T{sub i}, delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high)-mode but with a confinement zone moved inwards. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhanced NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central T{sub i} results from {chi}{sub i} reduction (compared to H-mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32--0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma.

  16. CALUTRON ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Oppenheimer, F.F.

    1959-06-01

    A shielding arrangement for eliminating oscillating electrons in the ion source region of calutrons is offered. Metal plates are attached to the ion generator so as to intercept the magnetic field between ion generator and accelerating electrode. The oscillating electrons are discharged on the plates. (T.R.H.)

  17. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  18. Ion-kill dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Fromm, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    2001-01-01

    Unanticipated late effects in neutron and heavy ion therapy, not attributable to overdose, imply a qualitative difference between low and high LET therapy. We identify that difference as 'ion kill', associated with the spectrum of z/beta in the radiation field, whose measurement we label 'ion-kill dosimetry'.

  19. [Development of metal ions analysis by ion chromatography].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Wang, Yuxin

    2007-05-01

    Analysis of metal ions by ion chromatography, including cation-exchange ion chromatography, anion-exchange ion chromatography and chelation ion chromatography, is reviewed. The cation-exchange ion chromatography is a main method for the determination of metal ions. Stationary phases in cation-exchange ion chromatography are strong acid cation exchanger (sulfonic) and weak acid cation exchanger (carboxylic). Alkali metal ions, alkaline earth metal ions, transition metal ions, rare earth metal ions, ammonium ions and amines can be analyzed by cation-exchange ion chromatography with a suitable detector. The anion-exchange ion chromatography is suitable for the separation and analysis of alkaline earth metal ions, transition metal ions and rare earth metal ions. The selectivity for analysis of metal ions with anion-exchange ion chromatography is good. Simultaneous determination of metal ions and inorganic anions can be achieved using anion-exchange ion chromatography. Chelation ion chromatography is suitable for the determination of trace metal ions in complex matrices. A total of 125 references are cited.

  20. L-H transitions driven by ion heating in scrape-off layer turbulence (SOLT) model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, D. A.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The original SOLT model now includes the evolution of ion pressure consistent with drift-ordering. It is a two-dimensional, electrostatic reduced model wherein closure relations, obtained by integrating the equations along the B-field, model parallel physics that includes sheath-mediated current and heat flux in the scrape-off-layer and electron drift waves inside the separatrix. Low (L) and high (H) confinement regimes are observed in SOLT simulations, depending on the strength of an ion pressure (i.e., ion heating) source localized inside the separatrix: With increasing heating, particle and energy confinement times at first decrease in the L-mode then rise in the H-mode. The L-H transition is marked by distinct changes in sheared-flow profiles. The addition of ion pressure dynamics enables modeling the self-consistent interaction between the ion diamagnetic drift and the radial electric field (mean and zonal flows). The roles of these sheared flows in mediating the L-H transition are explored. A new diagnostic, based on the density correlation function, is applied to study blob velocities in different regimes. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  1. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Backus, J.G.

    1958-08-19

    A novel ion source is described for use in a calutron which has the prime adwantage of reducing the nunnber of unwanted ions in the ion generating mechamism.An important feature of the invention resides In an arc chamber having a lining of the polyisotopic material to be treated In the calutron and bombardment of the linirg with positive ions of a light gas to induce sputtering and ionization of the lining. With the reduction of unwanted ions in the source beam provided by the described source, the calutron operation may be more accurately controlled.

  2. PULSED ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Ford, F.C.; Ruff, J.W.; Zizzo, S.G.; Cook, B.

    1958-11-11

    An ion source is described adapted for pulsed operation and producing copious quantities of ions with a particular ion egress geometry. The particular source construction comprises a conical member having a conducting surface formed of a metal with a gas occladed therein and narrow non-conducting portions hereon dividing the conducting surface. A high voltage pulse is applied across the conducting surface or producing a discharge across the surface. After the gas ions have been produced by the discharge, the ions are drawn from the source in a diverging conical beam by a specially constructed accelerating electrode.

  3. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  4. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    DOEpatents

    Weller, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions.

  5. Microfabricated ion trap array

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.; Fleming, James G.

    2006-12-26

    A microfabricated ion trap array, comprising a plurality of ion traps having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale ion traps to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microfabricated ion trap array with on-chip circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of the microfabricated ion trap array can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  6. Industrial ion source technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    A 30 cm electron bombardment ion source was designed and fabricated for micromachining and sputtering applications. This source has a multipole magnetic field that employs permanent magnets between permeable pole pieces. An average ion current density of 1 ma/sq cm with 500 eV argon ions was selected as a design operating condition. The ion beam at this operating condition was uniform and well collimated, with an average variation of plus or minus 5 percent over the center 20 cm of the beam at distances up to 30 cm from the ion source. A variety of sputtering applications were undertaken with a small 10 cm ion source to better understand the ion source requirements in these applications. The results of these experimental studies are also included.

  7. Performance of a compact injector for heavy-ion medical accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Y.; Yamada, S.; Murakami, T.; Fujimoto, T.; Fujisawa, T.; Ogawa, H.; Miyahara, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Hojo, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Muramatsu, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Mitsumoto, T.; Tsutsui, H.; Watanabe, T.; Ueda, T.

    2007-03-01

    A compact injector, designed for a heavy-ion medical accelerator complex, was constructed. It consists of an Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Ion-Source (ECRIS) and two linacs, which are a Radio-Frequency-Quadrupole linac and an Interdigital H-mode Drift-Tube-Linac (IH-DTL) having the same operating frequency of 200 MHz. For beam focusing of the IH-DTL, the method of Alternating-Phase-Focusing (APF) was employed. The compact injector can accelerate heavy ions having a charge-to-mass ratio of {q}/{m}={1}/{3} up to 4.0 MeV/u. Use of the APF IH-DTL and operating frequency of 200 MHz allowed us to design compact linacs; the total length of the two linacs is less than 6 m. Beam-acceleration tests of the compact injector system were performed. The measured intensity of accelerated C4+12 beams with the compact injector was 380 eμA. Beam transmission of the APF IH-DTL was estimated to be as high as 96%, which is comparable to the value calculated by a simulation code. Transverse phase-space and energy distributions of accelerated beams were measured and compared with those calculated by the simulation code, and we found that they were agreed well with each other.

  8. Measurements of Fast Ion Transport Due to n = 3 Magnetic Perturbations on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zeeland, M. A.; Evans, T. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Lanctot, M. J.; Pace, D. C.; Collins, C.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Hanson, J. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R.; Allen, S. L.; Lasnier, C. J.; Meyer, W. H.

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of fast ion (FI) transport due to applied n = 3 magnetic perturbations on DIII-D have been made in both ELM suppressed H-mode as well as L-mode discharges. FIDA measurements probe the confined FI profile in the edge and losses to the wall are obtained with scintillator detectors as well as an infrared periscope. In ELM suppressed plasmas FIDA data show a significant depletion of the edge FI profile during application of n = 3 fields. IR imaging of the beam ion prompt loss footprint shows a difference in wall heating depending on phase of the n = 3 perturbation. Measurements of both the impact on the confined FI profile and prompt losses will be compared to full-orbit modeling which predicts up to 10%-15% of the injected beam ions are lost before thermalization. Orbit following simulations also predict an increase in losses due to resonance between the FI drift orbits and the applied n = 3 fields. Measurements during L-mode current ramp plasmas used to scan for signatures of these resonances will be discussed. Work supported in part by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, SC-G903402, DE-FG02-04ER54761, DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Charge exchange molecular ion source

    DOEpatents

    Vella, Michael C.

    2003-06-03

    Ions, particularly molecular ions with multiple dopant nucleons per ion, are produced by charge exchange. An ion source contains a minimum of two regions separated by a physical barrier and utilizes charge exchange to enhance production of a desired ion species. The essential elements are a plasma chamber for production of ions of a first species, a physical separator, and a charge transfer chamber where ions of the first species from the plasma chamber undergo charge exchange or transfer with the reactant atom or molecules to produce ions of a second species. Molecular ions may be produced which are useful for ion implantation.

  10. Atomic ion clock with two ion traps, and method to transfer ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D. (Inventor); Chung, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An atomic ion clock with a first ion trap and a second ion trap, where the second ion trap is of higher order than the first ion trap. In one embodiment, ions may be shuttled back and forth from one ion trap to the other by application of voltage ramps to the electrodes in the ion traps, where microwave interrogation takes place when the ions are in the second ion trap, and fluorescence is induced and measured when the ions are in the first ion trap. In one embodiment, the RF voltages applied to the second ion trap to contain the ions are at a higher frequency than that applied to the first ion trap. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  11. Ion Outflow Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellot, Mary (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The characteristics of out-flowing ions have been investigated under various circumstances. In particular the upwelling of ions from the cleft region has been studied to attempt to look at source characteristics (e.g., temperature, altitude). High altitude (6-8 Re) data tend to show ions species that have the same velocity and are adiabatically cooled. Such ions, while representative of their source, can not provide an accurate picture. Ion observations from the TIDE detector on the Polar spacecraft show an energy (or equivalently a velocity) spectrum of ions as they undo the geomagnetic mass spectrometer effect due to convection-gravity separation of the different species. Consolidation of this type of data into a complete representation of the source spectrum can be attempted by building a set of maximum-phase-space- density-velocity pairs and attributing the total to the source.

  12. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  13. Ion-Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastasi, Michael; Mayer, James; Hirvonen, James K.

    2004-12-01

    Modern technology depends on materials with precisely controlled properties. Ion beams are an excellent way to achieve controlled modification of surface and near-surface regions. In every integrated circuit production line, for example, there are ion implantation systems. In addition to integrated circuit technology, ion beams can modify the mechanical, tribological, and chemical properties of metal, intermetallic, and ceramic materials without altering their bulk properties. Ion-solid interactions are the foundation that underlies the broad application of ion beams to the modification of materials. This text covers the fundamentals and applications of ion-solid interactions, and is aimed at graduate students and researchers interested in electronic devices, surface engineering, reactor and nuclear engineering, and materials science issues associated with metastable phase synthesis.

  14. HEAVY ION LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Van Atta, C.M.; Beringer, R.; Smith, L.

    1959-01-01

    A linear accelerator of heavy ions is described. The basic contributions of the invention consist of a method and apparatus for obtaining high energy particles of an element with an increased charge-to-mass ratio. The method comprises the steps of ionizing the atoms of an element, accelerating the resultant ions to an energy substantially equal to one Mev per nucleon, stripping orbital electrons from the accelerated ions by passing the ions through a curtain of elemental vapor disposed transversely of the path of the ions to provide a second charge-to-mass ratio, and finally accelerating the resultant stripped ions to a final energy of at least ten Mev per nucleon.

  15. Collection of ions

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Koster, James E.

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide an improved technique for detecting ions as the area from which ions are attracted to a detector is increased, consequently increasing the number of ions detected. This is achieved by providing the outer electrodes of the detector connected to the electrical potential, together with alternate intermediate electrodes. The other intermediate electrodes and preferably the housing are grounded. The technique renders such detection techniques more sensitive and gives them a lower threshold at which they can function.

  16. ION ACCELERATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.; Martin, J.A.

    1960-02-23

    Well focused, intense ion beams are obtained by providing a multi- apertured source grid in front of an ion source chamber and an accelerating multi- apertured grid closely spaced from and in alignment with the source grid. The longest dimensions of the elongated apertures in the grids are normal to the direction of the magnetic field used with the device. Large ion currents may be withdrawn from the source, since they do not pass through any small focal region between the grids.

  17. Neutron ion temperature measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Hendel, H.W.; Lovberg, J.; Nieschmidt, E.B.

    1986-11-01

    One important use of fusion product diagnostics is in the determination of the deuterium ion temperature from the magnitude of the 2.5 MeV d(d,n)/sup 3/He neutron emission. The detectors, calibration methods, and limitations of this technique are reviewed here with emphasis on procedures used at PPPL. In most tokamaks, the ion temperature deduced from neutrons is in reasonable agreement with the ion temperature deduced by other techniques.

  18. APPARATUS FOR HEATING IONS

    DOEpatents

    Chambers, E.S.; Garren, A.A.; Kippenhan, D.O.; Lamb, W.A.S.; Riddell, R.J. Jr.

    1960-01-01

    The heating of ions in a magnetically confined plasma is accomplished by the application of an azimuthal radiofrequency electric field to the plasma at ion cyclotron resonance. The principal novelty resides in the provision of an output tank coil of a radiofrequency driver to induce the radiofrequency field in the plasma and of electron current bridge means at the ends of the plasma for suppressing radial polarization whereby the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the ions with high efficiency.

  19. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

    1987-12-22

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

  20. Ion trap device

    DOEpatents

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  1. Ion thrusting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An ion thrusting system is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which a gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas molecules passing therethrough to form ions and electrons, and an accelerator element which accelerates the ions to form thrust. In some variations, a potential is applied to the ionization membrane may be reversed to thrust ions in an opposite direction. The ionization membrane may also include an opening with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of the gas being ionized. Methods of manufacture and use are also provided.

  2. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rohde, Steven B.

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  3. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  4. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam. An accelerator electrode device downstream from the extraction grids is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam. The application of the system to ion implantation is mentioned.

  5. Peristaltic ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Dickinson, M.R.; MacGill, R.A.

    1995-08-01

    Conventional ion sources generate energetic ion beams by accelerating the plasma-produced ions through a voltage drop at the extractor, and since it is usual that the ion beam is to propagate in a space which is at ground potential, the plasma source is biased at extractor voltage. For high ion beam energy the plasma source and electrical systems need to be raised to high voltage, a task that adds considerable complexity and expense to the total ion source system. The authors have developed a system which though forming energetic ion beams at ground potential as usual, operates with the plasma source and electronics at ground potential also. Plasma produced by a nearby source streams into a grided chamber that is repetitively pulsed from ground to high positive potential, sequentially accepting plasma into its interior region and ejecting it energetically. They call the device a peristaltic ion source. In preliminary tests they`ve produced nitrogen and titanium ion beams at energies from 1 to 40 keV. Here they describe the philosophy behind the approach, the test embodiment that they have made, and some preliminary results.

  6. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  7. Halide Ion Enhancement of Nitrate Ion Photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, N. K.; Wingen, L. M.; Callahan, K. M.; Tobias, D. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrate ion photochemistry is an important source of NOx in the polar regions. It is uncertain whether coexisting ions such as halides play a role in nitrate photochemistry. The effect of halides on NO3 photolysis was investigated using photolysis experiments in 230 L Teflon chambers that contain deliquesced aerosols of NaBr:NaNO3, KBr:KNO3 and ternary mixtures of NaCl:NaBr:NaNO3. Gas phase NO2 and gaseous halogen products were measured as a function of photolysis time using long path FTIR, NOx chemiluminescence and API-MS (atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry). Experiments were conducted with NO3- held at a constant 0.5 M and with the amount of total halide concentration varying from 0.25 M to 4 M. Studies on NaBr:NaNO3 mixtures suggest that as the bromide ion to nitrate ion ratio increases, there is an enhancement in the rate of production of NO2 in the nitrate-bromide mixtures over that formed in the photolysis of NaNO3. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations provide molecular level insight into the ions near the air-water interface in the aqueous halide-nitrate mixtures. These studies suggest that the presence of sodium halides at the air-water interface may encourage some nitrate ions to approach the top layers of water, allowing for more efficient escape of photoproducts than is seen in the absence of halides. Experiments on mixtures of KBr:KNO3 are being conducted to determine potential cation effects. In addition, ternary mixtures of NaCl:NaBr:NaNO3 are being examined to determine the effects of mixtures of halides on production of NO2 and gaseous halogen products. The implications of this photochemistry for tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  8. Cold Strontium Ion Source for Ion Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Durfee, Dallin

    2015-05-01

    We are working on a cold source of Sr Ions to be used in an ion interferometer. The beam will be generated from a magneto-optical trap (MOT) of Sr atoms by optically ionizing atoms leaking out a carefully prepared hole in the MOT. A single laser cooling on the resonant transition (461 nm) in Sr should be sufficient for trapping, as we've calculated that losses to the atom beam will outweigh losses to dark states. Another laser (405 nm), together with light from the trapping laser, will drive a two photon transition in the atom beam to an autoionizing state. Supported by NSF Award No. 1205736.

  9. Mercury ion thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Matossian, J. N.

    1989-01-01

    The Mercury Ion Thruster Technology program was an investigation for improving the understanding of state-of-the-art mercury ion thrusters. Emphasis was placed on optimizing the performance and simplifying the design of the 30 cm diameter ring-cusp discharge chamber. Thruster performance was improved considerably; the baseline beam-ion production cost of the optimized configuration was reduced to Epsilon (sub i) perspective to 130 eV/ion. At a discharge propellant-utilization efficiency of 95 percent, the beam-ion production cost was reduced to about 155 eV/ion, representing a reduction of about 40 eV/ion over the corresponding value for the 30 cm diameter J-series thruster. Comprehensive Langmuir-probe surveys were obtained and compared with similar measurements for a J-series thruster. A successful volume-averaging scheme was developed to correlate thruster performance with the dominant plasma processes that prevail in the two thruster designs. The average Maxwellian electron temperature in the optimized ring-cusp design is as much as 1 eV higher than it is in the J-series thruster. Advances in ion-extraction electrode fabrication technology were made by improving materials selection criteria, hydroforming and stress-relieving tooling, and fabrications procedures. An ion-extraction performance study was conducted to assess the effect of screen aperture size on ion-optics performance and to verify the effectiveness of a beam-vectoring model for three-grid ion optics. An assessment of the technology readiness of the J-series thruster was completed, and operation of an 8 cm IAPS thruster using a simplified power processor was demonstrated.

  10. Metal Ions in Unusual Valency States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Robin M.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses reactivity of metal ions with the primary products of water radiolysis, hyper-reduced metal ions, zero-valent metal ions, unstable divalent ions from the reduction of bivalent ions, hyper-oxidized metal ions, and metal complexes. (CS)

  11. Conceptional design of a heavy ion linac injector for HIRFL-CSRm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Hu; Yuan, You-Jin; Xia, Jia-Wen; Yin, Xue-Jun; Du, Heng; Li, Zhong-Shan

    2014-10-01

    A room temperature heavy ion linac has been proposed as a new injector of the main Cooler Storage Ring (CSRm) at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL), which is expected to improve the performance of HIRFL. The linac injector can supply heavy ions with a maximum mass to charge ratio of 7 and an injection kinetic energy of 7.272 MeV/u for CSRm; the pulsed beam intensity is 3 emA with the duty factor of 3%. Compared with the present cyclotron injector, the Sector Focusing Cyclotron (SFC), the beam current from linac can be improved by 10-100 times. As the pre-accelerator of the linac, the 108.48 MHz 4-rod Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerates the ion beam from 4 keV/u to 300 keV/u, which achieves the transmission efficiency of 95.3% with a 3.07 m long vane. The phase advance has been taken into account in the analysis of the error tolerance, and parametric resonances have been carefully avoided by adjusting the structure parameters. Kombinierte Null Grad Struktur Interdigital H-mode Drift Tube Linacs (KONUS IH-DTLs), which follow the RFQ, accelerate ions up to the energy of 7.272 MeV/u for CSRm. The resonance frequency is 108.48 MHz for the first two cavities and 216.96 MHz for the last 5 Drift Tube Linacs (DTLs). The maximum accelerating gradient can reach 4.95 MV/m in a DTL section with the length of 17.066 m, and the total pulsed RF power is 2.8 MW. A new strategy, for the determination of resonance frequency, RFQ vane voltage and DTL effective accelerating voltage, is described in detail. The beam dynamics design of the linac will be presented in this paper.

