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Sample records for ion scattering spectrometry

  1. Surface analysis of polished fused-silica laser lenses by ion-scattering spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Orvek, K.; Steward, S.A.

    1982-10-11

    New advances in high-powered glass lasers, particularly the NOVA system, have resulted in a need for lenses having higher damage threshold values than those now available. It is currently thought that surface contaminants on the lenses are responsible for initiating part of the damage. These contaminants are apparently introduced during the final polishing stages. In this study, we used ion-scattering spectrometry (ISS) to identify contaminants arising through the use of different polishing techniques. Five lenses were studied, each having undergone different polishing procedures. The first lens was not polished after receiving it from the manfacturer (No. 381). Ion microprobe data were available for this lens, and they were compared to ISS results. The second lens had been polished with rouge, a polishing compound no longer in use (No. 796). This sample served as a further check on the ISS results. The third lens was studied as received from the manufacturer - with no handling or cleaning (No. 802). The final two lenses had both been polished using high-purity ceria, cerium oxide (No. 800 and No. 801). The difference between these two was that No. 800 was polished using a nylon lap, and No. 801 was polished using pitch as a lap. The 800-series lenses were all made from the same batch, and constituted the major part of the investigation.

  2. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided.

  3. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  4. In situ real-time studies of oxygen incorporation in complex oxide thin films using spectroscopic ellipsometry and ion scattering and recoil spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A. H.; Gao, Y.; Irene, E. A.; Auciello, O.; Krauss, A. R.; Achultz, J. A.

    2000-05-25

    The surface termination of c-axis oriented YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} (YBCO) and the oxygen incorporation mechanism has been investigated using a unique combination of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and time of flight ion scattering and recoil spectrometry (ToF-ISARS). The high surface sensitivity of the ToF-ISARS technique combined with the bulk oxygen sensitivity of SE are shown to yield complimentary information. The SE provided the film orientation and quality, while ToF-ISARS supplied surface compositional and structural information and enabled isotopic {sup 18}O tracer studies. It was determined that the O content of the film had little effect on the surface termination of the film, indicating a lack of labile Cu(1) sites at the c-axis oriented YBCO surface. Also, strong evidence for a Ba or BaO terminated structure is shown. The data related to the {sup 18}O tracer studies indicate that O from the reaction ambient incorporates only into the labile Cu(1) sites during both deposition and annealing, while stable O sites were populated with O from the sputtered target, indicating either the need for sputtered atomic O or sputtered YCuO complexes to occupy the stable Cu(2) sites.

  5. Spectrometry of the Rutherford backscattering of ions and the Raman scattering of light in GaS single crystals irradiated with 140-keV H{sub 2}{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect

    Garibov, A. A.; Madatov, R. S.; Komarov, F. F.; Pilko, V. V.; Mustafayev, Yu. M.; Akhmedov, F. I.; Jakhangirov, M. M.

    2015-05-15

    The methods of the Raman scattering of light and Rutherford backscattering are used to study the degree of structural disorder in layered GaS crystals before and after irradiation with 140-keV H{sub 2}{sup +} ions. It is shown that the distribution of the crystal’s components over depth is homogeneous; for doses as high as 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}, the stoichiometric composition of the compound’s components is retained. The experimental value of the critical dose for the beginning of amorphization amounts to about 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} and is in accordance with the calculated value. The results obtained by the method of the Raman scattering of light confirm conservation of crystalline structure and the start of the amorphization process.

  6. Ion Beam Scattering by Background Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillet, Anne; Hughes, Thomas; Boerner, Jeremiah

    2015-11-01

    The presence of background gases can cause charged particle beams to become more diffuse due to scattering. Calculations for the transport of an ion beam have been performed using Aleph, a particle-in-cell plasma modeling code, and verified against a general envelop equation for charged particle beams. We have investigated the influence of background helium on the coherence and transmitted current of the ion beam. Collisions between ions and neutral particles were calculated assuming isotropic elastic scattering. Since this tends to predict larger scattering angles than are expected at high energies, these are conservative estimates for beam scattering. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

  7. Third International Workshop on Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, John H. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    Basic research in ion mobility spectrometry has given rise to rapid advancement in hardware development and applications. The Third International Workshop on Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was held October 16-19, 1994, at Johnson Space Center to provide a forum for investigators to present the most recent results of both basic and applied IMS research. Presenters included manufacturers and various users, including military research organizations and drug enforcement agencies. Thirty papers were given in the following five sessions: Fundamental IMS Studies, Instrument Development, Hyphenated IMS Techniques, Applications, and Data Reduction and Signal Processing. Advances in hardware development, software development, and user applications are described.

  8. Fundamentals of trapped ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Michelmann, Karsten; Silveira, Joshua A; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a relatively new gas-phase separation method that has been coupled to quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The TIMS analyzer is a segmented rf ion guide wherein ions are mobility-analyzed using an electric field that holds ions stationary against a moving gas, unlike conventional drift tube ion mobility spectrometry where the gas is stationary. Ions are initially trapped, and subsequently eluted from the TIMS analyzer over time according to their mobility (K). Though TIMS has achieved a high level of performance (R > 250) in a small device (<5 cm) using modest operating potentials (<300 V), a proper theory has yet to be produced. Here, we develop a quantitative theory for TIMS via mathematical derivation and simulations. A one-dimensional analytical model, used to predict the transit time and theoretical resolving power, is described. Theoretical trends are in agreement with experimental measurements performed as a function of K, pressure, and the axial electric field scan rate. The linear dependence of the transit time with 1/K provides a fundamental basis for determination of reduced mobility or collision cross section values by calibration. The quantitative description of TIMS provides an operational understanding of the analyzer, outlines the current performance capabilities, and provides insight into future avenues for improvement.

  9. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-03-06

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  10. Indirect processes in electron-ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bottcher, C.; Griffin, D.C.; Pindzola, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1983-10-01

    A summary is given of an informal workshop held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on June 22-23, 1983, in which the current status of theoretical calculations of indirect processes in electron-ion scattering was reviewed. Processes of particular interest in astrophysical and fusion plasmas were emphasized. Topics discussed include atomic structure effects, electron-impact ionization, and dielectronic recombination.

  11. Relative sensitivity factors for submicron secondary ion mass spectrometry with gallium primary ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satosh, Hitomi; Owari, Masanori; Nihei, Yoshimasa

    1993-08-01

    Relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) of thirteen elements in the oxide glass matrix in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) excited by a gallium focused ion beam were determined. RSFs were obtained by analyzing powder particles of standard glass samples. Whole volumes of each particles were analyzed in the 'shave-off' mode in order to avoid topographic effects. Reproducibility of RSFs was good, and sample-to-sample scattering of values was relatively small. Dependence of RSFs on the first ionization potential was shown to be reasonable. In order to with the data obtained through the bulk chemical analysis.

  12. Radiocarbon positive-ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Shanks, Richard P.; Donzel, Xavier; Gaubert, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    Proof-of-principle of a new mass spectrometric technique for radiocarbon measurement is demonstrated. Interfering nitrogen and hydrocarbon molecules are largely eliminated in a charge-exchange cell operating on non-metallic gas. The positive-to-negative ion conversion is the reverse of that conventionally used in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and is compatible with plasma ion sources that may be significantly more efficient and capable of greater output than are AMS sputter ion sources. The Nanogan electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source employed exhibited no sample memory and the >50 kyrs age range of AMS was reproduced. A bespoke prototype new instrument is now required to optimise the plasma and cell physics and to realise hypothetical performance gains over AMS.

  13. Fundamentals of traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Smith, Richard D

    2008-12-15

    Traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TW IMS) is a new IMS method implemented in the Synapt IMS/mass spectrometry system (Waters). Despite its wide adoption, the foundations of TW IMS were only qualitatively understood and factors governing the ion transit time (the separation parameter) and resolution remained murky. Here we develop the theory of TW IMS using derivations and ion dynamics simulations. The key parameter is the ratio (c) of ion drift velocity at the steepest wave slope to wave speed. At low c, the ion transit velocity is proportional to the squares of mobility (K) and electric field intensity (E), as opposed to linear scaling in drift tube (DT) IMS and differential mobility analyzers. At higher c, the scaling deviates from quadratic in a way controlled by the waveform profile, becoming more gradual with the ideal triangular profile but first steeper and then more gradual for realistic profiles with variable E. At highest c, the transit velocity asymptotically approaches the wave speed. Unlike with DT IMS, the resolving power of TW IMS depends on mobility, scaling as K(1/2) in the low-c limit and less at higher c. A nonlinear dependence of the transit time on mobility means that the true resolving power of TW IMS differs from that indicated by the spectrum. A near-optimum resolution is achievable over an approximately 300-400% range of mobilities. The major predicted trends are in agreement with TW IMS measurements for peptide ions as a function of mobility, wave amplitude, and gas pressure. The issues of proper TW IMS calibration and ion distortion by field heating are also discussed. The new quantitative understanding of TW IMS separations allows rational optimization of instrument design and operation and improved spectral calibration.

  14. Development of ultralow energy (1-10 eV) ion scattering spectrometry coupled with reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption for the investigation of molecular solids.

    PubMed

    Bag, Soumabha; Bhuin, Radha Gobinda; Methikkalam, Rabin Rajan J; Pradeep, T; Kephart, Luke; Walker, Jeff; Kuchta, Kevin; Martin, Dave; Wei, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Extremely surface specific information, limited to the first atomic layer of molecular surfaces, is essential to understand the chemistry and physics in upper atmospheric and interstellar environments. Ultra low energy ion scattering in the 1-10 eV window with mass selected ions can reveal extremely surface specific information which when coupled with reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectroscopies, diverse chemical and physical properties of molecular species at surfaces could be derived. These experiments have to be performed at cryogenic temperatures and at ultra high vacuum conditions without the possibility of collisions of neutrals and background deposition in view of the poor ion intensities and consequent need for longer exposure times. Here we combine a highly optimized low energy ion optical system designed for such studies coupled with RAIR and TPD and its initial characterization. Despite the ultralow collision energies and long ion path lengths employed, the ion intensities at 1 eV have been significant to collect a scattered ion spectrum of 1000 counts/s for mass selected CH2(+).

  15. Development of ultralow energy (1–10 eV) ion scattering spectrometry coupled with reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption for the investigation of molecular solids

    SciTech Connect

    Bag, Soumabha; Bhuin, Radha Gobinda; Methikkalam, Rabin Rajan J.; Pradeep, T.; Kephart, Luke; Walker, Jeff; Kuchta, Kevin; Martin, Dave; Wei, Jian

    2014-01-15

    Extremely surface specific information, limited to the first atomic layer of molecular surfaces, is essential to understand the chemistry and physics in upper atmospheric and interstellar environments. Ultra low energy ion scattering in the 1–10 eV window with mass selected ions can reveal extremely surface specific information which when coupled with reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectroscopies, diverse chemical and physical properties of molecular species at surfaces could be derived. These experiments have to be performed at cryogenic temperatures and at ultra high vacuum conditions without the possibility of collisions of neutrals and background deposition in view of the poor ion intensities and consequent need for longer exposure times. Here we combine a highly optimized low energy ion optical system designed for such studies coupled with RAIR and TPD and its initial characterization. Despite the ultralow collision energies and long ion path lengths employed, the ion intensities at 1 eV have been significant to collect a scattered ion spectrum of 1000 counts/s for mass selected CH{sub 2}{sup +}.

  16. Secondary ion mass spectrometry: Polyatomic and molecular ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, Richard J.; Ross, Mark M.; Kidwell, David A.

    1986-03-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has become a diverse tool for the study of many substances such as metals, semiconductors, inorganic compounds and organic compounds, including polymers and biomolecules. This paper discusses the formation and emission of polyatomic and molecular ions from surfaces of these materials. The mass, energy, and abundance distribution of cluster ions emitted from various solids — Van der Waals, molecular, metallic, ionic and covalent — are compared. Trends in their emission patterns are discussed in terms of a recombination or a direct emission mechanism. For example, the ion abundance of cluster ions sputtered from metals decreases monotonically with increasing cluster size due to a decreasing formation probability for large clusters. The emission from metal oxides, however, shows a broad distribution of M mO ±n cluster ions whose formation can be described by both recombination and direct emission mechanisms. Covalently bonded molecules tend to eject as intact species. The emission of molecular ions is also discussed with respect to the method of ionization and the various sample preparation and matrix-assisted and derivatization procedures used. For example, the emission of molecular ions from metal surfaces is strongly influenced by the nature of the adsorption site; and matrix-assisted and derivatization procedures enhance the ionization efficiency of the analyte.

  17. Gated Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ridgeway, Mark E; Wolff, Jeremy J; Silveira, Joshua A; Lin, Cheng; Costello, Catherine E; Park, Melvin A

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of molecules by ion mobility spectrometry coupled with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) provides chemical information on the three dimensional structure and mass of the molecules. The coupling of ion mobility to trapping mass spectrometers has historically been challenging due to the large differences in analysis time between the two devices. In this paper we present a modification of the trapped ion mobility (TIMS) analysis scheme termed "Gated TIMS" that allows efficient coupling to a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) analyzer. Analyses of standard compounds and the influence of source conditions on the TIMS distributions produced by ion mobility spectra of labile ubiquitin protein ions are presented. Ion mobility resolving powers up to 100 are observed. Measured collisional cross sections of ubiquitin ions are in excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement to previous measurements. Gated TIMS FT-ICR produces results comparable to those acquired using TIMS/time-of-flight MS instrument platforms as well as numerous drift tube IMS-MS studies published in the literature.

  18. Environment applications for ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Robert K.; Rudolph, Andreas

    1995-01-01

    The detection of environmentally important polychlorinated aromatics by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was investigated. Single polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) isomers (congeners) having five or more chlorine atoms were reliably detected in isooctane solution at levels of 35 ng with a Barringer IONSCAN ion mobility spectrometer operating in negative mode; limits of detection (LOD) were extrapolated to be in the low ng region. Mixtures of up to four PCB congeners, showing characteristic multiple peaks, and complex commercial mixtures of PCBs (Aroclors) were also detected. Detection of Aroclors in transformer oil was suppressed by the presence of the antioxidant BHT (2,6-di-t-butyl4-methylphenol) in the oil. The wood preservative pentachlorophenol (PCP) was easily detected in recycled wood shavings at levels of 52 ppm with the IONSCAN; the LOD was extrapolated to be in the low ppm region.

  19. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  20. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Environmental Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; Cliff, John B.

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric particles influence many aspects of climate, air quality and human health. Understanding the composition, chemistry and behavior of atmospheric aerosols is a key remaining challenge in improving climate models. Furthermore, particles may be traced back to a particular source based on composition, stable isotope ratios, or the presence of particular surface chemistries. Finally, the characterization of atmospheric particles in the workplace plays an important role in understanding the potential for exposure and environmental and human health effects to engineered and natural nanoscale particles. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a useful tool in determining any of several aspects of the structure, composition and chemistry of these particles. Often used in conjunction with other surface analysis and electron microscopy methods, SIMS has been used to determine or confirm reactions on and in particles, the presence of particular organic species on the surface of atmospheric aerosols and several other interesting and relevant findings. Various versions of SIMS instruments – dynamic SIMS, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry or TOF-SIMS, nanoSIMS – have been used to determine specific aspects of aerosol structure and chemistry. This article describes the strengths of each type of SIMS instrument in the characterization of aerosols, along with guidance on sample preparation, specific characterization specific to the particular information sought in the analysis. Examples and guidance are given for each type of SIMS analysis.

  1. Biomolecule Analysis by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bohrer, Brian C.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Koeniger, Stormy L.; Hilderbrand, Amy E.; Clemmer, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Although nonnative protein conformations, including intermediates along the folding pathway and kinetically trapped misfolded species that disfavor the native state, are rarely isolated in the solution phase, they are often stable in the gas phase, where macromolecular ions from electrospray ionization can exist in varying charge states. Differences in the structures of nonnative conformations in the gas phase are often large enough to allow different shapes and charge states to be separated because of differences in their mobilities through a gas. Moreover, gentle collisional activation can be used to induce structural transformations. These new structures often have different mobilities. Thus, there is the possibility of developing a multidimensional separation that takes advantage of structural differences of multiple stable states. This review discusses how nonnative states differ in the gas phase compared with solution and presents an overview of early attempts to utilize and manipulate structures in order to develop ion mobility spectrometry as a rapid and sensitive technique for separating complex mixtures of biomolecules prior to mass spectrometry. PMID:20636082

  2. New Cs sputter ion source with polyatomic ion beams for secondary ion mass spectrometry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Belykh, S. F.; Palitsin, V. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Kovarsky, A. P.; Chang, R. J. H.; Adriaens, A.; Dowsett, M. G.; Adams, F.

    2007-08-15

    A simple design for a cesium sputter ion source compatible with vacuum and ion-optical systems as well as with electronics of the commercially available Cameca IMS-4f instrument is reported. This ion source has been tested with the cluster primary ions of Si{sub n}{sup -} and Cu{sub n}{sup -}. Our experiments with surface characterization and depth profiling conducted to date demonstrate improvements of the analytical capabilities of the secondary ion mass spectrometry instrument due to the nonadditive enhancement of secondary ion emission and shorter ion ranges of polyatomic projectiles compared to atomic ones with the same impact energy.

  3. New Cs sputter ion source with polyatomic ion beams for secondary ion mass spectrometry applications.

    PubMed

    Belykh, S F; Palitsin, V V; Veryovkin, I V; Kovarsky, A P; Chang, R J H; Adriaens, A; Dowsett, M G; Adams, F

    2007-08-01

    A simple design for a cesium sputter ion source compatible with vacuum and ion-optical systems as well as with electronics of the commercially available Cameca IMS-4f instrument is reported. This ion source has been tested with the cluster primary ions of Si(n)(-) and Cu(n)(-). Our experiments with surface characterization and depth profiling conducted to date demonstrate improvements of the analytical capabilities of the secondary ion mass spectrometry instrument due to the nonadditive enhancement of secondary ion emission and shorter ion ranges of polyatomic projectiles compared to atomic ones with the same impact energy.

  4. New Cs sputter ion source with polyatomic ion beams for secondary ion mass spectrometry applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belykh, S. F.; Palitsin, V. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Kovarsky, A. P.; Chang, R. J. H.; Adriaens, A.; Dowsett, M. G.; Adams, F.

    2007-08-01

    A simple design for a cesium sputter ion source compatible with vacuum and ion-optical systems as well as with electronics of the commercially available Cameca IMS-4f instrument is reported. This ion source has been tested with the cluster primary ions of Sin- and Cun-. Our experiments with surface characterization and depth profiling conducted to date demonstrate improvements of the analytical capabilities of the secondary ion mass spectrometry instrument due to the nonadditive enhancement of secondary ion emission and shorter ion ranges of polyatomic projectiles compared to atomic ones with the same impact energy.

  5. How hot are your ions in TWAVE ion mobility spectrometry?

    PubMed

    Merenbloom, Samuel I; Flick, Tawnya G; Williams, Evan R

    2012-03-01

    Effective temperatures of ions during traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) analysis were measured using singly protonated leucine enkephalin dimer as a chemical thermometer by monitoring dissociation of the dimer into monomer, as well as the subsequent dissociation of monomer into a-, b-, and y-ions, as a function of instrumental parameters. At fixed helium cell and TWIMS cell gas flow rates, the extent of dissociation does not vary significantly with either the wave velocity or wave height, except at low (<500 m/s) wave velocities that are not commonly used. Increasing the flow rate of nitrogen gas into the TWIMS cell and decreasing the flow rate of helium gas into the helium cell resulted in greater dissociation. However, the mobility distributions of the fragment ions formed by dissociation of the dimer upon injection into the TWIMS cell are nearly indistinguishable from those of fragment ions formed in the collision cell prior to TWIMS analysis for all TWIMS experiments. These results indicate that heating and dissociation occur when ions are injected into the TWIMS cell, and that the effective temperature subsequently decreases to a point at which no further dissociation is observed during the TWIMS analysis. An upper limit to the effective ion temperature of 449 K during TWIMS analysis is obtained at a helium flow rate of 180 mL/min, TWIMS flow rate of 80 mL/min, and traveling wave height of 40 V, which is well below previously reported values. Effects of ion heating in TWIMS on gas-phase protein conformation are presented.

  6. Positron scattering and annihilation from hydrogenlike ions

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, S.A.; Bromley, M.W.J.; Mitroy, J.

    2004-05-01

    The Kohn variational method is used with a configuration-interaction-type wave function to determine the J=0 and J=1 phase shifts and annihilation parameter Z{sub eff} for positron-hydrogenic ion scattering. The phase shifts are within 1-2% of the best previous calculations. The values of Z{sub eff} are small and do not exceed unity for any of the momenta considered. At thermal energies Z{sub eff} is minute with a value of order 10{sup -50} occurring for He{sup +} at k=0.05a{sub 0}{sup -1}. In addition to the variational calculations, analytic expressions for the phase shift and annihilation parameters within the Coulomb wave Born approximation are derived and used to help elucidate the dynamics of positron collisions with positive ions.

  7. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry SIMS XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, G.; Lareau, R.; Bennett, J.; Stevie, F.

    2003-05-01

    This volume contains 252 contributions presented as plenary, invited and contributed poster and oral presentations at the 11th International Conference on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS XI) held at the Hilton Hotel, Walt Disney World Village, Orlando, Florida, 7 12 September, 1997. The book covers a diverse range of research, reflecting the rapid growth in advanced semiconductor characterization, ultra shallow depth profiling, TOF-SIMS and the new areas in which SIMS techniques are being used, for example in biological sciences and organic surface characterization. Papers are presented under the following categories: Isotopic SIMS Biological SIMS Semiconductor Characterization Techniques and Applications Ultra Shallow Depth Profiling Depth Profiling Fundamental/Modelling and Diffusion Sputter-Induced Topography Fundamentals of Molecular Desorption Organic Materials Practical TOF-SIMS Polyatomic Primary Ions Materials/Surface Analysis Postionization Instrumentation Geological SIMS Imaging Fundamentals of Sputtering Ion Formation and Cluster Formation Quantitative Analysis Environmental/Particle Characterization Related Techniques These proceedings provide an invaluable source of reference for both newcomers to the field and experienced SIMS users.

  8. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yuji; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-09-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here, we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes 'scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are 'ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e., the vortex equation is independent of the wave fields). This model describes a minimal departure from the integrable KP system. By the Painlevé test, we delineate how the vorticity term violates integrability, bringing about an essential three-dimensionality to the solutions. By numerical simulation, we show how the solitons are scattered by vortexes and become chaotic.

  9. Field applications of ion-mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Patricia A.

    1997-02-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an excellent tool for detection of controlled substances under field conditions. Plasmagrams and tables showing the results of field applications will be discussed. Residues of drugs, such as cocaine and heroin, can be left anywhere including vehicles, boats, and houses. In houses, the carpets, walls, and floors are good locations for residues to adhere. Individual clothing can also be contaminated with drug residue. Vehicles that are suspected of having previously smuggled illegal substances can be vacuumed and screened. Tablets that look similar and respond the same when screened with the Marquis reagent can be differentiated by IMS. With Southern California being the 'methamphetamine capital of the world' and the resurgence of phencyclidine, IMS has proven extremely valuable in the screening of abandoned clandestine laboratory sites and vehicles in which the clandestine laboratories; chemicals and glassware were transported. IMS is very responsive to ephedrine/pseudophedrine, a precursor of methamphetamine and 1-piperidinocyclohexanecarbonitrile, an intermediate of phencyclidine. Once residues are detected, vacuum samples, and/or methanol wipes are collected and analyzed at the DEA Laboratory for confirmation of the suspected substance using GC-IRD or Mass Spectrometry.

  10. Relative Sensitivity Factors for Submicron Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with Gallium Primary Ion Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitomi; Owari, Masanori; Nihei, Yoshimasa

    1993-08-01

    Relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) of thirteen elements in the oxide glass matrix in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) excited by a gallium focused ion beam were determined. RSFs were obtained by analyzing powder particles of standard glass samples. Whole volumes of each particles were analyzed in the “shave-off” mode in order to avoid topographic effects. Reproducibility of RSFs was good, and sample-to-sample scattering of values was relatively small. Dependence of RSFs on the first ionization potential was shown to be reasonable. In order to check the validity of the RSFs, coal fly ash particles were analyzed. The results were in reasonable agreement with the data obtained through the bulk chemical analysis.

  11. Reactions of Ions with Ionic Liquid Vapors by Selected-Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    are observed by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry. Free energies of the reactions involved are determined by ab initio quantum mechanical...spectrometry. Free energies of the reactions involving 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis-trifluoromethylsulfonylimide determined by ab initio...of the ion pairs should indicate potential reactivity with the above ions. Apparently, the Coulombic energy gained by ion addition or ion exchange

  12. Heavy ion recoil spectrometry of barium strontium titanate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannard, W. B.; Johnston, P. N.; Walker, S. R.; Bubb, I. F.; Scott, J. F.; Cohen, D. D.; Dytlewski, N.; Martin, J. W.

    1995-05-01

    Thin films of barium strontium titanate have been analysed using heavy ion recoil spectrometry with 77 and 98 MeV 127I ions at the new heavy ion recoil facility at ANSTO, Lucas Heights. New calibration procedures have been developed for quantitative analysis. Energy spectra for each of the elements present reveal interdiffusion that was not previously known.

  13. Examining the Influence of Phosphorylation on Peptide Ion Structure by Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Matthew S.; Dilger, Jonathan M.; Acton, Matthew D.; Arnold, Randy J.; Radivojac, Predrag; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-05-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) techniques are used to study the general effects of phosphorylation on peptide structure. Cross sections for a library of 66 singly phosphorylated peptide ions from 33 pairs of positional isomers, and unmodified analogues were measured. Intrinsic size parameters (ISPs) derived from these measurements yield calculated collision cross sections for 85% of these phosphopeptide sequences that are within ±2.5% of experimental values. The average ISP for the phosphoryl group (0.64 ± 0.05) suggests that in general this moiety forms intramolecular interactions with the neighboring residues and peptide backbone, resulting in relatively compact structures. We assess the capability of ion mobility to separate positional isomers (i.e., peptide sequences that differ only in the location of the modification) and find that more than half of the isomeric pairs have >1% difference in collision cross section. Phosphorylation is also found to influence populations of structures that differ in the cis/ trans orientation of Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. Several sequences with phosphorylated Ser or Thr residues located N-terminally adjacent to Pro residues show fewer conformations compared to the unmodified sequences.

  14. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Lamich, George J.

    1994-01-01

    A time of flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line (10). The beam line (10) includes an ion source (12) which injects ions into pulse deflection regions (14) and (16) separated by a drift space (18). A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly (22). The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions (14) and (16).

  15. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lamich, G.J.

    1994-09-13

    A time-of-flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line is disclosed. The beam line includes an ion source which injects ions into pulse deflection regions and separated by a drift space. A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly. The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions. 23 figs.

  16. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Dictyostelium discoideum Aggregation Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Debord, J. Daniel; Smith, Donald F.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Gomer, Richard H.; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.

    2014-06-09

    High resolution imaging mass spectrometry could become a valuable tool for cell and developmental biology, but both, high spatial and mass spectral resolution are needed to enable this. In this report, we employed Bi3 bombardment time-of-flight (Bi3 ToF-SIMS) and C60 bombardment Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60 FTICR-SIMS) to image Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation streams. Nearly 300 lipid species were identified from the aggregation streams. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging (FTICR-SIMS) enabled the generation of multiple molecular ion maps at the nominal mass level and provided good coverage for fatty acyls, prenol lipids, and sterol lipids. The comparison of Bi3 ToF-SIMS and C60 FTICR-SIMS suggested that while the first provides fast, high spatial resolution molecular ion images, the chemical complexity of biological samples warrants the use of high resolution analyzers for accurate ion identification.

  17. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1993-04-27

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  18. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  19. NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

  20. Field screening of volatile organochlorine compounds using ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stach, J.; Brodacki, M.; Doering, H.R.; Flachowsky, J.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorinated alkanes and alkenes produce due to a dissociative charge transfer reaction strong signals of Cl{sup {minus}} ions in ion mobility spectra. This reaction can be used to analyze these compounds in on site analyses. The method is applicable to dump gases, soil air or soil using head space techniques and volatile halogen compounds dissolved in organic solvents. The results obtained by ion mobility spectrometry correlate with GC/MS or AOX measurements in most cases.

  1. Diffraction phenomena in elastic scattering of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kotlyar, V.V.; Shebeko, A.V.

    1981-08-01

    Nuclear diffraction phenomena in elastic scattering of heavy ions are studied in the intermediate energy range. Examination is carried out using the strong absorption models for the S-matrix in the angular momentum representation. New asymptotic expressions for the diffraction scattering amplitudes are obtained. The main attention is paid to the study of the relation between the Fresnel and the Fraunhofer parts of the amplitudes obtained in different regions of scattering angles.

  2. Pharmaceutical metabolite profiling using quadrupole/ion mobility spectrometry/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric C Y; New, Lee Sun; Yap, Chun Wei; Goh, Lin Tang

    2009-02-01

    The use of hybrid quadrupole ion mobility spectrometry time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q/IMS/TOFMS) in the metabolite profiling of leflunomide (LEF) and acetaminophen (APAP) is presented. The IMS drift times (T(d)) of the drugs and their metabolites were determined in the IMS/TOFMS experiments and correlated with their exact monoisotopic masses and other in silico generated structural properties, such as connolly molecular area (CMA), connolly solvent-excluded volume (CSEV), principal moments of inertia along the X, Y and Z Cartesian coordinates (MI-X, MI-Y and MI-Z), inverse mobility and collision cross-section (CCS). The correlation of T(d) with these parameters is presented and discussed. IMS/TOF tandem mass spectrometry experiments (MS(2) and MS(3)) were successfully performed on the N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine glutathione (NAPQI-GSH) adduct derived from the in vitro microsomal metabolism of APAP. As comparison, similar experiments were also performed using hybrid triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry (QTRAPMS) and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS). The abilities to resolve the product ions of the metabolite within the drift tube and fragment the ion mobility resolved product ions in the transfer travelling wave-enabled stacked ring ion guide (TWIG) demonstrated the potential applicability of the Q/IMS/TOFMS technique in pharmaceutical metabolite profiling.

  3. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J S; Park, H S; Amendt, A; Divol, L; Kugland, N L; Rozmus, W; Glenzer, S H

    2012-05-01

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

  4. Ion mobility–mass spectrometry for structural proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yueyang; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2012-01-01

    Ion mobility coupled to mass spectrometry has been an important tool in the fields of chemical physics and analytical chemistry for decades, but its potential for interrogating the structure of proteins and multiprotein complexes has only recently begun to be realized. Today, ion mobility– mass spectrometry is often applied to the structural elucidation of protein assemblies that have failed high-throughput crystallization or NMR spectroscopy screens. Here, we highlight the technology, approaches and data that have led to this dramatic shift in use, including emerging trends such as the integration of ion mobility–mass spectrometry data with more classical (e.g., ‘bottom-up’) proteomics approaches for the rapid structural characterization of protein networks. PMID:22292823

  5. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGES

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  6. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this has been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.

  7. Mass spectrometry and inhomogeneous ion optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    Work done in several areas to advance the state of the art of magnetic mass spectrometers is described. The calculations and data necessary for the design of inhomogeneous field mass spectrometers, and the calculation of ion trajectories through such fields are presented. The development and testing of solid state ion detection devices providing the capability of counting single ions is discussed. New techniques in the preparation and operation of thermal-ionization ion sources are described. Data obtained on the concentrations of copper in rainfall and uranium in air samples using the improved thermal ionization techniques are presented. The design of a closed system static mass spectrometer for isotopic analyses is discussed. A summary of instrumental aspects of a four-stage mass spectrometer comprising two electrostatic and two 90 deg. magnetic lenses with a 122-cm radius used to study the interaction of ions with solids is presented.

  8. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  9. Shower approach in the simulation of ion scattering from solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodyrev, V. A.; Andrzejewski, R.; Rivera, A.; Boerma, D. O.; Prieto, J. E.

    2011-05-01

    An efficient approach for the simulation of ion scattering from solids is proposed. For every encountered atom, we take multiple samples of its thermal displacements among those which result in scattering with high probability to finally reach the detector. As a result, the detector is illuminated by intensive “showers,” where each event of detection must be weighted according to the actual probability of the atom displacement. The computational cost of such simulation is orders of magnitude lower than in the direct approach, and a comprehensive analysis of multiple and plural scattering effects becomes possible. We use this method for two purposes. First, the accuracy of the approximate approaches, developed mainly for ion-beam structural analysis, is verified. Second, the possibility to reproduce a wide class of experimental conditions is used to analyze some basic features of ion-solid collisions: the role of double violent collisions in low-energy ion scattering; the origin of the “surface peak” in scattering from amorphous samples; the low-energy tail in the energy spectra of scattered medium-energy ions due to plural scattering; and the degradation of blocking patterns in two-dimensional angular distributions with increasing depth of scattering. As an example of simulation for ions of MeV energies, we verify the time reversibility for channeling and blocking of 1-MeV protons in a W crystal. The possibilities of analysis that our approach offers may be very useful for various applications, in particular, for structural analysis with atomic resolution.

  10. Characterization of a Distributed Plasma Ionization Source (DPIS) for Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Waltman, Melanie J.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hill, Herbert; Blanchard, William C.; Ewing, Robert G.

    2008-10-15

    A recently developed atmospheric pressure ionization source, a distributed plasma ionization source (DPIS), was characterized and compared to commonly used atmospheric pressure ionization sources with both mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. The source consisted of two electrodes of different sizes separated by a thin dielectric. Application of a high RF voltage across the electrodes generated plasma in air yielding both positive and negative ions depending on the polarity of the applied potential. These reactant ions subsequently ionized the analyte vapors. The reactant ions generated were similar to those created in a conventional point-to-plane corona discharge ion source. The positive reactant ions generated by the source were mass identified as being solvated protons of general formula (H2O)nH+ with (H2O)2H+ as the most abundant reactant ion. The negative reactant ions produced were mass identified primarily as CO3-, NO3-, NO2-, O3- and O2- of various relative intensities. The predominant ion and relative ion ratios varied depending upon source construction and supporting gas flow rates. A few compounds including drugs, explosives and environmental pollutants were selected to evaluate the new ionization source. The source was operated continuously for several months and although deterioration was observed visually, the source continued to produce ions at a rate similar that of the initial conditions. The results indicated that the DPIS may have a longer operating life than a conventional corona discharge.

  11. Characterization of a distributed plasma ionization source (DPIS) for ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Waltman, Melanie J; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hill, Herbert H; Blanchard, William C; Ewing, Robert G

    2008-10-19

    A recently developed atmospheric pressure ionization source, a distributed plasma ionization source (DPIS), was characterized and compared to commonly used atmospheric pressure ionization sources with both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The source consisted of two electrodes of different sizes separated by a thin dielectric. Application of a high RF voltage across the electrodes generated plasma in air yielding both positive and negative ions. These reactant ions subsequently ionized the analyte vapors. The reactant ions generated were similar to those created in a conventional point-to-plane corona discharge ion source. The positive reactant ions generated by the source were mass identified as being solvated protons of general formula (H(2)O)(n)H(+) with (H(2)O)(2)H(+) as the most abundant reactant ion. The negative reactant ions produced were mass identified primarily as CO(3)(-), NO(3)(-), NO(2)(-), O(3)(-) and O(2)(-) of various relative intensities. The predominant ion and relative ion ratios varied depending upon source construction and supporting gas flow rates. A few compounds including drugs, explosives and amines were selected to evaluate the new ionization source. The source was operated continuously for 3 months and although surface deterioration was observed visually, the source continued to produce ions at a rate similar that of the initial conditions.

  12. Isotope ratio measurements by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betti, Maria

    2005-04-01

    The basic principles of secondary ion mass spectrometry and glow discharge mass spectrometry have been shortly revisited. The applications of both techniques as exploited for the isotope ratio measurements in several matrices have been reviewed. Emphasis has been given to research fields in expansions such as solar system studies, medicine, biology, environment and nuclear forensic. The characteristics of the two techniques are discussed in terms of sensitivity and methodology of quantification. Considerations on the different detection possibilities in SIMS are also presented.

  13. Gas Phase Chiral Separations By Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Prabha; Wu, Ching; Hill, Herbert H.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript introduces the concept of Chiral Ion Mobility Spectrometry (CIMS) and presents examples demonstrating the gas phase separation of enantiomers of a wide range of racemates including pharmaceuticals, amino acids and carbohydrates. CIMS is similar to traditional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), where gas phase ions, when subjected to a potential gradient are separated at atmospheric pressure due to differences in their shapes and sizes. In addition to size and shape, CIMS separates ions based on their stereospecific interaction with a chiral gas. In order to achieve chiral discrimination by CIMS, an asymmetric environment was provided by doping the drift gas with a volatile chiral reagent. In this study S-(+)-2-butanol was used as a chiral modifier to demonstrate enantiomeric separations of atenolol, serine, methionine, threonine, methyl-α-glucopyranoside, glucose, penicillamine, valinol, phenylalanine, and tryptophan from their respective racemic mixtures. PMID:17165808

  14. TXRF spectrometry at ion beam excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, V.; Egorov, E.; Afanas’ef, M.

    2017-02-01

    The work presents short discussion of TXRF and PIXE methods peculiarities. Taking into account of these peculiarities we elaborate the experimental scheme for TXRF measurements at ion beam excitation of characteristical fluorescence. The scheme is built on base of the planar X-ray waveguide-resonator with specific design. Features of the new experimental method and possibilities of Sokol-3 ion beam analytical complex were used for the method application in real measurements.

  15. Modeling vapor uptake induced mobility shifts in peptide ions observed with transversal modulation ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Vivek K; Vidal-de-Miguel, Guillermo; Hogan, Christopher J

    2015-10-21

    Low field ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) techniques exhibit low orthogonality, as inverse mobility often scales with mass to charge ratio. This inadequacy can be mitigated by adding vapor dopants, which may cluster with analyte ions and shift their mobilities by amounts independent of both mass and mobility of the ion. It is therefore important to understand the interactions of vapor dopants with ions, to better quantify the extent of dopant facilitated mobility shifts. Here, we develop predictive models of vapor dopant facilitated mobility shifts, and compare model calculations to measurements of mobility shifts for peptide ions exposed to variable gas phase concentrations of isopropanol. Mobility measurements were made at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a recently developed transversal modulation ion mobility spectrometer (TMIMS). Results are compared to three separate models, wherein mobility shifts due to vapor dopants are attributed to changes in gas composition and (I) no vapor dopant uptake is assumed, (II) site-specific dopant uptake by the ion is assumed (approximated via a Langmuir adsorption model), and (III) site-unspecific dopant uptake by the ion is assumed (approximated via a classical nucleation model). We find that mobility shifts in peptide ions are in excellent agreement with model II, site-specific binding predictions. Conversely, mobility shifts of tetraalkylammonium ions from previous measurements were compared with these models and best agreement was found with model III predictions, i.e. site-unspecific dopant uptake.

  16. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 1. Peptides to Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, Gregory C.; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  17. Ion mobility spectrometry-hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry of anions: part 1. Peptides to proteins.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  18. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Robinson, Errol W.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-12-15

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has seen increased application for high spatial chemical imaging of complex biological surfaces. The advent and commercial availability of cluster and polyatomic primary ion sources (e.g. Au and Bi cluster and buckminsterfullerene (C60)) provide improved secondary ion yield and decreased fragmentation of surface species, thus accessibility to intact molecular ions. Despite developments in primary ion sources, development of mass spectrometers to fully exploit their advantages has been limited. Tandem mass spectrometry for identification of secondary ions is highly desirable, but implementation has proven to be difficult. Similarly, high mass resolution and high mass measurement accuracy would greatly improve the chemical specificity of SIMS. Here we combine, for the first time, the advantages of a C60 primary ion source with the ultra-high mass resolving power and high mass measurement accuracy of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Mass resolving power in excess of 100,000 (m/Δm50%) is demonstrated, with mass measurement accuracies below 3 parts-per-million. Imaging of mouse brain tissue at 40 μm pixel size is shown. Tandem mass spectrometry of ions from biological tissue is demonstrated and molecular formulae can be assigned to fragment ions.

  19. Ion yield improvement for static secondary ion mass spectrometry by use of polyatomic primary ions.

    PubMed

    De Mondt, Roel; Van Vaeck, Luc; Heile, Andreas; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Nieuwjaer, Nicolas; Delcorte, Arnaud; Bertrand, Patrick; Lenaerts, Jens; Vangaever, Frank

    2008-05-01

    Static secondary ion mass spectrometry (S-SIMS) is one of the potentially most powerful and versatile tools for the analysis of surface components at the monolayer level. Current improvements in detection limit (LOD) and molecular specificity rely on the optimisation of the desorption-ionisation (DI) process. As an alternative to monoatomic projectiles, polyatomic primary ion (P.I.) bombardment increases ion yields non-linearly. Common P.I. sources are Ga+ (liquid metal ion gun (LMIG), SF5+ (electron ionisation) and the newer Au(n)+, Bi(n)q+ (both LMIG) and C60+ (electron ionisation) sources. In this study the ion yield improvement obtained by using the newly developed ion sources is assessed. Two dyes (zwitterionic and/or thermolabile polar functionalities on a largely conjugated backbone) were analysed as a thin layer using Ga+, SF5+, C60+, Bi+, Bi3(2+) and Bi5(2+) projectiles under static conditions. The study aims at evaluating the improvement in LOD, useful and characteristic yield and molecular specificity. The corrected total ion count values for the different P.I. sources are compared for different instruments to obtain a rough estimate of the improvements. Furthermore, tentative ionisation and fragmentation schemes are provided to describe the generation of radical and adduct ions. Characteristic ion yields are discussed for the different P.I. sources. An overview of the general appearances of the mass spectra obtained with the different P.I. sources is given to stress the major improvement provided by polyatomic P.I.s in yielding information at higher m/z values.

  20. LABORATORY DETECTION OF PLASTICS IN SEEDCOTTON WITH ION MOBILITY SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US cotton industry wants to increase market share and value by supplying pure cotton. Removing contamination requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to determine if Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) could be used to find small amounts of plastic in ...

  1. Resonant quasiparticle-ion scattering in anisotropic superfluid 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmelin, R. H.; Salomaa, M. M.

    1990-03-01

    Low-energy excitations in quantum fluids are most directly encountered by ions. In the superfluid phases of 3He the relevant elementary excitations are Bogoliubov quasiparticles, which undergo repeated scattering off an ion in the presence of a divergent density of states. We present a quantum-mechanical calculation of the resonant 3He quasiparticle-scattering-limited mobility for negative ions in the anisotropic bulk 3A (A phase) and 3P (polar phase) that is exact when the quasiparticles scatter elastically. We develop a numerical scheme to solve the singular equations for quasiparticle-ion scattering in the A and P phases. Both of these superfluid phases feature a uniaxially symmetric order parameter but distinct topology for the magnitude of the energy gap on the Fermi sphere, i.e., points versus lines of nodes. In particular, the perpetual orbital circulation of Cooper pairs in 3A results in a novel, purely quantum-mechanical intrinsic Magnus effect, which is absent in the polar phase, where Cooper pairs possess no spontaneous orbital angular momentum. This is of interest also for transport properties of heavy-fermion superconductors. We discuss the 3He quasiparticle-ion cross sections, which allow one to account for the mobility data with essentially no free parameters. The calculated mobility thus facilitates an introduction of ``ion spectroscopy'' to extract useful information on fundamental properties of the superfluid state, such as the temperature dependence of the energy gap in 3A.

  2. Ion trap mass spectrometry of externally generated ions

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Van Berkel, G.J.; Georinger, D.E. ); Glish, G.L.

    1994-07-01

    This discussion provides background for consideration of the merits of ion trap MS in conjunction with an external ion source relative to a scanning beam-type form of mass analysis. Emphasis has been placed primarily on efficiency. However, a variety of other factors can be major considerations, depending upon the application. For example, the ion trap has clear advantages over most other forms of MS in terms of size, weight, and pumping requirements. These advantages make the ion trap attractive for field applications, particularly because the performance characteristics of the ion trap need not be compromised in a compact system. One of the most significant advantages is the high efficiency obtainable with tandem MS experiments by using collisional activation via resonance excitation. Under favorable conditions, the conversion of 100% of the parent ions to product ions can be achieved, although 10-50% conversions are more typical. The analogous conversion in most beam-type tendem MS experiments is typically 1-3 orders of magnitude lower; thus, significant reductions in detection limits by use of the ion trap can be anticipated in analyses requiring two or more stages of MS. 61 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Reactions of Ions with Ionic Liquid Vapors by Selected-Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chambreau, Steven D; Boatz, Jerry A; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L; Friedman, Jeffrey F; Eyet, Nicole; Viggiano, A A

    2011-04-21

    Room-temperature ionic liquids exert vanishingly small vapor pressures under ambient conditions. Under reduced pressure, certain ionic liquids have demonstrated volatility, and they are thought to vaporize as intact cation-anion ion pairs. However, ion pair vapors are difficult to detect because their concentration is extremely low under these conditions. In this Letter, we report the products of reacting ions such as NO(+), NH4(+), NO3(-), and O2(-) with vaporized aprotic ionic liquids in their intact ion pair form. Ion pair fragmentation to the cation or anion as well as ion exchange and ion addition processes are observed by selected-ion flow tube mass spectrometry. Free energies of the reactions involving 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis-trifluoromethylsulfonylimide determined by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations indicate that ion exchange or ion addition are energetically more favorable than charge-transfer processes, whereas charge-transfer processes can be important in reactions involving 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide.

  4. Inclusive inelastic scattering of heavy ions and nuclear correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations of inclusive inelastic scattering distributions for heavy ion collisions are considered within the high energy optical model. Using ground state sum rules, the inclusive projectile and complete projectile-target inelastic angular distributions are treated in both independent particle and correlated nuclear models. Comparisons between the models introduced are made for alpha particles colliding with He-4, C-12, and O-16 targets and protons colliding with O-16. Results indicate that correlations contribute significantly, at small momentum transfers, to the inelastic sum. Correlation effects are hidden, however, when total scattering distributions are considered because of the dominance of elastic scattering at small momentum transfers.