  12. Ion-Selective Electrodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Mark A.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on ion-selective electrodes (ISEs) is reviewed in seven sections: books, conferences, reviews; potentiometric membrane electrodes; glass and solid-state membrane electrodes; liquid and polymer membrane ISEs; coated wire electrodes, ion-selective field effect transistors, and microelectrodes; gas sensors and selective bioelectrode…

  13. Selective ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-05-14

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

  14. Microfabricated cylindrical ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Blain, Matthew G.

    2005-03-22

    A microscale cylindrical ion trap, having an inner radius of order one micron, can be fabricated using surface micromachining techniques and materials known to the integrated circuits manufacturing and microelectromechanical systems industries. Micromachining methods enable batch fabrication, reduced manufacturing costs, dimensional and positional precision, and monolithic integration of massive arrays of ion traps with microscale ion generation and detection devices. Massive arraying enables the microscale cylindrical ion trap to retain the resolution, sensitivity, and mass range advantages necessary for high chemical selectivity. The microscale CIT has a reduced ion mean free path, allowing operation at higher pressures with less expensive and less bulky vacuum pumping system, and with lower battery power than conventional- and miniature-sized ion traps. The reduced electrode voltage enables integration of the microscale cylindrical ion trap with on-chip integrated circuit-based rf operation and detection electronics (i.e., cell phone electronics). Therefore, the full performance advantages of microscale cylindrical ion traps can be realized in truly field portable, handheld microanalysis systems.

  15. Selective ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

  16. Ion Induction Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, John J.; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    The description of beams in RF and induction accelerators share many common features. Likewise, there is considerable commonality between electron induction accelerators (see Chap. 7) and ion induction accelerators. However, in contrast to electron induction accelerators, there are fewer ion induction accelerators that have been operated as application-driven user facilities. Ion induction accelerators are envisioned for applications (see Chap. 10) such as Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), High Energy Density Physics (HEDP), and spallation neutron sources. Most ion induction accelerators constructed to date have been limited scale facilities built for feasibility studies for HIF and HEDP where a large numbers of ions are required on target in short pulses. Because ions are typically non-relativistic or weakly relativistic in much of the machine, space-charge effects can be of crucial importance. This contrasts the situation with electron machines, which are usually strongly relativistic leading to weaker transverse space-charge effects and simplified longitudinal dynamics. Similarly, the bunch structure of ion induction accelerators relative to RF machines results in significant differences in the longitudinal physics.

  17. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.R.

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  18. Ion bombardment of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, Timothy A.; Paranicas, C.; Hendrix, A.; Johnson, R. E.

    2010-10-01

    The spectral difference between Europa's leading and trailing hemispheres has long been explained as a result of magnetospheric bombardment. A closer look at the longitudinal variation of ultraviolet spectral features reveals, however, that several processes, both exogenic and endogenic, are operating on the surface (Hendrix et al., 2010, submitted; Dalton et al., 2010, in preparation). Even magnetospheric bombardment can produce a variety of exogenic patterns; each "population” of particles has a distinct bombardment pattern. Work is ongoing to connect exogenic and spectral patterns. Here we describe one piece of that ongoing work, the calculation of ion bombardment and sputtering rates. We calculated the ion bombardment rate using a program that traces ion motion given the magnetic and electric fields in the vicinity of Europa's orbit, along with information on ion composition and energies from the Voyager and Galileo missions. We conclude that the vast majority of sulfur ions impact Europa's trailing hemisphere, while the sputtering rate is more uniform, in qualitative agreement with previous work. Overall, we find that the sputtering rate at the trailing hemisphere apex (where ion flux peaks) is about 3 times that at the leading hemisphere apex. This likely results in a net erosion of Europa's entire surface, not, as some have suggested, a net deposition of ice onto the leading hemisphere. We also conclude that the energetic ion flux peaks at Europa's poles, though the sputtering rate still peaks at the equatorial trailing hemisphere apex, where the combined sputtering by "cold” and "suprathermal” ions is highest.

  19. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  20. Mechanically Activated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Ranade, Sanjeev S.; Syeda, Ruhma; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Mechanotransduction, the conversion of physical forces into biochemical signals, is an essential component of numerous physiological processes including not only conscious senses of touch and hearing, but also unconscious senses such as blood pressure regulation. Mechanically activated (MA) ion channels have been proposed as sensors of physical force, but the identity of these channels and an understanding of how mechanical force is transduced has remained elusive. A number of recent studies on previously known ion channels along with the identification of novel MA ion channels have greatly transformed our understanding of touch and hearing in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we present an updated review of eukaryotic ion channel families that have been implicated in mechanotransduction processes and evaluate the qualifications of the candidate genes according to specified criteria. We then discuss the proposed gating models for MA ion channels and highlight recent structural studies of mechanosensitive potassium channels. PMID:26402601

  1. ION PULSE GENERATION

    DOEpatents

    King, R.F.; Moak, C.D.; Parker, V.E.

    1960-10-11

    A device for generating ions in an ion source, forming the ions into a stream, deflecting the stream rapidly away from and back to its normal path along the axis of a cylindrical housing, and continually focusing the stream by suitable means into a sharp, intermittent beam along the axis is described. The beam exists through an axial aperture into a lens which focuses it into an accelerator tube. The ions in each burst are there accelerated to very high energies and are directed against a target placed in the high-energy end of the tube. Radiations from the target can then be analyzed in the interval between incidence of the bursts of ions on the target.

  2. Measurements of the deuterium ion toroidal rotation in the DIII-D tokamak and comparison to neoclassical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Grierson, B. A.; Pablant, N. A.; Solomon, W. M.; Burrell, K. H.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Lanctot, M. J.

    2012-05-15

    Bulk ion toroidal rotation plays a critical role in controlling microturbulence and MHD stability as well as yielding important insight into angular momentum transport and the investigation of intrinsic rotation. So far, our understanding of bulk plasma flow in hydrogenic plasmas has been inferred from impurity ion velocity measurements and neoclassical theoretical calculations. However, the validity of these inferences has not been tested rigorously through direct measurement of the main-ion rotation in deuterium plasmas, particularly in regions of the plasma with steep pressure gradients where very large differences can be expected between bulk ion and impurity rotation. New advances in the analysis of wavelength-resolved D{sub {alpha}} emission on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 807 (2002)] have enabled accurate measurements of the main-ion (deuteron) temperature and toroidal rotation. The D{sub {alpha}} emission spectrum is accurately fit using a model that incorporates thermal deuterium charge exchange, beam emission, and fast ion D{sub {alpha}} (FIDA) emission spectra. Simultaneous spectral measurements of counter current injected and co current injected neutral beams permit a direct determination of the deuterium toroidal velocity. Time-dependent collisional radiative modeling of the photoemission process is in quantitative agreement with measured spectral characteristics. L-mode discharges with low beam ion densities and broad thermal pressure profiles exhibit deuteron temperature and toroidal rotation velocities similar to carbon. However, intrinsic rotation H-mode conditions and plasmas with internal transport barriers exhibit differences between core deuteron and carbon rotation which are inconsistent with the sign and magnitude of the neoclassical predictions.

  3. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. However we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. In 2014, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  4. Novel linac structures for low-beta ions and for muons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, Sergey S

    2010-01-01

    Development of two innovative linacs is discussed. (1) High-efficiency normal-conducting accelerating structures for ions with beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Two existing accelerator technologies - the H-mode resonator cavities and transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ) - are merged to create efficient structures for light-ion beams of considerable currents. The inter-digital H-mode accelerator with PMQ focusing (IH-PMQ) has the shunt impedance 10-20 times higher than the standard drift-tube linac. Results of the combined 3-D modeling for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. H-PMQ structures following a short RFQ accelerator can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications like a compact mobile deuteron-beam accelerator up to a few MeV. (2) A large-acceptance high-gradient linac for accelerating low-energy muons in a strong solenoidal magnetic field. When a proton beam hits a target, many low-energy pions are produced almost isotropically, in addition to a small number of high-energy pions in the forward direction. We propose to collect and accelerate copious muons created as the low-energy pions decay. The acceleration should bring muons to a kinetic energy of {approx}200 MeV in about 10 m, where both an ionization cooling of the muon beam and its further acceleration in a superconducting linac become feasible. One potential solution is a normal-conducting linac consisting of independently fed O-mode RF cavities with wide apertures closed by thin metal windows or grids. The guiding magnetic field is provided by external superconducting solenoids. The cavity choice, overall linac design considerations, and simulation results of muon acceleration are presented. Potential applications range from basic research to homeland defense to industry and medicine.

  5. Novel Linac Structures For Low-Beta Ions And For Muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2011-06-01

    Development of two innovative linacs is discussed. (1) High-efficiency normal-conducting accelerating structures for ions with beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Two existing accelerator technologies—the H-mode resonator cavities and transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ)—are merged to create efficient structures for light-ion beams of considerable currents. The inter-digital H-mode accelerator with PMQ focusing (IH-PMQ) has the shunt impedance 10-20 times higher than the standard drift-tube linac. Results of the combined 3-D modeling for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank—electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations, and thermal-stress analysis—are presented. H-PMQ structures following a short RFQ accelerator can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications like a compact mobile deuteron-beam accelerator up to a few MeV. (2) A large-acceptance high-gradient linac for accelerating low-energy muons in a strong solenoidal magnetic field. When a proton beam hits a target, many low-energy pions are produced almost isotropically, in addition to a small number of high-energy pions in the forward direction. We propose to collect and accelerate copious muons created as the low-energy pions decay. The acceleration should bring muons to a kinetic energy of ˜200 MeV in about 10 m, where both an ionization cooling of the muon beam and its further acceleration in a superconducting linac become feasible. One potential solution is a normal-conducting linac consisting of independently fed 0-mode RF cavities with wide apertures closed by thin metal windows or grids. The guiding magnetic field is provided by external superconducting solenoids. The cavity choice, overall linac design considerations, and simulation results of muon acceleration are presented. Potential applications range from basic research to homeland defense to industry and medicine.

  6. Industrial ion source technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    In reactive ion etching of Si, varying amounts of O2 were added to the CF4 background. The experimental results indicated an etch rate less than that for Ar up to an O2 partial pressure of about .00006 Torr. Above this O2 pressure, the etch rate with CF4 exceeded that with Ar alone. For comparison the random arrival rate of O2 was approximately equal to the ion arrival rate at a partial pressure of about .00002 Torr. There were also ion source and ion pressure gauge maintenance problems as a result of the use of CF4. Large scale (4 sq cm) texturing of Si was accomplished using both Cu and stainless steel seed. The most effective seeding method for this texturing was to surround the sample with large inclined planes. Designing, fabricating, and testing a 200 sq cm rectangular beam ion source was emphasized. The design current density was 6 mA/sq cm with 500 eV argon ions, although power supply limitations permitted operation to only 2 mA/sq cm. The use of multiple rectangular beam ion sources for continuous processing of wider areas than would be possible with a single source was also studied. In all cases investigated, the most uniform coverage was obtained with 0 to 2 cm beam overlay. The maximum departure from uniform processing at optimum beam overlap was found to be +15%.

  7. Ion channels in microbes

    PubMed Central

    Martinac, Boris; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2008-01-01

    Summary Studies of ion channels have for long been dominated by the animalcentric, if not anthropocentric view of physiology. The structures and activities of ion channels had, however, evolved long before the appearance of complex multicellular organisms on Earth. The diversity of ion channels existing in cellular membranes of prokaryotes is a good example. Though at first it may appear as a paradox that most of what we know about the structure of eukaryotic ion channels is based on the structure of bacterial channels, this should not be surprising given the evolutionary relatedness of all living organisms and suitability of microbial cells for structural studies of biological macromolecules in a laboratory environment. Genome sequences of the human as well as various microbial, plant and animal organisms unambiguously established the evolutionary links, whereas crystallographic studies of the structures of major types of ion channels published over the last decade clearly demonstrated the advantage of using microbes as experimental organisms. The purpose of this review is not only to provide an account of acquired knowledge on microbial ion channels but also to show that the study of microbes and their ion channels may also hold a key to solving unresolved molecular mysteries in the future. PMID:18923187

  8. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  9. Ion thruster performance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    A model of ion thruster performance is developed for high flux density, cusped magnetic field thruster designs. This model is formulated in terms of the average energy required to produce an ion in the discharge chamber plasma and the fraction of these ions that are extracted to form the beam. The direct loss of high energy (primary) electrons from the plasma to the anode is shown to have a major effect on thruster performance. The model provides simple algebraic equations enabling one to calculate the beam ion energy cost, the average discharge chamber plasma ion energy cost, the primary electron density, the primary-to-Maxwellian electron density ratio and the Maxwellian electron temperature. Experiments indicate that the model correctly predicts the variation in plasma ion energy cost for changes in propellant gas (Ar, Kr and Xe), grid transparency to neutral atoms, beam extraction area, discharge voltage, and discharge chamber wall temperature. The model and experiments indicate that thruster performance may be described in terms of only four thruster configuration dependent parameters and two operating parameters. The model also suggests that improved performance should be exhibited by thruster designs which extract a large fraction of the ions produced in the discharge chamber, which have good primary electron and neutral atom containment and which operate at high propellant flow rates.

  10. Polarized negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Haeberli, W.

    1981-04-01

    This paper presents a survey of methods, commonly in use or under development, to produce beams of polarized negative ions for injection into accelerators. A short summary recalls how the hyperfine interaction is used to obtain nuclear polarization in beams of atoms. Atomic-beam sources for light ions are discussed. If the best presently known techniques are incorporated in all stages of the source, polarized H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ beams in excess of 10 ..mu..A can probably be achieved. Production of polarized ions from fast (keV) beams of polarized atoms is treated separately for atoms in the H(25) excited state (Lamb-Shift source) and atoms in the H(1S) ground state. The negative ion beam from Lamb-Shift sources has reached a plateau just above 1 ..mu..A, but this beam current is adequate for many applications and the somewhat lower beam current is compensated by other desirable characteristics. Sources using fast polarized ground state atoms are in a stage of intense development. The next sections summarize production of polarized heavy ions by the atomic beam method, which is well established, and by optical pumping, which has recently been demonstrated to yield very large nuclear polarization. A short discussion of proposed ion sources for polarized /sup 3/He/sup -/ ions is followed by some concluding remarks.

  11. Laser-cooled atomic ions as probes of molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kenneth R.; Viteri, C. Ricardo; Clark, Craig R.; Goeders, James E.; Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Vittorini, Grahame D.

    2015-01-22

    Trapped laser-cooled atomic ions are a new tool for understanding cold molecular ions. The atomic ions not only sympathetically cool the molecular ions to millikelvin temperatures, but the bright atomic ion fluorescence can also serve as a detector of both molecular reactions and molecular spectra. We are working towards the detection of single molecular ion spectra by sympathetic heating spectroscopy. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy uses the coupled motion of two trapped ions to measure the spectra of one ion by observing changes in the fluorescence of the other ion. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy is a generalization of quantum logic spectroscopy, but does not require ions in the motional ground state or coherent control of the ion internal states. We have recently demonstrated this technique using two isotopes of Ca{sup +} [Phys. Rev. A, 81, 043428 (2010)]. Limits of the method and potential applications for molecular spectroscopy are discussed.

  12. Ion dynamics during seizures

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Joseph V.; Burman, Richard J.; Katz, Arieh A.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in membrane voltage brought about by ion fluxes through voltage and transmitter-gated channels represent the basis of neural activity. As such, electrochemical gradients across the membrane determine the direction and driving force for the flow of ions and are therefore crucial in setting the properties of synaptic transmission and signal propagation. Ion concentration gradients are established by a variety of mechanisms, including specialized transporter proteins. However, transmembrane gradients can be affected by ionic fluxes through channels during periods of elevated neural activity, which in turn are predicted to influence the properties of on-going synaptic transmission. Such activity-induced changes to ion concentration gradients are a feature of both physiological and pathological neural processes. An epileptic seizure is an example of severely perturbed neural activity, which is accompanied by pronounced changes in intracellular and extracellular ion concentrations. Appreciating the factors that contribute to these ion dynamics is critical if we are to understand how a seizure event evolves and is sustained and terminated by neural tissue. Indeed, this issue is of significant clinical importance as status epilepticus—a type of seizure that does not stop of its own accord—is a life-threatening medical emergency. In this review we explore how the transmembrane concentration gradient of the six major ions (K+, Na+, Cl−, Ca2+, H+and HCO3−) is altered during an epileptic seizure. We will first examine each ion individually, before describing how multiple interacting mechanisms between ions might contribute to concentration changes and whether these act to prolong or terminate epileptic activity. In doing so, we will consider how the availability of experimental techniques has both advanced and restricted our ability to study these phenomena. PMID:26539081

  13. Heavy-ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmerling, W.

    1980-03-01

    This lecture deals with some of the more important physical characteristics of relativistic heavy ions and their measurement, with beam delivery and beam monitoring, and with conventional radiation dosimetry as used in the operation of the BEVALAC biomedical facility for high energy heavy ions (Lyman and Howard, 1977; BEVALAC, 1977). Even so, many fundamental aspects of the interaction of relativistic heavy ions with matter, including important atomic physics and radiation chemical considerations, are not discussed beyond the reminder that such additional understanding is required before an adequte perspective of the problem can be attained.

  14. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, E.O.

    1958-09-16

    Improvements are presented in calutron devices and, more specifically, dealswith an improved mounting arrangement fer the ion source of the calutron. An important feature of the invention resides in a pluraiity of insulators so mounted as to be accessible from the exterior of the calutron tank and supporting at their inner ends the ion source. These insutators are arranged in mutually parallel relation and also parallel to the flux of the nmgnetic field, whereby the strain of the supporting elements is reduced to a minimum. In addition the support assembly is secured to a removable wall portion of the task to facilitate withdrawal and examination of the ion producing mechanism.

  15. Relating to ion detection

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for improving detection of alpha and/or beta emitting sources on items or in locations using indirect means. The emission forms generate ions in a medium surrounding the item or location and the medium is then moved to a detecting location where the ions are discharged to give a measure of the emission levels. To increase the level of ions generated and render the system particularly applicable for narrow pipes and other forms of conduits, the medium pressure is increased above atmospheric pressure. STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

  16. ION ROCKET ENGINE

    DOEpatents

    Ehlers, K.W.; Voelker, F. III

    1961-12-19

    A thrust generating engine utilizing cesium vapor as the propellant fuel is designed. The cesium is vaporized by heat and is passed through a heated porous tungsten electrode whereby each cesium atom is fonized. Upon emergfng from the tungsten electrode, the ions are accelerated rearwardly from the rocket through an electric field between the tungsten electrode and an adjacent accelerating electrode grid structure. To avoid creating a large negative charge on the space craft as a result of the expulsion of the positive ions, a source of electrons is disposed adjacent the ion stream to neutralize the cesium atoms following acceleration thereof. (AEC)

  17. Phosphoinositides regulate ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Bertil; Dickson, Eamonn J.; Kruse, Martin; Vivas, Oscar; Suh, Byung-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoinositides serve as signature motifs for different cellular membranes and often are required for the function of membrane proteins. Here, we summarize clear evidence supporting the concept that many ion channels are regulated by membrane phosphoinositides. We describe tools used to test their dependence on phosphoinositides, especially phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, and consider mechanisms and biological meanings of phosphoinositide regulation of ion channels. This lipid regulation can underlie changes of channel activity and electrical excitability in response to receptors. Since different intracellular membranes have different lipid compositions, the activity of ion channels still in transit towards their final destination membrane may be suppressed until they reach an optimal lipid environment. PMID:25241941

  18. Ion wave breaking acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Bamberg, K.-U.; Ma, W. J.; Liu, J.; He, X. T.; Yan, X. Q.; Ruhl, H.

    2016-07-01

    Laser driven ion wave breaking acceleration (IWBA) in plasma wakefields is investigated by means of a one-dimensional (1D) model and 1D/3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. IWBA operates in relativistic transparent plasma for laser intensities in the range of 1020- 1023 W /cm2 . The threshold for IWBA is identified in the plane of plasma density and laser amplitude. In the region just beyond the threshold, self-injection takes place only for a fraction of ions and in a limited time period. This leads to well collimated ion pulses with peaked energy spectra, in particular for 3D geometry.

  19. Ion beam accelerator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A system is described that combines geometrical and electrostatic focusing to provide high ion extraction efficiency and good focusing of an accelerated ion beam. The apparatus includes a pair of curved extraction grids (16, 18) with multiple pairs of aligned holes positioned to direct a group of beamlets (20) along converging paths. The extraction grids are closely spaced and maintained at a moderate potential to efficiently extract beamlets of ions and allow them to combine into a single beam (14). An accelerator electrode device (22) downstream from the extraction grids, is at a much lower potential than the grids to accelerate the combined beam.

  20. Ion acoustic solitons in a plasma with finite temperature drifting ions: Limit on ion drift velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, H.K.; Singh, S.; Dahiya, R.P. )

    1994-05-01

    Propagation of ion acoustic solitons in a plasma consisting of finite temperature drifting ions and nondrifting electrons has been studied. It is shown that in addition to the electron inertia and weak relativistic effects, the ion temperature also modifies the soliton behavior. By including the finite ion temperature, limit for the ion drift velocity [ital u][sub 0] for which the ion acoustic solitons are possible, is obtained. The solitons can exist for [ital v][sub [ital Te

  1. Ion manipulation device

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Baker, Erin M

    2014-09-16

    An ion manipulation method and device is disclosed. The device includes a pair of substantially parallel surfaces. An array of inner electrodes is contained within, and extends substantially along the length of, each parallel surface. The device includes a first outer array of electrodes and a second outer array of electrodes. Each outer array of electrodes is positioned on either side of the inner electrodes, and is contained within and extends substantially along the length of each parallel surface. A DC voltage is applied to the first and second outer array of electrodes. A RF voltage, with a superimposed electric field, is applied to the inner electrodes by applying the DC voltages to each electrode. Ions either move between the parallel surfaces within an ion confinement area or along paths in the direction of the electric field, or can be trapped in the ion confinement area.

  2. Ion sensing method

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard Harding; Martin, Glenn Brian

    2004-05-18

    The present invention allows the determination of trace levels of ionic substances in a sample solution (ions, metal ions, and other electrically charged molecules) by coupling a separation method, such as liquid chromatography, with ion selective electrodes (ISE) prepared so as to allow detection at activities below 10.sup.-6 M. The separation method distributes constituent molecules into fractions due to unique chemical and physical properties, such as charge, hydrophobicity, specific binding interactions, or movement in an electrical field. The separated fractions are detected by means of the ISE(s). These ISEs can be used singly or in an array. Accordingly, modifications in the ISEs are used to permit detection of low activities, specifically, below 10.sup.-6 M, by using low activities of the primary analyte (the molecular species which is specifically detected) in the inner filling solution of the ISE. Arrays constructed in various ways allow flow-through sensing for multiple ions.

  3. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Ji, Qing; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    1999-01-01

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 .mu.m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 .mu.m or less.

  4. Ion Milling of Sapphire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don A.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2004-01-01

    The ion milling of sapphire is a complicated operation due to several characteristics of the material itself. It is a relatively hard transparent nonconductive crystalline material that does not transfer heat nearly as well as metals that have been successfully ion milled in the past. This investigation involved designing an experimental arrangement, using existing ion milling equipment, as the precursor to figuring the surface of sapphire and other insulating optical materials. The experimental arrangement employs a laser probe beam to constantly monitor the stresses being induced in the material, as it is being ion milled. The goal is to determine if the technique proposed would indeed indicate the stress being induced in the material so that these stresses can be managed to prevent failure of the optic.

  5. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  6. Planar ion microtraps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, R. G.; Devoe, R. G.; Kallenbach, R.

    1992-12-01

    Planar quadrupole ion traps have been analyzed through numerical and analytic solutions of Laplace's equation. These involve either one or more conducting rings or their analogs, a hole in one or more conducting sheets. The leading terms in the potential are harmonic, corresponding to the Paul trap, but with coefficients that reduce their efficiency and for some traps, the anharmonic terms can be suppressed to eighth-order. Stable ion trapping is predicted for all electrode configurations possessing radial and axial symmetry. A three-hole microtrap with an inner hole radius of 80 μm trapped from one to many (dense clouds) laser-cooled Ba+ ions where the two-ion distance is compressed to 1 μm, allowing new experiments in quantum optics. Also, arrays of traps for optical clocks are contemplated using photolithographic fabrication.

  7. Trapping radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, H.-J.; Blaum, K.

    2004-12-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  8. Ion beam texturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    A microscopic surface texture is created by sputter etching a surface while simultaneously sputter depositing a lower sputter yield material onto the surface. A xenon ion beam source has been used to perform this texturing process on samples as large as three centimeters in diameter. Ion beam textured surface structures have been characterized with SEM photomicrographs for a large number of materials including Cu, Al, Si, Ti, Ni, Fe, Stainless steel, Au, and Ag. Surfaces have been textured using a variety of low sputter yield materials - Ta, Mo, Nb, and Ti. The initial stages of the texture creation have been documented, and the technique of ion beam sputter removal of any remaining deposited material has been studied. A number of other texturing parameters have been studied such as the variation of the texture with ion beam power, surface temperature, and the rate of texture growth with sputter etching time.

  9. COASTING ARC ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1957-09-10

    An improved ion source is described and in particular a source in which the ions are efficiently removed. The plasma is generated in a tubular amode structure by the oscillation of electrons in an axial magnetic field, as in the Phillips Ion Gage. The novel aspect of the source is the expansion of the plasma as it leaves the anode structure, so as to reduce the ion density at the axis of the anode and present a uniform area of plasma to an extraction grid. The structure utilized in the present patent to expand the plasma comprises flange members of high permeability at the exitgrid end of the amode to diverge the magnetic field adjacent the exit.

  10. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1997-01-01

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  11. Ion exchange phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2011-05-01

    Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

  12. Ion replacement electrorefining

    SciTech Connect

    Willit, J.L.; Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1994-04-01

    We are developing a two-step electrochemical process for purifying and separating metals called ion replacement electrorefining. In each step, metal cations formed by oxidation at an electrode replace other metal cations that are reduced at another elecmae. Using this approach, we have separated or purified uranium, dysprosium, and lanthanum on a laboratory scale. This paper explains the ion replacement concept and presents results of these demonstration experiments.

  13. Miniaturized Ion Mobility Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaye, William J. (Inventor); Stimac, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    By utilizing the combination of a unique electronic ion injection control circuit in conjunction with a particularly designed drift cell construction, the instantly disclosed ion mobility spectrometer achieves increased levels of sensitivity, while achieving significant reductions in size and weight. The instant IMS is of a much simpler and easy to manufacture design, rugged and hermetically sealed, capable of operation at high temperatures to at least 250.degree. C., and is uniquely sensitive, particularly to explosive chemicals.

  14. Ion electric propulsion unit

    DOEpatents

    Light, Max E; Colestock, Patrick L

    2014-01-28

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) thruster is disclosed having a plasma chamber which is electrically biased with a positive voltage. The chamber bias serves to efficiently accelerate and expel the positive ions from the chamber. Electrons follow the exiting ions, serving to provide an electrically neutral exhaust plume. In a further embodiment, a downstream shaping magnetic field serves to further accelerate and/or shape the exhaust plume.

  15. HIGH VOLTAGE ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-04-19

    A device is described for providing a source of molecular ions having a large output current and with an accelerated energy of the order of 600 kv. Ions are produced in an ion source which is provided with a water-cooled source grid of metal to effect maximum recombination of atomic ions to molecular ions. A very high accelerating voltage is applied to withdraw and accelerate the molecular ions from the source, and means are provided for dumping the excess electrons at the lowest possible potentials. An accelerating grid is placed adjacent to the source grid and a slotted, grounded accelerating electrode is placed adjacent to the accelerating grid. A potential of about 35 kv is maintained between the source grid and accelerating grid, and a potential of about 600 kv is maintained between the accelerating grid and accelerating electrode. In order to keep at a minimum the large number of oscillating electrons which are created when such high voltages are employed in the vicinity of a strong magnetic field, a plurality of high voltage cascaded shields are employed with a conventional electron dumping system being employed between each shield so as to dump the electrons at the lowest possible potential rather than at 600 kv.

  16. Advanced ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    A series of experiments conducted on a ring cusp magnetic field ion thruster; in which the anode, cathode and discharge chamber backplate were moved relative to the magnetic cusp; are described. Optimum locations for the anode, cathode and backplate which yield the lowest energy cost per plasma ion and highest extracted ion fraction are identified. The results are discussed in terms of simple physical models. The results of preliminary experiments into the operation of hollow cathodes on nitrogen and xenon over a large pressure range (0.1 to 100 Torr) are presented. They show that the cathode discharge transfers from the cathode insert to the exterior edge of the orifice plate as the interelectrode pressure is increased. Experimental evidence showing that a new ion extractor grid concept can be used to stabilize the plasma sheath at the screen grid is presented. This concept, identified by the term constrained sheath optics, is shown to hold ion beamlet divergence and impingement characteristics to stable values as the beamlet current and the net and total accelerating voltages are changed. The current status of a study of beamlet vectoring induced by displacing the accelerator and/or decelerator grids of a three grid ion extraction system relative to the screen grid is discussed.

  17. Microscale continuous ion exchanger.

    PubMed

    Kuban, Petr; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Morris, Kavin A

    2002-11-01

    A microscale continuous ion exchanger based on two liquid streams flowing in parallel is presented. The ion exchange reaction occurs through diffusional transfer of molecules between the ion exchanger phase and the eluent phase and is applied for conductivity suppression. Two approaches are demonstrated. In the first approach, a liquid ion exchanger (i.e. a strongly basic compound, e.g., tetraoctylammonium hydroxide, or a secondary amine, e.g., Amberlite IA-2) is dissolved in an organic solvent immiscible with the aqueous eluent. The system allows for sensitive suppressed conductivity detection of various inorganic cations. When the weakly basic secondary amine is used, conductometric detection of heavy metals is possible. In the second approach, a suspension of finely ground ion-exchange resin is used as the ion exchanger phase. In this case, the suspension need not involve an organic solvent. Theoretical models and computations are presented along with experimental results. The potential of such a system as a chip-scale post-separation suppressor/reactor is evident.

  18. Ion channels and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kunzelmann, Karl

    2005-06-01

    Membrane ion channels are essential for cell proliferation and appear to have a role in the development of cancer. This has initially been demonstrated for potassium channels and is meanwhile also suggested for other cation channels and Cl- channels. For some of these channels, like voltage-gated ether à go-go and Ca2+-dependent potassium channels as well as calcium and chloride channels, a cell cycle-dependent function has been demonstrated. Along with other membrane conductances, these channels control the membrane voltage and Ca2+ signaling in proliferating cells. Homeostatic parameters, such as the intracellular ion concentration, cytosolic pH and cell volume, are also governed by the activity of ion channels. Thus it will be an essential task for future studies to unravel cell cycle-specific effects of ion channels and non-specific homeostatic functions. When studying the role of ion channels in cancer cells, it is indispensable to choose experimental conditions that come close to the in vivo situation. Thus, environmental parameters, such as low oxygen pressure, acidosis and exposure to serum proteins, have to be taken into account. In order to achieve clinical application, more studies on the original cancer tissue are required, and improved animal models. Finally, it will be essential to generate more potent and specific inhibitors of ion channels to overcome the shortcomings of some of the current approaches.

  19. Single ion heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Kilian

    2015-03-01

    An experimental realization of a heat engine with a single ion is presented, which will allow for work extraction even with non-classical thermal reservoirs. To this goal a custom designed linear Paul trap with a single ion performing an Otto cycle is presented. The radial state of the ion is used as the working gas analogous to the gas in a conventional heat engine. The conventional piston is realized by the axial degrees of freedom and the axial motional excitation stores the generated work, just like a conventional fly-wheel. The heat baths can be realized by tailored laser radiation. Alternatively electrical noise can be used to control the state of the ion. The presented system possesses advantageous properties, as the working parameters can be tuned over a broad range and the motional degrees of freedom of the ion can be accurately determined. Dark resonances allow for fast stroboscopic thermometry during the entire working cycle. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to predict the efficiency and the gained work of the working cycle. We have also shown how the equations for the Carnot limit have to be modified if a squeezed thermal reservoir is employed. Furthermore structural phase transitions with laser cooled linear ion crystals are induced verifying the Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  20. Effects of sawtooth crashes on beam ions and fusion product tritons in JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, F. B.; Adams, J. M.; Bond, D. S.; Hone, M. A.; Howarth, P. J. A.; Jarvis, O. N.; Loughlin, M. J.; Sadler, G. J.; Van Belle, P.; Watkins, N.

    1994-05-01

    The JET neutron emission profile monitor is used to measure the 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV neutron emission line integrals before and after sawtooth crashes in high d-d neutron yield, hot ion H mode plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET). Deuterium-deuterium (d-d) fusion produces 2.5 MeV neutrons and 1 MeV tritons (t) at nearly equal rates from its two reaction channels. A plasma current of 3 MA is sufficiently high to contain most of the fusion product tritons, which have birth orbit gyroradii and velocity space distributions similar to those of the 3.5 MeV or particles from d-t fusion. By examining neutron emission line integrals and tomographically deduced local emissivity profiles, an upper limit of 10% can be placed on the net fraction of fusion product tritons which are displaced from the plasma axis by those sawtooth crashes studied. This is a much smaller net fraction than that typically observed, 35-55%, for displaced injected neutral beam deuterium ions. A study of the response of beam injected deuterium ions to a sawtooth crash shows that the change in their axial density depends on the precrash spatial width of the neutron emissivity profile. The fusion product tritons, which have a large precrash spatial width, respond weakly to a crash. This weak response is consistent with the behaviour of the analogous d-d beam thermal neutrons when extrapolated to the corresponding emissivity spatial width. The implication of these observations is that beam ions and 3.5 MeV alpha particles in JET may be relatively resilient to sawtooth clashes, when the spatial width of their density is sufficiently large

  1. Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe

    DOEpatents

    Ward, James W.; Schlanger, Herbert; McNulty, Jr., Hugh; Parker, Norman W.

    1985-01-01

    A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

  2. First Experimental Evidence of Turbulence-driven Main Ion Flow and ExB Flow Triggering the L-H Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, L.

    2014-10-01

    Simultaneous measurements of main ion flow, E × B flow, and turbulence level ñ / n inside the separatrix (LCFS) show for the first time that the initial turbulence collapse preceding the L-H transition is due to turbulence-driven ion flow and E × B flow in the ion diamagnetic direction, opposing the pressure-gradient-driven equilibrium E × B flow in the L-mode phase. Low to high confinement (L-H) transitions characterized by limit cycle oscillations (LCO,) allow probing the trigger dynamics and synergy of turbulence-driven meso-scale flows, and pressure-gradient driven flows with high spatio-temporal resolution. A density/plasma current scan indicates that the LCO is triggered at a critical value of turbulence-driven flow shear. Near the minimum of the electric field well, turbulence-driven flow in the electron diamagnetic direction is observed. The radial flow (shear) reversal is consistent with the direction of the (ñ , Er) limit cycle observed just inside the LCFS in DIII-D (and recently in LCO-H-mode transitions in HL-2A and JFT-2M), and the reversed limit cycle direction observed in the inner shear layer. Causality of shear-flow generation has been established: early during LCO, the E × B shearing rate leads the ion pressure gradient increase; during the final phase of the LCO, the edge pressure gradient and ion diamagnetic flow are modulated and increase, and the shearing rate lags the ion pressure gradient. Pressure-gradient-driven shear then becomes sufficiently large to secure the final LCO-H-mode transition. A two-predator, one-prey model, similar to a previously developed model but retaining arbitrary polarity of turbulence-driven flow with to respect pressure-gradient-driven E × B flow, captures essential aspects of the transition dynamics, including the magnitude and direction of the driven poloidal main ion flow. Supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FG02-08ER54984 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  3. Ion-ion waves in the auroral region - Wave excitation and ion heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Martin, R. F., Jr.; Winglee, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of the ion-ion mode which is excited in plasmas when two or more cold ion beams are streaming relative to one another are investigated assuming a warm electron distribution at rest (the model consistent with particle distributions observed in auroral plasma cavities). Numerical solutions are derived for the generalized electrostatic dispersion equation for parallel propagation and for oblique propagation of ion waves. It is shown that the relative ion temperature and concentration have significant effects on the stability of the accelerated plasma and the expected ion heating. Finally, a relationship between ion drift and thermal speed is derived using the marginal stability of ion-ion waves for nonzero ion temperature; the relationship was found to compare favorably with DE-1 ion observations at the high-altitude boundary of the auroral cavity.

  4. Calculation of ion distribution functions and neoclassical transport in the edge of single-null divertor tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognlien, T. D.; Cohen, R. H.; Xu, X. Q.

    2007-11-01

    The ion distribution function in the H-mode pedestal region and outward across the magnetic separatrix is expected to have a substantial non-Maxwellian character owing to the large banana orbits and steep gradients in temperature and density. The 4D (2r,2v) version of the TEMPEST continuum gyrokinetic code is used with a Coulomb collision model to calculate the ion distribution in a single-null tokamak geometry throughout the pedestal/scrape-off-layer regions. The mean density, parallel velocity, and energy radial profiles are shown at various poloidal locations. The collisions cause neoclassical energy transport through the pedestal that is then lost to the divertor plates along the open field lines outside the separatrix. The resulting heat flux profiles at the inner and outer divertor plates are presented and discussed, including asymmetries that depend on the B-field direction. Of particular focus is the effect on ion profiles and fluxes of a radial electric field exhibiting a deep well just inside the separatrix, which reduces the width of the banana orbits by the well-known squeezing effect.

  5. Radiative ion-ion neutralization: a new gas-phase atmospheric pressure ion transduction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Davis, Eric J; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2012-06-01

    All atmospheric pressure ion detectors, including photo ionization detectors, flame ionization detectors, electron capture detectors, and ion mobility spectrometers, utilize Faraday plate designs in which ionic charge is collected and amplified. The sensitivity of these Faraday plate ion detectors are limited by thermal (Johnson) noise in the associated electronics. Thus approximately 10(6) ions per second are required for a minimal detection. This is not the case for ion detection under vacuum conditions where secondary electron multipliers (SEMs) can be used. SEMs produce a cascade of approximately 10(6) electrons per ion impinging on the conversion dynode. Similarly, photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) can generate approximately 10(6) electrons per photon. Unlike SEMs, however, PMTs are evacuated and sealed so that they are commonly used under atmospheric pressure conditions. This paper describes an atmospheric pressure ion detector based on coupling a PMT with light emitted from ion-ion neutralization reactions. The normal Faraday plate collector electrode was replaced with an electrode "needle" used to concentrate the anions as they were drawn to the tip of the needle by a strong focusing electric field. Light was emitted near the surface of the electrode when analyte ions were neutralized with cations produced from the anode. Although radiative-ion-ion recombination has been previously reported, this is the first time ions from separate ionization sources have been combined to produce light. The light from this radiative-ion-ion-neutralization (RIIN) was detected using a photon multiplier such that an ion mobility spectrum was obtained by monitoring the light emitted from mobility separated ions. An IMS spectrum of nitroglycerin (NG) was obtained utilizing RIIN for tranducing the mobility separated ions into an analytical signal. The implications of this novel ion transduction method are the potential for counting ions at atmospheric pressure and for obtaining ion

  6. Heavy ion tumour therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, M.

    2000-03-01

    Ion beams represent a promising radiotherapy modality for the treatment of deep seated tumours. Compared to conventional photon beams, in particular beams of heavier ions like e.g. carbon show several advantages which are related to their different physical and radiobiological properties: The dose increases with penetration depth and shows a sharp distal fall off at the end of the particle range, i.e., the depth dose profile is inverted compared to photon beams. They exhibit an increased biological effectiveness in particular at the end of their range and thus in the target volume. The spatial distribution of stopping particles can be monitored by means of PET-techniques making use of the small amount of radioactive projectile fragments. Ion beams were first used for medical applications in 1954 in Berkeley. Since then, several treatment facilities for tumour therapy have been established worldwide, and approximately 25 000 patients have been treated with protons and 3000 patients with heavier ions successfully. As an example, the specific advantages of the heavy ion therapy facility at GSI Darmstadt established in cooperation with the Radiological Clinics and DKFZ Heidelberg and FZ Rossendorf will be described. In contrast to most existing facilities, it is based on an active beam delivery system, using magnetic deflection of a pencil beam (raster scan) and accelerator energy variation to adjust the penetration depth. Thus, an optimal conformation of the dose to the target volume is achieved. PET-measurements allow for a quasi on-line monitoring of the 3D distribution of stopping particles and in particular of the position of the distal edge of the dose distribution. Furthermore, in the treatment planning procedure the radiobiological properties of ion beams are taken into account in great detail. In December 1997, patient treatments started at GSI, and up to now 42 patients were treated with carbon ions alone or in a mixed carbon/photon beam regime.