  5. Mass spectrometry. [in organic ion and biorganic chemistry and medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Cox, R. E.; Derrick, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Review of the present status of mass spectrometry in the light of pertinent recent publications spanning the period from December 1971 to January 1974. Following an initial survey of techniques, instruments, and computer applications, a sharp distinction is made between the chemistry of organic (radical-)ions and analytical applications in biorganic chemistry and medicine. The emphasis is on the chemistry of organic (radical-)ions at the expense of inorganic, organometallic, and surface ion chemistry. Biochemistry and medicine are chosen because of their contemporary importance and because of the stupendous contributions of mass spectroscopy to these fields in the past two years. In the review of gas-phase organic ion chemistry, special attention is given to studies making significant contributions to the understanding of ion chemistry.

  6. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Isomeric Disaccharide Precursor, Product and Cluster Ions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongli; Bendiak, Brad; Siems, William F.; Gang, David R.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE Carbohydrates are highly variable in structure owing to differences in their anomeric configurations, monomer stereochemistry, inter-residue linkage positions and general branching features. The separation of carbohydrate isomers poses a great challenge for current analytical techniques. METHODS The isomeric heterogeneity of disaccharide ions and monosaccharideglycolaldehyde product ions evaluated using electrospray traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (Synapt G2 high definition mass spectrometer) in both positive and negative ion modes investigation. RESULTS The separation of isomeric disaccharide ions was observed but not fully achieved based on their mobility profiles. The mobilities of isomeric product ions, the monosaccharide-glycolaldehydes, derived from different disaccharide isomers were measured. Multiple mobility peaks were observed for both monosaccharide-glycolaldehyde cations and anions, indicating that there was more than one structural configuration in the gas phase as verified by NMR in solution. More importantly, the mobility patterns for isomeric monosaccharide-glycolaldehyde product ions were different, which enabled partial characterization of their respective disaccharide ions. Abundant disaccharide cluster ions were also observed. The Results showed that a majority of isomeric cluster ions had different drift times and, moreover, more than one mobility peak was detected for a number of specific cluster ions. CONCLUSIONS It is demonstrated that ion mobility mass spectrometry is an advantageous method to assess the isomeric heterogeneity of carbohydrate compounds. It is capable of differentiating different types of carbohydrate ions having identical m/z values as well as multiple structural configurations of single compounds. PMID:24591031

  7. Tandem ion mobility spectrometry coupled to laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Anne-Laure; Choi, Chang Min; Clavier, Christian; Barbaire, Marc; Maurelli, Jacques; Dagany, Xavier; MacAleese, Luke; Dugourd, Philippe; Chirot, Fabien

    2015-09-15

    This manuscript describes a new experimental setup that allows to perform tandem ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurements and which is coupled to a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It consists of two 79 cm long drift tubes connected by a dual ion funnel assembly. The setup was built to permit laser irradiation of the ions in the transfer region between the two drift tubes. This geometry allows selecting ions according to their ion mobility in the first drift tube, to irradiate selected ions, and examine the ion mobility of the product ions in the second drift tube. Activation by collision is possible in the same region (between the two tubes) and between the second tube and the time-of-flight. IMS-IMS experiments on Ubiquitin are reported. We selected a given isomer of charge state +7 and explored its structural rearrangement following collisional activation between the two drift tubes. An example of IMS-laser-IMS experiment is reported on eosin Y, where laser irradiation was used to produce radical ions by electron photodetachment starting from doubly deprotonated species. This allowed measuring the collision cross section of the radical photo-product, which cannot be directly produced with an electrospray source.

  8. The role of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry in the analysis of protein reference standards.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Caroline; O'Connor, Gavin; Ashcroft, Alison E

    2013-08-06

    To achieve comparability of measurement results of protein amount of substance content between clinical laboratories, suitable reference materials are required. The impact on measurement comparability of potential differences in the tertiary and quaternary structure of protein reference standards is as yet not well understood. With the use of human growth hormone as a model protein, the potential of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry as a tool to assess differences in the structure of protein reference materials and their interactions with antibodies has been investigated here.

  9. Multiplexed Ion Mobility Spectrometry - Orthogonal Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, Mikhail E.; Buschbach, Michael A.; Prior, David C.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-03-15

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF) has shown significant promise for the characterization of complex biological mixtures. The enormous complexity of biological samples (e.g. from proteomics) and the need for both biological and technical analysis replicates imposes major challenges for multidimensional separation platforms in regard to both sensitivity and sample throughput. A major potential attraction of the IMS-TOF MS platform is separation speeds exceeding that of conventional condensed-phase separations by orders of magnitude. Known limitations of the IMS-TOF MS platforms that presently mitigate this attraction include the need for extensive signal averaging due to factors that include significant ion losses in the IMS-TOF interface and an ion utilization efficiency of less than ~1% with continuous ion sources (e.g. ESI). We have developed a new multiplexed ESI-IMS-TOF mass spectrometer that enables lossless ion transmission through the IMS-TOF as well as a utilization efficiency of >50% for ions from the ESI source. Initial results with a mixture of peptides show a ~10-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio with the multiplexed approach compared to a signal averaging approach, with no reduction in either IMS or TOF MS resolution.

  10. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) Data Archiving in the CAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I. S.; Barthe, A.; Penou, E.; Brunato, S.; Reme, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Blagau, A.; Facsko, G.; Kronberg, E.; Laakso, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Cluster Active Archive (CAA) aims at preserving the four Cluster spacecraft data, so that they are usable in the long-term by the scientific community as well as by the instrument team PIs and Co-Is. This implies that the data are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the four Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0 to 40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 sec) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. The CIS package consists of two different instruments, a Hot Ion Analyser (HIA) and a time-of-flight ion Composition Distribution Function (CODIF) analyser. For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CAA archival includes processed raw data (Level 1 data), moments of the ion distribution functions (Level 2 data), and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units (Level 3 data). The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions and 2-D pitch-angle distributions. In addition, a software package has been developed to allow the CAA user to interactively calculate partial or total moments of the ion distributions. Instrument cross-calibration has been an important activity in preparing the data for archival. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, and data caveats. In addition, data quality indexes are under preparation, to help the user. Given the complexity of an ion spectrometer, and the variety of its operational modes, each one being optimised for a different magnetospheric region or measurement objective, consultation of the data caveats by the end user will always be a necessary step in the data analysis.

  11. Review on Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Part 1: Current Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. All IMS instruments operate with an electric field that provides space separation, but some IMS instruments also operate with a drift gas flow which provides also a temporal separation. In this review we will summarize the current IMS instrumentation. IMS techniques have received an increased interest as new instrumentation has become available to be coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). For each of the eight types of IMS instruments reviewed it is mentioned whether they can be hyphenated with MS and whether they are commercially available. Finally, out of the described devices, the six most-consolidated ones are compared. The current review article is followed by a companion review article which details the IMS hyphenated techniques (mainly gas chromatography and mass spectrometry) and the factors that make the data from an IMS device change as function of device parameters and sampling conditions. These reviews will provide the reader with an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465076

  12. High Performance Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Hourglass Electrodynamic Funnel And Internal Ion Funnel

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2005-11-22

    A method and apparatus enabling increased sensitivity in ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry instruments which substantially reduces or eliminates the loss of ions in ion mobility spectrometer drift tubes utilizing a device for transmitting ions from an ion source which allows the transmission of ions without significant delay to an hourglass electrodynamic ion funnel at the entrance to the drift tube and/or an internal ion funnel at the exit of the drift tube. An hourglass electrodynamic funnel is formed of at least an entry element, a center element, and an exit element, wherein the aperture of the center element is smaller than the aperture of the entry element and the aperture of the exit elements. Ions generated in a relatively high pressure region by an ion source at the exterior of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel are transmitted to a relatively low pressure region at the entrance of the hourglass funnel through a conductance limiting orifice. Alternating and direct electrical potentials are applied to the elements of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby drawing ions into and through the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby introducing relatively large quantities of ions into the drift tube while maintaining the gas pressure and composition at the interior of the drift tube as distinct from those at the entrance of the electrodynamic funnel and allowing a positive gas pressure to be maintained within the drift tube, if desired. An internal ion funnel is provided within the drift tube and is positioned at the exit of said drift tube. The advantage of the internal ion funnel is that ions that are dispersed away from the exit aperture within the drift tube, such as those that are typically lost in conventional drift tubes to any subsequent analysis or measurement, are instead directed through the exit of the drift tube, vastly increasing the amount of ions exiting the drift tube.

  13. Ion/Neutral, Ion/Electron, Ion/Photon, and Ion/Ion Interactions in Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Do we need them all? Are they enough?

    PubMed Central

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Mentinova, Marija

    2011-01-01

    A range of strategies and tools has been developed to facilitate the determination of primary structures of analyte molecules of interest via tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The two main factors that determine the primary structural information present in an MS/MS spectrum are the type of ion generated from the analyte molecule and the dissociation method. The ion-type subjected to dissociation is determined by the ionization method/conditions and ion transformation processes that might take place after initial gas-phase ion formation. Furthermore, the range of analyte-related ion types can be expanded via derivatization reactions prior to mass spectrometry. Dissociation methods include those that simply alter the population of internal states of the mass-selected ion (i.e., activation methods like collision-induced dissociation) as well as processes that rely on transformation of the ion-type prior to dissociation (e.g., electron capture dissociation). A variety of ionic interactions has been studied for the purpose of ion dissociation and ion transformation that include ion/neutral, ion/photon, ion/electron, and ion/ion interactions. A wide range of phenomena has been observed, many of which have been explored/developed as means for structural analysis. The techniques arising from these phenomena are discussed within the context of the elements of structure determination in tandem mass spectrometry, viz., ion-type definition and dissociation. Unique aspects of the various ion interactions are emphasized along with any barriers to widespread implementation. PMID:21472539

  14. Desalting protein ions in native mass spectrometry using supercharging reagents.

    PubMed

    Cassou, Catherine A; Williams, Evan R

    2014-10-07

    Effects of the supercharging reagents m-NBA and sulfolane on sodium ion adduction to protein ions formed using native mass spectrometry were investigated. There is extensive sodium adduction on protein ions formed by electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions containing millimolar concentrations of NaCl, which can lower sensitivity by distributing the signal of a given charge state over multiple adducted ions and can reduce mass measuring accuracy for large proteins and non-covalent complexes for which individual adducts cannot be resolved. The average number of sodium ions adducted to the most abundant ion formed from ten small (8.6-29 kDa) proteins for which adducts can be resolved is reduced by 58% or 80% on average, respectively, when 1.5% m-NBA or 2.5% sulfolane are added to aqueous solutions containing sodium compared to without the supercharging reagent. Sulfolane is more effective than m-NBA at reducing sodium ion adduction and at preserving non-covalent protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions. Desalting with 2.5% sulfolane enables detection of several glycosylated forms of 79.7 kDa holo-transferrin and NADH bound to the 146 kDa homotetramer LDH, which are otherwise unresolved due to peak broadening from extensive sodium adduction. Although sulfolane is more effective than m-NBA at protein ion desalting, m-NBA reduces salt clusters at high m/z and can increase the signal-to-noise ratios of protein ions by reducing chemical noise. Desalting is likely a result of these supercharging reagents binding sodium ions in solution, thereby reducing the sodium available to adduct to protein ions.

  15. Interpreting electron transmission spectroscopy and negative ion mass spectrometry data using a spherical potential well model

    SciTech Connect

    Asfandiarov, N. L. Nafikova, E. P.; Pshenichnyuk, S. A.

    2007-03-15

    Experimental data obtained using electron transmission spectroscopy and negative ion mass spectrometry based on resonance electron capture are interpreted within the framework of a spherical potential well model in application to a series of chloro-and bromoalkane molecules. Allowance for the scattering of a single partial p-wave of the incoming electron makes possible (i) reproduction of the ratio of a resonance peak width to the electron energy observed in the electron transmission spectra and (ii) establishment of a relation between the total cross section of electron scattering on a molecule and the dissociative electron attachment cross section. The proposed model offers a radical simplification of the approach developed previously based on the Fashbach-Fano resonance theory.

  16. Calculation of anomalous scattering for ions and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Pratt, R. H.; Roy, S. C.; Kissel, Lynn

    1990-04-01

    The anomalous scattering factors g', g" for forward scattering are generated for neutral Ne and for Ne 2+, 4+, 6+ and 7+ ions, utilizing a dispersion relation integration method, for photon energies from 1 to 70 keV. Photoionization cross sections (i.e., g") above threshold are calculated in the relativistic Hartree-Slater potential; the code of Cromer and Liberman [1] is used to obtained the corresponding bound-free contribution to g' from g". However it is found that the contribution from bound-bound transitions to g' is much more important for ions than for the neutral atom. The primary reason is that in ions there are more inner-shell vacancies for which bound-bound transitions are allowed. Near the K threshold the major bound-bound transition for the neutral neon atom is 1s → 3p, whose oscillator strength is about ten times less than that of 1s → 2p transition which is allowed in neon ions. With the contribution from the major bound-bound transitions included in g', the Rayleigh scattering cross sections obtained in this way agree well with results of direct S-matrix calculations [2].

  17. Online deuterium hydrogen exchange and protein digestion coupled with ion mobility spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Arndt, James R; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-05-19

    Online deuterium hydrogen exchange (DHX) and pepsin digestion (PD) is demonstrated using drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) coupled with linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometry (MS) with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) capabilities. DHX of deuterated ubiquitin, followed by subsequent quenching and digestion, is performed within ∼60 s, yielding 100% peptide sequence coverage. The high reproducibility of the IMS separation allows spectral feature matching between two-dimensional IMS-MS datasets (undeuterated and deuterated) without the need for dataset alignment. Extracted ion drift time distributions (XIDTDs) of deuterated peptic peptides are mobility-matched to corresponding XIDTDs of undeuterated peptic peptides that were identified using collision-induced dissociation (CID). Matching XIDTDs allows a straightforward identification and deuterium retention evaluation for labeled peptides. Aside from the mobility separation, the ion trapping capabilities of the LTQ, combined with ETD, are demonstrated to provide single-residue resolution. Deuterium retention for the c- series ions across residues M(1)-L(15) and N(25)-R(42) are in good agreement with the known secondary structural elements within ubiquitin.

  18. Determination of ammonia in ethylene using ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. H.; Limero, T. F.; Lane, J. L.; Wang, F.

    1997-01-01

    A simple procedure to analyze ammonia in ethylene by ion mobility spectrometry is described. The spectrometer is operated with a silane polymer membrane., 63Ni ion source, H+ (H2O)n reactant ion, and nitrogen drift and source gas. Ethylene containing parts per billion (ppb) (v/v) concentrations of ammonia is pulled across the membrane and diffuses into the spectrometer. Preconcentration or preseparation is unnecessary, because the ethylene in the spectrometer has no noticeable effect on the analytical results. Ethylene does not polymerize in the radioactive source. Ethylene's flammability is negated by the nitrogen inside the spectrometer. Response to ammonia concentrations between 200 ppb and 1.5 ppm is near linear, and a detection limit of 25 ppb is calculated.

  19. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, J.; Hahm, H. S.; Seeberger, P. H.; Pagel, K.

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  20. Effects of Angular Scattering on Ion Velocity Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huihui; Sukhomlinov, Vladimir; Kaganovich, Igor; Mustafaev, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    An approximation model for total elastic and charge exchange ion-atom angular differential scattering cross sections is developed for simulations of the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF), which is validated by the experiment data of mobility and diffusion. IVDFs are simulated using the developed model and compared with recently published experimental data. The IVDFs obtained with this model are compared to that from two other conventional models of less accurate differential cross sections. The simulation results show the necessity to take into account the accurate differential cross sections, especially for strong E/ N. The study reveals that IVDF cannot be separated into product of two independent IVDFs in the transverse and parallel to the electric field directions due to the significant effect of scattering.

  1. Metabolic profiling of Escherichia coli by ion mobility-mass spectrometry with MALDI ion source.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Prabha; Puzon, Geoffery; Tam, Maggie; Langlais, Denis; Jackson, Shelley; Kaplan, Kimberly; Siems, William F; Schultz, Albert J; Xun, Luying; Woods, Amina; Hill, Herbert H

    2010-12-01

    Comprehensive metabolome analysis using mass spectrometry (MS) often results in a complex mass spectrum and difficult data analysis resulting from the signals of numerous small molecules in the metabolome. In addition, MS alone has difficulty measuring isobars and chiral, conformational and structural isomers. When a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) source is added, the difficulty and complexity are further increased. Signal interference between analyte signals and matrix ion signals produced by MALDI in the low mass region (<1500 Da) cause detection and/or identification of metabolites difficult by MS alone. However, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with MS (IM-MS) provides a rapid analytical tool for measuring subtle structural differences in chemicals. IMS separates gas-phase ions based on their size-to-charge ratio. This study, for the first time, reports the application of MALDI to the measurement of small molecules in a biological matrix by ion mobility-time of flight mass spectrometry (IM-TOFMS) and demonstrates the advantage of ion-signal dispersion in the second dimension. Qualitative comparisons between metabolic profiling of the Escherichia coli metabolome by MALDI-TOFMS, MALDI-IM-TOFMS and electrospray ionization (ESI)-IM-TOFMS are reported. Results demonstrate that mobility separation prior to mass analysis increases peak-capacity through added dimensionality in measurement. Mobility separation also allows detection of metabolites in the matrix-ion dominated low-mass range (m/z < 1500 Da) by separating matrix signals from non-matrix signals in mobility space.

  2. High-Performance Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Hourglass Electrodynamic Funnel And Internal Ion Funnel

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2004-11-16

    A method and apparatus enabling increased sensitivity in ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry instruments which substantially reduces or eliminates the loss of ions in ion mobility spectrometer drift tubes utilizing an hourglass electrodynamic ion funnel at the entrance to the drift tube and/or an internal ion funnel at the exit of the drift tube. An hourglass electrodynamic funnel is formed of at least an entry element, a center element, and an exit element, wherein the aperture of the center element is smaller than the aperture of the entry element and the aperture of the exit elements. Ions generated in a relatively high pressure region by an ion source at the exterior of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel are transmitted to a relatively low pressure region at the entrance of the hourglass funnel through a conductance limiting orifice. Alternating and direct electrical potentials are applied to the elements of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby drawing ions into and through the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby introducing relatively large quantities of ions into the drift tube while maintaining the gas pressure and composition at the interior of the drift tube as distinct from those at the entrance of the electrodynamic funnel and allowing a positive gas pressure to be maintained within the drift tube, if desired. An internal ion funnel is provided within the drift tube and is positioned at the exit of said drift tube. The advantage of the internal ion funnel is that ions that are dispersed away from the exit aperture within the drift tube, such as those that are typically lost in conventional drift tubes to any subsequent analysis or measurement, are instead directed through the exit of the drift tube, vastly increasing the amount of ions exiting the drift tube.

  3. Ion mobility spectrometry for pharmacokinetic studies – exemplary application

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, V.

    2013-01-01

    Breath analysis is an attractive non-invasive method for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring. It uses endogenously produced compounds and metabolites of isotopically labelled precursors. In order to make such tests clinically useful, it is important to have relatively small portable instruments detecting volatile compounds within short time. A particularly promising analytical technique is ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to a multicapillary column (MCC). The present paper focuses on demonstrating the suitability of breath analysis for pharmacokinetic applications using MCC-IMS with respect to practicability and reproducibility testing the model substrate eucalyptol. Validation of the MCC-IMS measurements were performed using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and resulted in an excellent correspondence of the time-dependent concentrations presented by the two different analytical techniques. Moreover, the good accordance in variance of kinetic parameters with repeated measures, and the determined inter-subject differences indicate the eligibility of the analysis method. PMID:24287589

  4. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Renal Cell Carcinoma with Electrospray Droplet Ion Beams

    PubMed Central

    Ninomiya, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Chen, Lee Chuin; Takeda, Sen; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2017-01-01

    Tissue samples from renal cell carcinoma patients were analyzed by electrospray droplet ion beam-induced secondary ion mass spectrometry (EDI/SIMS). Positively- and negatively-charged secondary ions were measured for the cancerous and noncancerous regions of the tissue samples. Although specific cancerous species could not be found in both the positive and negative secondary ion spectra, the spectra of the cancerous and noncancerous tissues presented different trends. For instance, in the m/z range of 500–800 of the positive secondary ion spectra for the cancerous tissues, the intensities for several m/z values were lower than those of the m/z+2 peaks (indicating one double bond loss for the species), whereas, for the noncancerous tissues, the inverse trend was obtained. The tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was also performed on the tissue samples using probe electrospray ionization (PESI), and some molecular ions produced by PESI were found to be fragmented into the ions observed in EDI/SIMS analysis. When the positive secondary ion spectra produced by EDI/SIMS were analyzed by principal component analysis, the results for cancerous and noncancerous tissues were separated. The EDI/SIMS method can be applied to distinguish between a cancerous and a noncancerous area with high probability. PMID:28149705

  5. Gas phase ion chemistry of an ion mobility spectrometry based explosive trace detector elucidated by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kozole, Joseph; Levine, Lauren A; Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Stairs, Jason R

    2015-08-01

    The gas phase ion chemistry for an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) based explosive detector has been elucidated using tandem mass spectrometry. The IMS system, which is operated with hexachloroethane and isobutyramide reagent gases and an ion shutter type gating scheme, is connected to the atmospheric pressure interface of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS/MS). Product ion masses, daughter ion masses, and reduced mobility values for a collection of nitro, nitrate, and peroxide explosives measured with the IMS/MS/MS instrument are reported. The mass and mobility data together with targeted isotopic labeling experiments and information about sample composition and reaction environment are leveraged to propose molecular formulas, structures, and ionization pathways for the various product ions. The major product ions are identified as [DNT-H](-) for DNT, [TNT-H](-) for TNT, [RDX+Cl](-) and [RDX+NO2](-) for RDX, [HMX+Cl](-) and [HMX+NO2](-) for HMX, [NO3](-) for EGDN, [NG+Cl](-) and [NG+NO3](-) for NG, [PETN+Cl](-) and [PETN+NO3](-) for PETN, [HNO3+NO3](-) for NH4NO3, [NO2](-) for DMNB, [HMTD-NC3H6O3+H+Cl](-) and [HMTD+H-CH2O-H2O2](+) for HMTD, and [(CH3)3CO2](+) for TATP. In general, the product ions identified for the IMS system studied here are consistent with the product ions reported previously for an ion trap mobility spectrometer (ITMS) based explosive trace detector, which is operated with dichloromethane and ammonia reagent gases and an ion trap type gating scheme. Differences between the explosive trace detectors include the [NG+Cl](-) and [PETN+Cl](-) product ions being major ions in the IMS system compared to minor ions in the ITMS system as well as the major product ion for TATP being [(CH3)3CO2](+) for the IMS system and [(CH3)2CNH2](+) for the ITMS system.

  6. External Second Gate-Fourier Transform Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, Edward E., III

    2005-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is recognized as one of the most sensitive and versatile techniques for the detection of trace levels of organic vapors. IMS is widely used for detecting contraband narcotics, explosives, toxic industrial compounds and chemical warfare agents. Increasing threat of terrorist attacks, the proliferation of narcotics, Chemical Weapons Convention treaty verification as well as humanitarian de-mining efforts has mandated that equal importance be placed on the analysis time as well as the quality of the analytical data. (1) IMS is unrivaled when both speed of response and sensitivity has to be considered. (2) With conventional (signal averaging) IMS systems the number of available ions contributing to the measured signal to less than 1%. Furthermore, the signal averaging process incorporates scan-to-scan variations decreasing resolution. With external second gate Fourier Transform ion mobility spectrometry (FT-IMS), the entrance gate frequency is variable and can be altered in conjunction with other data acquisition parameters to increase the spectral resolution. The FT-IMS entrance gate operates with a 50% duty cycle and so affords a 7 to 10-fold increase in sensitivity. Recent data on high explosives are presented to demonstrate the parametric optimization in sensitivity and resolution of our system.

  7. Buffer Gas Modifiers Effect Resolution in Ion Mobility Spectrometry through Selective Ion-Molecule Clustering Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Wu, Ching; Hill, Herbert H.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE When polar molecules (modifiers) are introduced into the buffer gas of an ion mobility spectrometer, most ion mobilities decrease due to the formation of ion-modifier clusters. METHODS We used ethyl lactate, nitrobenzene, 2-butanol, and tetrahydrofuran-2-carbonitrile as buffer gas modifiers and electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to quadrupole mass spectrometry. Ethyl lactate, nitrobenzene, and tetrahydrofuran-2-carbonitrile had not been tested as buffer gas modifiers and 2-butanol had not been used with basic amino acids. RESULTS The ion mobilities of several diamines (arginine, histidine, lysine, and atenolol) were not affected or only slightly reduced when these modifiers were introduced into the buffer gas (3.4% average reduction in an analyte's mobility for the three modifiers). Intramolecular bridges caused limited change in the ion mobilities of diamines when modifiers were added to the buffer gas; these bridges hindered the attachment of modifier molecules to the positive charge of ions and delocalized the charge, which deterred clustering. There was also a tendency towards large changes in ion mobility when the mass of the analyte decreased; ethanolamine, the smallest compound tested, had the largest reduction in ion mobility with the introduction of modifiers into the buffer gas (61%). These differences in mobilities, together with the lack of shift in bridge-forming ions, were used to separate ions that overlapped in IMS, such as isoleucine and lysine, and arginine and phenylalanine, and made possible the prediction of separation or not of overlapping ions. CONCLUSIONS The introduction of modifiers into the buffer gas in IMS can selectively alter the mobilities of analytes to aid in compound identification and/or enable the separation of overlapping analyte peaks. PMID:22956312

  8. Gold Ion-Angiotensin Peptide Interaction by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jenny; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P.; Gupta, Shalini; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Lee, Bao-Shiang

    2012-05-01

    Stimulated by the interest in developing gold compounds for treating cancer, gold ion-angiotensin peptide interactions are investigated by mass spectrometry. Under the experimental conditions used, the majority of gold ion-angiotensin peptide complexes contain gold in the oxidation states I and III. Both ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF MS detect singly/multiply charged ions for mononuclear/multinuclear gold-attached peptides, which are represented as [peptide + a Au(I) + b Au(III) + (e - a -3b) H]e+, where a,b ≥ 0 and e is charge. ESI-MS data shows singly/multiply charged ions of Au(I)-peptide and Au(III)-peptide complexes. This study reveals that MALDI-TOF MS mainly detects singly charged Au(I)-peptide complexes, presumably due to the ionization process. The electrons in the MALDI plume seem to efficiently reduce Au(III) to Au(I). MALDI also tends to enhance the higher polymeric forms of gold-peptide complexes regardless of the laser power used. Collision-induced dissociation experiments of the mononuclear and dinuclear gold-attached peptide ions for angiotensin peptides show that the gold ion (a soft acid) binding sites are in the vicinity of Cys (a soft ligand), His (a major anchor of peptide for metal ion chelation), and the basic residue Arg. Data also suggests that the abundance of gold-attached peptides increases with higher gold concentration until saturation, after which an increase in gold ion concentration leads to the aggregation and/or precipitation of gold-bound peptides.

  9. Characterization of Membrane Protein-Lipid Interactions by Mass Spectrometry Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Cong, Xiao; Liu, Wen; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-12-01

    Lipids in the biological membrane can modulate the structure and function of integral and peripheral membrane proteins. Distinguishing individual lipids that bind selectively to membrane protein complexes from an ensemble of lipid-bound species remains a daunting task. Recently, ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has proven to be invaluable for interrogating the interactions between protein and individual lipids, where the complex undergoes collision induced unfolding followed by quantification of the unfolding pathway to assess the effect of these interactions. However, gas-phase unfolding experiments for membrane proteins are typically performed on the entire ensemble (apo and lipid bound species), raising uncertainty to the contribution of individual lipids and the species that are ejected in the unfolding process. Here, we describe the application of mass spectrometry ion mobility mass spectrometry (MS-IM-MS) for isolating ions corresponding to lipid-bound states of a model integral membrane protein, ammonia channel (AmtB) from Escherichia coli. Free of ensemble effects, MS-IM-MS reveals that bound lipids are ejected as neutral species; however, no correlation was found between the lipid-induced stabilization of complex and their equilibrium binding constants. In comparison to data obtained by IM-MS, there are surprisingly limited differences in stability measurements from IM-MS and MS-IM-MS. The approach described here to isolate ions of membrane protein complexes will be useful for other MS methods, such as surface induced dissociation or collision induced dissociation to determine the stoichiometry of hetero-oligomeric membrane protein complexes.

  10. Dynamic Reactive Ionization with Cluster Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hua; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-02-01

    Gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) have been tuned to enhance secondary ion yields by doping small gas molecules such as CH4, CO2, and O2 into an Ar cluster projectile, Arn + ( n = 1000-10,000) to form a mixed cluster. The `tailored beam' has the potential to expand the application of secondary ion mass spectrometry for two- and three-dimensional molecular specific imaging. Here, we examine the possibility of further enhancing the ionization by doping HCl into the Ar cluster. Water deposited on the target surface facilitates the dissociation of HCl. This concerted effect, occurring only at the impact site of the cluster, arises since the HCl is chemically induced to ionize to H+ and Cl- , allowing improved protonation of neutral molecular species. This hypothesis is confirmed by depth profiling through a trehalose thin film exposed to D2O vapor, resulting in ~20-fold increase in protonated molecules. The results show that it is possible to dynamically maintain optimum ionization conditions during depth profiling by proper adjustment of the water vapor pressure. H-D exchange in the trehalose molecule M was monitored upon deposition of D2O on the target surface, leading to the observation of [Mn* + H]+ or [Mn* + D]+ ions, where n = 1-8 hydrogen atoms in the trehalose molecule M have been replaced by deuterium. In general, we discuss the role of surface chemistry and dynamic reactive ionization of organic molecules in increasing the secondary ion yield.

  11. Molecular secondary ion mass spectrometry: New dimensions in chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, Richard J.; Campana, Joseph E.; Kidwell, David A.; Ross, Mark M.; Wyatt, Jeffrey R.

    1985-04-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has become a diverse tool for the study of many substances other than metals and semiconductors. This paper discusses the emission of polyatomic and molecular ions from surfaces that contain various inorganic and organic compounds including polymers and biomolecules. The mass and abundance distribution of cluster ions emitted from various solids — Van der Waals, metallic, ionic and covalent — are compared. Trends in the emission patterns are discussed in terms of a recombination or direct emission mechanism. The emission of molecular ions is also discussed with respect to the method of ionization and the various sample preparation and matrix-assisted procedures used. The matrices include various solid-state and liquid matrices such as ammonium chloride, charcoal, glycerol and gallium. Various chemical derivatization procedures have been developed to enhance the sensitivity of molecular SIMS and to detect selectively components in mixtures. The procedures are demonstrated for the low-level detection of airborne contaminants from paints, for the analysis of drugs in biological fluids, and for the sequencing of biomolecules such as peptides and sugars. The emission of characteristic fragment ions from the surfaces of polymers is also described for thick, insulating films.

  12. Dynamic Reactive Ionization with Cluster Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) have been tuned to enhance secondary ion yields by doping small gas molecules such as CH4, CO2, and O2 into an Ar cluster projectile, Arn+ (n = 1000–10,000) to form a mixed cluster. The ‘tailored beam’ has the potential to expand the application of secondary ion mass spectrometry for two- and three-dimensional molecular specific imaging. Here, we examine the possibility of further enhancing the ionization by doping HCl into the Ar cluster. Water deposited on the target surface facilitates the dissociation of HCl. This concerted effect, occurring only at the impact site of the cluster, arises since the HCl is chemically induced to ionize to H+ and Cl−, allowing improved protonation of neutral molecular species. This hypothesis is confirmed by depth profiling through a trehalose thin film exposed to D2O vapor, resulting in ~20-fold increase in protonated molecules. The results show that it is possible to dynamically maintain optimum ionization conditions during depth profiling by proper adjustment of the water vapor pressure. Protonation and H–D exchange in the trehalose molecule M was monitored upon deposition of D2O on the target surface, leading to the observation of [Mn* + H]+ or [Mn* + D]+ ions, where n = 1–8 hydrogen atoms in the trehalose molecule M have been replaced by deuterium. In general, we discuss the role of surface chemistry and dynamic reactive ionization of organic molecules in increasing the secondary ion yield. PMID:26463238

  13. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here may contribute to elucidating some physiological processes occurring in the human skin. PMID:23217311

  14. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles.

    PubMed

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-12-12

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here may contribute to elucidating some physiological processes occurring in the human skin.

  15. Stimulated Brillouin scatter and stimulated ion Bernstein scatter during electron gyroharmonic heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, H.; Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Samimi, A.; Mahmoudian, A.; Briczinski, S. J.; McCarrick, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    Results of secondary radiation, Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE), produced during ionospheric modification experiments using ground-based high-power radio waves are reported. These results obtained at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility specifically considered the generation of Magnetized Stimulated Brillouin Scatter (MSBS) and Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter (SIBS) lines in the SEE spectrum when the transmitter frequency is near harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency. The heater antenna beam angle effect was investigated on MSBS in detail and shows a new spectral line postulated to be generated near the upper hybrid resonance region due to ion acoustic wave interaction. Frequency sweeping experiments near the electron gyroharmonics show for the first time the transition from MSBS to SIBS lines as the heater pump frequency approaches the gyroharmonic. Significantly far from the gyroharmonic, MSBS lines dominate, while close to the gyroharmonic, SIBS lines strengthen while MSBS lines weaken. New possibilities for diagnostic information are discussed in light of these new observations.

  16. Enhancing glycan isomer separations with metal ions and positive and negative polarity ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xueyun; Zhang, Xing; Schocker, Nathaniel S.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Orton, Daniel J.; Khamsi, Jamal; Ashmus, Roger A.; Almeida, Igor C.; Tang, Keqi; Costello, Catherine E.; Smith, Richard D.; Michael, Katja; Baker, Erin S.

    2016-09-07

    Glycomics has become an increasingly important field of research since glycans play critical roles in biology processes ranging from molecular recognition and signaling to cellular communication. Glycans often conjugate with other biomolecules such as proteins and lipids, and alter their properties and functions, so understanding the effect glycans have on cellular systems is essential. However the analysis of glycans is extremely difficult due to their complexity and structural diversity (i.e., the number and identity of monomer units, and configuration of their glycosidic linkages and connectivities). In this work, we coupled ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to characterize glycan standards and biologically important isomers of synthetic αGal-containing O-glycans including glycotopes of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. IMS-MS results showed significant differences for the glycan structural isomers when analyzed in positive and negative polarity and complexed with different metal cations. These results suggest specific metal ions or ion polarities could be used to target and baseline separate glycan isomers of interest with IMS-MS.

  17. Uncovering biologically significant lipid isomers with liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, Jennifer E.; Zhang, Xing; Weitz, Karl K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; Polyak, Stephen J.; Metz, Thomas O.; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Smith, Richard D.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how biological molecules are generated, metabolized and eliminated in living systems is important for interpreting processes such as immune response and disease pathology. While genomic and proteomic studies have provided vast amounts of information over the last several decades, interest in lipidomics has also grown due to improved analytical technologies revealing altered lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes, cancer, and lipid storage disease. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for characterizing the lipidome by providing detailed information on the spatial and temporal composition of lipids. However, interpreting lipids’ biological roles is challenging due to the existence of numerous structural and stereoisomers (i.e. distinct acyl chain and double-bond positions), which are unresolvable using present LC-MS approaches. Here we show that combining structurally-based ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with LC-MS measurements distinguishes lipid isomers and allows insight into biological and disease processes.

  18. Uncovering Biologically Significant Lipid Isomers with Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kyle, Jennifer E.; Zhang, Xing; Weitz, Karl K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; Polyak, Stephen J.; Metz, Thomas O.; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Smith, Richard D.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how biological molecules are generated, metabolized and eliminated in living systems is important for interpreting processes such as immune response and disease pathology. While genomic and proteomic studies have provided vast amounts of information over the last several decades, interest in lipidomics has also grown due to improved analytical technologies revealing altered lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes, cancer, and lipid storage disease. Mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for characterizing the lipidome by providing detailed information on the spatial and temporal composition of lipids. However, interpreting lipids’ biological roles is challenging due to the existence of numerous structural and stereoisomers (i.e. distinct acyl chain and double-bond positions), which are often unresolvable using present approaches. Here we show that combining liquid chromatography (LC) and structurally-based ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurement with MS analyses distinguishes lipid isomers and allows insight into biological and disease processes. PMID:26734689

  19. Fast Screening of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons using Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry - Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, A.; Benigni, P.; Hernandez, D. R.; DeBord, J. D.; Ridgeway, M. E.; Park, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we showed the advantages of trapped ion mobility spectrometry coupled too mass spectrometry (TIMS-MS) combined with theoretical calculations for fast identification (millisecond timescale) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) compounds from complex mixtures. Accurate PAH collision cross sections (CCS, in nitrogen as a bath gas) are reported for the most commonly encountered PAH compounds and the ability to separate PAH geometric isomers is shown for three isobaric pairs with mobility resolution exceeding 150 (3–5 times higher than conventional IMS devices). Theoretical candidate structures (optimized at the DFT/B3LYP level) are proposed for the most commonly encountered PAH compounds showing good agreement with the experimental CCS values (<5%). The potential of TIMS-MS for the separation and identification of PAH compounds from complex mixtures without the need of lengthy pre-separation steps is illustrated for the case of a complex soil mixture. PMID:25558291

  20. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with transmission of energetic primary cluster ions through foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, K.; Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Matoba, S.; Narumi, K.

    2014-03-15

    We developed time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry that provides informative SI ion mass spectra without needing a sophisticated ion beam pulsing system. In the newly developed spectrometry, energetic large cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater are used as primary ions. Because their impacts on the target surface produce high yields of SIs, the resulting SI mass spectra are informative. In addition, the start signals necessary for timing information on primary ion incidence are provided by the detection signals of particles emitted from the rear surface of foil targets upon transmission of the primary ions. This configuration allows us to obtain positive and negative TOF SI mass spectra without pulsing system, which requires precise control of the primary ions to give the spectra with good mass resolution. We also successfully applied the TOF SI mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impacts to the chemical structure characterization of organic thin film targets.

  1. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E.; Yevdokimov, Alexander V.; Smith, James L.; Oxley, Jimmie C.

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression.

  2. Acetonitrile Ion Suppression in Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Colizza, Kevin; Mahoney, Keira E; Yevdokimov, Alexander V; Smith, James L; Oxley, Jimmie C

    2016-11-01

    Efforts to analyze trace levels of cyclic peroxides by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry gave evidence that acetonitrile suppressed ion formation. Further investigations extended this discovery to ketones, linear peroxides, esters, and possibly many other types of compounds, including triazole and menadione. Direct ionization suppression caused by acetonitrile was observed for multiple adduct types in both electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization. The addition of only 2% acetonitrile significantly decreased the sensitivity of analyte response. Efforts to identify the mechanism were made using various nitriles. The ion suppression was reduced by substitution of an acetonitrile hydrogen with an electron-withdrawing group, but was exacerbated by electron-donating or steric groups adjacent to the nitrile. Although current theory does not explain this phenomenon, we propose that polar interactions between the various functionalities and the nitrile may be forming neutral aggregates that manifest as ionization suppression. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. 1992 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  4. Surface structure and electron density dependence of scattered Ne + ion fractions from the Si(1 0 0)-(2×1) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaquila, I.; Lui, K. M.; Rabalais, J. W.; Wolfgang, J.; Nordlander, P.

    2001-01-01

    The magnitudes and azimuthal anisotropies of 4 keV Ne + scattered ion fractions from the Si(1 0 0)-(2×1) two-domain surface have been measured by means of time-of-flight scattering and recoiling spectrometry. The absolute values of these ion fractions as well as their dependence on surface structure and electron density have been determined. By investigating the trajectories of the scattered Ne +, a clear correlation is demonstrated between these experimentally observed surviving ion fractions of Ne + and the fraction of ions that scatters from the topmost layer of the surface. This is interpreted in terms of a model in which the neutralization probability of Ne + is proportional to the local substrate electronic charge density.

  5. Analysis of VX on soil particles using ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Groenewold, G S; Appelhans, A D; Gresham, G L; Olson, J E; Jeffery, M; Wright, J B

    1999-07-01

    The direct detection of the nerve agent VX (methylphosphonothioic acid, S-[2-[bis(1-methylethyl)amino]ethyl] O-ethyl ester) on milligram quantities of soil particles has been achieved using ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometry (IT-SIMS). VX is highly adsorptive toward a wide variety of surfaces; this attribute makes detection using gas-phase approaches difficult but renders the compound very amenable to surface detection. An ion trap mass spectrometer, modified to perform SIMS, was employed in the present study. A primary ion beam (ReO4-) was fired on axis through the ion trap, where it impacted the soil particle samples. [VX + H]+, [VX + H]+ fragment ions, and ions from the chemical background were sputtered into the gas-phase environment of the ion trap, where they were either scanned out or isolated and fragmented (MS2). At a surface concentration of 0.4 monolayer, intact [VX + H]+, and its fragment ions, were readily observable above background. However, at lower concentrations, the secondary ion signal from VX became obscured by ions derived from the chemical background on the surface of the soil particles. MS2 analysis using the ion trap was employed to improve detection of lower concentrations of VX: detection of the 34S isotopic ion of [VX + H]+, present at a surface concentration of approximately 0.002 monolayer, was accomplished. The study afforded the opportunity to investigate the fragmentation chemistry of VX. Semiempirical calculations suggest strongly that the molecule is protonated at the N atom. Deuterium labeling showed that formation of the base peak ion (C2H4)N(i-C3H7)2+ involves transfer of the amino proton to the phosphonothioate moiety prior to, or concurrent with, C-S bond cleavage. To manage the risk associated with working with the compound, the vacuum unit of the IT-SIMS was located in a hood, connected by cables to the externally located electronics and computer.

  6. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is directed to a target inside a chamber evacuated to ~15 Pa causing desorption of molecules from the target's surface. The desorbed molecules are ionized by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp (filled with xenon, major wavelength at 148 nm). The resulting ions are stored and detected in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap modified from a Finnigan Mat LCQ mass spectrometer operated at a pressure of ≥ 0.004 Pa. The limit of detection for desorbed coronene molecules is 1.5 pmol, which is about two orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry using a fluorine excimer laser (157 nm) as the ionization source. The mass spectrum of four standard aromatic compounds (pyrene, coronene, rubrene and 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (OPC)) shows that parent ions dominate. By increasing the infrared laser power, this instrument is capable of detecting inorganic compounds.

  7. Monitoring Trace Contaminants in Air Via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Karr, Dane; Pearson, Richard; Valero, Gustavo; Wong, Carla

    1995-01-01

    Recent passage of the Clean Air Act with its stricter regulation of toxic gas emissions, and the ever-growing number of applications which require faster turnaround times between sampling and analysis are two major factors which are helping to drive the development of new instrument technologies for in-situ, on-line, real-time monitoring. The ion trap, with its small size, excellent sensitivity, and tandem mass spectrometry capability is a rapidly evolving technology which is well-suited for these applications. In this paper, we describe the use of a commercial ion trap instrument for monitoring trace levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. A number of sample introduction devices including a direct transfer line interface, short column GC, and a cryotrapping interface are employed to achieve increasing levels of sensitivity. MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS methods are compared to illustrate trade-offs between sensitivity and selectivity. Filtered Noise Field (FNF) technology is found to be an excellent means for achieving lower detection limits through selective storage of the ion(s) of interest during ionization. Figures of merit including typical sample sizes, detection limits, and response times are provided. The results indicate the potential of these techniques for atmospheric assessments, the High Speed Research Program, and advanced life support monitoring applications for NASA.

  8. Strong intrabeam scattering in heavy ion and proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1985-01-01

    Intrabeam scattering is the scattering of the particles in the beam from each other through the Coulomb forces that act between each pair of particles. This causes the beam dimensions to grow both longitudinally and transversely. In strong intrabeam scattering, the beam dimensions may grow by several fold, and the accelerator aperture is large enough to contain the beam as it grows. The growth rates may be very large initially, but they quickly decrease as the beam increases in size. The growth of a beam of particles has been studied over long periods of time of the order of many hours, for a beam of gold ions and for a beam of protons, and as function of the beam energy. These studies revealed certain features of strong intrabeam scattering which are likely to have a general validity. Some simple general results were found to hold in the high energy limit which hold for ..gamma.. sufficiently above the transition energy, ..gamma..t. One result is the time invariant. (X/sub p/sigma/sub p/)/sup 2/ - sigma/sub x//sup 2/ = constant, where sigma/sub x/ is the rms betatron oscillation amplitude, sigma/sub p/ is the rms relative momentum, ..delta..p/p, and X/sub p/ is the horizontal dispersion. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Ion mobility spectrometry for food quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Vautz, W; Zimmermann, D; Hartmann, M; Baumbach, J I; Nolte, J; Jung, J

    2006-11-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry is known to be a fast and sensitive technique for the detection of trace substances, and it is increasingly in demand not only for protection against explosives and chemical warfare agents, but also for new applications in medical diagnosis or process control. Generally, a gas phase sample is ionized by help of ultraviolet light, ss-radiation or partial discharges. The ions move in a weak electrical field towards a detector. During their drift they collide with a drift gas flowing in the opposite direction and, therefore, are slowed down depending on their size, shape and charge. As a result, different ions reach the detector at different drift times, which are characteristic for the ions considered. The number of ions reaching the detector are a measure of the concentration of the analyte. The method enables the identification and quantification of analytes with high sensitivity (ng l(-1) range). The selectivity can even be increased - as necessary for the analyses of complex mixtures - using pre-separation techniques such as gas chromatography or multi-capillary columns. No pre-concentration of the sample is necessary. Those characteristics of the method are preserved even in air with up to a 100% relative humidity rate. The suitability of the method for application in the field of food quality and safety - including storage, process and quality control as well as the characterization of food stuffs - was investigated in recent years for a number of representative examples, which are summarized in the following, including new studies as well: (1) the detection of metabolites from bacteria for the identification and control of their growth; (2) process control in food production - beer fermentation being an example; (3) the detection of the metabolites of mould for process control during cheese production, for quality control of raw materials or for the control of storage conditions; (4) the quality control of packaging materials during

  10. Structural resolution of 4-substituted proline diastereomers with ion mobility spectrometry via alkali metal ion cationization.