  7. Clues From Pluto's Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Nearly a year ago, in July 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft passed by the Pluto system. The wealth of data amassed from that flyby is still being analyzed including data from the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) instrument. Recent examination of this data has revealedinteresting new information about Plutos atmosphere and how the solar wind interacts with it.A Heavy Ion TailThe solar wind is a constant stream of charged particles released by the Sun at speeds of around 400 km/s (thats 1 million mph!). This wind travels out to the far reaches of the solar system, interacting with the bodies it encounters along the way.By modeling the SWAP detections, the authors determine the directions of the IMF that could produce the heavy ions detected. Red pixels represent IMF directions permitted. No possible IMF could reproduce the detections if the ions are nitrogen (bottom panels), and only retrograde IMF directions can produce the detections if the ions are methane. [Adapted from Zirnstein et al. 2016]New Horizons data has revealed that Plutos atmosphere leaks neutral nitrogen, methane, and carbon monoxide molecules that sometimes escape its weak gravitational pull. These molecules become ionized and are subsequently picked up by the passing solar wind, forming a tail of heavy ions behind Pluto. The details of the geometry and composition of this tail, however, had not yet been determined.Escaping MethaneIn a recent study led by Eric Zirnstein (Southwest Research Institute), the latest analysis of data from the SWAP instrument on board New Horizons is reported. The team used SWAPs ion detections from just after New Horizons closest approach to Pluto to better understand how the heavy ions around Pluto behave, and how the solar wind interacts with Plutos atmosphere.In the process of analyzing the SWAP data, Zirnstein and collaborators first establish what the majority of the heavy ions picked up by the solar wind are. Models of the SWAP detections indicate they are unlikely

  8. Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kosuga, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Diamond, P. H.; Itoh, K.; Lesur, M.

    2014-10-15

    A theory to describe basic characterization of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance is presented. The role of trapped ion granulations, clusters of trapped ions correlated by precession resonance, is the focus. Microscopically, the presence of trapped ion granulations leads to a sharp (logarithmic) divergence of two point phase space density correlation at small scales. Macroscopically, trapped ion granulations excite potential fluctuations that do not satisfy dispersion relation and so broaden frequency spectrum. The line width from emission due only to trapped ion granulations is calculated. The result shows that the line width depends on ion free energy and electron dissipation, which implies that non-adiabatic electrons are essential to recover non-trivial dynamics of trapped ion granulations. Relevant testable predictions are summarized.

  9. Cassini observations of ion cyclotron waves and ions anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crary, F. J.; Dols, V. J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Tokar, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    In Saturn's equatorial, inner magnetosphere, the production of fresh ions in a pick-up distribution generates ion cyclotron waves. These waves are a sensitive indicator of fresh plasma production, but the quantitative relation between wave properties and ionization rates is nontrivial. We present a combined analysis of Cassini MAG and CAPS data, from a variety of equatorial orbits between 2005 and 2012. Using the MAG data, we determine the amplitude and peak frequency of ion cyclotron waves. From the CAPS data we extract the parallel and perpendicular velocity distribution of water group ions. We compare these results with hybrid simulations of the ion cyclotron instability and relate the observed wave amplitudes and ion velocity distributions to the production rate of pickup ions. The resulting relation between wave and plasma properties will allow us to infer ion production rates even at times when no direct ion measurements are available.

  10. Molecular ion photofragment spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bustamente, S.W.

    1983-11-01

    A new molecular ion photofragment spectrometer is described which features a supersonic molecular beam ion source and a radio frequency octapole ion trap interaction region. This unique combination allows several techniques to be applied to the problem of detecting a photon absorption event of a molecular ion. In particular, it may be possible to obtain low resolution survey spectra of exotic molecular ions by using a direct vibrational predissociation process, or by using other more indirect detection methods. The use of the spectrometer is demonstrated by measuring the lifetime of the O/sub 2//sup +/(/sup 4/..pi../sub u/) metastable state which is found to consist of two main components: the /sup 4/..pi../sub 5/2/ and /sup 4/..pi../sub -1/2/ spin components having a long lifetime (approx. 129 ms) and the /sup 4/..pi../sub 3/2/ and /sup 4/..pi../sub 1/2/ spin components having a short lifetime (approx. 6 ms).

  11. Ion Milling of Sapphire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Don A.

    2002-01-01

    The ion figuring system at the Marshall Space Flight Center has been successfully used for at least three previous investigations into the ion milling of metals. The research was directed toward improving the surface quality of X-ray directing optics. These studies were performed on surfaces that were already hand polished to an excellent surface quality and were intended to remove the residual unwanted figure left by those techniques. The ion milling was typically carried out on test surfaces or mandrels that were several centimeters in width and length. The good thermal conductivity of the metal samples allowed the ion beam to be directed onto the sample for an indefinite period of time. This is not true of sapphire or most electrical insulators and problems have arisen in recent attempts to ion mill thin samples of sapphire. The failure and fracture of the material was likely due to thermal stresses and the relatively low thermal conductivity of sapphire (compared to most metals), These assumed stresses actually provided the key as to how they might be monitored. A thermal gradient in the sapphire sample will induce an effective index of refraction change and because of the shape constraint and the crystal structure and simple thermal expansion, this index change will be nonuniform across the sample. In all but simple cubic crystal structures, this leads to a spatially nonuniform optical retardance induced on any polarized optical beam traversing the sample, and it is this retardance that can be monitored using standard polarimetric procedures.

  12. Ion transport in pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Oancea, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system,, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis. PMID:25034214

  13. Ion Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, I.

    The following sections are included: * FILM FORMATION BY ION BEAMS * Fundamental Processes in Film Formation by Low Energy Ion Beams * Comparison of ICB with Other Physical Vapor Deposition Methods * Vacuum Deposition * Sputter Deposition * Ion Plating * Ion Beam Deposition * Simultaneous Deposition and Implantation * Plasma Enhanced Deposition * Section I References * ION CLUSTER BEAM DEPOSITION AND CLUSTER BEAM FORMATION * Nucleation Process * Growth and Condensation Process * Section II References * CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CLUSTER * Velocity of Clusters * Energy of Clusters * TEM Observation of Clusters * Structural Properties * Section III References * IONIZED CLUSTER BEAM DEPOSITION SYSTEM * Section IV References * FILM DEPOSITION PROCESS BY ICB * Fundamental Process * Effects of Kinetic Energy on the Film Properties * Epitaxial phenomena * Crystallographic Structure * Physical Structure of Films * Effects of the Electric Charge on the Film Properties * Section V References * APPLICATIONS * Silicon and Silicon Alloy Films * Low Temperature Epitaxy of Silicon Films * Thermally Stable a-Si Film Growth * High Quality SiO2 Film Deposition * Epitaxial A1 Films * Electromigration Resistant A1 Film * Thermally Stable Al/Si Contact * II-VI and III-V Compound Films * Thin Multiple Layered Film * CONCLUSIONS * Acknowledgements * Section VI References

  14. ION Configuration Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borgen, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The configuration of ION (Inter - planetary Overlay Network) network nodes is a manual task that is complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. This program seeks to accelerate this job and produce reliable configurations. The ION Configuration Editor is a model-based smart editor based on Eclipse Modeling Framework technology. An ION network designer uses this Eclipse-based GUI to construct a data model of the complete target network and then generate configurations. The data model is captured in an XML file. Intrinsic editor features aid in achieving model correctness, such as field fill-in, type-checking, lists of valid values, and suitable default values. Additionally, an explicit "validation" feature executes custom rules to catch more subtle model errors. A "survey" feature provides a set of reports providing an overview of the entire network, enabling a quick assessment of the model s completeness and correctness. The "configuration" feature produces the main final result, a complete set of ION configuration files (eight distinct file types) for each ION node in the network.

  15. Ion transport in pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Oancea, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis.

  16. [Ion specificity during ion exchange equilibrium in natural clinoptilolite].

    PubMed

    He, Yun-Hua; Li, Hang; Liu, Xin-Min; Xiong, Hai-Ling

    2015-03-01

    Zeolites have been widely applied in soil improvement and environment protection. The study on ion specificity during ion exchange equilibrium is of important significance for better use of zeolites. The maximum adsorption capacities of alkali ions during ion exchange equilibrium in the clinoptilolite showed obvious specificity. For alkali metal ions with equivalent valence, the differences in adsorption capacity increased with the decrease of ionic concentration. These results cannot be well explained by the classical theories including coulomb force, ionic size, hydration, dispersion force, classic induction force and surface complexation. We found that the coupling of polarization effects resulted from the quantum fluctuation of diverse alkali metal ions and electric field near the zeolite surface should be the primary reason for specific ion effect during ion exchange in zeolite. The result of this coupling effect was that the difference in the ion dipole moment increased with the increase of surface potential, which further expanded the difference in the adsorption ability between zeolite surface and ions, resulting in different ion exchange adsorption ability at the solid/liquid interface. Due to the high surface charge density of zeolite, ionic size also played an important role in the distribution of ions in the double diffuse layer, which led to an interesting result that distinct differences in exchange adsorption ability of various alkali metal ions were only detected at high surface potential (the absolute value was greater than 0.2 V), which was different from the ion exchange equilibrium result on the surface with low charge density.

  17. Experimental study of particle formation by ion-ion recombination.

    PubMed

    Nagato, Kenkichi; Nakauchi, Masataka

    2014-10-28

    Particle formation by ion-ion recombination has been studied using an ion-ion recombination drift tube (IIR-DT). IIR-DT uses two DC corona ionizers to produce positive and negative ions at the ends of the drift tube. The ions of different polarity move in opposite directions along the electric field in the drift tube. We observed significant particle formation using ions generated in purified air containing H2O, SO2, and NH3. Particle formation was suppressed when no drift field was applied. We also observed few particles when we used a single discharge (positive or negative only). These results clearly show that particle formation observed in the IIR-DT was caused by nucleation by ion-ion recombination. Positive and negative ion species produced by corona ionizers were investigated using an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer. The ions involved in the particle formation were suggested to include H3O(+)(H2O)n and NH4(+)(H2O)n for positive ions and sulfur-based ions such as SO5(-), SO5(-)NO2, and HSO4(-) for negative ions. PMID:25362301

  18. Electronuclear ion fusion in an ion cyclotron resonance reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    1996-12-01

    A method and apparatus for generating nuclear fusion by ion cyclotron resonance in an ion trap reactor. The reactor includes a cylindrical housing having an axial axis, an internal surface, and first and second ends. First and second end plates that are charged are respectively located at the first and second ends of the cylindrical housing. A gas layer is adsorbed on the internal surface of the cylindrical housing. Ions are desorbed from the gas layer, forming a plasma layer adjacent to the cylindrical housing that includes first ions that have a same charge sign as the first and second end plates. A uniform magnetic field is oriented along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. Second ions, that are unlike the first ions, but have the same charge sign, are injected into the cylindrical housing along the axial axis of the cylindrical housing. A radio frequency field resonantly accelerates the injected second ions at the cyclotron resonance frequency of the second ions. The second ions circulate in increasing helical orbits and react with the first ions, at the optimum energy for nuclear fusion. The amplitude of the radio frequency field is adjusted to accelerate the second ions at a rate equal to the rate of tangential energy loss of the second ions by nuclear scattering in the first ions, causing the ions to continually interact until fusion occurs.

  19. New Cs sputter ion source with polyatomic ion beams for secondary ion mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belykh, S. F.; Palitsin, V. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Kovarsky, A. P.; Chang, R. J. H.; Adriaens, A.; Dowsett, M. G.; Adams, F.

    2007-08-01

    A simple design for a cesium sputter ion source compatible with vacuum and ion-optical systems as well as with electronics of the commercially available Cameca IMS-4f instrument is reported. This ion source has been tested with the cluster primary ions of Sin- and Cun-. Our experiments with surface characterization and depth profiling conducted to date demonstrate improvements of the analytical capabilities of the secondary ion mass spectrometry instrument due to the nonadditive enhancement of secondary ion emission and shorter ion ranges of polyatomic projectiles compared to atomic ones with the same impact energy.

  20. Dynamics of the ion-ion acoustic instability in the thermalization of ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.H.; Horton, W. . Inst. for Fusion Studies); Leboeuf, J.N. )

    1992-07-01

    Particle simulation using a nonlinear adiabatic electron response with two streaming ion species and nonlinear theory are used to study the collisionless thermalization of ion beams in a hot electron plasma. The slow beam or subsonic regime is investigated and the criterion for the transition from predominantly light ion to predominantly heavy ion heating is developed. Long-lived ion hole structures a-re observed in the final state.

  1. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-08-06

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  2. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  3. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1984-12-04

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field. 14 figs.

  4. Microwave ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Thomae, Rainer W.

    2005-07-26

    A compact microwave ion source has a permanent magnet dipole field, a microwave launcher, and an extractor parallel to the source axis. The dipole field is in the form of a ring. The microwaves are launched from the middle of the dipole ring using a coaxial waveguide. Electrons are heated using ECR in the magnetic field. The ions are extracted from the side of the source from the middle of the dipole perpendicular to the source axis. The plasma density can be increased by boosting the microwave ion source by the addition of an RF antenna. Higher charge states can be achieved by increasing the microwave frequency. A xenon source with a magnetic pinch can be used to produce intense EUV radiation.

  5. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  6. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  7. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, K.E.; Weeks, D.R.

    1997-08-12

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity. 2 figs.

  8. Radioactive ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Bower, Kenneth E.; Weeks, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus for detecting the presence, in aqueous media, of substances which emit alpha and/or beta radiation and determining the oxidation state of these radioactive substances, that is, whether they are in cationic or anionic form. In one embodiment, a sensor assembly has two elements, one comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds cations and the other comprised of an ion-exchange material which binds anions. Each ion-exchange element is further comprised of a scintillation plastic and a photocurrent generator. When a radioactive substance to which the sensor is exposed binds to either element and emits alpha or beta particles, photons produced in the scintillation plastic illuminate the photocurrent generator of that element. Sensing apparatus senses generator output and thereby indicates whether cationic species or anionic species or both are present and also provides an indication of species quantity.

  9. Actinide-ion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Li, Shelly X; Jue, Jan-fong; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Herrmann, Steven Douglas

    2015-01-13

    An apparatus for the real-time, in-situ monitoring of actinide-ion concentrations. A working electrolyte is positioned within the interior of a container. The working electrolyte is separated from a reference electrolyte by a separator. A working electrode is at least partially in contact with the working electrolyte. A reference electrode is at least partially in contact with the reference electrolyte. A voltmeter is electrically connected to the working electrode and the reference electrode. The working electrolyte comprises an actinide-ion of interest. The separator is ionically conductive to the actinide-ion of interest. The separator comprises an actinide, Zr, and Nb. Preferably, the actinide of the separator is Am or Np, more preferably Pu. In one embodiment, the actinide of the separator is the actinide of interest. In another embodiment, the separator further comprises P and O.

  10. ION PRODUCING MECHANISMS

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.M.

    1959-02-10

    Ion generating means and means for producing ions of material for isotopic separation are discussed. One feature of the invention resides in providing a heater means located in the source block approximately equidistant from a charge reservoir and an arc chamber, whereby the heat distribution in the block is such as to avoid overheating and to maintain the temperature of the various critical localities of the unit at their optimum values. Another feature consists of a pair of plates disposed on either side of the arc chamber exit opening to define a narrow slit for the egression of the ion beam. When the adjacent edges of the plates have become worn, the plates may be detached and reversed to use the opposite edges thereof to define the exit opening.

  11. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2003-01-01

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  12. Ion channels versus ion pumps: the principal difference, in principle

    PubMed Central

    Gadsby, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Two kinds of border guards control the incessant traffic of ions across cell membranes: ion channels and ion pumps. When open, channels let selected ions diffuse rapidly down electrical and concentration gradients, whereas ion pumps labour tirelessly to maintain the gradients, by consuming energy to slowly move ions against them. Because of their diametrically opposed tasks and their divergent speeds, channels and pumps have traditionally been viewed as completely different entities, as alike as chalk and cheese. But new structural and mechanistic information about both classes of these molecular machines challenges this comfortable separation, forcing its reevaluation. PMID:19339978

  13. Laser ion source for isobaric heavy ion collider experiment.

    PubMed

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    Heavy-ion collider experiment in isobaric system is under investigation at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. For this experiment, ion source is required to maximize the abundance of the intended isotope. The candidate of the experiment is (96)Ru + (96)Zr. Since the natural abundance of particular isotope is low and composition of isotope from ion source depends on the composites of the target, an isotope enriched material may be needed as a target. We studied the performance of the laser ion source required for the experiment for Zr ions.

  14. Impurity ion flow and temperature measured in a detached divertor with externally applied non-axisymmetric fields on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Briesemeister, A. R.; Isler, R. C.; Allen, S. L.; Ahn, J. -W.; McLean, A. G.; Unterberg, E. A.; Hillis, D. L.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Meyer, W. H.

    2014-11-15

    Externally applied non-axisymmetric magnetic fields are shown to have little effect on the impurity ion flow velocity and temperature as measured by the multichord divertor spectrometer in the DIII-D divertor for both attached and detached conditions. These experiments were performed in H-mode plasmas with the grad-B drift toward the target plates, with and without n = 3 resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs). The flow velocity in the divertor is shown to change by as much as 30% when deuterium gas puffing is used to create detachment of the divertor plasma. No measurable changes in the C III flow were observed inmore » response to the RMP fields for the conditions used in this work. Images of the C III emission are used along with divertor Thomson scattering to show that the local electron and C III temperatures are equilibrated for the conditions shown.« less

  15. Ion Engine Test Firing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This image of a xenon ion engine, photographed through a port of the vacuum chamber where it was being tested at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, shows the faint blue glow of charged atoms being emitted from the engine. The ion propulsion engine is the first non-chemical propulsion to be used as the primary means of propelling a spacecraft. The first flight in NASA's New Millennium Program, Deep Space 1 is designed to validate 12 new technologies for scientific space missions of the next century. Ion propulsion was first proposed in the 1950s and NASA performed experiments on this highly efficient propulsion system in the 1960s, but it was not used aboard an American spacecraft until the 1990s. Deep Space 1 was launched in October 1998 as part of NASA's New Millennium Program, which is managed by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. The California Institute of Technology in Pasadena manages JPL for NASA. The almost imperceptible thrust from the ion propulsion system is equivalent to the pressure exerted by a sheet of paper held in the palm of your hand. The ion engine is very slow to pick up speed, but over the long haul it can deliver 10 times as much thrust per pound of fuel as more traditional rockets. Unlike the fireworks of most chemical rockets using solid or liquid fuels, the ion drive emits only an eerie blue glow as ionized (electrically charged) atoms of xenon are pushed out of the engine. Xenon is the same gas found in photo flash tubes and many lighthouse bulbs.