    PubMed

    Flick, Tawnya G; Campuzano, Iain D G; Bartberger, Michael D

    2015-03-17

    The chirality of substituents on an amino acid can significantly change its mode of binding to a metal ion, as shown here experimentally by traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) of different proline isomeric molecules complexed with alkali metal ions. Baseline separation of the cis- and trans- forms of both hydroxyproline and fluoroproline was achieved using TWIMS-MS via metal ion cationization (Li(+), Na(+), K(+), and Cs(+)). Density functional theory calculations indicate that differentiation of these diastereomers is a result of the stabilization of differing metal-complexed forms adopted by the diastereomers when cationized by an alkali metal cation, [M + X](+) where X = Li, Na, K, and Cs, versus the topologically similar structures of the protonated molecules, [M + H](+). Metal-cationized trans-proline variants exist in a linear salt-bridge form where the metal ion interacts with a deprotonated carboxylic acid and the proton is displaced onto the nitrogen atom of the pyrrolidine ring. In contrast, metal-cationized cis-proline variants adopt a compact structure where the carbonyl of the carboxylic acid, nitrogen atom, and if available, the hydroxyl and fluorine substituent solvate the metal ion. Experimentally, it was observed that the resolution between alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants decreases as the size of the metal ion increases. Density functional theory demonstrates that this is due to the decreasing stability of the compact charge-solvated cis-proline structure with increased metal ion radius, likely a result of steric hindrance and/or weaker binding to the larger metal ion. Furthermore, the unique structures adopted by the alkali metal-cationized cis- and trans-proline variants results in these molecules having significantly different quantum mechanically calculated dipole moments, a factor that can be further exploited to improve the diastereomeric resolution when utilizing a drift gas with a

  11. Influence of planar oscillations on scattered ion energy distributions in transmission ion channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailes, A. A.; Seiberling, L. E.

    1999-06-01

    Utilizing the transmission ion channeling technique and a Monte Carlo simulation of the channeling of He ions in Si, we have been able to determine surface structure by comparing experimental to simulated scattered ion energy distributions. In analyzing data for {110} beam incidence, we have found that planar oscillations persist well past 2000 Å in our Monte Carlo simulations. These oscillations yield no benefit to this method of data analysis but can make analysis more difficult by the requirement for more accurate Si thickness determination.

  12. Fast ion dynamics measured by collective Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindslev, Henrik

    2001-10-01

    In magnetically confined fusion plasmas, fast ions, from fusion reactions and auxiliary heating, typically carry a third of the total plasma kinetic energy, and even more of the free energy. This free energy must be channelled into heating the bulk plasma, but is also available for driving waves in the plasma, affecting confinement of bulk and fast ions. We know that fast ions can drive Alfvén waves, affect sawteeth and fishbones. In turn all three can redistribute or ejects the fast ions. Wave particle interaction, also the basis of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH), depends crucially on the phase space distribution of the fast ions. Conversely the effect waves and instabilities have of fast ions will manifest itself in the detail of the fast ion phase space distribution. To explore the dynamics of fast ions and their interaction with the plasma thus begs for measurements of the fast ion distribution resolved in space, time and velocity. This has long been the promise of Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) [1]. First demonstrated at JET [2]and subsequently at TEXTOR [3], CTS is living up to its promise and is now contributing to the understanding of fast ion dynamics. With the TEXTOR CTS, temporal behaviours of fast ion velocity distributions have been uncovered. The fast ion populations are produced by ICRH and Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). At sawteeth, we see clear variations in the fast ion population, which depend on ion energy, pitch angle and spatial location. Investigating the region just inside the inversion radius, we find that ions with small parallel energy, and with perpendicular energies up to a soft threshold well above thermal, are lost from the high field side near the inversion radius, while more energetic ions in the same pitch angle range remain insensitive to the sawteeth. The sensitive population could include the potato and stagnation orbit particles identified theoretically as being sensitive the sawteeth [4]. Under the same conditions

  13. Simultaneous Proteomic Discovery and Targeted Monitoring using Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Nie, Song; Casey, Cameron P.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Orton, Daniel J.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese R. W.; Shukla, Anil K.; Moore, Ronald J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Shi, Tujin; Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-09-25

    Current proteomics approaches are comprised of both broad discovery measurements as well as more quantitative targeted measurements. These two different measurement types are used to initially identify potentially important proteins (e.g., candidate biomarkers) and then enable improved quantification for a limited number of selected proteins. However, both approaches suffer from limitations, particularly the lower sensitivity, accuracy, and quantitation precision for discovery approaches compared to targeted approaches, and the limited proteome coverage provided by targeted approaches. Herein, we describe a new proteomics approach that allows both discovery and targeted monitoring (DTM) in a single analysis using liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS). In DTM, heavy labeled peptides for target ions are spiked into tryptic digests and both the labeled and unlabeled peptides are broadly detected using LC-IMS-MS instrumentation, allowing the benefits of discovery and targeted approaches. To understand the possible improvement of the DTM approach, it was compared to LC-MS broad measurements using an accurate mass and time tag database and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) targeted measurements. The DTM results yielded greater peptide/protein coverage and a significant improvement in the detection of lower abundance species compared to LC-MS discovery measurements. DTM was also observed to have similar detection limits as SRM for the targeted measurements indicating its potential for combining the discovery and targeted approaches.

  14. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Joshua A; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  15. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Joshua A.; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  16. Isotopic effect on ion mobility and separation of isotopomers by high-field ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Clemmer, David E; Smith, Richard D

    2010-10-01

    Distinguishing and separating isotopic molecular variants is important across many scientific fields. However, discerning such variants, especially those producing no net mass difference, has been challenging. For example, single-stage mass spectrometry is broadly employed to analyze isotopes but is blind to isotopic isomers (isotopomers) and, except at very high resolution, species of the same nominal mass (isobars). Here, we report separation of isotopic ions, including isotopomers and isobars, using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), specifically, the field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS). The effect is not based on the different reduced masses of ion-gas molecule pairs previously theorized to cause isotopic separations in conventional IMS, but appears related to the details of energetic ion-molecule collisions in strong electric fields. The observed separation qualitatively depends on the gas composition and may be improved using gas mixtures. Isotopic shifts depend on the position of the labeled site, which allows its localization and contains information about the ion geometry, potentially enabling a new approach to molecular structure characterization.

  17. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e. peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression, i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species. This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, and which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion driven peak spreading over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range. PMID:27052738

  18. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-04-06

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression, i.e., a reduction in peak widths of all species. This peak compression occurs with a modest reduction of resolution, but which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. In addition, approaches for peak compression in traveling wave IMS are also discussed. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion driven peak spreading over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range.

  19. Nanowire dopant measurement using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chia, A. C. E.; Boulanger, J. P.; Wood, B. A.; LaPierre, R. R.; Dhindsa, N.; Saini, S. S.

    2015-09-21

    A method is presented to improve the quantitative determination of dopant concentration in semiconductor nanowire (NW) arrays using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). SIMS measurements were used to determine Be dopant concentrations in a Be-doped GaAs thin film and NW arrays of various pitches that were dry-etched from the same film. A comparison of these measurements revealed a factor of 3 to 12 difference, depending on the NW array pitch, between the secondary Be ion yields of the film and the NW arrays, despite being identically doped. This was due to matrix effects and ion beam mixing of Be from the NWs into the surrounding benzocyclobutene that was used to fill the space between the NWs. This indicates the need for etched NWs to be used as doping standards instead of 2D films when evaluating NWs of unknown doping by SIMS. Using the etched NWs as doping standards, NW arrays of various pitches grown by the vapour-liquid-solid mechanism were characterized by SIMS to yield valuable insights into doping mechanisms.

  20. The periodic focusing ion funnel: theory, design, and experimental characterization by high-resolution ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fort, Kyle L; Silveira, Joshua A; Russell, David H

    2013-10-15

    Simulation-based development and experimental characterization of a DC-only ion funnel is described herein. Radial ion confinement is achieved via periodic focusing whereby a collisionally dampened effective potential is generated in the inertial frame of an ion traversing the device with appreciable velocity. The new device, termed a periodic focusing ion funnel (PF IF), provides an efficient alternative to the rf ion funnel providing high ion transmission with fewer electrodes, simplified electrical circuitry, and reduced power supply requirements. The utility of the PF IF for structural ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) studies is demonstrated using model peptide ions (bradykinin, gramicidin S, and trpzip 1).

  1. Analysis of helium-ion scattering with a desktop computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, J. W.

    1986-04-01

    This paper describes a program written in an enhanced BASIC language for a desktop computer, for simulating the energy spectra of high-energy helium ions scattered into two concurrent detectors (backward and glancing). The program is designed for 512-channel spectra from samples containing up to 8 elements and 55 user-defined layers. The program is intended to meet the needs of analyses in materials sciences, such as metallurgy, where more than a few elements may be present, where several elements may be near each other in the periodic table, and where relatively deep structure may be important. These conditions preclude the use of completely automatic procedures for obtaining the sample composition directly from the scattered ion spectrum. Therefore, efficient methods are needed for entering and editing large amounts of composition data, with many iterations and with much feedback of information from the computer to the user. The internal video screen is used exclusively for verbal and numeric communications between user and computer. The composition matrix is edited on screen with a two-dimension forms-fill-in text editor and with many automatic procedures, such as doubling the number of layers with appropriate interpolations and extrapolations. The control center of the program is a bank of 10 keys that initiate on-event branching of program flow. The experimental and calculated spectra, including those of individual elements if desired, are displayed on an external color monitor, with an optional inset plot of the depth concentration profiles of the elements in the sample.

  2. Interrogating viral capsid assembly with ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetrecht, Charlotte; Barbu, Ioana M.; Shoemaker, Glen K.; van Duijn, Esther; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2011-02-01

    Most proteins fulfil their function as part of large protein complexes. Surprisingly, little is known about the pathways and regulation of protein assembly. Several viral coat proteins can spontaneously assemble into capsids in vitro with morphologies identical to the native virion and thus resemble ideal model systems for studying protein complex formation. Even for these systems, the mechanism for self-assembly is still poorly understood, although it is generally thought that smaller oligomeric structures form key intermediates. This assembly nucleus and larger viral assembly intermediates are typically low abundant and difficult to monitor. Here, we characterised small oligomers of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and norovirus under equilibrium conditions using native ion mobility mass spectrometry. This data in conjunction with computational modelling enabled us to elucidate structural features of these oligomers. Instead of more globular shapes, the intermediates exhibit sheet-like structures suggesting that they are assembly competent. We propose pathways for the formation of both capsids.

  3. Time-of-flight detector for heavy ion backscattering spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.A.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year laboratory directed research and development project to explore advanced concepts in Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS), undertaken with the goal of extending the sensitivity of this relatively new technique to levels unattainable by any other existing trace element surface analysis. Improvements in sensitivity are required for the application of HIBS to contamination control in the microelectronics industry. Tools with sensitivity approaching 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} are expected to be essential for enabling advanced IC production by the year 2000. During the project the authors developed a new analysis chamber with channeling goniometer and a prototype time-of-flight detector with a demonstrated sensitivity of {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} for Au on Si and {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 10} for Fe, and sufficient mass resolution to separate contributions from Fe and Cu.

  4. Analysis of phthalate esters by ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Giam, C.S.; Reed, G.E.; Holliday, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Esters of phthalic acid can be detected by IMS (ion mobility spectrometry). The six phthalates in the EPA`s Priority Pollutant List can be detected in both modes--positive as well as negative mode. In the positive mode, a characteristic reduced mobility was obtained for each phthalate; thus the different esters can be distinguished, including the isomeric di-n-octyl- and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate. Phthalates can be detected in the low nanogram range; detection sensitivity is comparable or better than those found by gas chromatography using different detectors, including by GC-ECD, GC-FID or GC-MS. Direct Monitoring of environmental phthalates by IMS possess several advantages, e.g., without the usual separation protocols for ubiquitous interferants, faster instrumental analysis time (minutes instead of hours), and lower cost. Thus, IMS of phthalates has a great potential as an environmental monitor.

  5. Secondary ion mass spectrometry of irradiated nuclear fuel and cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portier, S.; Brémier, S.; Walker, C. T.

    2007-06-01

    The principles and operating modes of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) are first described after which the different methods of quantification are summarised. Some current applications of SIMS in nuclear fuel and cladding research are then reviewed after briefly considering the modifications that are needed to allow a SIMS instrument to be used for the analysis of highly radioactive materials. Amongst the applications reported are the investigation of the behaviour of fission gas xenon and the volatile fission products tellurium, iodine and caesium in UO2 nuclear fuel, measurement of the radial distribution of Pu isotopes in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and of the radial distribution of Gd isotopes in (U,Gd)O2 fuel, and determination of the distribution of Li and B in the external oxide layer on Zircaloy cladding. It is evident from the large amount of new information gained that SIMS is a powerful complementary technique to electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) in these fields of study.

  6. Development of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Carle, Glenn C.; Humphry, Donald E.; Shao, Maxine; Takeuchi, Nori; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) can provide gas chromatography with sample identification independent of sample retention time, with minimal interface. Initial commercial methods of IMS however, did not possess sufficient analytical capabilities and presented operational parameters which were unsuitable for exobiology missions. Subsequent development of IMS technology, with the focus on exobiology analytical requirements and mission imposed operational limitations, has produced an IMS interfaced with a GC capable of fulfilling the analytical requirements of several exobiology missions. Future exobiology missions will require further development of the IMS, particularly in the areas of overall instrument miniaturization and complex sample identification. The evolution of the exobiology focused IMS will be presented up to the current prototype design, which is a component of several proposed exobiology instruments. Areas of future development will also be discussed.

  7. Cocaine abuse determination by ion mobility spectrometry using molecular imprinting.

    PubMed

    Sorribes-Soriano, A; Esteve-Turrillas, F A; Armenta, S; de la Guardia, M; Herrero-Martínez, J M

    2017-01-20

    A cocaine-based molecular imprinted polymer (MIP) has been produced by bulk polymerization and employed as selective solid-phase extraction support for the determination of cocaine in saliva samples by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The most appropriate conditions for washing and elution of cocaine from MIPs were studied and MIPs were characterized in terms of analyte binding capacity, reusability in water and saliva analysis, imprinting factor and selectivity were established and compared with non-imprinted polymers. The proposed MIP-IMS method provided a LOD of 18μgL(-1) and quantitative recoveries for blank saliva samples spiked from 75 to 500μgL(-1) cocaine. Oral fluid samples were collected from cocaine consumers and analysed by the proposed MIP-IMS methodology. Results, ranging from below the LOD to 51±2mgL(-1), were statistically comparable to those obtained by a confirmatory gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Moreover, results were compared to a qualitative lateral flow immunoassay procedure providing similar classification of the samples. Thus, MIP-IMS can be considered an useful alternative that provided fast, selective and sensitive results with a cost affordable instrumentation that does not require skilled operators.

  8. Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Clemmer, David E.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-10-01

    Since early 1900-s, when vacuum techniques and ion detectors first enabled investigations of gas-phase ions, two approaches to their separation and characterization have emerged - mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS).1,2 Though both exploit that distinct charged species move in electric fields differently, MS is performed in vacuum and is based only on the ion mass/charge (m/q) ratio while IMS involves sufficiently dense buffer gases and relies on ion transport properties. The first major discovery enabled by MS was the existence of isotopes by Thomson and Aston,3 and isotopic analyses have since been integral to MS. In particular, the preparative separation of U isotopes using Lawrence’s Calutron was the first industrial application of MS,4 and isotopic labeling is key to MS quantification methods. With IMS, the issue of isotopes was largely ignored as the resolving power (R) was generally too low for their separation. Here, we demonstrate that recently developed high-resolution differential IMS can separate isotopic molecular ions, including nominal isobars with different isotopic content and isotopomers. This capability may enable a new method for isotope separation in a small-scale format at ambient pressure and aid localization of labeled sites in various molecules. Perhaps most importantly, the isotopic shifts depend on the labeled atom position and thus may contain the kind of detailed structural information that is available in solution or solid state using tools such as NMR but has not generally been obtainable for gas-phase ions.

  9. Anomerization of Acrylated Glucose During Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chendo, Christophe; Moreira, Guillaume; Tintaru, Aura; Posocco, Paola; Laurini, Erik; Lefay, Catherine; Gigmes, Didier; Viel, Stéphane; Pricl, Sabrina; Charles, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    Anomerization of simple sugars in the liquid phase is known as an acid- and base-catalyzed process, which highly depends on solvent polarity. This reaction is reported here to occur in the gas phase, during traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) experiments aimed at separating α- and β-anomers of penta-acrylated glucose generated as ammonium adducts in electrospray ionization. This compound was available in two samples prepared from glucose dissolved in solvents of different polarity, namely tetrahydrofuran (THF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAC), and analyzed by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) as well as traveling wave ion mobility (ESI-TWIMS-MS). In MS/MS, an anchimerically-assisted process was found to be unique to the electrosprayed α-anomer, and was only observed for the THF sample. In ESI-TWIMS-MS, a signal was measured at the drift time expected for the α-anomer for both the THF and DMAC samples, in apparent contradiction to the MS/MS results, which indicated that the α-anomer was not present in the DMAC sample. However, MS/MS experiments performed after TWIMS separation revealed that ammonium adducts of the α-anomer produced from each sample, although exhibiting the same collision cross section, were clearly different. Indeed, while the α-anomer actually present in the THF sample was electrosprayed with the ammonium adducted at the C2 acrylate, its homologue only observed when the DMAC sample was subjected to TWIMS hold the adducted ammonium at the C1 acrylate. These findings were explained by a β/α inter-conversion upon injection in the TWIMS cell, as supported by theoretical calculation and dynamic molecular modeling.

  10. The investigation of ionization conditions in the trace amounts detection of heterocyclic compounds by ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltaeva, Y. R.; Sysoev, A. A.; Poteshin, S. S.; Negru, K. I.; Grishin, S. S.; Trefilova, V. V.; Zuev, M. I.; Baberkina, E. P.

    2016-10-01

    The first part of paper is devoted to the detection of New Psychoactive Substances by ion mobility mass spectrometry study. In the second part of the paper presents a promising approach to prevent the spread of narcotic substances, consisting in the use of field-portable ion mobility spectrometers and finding the correlation between the peaks of the spectrograms of ion mobility and the chemical structure of the compound.

  11. Trying to detect gas-phase ions? Understanding Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, especially mass spectrometry as identification approach and multi-capillary column as pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data is treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters in both a conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and a miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The current review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and to the sections that configures both a conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. Those reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465248

  12. Structurally selective imaging mass spectrometry by imaging ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McLean, John A; Fenn, Larissa S; Enders, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes the utility of structurally based separations combined with imaging mass spectrometry (MS) by ion mobility-MS (IM-MS) approaches. The unique capabilities of combining rapid (mus-ms) IM separations with imaging MS are detailed for an audience ranging from new to potential practitioners in IM-MS technology. Importantly, imaging IM-MS provides the ability to rapidly separate and elucidate various types of endogenous and exogenous biomolecules (e.g., nucleotides, carbohydrates, peptides, and lipids), including isobaric species. Drift tube and traveling wave IM-MS instrumentation are described and specific protocols are presented for calculating ion-neutral collision cross sections (i.e., apparent ion surface area or structure) from experimentally obtained IM-MS data. Special emphasis is placed on the use of imaging IM-MS for the analysis of samples in life sciences research (e.g., thin tissue sections), including selective imaging for peptide/protein and lipid distributions. Future directions for rapid and multiplexed imaging IM-MS/MS are detailed.

  13. Differentiating Fragmentation Pathways of Cholesterol by Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Agthoven, Maria A; Barrow, Mark P; Chiron, Lionel; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Kilgour, David; Wootton, Christopher A; Wei, Juan; Soulby, Andrew; Delsuc, Marc-André; Rolando, Christian; O'Connor, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is a data-independent analytical method that records the fragmentation patterns of all the compounds in a sample. This study shows the implementation of atmospheric pressure photoionization with two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In the resulting 2D mass spectrum, the fragmentation patterns of the radical and protonated species from cholesterol are differentiated. This study shows the use of fragment ion lines, precursor ion lines, and neutral loss lines in the 2D mass spectrum to determine fragmentation mechanisms of known compounds and to gain information on unknown ion species in the spectrum. In concert with high resolution mass spectrometry, 2D Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry can be a useful tool for the structural analysis of small molecules. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  14. Differentiating Fragmentation Pathways of Cholesterol by Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Agthoven, Maria A.; Barrow, Mark P.; Chiron, Lionel; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Kilgour, David; Wootton, Christopher A.; Wei, Juan; Soulby, Andrew; Delsuc, Marc-André; Rolando, Christian; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is a data-independent analytical method that records the fragmentation patterns of all the compounds in a sample. This study shows the implementation of atmospheric pressure photoionization with two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In the resulting 2D mass spectrum, the fragmentation patterns of the radical and protonated species from cholesterol are differentiated. This study shows the use of fragment ion lines, precursor ion lines, and neutral loss lines in the 2D mass spectrum to determine fragmentation mechanisms of known compounds and to gain information on unknown ion species in the spectrum. In concert with high resolution mass spectrometry, 2D Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry can be a useful tool for the structural analysis of small molecules.

  15. Toward Plasma Proteome Profiling with Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, Stephen J.; Plasencia, Manolo D.; Liu, Xiaoyun; Krishnan, Meera; Naylor, Stephen; Udseth, Harold R.; Smith, Richard D.; Clemmer, David E.

    2006-11-01

    Differential, functional, and mapping proteomic analyses of complex biological mixtures suffer from a lack of component resolution. Here we describe the application of ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMSMS) to this problem. With this approach, components that are separated by liquid chromatography are dispersed based on differences in their mobilities through a buffer gas prior to being analyzed by MS. The inclusion of the gas-phase dispersion provides more than an order of magnitude enhancement in component resolution at no cost to data acquisition time. Additionally, the mobility separation often removes high-abundance species from spectral regions containing low-abundance species, effectively increasing measurement sensitivity and dynamic range. Finally, collision-induced dissociation of all ions can be recorded in a single experimental sequence while conventional MS methods sequentially select precursors. The approach is demonstrated in a single, rapid (3.3 h) analysis of a plasma digest sample where abundant proteins have not been removed. Protein database searches have yielded 731 high confidence peptide assignments corresponding to 438 unique proteins. Results have been compiled into an initial analytical map to be used -after further augmentation and refinement- for comparative plasma profiling studies.

  16. Nanospray ion mobility mass spectrometry of selected high mass species.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Iain; Giles, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of electrospray ionization (ESI) and in particular nano-electrospray (nESI) has enabled the routine mass spectrometric (MS) analysis of large protein complexes in native aqueous buffers. Time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometers, in particular the hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-ToF) instruments, are well suited to the analysis of large protein complexes. When ionized under native-MS conditions, protein complexes routinely exhibit multiple charge states in excess of m/z 6,000, well above the standard mass range of many quadrupole or ion cyclotron-based instruments. The research area of native MS has expanded considerably in the last decade and has shown particular relevance in the area of protein structure determination. Researchers are now able to routinely measure intact MS spectra of protein complexes above 1 MDa in mass. The advent of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) studies, is now allowing researchers to infer the shape of the protein complex being analyzed. Herein, we describe how to acquire IM-MS data that ranges from inorganic salt clusters of caesium iodide (CsI) to large biomolecular complexes such as the chaperone protein GroEL.

  17. Characterization of environmental samples using ion trap-secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.

    1998-02-01

    The detection of chemical warfare agent residues on environmental surfaces is an important analytical activity because of the potential for proliferation of these weapons, and for environmental monitoring in areas where they are stored. Historically, one of the most widely used agents has been bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, also known as mustard gas and HD. It was initially used in combat in 1917; by the end of the First World War, more than 16% of all casualties were due to chemicals, in most cases mustard. Manufacture of mustard is continuing to this day; consequently, there are ongoing opportunities for exposure. 2-Chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) is used as a simulant for mustard (HD) in a study to develop secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for rapid, semi-quantitative detection of mustard on soil. Using SIMS with single stage mass spectrometry, a signature for CEES can be unequivocally observed only at the highest concentrations (0.1 monolayer and above). Selectivity and sensitivity are markedly improved employing multiple-stage mass spectrometry using an ion trap. C{sub 2}H{sub 5}SC{sub 2}H{sub 4}{sup +} from CEES eliminates C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and H{sub 2}S, which are highly diagnostic. CEES was detected at 0.0012 monolayer on soil. A single analysis could be conducted in under 5 minutes.

  18. Simultaneous Proteomic Discovery and Targeted Monitoring using Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E; Nie, Song; Casey, Cameron P; Monroe, Matthew E; Orton, Daniel J; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Gritsenko, Marina A; Clauss, Therese R W; Shukla, Anil K; Moore, Ronald J; Purvine, Samuel O; Shi, Tujin; Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin S; Smith, Richard D

    2016-12-01

    Current proteomic approaches include both broad discovery measurements and quantitative targeted analyses. In many cases, discovery measurements are initially used to identify potentially important proteins (e.g. candidate biomarkers) and then targeted studies are employed to quantify a limited number of selected proteins. Both approaches, however, suffer from limitations. Discovery measurements aim to sample the whole proteome but have lower sensitivity, accuracy, and quantitation precision than targeted approaches, whereas targeted measurements are significantly more sensitive but only sample a limited portion of the proteome. Herein, we describe a new approach that performs both discovery and targeted monitoring (DTM) in a single analysis by combining liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS). In DTM, heavy labeled target peptides are spiked into tryptic digests and both the labeled and unlabeled peptides are detected using LC-IMS-MS instrumentation. Compared with the broad LC-MS discovery measurements, DTM yields greater peptide/protein coverage and detects lower abundance species. DTM also achieved detection limits similar to selected reaction monitoring (SRM) indicating its potential for combined high quality discovery and targeted analyses, which is a significant step toward the convergence of discovery and targeted approaches.

  19. Structural Elucidation of cis/trans Dicaffeoylquinic Acid Photoisomerization Using Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xueyun; Renslow, Ryan S; Makola, Mpho M; Webb, Ian K; Deng, Liulin; Thomas, Dennis G; Govind, Niranjan; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Dubery, Ian A; Heyman, Heino M; Smith, Richard D; Madala, Ntakadzeni E; Baker, Erin S

    2017-04-06

    Due to the recently uncovered health benefits and anti-HIV activities of dicaffeoylquinic acids (diCQAs), understanding their structures and functions is of great interest for drug discovery efforts. DiCQAs are analytically challenging to identify and quantify since they commonly exist as a diverse mixture of positional and geometric (cis/trans) isomers. In this work, we utilized ion mobility spectrometry coupled with mass spectrometry to separate the various isomers before and after UV irradiation. The experimental collision cross sections were then compared with theoretical structures to differentiate and identify the diCQA isomers. Our analyses found that naturally the diCQAs existed predominantly as trans/trans isomers, but after 3 h of UV irradiation, cis/cis, cis/trans, trans/cis, and trans/trans isomers were all present in the mixture. This is the first report of successful differentiation of cis/trans diCQA isomers individually, which shows the great promise of IMS coupled with theoretical calculations for determining the structure and activity relationships of different isomers in drug discovery studies.

  20. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry analysis for the site of aromatic hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Atsushi; Chiba, Masato

    2013-07-01

    Hydroxylated metabolites often retain the pharmacological activity of parent compound, and the position of hydroxylation determines the formation of chemically reactive intermediates, such as quinones and analogs, from para- and/or ortho-hydroxylation of phenols or arylamines. Therefore, the identification of exact position of hydroxylation is often required at the early development stage of new drug candidates. In many cases, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) provides identical MS/MS spectra among isomeric hydroxylated metabolites, and therefore, it alone cannot unequivocally identify the exact position(s) of hydroxylation. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), integrated with LC-MS/MS, recently showed the capability of separating isomeric species based on differences in their drift times from IMS, which are linearly proportional to the collision cross-section (CCS) reflecting physical size and shape. In the present study, a chemical derivatization of isomeric hydroxylated metabolites with 2-fluoro-N-methyl pyridinium p-toluenesulfonate was found to confer distinct theoretical CCS value on each isomer by forming corresponding N-methyl pyridine (NMP) derivative. The regression lines established by the comparison between theoretical CCS values and observed drift times from IMS for each set of parent compound (labetalol, ezetimibe, atorvastatin, and warfarin) and its MS/MS product ions accurately and selectively projected the actual drift times of NMP derivatives of corresponding aromatic or isomeric hydroxylated metabolites. The established method was used for the accurate assignment of predominant formation of 2-hydroxylated metabolite from imipramine in NADPH- fortified human liver microsomes. The present application expands the versatility of LC-IMS-MS technique to the structure identification of isomeric hydroxylated metabolites at the early stage for drug development.

  1. X-ray ionization differential ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kuklya, Andriy; Reinecke, Tobias; Uteschil, Florian; Kerpen, Klaus; Zimmermann, Stefan; Telgheder, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    X-ray was utilized as an ionization source for differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) for the first time. The utilization of this ionization source increases the potential of DMS system for on-site based applications. The influence of experimental parameters (e.g. accelerating voltage, filament current, and separation field) on the analysis of model compounds was investigated and discussed. It was found that both the positive and the negative reactive ion peaks [RIP(+) and RIP(-)] formed during X-ray ionization are identical with those observed with the traditional (63)Ni radioactive ion source. This is especially notable for RIP(-), because the chemistry provided by other nonradioactive sources in the negative mode is more complicated or even different than that observed with a (63)Ni source. Increase of either filament current or accelerating voltage resulted in increased intensity of both RIP(+) and RIP(-). However, because of the materials used for construction of X-ray adapter the maximal level of filament current and accelerating voltage used in this study were limited to 700mA and 5kV, respectively. Analytical performance was determined with two model compounds (acetone and methyl salicylate) using X-ray and directly compared to (63)Ni ionization source. When X-ray was coupled to DMS, calculated LOD values were found to be within the range of 0.17-1.52ppbv/v (concentration in the carrier gas). These values are competitive with those calculated for DMS equipped with traditional (63)Ni radioactive ionization source. The obtained results are promising enough to ensure the potential of X-ray as ionization source for DMS.

  2. Low-Energy Grazing Ion-Scattering From Alkali-Halide Surfaces: A Novel Approach To C-14 Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. W.; Galutschek, E.; Hotchkis, M.

    2009-03-01

    Carbon-14 labeled compounds are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., as tracers to determine the fate of these compounds in vivo. Conventional accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is one approach that offers sufficiently high sensitivity to avoid radiological waste and contamination issues in such studies, but requires large, expensive facilities that are usually not solely dedicated to this task. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) we are exploring a small size, low cost alternative to AMS for biomedical 14C tracer studies that utilizes ECR-ion-source-generated keV-energy-range multicharged C beams grazingly incident on an alkali halide target, where efficient negative ion production by multiple electron capture takes place. By using C ion charge states of +3 or higher, the molecular isobar interference at mass 14, e.g. 12CH2 and 13CH, is eliminated. The negatively charged ions in the beam scattered from the alkali halide surface are separated from other scattered charge states by two large acceptance (˜15 msr) stages of electrostatic analysis. The N-14 isobar interference is thus removed, since N does not support a stable negative ion. Initial results for C-14 detection obtained using C-14 enriched CO2 from ANSTO will be described.

  3. Low-Energy Grazing Ion-Scattering from Alkali-Halide Surfaces: A Novel Approach to C-14 Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Fred W; Galutschek, Ernst; Hotchkis, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Carbon-14 labeled compounds are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., as tracers to determine the fate of these compounds in vivo. Conventional accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is one approach that offers sufficiently high sensitivity to avoid radiological waste and contamination issues in such studies, but requires large, expensive facilities that are usually not solely dedicated to this task. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) we are exploring a small size, low cost alternative to AMS for biomedical 14C tracer studies that utilizes ECR-ion-source-generated keV-energy-range multicharged C beams grazingly incident on an alkali halide target, where efficient negative ion production by multiple electron capture takes place. By using C ion charge states of +3 or higher, the molecular isobar interference at mass 14, e.g. 12CH2 and 13CH, is eliminated. The negatively charged ions in the beam scattered from the alkali halide surface are separated from other scattered charge states by two large acceptance ({approx}15 msr) stages of electrostatic analysis. The N-14 isobar interference is thus removed, since N does not support a stable negative ion. Initial results for C-14 detection obtained using C-14 enriched CO2 from ANSTO will be described.

  4. Low-Energy Grazing Ion-Scattering From Alkali-Halide Surfaces: A Novel Approach To C-14 Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F. W.; Galutschek, E.; Hotchkis, M.

    2009-03-10

    Carbon-14 labeled compounds are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., as tracers to determine the fate of these compounds in vivo. Conventional accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is one approach that offers sufficiently high sensitivity to avoid radiological waste and contamination issues in such studies, but requires large, expensive facilities that are usually not solely dedicated to this task. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) we are exploring a small size, low cost alternative to AMS for biomedical {sup 14}C tracer studies that utilizes ECR-ion-source-generated keV-energy-range multicharged C beams grazingly incident on an alkali halide target, where efficient negative ion production by multiple electron capture takes place. By using C ion charge states of +3 or higher, the molecular isobar interference at mass 14, e.g. {sup 12}CH{sub 2} and {sup 13}CH, is eliminated. The negatively charged ions in the beam scattered from the alkali halide surface are separated from other scattered charge states by two large acceptance ({approx}15 msr) stages of electrostatic analysis. The N-14 isobar interference is thus removed, since N does not support a stable negative ion. Initial results for C-14 detection obtained using C-14 enriched CO{sub 2} from ANSTO will be described.

  5. Mechanical ion gate for electrospray-ionization ion-mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Collins, David C; Lee, Edgar D; Rockwood, Alan L; Lee, Milton L

    2007-05-01

    A novel ion gate for electrospray-ionization atmospheric-pressure ion-mobility spectrometry (ESI-IMS) has been constructed and evaluated. The ion gate consisted of a chopper wheel with two windows--one for periodic ion passage from the ESI source into the drift region and the other for timing and synchronization purposes. The instrument contained a 45.0 cm long drift tube comprising 78 stainless steel rings (0.12 cm thick, 4.90 cm o.d., 2.55 cm i.d.). The rings were connected together in series with 3.34-MOmega resistors. The interface plate and the back plate were also connected with the first and the last rings, respectively, of the drift tube with 3.34-MOmega resistors. A potential of -20.0 kV was applied to the back plate and the interface plate was grounded. The drift tube was maintained at an electric field strength of approximately 400 V cm-1. An aperture grid was attached to the last ring in front of a Faraday plate detector, center-to-center. Several sample solutions were electrosprayed at +5.0 kV with +500 V applied to the ion gate. Baseline separations of selected benzodiazepines, antidepressants, and antibiotics were observed with moderate experimental resolution of approximately 70.

  6. The collision cross sections of iodide salt cluster ions in air via differential mobility analysis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Hui; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Oberreit, Derek R; Hogan, Christopher J

    2013-12-01

    To date, most collision cross section (CCS) predictions have invoked gas molecule impingement-reemission rules in which specular and elastic scattering of spherical gas molecules from rigid polyatomic surfaces are assumed. Although such predictions have been shown to agree well with CCSs measured in helium bath gas, a number of studies reveal that these predictions do not agree with CCSs for ions in diatomic gases, namely, air and molecular nitrogen. To further examine the validity of specular-elastic versus diffuse-inelastic scattering models, we measured the CCSs of positively charged metal iodide cluster ions of the form [MI]n[M(+)]z, where M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs, n = 1 - 25, and z = 1 - 2. Measurements were made in air via differential mobility analysis mass spectrometry (DMA-MS). The CCSs measured are compared with specular-elastic as well as diffuse-inelastic scattering model predictions with candidate ion structures determined from density functional theory. It is found that predictions from diffuse-inelastic collision models agree well (within 5%) with measurements from sodium iodide cluster ions, while specular-elastic collision model predictions are in better agreement with cesium iodide cluster ion measurements. The agreement with diffuse-inelastic and specular-elastic predictions decreases and increases, respectively, with increasing cation mass. However, even when diffuse-inelastic cluster ion predictions disagree with measurements, the disagreement is of a near-constant factor for all ions, indicating that a simple linear rescaling collapses predictions to measurements. Conversely, rescaling cannot be used to collapse specular-elastic predictions to measurements; hence, although the precise impingement reemission rules remain ambiguous, they are not specular-elastic.

  7. The Collision Cross Sections of Iodide Salt Cluster Ions in Air via Differential Mobility Analysis-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hui; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Oberreit, Derek R.; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2013-12-01

    To date, most collision cross section (CCS) predictions have invoked gas molecule impingement-reemission rules in which specular and elastic scattering of spherical gas molecules from rigid polyatomic surfaces are assumed. Although such predictions have been shown to agree well with CCSs measured in helium bath gas, a number of studies reveal that these predictions do not agree with CCSs for ions in diatomic gases, namely, air and molecular nitrogen. To further examine the validity of specular-elastic versus diffuse-inelastic scattering models, we measured the CCSs of positively charged metal iodide cluster ions of the form [MI]n[M+]z, where M = Na, K, Rb, or Cs, n = 1 - 25, and z = 1 - 2. Measurements were made in air via differential mobility analysis mass spectrometry (DMA-MS). The CCSs measured are compared with specular-elastic as well as diffuse-inelastic scattering model predictions with candidate ion structures determined from density functional theory. It is found that predictions from diffuse-inelastic collision models agree well (within 5 %) with measurements from sodium iodide cluster ions, while specular-elastic collision model predictions are in better agreement with cesium iodide cluster ion measurements. The agreement with diffuse-inelastic and specular-elastic predictions decreases and increases, respectively, with increasing cation mass. However, even when diffuse-inelastic cluster ion predictions disagree with measurements, the disagreement is of a near-constant factor for all ions, indicating that a simple linear rescaling collapses predictions to measurements. Conversely, rescaling cannot be used to collapse specular-elastic predictions to measurements; hence, although the precise impingement reemission rules remain ambiguous, they are not specular-elastic.

  8. Detection and characterization of smokeless powders with ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Neiza M.; Rosario, Santa V.; Hernandez, Samuel P.; Mina, Nairmen

    2005-05-01

    Smokeless Powders are a class of propellants that were developed in the late 19th century to replace black powder; it has been used as an explosive in shotguns, rifles, firearms and many other larger caliber weapons. These propellants can be placed into one of three different classes according to the chemical composition of their primary energetic ingredients. Advance equipment have been designed and used for the detection of explosives devices and compounds potentially energetic. In this research we are developing an analytical methodology to detect different formulation of smokeless powders: Alliant-American Select, Alliant-Bullseye, and Alliant-Red Dot using the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) technique. We used different surfaces like computer diskettes, CD"s, book covers and plastics to study their adsorption/desorption process. Using micropipettes, we delivered solutions with different amounts of Smokeless Powders from a 1000 ppm solution and deposit it on various types of filters to make a calibration curve. Several amounts of Smokeless Powder were deposited to the different surfaces and collected with filter paper. The samples were desorbed directly from the filter to the instrument inlet port. Subsequently, the percentage of explosive recovered was calculated.

  9. Improving Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Image Quality with Image Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Jackson, Lauren M.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2014-12-01

    The spatial resolution of chemical images acquired with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is limited not only by the size of the probe utilized to create the images but also by detection sensitivity. As the probe size is reduced to below 1 μm, for example, a low signal in each pixel limits lateral resolution because of counting statistics considerations. Although it can be useful to implement numerical methods to mitigate this problem, here we investigate the use of image fusion to combine information from scanning electron microscope (SEM) data with chemically resolved SIMS images. The advantage of this approach is that the higher intensity and, hence, spatial resolution of the electron images can help to improve the quality of the SIMS images without sacrificing chemical specificity. Using a pan-sharpening algorithm, the method is illustrated using synthetic data, experimental data acquired from a metallic grid sample, and experimental data acquired from a lawn of algae cells. The results show that up to an order of magnitude increase in spatial resolution is possible to achieve. A cross-correlation metric is utilized for evaluating the reliability of the procedure.

  10. Improving Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Image Quality with Image Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Jackson, Lauren M.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The spatial resolution of chemical images acquired with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is limited not only by the size of the probe utilized to create the images, but also by detection sensitivity. As the probe size is reduced to below 1 µm, for example, a low signal in each pixel limits lateral resolution due to counting statistics considerations. Although it can be useful to implement numerical methods to mitigate this problem, here we investigate the use of image fusion to combine information from scanning electron microscope (SEM) data with chemically resolved SIMS images. The advantage of this approach is that the higher intensity and, hence, spatial resolution of the electron images can help to improve the quality of the SIMS images without sacrificing chemical specificity. Using a pan-sharpening algorithm, the method is illustrated using synthetic data, experimental data acquired from a metallic grid sample, and experimental data acquired from a lawn of algae cells. The results show that up to an order of magnitude increase in spatial resolution is possible to achieve. A cross-correlation metric is utilized for evaluating the reliability of the procedure. PMID:24912432

  11. Towards metals analysis using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2016-02-25

    For the first time, the capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) in the determination of metal complex was evaluated. The extreme simplicity of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to the high sensitivity of CD-IMS measurement could make this combination really useful for simple, rapid, and sensitive determination of metals in different samples. In this regard, mercury, as a model metal, was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and then extracted into the carbon tetrachloride using DLLME. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and volume of the disperser solvent, the concentration of the chelating agent, salt addition and, pH were exhaustively investigated. Under the optimized condition, the enrichment factor was obtained to be 142. The linear range of 0.035-10.0 μg mL(-1) with r(2) = 0.997 and the detection limit of 0.010 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 4% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of mercury in various real samples. The satisfactory results revealed the capability of the proposed method in trace analysis without tedious derivatization or hydride generation.

  12. Thin layer chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (TLC-IMS).

    PubMed

    Ilbeigi, Vahideh; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud

    2015-01-06

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a fast and sensitive analytical method which operates at the atmospheric pressure. To enhance the capability of IMS for the analysis of mixtures, it is often used with preseparation techniques, such as GC or HPLC. Here, we report for the first time the coupling of the thin-layer chromatography and IMS. A variety of coupling schemes were tried that included direct electrospray from the TLC strip tip, indirect electrospray from a needle connected to the TLC strip, introducing the moving solvent into the injection port, and, the simplest way, offline introduction of scratched or cut pieces of strips into the IMS injection port. In this study a special solvent tank was designed and the TLC strip was mounted horizontally where the solvent would flow down. A very small funnel right below the TLC tip collected the solvent and transferred it to a needle via a capillary tubing. Using the TLC-ESI-IMS technique, acceptable separations were achieved for two component mixtures of morphine-papaverine and acridine-papaverine. A special injection port was designed to host the pieces cut off the TLC. The method was successfully used to identify each spot on the TLC by IMS in a few seconds.

  13. An online peak extraction algorithm for ion mobility spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Kopczynski, Dominik; Rahmann, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Ion mobility (IM) spectrometry (IMS), coupled with multi-capillary columns (MCCs), has been gaining importance for biotechnological and medical applications because of its ability to detect and quantify volatile organic compounds (VOC) at low concentrations in the air or in exhaled breath at ambient pressure and temperature. Ongoing miniaturization of spectrometers creates the need for reliable data analysis on-the-fly in small embedded low-power devices. We present the first fully automated online peak extraction method for MCC/IMS measurements consisting of several thousand individual spectra. Each individual spectrum is processed as it arrives, removing the need to store the measurement before starting the analysis, as is currently the state of the art. Thus the analysis device can be an inexpensive low-power system such as the Raspberry Pi. The key idea is to extract one-dimensional peak models (with four parameters) from each spectrum and then merge these into peak chains and finally two-dimensional peak models. We describe the different algorithmic steps in detail and evaluate the online method against state-of-the-art peak extraction methods.

  14. Determination of N-linked Glycosylation in Viral Glycoproteins by Negative Ion Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility.

    PubMed

    Bitto, David; Harvey, David J; Halldorsson, Steinar; Doores, Katie J; Pritchard, Laura K; Huiskonen, Juha T; Bowden, Thomas A; Crispin, Max

    2015-01-01

    Glycan analysis of virion-derived glycoproteins is challenging due to the difficulties in glycoprotein isolation and low sample abundance. Here, we describe how ion mobility mass spectrometry can be used to obtain spectra from virion samples. We also describe how negative ion fragmentation of glycans can be used to probe structural features of virion glycans.

  15. Determination of N-linked glycosylation in viral glycoproteins by negative ion mass spectrometry and ion mobility

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, David; Harvey, David J.; Halldorsson, Steinar; Doores, Katie J.; Pritchard, Laura K.; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Bowden, Thomas A.; Crispin, Max

    2016-01-01

    Summary Glycan analysis of virion-derived glycoproteins is challenging due to the difficulties in glycoprotein isolation and low sample abundance. Here, we describe how ion mobility mass spectrometry can be used to obtain spectra from virion samples. We also describe how negative ion fragmentation of glycans can be used to probe structural features of virion glycans. PMID:26169737

  16. Evolution of Instrumentation for the Study of Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Chemistry via Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yu; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    The scope of gas phase ion/ion chemistry accessible to mass spectrometry is largely defined by the available tools. Due to the development of novel instrumentation, a wide range of reaction phenomenologies have been noted, many of which have been studied extensively and exploited for analytical applications. This perspective presents the development of mass spectrometry-based instrumentation for the study of the gas phase ion/ion chemistry in which at least one of the reactants is multiply-charged. The instrument evolution is presented within the context of three essential elements required for any ion/ion reaction study: the ionization source(s), the reaction vessel or environment, and the mass analyzer. Ionization source arrangements have included source combinations that allow for reactions between multiply charged ions of one polarity and singly charged ions of opposite polarity, arrangements that enable the study of reactions of multiply charged ions of opposite polarity, and most recently, arrangements that allow for ion formation from more than two ion sources. Gas phase ion/ion reaction studies have been performed at near atmospheric pressure in flow reactor designs and within electrodynamic ion traps operated in the mTorr range. With ion trap as a reaction vessel, ionization and reaction processes can be independently optimized and ion/ion reactions can be implemented within the context of MSn experiments. Spatial separation of the reaction vessel from the mass analyzer allows for the use of any form of mass analysis in conjunction with ion/ion reactions. Time-of-flight mass analysis, for example, has provided significant improvements in mass analysis figures of merit relative to mass filters and ion traps. PMID:18083527

  17. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry reveals conformational flexibility in the deubiquitinating enzyme USP5.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Oldham, Neil J

    2015-08-01

    Many proteins exhibit conformation flexibility as part of their biological function, whether through the presence of a series of well-defined states or by the existence of intrinsic disorder. Ion mobility spectrometry, in combination with MS (IM-MS), offers a rapid and sensitive means of probing ensembles of protein structures through measurement of gas-phase collisional cross sections. We have applied IM-MS analysis to the multidomain deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific protease 5 (USP5), which is believed to exhibit significant conformational flexibility. Native ESI-MS measurement of the 94-kDa USP5 revealed two distinct charge-state distributions: [M + 17H](+) to [M + 21H](+) and [M + 24H](+) to [M + 29H](+). The collisional cross sections of these ions revealed clear groupings of 52 ± 4 nm(2) for the lower charges and 66 ± 6 nm(2) for the higher charges. Molecular dynamics simulation of a compact form of USP5, based on a crystal structure, produced structures of 53-54 nm(2) following 2 ns in the gas phase, while simulation of an extended form (based on small-angle X-ray scattering data) led to structures of 64 nm(2). These data demonstrate that IM-MS is a valuable tool in studying proteins with different discrete conformational states.

  18. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Direct Isotope Abundance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel J. Manard, Stephan Weeks, Kevin Kyle

    2010-05-27

    The nuclear forensics community is currently engaged in the analysis of illicit nuclear or radioactive material for the purposes of non-proliferations and attribution. One technique commonly employed for gathering nuclear forensics information is isotope analysis. At present, the state-of-the-art methodology for obtaining isotopic distributions is thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Although TIMS is highly accurate at determining isotope distributions, the technique requires an elementally pure sample to perform the measurement. The required radiochemical separations give rise to sample preparation times that can be in excess of one to two weeks. Clearly, the nuclear forensics community is in need of instrumentation and methods that can expedite their decision making process in the event of a radiological release or nuclear detonation. Accordingly, we are developing instrumentation that couples a high resolution IM drift cell to the front end of a MS. The IM cell provides a means of separating ions based upon their collision cross-section and mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). Two analytes with the same m/z, but with different collision cross-sections (shapes) would exit the cell at different times, essentially enabling the cell to function in a similar manner to a gas chromatography (GC) column. Thus, molecular and atomic isobaric interferences can be effectively removed from the ion beam. The mobility selected chemical species could then be introduced to a MS for high-resolution mass analysis to generate isotopic distributions of the target analytes. The outcome would be an IM/MS system capable of accurately measuring isotopic distributions while concurrently eliminating isobaric interferences and laboratory radiochemical sample preparation. The overall objective of this project is developing instrumentation and methods to produce near real-time isotope distributions with a modular mass spectrometric system that performs the required gas-phase chemistry and

  19. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling.

    PubMed

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Donohoe, Gregory C; Valentine, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H](2-) ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H](3-) ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H](2-) ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H](3-) ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  20. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H]2- ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H]2- ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  1. Fundamentals of ambient metastable-induced chemical ionization mass spectrometry and atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Glenn A.

    Molecular ionization is owed much of its development from the early implementation of electron ionization (EI). Although dramatically increasing the library of compounds discovered, an inherent problem with EI was the low abundance of molecular ions detected due to high fragmentation leading to the difficult task of the correct chemical identification after mass spectrometry (MS). These problems stimulated the research into new ionization methods which sought to "soften" the ionization process. In the late 1980s the advancements of ionization techniques was thought to have reached its pinnacle with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Both ionization techniques allowed for "soft" ionization of large molecular weight and/or labile compounds for intact characterization by MS. Albeit pervasive, neither ESI nor MALDI can be viewed as "magic bullet" ionization techniques. Both techniques require sample preparation which often included native sample destruction, and operation of these techniques took place in sealed enclosures and often, reduced pressure conditions. New open-air ionization techniques termed "ambient MS" enable direct analysis of samples of various physical states, sizes and shapes. One particular technique named Direct Analysis In Real Time (DART) has been steadily growing as one of the ambient tools of choice to ionize small molecular weight (< 1000 Da) molecules with a wide range of polarities. Although there is a large list of reported applications using DART as an ionization source, there have not been many studies investigating the fundamental properties of DART desorption and ionization mechanisms. The work presented in this thesis is aimed to provide in depth findings on the physicochemical phenomena during open-air DART desorption and ionization MS and current application developments. A review of recent ambient plasma-based desorption/ionization techniques for analytical MS is presented in

  2. An overview of resid characterization by mass spectrometry and small angle scattering techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J. E.; Winans, R. E.

    1999-07-14

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss what is known about the molecular structures found in petroleum resid from mass spectrometry and small angle neutron and X-ray scattering methods. The question about molecular size distributions and the occurrence of aggregation in the asphaltene fraction will be examined. Our understanding of this problem has evolved with the application of new analytical methods. Also, correlations with results from other approaches will be discussed. In addition, the issue of the nature of the heteroatom-containing molecules will be examined and the challenges that remain in this area.

  3. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Bergloff, J. F.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Munro, W.; Karpas, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5-xFxOH Where x = 0-5) in nitrogen with Cl- as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M Cl- through ion associations or (M-H)- through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID) in the interface region. This was proven using CID of adduct ions (M Cl-) with Q2 studies where adduct ions were dissociated to Cl- or proton abstracted to (M-H)-. The extent of proton abstraction depended upon ion energy and structure in order of calculated acidities: pentafluorophenol > tetrafluorophenol > trifluorophenol > difluorophenol. Little or no proton abstraction occurred for fluorophenol, phenol, or benzyl alcohol analogs. Ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine if proton abstraction reactions passed through an adduct intermediate with thermalized ions and mobility spectra for all chemicals were obtained from 25 to 200 degrees C. Proton abstraction from M Cl- was not observed at any temperature for phenol, monofluorophenol, or difluorophenol. Mobility spectra for trifluorophenol revealed the kinetic transformations to (M-H)- either from M Cl- or from M2 Cl- directly. Proton abstraction was the predominant reaction for tetra- and penta-fluorophenols. Consequently, the evidence suggests that proton abstraction occurs from an adduct ion where the reaction barrier is reduced with increasing acidity of the O-H bond in C6H5-xFxOH.

  4. Enhanced analyte detection using in-source fragmentation of field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-selected ions in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lauren J; Smith, Robert W; Toutoungi, Danielle E; Reynolds, James C; Bristow, Anthony W T; Ray, Andrew; Sage, Ashley; Wilson, Ian D; Weston, Daniel J; Boyle, Billy; Creaser, Colin S

    2012-05-01

    Miniaturized ultra high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is used for the selective transmission of differential mobility-selected ions prior to in-source collision-induced dissociation (CID) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) analysis. The FAIMS-in-source collision induced dissociation-TOFMS (FISCID-MS) method requires only minor modification of the ion source region of the mass spectrometer and is shown to significantly enhance analyte detection in complex mixtures. Improved mass measurement accuracy and simplified product ion mass spectra were observed following FAIMS preselection and subsequent in-source CID of ions derived from pharmaceutical excipients, sufficiently close in m/z (17.7 ppm mass difference) that they could not be resolved by TOFMS alone. The FISCID-MS approach is also demonstrated for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of mixtures of peptides with FAIMS used to filter out unrelated precursor ions thereby simplifying the resulting product ion mass spectra. Liquid chromatography combined with FISCID-MS was applied to the analysis of coeluting model peptides and tryptic peptides derived from human plasma proteins, allowing precursor ion selection and CID to yield product ion data suitable for peptide identification via database searching. The potential of FISCID-MS for the quantitative determination of a model peptide spiked into human plasma in the range of 0.45-9.0 μg/mL is demonstrated, showing good reproducibility (%RSD < 14.6%) and linearity (R(2) > 0.99).

  5. Surface analysis of catalysts by low-energy ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanleerdam, Gerrit Cornelis

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of catalyst surfaces using Low Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS) is described. The structure of a catalyst is generally described in conjunction with the different spectroscopic techniques used to characterize them. LEIS is discussed in detail. The importance of the different mechanisms for a number of elements is discussed and related to the total shape of a LEIS spectrum. The consequences for quantitative surface composition analysis are addressed. The absence of signals for tetragonally coordinated cations in the surface of gamma Al2O3 is argued to be due to the preferential exposure of crystallographic planes which contain exclusively octahedral sites. The insight makes it possible to propose a detailed model for the surface structure of gamma Al2O3 and the position of deposited metaloxides there upon. The location of molybdenum strongly depends on the amount deposited and the calcination temperature. The addition of lanthanum making gamma Al2O3 more thermostable is investigated. A series of silica supported molybdenum oxide catalysts is investigated toexplain the remarkable behavior to the selective oxidation of ammonia.

  6. Probing the Electron Capture Dissociation Mass Spectrometry of Phosphopeptides with Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doyong; Pai, Pei-Jing; Creese, Andrew J.; Jones, Andrew W.; Russell, David H.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2015-06-01

    Electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry offers several advantages for the analysis of peptides, most notably that backbone c and z fragments typically retain labile modifications such as phosphorylation. We have shown previously that, in some cases, the presence of phosphorylation has a deleterious effect on peptide sequence coverage, and hypothesized that intramolecular interactions involving the phosphate group were preventing separation of backbone fragments. In the present work, we seek to rationalize the observed ECD behavior through a combination of ECD of model peptides, traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry and molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that for doubly protonated ions of phosphopeptide APLpSFRGSLPKSYVK a salt-bridge structure is favored, whereas for the doubly-protonated ions of APLSFRGSLPKpSYVK ionic hydrogen bonds predominate.

  7. Theory for inverse pulsing of the shutter grid in ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Glenn E

    2010-10-01

    The fundamental transport theory for ion mobility spectrometry is modified to include effects of space charge. The new theory is then applied to describing the performance of "inverse ion mobility spectrometry" recently reported in Tabrizchi, M.; Jazan, E. Anal. Chem. 2010, 82, 746-750 using a discharge ionization source. The improved separation capabilities arise from space charge repulsion of the greater number of ions that are introduced into the drift tube by the technique. A larger effective diffusion coefficient and additional displacement velocities for the leading and trailing edges of the ion mobility peak account for the results. Performance is compared to conventional linear ion mobility spectrometry, with and without a radioactive source for ionization.

  8. Ion-Surface Collisions in Mass Spectrometry: Where Analytical Chemistry Meets Surface Science

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia

    2015-02-01

    This article presents a personal perspective regarding the development of key concepts in understanding hyperthermal collisions of polyatomic ions with surfaces as a unique tool for mass spectrometry applications. In particular, this article provides a historic overview of studies focused on understanding the phenomena underlying surface-induced dissociation (SID) and mass-selected deposition of complex ions on surfaces. Fast energy transfer in ion-surface collisions makes SID especially advantageous for structural characterization of large complex molecules, such as peptides, proteins, and protein complexes. Soft, dissociative, and reactive landing of mass-selected ions provide the basis for preparatory mass spectrometry. These techniques enable precisely controlled deposition of ions on surfaces for a variety of applications. This perspective article shows how basic concepts developed in the 1920s and 1970s have evolved to advance promising mass-spectrometry-based applications.

  9. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Nicholas B.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  10. Noise reduction in negative-ion quadrupole mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1993-01-01

    A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system having an ion source, quadrupole mass filter, and ion collector/recorder system. A weak, transverse magnetic field and an electron collector are disposed between the quadrupole and ion collector. When operated in negative ion mode, the ion source produces a beam of primarily negatively-charged particles from a sample, including electrons as well as ions. The beam passes through the quadrupole and enters the magnetic field, where the electrons are deflected away from the beam path to the electron collector. The negative ions pass undeflected to the ion collector where they are detected and recorded as a mass spectrum.

  11. Noise reduction in negative-ion quadrupole mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1993-04-20

    A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system is described having an ion source, quadrupole mass filter, and ion collector/recorder system. A weak, transverse magnetic field and an electron collector are disposed between the quadrupole and ion collector. When operated in negative ion mode, the ion source produces a beam of primarily negatively-charged particles from a sample, including electrons as well as ions. The beam passes through the quadrupole and enters the magnetic field, where the electrons are deflected away from the beam path to the electron collector. The negative ions pass undeflected to the ion collector where they are detected and recorded as a mass spectrum.

  12. Size, weight and position: ion mobility spectrometry and imaging MS combined.

    PubMed

    Kiss, András; Heeren, Ron M A

    2011-03-01

    Size, weight and position are three of the most important parameters that describe a molecule in a biological system. Ion mobility spectrometry is capable of separating molecules on the basis of their size or shape, whereas imaging mass spectrometry is an effective tool to measure the molecular weight and spatial distribution of molecules. Recent developments in both fields enabled the combination of the two technologies. As a result, ion-mobility-based imaging mass spectrometry is gaining more and more popularity as a (bio-)analytical tool enabling the determination of the size, weight and position of several molecules simultaneously on biological surfaces. This paper reviews the evolution of ion-mobility-based imaging mass spectrometry and provides examples of its application in analytical studies of biological surfaces.

  13. Impact of Various Beam Parameters on Lateral Scattering in Proton and Carbon-ion Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi Loushab, M.; Mowlavi, A.A.; Hadizadeh, M.H.; Izadi, R.; Jia, S.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background In radiation therapy with ion beams, lateral distributions of absorbed dose in the tissue are important. Heavy ion therapy, such as carbon-ion therapy, is a novel technique of high-precision external radiotherapy which has advantages over proton therapy in terms of dose locality and biological effectiveness. Methods In this study, we used Monte Carlo method-based Geant4 toolkit to simulate and calculate the effects of energy, shape and type of ion beams incident upon water on multiple scattering processes. Nuclear reactions have been taken into account in our calculation. A verification of this approach by comparing experimental data and Monte Carlo methods will be presented in an upcoming paper. Results Increasing particle energies, the width of the Bragg curve becomes larger but with increasing mass of particles, the width of the Bragg curve decreases. This is one of the advantages of carbon-ion therapy to treat with proton. The transverse scattering of dose distribution is increased with energy at the end of heavy ion beam range. It can also be seen that the amount of the dose scattering for carbon-ion beam is less than that of proton beam, up to about 160mm depth in water. Conclusion The distortion of Bragg peak profiles, due to lateral scattering of carbon-ion, is less than proton. Although carbon-ions are primarily scattered less than protons, the corresponding dose distributions, especially the lateral dose, are not much less. PMID:26688795

  14. Structure of alcohol cluster ions in the gas phase, according to spectrometry and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisilov, A. V.; Lantsuzskaya, E. V.; Levina, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Reduced ion mobility and scattering cross sections are calculated from experimentally obtained spectra of the ion mobility of linear aliphatic alcohols with carbon atom numbers from 2 to 9. A linear increase in the scattering cross sections as the molecular weight grows is found. According to the results from experiments and quantum chemical calculations, alcohol cluster ions do not form a compact structure. Neither are dipole moments compensated for during dimerization, in contrast to the aldehydes and ketones described earlier. It was concluded from ab initio calculations that charge delocalization in monomeric and dimeric ions of alcohols increases the dipole moment many times over.

  15. Ion trap mass spectrometry in the structural analysis of haemoglobin peptides modified by epichlorohydrin and diepoxybutane.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Nadia; Basile, Adriana; Pieri, Maria; Acampora, Antonio; Malorni, Livia; De Giulio, Beatrice; Sannolo, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Ion trap mass spectrometry has been shown to be particularly suitable for the structural analysis of high molecular weight peptides directly fragmented in the mass analyser without needing further sub-digestion reactions. Here we report the advantages of using multi-stage ion trap mass spectrometry in the structural characterisation of haemoglobin alkylated with epichlorohydrin and diepoxybutane. Alkylated globins were digested with trypsin and the peptide mixtures were analysed by MS(3). This technique allows the sequential fragmentation of peptides under analysis, giving rise to MS(3) product ion spectra with additional information with respect to MS(2) mass spectra. The results obtained complete the previously reported structural characterisation of alkylated haemoglobin, demonstrating the potential of ion trap mass spectrometry.

  16. Stimulated Brillouin scattering at the second harmonic of a laser in two-ion-species plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Sushila; Kaur, Sukhdeep; Tripathi, V. K.

    2008-12-01

    A high power laser (ω0, k0), propagating through a two-ion-species plasma, produces oscillatory electron velocity at the second harmonic due to V×B force. This velocity parametrically couples an ion acoustic wave (ω, k) and a scattered electromagnetic wave (ω1, k1), where ω1=ω-2ω0, k1=k-2k0 causing second harmonic Brillouin scattering. The growth rate, far above the threshold, scales linearly with laser intensity. It has maximum growth rate slightly tilted to side scattering and vanishes for back scattering. The presence of light ion species introduces linear damping on the ion mode, diminishing the growth rate of the parametric instability.

  17. A novel approach to collision-induced dissociation (CID) for ion mobility-mass spectrometry experiments.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christopher; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A; Gillig, Kent J; Russell, William K; Cologna, Stephanie M; Russell, David H

    2009-06-01

    Collision induced dissociation (CID) combined with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-ion mobility-mass spectrometry (MALDI-IM-MS) is described. In this approach, peptide ions are separated on the basis of mobility in a 15 cm drift cell. Following mobility separation, the ions exit the drift cell and enter a 5 cm vacuum interface with a high field region (up to 1000 V/cm) to undergo collisional activation. Ion transmission and ion kinetic energies in the interface are theoretically evaluated accounting for the pressure gradient, interface dimensions, and electric fields. Using this CID technique, we have successfully fragmented and sequenced a number of model peptide ions as well as peptide ions obtained by a tryptic digest. This instrument configuration allows for the simultaneous determination of peptide mass, peptide-ion sequence, and collision-cross section of MALDI-generated ions, providing information critical to the identification of unknown components in complex proteomic samples.

  18. Higher sensitivity secondary ion mass spectrometry of biological molecules for high resolution, chemically specific imaging.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Liam A; Heeren, Ron M A; de Lange, Robert P J; Fletcher, Ian W

    2006-09-01

    To expand the role of high spatial resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in biological studies, numerous developments have been reported in recent years for enhancing the molecular ion yield of high mass molecules. These include both surface modification, including matrix-enhanced SIMS and metal-assisted SIMS, and polyatomic primary ions. Using rat brain tissue sections and a bismuth primary ion gun able to produce atomic and polyatomic primary ions, we report here how the sensitivity enhancements provided by these developments are additive. Combined surface modification and polyatomic primary ions provided approximately 15.8 times more signal than using atomic primary ions on the raw sample, whereas surface modification and polyatomic primary ions yield approximately 3.8 and approximately 8.4 times more signal. This higher sensitivity is used to generate chemically specific images of higher mass biomolecules using a single molecular ion peak.

  19. High efficiency tandem mass spectrometry analysis using dual linear ion traps.

    PubMed

    Li, Linfan; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Hager, James W; Ouyang, Zheng

    2014-10-07

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) plays an essential role in modern chemical analysis. It is used for differentiating isomers and isobars and suppressing chemical noise, which allows high precision quantitation. The MS/MS analysis has been typically applied by isolating the target precursor ions, while disregarding other ions, followed by a fragmentation process that produces the product ions. In this study, configurations of dual linear ion traps were explored to develop high efficiency MS/MS analysis. The ions trapped in the first linear ion trap were axially, mass-selectively transferred to the second linear ion trap for MS/MS analysis. Ions from multiple compounds simultaneously introduced into the mass spectrometer could be sequentially analyzed. This development enables highly efficient use of the sample. For miniature ion trap mass spectrometers with discontinuous atmospheric pressure interfaces, the analysis speed and the quantitation precision can be significantly improved.

  20. Collisional cooling of large ions in electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chernushevich, Igor V; Thomson, Bruce A

    2004-03-15

    Collisional cooling of ions in the rf-only multipole guides has become a method of choice for coupling electrospray sources to various mass analyzers. Normally parameters of such ion guides (length, pressure) provide enough thermalization and focusing for ions in a wide mass range. Noncovalent complexes, however, have more compact conformations than denatured biomolecules of similar mass and, therefore may not be transmitted efficiently through standard ion guides, as demonstrated by theoretical analysis, simulations, and experiments. Several methods of improving collisional cooling for large compact ions have been developed on a quadrupole time-of-flight instrument, which include operating the ion guides at higher pressure and trapping ions to increase the cooling time. Improved transmission of heavy ions obtained with those methods is studied in experiments with proteasome 20S, an oligomeric protein noncovalent complex with molecular weight around 692,000, and a few other compounds.

  1. Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Peter J.; McKown, Henry S.; Smith, David H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit.

  2. Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Todd, P.J.; McKown, H.S.; Smith, D.H.

    1982-04-26

    The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Carly N; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Carly N.; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C.

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics.

  5. Resolving the bulk ion region of millimeter-wave collective Thomson scattering spectra at ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Stejner, M. Nielsen, S.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Salewski, M.; Moseev, D.; Schubert, M.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D. H.

    2014-09-15

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements provide information about the composition and velocity distribution of confined ion populations in fusion plasmas. The bulk ion part of the CTS spectrum is dominated by scattering off fluctuations driven by the motion of thermalized ion populations. It thus contains information about the ion temperature, rotation velocity, and plasma composition. To resolve the bulk ion region and access this information, we installed a fast acquisition system capable of sampling rates up to 12.5 GS/s in the CTS system at ASDEX Upgrade. CTS spectra with frequency resolution in the range of 1 MHz are then obtained through direct digitization and Fourier analysis of the CTS signal. We here describe the design, calibration, and operation of the fast receiver system and give examples of measured bulk ion CTS spectra showing the effects of changing ion temperature, rotation velocity, and plasma composition.

  6. U/Th dating by SHRIMP RG ion-microprobe mass spectrometry using single ion-exchange beads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Wooden, J.; Murphy, F.; Williams, Ross W.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new analytical method for U-series isotopes using the SHRIMP RG (Sensitive High mass Resolution Ion MicroProbe) mass spectrometer that utilizes the preconcentration of the U-series isotopes from a sample onto a single ion-exchange bead. Ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is capable of producing Th ionization efficiencies in excess of 2%. Analytical precision is typically better than alpha spectroscopy, but not as good as thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma multicollector mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Like TIMS and ICP-MS the method allows analysis of small samples sizes, but also adds the advantage of rapidity of analysis. A major advantage of ion-microprobe analysis is that U and Th isotopes are analyzed in the same bead, simplifying the process of chemical separation. Analytical time on the instrument is ???60 min per sample, and a single instrument-loading can accommodate 15-20 samples to be analyzed in a 24-h day. An additional advantage is that the method allows multiple reanalyses of the same bead and that samples can be archived for reanalysis at a later time. Because the ion beam excavates a pit only a few ??m deep, the mount can later be repolished and reanalyzed numerous times. The method described of preconcentrating a low concentration sample onto a small conductive substrate to allow ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is potentially applicable to many other systems. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Letter: High-mass capabilities of positive-ion and negative-ion direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gross, Jürgen H

    2016-01-01

    Of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (C(+)) tricyanomethide (A(-)) high-mass cluster ions of both positive ([C(n)A(n-1)](+)) and negative ([C(n-1)A(n)](-)) charge were generated and detected by direct analysis in real time (DART) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS). After optimization of the settings of the DART ionization source and of the mass analyzer ions of m/z values unprecedented in DART-MS were detected. Thus, the upper m/z limits of positive-ion and negative-ion DART- MS were substantially expanded. Negative-ion DART-MS delivered cluster ions up to [C(15)A(16)](-), m/z 3527 (nominal mass of monoisotopic ion), while positive-ion DART-MS even yielded ions up to [C(30)A(29)](+), m/z 6784. The identification of the cluster ions is supported by their accurate mass and exact mass differences corresponding to CA between adjacent cluster ion peaks.

  8. Combining ion mobility spectrometry with hydrogen-deuterium exchange and top-down MS for peptide ion structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Maleki, Hossein; Arndt, James R; Donohoe, Gregory C; Valentine, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    The gas-phase conformations of electrosprayed ions of the model peptide KKDDDDIIKIIK have been examined by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. [M+4H](4+) ions exhibit two conformers with collision cross sections of 418 Å(2) and 471 Å(2). [M+3H](3+) ions exhibit a predominant conformer with a collision cross section of 340 Å(2) as well as an unresolved conformer (shoulder) with a collision cross section of ~367 Å(2). Maximum HDX levels for the more compact [M+4H](4+) ions and the compact and partially-folded [M+3H](3+) ions are ~12.9, ~15.5, and ~14.9, respectively. Ion structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) suggest that this ordering of HDX level results from increased charge-site/exchange-site density for the more compact ions of lower charge. Additionally, a new model that includes two distance calculations (charge site to carbonyl group and carbonyl group to exchange site) for the computer-generated structures is shown to better correlate to the experimentally determined per-residue deuterium uptake. Future comparisons of IMS-HDX-MS data with structures obtained from MDS are discussed with respect to novel experiments that will reveal the HDX rates of individual residues.

  9. Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry with Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange and Top-Down MS for Peptide Ion Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Maleki, Hossein; Arndt, James R.; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2014-12-01

    The gas-phase conformations of electrosprayed ions of the model peptide KKDDDDIIKIIK have been examined by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. [M+4H]4+ ions exhibit two conformers with collision cross sections of 418 Å2 and 471 Å2. [M+3H]3+ ions exhibit a predominant conformer with a collision cross section of 340 Å2 as well as an unresolved conformer (shoulder) with a collision cross section of ~367 Å2. Maximum HDX levels for the more compact [M+4H]4+ ions and the compact and partially-folded [M+3H]3+ ions are ~12.9, ~15.5, and ~14.9, respectively. Ion structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) suggest that this ordering of HDX level results from increased charge-site/exchange-site density for the more compact ions of lower charge. Additionally, a new model that includes two distance calculations (charge site to carbonyl group and carbonyl group to exchange site) for the computer-generated structures is shown to better correlate to the experimentally determined per-residue deuterium uptake. Future comparisons of IMS-HDX-MS data with structures obtained from MDS are discussed with respect to novel experiments that will reveal the HDX rates of individual residues.

  10. Investigation of corrosion-resistant LC200N steel by back scattering Mössbauer spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pašteka, Lukáš; Miglierini, Marcel; Dekan, Július; Štefánik, Milan

    2016-10-01

    In this work we focus on characterization of LC200N steel by back-scattering Mössbauer spectrometry (MS). This geometry was used due to high sample thickness (0.5 mm). MS is a method suitable for determination of iron compounds and their properties in steels. We investigated samples with three different thermal treatments: non-hardened, hardened, and hardened with subsequent rapid quenching. Disk-shaped samples were cut off from original rods and polished from one side. The effect of surface treatment was investigated, too. Variations in microstructure imposed by different thermal and surface treatments were unveiled by Mössbauer parameters of backscattering spectra taken from both sides of the investigated samples. In this way, differences between the original as-cut and polished surfaces of the disks were unveiled.

  11. Multidimensional Separation of Natural Products Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Knochenmuss, Richard; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2016-05-01

    A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)was interfaced to an atmospheric drift tube ion mobility time of flight mass spectrometry. The power of multidimensional separation was demonstrated using chili pepper extracts. The ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility provided high resolving powers up to 166 for the HPLC eluent. With implementation of Hadamard transform (HT), the duty cycle for the ion mobility drift tube was increased from less than 1% to 50%, and the ion transmission efficiency was improved by over 200 times compared with pulsed mode, improving signal to noise ratio 10 times. HT ion mobility and TOF mass spectrometry provide an additional dimension of separation for complex samples without increasing the analysis time compared with conventional HPLC.

  12. Ion Mobility Tandem Mass Spectrometry Enhances Performance of Bottom-up Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Dominic; Vissers, Johannes P. C.; Hughes, Christopher J.; Hahne, Hannes; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Pachl, Fiona; Grzyb, Arkadiusz; Richardson, Keith; Wildgoose, Jason; Maier, Stefan K.; Marx, Harald; Wilhelm, Mathias; Becher, Isabelle; Lemeer, Simone; Bantscheff, Marcus; Langridge, James I.; Kuster, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    One of the limiting factors in determining the sensitivity of tandem mass spectrometry using hybrid quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight instruments is the duty cycle of the orthogonal ion injection system. As a consequence, only a fraction of the generated fragment ion beam is collected by the time-of-flight analyzer. Here we describe a method utilizing postfragmentation ion mobility spectrometry of peptide fragment ions in conjunction with mobility time synchronized orthogonal ion injection leading to a substantially improved duty cycle and a concomitant improvement in sensitivity of up to 10-fold for bottom-up proteomic experiments. This enabled the identification of 7500 human proteins within 1 day and 8600 phosphorylation sites within 5 h of LC-MS/MS time. The method also proved powerful for multiplexed quantification experiments using tandem mass tags exemplified by the chemoproteomic interaction analysis of histone deacetylases with Trichostatin A. PMID:25106551

  13. Neutron scattering for analysis of processes in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagurov, A. M.; Bobrikov, I. A.; Samoylova, N. Yu; Drozhzhin, O. A.; Antipov, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    The review is concerned with analysis and generalization of information on application of neutron scattering for elucidation of the structure of materials for rechargeable energy sources (mainly lithium-ion batteries) and on structural rearrangements in these materials occurring in the course of electrochemical processes. Applications of the main methods including neutron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering, inelastic neutron scattering, neutron reflectometry and neutron introscopy are considered. Information on advanced neutron sources is presented and a number of typical experiments are outlined. The results of some studies of lithium-containing materials for lithium-ion batteries, carried out at IBR-2 pulsed reactor, are discussed. The bibliography includes 50 references.

  14. Application of ion scattering spectroscopy to measurement of surface potential of MgO thin film under ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagatomi, T.; Kuwayama, T.; Takai, Y.; Yoshino, K.; Morita, Y.; Kitagawa, M.; Nishitani, M.

    2008-02-25

    An experimental approach was proposed for the measurement of the surface potential (SP) induced on an insulator surface during ion irradiation by ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS). The resultant ISS spectra obtained for a MgO thin film of 600 nm thickness on a Si substrate under 950 eV He{sup +} irradiation revealed that the surface is positively charged by approximately 230 V. In addition, the onset energy of a secondary ion peak indicated a SP of approximately 205 V. The present results confirmed that ISS is an effective technique for measuring the SP during ion irradiation.

  15. Negative thermal ion mass spectrometry of osmium, rhenium, and iridium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creaser, R. A.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for obtaining, in a conventional surface ionization mass spectrometer, intense ion beams of negatively charged oxides of Os, Re, and Ir by thermal ionization. It is shown that the principal ion species of these ions are OsO3(-), ReO4(-), and IrO2(-), respectively. For Re-187/Os-187 studies, this technique offers the advantage of isotopic analyses without prior chemical separation of Re from Os.

  16. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McLuckey, S A; Goeringer, D E; Glish, G L

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly pronated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap.

  17. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly protonated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Model for scattered ion fractions based on equality in the close encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabalais, J. Wayne; Chen, Jie-Nan; Kumar, R.; Narayana, M.

    1985-10-01

    A model is developed for electronic transitions in KeV ion/surface collisions which considers Auger and resonant transitions along the ion trajectory and electron promotions in the quasi-diatomic molecule formed in the close encounter. Application to Ne + scattering from Mg allows determination of ionization and neutralization probabilities as a function of the distance of closest approach.

  19. Ion mobility mass spectrometry of peptide, protein, and protein complex ions using a radio-frequency confining drift cell.

    PubMed

    Allen, Samuel J; Giles, Kevin; Gilbert, Tony; Bush, Matthew F

    2016-02-07

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry experiments enable the characterization of mass, assembly, and shape of biological molecules and assemblies. Here, a new radio-frequency confining drift cell is characterized and used to measure the mobilities of peptide, protein, and protein complex ions. The new drift cell replaced the traveling-wave ion mobility cell in a Waters Synapt G2 HDMS. Methods for operating the drift cell and determining collision cross section values using this experimental set up are presented within the context of the original instrument control software. Collision cross sections for 349 cations and anions are reported, 155 of which are for ions that have not been characterized previously using ion mobility. The values for the remaining ions are similar to those determined using a previous radio-frequency confining drift cell and drift tubes without radial confinement. Using this device under 2 Torr of helium gas and an optimized drift voltage, denatured and native-like ions exhibited average apparent resolving powers of 14.2 and 16.5, respectively. For ions with high mobility, which are also low in mass, the apparent resolving power is limited by contributions from ion gating. In contrast, the arrival-time distributions of low-mobility, native-like ions are not well explained using only contributions from ion gating and diffusion. For those species, the widths of arrival-time distributions are most consistent with the presence of multiple structures in the gas phase.

  20. Monte Carlo Simulation of Ion Trajectories of Reacting Chemical Systems: Mobility of Small Water Clusters in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissdorf, Walter; Seifert, Luzia; Derpmann, Valerie; Klee, Sonja; Vautz, Wolfgang; Benter, Thorsten

    2013-04-01

    For the comprehensive simulation of ion trajectories including reactive collisions at elevated pressure conditions, a chemical reaction simulation (RS) extension to the popular SIMION software package was developed, which is based on the Monte Carlo statistical approach. The RS extension is of particular interest to SIMION users who wish to simulate ion trajectories in collision dominated environments such as atmospheric pressure ion sources, ion guides (e.g., funnels, transfer multi poles), chemical reaction chambers (e.g., proton transfer tubes), and/or ion mobility analyzers. It is well known that ion molecule reaction rate constants frequently reach or exceed the collision limit obtained from kinetic gas theory. Thus with a typical dwell time of ions within the above mentioned devices in the ms range, chemical transformation reactions are likely to occur. In other words, individual ions change critical parameters such as mass, mobility, and chemical reactivity en passage to the analyzer, which naturally strongly affects their trajectories. The RS method simulates elementary reaction events of individual ions reflecting the behavior of a large ensemble by a representative set of simulated reacting particles. The simulation of the proton bound water cluster reactant ion peak (RIP) in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was chosen as a benchmark problem. For this purpose, the RIP was experimentally determined as a function of the background water concentration present in the IMS drift tube. It is shown that simulation and experimental data are in very good agreement, demonstrating the validity of the method.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of ion trajectories of reacting chemical systems: mobility of small water clusters in ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wissdorf, Walter; Seifert, Luzia; Derpmann, Valerie; Klee, Sonja; Vautz, Wolfgang; Benter, Thorsten

    2013-04-01

    For the comprehensive simulation of ion trajectories including reactive collisions at elevated pressure conditions, a chemical reaction simulation (RS) extension to the popular SIMION software package was developed, which is based on the Monte Carlo statistical approach. The RS extension is of particular interest to SIMION users who wish to simulate ion trajectories in collision dominated environments such as atmospheric pressure ion sources, ion guides (e.g., funnels, transfer multi poles), chemical reaction chambers (e.g., proton transfer tubes), and/or ion mobility analyzers. It is well known that ion molecule reaction rate constants frequently reach or exceed the collision limit obtained from kinetic gas theory. Thus with a typical dwell time of ions within the above mentioned devices in the ms range, chemical transformation reactions are likely to occur. In other words, individual ions change critical parameters such as mass, mobility, and chemical reactivity en passage to the analyzer, which naturally strongly affects their trajectories. The RS method simulates elementary reaction events of individual ions reflecting the behavior of a large ensemble by a representative set of simulated reacting particles. The simulation of the proton bound water cluster reactant ion peak (RIP) in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was chosen as a benchmark problem. For this purpose, the RIP was experimentally determined as a function of the background water concentration present in the IMS drift tube. It is shown that simulation and experimental data are in very good agreement, demonstrating the validity of the method.

  2. Error in trapped-ion quantum gates due to spontaneous photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeri, R.; Langer, C.; Jost, J. D.; Blakestad, R. B.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Hume, D.; Itano, W. M.; Knill, E.; Leibfried, D.; Reichle, R.; Seidelin, S.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Wineland, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Quantum bits that are encoded into hyperfine states of trapped ions are a promising system for Quantum Information Processing (QIP). Quantum gates performed on trapped ions use laser induced stimulated Raman transitions. The spontaneous scattering of photons therefore sets a fundamental limit to the gate fidelity. Here we present a calculation that explores these limits. Errors are shown to arise from two sources. The first is due to spin relaxation (spontaneous Raman photon-scattering events) and the second due to the momentum-recoil that is imparted to the trapped ions in the scattering process. It is shown that the gate error due to spontaneous photon scattering can be reduced to very small values with the use of high laser power. It is further shown that error levels required for fault-tolerant QIP are within reach of experimentally realistic laser parameters.

  3. Momentum transfer cross-section for ion scattering on dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, I. L.; Khrapak, S. A.; Thomas, H. M.

    2017-03-01

    The momentum transfer cross-section for ion scattering on charged dust particles is calculated using different models of the interaction potential. The results are applied to estimate the ion drag force for typical conditions used in the experiments with complex (dusty) plasmas. The influence of two factors on the ion-dust collision cross section is discussed. The first is related to the nonlinear screening effects associated with the strong coupling between ions and dust particles. The second factor is the plasma absorption by dust particles. It is shown that the nonlinear screening effects are of importance and affect both the momentum transfer cross-section and the ion drag force. On the other hand, the absorption process affects the scattering momentum transfer cross-section only at low collision energies and thus can be neglected in estimating the ion drag force.

  4. Ion Mobility Separations of Isomers based upon Long Path Length Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Baker, Erin S.; Aly, Noor A.; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Zhang, Xing; Zheng, Xueyun; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Webb, Ian K.; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based multi-omic measurements, including proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, and glycomics, are increasingly transforming our ability to characterize and understand biological systems, but, presently have limitations due to the chemical diversity and range of abundances of biomolecules in complex samples. Advances addressing these challenges increasingly are based upon the ability to quickly separate, react and otherwise manipulate sample components for analysis by MS. Here we report on a new approach using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) to enable long serpentine path ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations followed by MS analyses. This approach provides previously unachieved mobility biomolecule isomer separations for biomolecular species, in conjunction with more effective ion utilization, and producing a basis for the improved characterization of very small samples.

  5. Characterization of Polyolefin Pyrolysis Species Produced Under Ambient Conditions by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farenc, Mathilde; Witt, Matthias; Craven, Kirsten; Barrère-Mangote, Caroline; Afonso, Carlos; Giusti, Pierre

    2017-03-01

    Polyolefins such as polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) are often characterized from their pyrolysis products by Py-MS. Nowadays the development of plasma-based direct probe atmospheric pressure sources allow the direct analysis of these polymers. These sources operate at atmospheric pressure, which implies a limited control of the ionization conditions. It was shown that side reactions could occur with species present in air, such as O2, which may lead to the formation of oxidized compounds. In this work, ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR) were used for the exhaustive characterization of the PP and PE pyrolysis ions produced using plasma-based atmospheric pressure ion sources. Both PP and PE yielded distributions of pyrolysis products presenting different amounts of unsaturation but also different numbers of oxygen atoms. In addition, the ions produced from PP presented a lower collision cross-section (CCS) than those produced from PE. In the same way, both PP and PE present repeated patterns separated by 14 m/z in the bidimensional drift time versus m/z plots. Within these plots, several trend lines can be evidenced, which are specific of each polymer investigated. Differences were observed between isotactic and atactic samples concerning the pyrolysis profile relative abundance and collision cross-section.

  6. Characterization of Polyolefin Pyrolysis Species Produced Under Ambient Conditions by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farenc, Mathilde; Witt, Matthias; Craven, Kirsten; Barrère-Mangote, Caroline; Afonso, Carlos; Giusti, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Polyolefins such as polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) are often characterized from their pyrolysis products by Py-MS. Nowadays the development of plasma-based direct probe atmospheric pressure sources allow the direct analysis of these polymers. These sources operate at atmospheric pressure, which implies a limited control of the ionization conditions. It was shown that side reactions could occur with species present in air, such as O2, which may lead to the formation of oxidized compounds. In this work, ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR) were used for the exhaustive characterization of the PP and PE pyrolysis ions produced using plasma-based atmospheric pressure ion sources. Both PP and PE yielded distributions of pyrolysis products presenting different amounts of unsaturation but also different numbers of oxygen atoms. In addition, the ions produced from PP presented a lower collision cross-section (CCS) than those produced from PE. In the same way, both PP and PE present repeated patterns separated by 14 m/z in the bidimensional drift time versus m/z plots. Within these plots, several trend lines can be evidenced, which are specific of each polymer investigated. Differences were observed between isotactic and atactic samples concerning the pyrolysis profile relative abundance and collision cross-section.

  7. Submicron mass spectrometry imaging of single cells by combined use of mega electron volt time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning transmission ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Siketić, Zdravko; Bogdanović Radović, Ivančica; Jakšić, Milko; Popović Hadžija, Marijana; Hadžija, Mirko

    2015-08-31

    In order to better understand biochemical processes inside an individual cell, it is important to measure the molecular composition at the submicron level. One of the promising mass spectrometry imaging techniques that may be used to accomplish this is Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), using MeV energy heavy ions for excitation. MeV ions have the ability to desorb large intact molecules with a yield that is several orders of magnitude higher than conventional SIMS using keV ions. In order to increase the spatial resolution of the MeV TOF-SIMS system, we propose an independent TOF trigger using a STIM (scanning transmission ion microscopy) detector that is placed just behind the thin transmission target. This arrangement is suitable for biological samples in which the STIM detector simultaneously measures the mass distribution in scanned samples. The capability of the MeV TOF-SIMS setup was demonstrated by imaging the chemical composition of CaCo-2 cells.

  8. Analysis of Ultra-Pure Gases by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimac, Robert M.; Wernlund, Roger F.; Cohen, Martin J.

    1995-01-01

    Work has continued with the evaluation of the Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) for the analysis of gases having low parts-per-billion (10(exp -9)) water concentration. A modified PCP, inc. MMS-160 Mobility Mass Spectrometer System was used for the analysis of ultra-pure argon and nitrogen. The MMS-160 system permits the mass-identification of unique reactant and product ions observed in the reduced-water host gases. When the water is removed to low ppb levels, higher energy reactant ions are observed. In nitrogen, distinct odd- and even-numbered nitrogen cluster ion mobility peaks are observed, as well as adduct ion peaks from the trace contaminants in the gas. Argon also produces a cluster ion mobility peak and adduct ion peaks from trace components in the gas. Levels of contaminants in these ultra-pure gases can be determined from the ion mobility spectra. A calibrated source was used to provide variable known quantities of water to the pure gas supply of the IMS.

  9. Laser desorption mass spectrometry and small angle neutron scattering of heavy fossil materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1997-09-01

    The determination of the structural building blocks and the molecular weight range of heavy hydrocarbon materials is of crucial importance in research on their reactivity and for their processing. The chemically and physically heterogenous nature of heavy hydrocarbon materials, such as coals, heavy petroleum fractions, and residues, dictates that their structure and reactivity patterns be complicated. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the molecular structure and molecular weight distribution of these materials is not dependent on a single molecule, but on a complex mixture of molecules which vary among coals and heavy petroleum samples. Laser Desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) is emerging as a technique for molecular weight determination having found widespread use in biological polymer research, but is still a relatively new technique in the fossil fuel area. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) provides information on the size and shape of heavy fossil materials. SANS offers the advantages of high penetration power even in thick cells at high temperatures and high contrast for hydrocarbon systems dispersed in deuterated solvents. LDMS coupled with time of flight has the advantages of high sensitivity and transmission and high mass range. We have used LDMS to examine various heavy fossil-derived materials including: long chain hydrocarbons, asphaltenes from petroleum vacuum resids, and coals. This paper describes the application of laser desorption and small angle neutron scattering techniques to the analysis of components in coals, petroleum resids and unsaturated polymers.

  10. Two-atom model in enhanced ion backscattering near 180/sup 0/ scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Oen, O.S.

    1981-06-01

    The recent discovery by Pronko, Appleton, Holland, and Wilson of an unusual enhancement of the yield of ions backscattered through angles close to 180/sup 0/ from the near surface regions of solids is investigated using a two-atom scattering model. The model predicts an enhancement effect in amorphous solids whose physical origin arises from the tolerance of path for those ions whose inward and outward trajectories lie in the vicinity of the critical impact parameter. Predictions are given of the dependence of the yield enhancement on the following parameters: ion energy, backscattering depth, exit angle, scattering potential, atomic numbers of projectile and target, and atomic density of target.

  11. New frontiers for mass spectrometry based upon structures for lossless ion manipulations.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Yehia M; Hamid, Ahmed M; Deng, Liulin; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Webb, Ian K; Baker, Erin S; Smith, Richard D

    2017-03-06

    Structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) provide a new paradigm for efficient, complex and extended gas phase ion manipulations. SLIM are created from electric fields generated by the application of DC and RF potentials to arrays of electrodes patterned on two parallel surfaces. The electric fields provide lossless ion manipulations, including effective ion transport and storage. SLIM modules have been developed using both constant and oscillatory electric fields (e.g. traveling waves) to affect the ion motion. Ion manipulations demonstrated to date with SLIM include: extended trapping, ion selection, ion dissociation, and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations achieving unprecedented ultra high resolution. SLIM thus provide the basis for previously impractical manipulations, such as very long path length ion mobility separations where ions traverse a serpentine path multiple times, as well as new capabilities that extend the utility of these developments based on temporal and spatial compression of ion mobility separations and other ion distributions. The evolution of SLIM devices developed over the last three years is reviewed and we provide examples of various ion manipulations performed, and briefly discuss potential applications and new directions.