  16. Tumortherapy with ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, G.; Heary Ion Therapy Collaboration

    2000-11-01

    Beams of heavy-charged particles like protons or carbon ions represent the optimum tool for the treatment of deep-seated inoperable tumors: in contrast to the conventionally used photons the dose increases along with the penetration depth through the body, culminating in a sharp maximum at the end of the particle range. In order to achieve a precisely conform irradiation of the selected target volume, this maximum can be shifted in depth by energy variation and distributed laterally through magnetic deflection of the particle beam. Because carbon ions have a lateral scattering of only about 1 mm at 10 cm depth they offer the most conform irradiation. In addition to this excellent physical selectivity the biological efficiency concerning cell killing increases towards the end of the carbon ions' range. Therefore, the increase in dose is potentiated by an increase in biological efficiency. Finally, the stopping of the carbon ions can be monitored by tracing a small amount of β + active 10C and 11C ions which are produced in nuclear reactions with atoms of the penetrated tissue. This β + distribution can be visualized by applying PET-techniques, thus allowing a good control of the beam distribution. At GSI Darmstadt a heavy-ion therapy unit has been designed and constructed in collaboration with the Radiological Clinic and the DKFZ Heidelberg and the FZR Dresden. The layout of this facility as well as the treatment of now more than 30 patients will be reported on. The proposal for the layout of a dedicated medical facility at Heidelberg will be presented

  17. Ion beam sputter etching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1986-01-01

    An ion beam etching process which forms extremely high aspect ratio surface microstructures using thin sputter masks is utilized in the fabrication of integrated circuits. A carbon rich sputter mask together with unmasked portions of a substrate is bombarded with inert gas ions while simultaneous carbon deposition occurs. The arrival of the carbon deposit is adjusted to enable the sputter mask to have a near zero or even slightly positive increase in thickness with time while the unmasked portions have a high net sputter etch rate.

  18. Heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacak, B.V.

    1994-11-01

    Heavy ion collisions at very high energies provide an opportunity to recreate in the laboratory the conditions which existed very early in the universe, just after the big bang. We prepare matter at very high energy density and search for evidence that the quarks and gluons are deconfined. I describe the kinds of observables that are experimentally accessible to characterize the system and to search for evidence of new physics. A wealth of information is now available from CERN and BNL heavy ion experiments. I discuss recent results on two particle correlations, strangeness production, and dilepton and direct photon distributions.

  19. CALUTRON ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Lofgren, E.J.

    1959-02-17

    An improvement is described in ion source mechanisms whereby the source structure is better adapted to withstanid the ravages of heat, erosion, and deterioration concomitant with operation of an ion source of the calutron type. A pair of molybdenum plates define the exit opening of the arc chamber and are in thermal contact with the walls of the chamber. These plates are maintained at a reduced temperature by a pair of copper blocks in thermal conducting contact therewith to form subsequent diverging margins for the exit opening.

  20. Hydrogen ion microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon; Deb, Satyen K.

    1990-01-01

    Disclosed is a hydrogen ion microlithography process for use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. The process comprises the steps of providing a single layer of either an amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon material. A pattern is recorded in a selected layer of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon materials by preferentially implanting hydrogen ions therein so as to permit the selected layer to serve as a mask-resist wafer suitable for subsequent development and device fabrication. The layer is developed to provide a surface pattern therein adaptable for subsequent use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing.

  1. Hydrogen ion microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Deb, S.K.

    1990-10-02

    Disclosed is a hydrogen ion microlithography process for use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. The process comprises the steps of providing a single layer of either an amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon material. A pattern is recorded in a selected layer of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon materials by preferentially implanting hydrogen ions therein so as to permit the selected layer to serve as a mask-resist wafer suitable for subsequent development and device fabrication. The layer is developed to provide a surface pattern therein adaptable for subsequent use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. 6 figs.

  2. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Alexander, Michael L.; Follansbee, James C.

    1997-01-01

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

  3. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Backus, J.G.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to improvements in calutron devices and particularly describes a novel ion source. The unique feature of this source lies in the shaping of the ionizing electron stream to conform to the arc plasma boundary at the exit slit of the ionization chamber, thereby increasing the ion density produced at the plasma boundary. The particular structure consists of an electron source disposed at onc end of an elongated ionization chambcr and a coilimating electrode positioned to trim the electron stream to a crescent shape before entering the ionization chamber.

  4. Uranyl ion coordination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, H.T.

    1963-01-01

    A review of the known crystal structures containing the uranyl ion shows that plane-pentagon coordination is equally as prevalent as plane-square or plane-hexagon. It is suggested that puckered-hexagon configurations of OH - or H2O about the uranyl group will tend to revert to plane-pentagon coordination. The concept of pentagonal coordination is invoked for possible explanations of the complex crystallography of the natural uranyl hydroxides and the unusual behavior of polynuclear ions in hydrolyzed uranyl solutions.

  5. Interferometry with Strontium Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jarom; Lambert, Enoch; Otterstrom, Nils; Jones, Tyler; Durfee, Dallin

    2014-05-01

    We describe progress on a cold ion matter-wave interferometer. Cold Strontium atoms are extracted from an LVIS. The atoms will be photo-ionized with a two-photon transition to an auto-ionizing state in the continuum. The ions will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions from a pair of diode lasers injection locked to two beams from a master laser which have been shifted up and down by half the hyperfine splitting. We are developing laser instrumentation for this project including a method to prevent mode-hopping by analyzing laser frequency noise, and an inexpensive, robust wavelength meter. Supported by NSF Award No. 1205736.

  6. Asymmetric ion trap

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

    1997-12-02

    An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

  7. Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries, which use a new battery chemistry, are being developed under cooperative agreements between Lockheed Martin, Ultralife Battery, and the NASA Lewis Research Center. The unit cells are made in flat (prismatic) shapes that can be connected in series and parallel to achieve desired voltages and capacities. These batteries will soon be marketed to commercial original-equipment manufacturers and thereafter will be available for military and space use. Current NiCd batteries offer about 35 W-hr/kg compared with 110 W-hr/kg for current lithium ion batteries. Our ultimate target for these batteries is 200 W-hr/kg.

  8. Nonpropulsive applications of ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    Eight centimeter ion beam sources utilizing xenon and argon have been developed that operate over a wide range of beam energies and currents. Three types of processes have been studied: sputter deposition, ion beam machining, and ion beam surface texturing. The broad range of source operating conditions allows optimum sputter deposition of various materials. An ion beam source was used to ion mill laser reflection holograms using photoresist patterns on silicon. Ion beam texturing was tried with many materials and has a multitude of potential applications.

  9. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ion dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.

  10. Ion-dust streaming instability with non-Maxwellian ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kählert, Hanno

    2015-07-15

    The influence of non-Maxwellian ions on the ion-dust streaming instability in a complex plasma is investigated. The ion susceptibility employed for the calculations self-consistently accounts for the acceleration of the ions by a homogeneous background electric field and their collisions with neutral gas particles via a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision term [e.g., A. V. Ivlev et al., Phys. Rev. E 71, 016405 (2005)], leading to significant deviations from a shifted Maxwellian distribution. The dispersion relation and the properties of the most unstable mode are studied in detail and compared with the Maxwellian case. The largest deviations occur at low to intermediate ion-neutral damping. In particular, the growth rate of the instability for ion streaming below the Bohm speed is found to be lower than in the case of Maxwellian ions, yet remains on a significant level even for fast ion flows above the Bohm speed.

  11. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Gushenets, V. I.; Seleznev, D. N.; Bugaev, A. S.; Dugin, S.; Oks, E. M.; Kulevoy, T. V.; Alexeyenko, O.; Kozlov, A.; Kropachev, G. N.; Kuibeda, R. P.; Minaev, S.; Vizir, A.; Yushkov, G. Yu.

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4+ ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  12. Molecular ion sources for low energy semiconductor ion implantation (invited).

    PubMed

    Hershcovitch, A; Gushenets, V I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Dugin, S; Oks, E M; Kulevoy, T V; Alexeyenko, O; Kozlov, A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Minaev, S; Vizir, A; Yushkov, G Yu

    2016-02-01

    Smaller semiconductors require shallow, low energy ion implantation, resulting space charge effects, which reduced beam currents and production rates. To increase production rates, molecular ions are used. Boron and phosphorous (or arsenic) implantation is needed for P-type and N-type semiconductors, respectively. Carborane, which is the most stable molecular boron ion leaves unacceptable carbon residue on extraction grids. A self-cleaning carborane acid compound (C4H12B10O4) was synthesized and utilized in the ITEP Bernas ion source resulting in large carborane ion output, without carbon residue. Pure gaseous processes are desired to enable rapid switch among ion species. Molecular phosphorous was generated by introducing phosphine in dissociators via 4PH3 = P4 + 6H2; generated molecular phosphorous in a pure gaseous process was then injected into the HCEI Calutron-Bernas ion source, from which P4(+) ion beams were extracted. Results from devices and some additional concepts are described.

  13. Electron-less negative ion extraction from ion-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-03-09

    This paper presents experimental results showing that continuous negative ion extraction, without co-extracted electrons, is possible from highly electronegative SF{sub 6} ion-ion plasma at low gas pressure (1 mTorr). The ratio between the negative ion and electron densities is more than 3000 in the vicinity of the two-grid extraction and acceleration system. The measurements are conducted by both magnetized and non-magnetized energy analyzers attached to the external grid. With these two analyzers, we show that the extracted negative ion flux is almost electron-free and has the same magnitude as the positive ion flux extracted and accelerated when the grids are biased oppositely. The results presented here can be used for validation of numerical and analytical models of ion extraction from ion-ion plasma.

  14. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-08-08

    A method and apparatus are described for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected auto-ionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy. 8 figs.

  15. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  16. Lithium ion conducting electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, Charles Austen; Liu, Changle; Xu, Kang; Skotheim, Terje A.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to highly conductive alkali-metal ion non-crystalline electrolyte systems, and more particularly to novel and unique molten (liquid), rubbery, and solid electrolyte systems which are especially well suited for use with high current density electrolytic cells such as primary and secondary batteries.

  17. Advanced ion thruster research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    A simple model describing the discharge chamber performance of high strength, cusped magnetic field ion thrusters is developed. The model is formulated in terms of the energy cost of producing ions in the discharge chamber and the fraction of ions produced in the discharge chamber that are extracted to form the ion beam. The accuracy of the model is verified experimentally in a series of tests wherein the discharge voltage, propellant, grid transparency to neutral atoms, beam diameter and discharge chamber wall temperature are varied. The model is exercised to demonstrate what variations in performance might be expected by varying discharge chamber parameters. The results of a study of xenon and argon orificed hollow cathodes are reported. These results suggest that a hollow cathode model developed from research conducted on mercury cathodes can also be applied to xenon and argon. Primary electron mean free paths observed in argon and xenon cathodes that are larger than those found in mercury cathodes are identified as a cause of performance differences between mercury and inert gas cathodes. Data required as inputs to the inert gas cathode model are presented so it can be used as an aid in cathode design.

  18. Ion implantation in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wintersgill, M. C.

    1984-02-01

    An introductory overview will be given of the effects of ion implantation on polymers, and certain areas will be examined in more detail. Radiation effects in general and ion implantation in particular, in the field of polymers, present a number of contrasts with those in ionic crystals, the most obvious difference being that the chemical effects of both the implanted species and the energy transfer to the host may profoundly change the nature of the target material. Common effects include crosslinking and scission of polymer chains, gas evolution, double bond formation and the formation of additional free radicals. Research has spanned the chemical processes involved, including polymerization reactions achievable only with the use of radiation, to applied research dealing both with the effects of radiation on polymers already in commercial use and the tailoring of new materials to specific applications. Polymers are commonly divided into two groups, in describing their behavior under irradiation. Group I includes materials which form crosslinks between molecules, whereas Group II materials tend to degrade. In basic research, interest has centered on Group I materials and of these polyethylene has been studied most intensively. Applied materials research has investigated a variety of polymers, particularly those used in cable insulation, and those utilized in ion beam lithography of etch masks. Currently there is also great interest in enhancing the conducting properties of polymers, and these uses would tend to involve the doping capabilities of ion implantation, rather than the energy deposition.

  19. Industrial ion source technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to describe the development of a coned surface texture with ion bombardment and simultaneous deposition of an impurity. A mathematical model of sputter deposition rate from a beveled target was developed in conjuction with the texturing models to provide an important input to that model. The establishment of a general procedure that will allow the treatment of manay different sputtering configurations is outlined. Calculation of cross sections for energetic binary collisions was extened to Ar, Kr.. and Xe with total cross sections for viscosity and diffusion calculated for the interaction energy range from leV to 1000eV. Physical sputtering and reactive ion etching experiments provided experimental data on the operating limits of a broad beam ion source using CF4 as a working gas to produce reactive species in a sputtering beam. Magnetic clustering effects are observed when Al is seeded with Fe and sputtered with Ar(?) ions. Silicon was textured at a micron scale by using a substrate temperature of 600 C.

  20. Laser driven ion accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Tajima, Toshiki

    2006-04-18

    A system and method of accelerating ions in an accelerator to optimize the energy produced by a light source. Several parameters may be controlled in constructing a target used in the accelerator system to adjust performance of the accelerator system. These parameters include the material, thickness, geometry and surface of the target.

  1. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Young, Charles E.; Pellin, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected autoionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy.

  2. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Oppenheimer, F.F.

    1959-06-01

    A calutron ion source is described which masks the ends of the arc to provide a more stable beam from the middle portion. The masking is effected by milling the arc slit in a single sheet of material which is secured to the open face of the arc block. (T.R.H.)

  3. Ion Beam Simulator

    2005-11-08

    IBSimu(Ion Beam Simulator) is a computer program for making two and three dimensional ion optical simulations. The program can solve electrostatic field in a rectangular mesh using Poisson equation using Finite Difference method (FDM). The mesh can consist of a coarse and a fine part so that the calculation accuracy can be increased in critical areas of the geometry, while most of the calculation is done quickly using the coarse mesh. IBSimu can launch ionmore » beam trajectories into the simulation from an injection surface or fomo plasma. Ion beam space charge of time independent simulations can be taken in account using Viasov iteration. Plasma is calculated by compensating space charge with electrons having Boltzmann energy distribution. The simulation software can also be used to calculate time dependent cases if the space charge is not calculated. Software includes diagnostic tools for plotting the geometry, electric field, space charge map, ion beam trajectories, emittance data and beam profiles.« less

  4. Compact RF ion source for industrial electrostatic ion accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2016-02-01

    Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex is developing a single-ended electrostatic ion accelerator to irradiate gaseous ions, such as hydrogen and nitrogen, on materials for industrial applications. ELV type high voltage power supply has been selected. Because of the limited space, electrical power, and robust operation, a 200 MHz RF ion source has been developed. In this paper, the accelerator system, test stand of the ion source, and its test results are described.

  5. Compact RF ion source for industrial electrostatic ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Park, Sae-Hoon; Kim, Dae-Il; Cho, Yong-Sub

    2016-02-01

    Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex is developing a single-ended electrostatic ion accelerator to irradiate gaseous ions, such as hydrogen and nitrogen, on materials for industrial applications. ELV type high voltage power supply has been selected. Because of the limited space, electrical power, and robust operation, a 200 MHz RF ion source has been developed. In this paper, the accelerator system, test stand of the ion source, and its test results are described.

  6. Ion polarization in the MEIC figure-8 ion collider ring

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, Y. Zhang, P. Chevtsov, A.M. Kondratenko, M.A. Kondratenko, Yu.N. Filatov

    2012-07-01

    The nuclear physics program envisaged at the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) currently being developed at the Jefferson Lab calls for collisions of 3-11 GeV/c longitudinally polarized electrons and 20-100 GeV/c, in equivalent proton momentum, longitudinally/ transversely polarized protons/ deuterons/ light ions. We present a scheme that provides the required ion polarization arrangement in the MEIC's ion collider ring.

  7. Bioinspired artificial single ion pump.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huacheng; Hou, Xu; Zeng, Lu; Yang, Fu; Li, Lin; Yan, Dadong; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2013-10-30

    Bioinspired artificial functional nanochannels for intelligent molecular and ionic transport control at the nanoscale have wide potential applications in nanofluidics, energy conversion, and biosensors. Although various smart passive ion transport properties of ion channels have been artificially realized, it is still hugely challenging to achieve high level intelligent ion transport features in biological ion pumps. Here we show a unique bioinspired single ion pump based on a cooperative pH response double-gate nanochannel, whose gates could be opened and closed alternately/simultaneously under symmetric/asymmetric pH environments. With the stimulation of the double-gate nanochannel by continuous switching of the symmetric/asymmetric pH stimuli, the bioinspired system systematically realized three key ionic transport features of biological ion pumps, including an alternating gates ion pumping process under symmetric pH stimuli, transformation of the ion pump into an ion channel under asymmetric pH stimuli, and a fail-safe ion pumping feature under both symmetric and asymmetric pH stimuli. The ion pumping processes could well be reproduced under a concentration gradient. With the advantages of the extraordinary ionic transport functions of biological ion pumps, the bioinspired ion pump should find widespread applicability in active transportation-controlling smart nanofluidic devices, efficient energy conversions, and seawater desalinization, and open the way to design and develop novel bioinspired intelligent artificial nanochannel materials.

  8. Bioinspired artificial single ion pump.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huacheng; Hou, Xu; Zeng, Lu; Yang, Fu; Li, Lin; Yan, Dadong; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2013-10-30

    Bioinspired artificial functional nanochannels for intelligent molecular and ionic transport control at the nanoscale have wide potential applications in nanofluidics, energy conversion, and biosensors. Although various smart passive ion transport properties of ion channels have been artificially realized, it is still hugely challenging to achieve high level intelligent ion transport features in biological ion pumps. Here we show a unique bioinspired single ion pump based on a cooperative pH response double-gate nanochannel, whose gates could be opened and closed alternately/simultaneously under symmetric/asymmetric pH environments. With the stimulation of the double-gate nanochannel by continuous switching of the symmetric/asymmetric pH stimuli, the bioinspired system systematically realized three key ionic transport features of biological ion pumps, including an alternating gates ion pumping process under symmetric pH stimuli, transformation of the ion pump into an ion channel under asymmetric pH stimuli, and a fail-safe ion pumping feature under both symmetric and asymmetric pH stimuli. The ion pumping processes could well be reproduced under a concentration gradient. With the advantages of the extraordinary ionic transport functions of biological ion pumps, the bioinspired ion pump should find widespread applicability in active transportation-controlling smart nanofluidic devices, efficient energy conversions, and seawater desalinization, and open the way to design and develop novel bioinspired intelligent artificial nanochannel materials. PMID:23773031

  9. Composite ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect

    Amarasinghe, S.; Zook, L.; Leddy, J.

    1994-12-31

    Composite ion exchange materials can be formed by sorbing ion exchange polymers on inert, high surface area substrates. In general, the flux of ions and molecules through these composites, as measured electrochemically, increases as the ratio of the surface area of the substrate increases relative to the volume of the ion exchanger. This suggests that fields and gradients established at the interface between the ion exchanger and substrate are important in determining the transport characteristics of the composites. Here, the authors will focus on composites formed with a cation exchange polymer, Nafion, and two different types of microbeads: polystyrene microspheres and polystyrene coated magnetic microbeads. For the polystyrene microbeads, scanning electron micrographs suggest the beads cluster in a self-similar manner, independent of the bead diameter. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through the composites was studied as a function of bead fraction, bead radii, and fixed surface area with mixed bead sizes. Flux was well modeled by surface diffusion along a fractal interface. Magnetic composites were formed with columns of magnetic microbeads normal to the electrode surface. Flux of Ru(NH3)63+ through these composites increased exponentially with bead fraction. For electrolyses, the difference in the molar magnetic susceptibility of the products and reactants, Dcm, tends to be non-zero. For seven redox reactions, the ratio of the flux through the magnetic composites to the flux through a Nafion film increases monotonically with {vert_bar}Dcm{vert_bar}, with enhancements as large as thirty-fold. For reversible species, the electrolysis potential through the magnetic composites is 35 mV positive of that for the Nafion films.

  10. Cholesterol and Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, Irena; Fang, Yun; Rosenhouse-Dantsker, Avia; Romanenko, Victor

    2010-01-01

    A variety of ion channels, including members of all major ion channel families, have been shown to be regulated by changes in the level of membrane cholesterol and partition into cholesterol-rich membrane domains. In general, several types of cholesterol effects have been described. The most common effect is suppression of channel activity by an increase in membrane cholesterol, an effect that was described for several types of inwardly-rectifying K+ channels, voltage-gated K+ channels, Ca+2 sensitive K+ channels, voltage-gated Na+ channels, N-type voltage-gated Ca+2 channels and volume-regulated anion channels. In contrast, several types of ion channels, such as epithelial amiloride-sensitive Na+ channels and Transient Receptor Potential channels, as well as some of the types of inwardly-rectifying and voltage-gated K+ channels were shown to be inhibited by cholesterol depletion. Cholesterol was also shown to alter the kinetic properties and current-voltage dependence of several voltage-gated channels. Finally, maintaining membrane cholesterol level is required for coupling ion channels to signalling cascades. In terms of the mechanisms, three general mechanisms have been proposed: (i) specific interactions between cholesterol and the channel protein, (ii) changes in the physical properties of the membrane bilayer and (iii) maintaining the scaffolds for protein-protein interactions. The goal of this review is to describe systematically the role of cholesterol in regulation of the major types of ion channels and to discuss these effects in the context of the models proposed. PMID:20213557

  11. Using Ion Exchange Chromatography to Separate and Quantify Complex Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange chromatography is an important technique in the separation of charged species, particularly in biological, inorganic, and environmental samples. In this experiment, students are supplied with a mixture of two substitution-inert complex ions. They separate the complexes by ion exchange chromatography using a "flash"…

  12. Introduction to Ion Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martisikova, Maria

    2010-01-05

    Presently, ion beam therapy reaches an increasing interest within the field of radiation therapy, which is caused by the promising clinical results obtained in the last decades. Ion beams enable higher dose conformation to the tumor and increased sparing of the surrounding tissue in comparison to the standard therapy using high energy photons. Heavy ions, like carbon, offer in addition increased biological effectiveness, which makes them suitable for treatment of radioresistant tumors. This contribution gives an overview over the physical and biological properties of ion beams. Common fundamental principles of ion beam therapy are summarized and differences between standard therapy with high energy photons, proton and carbon ion therapy are discussed. The technologies used for the beam production and delivery are introduced, with emphasis to the differences between passive and active beam delivery systems. The last part concentrates on the quality assurance in ion therapy. Specialties of dosimetry in medical ion beams are discussed.

  13. Membranes in Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Hou, Junbo

    2012-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries have proven themselves the main choice of power sources for portable electronics. Besides consumer electronics, lithium ion batteries are also growing in popularity for military, electric vehicle, and aerospace applications. The present review attempts to summarize the knowledge about some selected membranes in lithium ion batteries. Based on the type of electrolyte used, literature concerning ceramic-glass and polymer solid ion conductors, microporous filter type separators and polymer gel based membranes is reviewed. PMID:24958286

  14. Ion plating for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1981-01-01

    The ion plating techniques are classified relative to the instrumental set up, evaporation media, and mode of transport. A distinction is drawn between the low vacuum (plasma) and high vacuum (ion beam) techniques. Ion plating technology is discussed at the fundamental and industrial level. At the fundamental level, the capabilities and limitations of the plasma (evaporant flux) and film characteristics are evaluated. And on the industrial level, the performance and potential uses of ion plated films are discussed.

  15. A Cold Strontium Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Lyon, Mary; Blaser, Kelvin; Harper, Stuart; Durfee, Dallin

    2010-03-01

    We present a cold ion source for strontium 87. The source is based off of a standard Low-Velocity-Intense-Source (LVIS) for strontium using permanent magnets in place of anti-Helmholtz coils. Atoms from the LVIS are then ionized in a two photon process as they pass a 20kV anode plate. The result is a mono-energetic beam of ions whose velocity is tunable. Applications for the ions include spectroscopy and ion interferometry.

  16. Characterization of an RF plasma ion source for ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopalidis, Peter M.; Wan Zhimin

    2012-11-06

    A novel inductively coupled RF plasma ion source has been developed for use in a beamline ion implanter. Ion density data have been taken with an array of four Langmuir probes spaced equally at the source extraction arc slit. These provide ion density uniformity information as a function of source pressure, RF power and gas mixture composition. In addition, total extracted ion beam current data are presented for the same conditions. The comparative advantages of the RF source in terms of higher beam current, reduced maintenance and overall productivity improvement compared to a hot cathode source are discussed.

  17. Ion channel probes for scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Bright, Leonard K; Shi, Wenqing; Aspinwall, Craig A; Baker, Lane A

    2014-12-23

    The sensitivity and selectivity of ion channels provide an appealing opportunity for sensor development. Here, we describe ion channel probes (ICPs), which consist of multiple ion channels reconstituted into lipid bilayers suspended across the opening of perflourinated glass micropipets. When incorporated with a scanning ion conductance microscope (SICM), ICPs displayed a distance-dependent current response that depended on the number of ion channels in the membrane. With distance-dependent current as feedback, probes were translated laterally, to demonstrate the possibility of imaging with ICPs. The ICP platform yields several potential advantages for SICM that will enable exciting opportunities for incorporation of chemical information into imaging and for high-resolution imaging.

  18. Ion temperature via laser scattering on ion Bernstein waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wurden, G.A.; Ono, M.; Wong, K.L.

    1981-10-01

    Hydrogen ion temperature has been measured in a warm toroidal plasma with externally launched ion Bernstein waves detected by heterodyne CO/sub 2/ laser scattering. Radial scanning of the laser beam allows precise determination of k/sub perpendicular to/ for the finite ion Larmor radius wave (..omega.. approx. less than or equal to 2..cap omega../sub i/). Knowledge of the magnetic field strength and ion concentration then give a radially resolved ion temperature from the dispersion relation. Probe measurements and Doppler broadening of ArII 4806A give excellent agreement.

  19. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    DOE PAGES

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ionmore » dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.« less

  20. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Vane, C Randy; Gottwald, T.; Wendt, K.; Mattolat, C.; Lassen, J.

    2009-01-01

    A resonant ionization laser ion source based on all-solid-state, tunable Ti:Sapphire lasers is being developed for the production of pure radioactive ion beams. It consists of a hot-cavity ion source and three pulsed Ti:Sapphire lasers operating at a 10 kHz pulse repetition rate. Spectroscopic studies are being conducted to develop ionization schemes that lead to ionizing an excited atom through an auto-ionization or a Rydberg state for numerous elements of interest. Three-photon resonant ionization of 12 elements has been recently demonstrated. The overall efficiency of the laser ion source measured for some of these elements ranges from 1 to 40%. The results indicate that Ti:Sapphire lasers could be well suited for laser ion source applications. The time structures of the ions produced by the pulsed lasers are investigated. The information may help to improve the laser ion source performance.

  1. Ion response in a weakly ionized plasma with ion flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kompaneets, Roman; Tyshetskiy, Yuriy O.; Vladimirov, Sergey V.

    2013-04-15

    We study the ion response to an initial perturbation in a weakly ionized plasma with ion flow driven by a dc electric field. The analysis is made by extending the classical Landau work [J. Phys. (USSR) 10, 25 (1946)] to the ion kinetic equation including ion-neutral collisions and a dc electric field. We show, in particular, that the complex frequencies of ion waves can be directly found from a known expression for the ion susceptibility [A. V. Ivlev et al., Phys. Rev. E 71, 016405 (2005); V. A. Schweigert, Phys. Rep. 27, 997 (2001)]; this is not obvious from its original derivation, because it only aims to describe the ion response for real frequencies.

  2. Design study of primary ion provider for relativistic heavy ion collider electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Okamura, M

    2010-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed the new preinjector system, electron beam ion source (EBIS) for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory. Design of primary ion provider is an essential problem since it is required to supply beams with different ion species to multiple users simultaneously. The laser ion source with a defocused laser can provide a low charge state and low emittance ion beam, and is a candidate for the primary ion source for RHIC-EBIS. We show a suitable design with appropriate drift length and solenoid, which helps to keep sufficient total charge number with longer pulse length. The whole design of primary ion source, as well as optics arrangement, solid targets configuration and heating about target, is presented.

  3. Slow Ion Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher; Durfee, Dallin

    2009-05-01

    We will discuss an ion interferometer which is under construction. The device will utilize a laser-cooled source of ^87Sr^+ ions which will be split and recombined using stimulated Raman transitions inside of a conducting cylinder. The interferometer will be able to measure electric and magnetic fields with unprecedented precision. Potential uses of the device include practical applications such as the precision measurement of the evolution of fields near solids to reveal their electronic structure. It will also be used for fundamental tests of the basic laws of electromagnetism and the search for a non-zero photon rest mass. The device should enable the detection of a possible photon rest mass more than 100 times smaller than previous laboratory experiments. We will discuss both the details of the device and the theory connecting deviations from Coulomb's inverse-square law to a theory of massive photons.

  4. Ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  5. Ion cloud model for a linear quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Don J; Konenkov, Nikolai V

    2012-01-01

    If large numbers of ions are stored in a linear quadrupole ion trap, space charge causes the oscillation frequencies of ions to decrease. Ions then appear at higher apparent masses when resonantly ejected for mass analysis. In principle, to calculate mass shifts requires calculating the positions of all ions, interacting with each other, at all times, with a self-consistent space charge field. Here, we propose a simpler model for the ion cloud in the case where mass shifts and frequency shifts are relatively small (ca 0.2% and 0.4%, respectively), the trapping field is much stronger (ca × 10(2)) than the space charge field and space charge only causes small perturbations to the ion motion. The self-consistent field problem need not be considered. As test ions move with times long compared to a cycle of the trapping field, the motion of individual ions can be ignored. Static positions of the ions in the cloud are used. To generate an ion cloud, trajectories of N (ca 10,000) ions are calculated for random times between 10 and 100 cycles of the trapping radio frequency field. The ions are then distributed axially randomly in a trap four times the field radius, r(0) in length. The potential and electric field from the ion cloud are calculated from the ion positions. Near the trap center (distances r< 1r(0)), the potential and electric fields from space charge are not cylindrically symmetric, but are quite symmetric for greater values of r. Trajectories of test ions, oscillation frequencies and mass shifts can then be calculated in the trapping field, including the space charge field. Mass shifts are in good agreement with experiments for reasonable values of the initial positions and speeds of the ions. Agreement with earlier analytical models for the ion cloud, based on a uniform occupation of phase space, or a thermal (Boltzmann) distribution of ions trapped in the effective potential [D. Douglas and N.V. Konenkov, Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 26, 2105 (2012)] is

  6. Experimental Evaluation of a Negative Ion Source for a Heavy Ion Fusion Negative Ion Driver

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L. R.; Hahto, S. K.; Hahto, S. T.; Kwan, J. W.; Leung, K. N.

    2004-06-16

    Negative halogen ions have recently been proposed as a possible alternative to positive ions for heavy ion fusion drivers because electron accumulation would not be a problem in the accelerator, and if desired, the beams could be photo-detached to neutrals. To test the ability to make suitable quality beams, an experiment was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using chlorine in an RF-driven ion source. Without introducing any cesium (which is required to enhance negative ion production in hydrogen ion sources) a negative chlorine current density of 45 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained under the same conditions that gave 57 45 mA/cm{sup 2} of positive chlorine, suggesting the presence of nearly as many negative ions as positive ions in the plasma near the extraction plane. The negative ion spectrum was 99.5% atomic chlorine ions, with only 0.5% molecular chlorine, and essentially no impurities. Although this experiment did not incorporate the type of electron suppression technology that i s used in negative hydrogen beam extraction, the ratio of co-extracted electrons to Cl{sup -} was as low as 7 to 1, many times lower than the ratio of their mobilities, suggesting that few electrons are present in the near-extractor plasma. This, along with the near-equivalence of the positive and negative ion currents, suggests that the plasma in this region was mostly an ion-ion plasma. The negative chlorine current density was relatively insensitive to pressure, and scaled linearly with RF power. If this linear scaling continues to hold at higher RF powers, it should permit current densities of 100 45 mA/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for present heavy ion fusion injector concepts. The effective ion temperatures of the positive and negative ions appeared to be similar and relatively low for a plasma source.

  7. Fast Ion Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, Alan V.

    Fast ion conductors, sometimes referred to as superionic conductors or solid electrolytes, are solids with ionic conductivities that are comparable to those found in molten salts and aqueous solutions of strong electrolytes, i.e., 10-2-10 S cm-1. Such materials have been known of for a very long time and some typical examples of the conductivity are shown in Fig. 1, along with sodium chloride as the archetypal normal ionic solid. Faraday [1] first noted the high conductivity of solid lead fluoride (PbF2) and silver sulphide (Ag2S) in the 1830s and silver iodide was known to be unusually high ionic conductor to the German physicists early in the 1900s. However, the materials were regarded as anomalous until the mid 1960s when they became the focus of intense interest to academics and technologists and they have remained at the forefront of materials research [2-4]. The academic aim is to understand the fundamental origin of fast ion behaviour and the technological goal is to utilize the properties in applications, particularly in energy applications such as the electrolyte membranes in solid-state batteries and fuel cells, and in electrochemical sensors. The last four decades has seen an expansion of the types of material that exhibit fast ion behaviour that now extends beyond simple binary ionic crystals to complex solids and even polymeric materials. Over this same period computer simulations of solids has also developed (in fact these methods and the interest in fast ion conductors were almost coincidental in their time of origin) and the techniques have played a key role in this area of research.

  8. Directly Driven Ion Outflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, H. A.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.; Moore, T. E.; Russell, C. T.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We examine ionospheric outflows in the high altitude magnetospheric polar cap during the POLAR satellite's apogee on April 19, 1996 using the Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment (TIDE) instrument. The elevated levels of O(+) observed in this pass may be due to the geophysical conditions during and prior to the apogee pass. In addition to the high abundance of O(+) relative to H(+), several other aspects of this data are noteworthy. We observe relationships between the density, velocity, and temperature which appear to be associated with perpendicular heating and the mirror force, rather than adiabatic expansion. The H(+) outflow is at a fairly constant flux which is consistent with being source limited by charge exchange at lower altitudes. Local centrifugal acceleration in the polar cap is found to be insufficient to account for the main variations we observe in the outflow velocity. The solar wind speed is high during this pass approximately 700 kilometers per second, and there are Alfve'n waves present in the solar wind such that the solar wind speed and IMF Bx are correlated. In this pass both the H(+) and O(+) outflow velocities correlate with both the solar wind speed and IMF fluctuations. Polar cap magnetometer and Hydra electron data show the same long period wave structure as found in the solar wind and polar cap ion outflow. In addition, the polar cap Poynting flux along the magnetic field direction correlates well with the H(+) temperature (R=0.84). We conclude that the solar wind can drive polar cap ion outflow particularly during polar squalls by setting up a parallel drop that is tens of eV which then causes the ion outflow velocity of O(+) and H(+), the electrons, and magnetic perturbations to vary in a similar fashion.

  9. Recombination of cluster ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsen, Rainer

    1993-01-01

    Some of our recent work on molecular band emissions from recombination of molecular dimer ions (N4(+) and CO(+) CO) is discussed. Much of the experimental work was done by Y. S. Cao; the results on N4(+) recombination have been published. A brief progress report is given on our ongoing measurements of neutral products of recombination using the flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe technique in conjunction with laser-induced fluorescence.

  10. Ion Collision, Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.

    2013-09-11

    The outcome of a collision between an ion and neutral species depends on the chemical and physical properties of the two reactants, their relative velocities, and the impact parameter of their trajectories. These include elastic and inelastic scattering of the colliding particles, charge transfer (including dissociative charge transfer), atom abstraction, complex formation and dissociation of the colliding ion. Each of these reactions may be characterized in terms of their energy-dependent rate coefficients, cross sections and reaction kinetics. A theoretical framework that emphasizes simple models and classical mechanics is presented for these processes. Collision processes are addressed in two categories of low-energy and high-energy collisions. Experiments under thermal or quasi-thermal conditions–swarms, drift tubes, chemical ionization and ion cyclotron resonance are strongly influenced by long-range forces and often involve collisions in which atom exchange and extensive energy exchange are common characteristics. High-energy collisions are typically impulsive, involve short-range intermolecular forces and are direct, fast processes.

  11. Ion channeling revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Corona, Aldo; Nguyen, Anh

    2014-09-01

    A MS Excel program has been written that calculates accidental, or unintentional, ion channeling in cubic bcc, fcc and diamond lattice crystals or polycrystalline materials. This becomes an important issue when simulating the creation by energetic neutrons of point displacement damage and extended defects using beams of ions. All of the tables and graphs in the three Ion Beam Analysis Handbooks that previously had to be manually looked up and read from were programed into Excel in handy lookup tables, or parameterized, for the case of the graphs, using rather simple exponential functions with different powers of the argument. The program then offers an extremely convenient way to calculate axial and planar half-angles and minimum yield or dechanneling probabilities, effects on half-angles of amorphous overlayers, accidental channeling probabilities for randomly oriented crystals or crystallites, and finally a way to automatically generate stereographic projections of axial and planar channeling half-angles. The program can generate these projections and calculate these probabilities for axes and [hkl] planes up to (555).

  12. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Delmore, James E.

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reeccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200.degree. to 500.degree. for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  13. Alternating-phase-focused IH-DTL for an injector of heavy-ion medical accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Y.; Yamada, S.; Murakami, T.; Fujimoto, T.; Fujisawa, T.; Ogawa, H.; Miyahara, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Hojo, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Muramatsu, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Mitsumoto, T.; Tsutsui, H.; Watanabe, T.; Ueda, T.

    2006-12-01

    A compact Drift-Tube-Linac (DTL) using an Interdigital H-mode (IH) cavity was designed for an injector of medical accelerators. For beam focusing, the method of Alternating-Phase-Focusing (APF) was applied. The APF IH-DTL can accelerate heavy ions having a charge-to-mass ratio of q/m={1}/{3} up to 4.0 MeV/u. Having optimized an array of synchronous phases for cells, namely arranging drift tubes and gaps appropriately, both longitudinal and transverse focusing strengths were produced just with the rf acceleration field, and therefore no focusing element or cooling equipments had to be installed in the cavity. This allowed us to employ a rather high operating frequency, and hence to design a compact and cost-effective cavity. A further advantage of the APF linac can be found in its operation. Since the parameters to be adjusted are just the level and phase of the input rf, beam tuning can be made with ease. Consequently, the APF linac is suitable for an injector for medical accelerators. Tuning methods of the gap voltages and cavity frequency as well as the design of the cavity for APF IH-DTL have been developed. After constructing the cavity, measurements of the electric field and tuning of the gap voltages were performed. Finally, the rf power was fed into the cavity. In this paper, the design and results of the measurements are described.

  14. Minimal model for transport barrier dynamics based on ion-temperature-gradient turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, G.; Horton, W.

    1997-09-01

    Low-order mode coupling equations are derived to describe recent computer simulations of the toroidal ion-temperature-gradient turbulent convection with steady and pulsating sheared mass flows in the transport barrier zone. The three convective transport states are identified with the tokamak confinement regimes called low mode (L-mode), high mode (H-mode), and barrier localized modes (BLMs) when the transport barrier is in the core plasma. The L-mode limit cycle is analytically derived and a bifurcation diagram showing L to H and H to BLM transitions in confinement is constructed numerically. Markovian closure procedures are sought to further reduce the dimensionality of the nonlinear system. First an exact expression is given for the energy transfer rate from the fluctuations to the sheared mass flow through the triplet velocity correlation function. Then the time scale expansion required to derive the Markovian closure formula is given. Markovian closure formulas form the basis for the thermodynamic-like L-H bifurcation models.