  12. A minimum thickness gate valve with integrated ion optics for mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Jason L; O'Connor, Peter B

    2005-04-01

    A minimum thickness gate valve design for mass spectrometry is described in detail. The ion optics required to transmit ions from the source to the ICR cell are integrated into the design to minimize fringe field effects on the ions as they travel through the gate valve. The total thickness of the complete gate valve assembly is 1.03 in. (26.2 mm) with a maximum fringe field distance of 0.065 in. (1.7 mm). The gate valve is able to maintain a vacuum of <10(-10) mbar at the ICR cell when the source is vented to atmosphere and the estimated ion transfer efficiency is >95%.

  13. Searching For A Suitable Gas Ion Source For 14C Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Reden, Karl von; Roberts, Mark; Han, Baoxi; Schneider, Robert; Wills, John

    2007-08-10

    This paper describes the challenges facing 14C Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) in the effort to directly analyze the combusted effluent of a chromatograph (or any other continuous source of sample material). An efficient, low-memory negative gas ion source would greatly simplify the task to make this a reality. We discuss our tests of a microwave ion source charge exchange canal combination, present an improved design, and hope to generate more interest in the negative ion source community to develop a direct-extraction negative carbon gas ion source for AMS.

  14. Scattering of sulfur ions by carbon: Classical-trajectory Monte Carlo results

    SciTech Connect

    Slabkowska, Katarzyna; Polasik, Marek; Janowicz, Maciej

    2003-01-01

    We analyze classically the scattering of sulfur ions by carbon using the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo method. It is assumed that the scatterer and scattered nuclei are coupled to each other as well as to all electrons, but there is no coupling between electrons themselves. To initialize the state of both atoms, quasiexact energies are used that are obtained from the Dirac-Fock method. Effective charges are used to partially take into account the intra-atomic interactions between electrons. We concentrate on the cross sections for production of vacancies in the K and L shells and capture of electrons to K, L, and M shells of the sulfur ions. The dependence of these cross sections on the energy of the projectile sulfur ions and on the initial charge states of these ions is analyzed. Our results will be helpful in the interpretation of x-ray spectra from highly ionized fast sulfur projectiles passing through a carbon foil.

  15. A novel method for the determination of the site of glucuronidation by ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Atsushi; Ohe, Tomoyuki; Chiba, Masato

    2012-08-01

    Glucuronidation not only plays a detoxifying role in living body, but it also can complicate pharmacological and toxicological profiles of new drug candidates by forming active and reactive conjugated metabolites. The opportunity to elucidate structure of conjugated metabolites has increased in drug metabolism studies at the early development stage. General methodologies for the structure elucidation of glucuronide conjugate(s) include liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and NMR spectroscopy. In many cases, LC-MS/MS alone cannot unequivocally identify the site(s) of conjugation in isomeric glucuronidations. In the present study, we established a new strategy for the structure elucidation of glucuronide conjugates using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-mass spectrometry. Linear correlation between calculated collision cross-sections (CCS) and actual drift times from IMS was found for each set of parent compound (raloxifene, losartan, telmisartan, and estradiol) and the corresponding MS/MS product ions. Thus, obtained regression lines accurately and selectively projected the actual drift times of authentic standards of glucuronide conjugate based on the theoretical CCS values. The established method was used for the accurate assignment of predominant formation of phenolic glucuronide conjugate (SCH 60663) in the isomeric (phenolic and benzylic) glucuronidations of ezetimibe in the incubated sample with cryopreserved human hepatocytes. This application demonstrates the potential to facilitate the structure identification of glucuronide conjugates at the early development stage of new drug candidates.

  16. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization/secondary neutral mass spectrometry and cesium attachment secondary ion mass spectrometry of bronze : a comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, M. P.; Calaway, W. F.; Pellin, M. J.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Constantinides, I.; Adriaens, A.; Adams, F.; Materials Science Division; Sam Houston State Univ.; Univ. of Antwerp

    2002-05-01

    Archaeologists have considerable interests in ancient bronzes. They want to know how these alloys were produced and how they corroded with time. Modern bronzes, with compositions very close to that of some ancient bronzes, have been produced and two methods were examined to characterize one of these modern bronzes. Analysis of this modern bronze using resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization/secondary neutral mass spectrometry (REMPI/SNMS) is examined in detail and compared to cesium attachment secondary ion mass spectrometry (CsAMS) results. Both REMPI/SNMS and CsAMS were used to quantify the composition of Fe, Ni and Mn in a modern quaternary bronze designed to serve as a certified reference material for an ancient bronze. Both methods exhibit reduced matrix effects when compared to secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and thus quantification should be simplified. It was found that when relative sensitivity factors obtained from a standard bronze material are used to calibrate the instruments, the REMPI/SNMS measurements yield results that were more sensitive and more accurate.

  17. Comparison of mono- and polyatomic primary ions for the characterization of organic dye overlayers with static secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lenaerts, Jens; Van Vaeck, Luc; Gijbels, Renaat; Van Luppen, Jaymes

    2004-01-01

    Organic carbocyanine dye coatings have been analyzed by time-of-flight static secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-S-SIMS) using three types of primary ions: Ga(+) operating at 25 keV, and Xe(+) and SF(5) (+) both operating at 9 keV. Secondary ion yields obtained with these three primary ions have been compared for coatings with different layer thickness, varying from (sub)-monolayer to multilayers, on different substrates (Si, Ag and AgBr cubic microcrystals). For (sub)-monolayers deposited on Ag, Xe(+) and SF(5) (+) primary ions generate similar precursor ion intensities, but with Ga(+) slightly lower precursor ion intensities were obtained. Thick coatings on Ag as well as mono- and multilayers on Si produce the highest precursor and fragment ion intensities with the polyatomic primary ion. The yield difference between SF(5) (+) and Xe(+) can reach a factor of 6. In comparison with Ga(+), yield enhancements by up to a factor of 180 are observed with SF(5) (+). For the mass spectrometric analysis of dye layers on AgBr microcrystals, SF(5) (+) again proves to be the primary ion of choice.

  18. Plasma characterization using ultraviolet Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic and electron plasma waves (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    Collective Thomson scattering is a technique for measuring the plasma conditions in laser-plasma experiments. Simultaneous measurements of ion-acoustic and electron plasma-wave spectra were obtained using a 263.25-nm Thomson-scattering probe beam. A fully reflective collection system was used to record light scattered from electron plasma waves at electron densities greater than 1021 cm-3, which produced scattering peaks near 200 nm. An accurate analysis of the experimental Thomson-scattering spectra required accounting for plasma gradients, instrument sensitivity, optical effects, and background radiation. Practical techniques for including these effects when fitting Thomson-scattering spectra are presented and applied to the measured spectra to show the improvements in plasma characterization.

  19. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation.

  20. Detection of alkylmethylphosphonic acids on leaf surfaces by static secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, J.C.; Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A. )

    1995-01-01

    Detection of environmental degradation products of nerve agents directly from the surface of plant leaves using static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is demonstrated. Pinacolylmethylphosphonic acid (PMPA), isopropylmethylphosphonic acid (IMPA), and ethylmethylphosphonic acid (EMPA) were spiked from aqueous solutions onto philodendron leaves prior to analysis by static SIMS. Fragment ions were observed in the anion SIMS spectra from all three compounds at m/z 63, 77, 79, and 95, which are attributed to PO[sub 2][sup [minus

  1. Analysis of Supramolecular Complexes of 3-Methylxanthine with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Kayleigh L.; Eiceman, Gary A.; Reynolds, James C.; Creaser, Colin S.

    2016-05-01

    Miniaturised field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), combined with mass spectrometry (MS), has been applied to the study of self-assembling, noncovalent supramolecular complexes of 3-methylxanthine (3-MX) in the gas phase. 3-MX forms stable tetrameric complexes around an alkali metal (Na+, K+) or ammonium cation, to generate a diverse array of complexes with single and multiple charge states. Complexes of (3-MX)n observed include: singly charged complexes where n = 1-8 and 12 and doubly charged complexes where n = 12-24. The most intense ions are those associated with multiples of tetrameric units, where n = 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24. The effect of dispersion field on the ion intensities of the self-assembled complexes indicates some fragmentation of higher order complexes within the FAIMS electrodes (in-FAIMS dissociation), as well as in-source collision induced dissociation within the mass spectrometer. FAIMS-MS enables charge state separation of supramolecular complexes of 3-MX and is shown to be capable of separating species with overlapping mass-to-charge ratios. FAIMS selected transmission also results in an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio for low intensity complexes and enables the visualization of species undetectable without FAIMS.

  2. Decomposition of cyclohexane ion induced by intense femtosecond laser fields by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Takao; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kanya, Reika; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2016-01-14

    Decomposition of cyclohexane cations induced by intense femtosecond laser fields at the wavelength of 800 nm is investigated by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry in which cyclohexane cations C{sub 6}H{sub 12}{sup +} stored in an ion trap are irradiated with intense femtosecond laser pulses and the generated fragment ions are recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The various fragment ion species, C{sub 5}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 7, 9), C{sub 4}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 5–8), C{sub 3}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 3–7), C{sub 2}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 2–6), and CH{sub 3}{sup +}, identified in the mass spectra show that decomposition of C{sub 6}H{sub 12}{sup +} proceeds efficiently by the photo-irradiation. From the laser intensity dependences of the yields of the fragment ion species, the numbers of photons required for producing the respective fragment ions are estimated.

  3. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Budisulistiorini, Sri H.; Zhang, Haofei; Surratt, Jason D.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2016-07-01

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS-MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI-IMS-MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambient field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS-MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS-MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS-MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS-MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of oligomers, and confirm the

  4. Dual mode ion mobility spectrometer and method for ion mobility spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Miller, Carla J [Idaho Falls, ID; Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-08-21

    Ion mobility spectrometer apparatus may include an ion interface that is operable to hold positive and negative ions and to simultaneously release positive and negative ions through respective positive and negative ion ports. A first drift chamber is operatively associated with the positive ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A first ion detector operatively associated with the first drift chamber detects positive ions from the first drift chamber. A second drift chamber is operatively associated with the negative ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A second ion detector operatively associated with the second drift chamber detects negative ions from said second drift chamber.

  5. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  6. Determining the Locations of Ions and Water around DNA from X-Ray Scattering Measurements.

    PubMed

    Meisburger, Steve P; Pabit, Suzette A; Pollack, Lois

    2015-06-16

    Nucleic acids carry a negative charge, attracting salt ions and water. Interactions with these components of the solvent drive DNA to condense, RNA to fold, and proteins to bind. To understand these biological processes, knowledge of solvent structure around the nucleic acids is critical. Yet, because they are often disordered, ions and water evade detection by x-ray crystallography and other high-resolution methods. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is uniquely sensitive to the spatial correlations between solutes and the surrounding solvent. Thus, SAXS provides an experimental constraint to guide or test emerging solvation theories. However, the interpretation of SAXS profiles is nontrivial because of the difficulty in separating the scattering signals of each component: the macromolecule, ions, and hydration water. Here, we demonstrate methods for robustly deconvoluting these signals, facilitating a more straightforward comparison with theory. Using SAXS data collected on an absolute intensity scale for short DNA duplexes in solution with Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+) counterions, we mathematically decompose the scattering profiles into components (DNA, water, and ions) and validate the decomposition using anomalous scattering measurements. In addition, we generate a library of physically motivated ion atmosphere models and rank them by agreement with the scattering data. The best-fit models have relatively compact ion atmospheres when compared to predictions from the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory of electrostatics. Thus, the x-ray scattering methods presented here provide a valuable measurement of the global structure of the ion atmosphere that can be used to test electrostatics theories that go beyond the mean-field approximation.

  7. Determining the Locations of Ions and Water around DNA from X-Ray Scattering Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Meisburger, Steve P.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Pollack, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acids carry a negative charge, attracting salt ions and water. Interactions with these components of the solvent drive DNA to condense, RNA to fold, and proteins to bind. To understand these biological processes, knowledge of solvent structure around the nucleic acids is critical. Yet, because they are often disordered, ions and water evade detection by x-ray crystallography and other high-resolution methods. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is uniquely sensitive to the spatial correlations between solutes and the surrounding solvent. Thus, SAXS provides an experimental constraint to guide or test emerging solvation theories. However, the interpretation of SAXS profiles is nontrivial because of the difficulty in separating the scattering signals of each component: the macromolecule, ions, and hydration water. Here, we demonstrate methods for robustly deconvoluting these signals, facilitating a more straightforward comparison with theory. Using SAXS data collected on an absolute intensity scale for short DNA duplexes in solution with Na+, K+, Rb+, or Cs+ counterions, we mathematically decompose the scattering profiles into components (DNA, water, and ions) and validate the decomposition using anomalous scattering measurements. In addition, we generate a library of physically motivated ion atmosphere models and rank them by agreement with the scattering data. The best-fit models have relatively compact ion atmospheres when compared to predictions from the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory of electrostatics. Thus, the x-ray scattering methods presented here provide a valuable measurement of the global structure of the ion atmosphere that can be used to test electrostatics theories that go beyond the mean-field approximation. PMID:26083928

  8. Analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beach, Daniel G; Melanson, Jeremy E; Purves, Randy W

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry remains a challenge because of their high polarity, large number of analogues and the complex matrix in which they occur. Here we investigate the potential utility of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) as a gas-phase ion separation tool for analysis of PSTs by mass spectrometry. We investigate the separation of PSTs using FAIMS with two divergent goals: using FAIMS as a primary separation tool for rapid screening by electrospray ionization (ESI)-FAIMS-MS or combined with LC in a multidimensional LC-ESI-FAIMS-MS separation. First, a survey of the parameters that affect the sensitivity and selectivity of PST analysis by FAIMS was carried out using ESI-FAIMS-MS. In particular, the use of acetonitrile as a gas additive in the carrier gas flow offered good separation of all PST epimeric pairs. A second set of FAIMS conditions was also identified, which focussed PSTs to a relatively narrow CV range allowing development of an LC-ESI-FAIMS-MS method for analysis of PST toxins in complex mussel tissue extracts. The quantitative capabilities of this method were evaluated by analysing a PST containing mussel tissue matrix material. Results compared favourably with analysis by an established LC-post-column oxidation-fluorescence method with recoveries ranging from 70 to 106%, although sensitivity was somewhat reduced. The current work represents the first successful separation of PST isomers using ion mobility and shows the promise of FAIMS as a tool for analysis of algal biotoxins in complex samples and outlines some critical requirements for its future improvement.

  9. Coulomb crystal mass spectrometry in a digital ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Nabanita; Pollum, Laura L.; Smith, Alexander D.; Keller, Matthias; Rennick, Christopher J.; Heazlewood, Brianna R.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2015-03-01

    We present a mass spectrometric technique for identifying the masses and relative abundances of Coulomb-crystallized ions held in a linear Paul trap. A digital radio-frequency wave form is employed to generate the trapping potential, as this can be cleanly switched off, and static dipolar fields are subsequently applied to the trap electrodes for ion ejection. Close to 100% detection efficiency is demonstrated for Ca+ and CaF+ ions from bicomponent Ca+-CaF+ Coulomb crystals prepared by the reaction of Ca+ with CH3F . A quantitative linear relationship is observed between ion number and the corresponding integrated time-of-flight (TOF) peak, independent of the ionic species. The technique is applicable to a diverse range of multicomponent Coulomb crystals—demonstrated here for Ca+-NH 3+ -NH 4+ and Ca+-CaOH +-CaOD + crystals—and will facilitate the measurement of ion-molecule reaction rates and branching ratios in complicated reaction systems.

  10. ANALYSIS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY ION TRAP TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ion-trap mass spectrometer with a wave board and tandem mass spectrometry software was used to analyze gas chromatographically separated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by using collision-induced dissociation (CID). The nonresonant (multiple collision) mode was used to...

  11. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Waltman, Melanie J.

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  12. Liquid Nebulization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry Based Quantification of Nanoparticle-Protein Conjugate Formation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seongho; Oberreit, Derek R; Van Schooneveld, Gary; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-08-02

    Despite the importance of examining the formation of nanoparticle-protein conjugates, there is a dearth of routine techniques for nanoparticle-protein conjugate characterization. The most prominent change to a nanoparticle population upon conjugate formation is a shift in the nanoparticle size distribution function. However, commonly employed dynamic light scattering based approaches for size distribution characterization are ineffective for nonmonodisperse samples, and further they are relatively insensitive to size shifts of only several nanometers, which are common during conjugate formation. Conversely, gas phase ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) techniques can be used to reliably examine polydisperse samples, and are sensitive to ∼1 nm size distribution function shifts; the challenge with IMS is to convert nanoparticle-protein conjugates to aerosol particles without bringing about nonspecific aggregation or conjugate formation. Except in limited circumstances, electrospray based aerosolization has proven difficult to apply for this purpose. Here we show that via liquid nebulization (LN) with online, high-flow-rate dilution (with dilution factors up to 10 000) it is possible to aerosolize nanoparticle-protein conjugates, enabling IMS measurements of their conjugate size distribution functions. We specifically employ the LN-IMS system to examine bovine serum albumin binding to gold nanoparticles. Inferred maximum protein surface coverages (∼0.025 nm(-2)) from measurements are shown to be in excellent agreement with reported values for gold from quartz crystal microbalance measurements. It is also shown that LN-IMS measurements can be used to detect size distribution function shifts on the order of 1 nm, even in circumstances where the size distribution function itself has a standard deviation of ∼5 nm. In total, the reported measurements suggest that LN-IMS is a potentially simple and robust technique for nanoparticle-protein conjugate characterization.

  13. Excitation of fullerene ions during grazing scattering from a metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wethekam, S.; Winter, H.

    2007-09-15

    Angular distributions, fragmentation, and charge fractions are studied for grazing scattering of C{sub 60}{sup +} fullerenes with keV energies from a clean and flat Al(001) surface. At low energies for the motion along the surface normal, C{sub 60}{sup +} ions are scattered nearly elastically, whereas for larger normal energies energy loss is substantial. We compare our experimental results with classical trajectory simulations exploiting the Tersoff potential between atoms in the cluster and different types of interaction potentials for the cluster with the surface. The internal energy of scattered clusters is deduced from the analysis of fragments. We observe that the loss of kinetic energy for the motion along the surface normal is transferred to internal excitations of the cluster, whereas the energy transfer to the metal surface is negligible. The charge state distributions for scattered projectiles can be understood by a full neutralization of incident ions at the surface and subsequent delayed electron emission.

  14. Characterizing the lipid and metabolite changes associated with placental function and pregnancy complications using ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin S.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2017-03-29

    A successful pregnancy is dependent upon discrete biological events, which include embryo implantation, decidualization, and placentation. Furthermore, problems associated with each of these events can cause infertility or conditions such as preeclampsia. A greater understanding of the molecular changes associated with these complex processes is necessary to aid in identifying treatments for each condition. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies have been used to identify metabolites and lipids associated with pregnancy-related complications. However, due to limitations associated with conventional implementations of both techniques, novel technology developments are needed to more fully understand the initiation and development ofmore » pregnancy related problems at the molecular level. Here, we describe current analytical techniques for metabolomic and lipidomic characterization of pregnancy complications and discuss the potential for new technologies such as ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry and mass spectrometry imaging to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular changes that affect the placenta and pregnancy outcomes.« less

  15. Atmospheric pressure ionization of chlorinated ethanes in ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Benson, Michael T.

    2015-05-16

    This study investigates the APCI mechanisms associated with chlorinated ethanes in an attempt to define conditions under which unique pseudo-molecular adducts, in addition to chloride ion, can be produced for analytical measurements using IMS and MS. The ionization chemistry of chlorinated compounds typically leads to the detection of only the halide ions. Using molecular modeling, which provides insights into the ion formation and relative binding energies, predictions for the formation of pseudo-molecular adducts are postulated. Predicted structures of the chloride ion with multiple hydrogens on the ethane backbone was supported by the observation of specific pseudo-molecular adducts in IMS and MS spectra. With the proper instrumental conditions, such as short reaction times and low temp.

  16. Characterization Of Commonly Encountered Explosives Using Highfield Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Coupled With Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    a second nitro group. In other words, the predominant fragment ion peak shown here is the same elemental composition as the [M]- ion for... composition X) was developed as an explosive during the 1930s and was used widely during World War II. This explosive is found in many mixtures (such as...which is Composition C-4 (RDX with polyisobutylene and di(2-ethylhexyl)sebacate as the binder and plasticizer). RDX is stable at room temperature

  17. Theory Of Anomalous X-Ray Scattering From Atoms And Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, R. H.; Kissel, Lynn

    1988-07-01

    New developments in the theory of anomalous x-ray scattering are reviewed. The second order S-matrix calculations remove several previous discrepancies, in particular it is now known that there is an error in the Cromer-Liberman tables. In high Z elements a window is found in near threshold scattering at back angles. New results obtained for ions indicate that with increasing degrees of ionization the anomalous behavior near threshold weakens.

  18. Electron-ion collision-frequency for x-ray Thomson scattering in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faussurier, Gérald Blancard, Christophe

    2016-01-15

    Two methods are presented to calculate the electron-ion collision-frequency in dense plasmas using an average-atom model. The first one is based on the Kubo-Greenwood approach. The second one uses the Born and Lenard-Balescu approximations. The two methods are used to calculate x-ray Thomson scattering spectra. Illustrations are shown for dense beryllium and aluminum plasmas. Comparisons with experiment are presented in the case of an x-ray Thomson scattering spectrum.

  19. Electron-ion collision-frequency for x-ray Thomson scattering in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Two methods are presented to calculate the electron-ion collision-frequency in dense plasmas using an average-atom model. The first one is based on the Kubo-Greenwood approach. The second one uses the Born and Lenard-Balescu approximations. The two methods are used to calculate x-ray Thomson scattering spectra. Illustrations are shown for dense beryllium and aluminum plasmas. Comparisons with experiment are presented in the case of an x-ray Thomson scattering spectrum.

  20. A Review and Bibliography of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Ridge Nati. Lab., Oak Ridge, Tenn .). Int. J. Mass SSSR GDR lIM6, 411-13 (Rus). Edited by Orlov, A. N.; Spectrom. Ion Phys. 1978 26(1), 61-76 (Eng). The...Monolage. statisch, magn. Ablkg.. 10 porn . 1143 (1969). W. oxicdation, 02-Partialcirucc. 69- 11 Investigation of Oxygen Adsorption on 69 - 15

  1. Polyatomic ion/surface collisions: new methodology in tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mabud, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The excitation of a gas phase ion to induce fragmentation is an important aspect of tandem mass spectrometry. Investigations have been made by using metal surfaces as collision partners to activate polyatomic ions by using ions of 20-150 eV kinetic energy. Among the phenomena investigated are dissociation of the polyatomic ions upon collision with metal surfaces. The extent of dissociation can be controlled by selection of the impact energy. Collision with a surface gives rise to a narrower range of internal energies than do the corresponding ion/gaseous target collisions. Very large amounts of energy can be deposited in polyatomic ions upon collision with a metal target. Even at modest laboratory kinetic energies, the average internal energy deposited in ion/surface collisions exceeds that in gaseous collisions. Charge-exchange of multiply-charged species at the surface also occurs. Although simple charge exchange is observed, dissociative charge exchange is dominant in the cases studied. Dissociation and charge exchange of polyatomic ions in ion/surface collision are also accompanied by reactive collisions between organic ions and gas-covered metal surfaces. Utility of polyatomic ion/surface interaction technique for isomeric ion characterization has also been investigated. The ion/surface interaction technique appears to have excellent ability to distinguish isomeric ions. One advantage of SID is isomeric ion characterization lies in the fact that reactive collisions occur simultaneously and add a new dimension of information to the daughter spectra recorded. The hydrogen and methyl radical abstraction reactions assist in distinguishing closely related isomeric ions.

  2. Pendular Proteins in Gases and New Avenues for Characterization of Macromolecules by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Noskov, Sergei; Purves, Randy; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-04-21

    Polar molecules align in electric fields when the dipole energy (proportional to field intensity E × dipole moment p) exceeds the thermal rotational energy. Small molecules have low p and align only at inordinately high E or upon extreme cooling. Many biomacromolecules and ions are strong permanent dipoles and may align at E achievable in gases and room temperature. The collision cross sections of aligned ions with gas molecules generally differ from orientationally averaged quantities, affecting ion mobilities measured in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) separates ions by the difference between mobilities at high and low E and hence can resolve and identify macroion conformers based on the mobility difference between pendular and free rotor states. An exceptional sensitivity of that difference to the ion geometry and charge distribution holds the potential for a powerful new method for separation and characterization of macromolecular species. Theory predicts that the pendular alignment of ions in gases at any E requires a minimum p depending on the ion mobility, gas pressure, and temperature. At ambient conditions used in current FAIMS systems, the p for realistic ions must exceed ~300 - 400 Debye. The dipole moments of proteins statistically increase with increasing mass, and such values are typical above ~30 kDa. FAIMS analyses of protein ions and complexes of ~30 - 130 kDa show an order-of-magnitude expansion of separation space compared to smaller proteins and other ions, consistent with expectations for the dipole-aligned regime.

  3. Comparison of primary monoatomic with primary polyatomic ions for the characterisation of polyesters with static secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Van Royen, Pieter; Taranu, Anca; Van Vaeck, Luc

    2005-01-01

    Static secondary ion mass spectrometry (S-SIMS) emerges as one of the most adequate methods for the surface characterisation of polymers with an information depth of essentially one monolayer. The continuing search for increased analytical sensitivity and specificity has led to exploring the use of polyatomic primary ions as an alternative to the traditionally applied monoatomic projectiles. As part of a systematic investigation on polyatomic bombardment of organic and inorganic solids, this paper focuses on selected polyesters. Mass spectra and ion yields are compared for layers deposited on silicon wafers by spincoating solutions with different concentrations of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(butylene adipate) (PBA) and poly(ethylene adipate) (PEA). Accurate mass measurements have been used to support the assignment of the ions and link the composition of the detected ions to the analyte structure. Use of polyatomic projectiles increases the yield of structural ions with a factor of +/-15, +/-30 and +/-10 for PCL, PBA and PEA, respectively, in comparison to bombardment with Ga+ primary ions, while the molecular specificity is improved by the detection of additional high m/z ions.

  4. Ion mobilities in diatomic gases: measurement versus prediction with non-specular scattering models.

    PubMed

    Larriba, Carlos; Hogan, Christopher J

    2013-05-16

    Ion/electrical mobility measurements of nanoparticles and polyatomic ions are typically linked to particle/ion physical properties through either application of the Stokes-Millikan relationship or comparison to mobilities predicted from polyatomic models, which assume that gas molecules scatter specularly and elastically from rigid structural models. However, there is a discrepancy between these approaches; when specular, elastic scattering models (i.e., elastic-hard-sphere scattering, EHSS) are applied to polyatomic models of nanometer-scale ions with finite-sized impinging gas molecules, predictions are in substantial disagreement with the Stokes-Millikan equation. To rectify this discrepancy, we developed and tested a new approach for mobility calculations using polyatomic models in which non-specular (diffuse) and inelastic gas-molecule scattering is considered. Two distinct semiempirical models of gas-molecule scattering from particle surfaces were considered. In the first, which has been traditionally invoked in the study of aerosol nanoparticles, 91% of collisions are diffuse and thermally accommodating, and 9% are specular and elastic. In the second, all collisions are considered to be diffuse and accommodating, but the average speed of the gas molecules reemitted from a particle surface is 8% lower than the mean thermal speed at the particle temperature. Both scattering models attempt to mimic exchange between translational, vibrational, and rotational modes of energy during collision, as would be expected during collision between a nonmonoatomic gas molecule and a nonfrozen particle surface. The mobility calculation procedure was applied considering both hard-sphere potentials between gas molecules and the atoms within a particle and the long-range ion-induced dipole (polarization) potential. Predictions were compared to previous measurements in air near room temperature of multiply charged poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ions, which range in morphology from

  5. Rayleigh x-ray scattering from many-electron atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhykov, A.; Yerokhin, V. A.; Stöhlker, Th; Fritzsche, S.

    2015-07-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for the elastic Rayleigh scattering of x-rays by many-electron atoms and ions. Special emphasis is placed on the angular distribution and linear polarization of the scattered photons for the case when the incident light is completely (linearly) polarized. Based on second-order perturbation theory and the independent particle approximation, we found that the Rayleigh angular distribution is strongly affected by the charge state and shell structure of the target ions or atoms. This effect can be observed experimentally at modern synchrotron facilities and might provide further insight into the structure of heavy atomic systems.

  6. Rapid counting of liquid-borne microorganisms by light scattering spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mainelis, Gediminas; Górny, Rafał; Willeke, Klaus; Reponen, Tiina

    2005-01-01

    Fast and sensitive techniques are needed to determine microorganism presence in liquid samples. In this research, the feasibility of using light scattering spectrometry for enumerating the biological particles in liquid samples was investigated. A particle size spectrometer was used to count six commonly found microbial species suspended in liquid with and without microbiological stains applied: Pseudomonas fluorescens, Micrococcus spp. vegetative cells and Bacillus subtilis var. niger endospores were stained with Acridine Orange and Crystal Violet, while Cladosporium cladosporioides, Penicillium melinii and Aspergillus versicolor fungi were stained with Acridine Orange and Lactophenol Cotton Blue. The counts obtained with the spectrometer were compared with those obtained with a phase-contrast microscope. It was found that the spectrometer counted about 32 % of non-stained B. subtilis endospores and this percentage increased to almost 90 % for stained endospores. Among the investigated species of fungi, the counting efficiency of P. melinii was the only one significantly affected by the application of the stain Lactophenol Cotton Blue: the fraction of counted fungal spores increased from 64 % (non-stained spores) to about 100 % (stained spores). The observed difference in counting efficiency may serve as a basis for differentiating biological from non-biological particles in liquid samples.

  7. Servo-amplifiers for ion current measurement in mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Russell, R.D.; Kollar, F.

    1965-01-01

    A servo-voltmeter can provide a useful alternative to the d.c. amplifier or vibrating reed electrometer for the accurate measurement of mass spectrometer ion currents, and has some advantages which recommend its use in certain applications. A generalized analysis based on servomechanism theory is presented as an aid for understanding the design criteria for this type of device. Two existing systems are described and their operation and performance are examined.

  8. When API Mass Spectrometry Meets Super Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin

    2015-01-01

    In a tutorial paper on the application of free-jet technique for API-MS, John Fenn mentioned that "…for a number of years and a number of reasons, it has been found advantageous in many situations to carry out the ionization process in gas at pressures up to 1000 Torr or more" (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 200: 459-478, 2000). In fact, the first ESI mass spectrometer constructed by Yamashita and Fenn had a counter-flow curtain gas source at 1050 Torr (ca. 1.4 atm) to sweep away the neutral (J. Phys. Chem. 88: 4451-4459, 1984). For gaseous ionization using electrospray plume, theoretical analysis also shows that "super-atmospheric operation would be more preferable in space-charge-limited situations."(Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 300: 182-193, 2011). However, electrospray and the corona-based chemical ion source (APCI) in most commercial instrument are basically operated under an atmospheric pressure ambient, perhaps out of the concern of safety, convenience and simplicity in maintenance. Running the ion source at pressure much higher than 1 atm is not so common, but had been done by a number of groups as well as in our laboratory. A brief review on these ion sources will be given in this paper.

  9. When API Mass Spectrometry Meets Super Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lee Chuin

    2015-01-01

    In a tutorial paper on the application of free-jet technique for API-MS, John Fenn mentioned that “…for a number of years and a number of reasons, it has been found advantageous in many situations to carry out the ionization process in gas at pressures up to 1000 Torr or more” (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 200: 459–478, 2000). In fact, the first ESI mass spectrometer constructed by Yamashita and Fenn had a counter-flow curtain gas source at 1050 Torr (ca. 1.4 atm) to sweep away the neutral (J. Phys. Chem. 88: 4451–4459, 1984). For gaseous ionization using electrospray plume, theoretical analysis also shows that “super-atmospheric operation would be more preferable in space-charge-limited situations.”(Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 300: 182–193, 2011). However, electrospray and the corona-based chemical ion source (APCI) in most commercial instrument are basically operated under an atmospheric pressure ambient, perhaps out of the concern of safety, convenience and simplicity in maintenance. Running the ion source at pressure much higher than 1 atm is not so common, but had been done by a number of groups as well as in our laboratory. A brief review on these ion sources will be given in this paper. PMID:26819912

  10. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of amino acids assisted by gold nanoparticles and Gd(3+) ions.

    PubMed

    López-Neira, Juan Pablo; Galicia-Hernández, José Mario; Reyes-Coronado, Alejandro; Pérez, Elías; Castillo-Rivera, Francisco

    2015-05-07

    The surface enhanced raman scattering (SERS) signal from the l-tyrosine (tyr) molecule adsorbed on gold nanoparticles (Au-tyr) is compared with the SERS signal assisted by the presence of gadolinium ions (Gd(3+)) coordinated with the Au-tyr system. An enhancement factor of the SERS signal in the presence of Gd(3+) ions was ∼5 times higher than that produced by l-tyrosine adsorbed on gold nanoparticles. The enhancement of the SERS signal can be attributed to a corresponding increase in the local electric field due to the presence of Gd(3+) ions in the vicinity of a gold dimer configuration. This scenario was confirmed by solving numerically Maxwell equations, showing an increase of 1 order of magnitude in the local electric scattered field when the Gd(3+) ion is located in between a gold dimer compared with naked gold nanoparticles.

  11. The effect of residual gas scattering on Ga ion beam patterning of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Thissen, Nick F. W. E-mail: a.a.bol@tue.nl; Vervuurt, R. H. J.; Weber, J. W.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Bol, A. A. E-mail: a.a.bol@tue.nl; Mulders, J. J. L.

    2015-11-23

    The patterning of graphene by a 30 kV Ga{sup +} focused ion beam (FIB) is studied by in-situ and ex-situ Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the graphene surrounding the patterned target area can be damaged at remarkably large distances of more than 10 μm. We show that scattering of the Ga ions in the residual gas of the vacuum system is the main cause of the large range of lateral damage, as the size and shape of the tail of the ion beam were strongly dependent on the system background pressure. The range of the damage was therefore greatly reduced by working at low pressures and limiting the total amount of ions used. This makes FIB patterning a feasible alternative to electron beam lithography as long as residual gas scattering is taken into account.

  12. Fast detection of narcotics by single photon ionization mass spectrometry and laser ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudien, Robert; Schultze, Rainer; Wieser, Jochen

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution two analytical devices for the fast detection of security-relevant substances like narcotics and explosives are presented. One system is based on an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) with single photon ionization (SPI). This soft ionization technique, unlike electron impact ionization (EI), reduces unwanted fragment ions in the mass spectra allowing the clear determination of characteristic (usually molecular) ions. Their enrichment in the ion trap and identification by tandem MS investigations (MS/MS) enables the detection of the target substances in complex matrices at low concentrations without time-consuming sample preparation. For SPI an electron beam pumped excimer light source of own fabrication (E-Lux) is used. The SPI-ITMS system was characterized by the analytical study of different drugs like cannabis, heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, and some precursors. Additionally, it was successfully tested on-site in a closed illegal drug laboratory, where low quantities of MDMA could be directly detected in samples from floors, walls and lab equipments. The second analytical system is based on an ion mobility (IM) spectrometer with resonant multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With the frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (266 nm), used for ionization, a selective and sensitive detection of aromatic compounds is possible. By application of suited aromatic dopants, in addition, also non-aromatic polar compounds are accessible by ion molecule reactions like proton transfer or complex formation. Selected drug precursors could be successfully detected with this device as well, qualifying it to a lower-priced alternative or useful supplement of the SPI-ITMS system for security analysis.

  13. Studies of polyisobutylene using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Keyang; Proctor, Andrew; Hercules, David M.

    1995-05-01

    A series of polyisobutylenes (PIBs) with average molecular weights from 800 to 4 × 105 were analyzed using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). The PIB spectra consist of a sequence of repeating patterns. Four clusters are observed within each pattern. Each cluster corresponds to several species, which are neutral fragments generated from polymer chain scission, cationized by a silver ion. The species formed have various numbers of double bonds and/or rings, and are separated by two mass units. The data indicate that the average molecular weight of PIB affects the ion formation. It changes the relative cluster intensities in a pattern, and also varies the cluster structures. More fragment-ion species can be detected from a high molecular weight polymer, and the unsaturated fragments are predominant. In addition to the large fragments, small fragment ions also provide information about some structurally important features.

  14. Collisions of slow polyatomic ions with surfaces: the scattering method and results.

    PubMed

    Herman, Zdenek

    2003-12-01

    Surface-induced dissociation (SID) and reactions following impact of well-defined ion beams of polyatomic cations C2H5OH+, CH4+, and CH5+ (and its deuterated variants) at several incident angles and energies with self-assembled monolayers (SAM), carbon surfaces, and hydrocarbon covered stainless steel were investigated by the scattering method. Energy transfer and partitioning of the incident projectile energy into internal excitation of the projectile, translational energy of products, and energy transferred into the surface were deduced from the mass spectra and the translational energy and angular distributions of the product ions. Conversion of ion impact energy into internal energy of the recoiling ions peaked at about 17% of the incident energy for the perfluoro-hydrocarbon SAM, and at about 6% for the other surfaces investigated. Ion survival probability is about 30-50 times higher for closed-shell ions than for open-shell radical cations (e.g., 12% for CD5+ versus 0.3% for CD4+, at the incident angle of 60 degrees with respect to the surface normal). Contour velocity plots for inelastic scattering of CD5+ from hydrocarbon-coated and hydrocarbon-free highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces gave effective masses of the surface involved in the scattering event, approximately matching that of an ethyl group (or two methyl groups) and four to five carbon atoms, respectively. Internal energy effects in impacting ions on SID were investigated by comparing collision energy resolved mass spectra (CERMS) of methane ions generated in a low pressure Nier-type electron impact source versus those generated in a Colutron source in which ions undergo many collisions prior to extraction and are essentially vibrationally relaxed. This comparison supports the hypothesis that internal energy of incident projectile ions is fully available to drive their dissociation following surface impact.

  15. Gas molecule scattering & ion mobility measurements for organic macro-ions in He versus N2 environments.

    PubMed

    Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Fernández-García, Juan; Ewing, Michael A; Hogan, Christopher J; Clemmer, David E

    2015-06-14

    A pending issue in linking ion mobility measurements to ion structures is that the collisional cross section (CCS, the measured structural parameter in ion mobility spectrometry) of an ion is strongly dependent upon the manner in which gas molecules effectively impinge on and are reemitted from ion surfaces (when modeling ions as fixed structures). To directly examine the gas molecule impingement and reemission processes and their influence, we measured the CCSs of positively charged ions of room temperature ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (EMIM-N(CN)2) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIM-BF4) in N2 using a differential mobility analyzer-mass spectrometer (DMA-MS) and in He using a drift tube mobility spectrometer-mass spectrometer (DT-MS). Cluster ions, generated via electrosprays, took the form (AB)N(A)z, spanning up to z = 20 and with masses greater than 100 kDa. As confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, at the measurement temperature (∼300 K), such cluster ions took on globular conformations in the gas phase. Based upon their attained charge levels, in neither He nor N2 did the ion-induced dipole potential significantly influence gas molecule-ion collisions. Therefore, differences in the CCSs measured for ions in the two different gases could be primarily attributed to differences in gas molecule behavior upon collision with ions. Overwhelmingly, by comparison of predicted CCSs with selected input impingement-reemission laws to measurements, we find that in N2, gas molecules collide with ions diffusely--they are reemitted at random angles relative to the gas molecule incoming angle--and inelastically. Meanwhile, in He, gas molecules collide specularly and elastically and are emitted from ion surfaces at determined angles. The results can be rationalized on the basis of the momentum transferred per collision; in the case of He, individual gas molecule collisions minimally perturb the atoms within a cluster ion

  16. Impact Collision Ion Scattering Spectroscopy Applied to the Determination of Atomic Surface Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Richard Stephen

    1990-08-01

    The technique of impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS) was used to investigate the atomic structure and low energy ion scattering dynamics from various surfaces. A new formalism for calculating the three-dimensional cross section for an ion to scatter sequentially and classically from two atoms has been developed. This method can be used to assist in the interpretation of ICISS data in terms of quantitative surface-structure models. Shadowing and blocking effects for energetic ions scattering from more than one atom are shown to be special cases of rainbow scattering. Even at keV energies and above, the cross section at the critical angle for scattering must be evaluated by quantum or semi-classical means to avoid the singularity in the classically calculated cross sections. In an ICISS investigation of the Ag(110) surface, a surface flux peak analysis demonstrated that the surface was not a complete monolayer, but rather contained 10-15% random vacancies. Subsurface Li^+ scattering results confirmed the oscillatory relaxation of the first two atomic layers of the surface, with Delta_{12} = -7.5% and Delta_{23} = 4.0%. Modeling of the neutralization mechanism for the He^+ scattering gave a best fit time-dependent Auger neutralization time constant of 0.84 +/- 0.08 fs. A neutralization study of 5 keV He^+ ions scattered from Au adatoms on the Si(111)- sqrt{3} x sqrt {3}-Au surface showed the He^+ ICISS data contained false shadowing features that were actually the result of local neutralization effects. Good agreement was obtained for a radially dependent ion-atom neutralization theory with rate R = Aexp (-ar) , where A and a are 15.5 fs^{ -1} and 1.94 A^{-1} , respectively. A detailed examination of the Si(111)- sqrt{3} x sqrt{3 })-Ag surface was also made. The 5 keV Li ^+ ICISS data gave evidence for Ag island formation at single monolayer coverages of silver, while the LEED, AES and LEIS data showed that at relatively high coverages of Ag (35 ML

  17. Quantitative considerations in medium energy ion scattering depth profiling analysis of nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalm, P. C.; Bailey, P.; Reading, M. A.; Rossall, A. K.; van den Berg, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    The high depth resolution capability of medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) is becoming increasingly relevant to the characterisation of nanolayers in e.g. microelectronics. In this paper we examine the attainable quantitative accuracy of MEIS depth profiling. Transparent but reliable analytical calculations are used to illustrate what can ultimately be achieved for dilute impurities in a silicon matrix and the significant element-dependence of the depth scale, for instance, is illustrated this way. Furthermore, the signal intensity-to-concentration conversion and its dependence on the depth of scattering is addressed. Notably, deviations from the Rutherford scattering cross section due to screening effects resulting in a non-coulombic interaction potential and the reduction of the yield owing to neutralization of the exiting, backscattered H+ and He+ projectiles are evaluated. The former mainly affects the scattering off heavy target atoms while the latter is most severe for scattering off light target atoms and can be less accurately predicted. However, a pragmatic approach employing an extensive data set of measured ion fractions for both H+ and He+ ions scattered off a range of surfaces, allows its parameterization. This has enabled the combination of both effects, which provides essential information regarding the yield dependence both on the projectile energy and the mass of the scattering atom. Although, absolute quantification, especially when using He+, may not always be achievable, relative quantification in which the sum of all species in a layer adds up to 100%, is generally possible. This conclusion is supported by the provision of some examples of MEIS derived depth profiles of nanolayers. Finally, the relative benefits of either using H+ or He+ ions are briefly considered.

  18. Comprehensive study of the surface peak in charge-integrated low-energy ion scattering spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Draxler, M.; Gruber, R.; Bauer, P.; Beikler, R.; Taglauer, E.; Schmid, K.; Ermolov, S. N.

    2003-08-01

    Low-energy ion scattering is very surface sensitive if scattered ions are analyzed. By time-of-flight (TOF) techniques, the neutral and the charge-integrated spectra (ions plus neutrals) are obtained, which yield information about deeper layers. It is well known that charge integrated spectra may exhibit a surface peak which is more pronounced for heavier projectiles, e.g., Ne ions. Aiming at a more profound physical understanding of this surface peak, we performed TOF experiments and computer simulations for H, He, and Ne projectiles scattered from a polycrystalline copper target. Measurements were done in the range of 1-9 keV for a scattering angle of 129 degree sign under UHV conditions. The simulations were performed using the MARLOWE code for the given experimental parameters and a polycrystalline target. In the experiments, a pronounced surface peak was observed at low energies, which fades away at higher energies. This peak is quantitatively reproduced by the simulation. Several atomic layers may contribute to the surface peak, depending on the energy. Analyzing the contributions of the individual outermost atomic layers, one finds that the binary collisions of the projectiles with atoms in the first and the second layer yield a narrow energy distribution, while the contribution from the deeper layers is dominated by multiple scattering and therefore exhibits a very broad energy spectrum. It is shown that the appearance of a more or less pronounced surface peak is due to the relative contributions of single scattering and multiple scattering and thus depends on the projectile energy and mass.

  19. Signals of strong electronic correlation in ion scattering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetto, F.; Gonzalez, C.; Goldberg, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    Previous measurements of neutral atom fractions for S r+ scattered by gold polycrystalline surfaces show a singular dependence with the target temperature. There is still not a theoretical model that can properly describe the magnitude and the temperature dependence of the neutralization probabilities found. Here, we applied a first-principles quantum-mechanical theoretical formalism to describe the time-dependent scattering process. Three different electronic correlation approaches consistent with the system analyzed are used: (i) the spinless approach, where two charge channels are considered (S r0 and S r+ ) and the spin degeneration is neglected; (ii) the infinite-U approach, with the same charge channels (S r0 and S r+ ) but considering the spin degeneration; and (iii) the finite-U approach, where the first ionization and second ionization energy levels are considered very, but finitely, separated. Neutral fraction magnitudes and temperature dependence are better described by the finite-U approach, indicating that e -correlation plays a significant role in charge-transfer processes. However, none of them is able to explain the nonmonotonous temperature dependence experimentally obtained. Here, we suggest that small changes in the surface work function introduced by the target heating, and possibly not detected by experimental standard methods, could be responsible for that singular behavior. Additionally, we apply the same theoretical model using the infinite-U approximation for the Mg-Au system, obtaining an excellent description of the experimental neutral fractions measured.

  20. Ultrasensitive Identification of Localization Variants of Modified Peptides Using Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.; Belov, Mikhail E.

    2011-05-28

    Localization of the modification sites on peptides is challenging, particularly when multiple modifications or mixtures of localization isomers (variants) are involved. Such variants commonly coelute in liquid chromatography and may be undistinguishable in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for lack of unique fragments. Here, we have resolved the variants of singly and doubly phosphorylated peptides employing drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Even with a moderate IMS resolving power of ~80, substantial separation was achieved for both 2+ and 3+ ions normally generated by electrospray ionization, including for the variant indistinguishable by MS/MS. Variants often exhibit a distribution of 3-D conformers, which can be adjusted for optimum IMS separation by prior field heating of ions in a funnel trap. The peak assignments were confirmed using MS/MS after IMS separation, but known species could be identified using just the ion mobility "tag". Avoiding the MS/MS step lowers the detection limit of localization variants to <100 attomoles, an order of magnitude better than provided by electron transfer dissociation in an Orbitrap MS.

  1. Matrix-enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry: The Alchemist's solution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcorte, Arnaud

    2006-07-01

    Because of the requirements of large molecule characterization and high-lateral resolution SIMS imaging, the possibility of improving molecular ion yields by the use of specific sample preparation procedures has recently generated a renewed interest in the static SIMS community. In comparison with polyatomic projectiles, however, signal enhancement by a matrix might appear to some as the alchemist's versus the scientist's solution to the current problems of organic SIMS. In this contribution, I would like to discuss critically the pros and cons of matrix-enhanced SIMS procedures, in the new framework that includes polyatomic ion bombardment. This discussion is based on a short review of the experimental and theoretical developments achieved in the last decade with respect to the three following approaches: (i) blending the analyte with a low-molecular weight organic matrix (MALDI-type preparation procedure); (ii) mixing alkali/noble metal salts with the analyte; (iii) evaporating a noble metal layer on the analyte sample surface (organic molecules, polymers).

  2. Trajectory analysis of low-energy and hyperthermal ions scattered from Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    McEachern, R.L.; Goodstein, D.M.; Cooper, B.H.

    1989-05-15

    Trajectories of Na{sup +} ions scattered from the Cu(110) surface in the <1 1bar 0> and <001> azimuths were studied for a range of incident energies from 56 eV to 4 keV. The goal is to explain the trends observed in the energy spectra and determine what types of trajectories contribute to these spectra. Using the computer program SAFARI, simulations were performed with trajectory analyses for 100-, 200-, and 400-eV scattering. We show results from the 100-eV simulations in both azimuths and compare them with the experimental data. The simulated energy spectra are in excellent agreement with the data. Ion trajectories and impact parameter plots from the simulations are used to determine the relative importance of different types of ion-surface-atom collisions. The simulations have shown that the striking differences observed in comparing the <1 1bar 0> and <001> spectra are mostly due to ions which scatter from second-layer atoms. This system exhibits strong focusing onto the second-layer atoms by the first-layer rows, and the focusing is very sensitive to the spacing between the rows. At the lower beam energies, scattering from the second layer dominates the measured spectra.

  3. Multiple-scattering model for inclusive proton production in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1994-01-01

    A formalism is developed for evaluating the momentum distribution for proton production in nuclear abrasion during heavy ion collisions using the Glauber multiple-scattering series. Several models for the one-body density matrix of nuclei are considered for performing numerical calculations. Calculations for the momentum distribution of protons in abrasion are compared with experimental data for inclusive proton production.

  4. Using a Buffer Gas Modifier to Change Separation Selectivity in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Wu, Ching; Hill, Herbert H.

    2010-01-01

    The mobilities of a set of common α-amino acids, four tetraalkylammonium ions, 2,4-dimethyl pyridine (2,4-lutidine), 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine (DTBP), and valinol were determined using electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-QMS) while introducing 2-butanol into the buffer gas. The mobilities of the test compounds decreased by varying extents with 2-butanol concentration in the mobility spectrometer. When the concentration of 2-butanol increased from 0.0 to 6.8 mmol m−3 (2.5×102 ppmv), percentage reductions in mobilities were: 13.6% (serine), 12.2% (threonine), 10.4% (methionine), 10.3% (tyrosine), 9.8% (valinol), 9.2% (phenylalanine), 7.8% (tryptophan), 5.6% (2,4-lutidine), 2.2% (DTBP), 1.0% (tetramethylammonium ion, TMA, and tetraethylammonium ion, TEA), 0.0% (tetrapropylammonium ion, TPA), and 0.3% (tetrabutylammonium ion, TBA). These variations in mobility depended on the size and steric hindrance on the charge of the ions, and were due to formation of large ion-2-butanol clusters. This selective variation in mobilities was applied to the resolution of a mixture of compounds with similar reduced mobilities such as serine and valinol, which overlapped in N2-only buffer gas in the IMS spectrum. The relative insensitivity of tetraalkylammonium ions and DTBP to the introduction of 2-butanol into the buffer gas was explained by steric hindrance of the four alkyl substituents in tetraalkylammonium ions and the two tert-butyl groups in DTBP, which shielded the positive charge of the ion from the attachment of 2-butanol molecules. Low buffer gas temperatures (100 °C) produced the largest reductions in mobilities by increasing ion-2-butanol interactions and formation of clusters; high temperatures (250 °C) prevented the formation of clusters, and no reduction in ion mobility was obtained with the introduction of 2-butanol into the buffer gas. Low temperatures and high concentrations of 2-butanol produced a series of

  5. Time-of-flight ion mobility spectrometry and differential mobility spectrometry: A comparative study of their efficiency in the analysis of halogenated compounds.

    PubMed

    Borsdorf, H; Nazarov, E G; Miller, R A

    2007-03-15

    The ion mobilities of halogenated aromatics which are of interest in environmental chemistry and process monitoring were characterized with field-deployable ion mobility spectrometers and differential mobility spectrometers. The dependence of mobility of gas-phase ions formed by atmospheric-pressure photoionization (APPI) on the electric field was determined for a number of structural isomers. The structure of the product ions formed was identified by investigations using the coupling of ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry (APPI-IMS-MS) and APPI-MS. In contrast to conventional time-of-flight ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with constant linear voltage gradients in drift tubes, differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) employs the field dependence of ion mobility. Depending on the position of substituents, differences in field dependence were established for the isomeric compounds in contrast to conventional IMS in which comparable reduced mobility values were detected for the isomers investigated. These findings permit the differentiation between most of the investigated isomeric aromatics with a different constitution using DMS.

  6. Soft Supercharging of Biomolecular Ions in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chingin, Konstantin; Xu, Ning; Chen, Huanwen

    2014-06-01

    The charge states of biomolecular ions in ESI-MS can be significantly increased by the addition of low-vapor supercharging (SC) reagents into the spraying solution. Despite the considerable interest from the community, the mechanistic aspects of SC are not well understood and are hotly debated. Arguments that denaturation accounts for the increased charging observed in proteins sprayed from aqueous solutions containing SC reagent have been published widely, but often with incomplete or ambiguous supporting data. In this work, we explored ESI MS charging and SC behavior of several biopolymers including proteins and DNA oligonucleotides. Analytes were ionized from 100 mM ammonium acetate (NH4Ac) aqueous buffer in both positive (ESI+) and negative (ESI-) ion modes. SC was induced either with m-NBA or by the elevated temperature of ESI capillary. For all the analytes studied we, found striking differences in the ESI MS response to these two modes of activation. The data suggest that activation with m-NBA results in more extensive analyte charging with lower degree of denaturation. When working solution with m-NBA was analyzed at elevated temperatures, the SC effect from m-NBA was neutralized. Instead, the net SC effect was similar to the SC effect achieved by thermal activation only. Overall, our observations indicate that SC reagents enhance ESI charging of biomolecules via distinctly different mechanism compared with the traditional approaches based on analyte denaturation. Instead, the data support the hypothesis that the SC phenomenon involves a direct interaction between a biopolymer and SC reagent occurring in evaporating ESI droplets.

  7. Advances in ion mobility spectrometry–mass spectrometry reveal key insights into amyloid assembly☆

    PubMed Central

    Woods, L.A.; Radford, S.E.; Ashcroft, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacing ion mobility spectrometry to mass spectrometry (IMS–MS) has enabled mass spectrometric analyses to extend into an extra dimension, providing unrivalled separation and structural characterization of lowly populated species in heterogeneous mixtures. One biological system that has benefitted significantly from such advances is that of amyloid formation. Using IMS–MS, progress has been made into identifying transiently populated monomeric and oligomeric species for a number of different amyloid systems and has led to an enhanced understanding of the mechanism by which small molecules modulate amyloid formation. This review highlights recent advances in this field, which have been accelerated by the commercial availability of IMS–MS instruments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mass spectrometry in structural biology. PMID:23063533

  8. Increased Ion Transmission for Differential Ion Mobility Combined with Mass Spectrometry by Implementation of a Flared Inlet Capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Matthew T.; Glish, Gary L.

    2017-01-01

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (DIMS) is capable of separating components of complex mixtures prior to mass spectrometric analysis, thereby increasing signal-to-noise and signal-to-background ratios on millisecond timescales. However, adding a DIMS device to the front end of a mass spectrometer can reduce the signal intensity of subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. This is a result, in part, of ions lost due to inefficient transfer of ions from the DIMS device through the aperture leading into the mass spectrometer. This problem of transferring ions can be at least partially corrected by modifying the front end of the inlet capillary leading to the vacuum of the mass spectrometer. The inner diameter of the ion-sampling end of the inlet capillary was enlarged by drilling into the face. This results in a conical flare at the front end of the capillary, while the other end of the capillary remains unmodified. These flared capillaries allow for a greater number of ions from the DIMS device to be sampled relative to the unmodified standard capillary. Four flare dimensions were tested, differing by the angle between the wall of the flare and the outer wall of the inlet capillary. All flared capillaries showed greater signal intensity than the standard capillary with a DIMS device present without reducing the resolving power. It was also observed that the signal intensity increased as the flare angle decreased. The flared capillary with the smallest flare angle showed greater than a fivefold increase in signal intensity compared with the standard capillary.

  9. Organic ion imaging of biological tissue with secondary ion mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization.

    PubMed

    Todd, P J; Schaaff, T G; Chaurand, P; Caprioli, R M

    2001-04-01

    Organic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry can be used to produce molecular images of samples. This is achieved through ionization from a clearly identified point on a flat sample, and performing a raster of the sample by moving the point of ionization over the sample surface. The unique analytical capabilities of mass spectrometry for mapping a variety of biological samples at the tissue level are discussed. SIMS provides information on the spatial distribution of the elements and low molecular mass compounds as well as molecular structures on these compounds, while MALDI yields spatial information about higher molecular mass compounds, including their distributions in tissues at very low levels, as well as information on the molecular structures of these compounds. Application of these methods to analytical problems requires appropriate instrumentation, sample preparation methodology, and a data presentation usually in a three-coordinate plot where x and y are physical dimensions of the sample and z is the signal amplitude. The use of imaging mass spectrometry is illustrated with several biological systems.

  10. Collisional activation of ions by off-resonance irradiation in ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seung Koo; Han, Seung-Jin; Seo, Jongcheol

    2009-06-01

    Collisional activation of ions in the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell by short off-resonance burst irradiation (ORBI) was studied by time-resolved photodissociation of the meta-bromotoluene radical cation. Off-resonance chirp or single-frequency burst was applied for 2 ms to the probe ion in the presence of Ar buffer gas. The amount of internal energy imparted to the probe ion by collision under ORBI was precisely determined by time-resolved photodissociation spectroscopy. The rate of unimolecular dissociation of the probe ion following the photolysis at 532 nm was measured by monitoring the real-time appearance of the C7H7+ product ion. The internal energy of the probe ion was extracted from the known rate-energy curve. To help understand the collisional activation of an ion under ORBI, we simulated the radial trajectory of the ion using Green's method. The calculated radial kinetic energy was converted to the collision energy in the center-of-mass frame, and the collision frequency was estimated by using a reactive hard-sphere collision model with an ion-induced dipole potential. Both experiments and trajectory simulations suggest that chirp irradiation leads to less collisional activation of ions than other waveforms.

  11. Fundamental studies of gas phase ionic reactions by ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, K.; Knighton, W. B.; Sahlstrom, K. E.; Grimsrud, E. P.

    1995-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) provides a promising approach to the study of gas phase ionic reactions in buffer gases at unusually high pressures. This point is illustrated here by studies of the Sn2 nucleophilic displacement reaction, Cl(-) + CH3Br yields Br + CH3Br, using IMS at atmospheric pressure. The equilibrium clustering reaction, Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n - 1) + CHCI3 yields Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n), where n = 1 and 2, and the effect of clustering on the Sn2 reaction with CH3Br have also been characterized by this IMS-based kinetic method. Present problems and anticipated improvements in the application of ion mobility spectrometry to studies of other gas phase ionic processes are discussed.

  12. Monitoring chloramines and bromamines in a humid environment using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wan-Ping; Langford, Vaughan S; McEwan, Murray J; Milligan, Daniel B; Storer, Malina K; Dummer, Jack; Epton, Michael J

    2010-06-30

    The selectivity and sensitivity of selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) for individual breath analysis of haloamines has been improved by heating the flow tube in a commercial instrument to around 106 degrees C. Data is presented showing the marked reduction in the number density of water clusters of product ions of common breath metabolites that are isobaric with the product ions from monochloramine and monobromamine that are used to monitor the haloamine concentrations. These results have direct relevance to the real-time monitoring of chloramines in drinking water, swimming pools and food processing plants. However, once the isobaric overlaps from water cluster ions are reduced at the higher temperatures, there is no conclusive evidence showing the presence of haloamines on single breath exhalations in the mid parts per trillion range from examination of the breaths of volunteers.

  13. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Fourier Transform–Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) Mass Spectrometry: Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Jared B.; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2016-02-16

    We revisited the implementation of UVPD within the ICR cell of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer. UVPD performance characteristics were examined in the context of recent developments in the understanding of UVPD and in-cell tandem mass spectrometry. Efficient UVPD and photo-ECD of a model peptide and small protein within the ICR cell of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer are accomplished through appropriate modulation of laser pulse timing relative to ion magnetron motion and the potential applied to an ion optical element that photons impinge on. It is shown that UVPD yields efficient and extensive fragmentation resulting in excellent sequence coverage for model peptide and protein cations.

  14. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Tissues, Cells, and Microbial Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Lara J.; Anderton, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a technique capable of imaging tissues, single cells, and microbes revealing chemical species with sub-micrometer spatial resolution. The recently developed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) SIMS instrument provides high mass resolving power and mass accuracy, ToF-SIMS can generate chemical maps with an order of magnitude better lateral resolution than the FTICR-SIMS, and the NanoSIMS instrument offers sub-100 nm spatial resolution in chemical imaging. Many commercial ToF-SIMS instruments are also capable of depth profiling that allows three-dimensional reconstructions of cell and tissue structure. PMID:27660591

  15. An Environmental Focus Using Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salido, Arthur; Atterholt, Cynthia; Bacon, J. Roger; Butcher, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The Western Carolina University chemistry faculty have developed an environmental focus to their curriculum. Inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and ion chromatography (IC) have been shown to be useful tools for the determination of elements and ions, respectively. Several novel experiments have been developed monitoring these analytes in environmental samples, including water, pressure-treated wood, and nutritional supplements. In addition, ICP-OES and IC have been used to teach seniors the principles of analytical method development. Lastly, this equipment has been employed extensively in a vigorous research program.

  16. Solvent extraction, ion chromatography, and mass spectrometry of molybdenum isotopes.

    PubMed

    Dauphas, N; Reisberg, L; Marty, B

    2001-06-01

    A procedure was developed that allows precise determination of molybdenum isotope abundances in natural samples. Purification of molybdenum was first achieved by solvent extraction using di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate. Further separation of molybdenum from isobar nuclides was obtained by ion chromatography using AG1-X8 strongly basic anion exchanger. Finally, molybdenum isotopic composition was measured using a multiple collector inductively coupled plasma hexapole mass spectrometer. The abundances of molybdenum isotopes 92, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, and 100 are 14.8428(510), 9.2498(157), 15.9303(133), 16.6787(37), 9.5534(83), 24.1346(394), and 9.6104(312) respectively, resulting in an atomic mass of 95.9304(45). After internal normalization for mass fractionation, no variation of the molybdenum isotopic composition is observed among terrestrial samples within a relative precision on the order of 0.00001-0.0001. This demonstrates the reliability of the method, which can be applied to searching for possible isotopic anomalies and mass fractionation.

  17. Advanced Automation for Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry-New Opportunities for Real-Time Autonomous Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Wong, C. M.; Salmonson, J. D.; Yost, R. A.; Griffin, T. P.; Yates, N. A.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The utility of MS/MS for both target compound analysis and the structure elucidation of unknowns has been described in a number of references. A broader acceptance of this technique has not yet been realized as it requires large, complex, and costly instrumentation which has not been competitive with more conventional techniques. Recent advancements in ion trap mass spectrometry promise to change this situation. Although the ion trap's small size, sensitivity, and ability to perform multiple stages of mass spectrometry have made it eminently suitable for on-line, real-time monitoring applications, advance automation techniques are required to make these capabilities more accessible to non-experts. Towards this end we have developed custom software for the design and implementation of MS/MS experiments. This software allows the user to take full advantage of the ion trap's versatility with respect to ionization techniques, scan proxies, and ion accumulation/ejection methods. Additionally, expert system software has been developed for autonomous target compound analysis. This software has been linked to ion trap control software and a commercial data system to bring all of the steps in the analysis cycle under control of the expert system. These software development efforts and their utilization for a number of trace analysis applications will be described.

  18. Pushing the Frontier of High-Definition Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using FAIMS

    SciTech Connect

    A. Shvartsburg, Alexandre; A. Anderson, Gordon; D. Smith, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) separates ions in gases based on the difference between their mobilities in strong and weak electric fields, captured directly employing a periodic waveform with dissimilar profiles in opposite polarities. As that difference is not tightly correlated with the ion size or mass, FAIMS separations are generally quite orthogonal to both conventional IMS (based on the absolute ion mobility that reflects the physical ion size) and mass spectrometry (based on mass). Until a few years ago, that advantage was largely offset by poor FAIMS resolving power (~10–20), an order of magnitude below that achieved with conventional (drift-tube) IMS. This article summarizes the major recent technical developments that have raised FAIMS resolving power up to ~500. These include use of higher and more stable voltages provided by new waveform generators, novel buffer gas compositions comprising high helium or hydrogen fractions, and extended filtering times up to ~1 s. These advances have enabled previously unthinkable analyses such as broad baseline separations of peptide sequence inversions, localization variants (post-translationally modified peptides with differing PTM attachment sites) even for the larger “middle-down” peptides and smallest PTMs, and lipid regioisomers.

  19. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Mg Tracer Diffusion: Issues and Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tuggle, Jay; Giordani, Andrew; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Coffey, Kevin; Sohn, Yong Ho; HunterJr., Jerry

    2014-01-01

    A Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) method has been developed to measure stable Mg isotope tracer diffusion. This SIMS method was then used to calculate Mg self- diffusivities and the data was verified against historical data measured using radio tracers. The SIMS method has been validated as a reliable alternative to the radio-tracer technique for the measurement of Mg self-diffusion coefficients and can be used as a routine method for determining diffusion coefficients.

  20. An unprecedented silver-decavanadate dimer investigated using ion-mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McGlone, Thomas; Thiel, Johannes; Streb, Carsten; Long, De-Liang; Cronin, Leroy

    2012-01-11

    A silver(I)-linked decavanadate system has been synthesised, and characterised in both the solid-state and solution showing that two cluster units are held in a specific, dimeric arrangement wholly supported by cooperative hydrogen bonds, and ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) was used to analyse the system yielding significant information on the secondary building units and aggregation behaviour supported by hydrogen bonding.

  1. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) Data in the Cluster Active Archive (CAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I.; Barthe, A.; Penou, E.; Brunato, S.; Rème, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Bavassano-Cattaneo, M. B.; Blagau, A.

    The Cluster Active Archive (CAA) aims at preserving the four Cluster spacecraft data, so that they are usable in the long-term by the scientific community as well as by the instrument team PIs and Co-Is. This implies that the data are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the four Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0-40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 s) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. The CIS package consists of two different instruments, a Hot Ion Analyser (HIA) and a time-of-flight ion Composition Distribution Function (CODIF) analyser, plus a sophisticated dual-processor based instrument control and data processing system (DPS). For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CAA archival includes processed raw data (Level 1 data), moments of the ion distribution functions (Level 2 data), and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units (Level 3 data). The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions. In addition, a software package has been developed to allow the CAA user to interactively calculate partial or total moments of the ion distributions. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, and data caveats. Given the complexity of an ion spectrometer, and the variety of its operational modes, each one being optimised for a different magnetospheric region or measurement objective, consultation of the data caveats by the end user will always be a necessary step in the data analysis.

  2. Interlaboratory study of the ion source memory effect in 36Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier; Buchriegler, Josef; Golser, Robin; Keddadouche, Karim; Martschini, Martin; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg; Steier, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Understanding and minimization of contaminations in the ion source due to cross-contamination and long-term memory effect is one of the key issues for accurate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of volatile elements. The focus of this work is on the investigation of the long-term memory effect for the volatile element chlorine, and the minimization of this effect in the ion source of the Dresden accelerator mass spectrometry facility (DREAMS). For this purpose, one of the two original HVE ion sources at the DREAMS facility was modified, allowing the use of larger sample holders having individual target apertures. Additionally, a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, an interlaboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect of the four Cs sputter ion sources at DREAMS (two sources: original and modified), ASTER (Accélérateur pour les Sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Risques) and VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) had been investigated by measuring samples of natural 35Cl/37Cl-ratio and samples highly-enriched in 35Cl (35Cl/37Cl ∼ 999). Besides investigating and comparing the individual levels of long-term memory, recovery time constants could be calculated. The tests show that all four sources suffer from long-term memory, but the modified DREAMS ion source showed the lowest level of contamination. The recovery times of the four ion sources were widely spread between 61 and 1390 s, where the modified DREAMS ion source with values between 156 and 262 s showed the fastest recovery in 80% of the measurements.

  3. Resonant laser ablation ion trap mass spectrometry -- Recent applications for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, C.G.; Garrett, A.W.; Hemberger, P.H.; Nogar, N.S.

    1995-12-31

    Resonant Laser Ablation (RLA) is a useful ionization process for selectively producing gas phase ions from a solid sample. Recent use of RLA for mass spectrometry by this group and by others has produced a wealth of knowledge and useful analytical techniques. The method relies upon the focusing of modest intensity laser pulses ({le} 10{sup 7} W {center_dot} Cm{sup {minus}2}) upon a sample surface. A small quantity of material is vaporized, and atoms of desired analyte are subsequently ionized by (n + m) photon processes in the gas phase (where n = number of photons to a resonant transition and m = number of photons to exceed the ionization limit). The authors have been using (2 + 1) resonant ionization schemes for this work. Quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry is realizing a very prominent role in current mass spectrometric research. Ion traps are versatile, powerful and extremely sensitive mass spectrometers, capable of a variety of ionization modes, MS{sup n} type experiments, high mass ranges and high resolution, all for a fraction of the cost of other instrumentation with similar capabilities. Quadrupole ion traps are ideally suited to pulsed ionization sources such as laser ionization methods, since their normal operational method (Mass Selective Instability) relies upon the storage of ions from a finite ionization period followed by ejection and detection of these ions based upon their mass to charge ratios. The paper describes selective ionization for trace atomic analysis, selective reagent ion source for ion chemistry investigations, and the analysis of ``difficult`` environmental contaminants, i.e., TBP.

  4. Dopant-assisted negative photoionization ion mobility spectrometry for sensitive detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shasha; Dou, Jian; Wang, Weiguo; Chen, Chuang; Hua, Lei; Zhou, Qinghua; Hou, Keyong; Li, Jinghua; Li, Haiyang

    2013-01-02

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a key trace detection technique for explosives and the development of a simple, stable, and efficient nonradioactive ionization source is highly demanded. A dopant-assisted negative photoionization (DANP) source has been developed for IMS, which uses a commercial VUV krypton lamp to ionize acetone as the source of electrons to produce negative reactant ions in air. With 20 ppm of acetone as the dopant, a stable current of reactant ions of 1.35 nA was achieved. The reactant ions were identified to be CO(3)(-)(H(2)O)(n) (K(0) = 2.44 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) by atmospheric pressure time-of-flight mass spectrometry, while the reactant ions in (63)Ni source were O(2)(-)(H(2)O)(n) (K(0) = 2.30 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)). Finally, its capabilities for detection of common explosives including ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), N-nitrobis(2-hydroxyethyl)amine dinitrate (DINA), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) were evaluated, and the limits of detection of 10 pg (ANFO), 80 pg (TNT), and 100 pg (DINA) with a linear range of 2 orders of magnitude were achieved. The time-of-flight mass spectra obtained with use of DANP source clearly indicated that PETN and DINA can be directly ionized by the ion-association reaction of CO(3)(-) to form PETN·CO(3)(-) and DINA·CO(3)(-) adduct ions, which result in good sensitivity for the DANP source. The excellent stability, good sensitivity, and especially the better separation between the reactant and product ion peaks make the DANP a potential nonradioactive ionization source for IMS.

  5. Description of Gas-Phase Ion/Neutral Interactions in Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry: CV Prediction Using Calibration Runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, David; Aspenleiter, Julia; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2014-09-01

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) coupled to mass spectrometry is increasingly used in both quantitative analyses of biological samples and as a means of removing background interferences for enhanced selectivity and improved quality of mass spectra. However, DMS separation efficiency using dry inert gases often lacks the required selectivity to achieve baseline separation. Polar gas-phase modifiers such as alcohols are therefore frequently employed to improve selectivity via clustering/declustering processes. The choice of an optimal modifier currently relies on trial and error experiments, making method development a tedious activity. It was the goal of this study to establish a means of CV prediction for compounds using a homologous series of alcohols as gas-phase modifiers. This prediction was based on linear regression of compensation voltages of two calibration runs for the alcohols with the lowest and the highest molecular weights and readily available descriptors such as proton affinity and gas phase acidity of the modifier molecules. All experiments were performed on a commercial quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with a DMS device between electrospray ionization source and entrance quadrupole lens. We evaluated our approach using a homologous series of 4-alkylbenzoic acids and a selection of 23 small molecules of high chemical diversity. Predicted CV values typically deviated from the experimentally determined values by less than 0.5 V. Several test compounds changed their ion mobility behavior for the investigated gas phase modifiers (e.g., from type B to type A) and thus could thus not be evaluated.

  6. Determination of epichlorohydrin by sulfite derivatization and ion chromatography: characterization of the sulfite derivatives by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta; Andrensek, Samo; Novic, Milko; Perrachon, Daniela; Sarzanini, Corrado

    2004-04-23

    This work is an upgrade of a previously developed method (J. Chromatogr. A 884 (2000) 251] for epichlorohydrin determination by ion chromatography (IC) and conductivity detection. Here, an ion chromatography-mass spectrometry (IC-MS) coupling has been employed for the separation and the identification of products of epichlorohydrin when reacted with the nucleophilic agent SO3(2-). The high capacity column (IonPac AS11-HC) used for separation provided good resolution. This allowed evaluation of the IC behavior and mass spectrometric identification of epichlorohydrin sulfite derivatives. By using atmospheric pressure interfaces (ESI and APCI) the following species were tentatively identified: 2,3-dihydroxy-1-propanesulfonic, 2,3-epoxy-1-propanesulfonic,1,3-dihydroxy-2-propanesulfonic and 3-oxetanesulfonic acids and 2-hydroxy-1,3-propanedisulfonic acid (or its isomer 3-hydroxy-1,2-propanedisulfonic acid). The study showed that chlorine atoms are displaced from epichlorohydrin during the reaction, while mass spectrometry confirmed that none of the products formed contains chlorine atoms.

  7. T-wave ion mobility-mass spectrometry: basic experimental procedures for protein complex analysis.

    PubMed

    Michaelevski, Izhak; Kirshenbaum, Noam; Sharon, Michal

    2010-07-31

    Ion mobility (IM) is a method that measures the time taken for an ion to travel through a pressurized cell under the influence of a weak electric field. The speed by which the ions traverse the drift region depends on their size: large ions will experience a greater number of collisions with the background inert gas (usually N(2;)) and thus travel more slowly through the IM device than those ions that comprise a smaller cross-section. In general, the time it takes for the ions to migrate though the dense gas phase separates them, according to their collision cross-section (Omega). Recently, IM spectrometry was coupled with mass spectrometry and a traveling-wave (T-wave) Synapt ion mobility mass spectrometer (IM-MS) was released. Integrating mass spectrometry with ion mobility enables an extra dimension of sample separation and definition, yielding a three-dimensional spectrum (mass to charge, intensity, and drift time). This separation technique allows the spectral overlap to decrease, and enables resolution of heterogeneous complexes with very similar mass, or mass-to-charge ratios, but different drift times. Moreover, the drift time measurements provide an important layer of structural information, as Omega is related to the overall shape and topology of the ion. The correlation between the measured drift time values and Omega is calculated using a calibration curve generated from calibrant proteins with defined cross-sections(1). The power of the IM-MS approach lies in its ability to define the subunit packing and overall shape of protein assemblies at micromolar concentrations, and near-physiological conditions(1). Several recent IM studies of both individual proteins(2,3) and non-covalent protein complexes(4-9), successfully demonstrated that protein quaternary structure is maintained in the gas phase, and highlighted the potential of this approach in the study of protein assemblies of unknown geometry. Here, we provide a detailed description of IMS

  8. Characterization of an Airborne Laser-Spark Ion Source for Ambient Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bierstedt, Andreas; Kersten, Hendrik; Glaus, Reto; Gornushkin, Igor; Panne, Ulrich; Riedel, Jens

    2017-03-07

    An airborne laser plasma is suggested as an ambient ion source for mass spectrometry. Its fundamental physical properties, such as an excellent spatial and temporal definition, high electron and ion densities and a high effective cross section in maintaining the plasma, make it a promising candidate for future applications. For deeper insights into the plasma properties, the optical plasma emission is examined and compared to mass spectra. The results show a seemingly contradictory behavior, since the emitted light reports the plasma to almost entirely consist of hot elemental ions, while the corresponding mass spectra exhibit the formation of intact molecular species. Further experiments, including time-resolved shadowgraphy, spatially resolved mass spectrometry, as well as flow-dependent emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, suggest the analyte molecules to be formed in the cold plasma vicinity upon interaction with reactive species formed inside the hot plasma center. Spatial separation is maintained by concentrically expanding pressure waves, inducing a strong unidirectional diffusion. The accompanying rarefaction inside the plasma center can be compensated by a gas stream application. This replenishing results in a strong increase in emission brightness, in local reactive species concentration, and eventually in direct mass spectrometric sensitivity. To determine the analytical performance of the new technique, a comparison with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source was conducted. Two kitchen herbs, namely, spearmint and basil, were analyzed without any sample pretreatment. The presented results demonstrate a considerably higher sensitivity of the presented laser-spark ionization technique.

  9. Afterglow of a microwave microstrip plasma as an ion source for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; White, Allen; Broekaert, José A. C.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    A microwave-induced plasma that was previously used for optical emission spectrometry has been repurposed as an afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry. This compact microwave discharge, termed the microstrip plasma (MSP), is operated at 20-50 W and 2.45 GHz in helium at a flow of 300 mL/min. The primary background ions present in the afterglow are ionized and protonated water clusters. An exponential dilution chamber was used to introduce volatile organic compounds into the MSP afterglow and yielded limits of detection in the 40 ppb to 7 ppm range (v/v). A hydride-generation system was also utilized for detection of volatile hydride-forming elements (arsenic, antimony, tin) in the afterglow and produced limits of detection in the 10-100 ppb range in solution. The MSP afterglow was found capable of desorption and ionization of analyte species directly from a solid substrate, suggesting its use as an ion source for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  10. Nanometer scale elemental analysis in the helium ion microscope using time of flight spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Klingner, N; Heller, R; Hlawacek, G; von Borany, J; Notte, J; Huang, J; Facsko, S

    2016-03-01

    Time of flight backscattering spectrometry (ToF-BS) was successfully implemented in a helium ion microscope (HIM). Its integration introduces the ability to perform laterally resolved elemental analysis as well as elemental depth profiling on the nm scale. A lateral resolution of ≤54nm and a time resolution of Δt≤17ns(Δt/t≤5.4%) are achieved. By using the energy of the backscattered particles for contrast generation, we introduce a new imaging method to the HIM allowing direct elemental mapping as well as local spectrometry. In addition laterally resolved time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) can be performed with the same setup. Time of flight is implemented by pulsing the primary ion beam. This is achieved in a cost effective and minimal invasive way that does not influence the high resolution capabilities of the microscope when operating in standard secondary electron (SE) imaging mode. This technique can thus be easily adapted to existing devices. The particular implementation of ToF-BS and ToF-SIMS techniques are described, results are presented and advantages, difficulties and limitations of this new techniques are discussed.

  11. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) of an Organothiophosphate at Ultrahigh Resolution by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Prokai, Laszlo; Stevens, Stanley M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) is a recently developed ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry to enable rapid and sensitive analyses with little or no sample preparation. After swab-based field sampling, the organothiophosphate malathion was analyzed using DART-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Mass resolution was documented to be over 800,000 in full-scan MS mode and over 1,000,000 for an MS/MS product ion produced by collision-induced dissociation of the protonated analyte. Mass measurement accuracy below 1 ppm was obtained for all DART-generated ions that belonged to the test compound in the mass spectra acquired using only external mass calibration. This high mass measurement accuracy, achievable at present only through FTMS, was required for unequivocal identification of the corresponding molecular formulae. PMID:26784186

  12. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) of an Organothiophosphate at Ultrahigh Resolution by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Prokai, Laszlo; Stevens, Stanley M

    2016-01-16

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) is a recently developed ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry to enable rapid and sensitive analyses with little or no sample preparation. After swab-based field sampling, the organothiophosphate malathion was analyzed using DART-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Mass resolution was documented to be over 800,000 in full-scan MS mode and over 1,000,000 for an MS/MS product ion produced by collision-induced dissociation of the protonated analyte. Mass measurement accuracy below 1 ppm was obtained for all DART-generated ions that belonged to the test compound in the mass spectra acquired using only external mass calibration. This high mass measurement accuracy, achievable at present only through FTMS, was required for unequivocal identification of the corresponding molecular formulae.

  13. Selected Ion Flow-Drift Tube Mass Spectrometry: Quantification of Volatile Compounds in Air and Breath.

    PubMed

    Spesyvyi, Anatolii; Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    2015-12-15

    A selected ion flow-drift tube mass spectrometric analytical technique, SIFDT-MS, is described that extends the established selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, by the inclusion of a static but variable E-field along the axis of the flow tube reactor in which the analytical ion-molecule chemistry occurs. The ion axial speed is increased in proportion to the reduced field strength E/N (N is the carrier gas number density), and the residence/reaction time, t, which is measured by Hadamard transform multiplexing, is correspondingly reduced. To ensure a proper understanding of the physics and ion chemistry underlying SIFDT-MS, ion diffusive loss to the walls of the flow-drift tube and the mobility of injected H3O(+) ions have been studied as a function of E/N. It is seen that the derived diffusion coefficient and mobility of H3O(+) ions are consistent with those previously reported. The rate coefficient has been determined at elevated E/N for the association reaction of the H3O(+) reagent ions with H2O molecules, which is the first step in the production of H3O(+)(H2O)1,2,3 reagent hydrate ions. The production of hydrated analyte ion was also experimentally investigated. The analytical performance of SIFDT-MS is demonstrated by the quantification of acetone and isoprene in exhaled breath. Finally, the essential features of SIFDT-MS and SIFT-MS are compared, notably pointing out that a much lower speed of the flow-drive pump is required for SIFDT-MS, which facilitates the development of smaller cost-effective analytical instruments for real time breath and fluid headspace analyses.

  14. Stimulated Raman scattering in the presence of suprathermal ion acoustic fluctuations in inhomogeneous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, H. C.; Boyd, T. J. M.; Lukyanov, A. V.

    2000-03-01

    In this report a complex Raman scattering event against a background of nonthermal ion coustic waves in an inhomogenous plasma is considered. The complex Raman process is a five-wave interaction in which three-wave stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is accompanied by the decay of the Raman Langmuir wave into either a second Langmuir wave (LD) or a second scattered light wave (ED) and an ion acoustic wave. An extension of Stokes’ theory is used to obtain expressions for the gain in the Raman Langmuir and scattered waves. It is shown that only very modest levels of ion waves are needed to produce duce a significant effect on the net Raman convective gain which proves to be sensitive to the source levels of the amplifying waves. For LD the gain from the Raman Langmuir wave source is suppressed while that from the secondary Langmuir wave is enhanced such that the net gain is increased or decreased depending on which of the two sources is greater. When the source levels of both Langmuir waves are at thermal levels, opposing effects mean no net change in the gain factor irrespective of the ion acoustic wave amplitude. For ED the gain is invariably suppressed for any source distributions. Two possible regimes of an enhanced effect have been identified: exact sidescattering for ED and the supersonic point vicinity for LD(ED). The theory thus provides a possible explanation for a variety of the observed effects in the interplay between SRS and stimulated Brillouin scattering, both of concern in laser fusion schemes.

  15. Commercial intermediate pressure MALDI ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometer capable of producing highly charged laserspray ionization ions.

    PubMed

    Inutan, Ellen D; Wang, Beixi; Trimpin, Sarah

    2011-02-01

    The first examples of highly charged ions observed under intermediate pressure (IP) vacuum conditions are reported using laser ablation of matrix/analyte mixtures. The method and results are similar to those obtained at atmospheric pressure (AP) using laserspray ionization (LSI) and/or matrix assisted inlet ionization (MAII). Electrospray ionization (ESI), LSI, and MAII are methods operating at AP and have been shown, with or without the use of a voltage or a laser, to produce highly charged ions with very similar ion abundance and charge states. A commercial matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) mass spectrometry (MS) instrument (SYNAPT G2) was used for the IP developments. The necessary conditions for producing highly charged ions of peptides and small proteins at IP appear to be a pressure drop region and the use of suitable matrixes and laser fluence. Ionization to produce these highly charged ions under the low pressure conditions of IP does not require specific heating or a special inlet ion transfer region. However, under the current setup, ubiquitin is the highest molecular weight protein observed. These findings are in accord with the need to provide thermal energy in the pressure drop region, similar to LSI and MAII, to improve sensitivity and extend the types of compounds that produce highly charged ions. The practical utility of IP-LSI in combination with IMS-MS is demonstrated for the analysis of model mixtures composed of a lipid, peptides, and a protein. Further, endogenous multiply charged peptides are observed directly from delipified mouse brain tissue with drift time distributions that are nearly identical in appearance to those obtained from a synthesized neuropeptide standard analyzed by either LSI- or ESI-IMS-MS at AP. Efficient solvent-free gas-phase separation enabled by the IMS dimension separates the multiply charged peptides from lipids that remained on the delipified tissue. Lipid and peptide

  16. Structural Characterization of Anticancer Drug Paclitaxel and Its Metabolites Using Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hong Hee; Hong, Areum; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Won Jong; Kim, Hugh I.

    2016-02-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a popular anticancer drug used in the treatment of various types of cancers. PTX is metabolized in the human liver by cytochrome P450 to two structural isomers, 3'- p-hydroxypaclitaxel (3 p-OHP) and 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel (6α-OHP). Analyzing PTX and its two metabolites, 3 p-OHP and 6α-OHP, is crucial for understanding general pharmacokinetics, drug activity, and drug resistance. In this study, electrospray ionization ion mobility mass spectrometry (ESI-IM-MS) and collision induced dissociation (CID) are utilized for the identification and characterization of PTX and its metabolites. Ion mobility distributions of 3 p-OHP and 6α-OHP indicate that hydroxylation of PTX at different sites yields distinct gas phase structures. Addition of monovalent alkali metal and silver metal cations enhances the distinct dissociation patterns of these structural isomers. The differences observed in the CID patterns of metalated PTX and its two metabolites are investigated further by evaluating their gas-phase structures. Density functional theory calculations suggest that the observed structural changes and dissociation pathways are the result of the interactions between the metal cation and the hydroxyl substituents in PTX metabolites.

  17. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion.

  18. Repeatability and reproducibility of product ion abundances in electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry of peptides.

    PubMed

    Ben Hamidane, Hisham; Vorobyev, Aleksey; Tsybin, Yury O

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific reproducibility and repeatability of electron capture dissociation (ECD) in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) are of fundamental importance for product ion abundance (PIA)-based peptide and protein structure analysis. However, despite the growing interest in ECD PIA-based applications, these parameters have not yet been investigated in a consistent manner. Here, we first provide a detailed description of the experimental parameters for ECD-based tandem mass spectrometry performed on a hybrid linear ion trap (LTQ) FT-ICR MS. In the following, we describe the evaluation and comparison of ECD and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) PIA methodologies upon variation of a number of experimental parameters, for example, cathode potential (electron energy), laser power, electron and photon irradiation periods and pre- irradiation delays, as well as precursor ion number. Ranges of experimental parameters that yielded an average PIA variation below 5% and 15% were determined for ECD and IRMPD, respectively. We report cleavage site-dependent ECD PIA variation below 20% and correlation coefficients between fragmentation patterns superior to 0.95 for experiments performed on three FT-ICR MS instruments. Overall, the encouraging results obtained for ECD PIA reproducibility and repeatability support the use of ECD PIA as a complementary source of information to m/z data in radical-induced dissociation applied for peptide and protein structure analysis.

  19. Uranium passivation by C+ implantation: a photoemission and secondary ion mass spectrometry study

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Felter, T E; Wu, K J; Evans, C; Ferreira, J; Siekhaus, W; McLean, W

    2005-01-20

    Implantation of 33 keV C{sup +} ions into polycrystalline U{sup 238} with a dose of 4.3 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} produces a physically and chemically modified surface layer that prevents further air oxidation and corrosion. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry were used to investigate the surface chemistry and electronic structure of this C{sup +} ion implanted polycrystalline uranium and a non-implanted region of the sample, both regions exposed to air for more than a year. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was used to examine and compare the surface morphology of the two regions. The U 4f, O 1s and C 1s core-level and valence band spectra clearly indicate carbide formation in the modified surface layer. The time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling results reveal an oxy-carbide surface layer over an approximately 200 nm thick UC layer with little or no residual oxidation at the carbide layer/U metal transitional interface.

  20. High-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry: Characterization, data management, and applications.

    PubMed

    Zühlke, Martin; Riebe, Daniel; Beitz, Toralf; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Andreotti, Sandro; Reinert, Knut; Zenichowski, Karl; Diener, Marc

    2016-12-01

    The combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry facilitates the two-dimensional separation of complex mixtures in the retention and drift time plane. The ion mobility spectrometer presented here was optimized for flow rates customarily used in high-performance liquid chromatography between 100 and 1500 μL/min. The characterization of the system with respect to such parameters as the peak capacity of each time dimension and of the 2D spectrum was carried out based on a separation of a pesticide mixture containing 24 substances. While the total ion current chromatogram is coarsely resolved, exhibiting coelutions for a number of compounds, all substances can be separately detected in the 2D plane due to the orthogonality of the separations in retention and drift dimensions. Another major advantage of the ion mobility detector is the identification of substances based on their characteristic mobilities. Electrospray ionization allows the detection of substances lacking a chromophore. As an example, the separation of a mixture of 18 amino acids is presented. A software built upon the free mass spectrometry package OpenMS was developed for processing the extensive 2D data. The different processing steps are implemented as separate modules which can be arranged in a graphic workflow facilitating automated processing of data.

  1. Enhanced Sensitivity for High Spatial Resolution Lipid Analysis by Negative Ion Mode MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Peggi M.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Baldwin, H. Scott; Caprioli, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We have achieved enhanced lipid imaging to a ~10 μm spatial resolution using negative ion mode matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging mass spectrometry, sublimation of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid as the MALDI matrix and a sample preparation protocol that uses aqueous washes. We report on the effect of treating tissue sections by washing with volatile buffers at different pHs prior to negative ion mode lipid imaging. The results show that washing with ammonium formate, pH 6.4, or ammonium acetate, pH 6.7, significantly increases signal intensity and number of analytes recorded from adult mouse brain tissue sections. Major lipid species measured were glycerophosphoinositols, glycerophosphates, glycerolphosphoglycerols, glycerophosphoethanolamines, glycerophospho-serines, sulfatides, and gangliosides. Ion images from adult mouse brain sections that compare washed and unwashed sections are presented and show up to fivefold increases in ion intensity for washed tissue. The sample preparation protocol has been found to be applicable across numerous organ types and significantly expands the number of lipid species detectable by imaging mass spectrometry at high spatial resolution. PMID:22243218

  2. Dyeing regions of oxidative hair dyes in human hair investigated by nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Toru; Yamada, Hiromi; Yamamoto, Toshihiko; Matsushita, Yasuyuki; Fukushima, Kazuhiko

    2013-06-01

    To develop more effective oxidative hair coloring products, it is important to understand the localization of colored chromophores, which are formed from oxidative dyes, in the fine structure of hair. However, the dyeing regions of oxidative hair dyes in the fine structure of hair have not been extensively examined. In this study, we investigated the distribution and localization of colored chromophores formed by an oxidative hair coloring product in the fine structure of human hair by using a stable isotope-labeled oxidative dye with nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). First, formation of the colored chromophore from a deuterium-labeled oxidative dye was examined by visible spectra similarly to a study of its formation using nonlabeled oxidative dye. Furthermore, the formation of binuclear indo dye containing deuterium in its chemical structure was confirmed using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) analysis. As a result of the NanoSIMS image on a cross-sectional dyed hair, although deuterium ions were detected in whole hair cross-section, quite a few of them were detected at particulate regions. These particulate regions of the dyed black hair in which deuterium ions were intensely detected were identified as melanin granules, by comparing the dyeing behaviors of black and white hair. NanoSIMS analysis revealed that melanin granules of black human hair are important dyeing regions in oxidative hair coloring.