  15. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions: Ion network versus ion cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-09-28

    The critical aggregation phenomena are ubiquitous in many self-assembling systems. Ions in high salt solutions could also spontaneously form larger ion aggregates, but their effects on hydrogen-bond structures in water have long been controversial. Here, carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of high salt solutions and comparing the MD simulation results with infrared absorption and pump-probe spectroscopy of O–D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated salt solutions and {sup 13}C-NMR chemical shift of S{sup 13}CN{sup −} in KSCN solutions, we find evidence on the onset of ion aggregate and large-scale ion-ion network formation that concomitantly breaks water hydrogen-bond structure in certain salt solutions. Despite that these experimental results cannot provide direct evidence on the three-dimensional morphological structures of ion aggregates, they serve as reference data for verifying MD simulation methods. The MD results suggest that disrupted water hydrogen-bond network is intricately intertwined with ion-ion network. This further shows morphological variation of ion aggregate structures from ion cluster to ion network in high salt solutions that are interrelated to the onset of macroscopic aggregate formation and the water hydrogen-bond structure making and breaking processes induced by Hofmeister ions.

  16. Measurements of ion-ion collisional broadening of ion acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, T. E.; Benage, J. F.; Montgomery, D. S.; Murillo, M. S.; Wysocki, F. J.; Rostoker, N.

    2002-10-01

    Although collisional plasmas are often encountered in inertial confinement fusion, dense plasma experiments and astrophysics, very few experiments have looked at the effects produced by the presence of these collisions. Ion-acoustic modes are predicted to broaden due to ion-ion collisions when the ion-ion mean free path, λ_ii, becomes comparable to the ion-acoustic wavelength, λ_iaw. This paper presents the first quantitative data of ion-acoustic wave broadening in moderately ion-ion collisional (0.05ion-acoustic modes was observed using collective Thomson scattering and analyzed using a collisional model that includes, ion and electron Landau, inhomogeneity and instrumental broadening. The results indicate that standard collisional models do not adequately predict the degree of ion-acoustic damping when 0.1

  17. Ion Cyclotron Waves at Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.; Wei, H.; Cowee, M.; Neubauer, F. M.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The observation of ion cyclotron waves was generally expected well before Cassini arrived at Titan in 2004, because strong ion cyclotron waves were seen at Io where its atmosphere interacted with the corotating magnetospheric plasma. However, the region of the interaction of the Saturnian magnetospheric plasma with the Titan atmosphere has been quite devoid of ion cyclotron waves. Finally, on pass T63, ion cyclotron waves were seen briefly. More recently, on pass T98, a longer sequence of ion cyclotron waves also occurred. On pass T63, the pick-up ion signature is that of both H+ and H2+, while on pass T98, only H+ ion cyclotron waves are observed. We examine the strength of these waves and their region of occurrence in the light of our previous work on the expected occurrence of these waves.

  18. Ion beam probe diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickok, R. L.; Jennings, W. C.; Woo, J. T.; Connor, K. A.

    1980-07-01

    Tokomak plasmas suitable for diagnostic development were produced in RENTOR following technological improvements in the vacuum chamber and discharge cleaning systems. Secondary ion signals were obtained from the heavy ion beam probe on RENTOR leading to initial estimates of the plasma space potential, which appears to vary by several hundred volts during the plasma pulse. The principle of measuring space potential in a minimum-B geometry was established using an ion gun mounted at the center of the ALEX baseball coil. The neutral beam probe was installed for measuring the space potential using actual secondary ion signals from a hollow cathode arc in ALEX and preliminary tests have begun. The ion beam test stand was significantly altered to allow more flexibility in testing energy analyzers, ion guns, and ion focusing concepts.

  19. Ion sources for energy extremes of ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Hershcovitch, A; Johnson, B M; Batalin, V A; Kropachev, G N; Kuibeda, R P; Kulevoy, T V; Kolomiets, A A; Pershin, V I; Petrenko, S V; Rudskoy, I; Seleznev, D N; Bugaev, A S; Gushenets, V I; Litovko, I V; Oks, E M; Yushkov, G Yu; Masunov, E S; Polozov, S M; Poole, H J; Storozhenko, P A; Svarovski, A Ya

    2008-02-01

    For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques that meet the two energy extreme range needs of meV and hundreads of eV ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of antimony and phosphorus ions: P(2+) [8.6 pmA (particle milliampere)], P(3+) (1.9 pmA), and P(4+) (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb(3+)Sb(4+), Sb(5+), and Sb(6+) respectively. For low energy ion implantation, our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA (electrical milliampere) of positive decaborane ions was extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bernas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources.

  20. ION SOURCES FOR ENERGY EXTREMES OF ION IMPLANTATION.

    SciTech Connect

    HERSCHCOVITCH,A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; BATALIN, V.A.; KROPACHEV, G.N.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; KULEVOY, T.V.; KOLOMIETS, A.A.; PERSHIN, V.I.; PETRENKO, S.V.; RUDSKOY, I.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; BUGAEV, A.S.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; LITOVKO, I.V.; OKS, E.M.; YUSHKOV, G. YU.; MASEUNOV, E.S.; POLOZOV, S.M.; POOLE, H.J.; STOROZHENKO, P.A.; SVAROVSKI, YA.

    2007-08-26

    For the past four years a joint research and development effort designed to develop steady state, intense ion sources has been in progress with the ultimate goal to develop ion sources and techniques, which meet the two energy extreme range needs of mega-electron-volt and 100's of electron-volt ion implanters. This endeavor has already resulted in record steady state output currents of high charge state of Antimony and Phosphorous ions: P{sup 2+} (8.6 pmA), P{sup 3+} (1.9 pmA), and P{sup 4+} (0.12 pmA) and 16.2, 7.6, 3.3, and 2.2 pmA of Sb{sup 3+} Sb{sup 4+}, Sb{sup 5+}, and Sb{sup 6+} respectively. For low energy ion implantation our efforts involve molecular ions and a novel plasmaless/gasless deceleration method. To date, 1 emA of positive Decaborane ions were extracted at 10 keV and smaller currents of negative Decaborane ions were also extracted. Additionally, Boron current fraction of over 70% was extracted from a Bemas-Calutron ion source, which represents a factor of 3.5 improvement over currently employed ion sources.

  1. Characterization of Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Webb, Ian K.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Zhang, Xinyu; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-08-23

    Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulation (SLIM) represent a novel class of ion optical devices based upon electrodes patterned on planar surfaces, and relying on a combined action of radio frequency and DC electric fields and specific buffer gas density conditions. Initial experimental studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the SLIM concept. This report offers an in-depth consideration of key ion dynamics properties in such devices based upon ion optics theory and computational modeling. The SLIM devices investigated are formed by two surfaces, each having an array of radio frequency (RF) "rung" electrodes, bordered by DC "guard" electrodes. Ion motion is confined by the RF effective potential in the direction orthogonal to the boards, and limited or controlled in the transversal direction by the guard DC potentials. Ions can be efficiently trapped and stored in SLIM devices where the confinement of ions can be ‘soft’ in regard to the extent of collisional activation, similarly to RF-only multipole ion guides and traps. The segmentation of the RF rung electrodes and guards along the axis makes it possible to apply electric field profiles to stimulate ion transfer within a SLIM. In the case of a linear DC gradient applied to RF rungs and guards, a virtually uniform electric field can be created along the axis of the device, enabling ion mobility separations.

  2. Ion Outflow At Mars Using MEX Ion And Electron Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, Christopher M.; Andersson, L.; Lundin, R. N.; Frahm, R. A.

    2013-10-01

    How Mars lost it’s water and atmosphere is still an important question. Many studies have investigated high-energy ion fluxes (>10 eV) surrounding the planet and derived ion outflow rates in order to determine atmospheric loss. These rates suggest that the outflow from high-energy ions is not the dominant escape path for atmospheric loss. Over the years increasing evidence has indicated that the loss of low-energy ions is more important than the high-energy ion loss. In this presentation ion observations (down to the spacecraft potential) from the Mars Express (MEX) mission (2010/11), are used to describe the ion altitude distribution at Mars. The focus of this study is below the altitude of ~2000 km. Within the Mars environment, using the MEX electron observations different plasma regions were identified. Supported by electron identification, different altitude profiles of ion fluxes have been analyzed from the different plasma regions. The altitude profiles of the ion fluxes observed below the photoelectron boundary and in the sheath transition region in this study show large asymmetries between the northern and southern hemispheres. The ion distributions, resulting altitude profiles, the influence of the crustal magnetic field at Mars, and the implications relating to plasma outflow will be discussed in this presentation.

  3. Characterization of ion dynamics in structures for lossless ion manipulations.

    PubMed

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Webb, Ian K; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Zhang, Xinyu; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-16

    Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulation (SLIM) represent a novel class of ion optical devices based upon electrodes patterned on planar surfaces, and relying on a combined action of radiofrequency and DC electric fields and specific buffer gas density conditions. Initial experimental studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the SLIM concept. This report offers an in-depth consideration of key ion dynamics properties in such devices based upon ion optics theory and computational modeling. The SLIM devices investigated are formed by two surfaces, each having an array of radiofrequency (RF) "rung" electrodes, bordered by DC "guard" electrodes. Ion motion is confined by the RF effective potential in the direction orthogonal to the boards and limited or controlled in the transversal direction by the guard DC potentials. Ions can be efficiently trapped and stored in SLIM devices where the confinement of ions can be "soft" in regard to the extent of collisional activation, similarly to RF-only multipole ion guides and traps. The segmentation of the RF rung electrodes and guards along the axis makes it possible to apply static or transient electric field profiles to stimulate ion transfer within a SLIM. In the case of a linear DC gradient applied to RF rungs and guards, a virtually uniform electric field can be created along the axis of the device, enabling high quality ion mobility separations. PMID:25152178

  4. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, D E; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-08-01

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C(4+) and C(6+) ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 10(10) C(4+) ions per pulse and about 5 × 10(9) C(6+) ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 10(11) C(6+) ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the (11)C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C(4+) ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of (11)C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated (11)C(4+) beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the (11)C(4+) beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons.

  5. Electron string ion sources for carbon ion cancer therapy accelerators.

    PubMed

    Boytsov, A Yu; Donets, D E; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Katagiri, K; Noda, K; Ponkin, D O; Ramzdorf, A Yu; Salnikov, V V; Shutov, V B

    2015-08-01

    The type of the Electron String Ion Sources (ESIS) is considered to be the appropriate one to produce pulsed C(4+) and C(6+) ion beams for cancer therapy accelerators. In fact, the new test ESIS Krion-6T already now provides more than 10(10) C(4+) ions per pulse and about 5 × 10(9) C(6+) ions per pulse. Such ion sources could be suitable to apply at synchrotrons. It has also been found that Krion-6T can provide more than 10(11) C(6+) ions per second at the 100 Hz repetition rate, and the repetition rate can be increased at the same or larger ion output per second. This makes ESIS applicable at cyclotrons as well. ESIS can be also a suitable type of ion source to produce the (11)C radioactive ion beams. A specialized cryogenic cell was experimentally tested at the Krion-2M ESIS for pulse injection of gaseous species into the electron string. It has been shown in experiments with stable methane that the total conversion efficiency of methane molecules to C(4+) ions reached 5%÷10%. For cancer therapy with simultaneous irradiation and precise dose control (positron emission tomography) by means of (11)C, transporting to the tumor with the primary accelerated (11)C(4+) beam, this efficiency is preliminarily considered to be large enough to produce the (11)C(4+) beam from radioactive methane and to inject this beam into synchrotrons. PMID:26329182

  6. STATUS OF ITEP DECABORANE ION SOURCE PROGRAM.

    SciTech Connect

    KULEVOY,T.V.; PETRENKO, S.V.; KUIBEDA, R.P.; SELEZNEV, D.N.; KOZLOV, A.V.; STASEVICH, YU.B.; SITNIKOV, A.L.; SHAMAILOV, I.M.; PERSHIN, V.I.; HERSHCOVITCH, A.; JOHNSON, B.M.; GUSHENETS, V.I.; OKS, E.M.; POOLE, H.J.; MASUNOV, E.S.; POLOZOV, S.M.

    2007-08-26

    The joint research and development program is continued to develop steady-state ion source of decaborane beam for ion implantation industry. Both Freeman and Bemas ion sources for decaborane ion beam generation were investigated. Decaborane negative ion beam as well as positive ion beam were generated and delivered to the output of mass separator. Experimental results obtained in ITEP are presented.

  7. New apparatus increases ion beam power density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, L. V.; Sandborn, V. A.

    1964-01-01

    To increase ion engine or rocket power, an ion source and emitter, an ion beam focusing electrode, and an ion accelerator are incorporated into the system. In operation the space charge surrounding the ion emitter decreases, the ion beam density accelerates, and engine power increases.

  8. Investigations of Sputtered Ion Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Stephen Nicholai

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry is based on sputtered ion emission. Although the sputtering process was observed over 100 years ago, the ion emission process is still not well understood. Ions are formed with a wide range of energies, charge states and multiplicities, and ionization efficiencies can vary by orders of magnitude, depending on the particular ion and the matrix from which it originates. A series of studies are presented here which examine ion production in several unusual areas in order to gain insight into the sputtered ion emission process. The energy of analyzed ions is usually limited to 125 eV or less. The range of the Cameca IMS-3f at Arizona State University has been extended to analyze ions with up to 4500 eV of initial kinetic energy. The use of high energy ions to eliminate cluster interferences has been developed as an analytical technique. Doubly-charged positive ions of Mg, Al and Si have been widely studied. Other doubley-charged ions have been almost ignored, mainly due to low signal intensity. Studies of doubly-charged ions of the fourth row elements are presented here. The energy distribution of these ions indicates that they are formed by an Auger process, commonly referred to as the kinetic emission process. Small gas phase doubly-charged negative ions are very rare. Reports of atomic doubly-charged negative ions have been disproved, or were unable to be confirmed. Large molecules or clusters are able to accommodate a double -negative charge, because of the large separation between the two electrons. Observations of small carbon cluster dianions are discussed. The oscillations in intensity give an indication of their structure and stability. Electron bombardment can also cause the emission of ions from surfaces. There is some controversy as to whether the ions are desorbed directly from the sample, or are desorbed as neutrals and ionized above the sample by interaction with the electron beam or secondary electrons. Measurements of

  9. Liquid metal ion source assembly for external ion injection into an electron string ion source (ESIS).

    PubMed

    Segal, M J; Bark, R A; Thomae, R; Donets, E E; Donets, E D; Boytsov, A; Ponkin, D; Ramsdorf, A

    2016-02-01

    An assembly for a commercial Ga(+) liquid metal ion source in combination with an ion transportation and focusing system, a pulse high-voltage quadrupole deflector, and a beam diagnostics system has been constructed in the framework of the iThemba LABS (Cape Town, South Africa)-JINR (Dubna, Russia) collaboration. First, results on Ga(+) ion beam commissioning will be presented. Outlook of further experiments for measurements of charge breeding efficiency in the electron string ion source with the use of external injection of Ga(+) and Au(+) ion beams will be reported as well.

  10. Hydride ions in oxide hosts hidden by hydroxide ions

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Katsuro; Sushko, Peter V.; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Shluger, Alexander L.; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The true oxidation state of formally ‘H−’ ions incorporated in an oxide host is frequently discussed in connection with chemical shifts of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, as they can exhibit values typically attributed to H+. Here we systematically investigate the link between geometrical structure and chemical shift of H− ions in an oxide host, mayenite, with a combination of experimental and ab initio approaches, in an attempt to resolve this issue. We demonstrate that the electron density near the hydrogen nucleus in an OH− ion (formally H+ state) exceeds that in an H− ion. This behaviour is the opposite to that expected from formal valences. We deduce a relationship between the chemical shift of H− and the distance from the H− ion to the coordinating electropositive cation. This relationship is pivotal for resolving H− species that are masked by various states of H+ ions. PMID:24662678

  11. Ion acoustic waves in a multi-ion plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, B. D.; White, R. B.; Samec, T. K.

    1971-01-01

    An exact treatment of the multispecies ion acoustic dispersion relation is given for an argon/helium plasma. Phase velocity and damping are obtained as a function of ion-electron temperature ratio and relative densities of the two species. There are two important modes in the plasma, with quite different phase velocities, which are referred to as principal heavy ion mode and principal light ion mode. Which of these is dominant depends on the relative densities of the two components, but, in general, the light ion mode becomes important for surprisingly small light ion contamination. Approximate analytic expressions are derived from damping rates and phase velocities and their domains of validity are investigated. Relevance of the results for the investigation of collisionless shocks is discussed.

  12. Electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron instability - Theory and simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Omidi, N.

    1992-01-01

    Linear theory and 1D and 2D hybrid simulations are employed to study electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron (EMIIC) instability driven by the relative streaming of two field-aligned ion beams. The characteristics of the instability are studied as a function of beam density, propagation angle, electron-ion temperature ratios, and ion beta. When the propagation angle is near 90 deg the EMIIC instability has the characteristics of an electrostatic instability, while at smaller angles electromagnetic effects play a significant role as does strong beam coupling. The 2D simulations point to a narrowing of the wave spectrum and accompanying coherent effects during the linear growth stage of development. The EMIIC instability is an important effect where ion beta is low such as in the plasma-sheet boundary layer and upstream of slow shocks in the magnetotail.

  13. Doubling of Ion Up-flow for Ion Outflow Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, H. C.; Moen, J. I.; Oksavik, K.; Aruliah, A. L.; Skjaeveland, A.

    2013-12-01

    Estimates of O+ ion escape fluxes from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere, involve the combination of ionospheric O+ up-flow to adequate altitudes for intermediate altitude acceleration processes to boost them into storage in the magnetosphere. Calculations of ambiploar up-flow based on measured ion and electron gas temperatures lead to ion up-flows order 100 m/s in the vicinity of 400 km, but are found to be only order half ion up-flow velocities observed. It has been speculated that this calculated shortfall can be explained by magnetic reconnection, leading to plasma flow jets, in turn leading to frictional drag heating of the thermosphere and consequent upwelling of the neutral rest frame within which ambipolar up-flow occurs. We report here the first direct observations confirming this mechanism for order doubling the ion up-flow speeds. This new perspective needs to be added to thinking within the heavy ion outflow community.

  14. Scanning ion microscopy with low energy lithium ions.

    PubMed

    Twedt, Kevin A; Chen, Lei; McClelland, Jabez J

    2014-07-01

    Using an ion source based on photoionization of laser-cooled lithium atoms, we have developed a scanning ion microscope with probe sizes of a few tens of nanometers and beam energies from 500eV to 5keV. These beam energies are much lower than the typical operating energies of the helium ion microscope or gallium focused ion beam systems. We demonstrate how low energy can be advantageous in ion microscopy when detecting backscattered ions, due to a decreased interaction volume and the potential for surface sensitive composition analysis. As an example application that demonstrates these advantages, we non-destructively image the removal of a thin residual resist layer during plasma etching in a nano-imprint lithography process.