  3. Brominated Tyrosine and Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Analysis by Laser Desorption VUV Postionization and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    University of Illinois at Chicago; Blaze, Melvin M. T.; Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Gasper, Gerald; Pleticha, F. Douglas; Hanley, Luke

    2011-03-14

    The small molecular analyte 3,5-dibromotyrosine (Br2Y) and chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) with and without adsorbed Br2Y were analyzed by laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). LDPI-MS using 7.87 eV laser and tunable 8 ? 12.5 eV synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation found that desorption of clusters from Br2Y films allowed detection by≤8 eV single photon ionization. Thermal desorption and electronic structure calculations determined the ionization energy of Br2Y to be ~;;8.3?0.1 eV and further indicated that the lower ionization energies of clusters permitted their detection at≤8 eV photon energies. However, single photon ionization could only detect Br2Y adsorbed within PEMs when using either higher photon energies or matrix addition to the sample. All samples were also analyzed by 25 keV Bi3 + secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), with the negative ion spectra showing strong parent ion signal which complemented that observed by LDPI-MS. The negative ion SIMS depended strongly on the high electron affinity of this specific analyte and the analyte?s condensed phase environment.

  4. Molecular depth profiling of multilayer polymer films using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wagner, M S

    2005-02-01

    The low penetration depth and high sputter rates obtained using polyatomic primary ions have facilitated their use for the molecular depth profiling of some spin-cast polymer films by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In this study, dual-beam time-of-flight (TOF) SIMS (sputter ion, 5 keV SF(5)(+); analysis ion, 10 keV Ar(+)) was used to depth profile spin-cast multilayers of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), and trifluoroacetic anhydride-derivatized poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (TFAA-PHEMA) on silicon substrates. Characteristic positive and negative secondary ions were monitored as a function of depth using SF(5)(+) primary ion doses necessary to sputter through the polymer layer and uncover the silicon substrate (>5 x10(14) ions/cm(2)). The sputter rates of the polymers in the multilayers were typically less than for corresponding single-layer films, and the order of the polymers in the multilayer affected the sputter rates of the polymers. Multilayer samples with PHEMA as the outermost layer resulted in lowered sputter rates for the underlying polymer layer due to increased ion-induced damage accumulation rates in PHEMA. Additionally, the presence of a PMMA or PHEMA overlayer significantly decreased the sputter rate of TFAA-PHEMA underlayers due to ion-induced damage accumulation in the overlayer. Typical interface widths between adjacent polymer layers were 10-15 nm for bilayer films and increased with depth to approximately 35 nm for the trilayer films. The increase in interface width and observations using optical microscopy showed the formation of sputter-induced surface roughness during the depth profiles of the trilayer polymer films. This study shows that polyatomic primary ions can be used for the molecular depth profiling of some multilayer polymer films and presents new opportunities for the analysis of thin organic films using TOF-SIMS.

  5. Gas phase ion - molecule reactions studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.W. III.

    1993-01-01

    Intrinsic thermodynamic information of molecules can easily be determined in the low pressure FT/ICR mass spectrometer. The gas phase basicity of two carbenes were measured by isolating the protonated carbene ion and reacting it with neutral reference compounds by the bracketing method. A fundamentally new-dimensional FT/ICR/MS experiment, SWIM (stored waveform ion modulation) 2D-FT/ICR MS/MS, is described. Prior encodement of the second dimension by use of two identical excitation waveforms separated by a variable delay period is replaced by a new encodement in which each row of the two-dimensional data array is obtained by use of a single stored excitation waveform whose frequency-domain magnitude spectrum is a sinusoid whose frequency increases from one row to the next. In the two-dimensional mass spectrum, the conventional one-dimensional FT/ICR mass spectrum appears along the diagonal, and each off-diagonal peak corresponds to an ion-neutral reaction whose ionic components may be identified by horizontal and vertical projections to the diagonal spectrum. All ion-molecule reactions in a gaseous mixture may be identified from a single 2D-FT/ICR MS/MS experiment, without any prior knowledge of the system. In some endoergic reactions there is a minimum energy threshold that must overcome for a reaction to occur. Hence, a simple sinusoidal modulation of parent ion cyclotron radius leads to a clipped sinusoidal signal of the product ion abundance in the second dimension, which upon Fourier transformation produces signals with harmonic and combination ion cyclotron resonance frequencies. Moreover, ion-molecule reaction rates may vary directly within kinetic energy rather than cyclotron radius. With SWIM, it is possible to tailor the excitation profile so as to produce a sinusoidal modulation of ion kinetic energy as a function of cyclotron frequency.

  6. Collective Thomson scattering measurements of fast-ion transport due to sawtooth crashes in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, S. K.; Stejner, M.; Galdon-Quiroga, J.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Jaulmes, F.; Korsholm, S. B.; Lazanyi, N.; Leipold, F.; Ryter, F.; Salewski, M.; Schubert, M.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROFusion MST1 Team

    2016-11-01

    Sawtooth instabilities can modify heating and current-drive profiles and potentially increase fast-ion losses. Understanding how sawteeth redistribute fast ions as a function of sawtooth parameters and of fast-ion energy and pitch is hence a subject of particular interest for future fusion devices. Here we present the first collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements of sawtooth-induced redistribution of fast ions at ASDEX Upgrade. These also represent the first localized fast-ion measurements on the high-field side of this device. The results indicate fast-ion losses in the phase-space measurement volume of about 50% across sawtooth crashes, in good agreement with values predicted with the Kadomtsev sawtooth model implemented in TRANSP and with the sawtooth model in the EBdyna_go code. In contrast to the case of sawteeth, we observe no fast-ion redistribution in the presence of fishbone modes. We highlight how CTS measurements can discriminate between different sawtooth models, in particular when aided by multi-diagnostic velocity-space tomography, and briefly discuss our results in light of existing measurements from other fast-ion diagnostics.

  7. Reactions of Ions with Ionic Liquid Vapors by Selected-Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-04

    pair to form an EMIM + NTf2 - EMIM + ion- trio (G = -21.2 kcal/mol, reaction 12, Table 1) at mass 502. Similarly, the formation of the NTf2...40.8 kcal/mol) or NO3 - EMIM + NTf2 - (mass 453, G = -28.0 kcal/mol) in reactions 6 and 7, respectively. Detection of the ion- trio ...perpendicular to the ring and is sandwiched between the EMIM + and NH4 + cations in the EMIM + NTf2 - NH4 + ion- trio . When BMIM + dca - (IP=7.4 eV

  8. Characterization of Solids and Surfaces Using Ion Beams and Mass Spectrometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    wmre able to make a correlation between the N12CO ’ ion and bridge bonded CO, and the Ni.c0 ion and linear bonded CO. Their rationale for this...explaining trajectories in atom-diatom scattering (69), properties of liquids (70) and even the solvation of large molecules like dipeptides (71). For...needs to be improved for two reasons. First, many solids have directional bonds - Si, GaAs or ice are examples where this correction needs to be

  9. Final Report - Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Sandia National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, W.B.

    2002-12-18

    This report covers the three main projects that collectively comprised the Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program. Chapter 1 describes the direct interrogation of individual particles by laser desorption within the ion trap mass spectrometer analyzer. The goals were (1) to develop an ''intelligent trigger'' capable of distinguishing particles of biological origin from those of nonbiological origin in the background and interferent particles and (2) to explore the capability for individual particle identification. Direct interrogation of particles by laser ablation and ion trap mass spectrometry was shown to have good promise for discriminating between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin, although detailed protocols and operating conditions were not worked out. A library of more than 20,000 spectra of various types of biological particles has been assembled. Methods based on multivariate analysis and on neural networks were used to discriminate between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin. It was possible to discriminate between at least some species of bacteria if mass spectra of several hundred similar particles were obtained. Chapter 2 addresses the development of a new ion trap mass analyzer geometry that offers the potential for a significant increase in ion storage capacity for a given set of analyzer operating conditions. This geometry may lead to the development of smaller, lower-power field-portable ion trap mass spectrometers while retaining laboratory-scale analytical performance. A novel ion trap mass spectrometer based on toroidal ion storage geometry has been developed. The analyzer geometry is based on the edge rotation of a quadrupolar ion trap cross section into the shape of a torus. Initial performance of this device was poor, however, due to the significant contribution of nonlinear fields introduced by the rotation of the symmetric ion-trapping geometry. These nonlinear resonances

  10. Detection of artificially created negative ion clouds with incoherent scatter radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultan, Peter J.; Mendillo, Michael; Oliver, William L.; Holt, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The physical mechanisms by which negative ions change the shape of the incoherent scatter spectrum, and the way in which shape changes may be used to detect the presence of heavy positive and negative ions in an ambient ionosphere are investigated. In order to detect heavy negative ions, the temperature structure of the ionosphere is fixed to a prevent average measurement, and any changes in spectral shape during the experiment are interpreted as being caused by changes in composition, and not by changes in the temperature ratio Te/Ti. The spatial and temporal development of heavy negative ion plasma clouds created during four active chemical release experiments was observed. Concentrations of 10-40-percent SF6(-) were detected in SPINEX 1, SPINEX 2, and IMS data sets. An average uncertainty of +/-10-percent SF6(-) is present in all three experiments. Concentrations of 30-percent Br(-) were detected in the NICARE 1 release, with uncertainties of +/-4 percent.

  11. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-05-06

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts and noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.

  12. Static secondary ion mass spectrometry to monitor solid-phase peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Maux, D; Enjalbal, C; Martinez, J; Aubagnac, J L; Combarieu, R

    2001-10-01

    Insights into the direct monitoring of supported peptide synthesis were realized through the design of time of flight static secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-S-SIMS) experiments. The mass spectrometric method was carried out at the resin bead level and was found reproducible (intra- and inter-day assays), sensitive (femtomol level) and non-destructive (only 0.01% of the peptides were destroyed by the primary ion beam bombardment). The nature of the peptide-resin linkage governed the recovery of ions characterizing the whole peptide sequence. A S-SIMS cleavable bond was thus required solely in that position to achieve the release of the growing structures from the insoluble support into the gas phase without any fragmentation. Results are presented with standard solid-phase resins allowing linkage through an amide or an ester bond. The latter was orthogonally broken upon the bombardment and thus constituted a convenient S-SIMS cleavable bond.

  13. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; ...

    2014-05-06

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts andmore » noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.« less

  14. Charge Breeding Techniques in an Electron Beam Ion Trap for High Precision Mass Spectrometry at TITAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, T. D.; Simon, M. C.; Bale, J. C.; Chowdhury, U.; Eibach, M.; Gallant, A. T.; Lennarz, A.; Simon, V. V.; Chaudhuri, A.; Grossheim, A.; Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Schultz, B. E.; Dilling, J.

    2012-10-01

    Penning trap mass spectrometry is the most accurate and precise method available for performing atomic mass measurements. TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science is currently the only facility to couple its Penning trap to a rare isotope facility and an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). The EBIT is a valuable tool for beam preparation: since the precision scales linearly with the charge state, it takes advantage of the precision gained by using highly charged ions. However, this precision gain is contingent on fast and efficient charge breeding. An optimization algorithm has been developed to identify the optimal conditions for running the EBIT. Taking only the mass number and half-life of the isotope of interest as inputs, the electron beam current density, charge breeding time, charge state, and electron beam energy are all specified to maximize this precision. An overview of the TITAN charge breeding program, and the results of charge breeding simulations will be presented.

  15. Label free biochemical 2D and 3D imaging using secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John S; Vickerman, John C; Winograd, Nicholas

    2011-10-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) provides a method for the detection of native and exogenous compounds in biological samples on a cellular scale. Through the development of novel ion beams the amount of molecular signal available from the sample surface has been increased. Through the introduction of polyatomic ion beams, particularly C(60), ToF-SIMS can now be used to monitor molecular signals as a function of depth as the sample is eroded thus proving the ability to generate 3D molecular images. Here we describe how this new capability has led to the development of novel instrumentation for 3D molecular imaging while also highlighting the importance of sample preparation and discuss the challenges that still need to be overcome to maximise the impact of the technique.

  16. Scattering of relativistic and ultra-relativistic electrons by obliquely propagating Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzbekov, Bogdan; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Orlova, Ksenia

    2016-10-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are transverse plasma waves that are generated in the Earth magnetosphere by ring current protons with temperature anisotropy in three different bands: below the H+, He+ and O+ ion gyrofrequencies. EMIC events are enhanced during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm when intensifications in the electric field result in enhanced injections of ions and are usually confined to high-density regions just inside the plasmapause or within drainage plumes. EMIC waves are capable of scattering radiation belt electrons and thus provide an important link between the intensification of the electric field, ion populations, and radiation belt electrons. Bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients computed with the assumption of parallel wave propagation are compared to the results of the code that uses the full cold plasma dispersion relation taking into account oblique propagation of waves and higher-order resonances. We study the sensitivity of the scattering rates to a number of included higher-order resonances, wave spectral distribution parameters, wave normal angle distribution parameters, ambient plasma density, and ion composition. Inaccuracies associated with the neglect of higher-order resonances and oblique propagation of waves are compared to potential errors introduced by uncertainties in the model input parameters.

  17. Surface Structure and Lattice Dynamics of Alkali Halide Crystals Studied by High-Resolution Ion Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Yoshiaki; Okazawa, Tetsuaki

    The rumpled surface structure and thermal lattice vibrations of KI(001) and RbI(001) were measured directly by high-resolution medium energy ion scattering (MEIS). The relaxation of interlayer distance between the top and second layer and the rumpling of the top and second layers were determined using the ion shadowing effect with an accuracy of 0.01 Å. From the displaced lattice positions determined above, we derived the dipole moments of the top- and second-layer ions self-consistently employing the polarizabilities estimated from the optical refractive index combined with the Clausius Mossotti relation. The balance between a short-range force and a long-range Coulombic one made it possible to judge the applicability of the short-range pair potentials proposed so far. We also determined the root-mean-square (rms) thermal vibration amplitudes of the bulk and the top-layer ions together with the correlations of the ions in the [001] and [101] strings by taking various kinds of scattering geometries. The results obtained were compared with those calculated from the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on a classical model using the dipole moments determined above and the Born Mayer type pair potential. The present MEIS results are in overall agreement with the MD simulations.

  18. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Zeolite Materials: Observation of Abundant Aluminosilicate Oligomers Using an Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Kessinger, Glen Frank; Scott, Jill Rennee; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Appelhans, Anthony David; Delmore, James Edward

    2000-12-01

    Oligomeric oxyanions were observed in the secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) of zeolite materials. The oxyanions have the general composition AlmSinO2(m+n)H(m-1)- (m + n = 2 to 8) and are termed dehydrates. For a given mass, multiple elemental compositions are possible because (Al + H) is an isovalent and isobaric substitute for Si. Using 18 keV Ga+ as a projectile, oligomer abundances are low relative to the monomers. Oligomer abundance can be increased by using the polyatomic projectile ReO4- (~5 keV). Oligomer abundance can be further increased using an ion trap (IT-) SIMS; in this instrument, long ion lifetimes (tens of ms) and relatively high He pressure result in significant collisional stabilization and increased high-mass abundance. The dehydrates rapidly react with adventitious H2O present in the IT-SIMS to form mono-, di-, and trihydrates. The rapidity of the reaction and comparison to aluminum oxyanion hydration suggest that H2O adds to the aluminosilicate oxyanions in a dissociative fashion, forming covalently bound product ions. In addition to these findings, it was noted that production of abundant oligomeric aluminosilicates could be significantly increased by substituting the countercation (NH4+) with the larger alkali ions Rb+ and Cs+. This constitutes a useful tactic for generating large aluminosilicate oligomers for surface characterization and ion-molecule reactivity studies.

  19. Combining dynamic and static depth profiling in low energy ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Veen, Rik ter; Fartmann, Michael; Kersting, Reinhard; Hagenhoff, Birgit

    2013-01-15

    The advantages of combining dynamic and static depth profiling in low energy ion scattering are demonstrated for an Si/SiO{sub x}/W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD stack. Dynamic depth profiling can be used to calibrate static depth profiling. Energy losses of 152 and 215 eV/nm were found for 3 keV {sup 4}He{sup +} and 5 keV {sup 4}He{sup +} primary ions, respectively, for the experimental configuration used. This is in good agreement with the values used in the field. Static depth profiling can be used to recognize sputter artifacts in dynamic depth profiles.

  20. Separation of Peptide Isomers with Variant Modified Sites by High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Creese, Andrew; Smith, Richard D.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2010-10-01

    Many proteins and proteolytic peptides incorporate the same post-translational modification (PTM) at different sites, creating multiple localization variants with different functions or activities that may coexist in cells. Current analytical methods based on liquid chromatography (LC) followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) are challenged by such isomers that often co-elute in LC and/or produce non-unique fragments. Application of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has previously been explored, but success was limited by insufficient resolution. We show that the recently developed high-resolution differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) using helium-rich gases can readily separate phosphopeptides with variant modified sites. Specifically, use of He/N2 mixtures containing up to 74% He has allowed separating to >95% three monophosphorylated peptides of identical sequence. Similar separation was achieved at 50% He, using an elevated electric field. Bisphosphorylated isomers that differ in only one modification site were separated to the same extent. We anticipate the FAIMS capabilities for such separations to extend to other PTMs.

  1. A Novel Microwave-Induced Plasma Ionization Source for Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jianxiong; Zhao, Zhongjun; Liang, Gaoling; Duan, Yixiang

    2017-03-01

    This work demonstrates the application of a novel microwave induced plasma ionization (MIPI) source to ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The MIPI source, called Surfatron, is composed of a copper cavity and a hollow quartz discharge tube. The ion mobility spectrum of synthetics air has a main peak with reduced mobility of 2.14 cm2V‑1s‑1 for positive ion mode and 2.29 cm2V‑1s‑1 for negative ion mode. The relative standard deviations (RSD) are 0.7% and 1.2% for positive and negative ion mode, respectively. The total ion current measured was more than 3.5 nA, which is much higher than that of the conventional 63Ni source. This indicates that a better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be acquired from the MIPI source. The SNR was 110 in the analysis of 500 pptv methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), resulting in the limit of detection (SNR = 3) of 14 pptv. The linear range covers close to 2.5 orders of magnitude in the detection of triethylamine with a concentration range from 500 pptv to 80 ppbv. Finally, this new MIPI-IMS was used to detect some volatile organic compounds, which demonstrated that the MIPI-IMS has great potential in monitoring pollutants in air.

  2. A Novel Microwave-Induced Plasma Ionization Source for Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jianxiong; Zhao, Zhongjun; Liang, Gaoling; Duan, Yixiang

    2017-01-01

    This work demonstrates the application of a novel microwave induced plasma ionization (MIPI) source to ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The MIPI source, called Surfatron, is composed of a copper cavity and a hollow quartz discharge tube. The ion mobility spectrum of synthetics air has a main peak with reduced mobility of 2.14 cm2V−1s−1 for positive ion mode and 2.29 cm2V−1s−1 for negative ion mode. The relative standard deviations (RSD) are 0.7% and 1.2% for positive and negative ion mode, respectively. The total ion current measured was more than 3.5 nA, which is much higher than that of the conventional 63Ni source. This indicates that a better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be acquired from the MIPI source. The SNR was 110 in the analysis of 500 pptv methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), resulting in the limit of detection (SNR = 3) of 14 pptv. The linear range covers close to 2.5 orders of magnitude in the detection of triethylamine with a concentration range from 500 pptv to 80 ppbv. Finally, this new MIPI-IMS was used to detect some volatile organic compounds, which demonstrated that the MIPI-IMS has great potential in monitoring pollutants in air. PMID:28287097

  3. Effect of microstructure of graphite on the nonreductive thermal ion emission in thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wei, H Z; Jiang, S Y; Xiao, Y K

    2010-02-25

    The emission behavior of polyatomic ions in the ionization source of thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) was investigated. The results suggest that the presence of a graphite promoter plays a key role for the formation and stable emission of polyatomic ions, such as M(2)X(+), M(2)BO(2)(+), Cs(2)NO(2)(+), and Cs(2)CNO(+). Our data further implied that the intensity of M(2)X(+) and M(2)BO(2)(+) increases and the emission temperature decreases with increasing cationic and anionic radius. During the boron isotopic measurement using the Cs(2)BO(2)(+)-graphite-PTIMS method, the isobaric interference ion Cs(2)CNO(+) cannot be transformed from nitrate or organic compounds containing an amide group but can be induced by the existence of trace amounts of boron because of its special electron-deficiency property (B(3+)). Characterization on the planar crystalline structure of various graphite samples with SEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the relationship of the emission capacity of polyatomic ions and the crystal microstructure of graphite and provides direct evidence that graphite with a perfect parallel and equidistant layer orientation shows a beneficial effect on the emission of polyatomic ions in TIMS. The mechanism study on the formation of polyatomic ions opens the possibility to establish high precision methods for isotopic composition analysis of more nonmetal elements with the TIMS technique.

  4. Development of a short pulsed corona discharge ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    An Yuan; Aliaga-Rossel, R.; Choi, Peter; Gilles, Jean-Paul

    2005-08-15

    The development of a pulsed corona discharge ionization source and its use in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is presented. In a point-plane electrode geometry, an electrical pulse up to 12 kV, 150 ns rise time and 500 ns pulse width was used to generate a corona discharge in air. A single positive high voltage pulse was able to generate about 1.6x10{sup 10} ions at energy consumption of 22 {mu}J. Since the temporal distribution of ions is in a pulsed form, the possibility of removal the ion gate has been investigated. By purposely arranging the interface between discharge field and drift field, nearly 10{sup 7} positive ions were drawn into the drift region with absence of the ion gate after every single discharge. The positive spectrum of acetone dimer (working at room temperature) was obtained with a resolving power of 20 by using this configuration. The advantages of this new scheme are the low power consumption compared with the dc method as well as the simplicity of the IMS cell structure.

  5. Capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry determination of inorganic ions using an ion spray-sheath flow interface.

    PubMed

    Huggins, T G; Henion, J D

    1993-01-01

    The determination of inorganic cations and anions by capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry (CE/MS) is reported using an ion spray-sheath flow interface coupling. A twelve-component synthetic mixture of cations which included the positive ions of K, Ba, Ca, Mn, Cd, Co, Pb, Cr, Ni, Zn, Ag, and Cu was loaded into the capillary column at levels ranging from 30 to 300 pg, separated by CE, and detected by indirect UV and in the full-scan (m/z 35-450) positive ion CE/MS mode using an aqueous buffer containing 30 mM creatinine and 8 mM alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid, pH 4.8. Creatinine forms adducts with the cations which are observed in the gas phase and requires rather high (120 electron volts) declustering energy to dissociate. This produces a reduction in charge state to form the free, singly charged, inorganic cations which are observed in the mass spectra. CE/MS analysis of an aqueous acidic extract of used aircraft engine oil revealed high levels of lead as well as lower levels of chromium and nickel. CE-indirect UV analysis of a synthetic mixture containing 300 pg each of 11 inorganic ions, which included the anions of Br, Cl, NO2, NO3, S2O3, N3, SCN, SO4, SeO4, oxalate, and MoO4, is shown. The running buffer which affected this separation contained 5 mM ammonium dichromate, 10 mM ammonium acetate, and 20 mM diethylenetriamine at pH 9.3. Although indirect UV detection revealed good separation of these anions, CE/MS analysis of this mixture was complicated by interfering ion current signals from the cluster ions formed by the interaction between the additives and the analytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Arrival time distributions of product ions reveal isomeric ratio of deprotonated molecules in ion mobility-mass spectrometry of hyaluronan-derived oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hermannová, Martina; Iordache, Andreea-Maria; Slováková, Kristína; Havlíček, Vladimír; Pelantová, Helena; Lemr, Karel

    2015-06-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring linear polysaccharide with substantial medical potential. In this work, discrimination of tyramine-based hyaluronan derivatives was accessed by ion mobility-mass spectrometry of deprotonated molecules and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. As the product ion mass spectra did not allow for direct isomer discrimination in mixture, the reductive labeling of oligosaccharides as well as stable isotope labeling was performed. The ion mobility separation of parent ions together with the characteristic fragmentation for reduced isomers providing unique product ions allowed us to identify isomers present in a mixture and determine their mutual isomeric ratio. The determination used simple recalculation of arrival time distribution areas of unique ions to areas of deprotonated molecules. Mass spectrometry data were confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  7. Time-of-flight secondary neutral & ion mass spectrometry using swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, L.; Meinerzhagen, F.; Bender, M.; Severin, D.; Wucher, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report on a new time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer designed to investigate sputtering phenomena induced by swift heavy ions in the electronic stopping regime. In this experiment, particular emphasis is put on the detection of secondary ions along with their emitted neutral counterparts in order to examine the ionization efficiency of the sputtered material. For the detection of neutral species, the system is equipped with a pulsed VUV laser for post-ionization of sputtered neutral atoms and molecules via single photon ionization at a wavelength of 157 nm (corresponding to 7.9 eV photon energy). For alignment purposes and in order to facilitate comparison to nuclear sputtering conditions, the system also includes a 5 keV Ar+ ion beam directed to the same sample area. The instrument has been added to the M1-branch beam line at the German accelerator facility in Darmstadt (GSI) and was tested with 4.8 MeV/u Au26+ ions impinging onto various samples including metals, salts and organic films. It is found that secondary ion and neutral spectra obtained under both bombardment conditions can be acquired in an interleaved manner throughout a single accelerator pulse cycle, thus making efficient use of valuable beam time. In addition, the keV ion beam can be intermittently switched to dc mode between subsequent data acquisition windows and accelerator pulses in order to ensure reproducible surface conditions. For the case of a dynamically sputter cleaned metal surface, comparison of secondary ion and neutral signals obtained under otherwise identical instrumental conditions reveals a nearly identical ionization probability of atoms emitted under electronic and nuclear sputtering conditions.

  8. On scattering effects for volume sources in low-energy photon spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lépy, Marie-Christine; Brondeau, Laurine; Ferreux, Laurent; Pierre, Sylvie

    2013-11-01

    In this study, different aspects of the Compton scattering inside volume sources are illustrated using experimental approach and Monte Carlo simulation. For the low-energy range (below 100 keV) scattered events represents around 30% of the whole spectrum. Influence of the source-detector geometry is discussed. The scattering effects induce strong differences in spectrum shape for different geometrical conditions. This should influence efficiency transfer factors. A new approach is proposed, including the scattered events, to avoid complex peak area determination.

  9. Ram ion scattering caused by Space Shuttle v x B induced differential charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Davis, V. A.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of secondary, high-inclination ions streams have been reported in the literature. The authors of these previous papers attributed the source of the secondary ions to a disturbed region in the plasma about 10 m from the Space Shuttle Orbiter. A new theory has been developed which shows how v x B induced differential charging on the plasma diagnostics package (PDP) can scatter the ram ion flux. Some of these ions are reflected back to the PDP and may be the sorce of the observed ion distributions. The effect is unique to large spacecraft; it occurs only when the magnitude of the induced v x B potentials are much larger than the electron thermal energy and of the order of the ion ram energy. That the ion streams observed at large angles must have been reflected from the PDP surface is demonstrated with three-dimensional sheath and particle trajectory calculations using the low earth orbit version of the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP/LEO).

  10. Determination of Cu Concentrations in CdTe/CdS Devices by High Mass Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, S. E.; Reedy, R. C.; Dhere, R.; Gessert, t. A.; Young, M. R.

    2000-01-01

    We have used secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to quantitatively determine the concentration of Cu in CdTe/CdS devices. Empirical standards were fabricated by ion implantation of Cu into single-crystal and polycrystalline CdTe and single-crystal CdS.

  11. Advancing the High Throughput Identification of Liver Fibrosis Protein Signatures Using Multiplexed Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Orton, Daniel J.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purdy, David E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Danielson, William F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Sandoval, John D.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Simons, Brenna C.; McMahon, Brian J.; Bhattacharya, Renuka; Perkins, James D.; Carithers, Robert L.; Strom, Susan; Self, Steven; Katze, Michael G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-04-01

    Rapid diagnosis of disease states using less invasive, safer, and more clinically acceptable approaches than presently employed is an imperative goal for the field of medicine. While mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches have attempted to meet these objectives, challenges such as the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in clinically relevant biofluid samples coupled with the need to address human biodiversity have slowed their employment. Herein, we report on the use of a new platform that addresses these challenges by coupling technical advances in rapid gas phase multiplexed ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations [1, 2] with liquid chromatography (LC) and MS to dramatically increase measurement sensitivity and throughput, further enabling future MS-based clinical applications. An initial application of the LC-IMS-MS platform for the analysis of blood serum samples from stratified post-liver transplant patients with recurrent fibrosis progression illustrates its potential utility for disease characterization and use in personalized medicine [3, 4].

  12. Application of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Park, Youmie; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2005-01-01

    The application of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) to the structural elucidation of oligosaccharides is described. This review covers the analyses of oligosaccharides in the context of the unique features of FTICR MS and the improvements in instrumentation that make it possible to study this class of compounds. It consists of work performed initially to understand the fundamental aspects of oligosaccharide ionization and unimolecular fragmentation. More recent investigation includes the application of the technique to samples of direct biological origin. Chemical and enzymatic degradation methods in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS) and the use front-end methods with FTICR MS are also discussed. The current applications including the characterization of bacterial lipooligosaccharides and phosporylated carbohydrates are described.

  13. Identification of hemoglobin variants by top-down mass spectrometry using selected diagnostic product ions.

    PubMed

    Coelho Graça, Didia; Hartmer, Ralf; Jabs, Wolfgang; Beris, Photis; Clerici, Lorella; Stoermer, Carsten; Samii, Kaveh; Hochstrasser, Denis; Tsybin, Yury O; Scherl, Alexander; Lescuyer, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Hemoglobin disorder diagnosis is a complex procedure combining several analytical steps. Due to the lack of specificity of the currently used protein analysis methods, the identification of uncommon hemoglobin variants (proteoforms) can become a hard task to accomplish. The aim of this work was to develop a mass spectrometry-based approach to quickly identify mutated protein sequences within globin chain variants. To reach this goal, a top-down electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry method was developed for hemoglobin β chain analysis. A diagnostic product ion list was established with a color code strategy allowing to quickly and specifically localize a mutation in the hemoglobin β chain sequence. The method was applied to the analysis of rare hemoglobin β chain variants and an (A)γ-β fusion protein. The results showed that the developed data analysis process allows fast and reliable interpretation of top-down electron transfer dissociation mass spectra by nonexpert users in the clinical area.

  14. Lipid and Glycolipid Isomer Analyses Using Ultra-High Resolution Ion Mobility Spectrometry Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, Roza; Webb, Ian; Deng, Liulin; Garimella, Sandilya; Prost, Spencer; Ibrahim, Yehia; Baker, Erin; Smith, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the biological mechanisms related to lipids and glycolipids is challenging due to the vast number of possible isomers. Mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for studying and providing detailed information on lipid and glycolipid structures. However, difficulties in distinguishing many structural isomers (e.g. distinct acyl chain positions, double bond locations, as well as glycan isomers) inhibit the understanding of their biological roles. Here we utilized ultra-high resolution ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations based upon the use of traveling waves in a serpentine long path length multi-pass Structures for Lossless Manipulations (SLIM) to enhance isomer resolution. The multi-pass arrangement allowed separations ranging from ~16 m (1 pass) to ~470 m (32 passes) to be investigated for the distinction of lipids and glycolipids with extremely small structural differences. These ultra-high resolution SLIM IMS-MS analyses provide a foundation for exploring and better understanding isomer specific biological and disease processes.

  15. "Evaluation of ion mobility spectrometry for the detection of mitragynine in kratom products".

    PubMed

    Fuenffinger, Nathan; Ritchie, Melissa; Ruth, Ashley; Gryniewicz-Ruzicka, Connie

    2017-02-05

    An ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) method was developed for the rapid detection of mitragynine, the most abundant alkaloid in Mitragyna speciosa also known as kratom. The peak corresponding to the mitragynine protonated ion exhibited a reduced ion mobility of 0.95±0.00014cm(2)/(Vs), and the mitragynine limit of detection using IMS was 0.5ng. The IMS method was applied to the analysis of 15 commercial samples suspected of containing kratom. IMS results were compared to those obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of the same samples. Mitragynine was conclusively detected in 14 of 15 samples using LC-MS/MS and 13 of 15 samples using IMS. The discrepancy between methods reflected the fact that one sample contained mitragynine at a concentration below the IMS detection limit. This study demonstrates the utility of IMS for the rapid screening of products containing kratom as well as the scientific reliability of the IMS screening method, which was demonstrated by comparing the IMS results to the confirmatory results obtained using LC-MS/MS.

  16. Nitrogen oxides as dopants for the detection of aromatic compounds with ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gaik, Urszula; Sillanpää, Mika; Witkiewicz, Zygfryd; Puton, Jarosław

    2017-03-03

    Limits of detection (LODs) in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) strictly depend on ionization of the analyte. Especially challenging is ionization of compounds with relatively low proton affinity (PA) such as aromatic compounds. To change the course of ion-molecule reactions and enhance the performance of the IMS spectrometer, substances called dopants are introduced into the carrier gas. In this work, we present the results of studies of detection using nitrogen oxides (NOx) dopants. Three aromatic compounds, benzene, toluene, toluene diisocyanate and, for comparison, two compounds with high PA, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and triethyl phosphate (TEP), were selected as analytes. The influence of water vapour on these analyses was also studied. Experiments were carried out with a generator of gas mixtures that allowed for the simultaneous introduction of three substances into the carrier gas. The experiments showed that the use of NOx dopants significantly decreases LODs for aromatic compounds and does not affect the detection of compounds with high PA. The water vapour significantly disturbs the detection of aromatic compounds; however, doping with NOx allows to reduce the effect of humidity. Graphical Abstract Two possible ionization mechanisms of aromatic compounds in ion mobility spectrometry: proton transfer reaction and adduct formation.

  17. Optimizing a microwave gas ion source for continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    von Reden, K F; Roberts, M L; Burton, J R; Beaupré, S R

    2012-02-01

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source coupled with a magnesium charge exchange canal (C × C) has been successfully adapted to a large acceptance radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry system at the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. CO(2) samples from various preparation sources are injected into the source through a glass capillary at 370 μl∕min. Routine system parameters are about 120-140 μA of negative (12)C current after the C × C, leading to about 400 (14)C counts per second for a modern sample and implying a system efficiency of 0.2%. While these parameters already allow us to perform high-quality AMS analyses on large samples, we are working on ways to improve the output of the ion source regarding emittance and efficiency. Modeling calculations suggest modifications in the extraction triode geometry, shape, and size of the plasma chamber could improve emittance and, hence, ion transport efficiency. Results of experimental tests of these modifications are presented.

  18. Rapid identification of triphenylmethane dyes by ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sysoev, Alexey A; Poteshin, Sergey S; Chernyshev, Denis M; Sysoev, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    An ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IM-TOFMS)-based method has been preliminarily investigated for the identification of triphenylmethane ballpoint pen dyes on paper. The dyes were sampled from one-year-old ballpoint pen ink entries. The entries were written on paper documents stored in the dark in a bookcase. Sample solutions were prepared by extraction of dyes in a vial. Basic violet 2, Methyl violet 6B, Methyl violet 2B and Crystal violet were characterized by IM-TOFMS. Since the ballpoint ink dyes contain ionic compounds, the studied compounds were expected to form stable peaks in the atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometry, and this was experimentally verified. The studied dyes produce [M - Cl](+) ions in electrospray and form stable individual mass-selective reduced mobility peaks. The values of the characteristic reduced mobility are: 1.187 cm(2)/(V·s) for Basic violet 2 (m/z 330.20), 1.165 cm(2)/(V·s) for Methyl violet 6B (m/z 344.21), 1.156 cm(2)/(V·s) for Methyl violet 2B (m/z 358.23), 1.123 cm(2)/(V·s) for Crystal violet (m/z 372.24). IM-TOFMS is expected to be a promising tool for fast and reliable analysis of dyes in complex matrixes.

  19. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and ion mobility analysis of the 20S proteasome complex.

    PubMed

    Loo, Joseph A; Berhane, Beniam; Kaddis, Catherine S; Wooding, Kerry M; Xie, Yongming; Kaufman, Stanley L; Chernushevich, Igor V

    2005-07-01

    Mass spectrometry and gas phase ion mobility [gas phase electrophoretic macromolecule analyzer (GEMMA)] with electrospray ionization were used to characterize the structure of the noncovalent 28-subunit 20S proteasome from Methanosarcina thermophila and rabbit. ESI-MS measurements with a quadrupole time-of-flight analyzer of the 192 kDa alpha7-ring and the intact 690 kDa alpha7beta7beta7alpha7 are consistent with their expected stoichiometries. Collisionally activated dissociation of the 20S gas phase complex yields loss of individual alpha-subunits only, and it is generally consistent with the known alpha7beta7beta7alpha7 architecture. The analysis of the binding of a reversible inhibitor to the 20S proteasome shows the expected stoichiometry of one inhibitor for each beta-subunit. Ion mobility measurements of the alpha7-ring and the alpha7beta7beta7alpha7 complex yield electrophoretic diameters of 10.9 and 15.1 nm, respectively; these dimensions are similar to those measured by crystallographic methods. Sequestration of multiple apo-myoglobin substrates by a lactacystin-inhibited 20S proteasome is demonstrated by GEMMA experiments. This study suggests that many elements of the gas phase structure of large protein complexes are preserved upon desolvation, and that methods such as mass spectrometry and ion mobility analysis can reveal structural details of the solution protein complex.

  20. Identification of isobaric product ions in electrospray ionization mass spectra of fentanyl using multistage mass spectrometry and deuterium labeling.

    PubMed

    Wichitnithad, Wisut; McManus, Terence J; Callery, Patrick S

    2010-09-15

    Isobaric product ions cannot be differentiated by exact mass determinations, although in some cases deuterium labeling can provide useful structural information for identifying isobaric ions. Proposed fragmentation pathways of fentanyl were investigated by electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry coupled with deuterium labeling experiments and spectra of regiospecific deuterium labeled analogs. The major product ion of fentanyl under tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) conditions (m/z 188) was accounted for by a neutral loss of N-phenylpropanamide. 1-(2-Phenylethyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (1) was proposed as the structure of the product ion. However, further fragmentation (MS(3)) of the fentanyl m/z 188 ion gave product ions that were different from the product ion in the MS/MS fragmentation of synthesized 1, suggesting that the m/z 188 product ion from fentanyl includes an isobaric structure different from the structure of 1. MS/MS fragmentation of fentanyl in deuterium oxide moved one of the isobars to 1 Da higher mass, and left the other isobar unchanged in mass. Multistage mass spectral data from deuterium-labeled proposed isobaric structures provided support for two fragmentation pathways. The results illustrate the utility of multistage mass spectrometry and deuterium labeling in structural assignment of isobaric product ions.

  1. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder. Detecting Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility, and Mass Spectrometry Features in Complex Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Lamarche, Brian L.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-09-05

    We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time, and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension.

  2. Bound-state methods for low-energy electron-ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Leonard

    1996-02-01

    An effective-potential formalism, previously developed for electron scattering by a neutral target, is extended to apply to electron-ion scattering, with the requirement of antisymmetrization now accounted for explicitly. A minimum principle for the effective potential is derived, valid for scattering below the ionization threshold and applicable when, as is usually the case, the target wave functions are imprecisely known. The basis for the minimum principle is the Rayleigh-Ritz property that is satisfied by the modified Hamiltonian in terms of which the effective potential is defined. An analysis of single-channel, zero-energy scattering for a particular partial wave is presented; it is based on the effective-potential formalism and leads to an absolute definition of the zero-energy phase shift δ(0) of the form δ(0)=μ(∞)π, where μ(n) is the quantum defect of the nth energy level. This result may be thought of as an extension of Levinson's theorem for scattering by short-range potentials.

  3. Many-electron effects on x-ray Rayleigh scattering by highly charged He-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotka, A. V.; Yerokhin, V. A.; Surzhykov, A.; Stöhlker, Th.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Rayleigh scattering of x rays by many-electron highly charged ions is studied theoretically. The many-electron perturbation theory, based on a rigorous quantum electrodynamics approach, is developed and implemented for the case of the elastic scattering of (high-energetic) photons by heliumlike ions. Using this elaborate approach, we here investigate the many-electron effects beyond the independent-particle approximation (IPA) as conventionally employed for describing the Rayleigh scattering. The total and angle-differential cross sections are evaluated for the x-ray scattering by heliumlike Ni26 +,Xe52 +, and Au77 + ions in their ground state. The obtained results show that, for high-energetic photons, the effects beyond the IPA do not exceed 2% for the scattering by a closed K shell.

  4. Identifying important ions and positions in mass spectrometry imaging data using CUR matrix decompositions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiyan; Rübel, Oliver; Prabhat; Mahoney, Michael W; Bowen, Benjamin P

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging enables label-free, high-resolution spatial mapping of the chemical composition of complex, biological samples. Typical experiments require selecting ions and/or positions from the images: ions for fragmentation studies to identify keystone compounds and positions for follow up validation measurements using microdissection or other orthogonal techniques. Unfortunately, with modern imaging machines, these must be selected from an overwhelming amount of raw data. Existing techniques to reduce the volume of data, the most popular of which are principle component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization, have the disadvantage that they return difficult-to-interpret linear combinations of actual data elements. In this work, we show that CX and CUR matrix decompositions can be used directly to address this selection need. CX and CUR matrix decompositions use empirical statistical leverage scores of the input data to provide provably good low-rank approximations of the measured data that are expressed in terms of actual ions and actual positions, as opposed to difficult-to-interpret eigenions and eigenpositions. We show that this leads to effective prioritization of information for both ions and positions. In particular, important ions can be found either by using the leverage scores as a ranking function and using a deterministic greedy selection algorithm or by using the leverage scores as an importance sampling distribution and using a random sampling algorithm; however, selection of important positions from the original matrix performed significantly better when they were chosen with the random sampling algorithm. Also, we show that 20 ions or 40 locations can be used to reconstruct the original matrix to a tolerance of 17% error for a widely studied image of brain lipids; and we provide a scalable implementation of this method that is applicable for analysis of the raw data where there are often more than a million rows and/or columns

  5. Differential mobility spectrometry with nanospray ion source as a compact detector for small organics and inorganics

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.; Fornace, Albert J.; Kidd, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is an important tool in chemical and biochemical survey and targeted analysis in many applications. For chemical detection and identification electrospray is usually used with mass spectrometry (MS). However, for screening and monitoring of chemicals of interest in light, low power field-deployable instrumentation, an alternative detection technology with chemical selectivity would be highly useful, especially since small, lightweight, chip-based gas and liquid chromatographic technologies are being developed. Our initial list of applications requiring portable instruments includes chemical surveys on Mars, medical diagnostics based on metabolites in biological samples, and water quality analysis. In this report, we evaluate ESI-Differential Mobility Spectrometry (DMS) as a compact, low-power alternative to MS detection. Use of DMS for chemically-selective detection of ESI suffers in comparison with mass spectrometry because portable MS peak capacity is greater than that of DMS by 10X or more, but the development of light, fast chip chromatography offers compensating resolution. Standalone DMS provides the chemical selectivity familiar from DMS-MS publications, and exploits the sensitivity of ion detection. We find that sub-microliter-per-minute flows and a correctly-designed interface prepare a desolvated ion stream that enables DMS to act as an effective ion filter. Results for a several small organic biomarkers and metabolites, including citric acid, azelaic acid, n-hexanoylglycine, thymidine, and caffeine, as well as compounds such as dinitrotoluene and others, have been characterized and demonstrate selective detection. Water-quality-related halogen-containing anions, fluoride through bromate, contained in liquid samples are also isolated by DMS. A reaction-chamber interface is highlighted as most practical for portable ESI-DMS instrumentation. PMID:23914140

  6. Differential mobility spectrometry with nanospray ion source as a compact detector for small organics and inorganics.

    PubMed

    Coy, Stephen L; Krylov, Evgeny V; Nazarov, Erkinjon G; Fornace, Albert J; Kidd, Richard D

    2013-09-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is an important tool in chemical and biochemical survey and targeted analysis in many applications. For chemical detection and identification electrospray is usually used with mass spectrometry (MS). However, for screening and monitoring of chemicals of interest in light, low power field-deployable instrumentation, an alternative detection technology with chemical selectivity would be highly useful, especially since small, lightweight, chip-based gas and liquid chromatographic technologies are being developed. Our initial list of applications requiring portable instruments includes chemical surveys on Mars, medical diagnostics based on metabolites in biological samples, and water quality analysis. In this report, we evaluate ESI-Differential Mobility Spectrometry (DMS) as a compact, low-power alternative to MS detection. Use of DMS for chemically-selective detection of ESI suffers in comparison with mass spectrometry because portable MS peak capacity is greater than that of DMS by 10X or more, but the development of light, fast chip chromatography offers compensating resolution. Standalone DMS provides the chemical selectivity familiar from DMS-MS publications, and exploits the sensitivity of ion detection. We find that sub-microliter-per-minute flows and a correctly-designed interface prepare a desolvated ion stream that enables DMS to act as an effective ion filter. Results for a several small organic biomarkers and metabolites, including citric acid, azelaic acid, n-hexanoylglycine, thymidine, and caffeine, as well as compounds such as dinitrotoluene and others, have been characterized and demonstrate selective detection. Water-quality-related halogen-containing anions, fluoride through bromate, contained in liquid samples are also isolated by DMS. A reaction-chamber interface is highlighted as most practical for portable ESI-DMS instrumentation.