  15. Ion binding to biological macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Petukh, Marharyta; Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Biological macromolecules carry out their functions in water and in the presence of ions. The ions can bind to the macromolecules either specifically or non-specifically, or can simply to be a part of the water phase providing physiological gradient across various membranes. This review outlines the differences between specific and non-specific ion binding in terms of the function and stability of the corresponding macromolecules. Furthermore, the experimental techniques to identify ion positions and computational methods to predict ion binding are reviewed and their advantages compared. It is indicated that specifically bound ions are relatively easier to be revealed while non-specifically associated ions are difficult to predict. In addition, the binding and the residential time of non-specifically bound ions are very much sensitive to the environmental factors in the cells, specifically to the local pH and ion concentration. Since these characteristics differ among the cellular compartments, the non-specific ion binding must be investigated with respect to the sub-cellular localization of the corresponding macromolecule. PMID:25774076

  16. Ion Microscopy on Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredotti, Claudio

    Because of its physical properties (strong radiation hardness, wide energy gap with a consequent extremely low dark current, very large electron and hole mobility) diamond is a very good candidate for nuclear particle detection, particularly in harsh environments or in conditions of strong radiation damage. Being commonly polycrystalline, diamond samples obtained by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) are not homogeneous, not only from the morphological point of view, but also from the electronic one. As a consequence, as it was indicated quite early starting from 1995, charge collection properties such as charge collection efficiency (cce) are not uniform, but they are depending on the site hit by incoming particle. Moreover, these properties are influenced by previous irradiations which are used in order to improve them and, finally, they are also dependent on the thickness of the sample, since the electronic non uniformity extends also in depth by affecting the profile of the electrical field from top to bottom electrode of the nuclear detector in the standard "sandwich" arrangement. By the use of focussed ion beams, it is possible to investigate these non uniformities by the aid of techniques like IBIC (Ion Beam Induced Charge) and IBIL (Ion Beam Induced Luminescence) with a space resolution of the order of 1 m. This relatively new kind of microscopy, which is called "ion microscopy", is capable not only to give 2D maps of cce, which can be quite precisely compared with morphological images obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (generally the grains display a much better cce than intergrain regions), but also to give the electric field profile from one electrode to the other one in a "lateral" arrangement of the ion beam. IBIL, by supplying 2D maps of luminescence intensity at different wavelength, can give information about the presence of specific radiative recombination centers and their distribution in the material. Finally, a new technique called XBIC (X

  17. Gas and metal ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Oaks, E. |; Yushkov, G.

    1996-08-01

    The positive ion sources are now of interest owing to both their conventional use, e.g., as injectors in charged-particle accelerators and the promising capabilities of intense ion beams in the processes related to the action of ions on various solid surfaces. For industrial use, the sources of intense ion beams and their power supplies should meet the specific requirements as follows: They should be simple, technologically effective, reliable, and relatively low-cost. Since the scanning of an intense ion beam is a complicated problem, broad ion beams hold the greatest promise. For the best use of such beams it is desirable that the ion current density be uniformly distributed over the beam cross section. The ion beam current density should be high enough for the treatment process be accomplished for an acceptable time. Thus, the ion sources used for high-current, high-dose metallurgical implantation should provide for gaining an exposure dose of {approximately} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}2} in some tens of minutes. So the average ion current density at the surface under treatment should be over 10{sup {minus}5} A/cm{sup 2}. The upper limit of the current density depends on the admissible heating of the surface under treatment. The accelerating voltage of an ion source is dictated by its specific use; it seems to lie in the range from {approximately}1 kV (for the ion source used for surface sputtering) to {approximately}100 kV and over (for the ion sources used for high-current, high-dose metallurgical implantation).

  18. Compact ion accelerator source

    DOEpatents

    Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali

    2014-04-29

    An ion source includes a conductive substrate, the substrate including a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips formed on the substrate. A conductive catalytic coating is formed on the nanostructures and substrate for dissociation of a molecular species into an atomic species, the molecular species being brought in contact with the catalytic coating. A target electrode placed apart from the substrate, the target electrode being biased relative to the substrate with a first bias voltage to ionize the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips and attract the ionized atomic species from the substrate in the direction of the target electrode.

  19. Ion channels in plants

    PubMed Central

    Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In his recent opus magnum review paper published in the October issue of Physiology Reviews, Rainer Hedrich summarized the field of plant ion channels.1 He started from the earliest electric recordings initiated by Charles Darwin of carnivorous Dionaea muscipula,1,2 known as Venus flytrap, and covered the topic extensively up to the most recent discoveries on Shaker-type potassium channels, anion channels of SLAC/SLAH families, and ligand-activated channels of glutamate receptor-like type (GLR) and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGC).1 PMID:23221742

  20. Ion beam lithography system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  1. Improved ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Tullis, A.M.

    1986-01-30

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber type comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  2. Cryogenically cooled octupole ion trap for spectroscopy of biomolecular ions.

    PubMed

    Boyarkin, Oleg V; Kopysov, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    We present here the design of a linear octupole ion trap, suitable for collisional cryogenic cooling and spectroscopy of large ions. The performance of this trap has been assessed using ultraviolet (UV) photofragmentation spectroscopy of protonated dipeptides. At the trap temperature of 6.1 K, the vibrational temperature of the ions reaches 9.1 K, although their estimated translational temperature is ~150 K. This observation suggests that, despite the significant translational heating by radio-frequency electrical field, vibrational cooling of heavy ions in the octupole is at least as efficient as in the 22-pole ion traps previously used in our laboratory. In contrast to the 22-pole traps, excellent radial confinement of ions in the octupole makes it convenient for laser spectroscopy and boosts the dissociation yield of the stored ions to 30%. Overlap of the entire ion cloud by the laser beam in the octupole also allows for efficient UV depletion spectroscopy of ion-He clusters. The measured electronic spectra of the dipeptides and the clusters differ drastically, complicating a use of UV tagging spectroscopy for structural determination of large species.

  3. A novel planar ion funnel design for miniature ion optics

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, A.; Amerom, Friso H. W. van; Short, R. T.

    2014-10-01

    The novel planar ion funnel (PIF) design presented in this article emphasizes simple fabrication, assembly, and operation, making it amenable to extreme miniaturization. Simulations performed in SIMION 8.0 indicate that ion focusing can be achieved by using a gradient of electrostatic potentials on concentric metal rings in a plane. A prototype was fabricated on a 35 × 35 mm custom-designed printed circuit board (PCB) with a center hole for ions to pass through and a series of concentric circular metal rings of increasing diameter on the front side of the PCB. Metal vias on the PCB electrically connected each metal ring to a resistive potential divider that was soldered on the back of the PCB. The PIF was tested at 5.5 × 10⁻⁶ Torr in a vacuum test setup that was equipped with a broad-beam ion source on the front and a micro channel plate (MCP) ion detector on the back of the PIF. The ion current recorded on the MCP anode during testing indicated a 23× increase in the ion transmission through the PIF when electric potentials were applied to the rings. These preliminary results demonstrate the functionality of a 2D ion funnel design with a much smaller footprint and simpler driving electronics than conventional 3D ion funnels. Future directions to improve the design and a possible micromachining approach to fabrication are discussed in the conclusions.

  4. A novel planar ion funnel design for miniature ion optics.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, A; van Amerom, Friso H W; Short, R T

    2014-10-01

    The novel planar ion funnel (PIF) design presented in this article emphasizes simple fabrication, assembly, and operation, making it amenable to extreme miniaturization. Simulations performed in SIMION 8.0 indicate that ion focusing can be achieved by using a gradient of electrostatic potentials on concentric metal rings in a plane. A prototype was fabricated on a 35 × 35 mm custom-designed printed circuit board (PCB) with a center hole for ions to pass through and a series of concentric circular metal rings of increasing diameter on the front side of the PCB. Metal vias on the PCB electrically connected each metal ring to a resistive potential divider that was soldered on the back of the PCB. The PIF was tested at 5.5 × 10(-6) Torr in a vacuum test setup that was equipped with a broad-beam ion source on the front and a micro channel plate (MCP) ion detector on the back of the PIF. The ion current recorded on the MCP anode during testing indicated a 23× increase in the ion transmission through the PIF when electric potentials were applied to the rings. These preliminary results demonstrate the functionality of a 2D ion funnel design with a much smaller footprint and simpler driving electronics than conventional 3D ion funnels. Future directions to improve the design and a possible micromachining approach to fabrication are discussed in the conclusions.

  5. A novel planar ion funnel design for miniature ion optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, A.; van Amerom, Friso H. W.; Short, R. T.

    2014-10-01

    The novel planar ion funnel (PIF) design presented in this article emphasizes simple fabrication, assembly, and operation, making it amenable to extreme miniaturization. Simulations performed in SIMION 8.0 indicate that ion focusing can be achieved by using a gradient of electrostatic potentials on concentric metal rings in a plane. A prototype was fabricated on a 35 × 35 mm custom-designed printed circuit board (PCB) with a center hole for ions to pass through and a series of concentric circular metal rings of increasing diameter on the front side of the PCB. Metal vias on the PCB electrically connected each metal ring to a resistive potential divider that was soldered on the back of the PCB. The PIF was tested at 5.5 × 10-6 Torr in a vacuum test setup that was equipped with a broad-beam ion source on the front and a micro channel plate (MCP) ion detector on the back of the PIF. The ion current recorded on the MCP anode during testing indicated a 23× increase in the ion transmission through the PIF when electric potentials were applied to the rings. These preliminary results demonstrate the functionality of a 2D ion funnel design with a much smaller footprint and simpler driving electronics than conventional 3D ion funnels. Future directions to improve the design and a possible micromachining approach to fabrication are discussed in the conclusions.

  6. Ion beam lithography with gold and silicon ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seniutinas, Gediminas; Balčytis, Armandas; Nishijima, Yoshiaki; Nadzeyka, Achim; Bauerdick, Sven; Juodkazis, Saulius

    2016-04-01

    Different ion species deliver a different material sputtering yield and implantation depth, thus enabling focused ion beam (FIB) fabrication for diverse applications. Using newly developed FIB milling with double charged hbox {Au}^{2+} and hbox {Si}^{2+} ions, fabrication has been carried out on Au-sputtered films to define arrays of densely packed nanoparticles supporting optical extinction peaks at visible-IR wavelengths determined by the size, shape, and proximity of nanoparticles. Results are qualitatively compared with hbox {Ga}+ milling. A possibility to use such ion implantation to tailor the etching rate of silicon is also demonstrated.

  7. Electron beam ion source and electron beam ion trap (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Reinard; Kester, Oliver

    2010-02-15

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) and its trap variant [electron beam ion trap (EBIT)] celebrated their 40th and 20th anniversary, respectively, at the EBIS/T Symposium 2007 in Heidelberg. These technologically challenging sources of highly charged ions have seen a broad development in many countries over the last decades. In contrast to most other ion sources the recipe of improvement was not ''sorcery'' but a clear understanding of the physical laws and obeying the technological constraints. This review will report important achievements of the past as well as promising developments in the future.

  8. Enhanced life ion source for germanium and carbon ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Tseh-Jen; Colvin, Neil; Kondratenko, Serguei

    2012-11-06

    Germanium and carbon ions represent a significant portion of total ion implantation steps in the process flow. Very often ion source materials that used to produce ions are chemically aggressive, especially at higher temperatures, and result in fast ion source performance degradation and a very limited lifetime [B.S. Freer, et. al., 2002 14th Intl. Conf. on Ion Implantation Technology Proc, IEEE Conf. Proc., p. 420 (2003)]. GeF{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} are commonly used to generate germanium and carbon beams. In the case of GeF{sub 4} controlling the tungsten deposition due to the de-composition of WF{sub 6} (halogen cycle) is critical to ion source life. With CO{sub 2}, the materials oxidation and carbon deposition must be controlled as both will affect cathode thermionic emission and anti-cathode (repeller) efficiencies due to the formation of volatile metal oxides. The improved ion source design Extended Life Source 3 (Eterna ELS3) together with its proprietary co-gas material implementation has demonstrated >300 hours of stable continuous operation when using carbon and germanium ion beams. Optimizing cogas chemistries retard the cathode erosion rate for germanium and carbon minimizes the adverse effects of oxygen when reducing gas is introduced for carbon. The proprietary combination of hardware and co-gas has improved source stability and the results of the hardware and co-gas development are discussed.

  9. Note: Ion source design for ion trap systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, J. R.; Quevedo, M.; Gnade, B.; Vasselli, J.

    2013-06-01

    A small plasma (glow discharge) based ion source and circuit are described in this work. The ion source works by producing a high voltage pulsed discharge between two electrodes in a pressure range of 50-100 mTorr. A third mesh electrode is used for ion extraction. The electrodes are small stainless steel screws mounted in a MACOR ionization chamber in a linear arrangement. The electrode arrangement is driven by a circuit, design for low power operation. This design is a proof of concept intended for applications on small cylindrical ion traps.

  10. Cryogenically cooled octupole ion trap for spectroscopy of biomolecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarkin, Oleg V.; Kopysov, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    We present here the design of a linear octupole ion trap, suitable for collisional cryogenic cooling and spectroscopy of large ions. The performance of this trap has been assessed using ultraviolet (UV) photofragmentation spectroscopy of protonated dipeptides. At the trap temperature of 6.1 K, the vibrational temperature of the ions reaches 9.1 K, although their estimated translational temperature is ˜150 K. This observation suggests that, despite the significant translational heating by radio-frequency electrical field, vibrational cooling of heavy ions in the octupole is at least as efficient as in the 22-pole ion traps previously used in our laboratory. In contrast to the 22-pole traps, excellent radial confinement of ions in the octupole makes it convenient for laser spectroscopy and boosts the dissociation yield of the stored ions to 30%. Overlap of the entire ion cloud by the laser beam in the octupole also allows for efficient UV depletion spectroscopy of ion-He clusters. The measured electronic spectra of the dipeptides and the clusters differ drastically, complicating a use of UV tagging spectroscopy for structural determination of large species.

  11. Simulation Based on Ion Propulsion Rocket System with Using Negative ion - Negative Ion Pair Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyavel, C.

    2016-07-01

    Ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of ion-ion pair techniques because of their stimulated of low propellant, Design of Thrust range is 1N with low electric power and high efficiency. A Negative ion-Negative ion pair of ion propulsion rocket system is proposed in this work .Negative Ion Based Rocket system consists of three parts 1.ionization chamber 2. Repulsion force and ion accelerator 3. Exhaust of Nozzle. The Negative ions from electro negatively gas are produced by attachment of the gas ,such as chlorine with electron emitted from a Electron gun ionization chamber. The formulate of large stable negative ion is achievable in chlorine gas with respect to electron affinity (∆E). The electron affinity is a measure of the energy change when an electron is added to a neutral atom to form a negative ion. When a neutral chlorine atom in the gaseous form picks up an electron to form a Cl- ion, it releases energy of 349 kJ/mol or 3.6 ev/atom. It is said to have an electron affinity of -349 kJ/mol ,the negative sign indicating that energy is released during this process .The mechanisms of attachment involve the formation of intermediate states. In that reason for , the highly repulsive force created between the same negative ions. The distance between same negative ions is important for the evaluate of the rocket thrust and is also determined by the exhaust velocity of the propellant. The mass flow rate of propellant is achieved by the ratio of total mass of the propellant (Kg) needed for operation to time period(s). Accelerate the Negative ions to a high velocity in the thrust vector direction with a significantly intense Magnetic field and the exhaust of negative ions through Nozzle. The simulation of the ion propulsion system has been carried out by MATLAB. By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results, we have found that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with estimated

  12. Photoelectrochemical detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-07-21

    Depending on the situation, metal ions may either play beneficial roles or be harmful to human health and ecosystems. Sensitive and accurate detection of metal ions is thus a critical issue in the field of analytical sciences and great efforts have been devoted to the development of various metal ion sensors. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) detection is an emerging technique for the bio/chemical detection of metal ions, and features a fast response, low cost and high sensitivity. Using representative examples, this review will first introduce the fundamentals and summarize recent progress in the PEC detection of metal ions. In addition, interesting strategies for the design of particular PEC metal ion sensors are discussed. Challenges and opportunities in this field are also presented. PMID:27297834

  13. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Bacal, M.; Wada, M.

    2015-06-15

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed.

  14. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  15. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, Daniel D.; Keville, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  16. Air ions and aerosol science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, Hannes

    1996-03-01

    Collaboration between Gas Discharge and Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Electricity, and Aerosol Science is a factor of success in the research of air ions. The concept of air ion as of any carrier of electrical current through the air is inherent to Atmospheric Electricity under which a considerable statistical information about the air ion mobility spectrum is collected. A new model of air ion size-mobility correlation has been developed proceeding from Aerosol Science and joining the methods of neighboring research fields. The predicted temperature variation of the mobility disagrees with the commonly used Langevin rule for the reduction of air ion mobilities to the standard conditions. Concurrent errors are too big to be neglected in applications. The critical diameter distinguishing cluster ions and charged aerosol particles has been estimated to be 1.4-1.8 nm.

  17. Cerium ion conducting solid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yasunori; Imanaka, Nobuhito; Adachi, Gin-ya

    2003-02-01

    A cerium ion conducting solid electrolyte, (Ce xZr 1- x) 4/4- xNb(PO 4) 3, was successfully realized with the NASICON-type structure which possesses a three-dimensional network, especially suitable for bulky ion migration. The cerium ion conductivity exceeds approximately one order of magnitude in comparison to that of the rare-earth ion conducting R2(WO 4) 3 and R1/3Zr 2(PO 4) 3 ( R=Sc, Y, Eu-Lu) series and the value is in the range between typical oxide anion conductors of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and calcia stabilized zirconia (CSZ). Since cerium ion has been demonstrated to be another migrating ion species in solid electrolyte field, a promising application for various functional materials is greatly expected.

  18. Rectangular ion funnel: a new ion funnel interface for structures for lossless ion manipulations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Webb, Ian K; Prost, Spencer A; Harrer, Marques B; Norheim, Randolph V; Tang, Keqi; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) have recently demonstrated the ability for near lossless ion focusing, transfer, and trapping in subatmospheric pressure regions. While lossless ion manipulations are advantageously applied to the applications of ion mobility separations and gas phase reactions, ion introduction through ring electrode ion funnels or more conventional ion optics to SLIM can involve discontinuities in electric fields or other perturbations that result in ion losses. In this work, we developed and investigated a new funnel design that aims to seamlessly couple to SLIM at the funnel exit. This rectangular ion funnel (RIF) was initially evaluated by ion simulations, fabricated utilizing printed circuit board technology, and tested experimentally. The RIF was integrated to a SLIM-time of flight (TOF) MS system, and the operating parameters, including RF, DC bias of the RIF electrodes, and electric fields for effectively interfacing with a SLIM, were characterized. The RIF provided a 2-fold sensitivity increase without significant discrimination over a wide m/z range and well matched to that of SLIM, along with greatly improved SLIM operational stability.

  19. Electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lilga, M.A.; Schwartz, D.T.; Genders, D.

    1997-10-01

    A variety of waste types containing radioactive {sup 137}Cs are found throughout the DOE complex. These waste types include water in reactor cooling basins, radioactive high-level waste (HLW) in underground storage tanks, and groundwater. Safety and regulatory requirements and economics require the removal of radiocesium before these wastes can be permanently disposed of. Electrically Switched Ion Exchange (ESIX) is an approach for radioactive cesium separation that combines IX and electrochemistry to provide a selective, reversible, and economic separation method that also produces little or no secondary waste. In the ESIX process, an electroactive IX film is deposited electrochemically onto a high-surface area electrode, and ion uptake and elution are controlled directly by modulating the potential of the film. For cesium, the electroactive films under investigation are ferrocyanides, which are well known to have high selectivities for cesium in concentrated sodium solutions. When a cathode potential is applied to the film, Fe{sup +3} is reduced to the Fe{sup +2} state, and a cation must be intercalated into the film to maintain charge neutrality (i.e., Cs{sup +} is loaded). Conversely, if an anodic potential is applied, a cation must be released from the film (i.e., Cs{sup +} is unloaded). Therefore, to load the film with cesium, the film is simply reduced; to unload cesium, the film is oxidized.

  20. Exotic Ions in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wanchun; Xie, Zhuolin; Cooper, Leon N.; Maris, Humphrey J.

    2016-11-01

    Exotic ions are negatively charged objects which have been detected in superfluid helium-4 at temperatures in the vicinity of 1 K. Mobility experiments in several different labs have revealed the existence of at least 18 such objects. These ions have a higher mobility than the normal negative ion and appear to be singly charged and smaller. We summarize the experimental situation, the possible structure of these objects, and how these objects might be formed.