  7. Metabolite identification for mass spectrometry-based metabolomics using multiple types of correlated ion information.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Ke-Shiuan; Cheng, Mei-Ling; Chen, Yet-Ran; Hsu, Chin; Chen, Ann; Lih, T Mamie; Chang, Hui-Yin; Huang, Ching-jang; Shiao, Ming-Shi; Pan, Wen-Harn; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2015-02-17

    Metabolite identification remains a bottleneck in mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolomics. Currently, this process relies heavily on tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectra generated separately for peaks of interest identified from previous MS runs. Such a delayed and labor-intensive procedure creates a barrier to automation. Further, information embedded in MS data has not been used to its full extent for metabolite identification. Multimers, adducts, multiply charged ions, and fragments of given metabolites occupy a substantial proportion (40-80%) of the peaks of a quantitation result. However, extensive information on these derivatives, especially fragments, may facilitate metabolite identification. We propose a procedure with automation capability to group and annotate peaks associated with the same metabolite in the quantitation results of opposite modes and to integrate this information for metabolite identification. In addition to the conventional mass and isotope ratio matches, we would match annotated fragments with low-energy MS/MS spectra in public databases. For identification of metabolites without accessible MS/MS spectra, we have developed characteristic fragment and common substructure matches. The accuracy and effectiveness of the procedure were evaluated using one public and two in-house liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data sets. The procedure accurately identified 89% of 28 standard metabolites with derivative ions in the data sets. With respect to effectiveness, the procedure confidently identified the correct chemical formula of at least 42% of metabolites with derivative ions via MS/MS spectrum, characteristic fragment, and common substructure matches. The confidence level was determined according to the fulfilled identification criteria of various matches and relative retention time.

  8. Applicability of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of quarantine pests in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, K. J.; Sanghera, J.; Myers, S. W.; Ervin, A. M.; Carey, C.; Gleason, G.; Mosser, L.; Levy, L.; Hennessey, M. K.; Bulluck, R.

    2016-05-01

    Visual inspection is the most commonly used method for detecting quarantine pests in agricultural cargo items at ports. For example, solid wood packing material (SWPM) at ports may be a pathway for wood pests and is a frequent item of inspection at ports. The inspection process includes examination of the external surface of the item and often destructive sampling to detect internal pest targets. There are few tools available to inspectors to increase the efficiency of inspection and reduce the labor involved. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has promise as an aid for inspection. Because pests emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as hormone like substances, Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was investigated for possible utility for detecting pests during inspection. SWPM is a major pest pathway in trade, and fumigation of many kinds of wood, including SWPM, with methyl bromide (MeBr) following a published schedule1 is regularly conducted for phytosanitary reasons prior to shipment to the United States. However, the question remains as to how long the methyl bromide remains in the wood samples after fumigation such that it could act as an interferent to the detection of pest related VOC emissions. This work investigates the capability of ion mobility spectrometry to detect the presence of residual methyl bromide in fumigated maple and poplar wood samples at different times post fumigation up to 118 days after fumigation. Data show that MeBr can be detected in the less dense poplar wood up to 118 days after fumigation while MeBr can be detected in the denser maple wood 55 days after fumigation.

  9. Mass determination of megadalton-DNA Electrospray Ions usingCharge Detection Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Jocelyn C.; Hack, Christopher; Benner, Henry W.

    1997-10-01

    Charge detection mass spectrometry (CD-MS) has been used to determine the mass of double-stranded, circular DNA and single-stranded, circular DNA in the range of 2500 to 8000 base pairs (1.5-5.0 MDa). Simultaneous measurement of the charge and velocity of an electrostatically accelerated ion allows a mass determination of the ion, with instrument calibration determined independently of samples. Positive ion mass spectra of electrosprayed commercial DNA samples supplied in tris(hydroxymethyl)ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid buffer, diluted in 50 vol. percent acetonitrile, were obtained without cleanup of the sample. ACD mass spectrum constructed from 3000 ion measurements takes 10 min to acquire and yields the DNA molecular mass directly (mass resolution = 6). The data collected represent progress toward a more automatable alternative to sizing of DNA by gel electrophoresis. In addition to the mass spectra, CD-MS generates charge versus mass plots, which provide another means to investigate the creation and fate of large electrospray ions.

  10. Negative ion mass spectrometry and the detection of carbonyls and HCN from clover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Thomas G.; Kato, Shuji; Fall, Ray; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2000-12-01

    We have demonstrated that negative ion-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) can be used to distinguish several isomeric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted from wounded plants. Reaction chemistry with HO-, hydrogen/deuterium exchange patterns, and collision-induced dissociation spectra allow identification of the isomers. Laboratory studies of emissions from wounded clover using NI-CIMS show several previously detected VOCs, but also clearly demonstrate the emission of HCN. This compound is presumably formed by the decomposition of cyanogenic glycosides which also form aldehyde and ketone byproducts. These results suggest that NI-CIMS may be a valuable tool for investigating VOCs and HCN release from vegetation.

  11. Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry of solid-phase peptide syntheses.

    PubMed

    Aubagnac, J L; Enjalbal, C; Drouot, C; Combarieu, R; Martinez, J

    1999-07-01

    Imaging time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) of solid-phase peptide syntheses carried out by the Merrifield and Sheppard strategies is described. Mixtures of resin beads mixed at random from batch syntheses or obtained in combinatorial chemistry by the mix and split technique, where each bead is functionalized by a unique peptide, were analyzed directly without any chemical cleavage of the growing chains to assess the nature of the growing structure on any bead of the mixture without its isolation.

  12. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry strategies for untargeted systems, synthetic, and chemical biology

    PubMed Central

    May, Jody C.; Goodwin, Cody R.; McLean, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary strategies that concentrate on only one or a handful of molecular targets limits the utility of the information gained for diagnostic and predictive purposes. Recent advances in the sensitivity, speed, and precision of measurements obtained from ion mobility coupled to mass spectrometry (IM-MS) have accelerated the utility of IM-MS in untargeted, discovery-driven studies in biology. Perhaps most evident is the impact that such wide-scale discovery capabilities have yielded in the areas of systems, synthetic, and chemical biology, where the need for comprehensive, hypothesis-driving studies from multidimensional and unbiased data is required. PMID:25462629

  13. Effects of Solvent and Ion Source Pressure on the Analysis of Anabolic Steroids by Low Pressure Photoionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengyuan; Zhu, Yanan; Yang, Jiuzhong; Zhao, Wan; Lu, Deen; Pan, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Solvent and ion source pressure were two important factors relating to the photon induced ion-molecule reactions in low pressure photoionization (LPPI). In this work, four anabolic steroids were analyzed by LPPI mass spectrometry. Both the ion species present and their relative abundances could be controlled by switching the solvent and adjusting the ion source pressure. Whereas M•+, MH+, [M - H2O]+, and solvent adducts were observed in positive LPPI, [M - H]- and various oxidation products were abundant in negative LPPI. Changing the solvent greatly affected formation of the ion species in both positive and negative ion modes. The ion intensities of the solvent adduct and oxygen adduct were selectively enhanced when the ion source pressure was elevated from 68 to 800 Pa. The limit of detection could be decreased by increasing the ion source pressure.

  14. Semiclassical calculation of heavy-ion scattering in the chaotic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Dasso, C. H.; Gallardo, M. I.; Saraceno, M.

    2007-05-15

    The semiclassical approach has proven to be a most valuable tool for the construction of the scattering matrix and accurate evaluation of cross sections in a large variety of heavy-ion collision problems. In its familiar implementation, however, its use is restricted to what is now known as the 'regular regime', as it makes use of classical reaction functions that must be continuous and interpolable. In this paper we identify what version of the semiclassical formalisms may be especially suitable for extension into the chaotic regime that develops at energies close to the Coulomb barrier. We also show the crucial role of the absorptive part of the ion-ion potential to retain the usefulness of the semiclassical methods under conditions of irregularity.

  15. Analysis of Ammonium Nitrate/Urea Nitrate with Crown Ethers and Sugars as Modifiers by Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Wei; Midey, Anthony; Wu, Ching; Yost, Richard A

    2016-10-04

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) and urea nitrate (UN) are commonly used materials in improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Detection by mass spectrometry (MS) and/or ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is traditionally difficult. The major challenges of detecting these species arise from their ionic nature and their low mass (for MS detection) and size (for IMS detection). Although AN and UN both produce characteristic higher mass (and size) cluster ions when ionized by electrospray ionization (ESI), detection of AN/UN using cluster ions poses difficulty at trace levels because their formation is concentration-dependent. The addition of modifiers to the ESI process is demonstrated here to overcome some of these challenges for the detection of AN and UN using MS and/or IMS.

  16. Application of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry to the Study of Ionic Clusters: Investigation of Cluster Ions with Stable Sizes and Compositions

    PubMed Central

    Ohshimo, Keijiro; Komukai, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Tohru; Norimasa, Naoya; Wu, Jenna Wen Ju; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Koyasu, Kiichirou; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2014-01-01

    Stable cluster sizes and compositions have been investigated for cations and anions of ionic bond clusters such as alkali halides and transition metal oxides by ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS). Usually structural information of ions can be obtained from collision cross sections determined in IM-MS. In addition, we have found that stable ion sizes or compositions were predominantly produced in a total ion mass spectrum, which was constructed from the IM-MS measurement. These stable species were produced as a result of collision induced dissociations of the ions in a drift cell. We have confirmed this result in the sodium fluoride cluster ions, in which cuboid magic number cluster ions were predominantly observed. Next the stable compositions, which were obtained for the oxide systems of the first row transition metals, Ti, Fe, and Co, are characteristic for each of the metal oxide cluster ions. PMID:26819887

  17. A novel principle for an ion mirror design in time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, S.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H.; Fischer, J.; Jäckel, A.; Korth, A.; Mildner, M.; Piazza, D.; Reme, H.; Wurz, P.

    2006-03-01

    A novel design for a gridless two-stage ion mirror, or reflectron, for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) will be presented. The development of this novel design was driven by the stringent engineering requirements for the ion mirror's utilization by the reflectron time-of-flight (RTOF) sensor in the Rosetta orbiter spectrometer for ion and neutral analysis (ROSINA) instrument package of the Rosetta cometary mission launched by the European Space Agency in March 2004. The reflectron consists of ceramic and titanium alloy components joined by brazing and welding processes. The device serves as both the mechanical structure and as an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) enclosure for the TOFMS system. The electrostatic fields of the reflectron are generated along two individually adjustable sections of a resistor helix applied to the inner surface of a ceramic cylinder. This design allows for increased homogeneity of the electrostatic fields, and minimizes fringe fields close to the cylindrical boundary of the reflectron structure. Thus, the usable inner diameter of ion flight path for a given outer diameter is maximized; a feature required by spacecraft constraints. An additional electrostatic lens in front of the reflectron allows the geometrical alteration of the shape of the ion beam, and its direction with regard to the ion optical axis. This makes it possible to switch the operation of the TOFMS system between a single-reflection and a triple-reflection mode, the latter using an additional ion mirror. Typically, mass resolutions of up to 5000 at full width at half maximum (FWHM) have been achieved in the triple-reflection mode for an overall sensor dimension of 1 m. Experimental results in the single-reflection mode and in the triple-reflection mode will be presented. Environmental constraints for space applications will also be discussed.

  18. CO2 Cluster Ion Beam, an Alternative Projectile for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hua; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of argon-based gas cluster ion beams for SIMS experiments opens new possibilities for molecular depth profiling and 3D chemical imaging. These beams generally leave less surface chemical damage and yield mass spectra with reduced fragmentation compared with smaller cluster projectiles. For nanoscale bioimaging applications, however, limited sensitivity due to low ionization probability and technical challenges of beam focusing remain problematic. The use of gas cluster ion beams based upon systems other than argon offer an opportunity to resolve these difficulties. Here we report on the prospects of employing CO2 as a simple alternative to argon. Ionization efficiency, chemical damage, sputter rate, and beam focus are investigated on model compounds using a series of CO2 and Ar cluster projectiles (cluster size 1000-5000) with the same mass. The results show that the two projectiles are very similar in each of these aspects. Computer simulations comparing the impact of Ar2000 and (CO2)2000 on an organic target also confirm that the CO2 molecules in the cluster projectile remain intact, acting as a single particle of m/z 44. The imaging resolution employing CO2 cluster projectiles is improved by more than a factor of two. The advantage of CO2 versus Ar is also related to the increased stability which, in addition, facilitates the operation of the gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) system at lower backing pressure.

  19. CO2 Cluster Ion Beam, an Alternative Projectile for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of argon-based gas cluster ion beams for SIMS experiments opens new possibilities for molecular depth profiling and 3D chemical imaging. These beams generally leave less surface chemical damage and yield mass spectra with reduced fragmentation compared with smaller cluster projectiles. For nanoscale bioimaging applications, however, limited sensitivity due to low ionization probability and technical challenges of beam focusing remain problematic. The use of gas cluster ion beams based upon systems other than argon offer an opportunity to resolve these difficulties. Here we report on the prospects of employing CO2 as a simple alternative to argon. Ionization efficiency, chemical damage, sputter rate, and beam focus are investigated on model compounds using a series of CO2 and Ar cluster projectiles (cluster size 1000-5000) with the same mass. The results show that the two projectiles are very similar in each of these aspects. Computer simulations comparing the impact of Ar2000 and (CO2)2000 on an organic target also confirm that the CO2 molecules in the cluster projectile remain intact, acting as a single particle of m/z 44. The imaging resolution employing CO2 cluster projectiles is improved by more than a factor of two. The advantage of CO2 versus Ar is also related to the increased stability which, in addition, facilitates the operation of the gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) system at lower backing pressure. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. Measurement of drug facilitated sexual assault agents in simulated sweat by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Demoranville, Leonard T; Verkouteren, Jennifer R

    2013-03-15

    Ion mobility spectrometry has found widespread use for the detection of explosives and illicit drugs. The technique offers rapid results with high sensitivity and little sample preparation. As such, it is well suited for field deployed screening settings. Here the response of ion mobility spectrometers for three drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) agents - flunitrazepam, ketamine, and MDMA - and related metabolites has been studied in the presence of a simulated sweat. While all three DFSA agents present certain challenges for qualitative identification, IMS can provide useful information to guide the early treatment and investigation of sexual assault cases. Used as a presumptive test, the identification of DFSA agents would later require confirmatory analysis by other techniques.

  1. Fourier-Transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Errol W.

    2014-03-28

    FT-ICR MS achieves the highest resolution and best mass measurement accuracy of any mass spectrometry method. These remarkable achievements are due to several factors, including multi-channel detection, measurement of frequency, magnetic field stability, and dependence of cyclotron frequency on only the magnetic field and ion mass to charge ratio, not on ion kinetic energy and other factors. Significant advances in magnet technology, instrument design and construction continue to enhance the capabilities of FT-ICR MS. FT-ICR has been applied to a variety of analytical challenges and is particularly suited to the analysis of complex mixtures and in applications where high resolution and mass measurement accuracy are critical analytical parameters.

  2. A novel approach to increasing cocaine detection confidence utilizing ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadamec, J. Richard; Su, Chih-Wu; Rigdon, Stephen; Norwood, Lavan

    1995-01-01

    When a positive detection of a narcotic occurs during the search of a vessel, a decision has to be made whether further intensive search is warranted. In terms of unwarranted delays of vessels and possible property damage, the accuracy of the analytical determination is very important. Analytical accuracy becomes critical when the data may be used in court actions as evidence. For this purpose, the U.S. Coast Guard has been investigating several confirmatory ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) field methods for the detection and identification of cocaine. This paper presents the findings of our investigations on the use of catalytic pyrolysis and base hydrolysis as confirmatory methods. The catalytic effects of various metals on the pyrolysis reaction are reported. In addition, the effects of several different ion mobility spectrometer sample transfer mediums and varying laboratory conditions on the base hydrolysis of the cocaine molecule are also be reported.

  3. Characterization of impurities in spiramycin by liquid chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pendela, Murali; Govaerts, Cindy; Diana, José; Hoogmartens, Jos; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    A reversed-phase liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method is described for the investigation of spiramycin and related substances. The method uses an XTerra C18 column (250 x 4.6 mm i.d.), 5 microm, and a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile, methanol, water and ammonium acetate solution, pH 6.5. Mass spectral data were acquired on an LCQ ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) operated in the positive ion mode. Using this method, the fragmentation behavior of spiramycin and its related substances was studied and the unknown impurities occurring in commercial samples were investigated. In total 17 compounds were identified, among which three reported as specified impurities in the European Pharmacopoeia. The other impurities showed mainly a modification in the forosamine sugar or in the substituent at C-3 and C-6 positions. In one impurity, the mycarose sugar is absent.

  4. Automated Gain Control Ion Funnel Trap for Orthogonal Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Liyu, Andrei V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS) is increasingly used in proteomics research. Herein, we report on the development and characterization of a TOF MS instrument with improved sensitivity equipped with an electrodynamic ion funnel trap (IFT) that employs an automated gain control (AGC) capability. The IFT-TOF MS was coupled to a reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography (RPLC) separation and evaluated in experiments with complex proteolytic digests. When applied to a global tryptic digest of Shewanella oneidensis proteins, an order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to that of the conventional continuous mode of operation was achieved due to efficient ion accumulation prior to TOF MS analysis. As a result of this sensitivity improvement and related improvement in mass measurement accuracy, the number of unique peptides identified in the AGC-IFT mode was 5-fold greater than that obtained in the continuous mode. PMID:18512944

  5. Evaluation of C60 secondary ion mass spectrometry for the chemical analysis and imaging of fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Sisco, Edward; Demoranville, Leonard T; Gillen, Greg

    2013-09-10

    The feasibility of using C60(+) cluster primary ion bombardment secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60(+) SIMS) for the analysis of the chemical composition of fingerprints is evaluated. It was found that C60(+) SIMS could be used to detect and image the spatial localization of a number of sebaceous and eccrine components in fingerprints. These analyses were also found to not be hindered by the use of common latent print powder development techniques. Finally, the ability to monitor the depth distribution of fingerprint constituents was found to be possible - a capability which has not been shown using other chemical imaging techniques. This paper illustrates a number of strengths and potential weaknesses of C60(+) SIMS as an additional or complimentary technique for the chemical analysis of fingerprints.

  6. Determination of the deposition order of overlapping latent fingerprints and inks using secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bright, Nicholas J; Webb, Roger P; Bleay, Stephen; Hinder, Steven; Ward, Neil I; Watts, John F; Kirkby, Karen J; Bailey, Melanie J

    2012-05-01

    A new protocol using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has been developed to identify the deposition order of a fingerprint overlapping an ink line on paper. By taking line scans of fragment ions characteristic of the ink molecules (m/z 358.2 and 372.2) where the fingerprint and ink overlap and by calculating the normalized standard deviation of the intensity variation across the line scan, it is possible to determine whether or not a fingerprint is above ink on a paper substrate. The protocol adopted works for a selection of fingerprints from four donors tested here and for a fingerprint that was aged for six months; for one donor, the very faint fingerprints could not be visualized using either standard procedures (ninhydrin development) or SIMS, and therefore the protocol correctly gives an inconclusive result.

  7. In Situ Ion-Transmission Mass Spectrometry for Paper-Based Analytical Devices.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaoyao; Wei, Zhenwei; Zhao, Hansen; Jia, Jia; Chen, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Sichun; Ouyang, Zheng; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Xinrong

    2016-11-15

    Current detection methods for paper-based analytical devices (PADs) rely on spectroscopic and electrochemical properties, which place special requirements on the analyte or need analyte labeling. Here, ion-transmission mass spectrometry (MS) was proposed for coupling with PADs to enable rapid in situ MS analysis of the sample on paper. The sample was analyzed directly on paper via analyte ionization by ions transmitted through the paper, generated by a low-temperature plasma probe. Prior to MS analysis, the sample can be separated by paper electrophoresis or by paper chromatography, among a variety of other features offered by PADs. The versatility of this technique was demonstrated by MS analysis of a paper microarray, a mixture of amino acids, and whole blood doped with drugs on PADs.

  8. Site-Specific Characterization of d-Amino Acid Containing Peptide Epimers by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the d-amino acid containing peptide (DAACP) candidate can be discovered by observing the differences of biological activity and chromatographic retention time between the synthetic peptides and naturally occurring peptides. However, it is difficult to determine the exact position of d-amino acid in the DAACP candidates. Herein, we developed a novel site-specific strategy to rapidly and precisely localize d-amino acids in peptides by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) analysis of mass spectrometry (MS)-generated epimeric fragment ions. Briefly, the d/l-peptide epimers were separated by online reversed-phase liquid chromatography and fragmented by collision-induced dissociation (CID), followed by IMS analysis. The epimeric fragment ions resulting from d/l-peptide epimers exhibit conformational differences, thus showing different mobilities in IMS. The arrival time shift between the epimeric fragment ions was used as criteria to localize the d-amino acid substitution. The utility of this strategy was demonstrated by analysis of peptide epimers with different molecular sizes, [d-Trp]-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, [d-Ala]-deltorphin, [d-Phe]-achatin-I, and their counterparts that contain all-l amino acids. Furthermore, the crustacean hyperglycemia hormones (CHHs, 8.5 kDa) were isolated from the American lobster Homarus americanus and identified by integration of MS-based bottom-up and top-down sequencing approaches. The IMS data acquired using our novel site-specific strategy localized the site of isomerization of l- to d-Phe at the third residue of the CHHs from the N-terminus. Collectively, this study demonstrates a new method for discovery of DAACPs using IMS technique with the ability to localize d-amino acid residues. PMID:24328107

  9. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) data quality indexes as a support for analysing magnetospheric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, Iannis; Barthe, Alain; Brunato, Sylvain; Rème, Henri; Laakso, Harri

    2016-04-01

    The Cluster Science Archive (CSA) aims at preserving the complete set of the measurements collected by the four Cluster spacecraft, so that they are usable in the long-term by the world-wide scientific community as well as by the instrument teams. This implies that the instrument data, properly calibrated, are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0 to 40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 sec) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CSA archival includes processed raw data, moments of the ion distribution functions, and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units. The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions, 2-D pitch-angle distributions and 1-D omni-directional fluxes. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, data caveats and data quality indexes. The later constitute a novel product, which has been prepared in order to help the user asses the quality of the data acquired in different magnetospheric regions and during various operational modes. It provides information on which are in each case the issues that can affect the data quality, which are the data products affected, and gives a simple quantitative measurement of the severity of these issues. The principle of the CIS data quality indexes will be described and the various issues, that can under some conditions affect the data quality and are thus taken into account in generating the data quality indexes, will be discussed.

  10. Comparison of Ambient and Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources for Cystic Fibrosis Exhaled Breath Condensate Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Zang, Xiaoling; Pérez, José J; Jones, Christina M; Monge, María Eugenia; McCarty, Nael A; Stecenko, Arlene A; Fernández, Facundo M

    2017-03-31

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The vast majority of the mortality is due to progressive lung disease. Targeted and untargeted CF breath metabolomics investigations via exhaled breath condensate (EBC) analyses have the potential to expose metabolic alterations associated with CF pathology and aid in assessing the effectiveness of CF therapies. Here, transmission-mode direct analysis in real time traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS) was tested as a high-throughput alternative to conventional direct infusion (DI) electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) methods, and a critical comparison of the three ionization methods was conducted. EBC was chosen as the noninvasive surrogate for airway sampling over expectorated sputum as EBC can be collected in all CF subjects regardless of age and lung disease severity. When using pooled EBC collected from a healthy control, ESI detected the most metabolites, APCI a log order less, and TM-DART the least. TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS was used to profile metabolites in EBC samples from five healthy controls and four CF patients, finding that a panel of three discriminant EBC metabolites, some of which had been previously detected by other methods, differentiated these two classes with excellent cross-validated accuracy. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Doubly excited states of ammonia by scattered electron-ion coincidence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Karin; Sakai, Yasuhiro

    2012-03-01

    To obtain information on the optically forbidden doubly excited states of ammonia (NH3), we performed scattered electron-ion coincidence measurements. First, we observed scattered electrons using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and determined the generalized oscillator strength distribution (GOSD) under 200 eV incident electron energy at a scattering angle of 8°. Ionic GOSDs were also determined by combination with the coincidence signal, which was observed by the time-of-flight mass spectrometer at each energy-loss value, for each ion. The total and partial ionic GOSDs were compared with the experimental results of both photon and fast electron impact. Moreover, the neutral GOSD determined by subtracting the total ionic GOSD from the total was compared with previous results. In addition to the optically forbidden doubly excited states, which were identified by Kato et al (2003 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 36 3541) and Ishikawa et al (2008 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 41 195204), we found a new optically forbidden doubly excited state at around 35 eV.

  12. Lipid and Glycolipid Isomer Analyses Using Ultra-High Resolution Ion Mobility Spectrometry Separations

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Roza; Webb, Ian K.; Deng, Liulin; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Prost, Spencer A.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Baker, Erin S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the biological roles and mechanisms of lipids and glycolipids is challenging due to the vast number of possible isomers that may exist. Mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for studying and providing detailed information on lipid and glycolipid presence and changes. However, difficulties in distinguishing the many structural isomers, due to the distinct lipid acyl chain positions, double bond locations or specific glycan types, inhibit the delineation and assignment of their biological roles. Here we utilized ultra-high resolution ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations by applying traveling waves in a serpentine multi-pass Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) platform to enhance the separation of selected lipid and glycolipid isomers. The multi-pass arrangement allowed the investigation of paths ranging from ~16 m (one pass) to ~60 m (four passes) for the distinction of lipids and glycolipids with extremely small structural differences. These ultra-high resolution SLIM IMS-MS analyses provide a foundation for exploring and better understanding isomer-specific biological activities and disease processes. PMID:28106768

  13. Integrating ion mobility spectrometry into mass spectrometry-based exposome measurements: what can it add and how far can it go?

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, Thomas O.; Baker, Erin S.; Schymanski, Emma L.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Thomas, Dennis G.; Causon, Tim J.; Webb, Ian K.; Hann, Stephan; Smith, Richard D.; Teeguarden, Justin G.

    2017-01-01

    Measuring the exposome remains a challenge due to the range and number of anthropogenic molecules that are encountered in our daily lives, as well as the complex systemic responses to these exposures. One option for improving the coverage, dynamic range and throughput of measurements is to incorporate ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) into current mass spectrometry (MS)-based analytical methods. In this perspective, we briefly review the state-of-the-art in measuring the exposome, and discuss the potential use for IMS-MS and the physico-chemical property of collisional cross section in both exposure assessment and molecular identification.

  14. Structural characterization of phospholipids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marto, J A; White, F M; Seldomridge, S; Marshall, A G

    1995-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provides for structural analysis of the principal biological phospholipids: glycerophosphatidylcholine, -ethanolamine, -serine, and -inositol. Both positive and negative molecular or quasimolecular ions are generated in high abundance. Isolated molecular ions may be collisionally activated in the source side of a dual trap mass analyzer, yielding fragments serving to identify the polar head group (positive ion mode) and fatty acid side chains (negative ion mode). Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation following collisionally activated dissociation refocuses productions close to the solenoid axis; subsequent transfer of product ions to the analyzer ion trap allows for high-resolution mass analysis. Cyro-cooling of the sample probe with liquid nitrogen greatly reduces matrix adduction encountered in the negative ion mode.

  15. The complex ion structure of warm dense carbon measured by spectrally resolved x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, D.; Barbrel, B.; Falcone, R. W.; Vorberger, J.; Helfrich, J.; Frydrych, S.; Ortner, A.; Otten, A.; Roth, F.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Siegenthaler, K.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Wünsch, K.; Bachmann, B.; Döppner, T.; Bagnoud, V.; Blažević, A.; and others

    2015-05-15

    We present measurements of the complex ion structure of warm dense carbon close to the melting line at pressures around 100 GPa. High-pressure samples were created by laser-driven shock compression of graphite and probed by intense laser-generated x-ray sources with photon energies of 4.75 keV and 4.95 keV. High-efficiency crystal spectrometers allow for spectrally resolving the scattered radiation. Comparing the ratio of elastically and inelastically scattered radiation, we find evidence for a complex bonded liquid that is predicted by ab-initio quantum simulations showing the influence of chemical bonds under these conditions. Using graphite samples of different initial densities we demonstrate the capability of spectrally resolved x-ray scattering to monitor the carbon solid-liquid transition at relatively constant pressure of 150 GPa. Showing first single-pulse scattering spectra from cold graphite of unprecedented quality recorded at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we demonstrate the outstanding possibilities for future high-precision measurements at 4th Generation Light Sources.

  16. Determining concentration depth profiles of thin foam films with neutral impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridings, Christiaan; Andersson, Gunther G.

    2010-11-01

    Equipment is developed to measure the concentration depth profiles in foam films with the vacuum based technique neutral impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy. Thin foam films have not previously been investigated using vacuum based techniques, hence specialized methods and equipment have been developed for generating and equilibrating of foam films under vacuum. A specialized film holder has been developed that encloses the foam film in a pressure cell. The pressure cell is air-tight except for apertures that allow for the entrance and exit of the ion beam to facilitate the analysis with the ion scattering technique. The cell is supplied with a reservoir of solvent which evaporates upon evacuating the main chamber. This causes the cell to be maintained at the vapor pressure of the solvent, thus minimizing further evaporation from the films. In order to investigate the effect of varying the pressure over the films, a hydrostatic pressure is applied to the foam films. Concentration depth profiles of the elements in a thin foam film made from a solution of glycerol and the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) were measured. The measured concentration depth profiles are used to compare the charge distribution in foam films with the charge distribution at the surface of a bulk solution. A greater charge separation was observed at the films' surface compared to the bulk surface, which implies a greater electrostatic force contribution to the stabilization of thin foam films.

  17. Evidence of hydroxyl-ion deficiency in bone apatites: an inelastic neutron-scattering study.

    PubMed

    Loong, C K; Rey, C; Kuhn, L T; Combes, C; Wu, Y; Chen, S; Glimcher, M J

    2000-06-01

    The novelty of very large neutron-scattering intensity from the nuclear-spin incoherence in hydrogen has permitted the determination of atomic motion of hydrogen in synthetic hydroxyapatite and in deproteinated isolated apatite crystals of bovine and rat bone without the interference of vibrational modes from other structural units. From an inelastic neutron-scattering experiment, we found no sharp excitations characteristic of the vibrational mode and stretch vibrations of OH ions around 80 and 450 meV (645 and 3630 cm(-1)), respectively, in the isolated, deproteinated crystals of bone apatites; such salient features were clearly seen in micron- and nanometer-size crystals of pure hydroxyapatite powders. Thus, the data provide additional definitive evidence for the lack of OH(-) ions in the crystals of bone apatite. Weak features at 160-180 and 376 meV, which are clearly observed in the apatite crystals of rat bone and possibly in adult mature bovine bone, but to a much lesser degree, but not in the synthetic hydroxyapatite, are assigned to the deformation and stretch modes of OH ions belonging to HPO(4)-like species.

  18. Plasma pencil atmospheric mass spectrometry detection of positive ions from micronutrients emitted from surfaces.

    PubMed

    Stein, M Jeanette; Lo, Edward; Castner, David G; Ratner, Buddy D

    2012-02-07

    Analysis and detection of micronutrients is important for the reduction of the global burden of malnutrition-related disease. A relatively new technique, plasma pencil atmospheric mass spectrometry (PPAMS) was applied in a comprehensive evaluation for rapid, simultaneous detection of the key micronutrients zinc, iron, folate, vitamin A, and iodine. PPAMS was performed through the coupling of a low-temperature plasma pencil to an atmospheric mass spectrometer. The effectiveness of the PPAMS system was demonstrated through the generation of characteristic mass spectra and tandem mass spectra on neat micronutrient powders suspended on double-sided tape. The analytical performance and ability to qualitatively separate out the nutrients from a complex biological solution and each other was then assessed through the application of PPAMS on a sample matrix of micronutrients in porcine plasma in which nutrient concentration is varied from high blood level concentrations (HBLCs) to low blood level concentrations (LBLCs). A multivariate analysis method, principal component analysis (PCA), was then used to qualitatively separate the fragments obtained by nutrient type. The resulting plots of PCA scores of the positive-ion spectra from each mixed sample showed excellent separation of HBLCs and LBLCs of single nutrients at the 95% confidence level (Wagner et al. Langmuir 2001, 17, 4649-4660). The associated plots of PCA loadings showed that key loadings could be attributed to the expected micronutrient fragments. The PPAMS technique was successfully demonstrated and compared with traditional MS techniques: time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Separation of the nutrients at concentrations relevant for human blood-based nutrient detection was possible by both ESI-MS and PPAMS. However, only PPAMS could detect the nutrients at physiological concentrations from porcine plasma. ToF-SIMS could detect the

  19. Raman scattering probe of ion-implanted and pulse laser annealed GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Prabhat; Jain, K. P.; Abbi, S. C.

    1996-04-01

    We report Raman scattering studies of phosphorus-ion-implanted and subsequently pulse laser annealed (PLA) GaAs. The threshold value of implantation fluence for the disappearance of one-phonon modes in the Raman spectrum of ion-implanted GaAs sample is found to be greater than that for the two-phonon modes by an order of magnitude. The phonon correlation length decreases with increasing disorder. The lattice reconstruction process during PLA creates microcrystallites for incomplete annealing, whose sizes can be given by the phonon correlation lengths, and are found to increase with the annealing power density. The intensity ratio of the Raman spectra corresponding to the allowed longitudinal-optical (LO)-phonon mode to the forbidden transverse-optical (TO)-phonon mode, ILO/ITO, is used as a quantitative measure of crystallinity in the implantation and PLA processes. The threshold annealing power density is estimated to be 20 MW/cm2 for 70 keV phosphorus-ion-implanted GaAs at a fluence of 5×1015 ions/cm2. The localized vibrational mode of phosphorus is observed in PLA samples for fluences above 1×1015 ions/cm2.

  20. Utility of Higher Harmonics in Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Electrostatic Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dziekonski, Eric T; Johnson, Joshua T; McLuckey, Scott A

    2017-03-30

    Mass resolution (M/ΔM fwhm) is observed to linearly increase with harmonic order in a Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap (ELIT) mass spectrometer. This behavior was predicted by Grosshans and Marshall for frequency-multiple detection in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer only for situations when the prominent mechanism for signal decay is ion ejection from the trap. As the analyzer pressure in our ELIT chamber is relatively high, such that collisional scattering and collision-induced dissociation are expected to underlie much of the ion loss, we sought to explore the relationship between harmonic order and mass resolution. Mass resolutions of 36 900 (fundamental), 75 850 (2nd harmonic), and 108 200 (3rd harmonic) were obtained for GdO(+) (avg. m/z 173.919) with a transient length of 300 ms. To demonstrate that the mass resolution was truly increasing with harmonic order, the unresolved isotopes at the fundamental distribution of cytochrome c(+8) (m/z ∼ 1549) were nearly baseline, resolved at the third harmonic (mass resolution ≈ 23 000) with a transient length of only 200 ms. This experiment demonstrates that, when the ion density is sufficiently low, ions with frequency differences of less than 4 Hz remain uncoalesced. Higher harmonics can be used to increase the effective mass resolution for a fixed transient length and thereby may enable the resolution of closely spaced masses, determination of a protein ion's charge state, and study of the onset of peak coalescence when the resolution at the fundamental frequency is insufficient.

  1. Thiolated cyclodextrin self-assembled monolayer-like characterized with secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabara, L.; Aranyosiova, M.; Velic, D.

    2011-01-01

    In the work the focus is on the preparation of self-assembled monolayer-like films consisting of thiolated cyclodextrin on gold substrate and a characterization by using secondary ion mass spectrometry. The short (1 min) and long (1 h) time preparations of self-assembled monolayer-like films, resulting in submonolayer and monolayer regimes, are investigated, respectively. The observed species of thiolated cyclodextrin (M as molecular ion) self-assembled monolayer-like films are assigned to three groups: Au xH yS z clusters, fragments with origin in cyclodextrin molecule associated with Au, and molecular ions. The group of Au xH yS z ( x = 2-17, y = 0-2, z = 1-5) clusters have higher intensities than other species in the positive and even more in negative mass spectra. Interestingly, the dependence between the number of Au and S atoms shows that with the increasing size of Au xH yS z clusters up to 11 Au atoms, the number of associated S atoms is also increasing and then decreasing. Molecular species as (M-S+H)Na +, (M+H)Na +, AuMNa +, (M 2-S)Na +, and M 2Na + are determined, and also in cationized forms with K +. The intensities of thiolated cyclodextrin fragments at the long time preparation are approximately 10 times higher than the intensities of the same fragments observed at the short time. The largest observed ions in thiolated cyclodextrin self-assembled monolayer-like films are AuM 2 and Au 2M. The thiolated cyclodextrin molecular ions are compared with hexadecanethiol molecular ions in the form of Au xM w where the values of x and w are smaller for thiolated cyclodextrin than for hexadecanethiol. This result is supported with larger, more compact, and more stabile thiolated cyclodextrin molecule.

  2. Analysis of the interactions between He + ions and transition metal surfaces using co-axial impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, M.; Brown, M. G.; Draxler, M.; Fishwick, L.; Dowsett, M. G.; McConville, C. F.

    2011-01-01

    The interactions between low energy He + ions and a series of transition metal surfaces have been studied using co-axial impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (CAICISS). Experimental data were collected from the Ni(110), Cu(100), Pd(111), Pt(111) and Au(111) surfaces using ion beams with primary energies between 1.5 keV and 4.0 keV. The shadow cone radii deduced from the experimental surface peak positions were found to closely match theoretical predictions. Data analysis was performed using both the FAN and Kalypso simulation codes, revealing a consistent requirement for a reduction of 0.252 in the screening length correction in the Molière approximation within the Thomas-Fermi (TFM) interaction potential. The adjustments of the screening length in the TFM potential, predicted by O'Connor, and the uncorrected Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark (ZBL) potential both yielded inaccurate results for all of the surfaces and incident energies studied. We also provide evidence that, despite their different computational methodologies, the FAN and Kalypso simulation codes generate similar results given identical input parameters for the analysis of 180° backscattering spectra.

  3. Design of a submillimeter laser Thomson scattering system for measurement of ion temperature in SUMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praddaude, H. C.; Woskoboinikow, P.

    1978-01-01

    A thorough discussion of submillimeter laser Thomson scattering for the measurement of ion temperature in plasmas is presented. This technique is very promising and work is being actively pursued on the high power lasers and receivers necessary for its implementation. In this report we perform an overall system analysis of the Thomson scattering technique aimed to: (1) identify problem areas; (2) establish specifications for the main components of the apparatus; (3) study signal processing alternatives and identify the optimum signal handling procedure. Because of its importance for the successful implementation of this technique, we also review the work presently being carried out on the optically pumped submillimeter CH3F and D2O lasers.

  4. Total electron scattering cross-sections and negative ion states of halogenated methanes

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood-Lemons, T.; Winkler, D.C.; Moore, J.H.; Tossell, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    The interaction of low energy electrons with halogenated methanes plays an important role in both their atmospheric and plasma processing chemistry. In this work, the total electron scattering cross-sections of mixed fluorohalomethanes (CF{sub n}X{sub 4-n}) were measured for incident electrons in the energy range of 0.2-12 eV using electron transmission spectroscopy. Resonances in the scattering cross-sections may be interpreted as the capture of low energy electrons into unoccupied molecular orbitals. To aid in the assignments of the resulting negative ion states, the authors performed quantum mechanical calculations of the electron attachment energies and measured the dissociative attachment cross-sections. The effect of halogen substitution on the orbitals participating in electron capture are examined.

  5. Structural characterization of product ions of regulated veterinary drugs by electrospray ionization and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (part 3) Anthelmintics, thyreostats, and flukicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RATIONALE: Previously we have reported a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the identification and quantification of regulated veterinary drugs. The methods used three selected transition ions but most of these ions lacked structural characterization. The work presented here ...

  6. Unified description of scattering and fusion phenomena in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sahu, Basudeb; Sahu, B. B.; Mallick, G. S.; Agarwalla, S. K.; Shastry, C. S.

    2008-02-15

    An analytical recursive formula of the partial-wave scattering matrix for the total effective complex potential of nucleus-nucleus collisions is derived to conveniently analyze the data of angular variations of elastic scattering cross sections. Further, another expression of cross sections for the absorption from arbitrarily small intervals is derived. This leads to the explanation of the fusion cross section ({sigma}{sub fus}) data at various incident center-of-mass energies E{sub c.m.} by collecting the absorption contributions in the interior region of the effective potential. This concept is akin to that used by Udagawa et al. in the calculation of fusion cross sections in elastic channels. The interaction potential considered in the analysis is energy independent and by virtue of its weakly absorbing character it supports resonance states in different partial-wave trajectories. Consequently, occurrence of these resonances is shown to be the physical origin of the observed oscillatory structure in the variation respect to energy of the quantity D(E{sub c.m.})=d{sup 2}(E{sub c.m.}{sigma}{sub fus})/dE{sub c.m.}{sup 2}, the second derivative of the product E{sub c.m.}{sigma}{sub fus} with respect to E{sub c.m.}. In this article, we investigate two well-known cases of heavy-ion collisions, namely {sup 12}C+{sup 208}Pb and {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb, and obtain simultaneous and very successful explanations of cross sections for elastic scattering and fusion and the results of D(E{sub c.m.}). These results obtained by using a somewhat novel and convenient method demonstrate the unified description of scattering and fusion for interacting heavy-ion systems.

  7. Inelastic processes in ion/surface collisions: Scattered ion fractions and VUV photon emission for Ne + and Ar + collisions with Mg and Y surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabalais, J. Wayne; Chen, Jie-Nan; Kumar, R.; Narayana, M.

    1985-12-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) scattering spectra and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon emission spectra resulting from 1-10 keV Ne+ and Ar+ ions impinging on magnesium and yttrium surfaces and the corresponding oxidized and hydroxylated surfaces have been measured. Measurements of the scattered neutrals plus ions and neutrals only are used to calculate scattered ion fractions Y+ for the single scattering collisions. The Y+ values rise steeply at low ion energies E0 (˜1-2 keV), reaching values of 70% and 38% at 10 keV for Ne+/Mg and Ar+/Y, respectively, and are very sensitive to adsorbate coverage. The dominant photon emission observed from the clean metals in the VUV range 30-200 nm is 1,3P → 1S resonance radiation from the excited neutral projectile atoms; emission was also observed from excited H and O for adsorbate covered surfaces. A model is developed for electronic transitions in keV ion/surface collisions which considers Auger and resonant transitions along the ion trajectory and electron promotions in the quasidiatomic molecule of the close encounter. By making an assumption of equality in the close encounter, the model can be fitted to the experimental data, allowing determination of ionization PI and neutralization PN probabilities as a function of the distance of approach. The results show that electron promotions within MO's of the collision complex formed during encounter are significant, if not dominating, processes in keV ion surface collisions.

  8. Nuclear effects on ion heating within the small-angle charged-particle elastic-scattering regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, A.; Hale, G. M.

    1984-10-01

    The effects of nuclear forces (in contrast to pure Coulomb interaction) on the ion heating rate which results from small-angle scattering processes between charged particles in plasmas are investigated within the framework of Fokker-Planck theory. These effects are included through the addition of analytic Coulomb-nuclear interference and nuclear elastic cross sections in the scattering integrals of the dynamical friction coefficient and dispersion tensor. It is found that corrections to traditional Fokker-Planck predictions of the ion-ion energy exchange rate can be calculated and that these corrections are sensitive to the choice of the maximum scattering angle defining the cutoff between small- and large-angle scattering.

  9. Ion distributions at charged aqueous surfaces: Synchrotron X-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Wei

    2009-01-01

    Surface sensitive synchrotron X-ray scattering studies were performed to obtain the distribution of monovalent ions next to a highly charged interface at room temperature. To control surface charge density, lipids, dihexadecyl hydrogen-phosphate (DHDP) and dimysteroyl phosphatidic acid (DMPA), were spread as monolayer materials at the air/water interface, containing CsI at various concentrations. Five decades in bulk concentrations (CsI) are investigated, demonstrating that the interfacial distribution is strongly dependent on bulk concentration. We show that this is due to the strong binding constant of hydronium H3O+ to the phosphate group, leading to proton-transfer back to the phosphate group and to a reduced surface charge. Using anomalous reflectivity off and at the L3 Cs+ resonance, we provide spatial counterion (Cs+) distributions next to the negatively charged interfaces. The experimental ion distributions are in excellent agreement with a renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions without fitting parameters or additional assumptions. Energy Scans at four fixed momentum transfers under specular reflectivity conditions near the Cs+ L3 resonance were conducted on 10-3 M CsI with DHDP monolayer materials on the surface. The energy scans exhibit a periodic dependence on photon momentum transfer. The ion distributions obtained from the analysis are in excellent agreement with those obtained from anomalous reflectivity measurements, providing further confirmation to the validity of the renormalized surface charge Poisson-Boltzmann theory for monovalent ions. Moreover, the dispersion corrections f0 and f00 for Cs+ around L3 resonance, revealing the local environment of a Cs+ ion in the solution at the interface, were extracted simultaneously with output of ion distributions.

  10. FAST NEUTRON SOURCE DETECTION AT LONG DISTANCES USING DOUBLE SCATTER SPECTROMETRY.

    SciTech Connect

    FORMAN,L.VANIER,P.WELSH,K.

    2003-08-03

    Fast neutrons can be detected with relatively high efficiency, >15%, using two planes of hydrogenous scintillator detectors where a scatter in the first plane creates a start pulse and scatter in the second plane is separated by time-of-flight. Indeed, the neutron spectrum of the source can be determined as the sum of energy deposited by pulse height in the first added to the energy of the second found by time-of-flight to the second detector. Gamma rays can also create a double scatter by Compton interaction in the first with detection in the second, but these events occur in a single time window because the scattered photons all travel at the speed of light. Thus, gamma ray events can be separated from neutrons by the time-of-flight differences. We have studied this detection system with a Cf-252 source using Bicron 501A organic scintillators and report on the ability to efficiently detect fast neutrons with high neutron/gamma detection ratios. We have further studied cosmic-ray neutron background detection response that is the dominant background in long range detection. We have found that most of the neutrons are excluded from the time-of-flight window because they are either too high in energy, >10 keV, or too low, < 10 keV. Moreover, if the detection planes are position-sensitive, the angular direction of the source can be determined by the ratio of the energy of scattered protons in the first detector relative to the position and energy of the scattered neutron detected in the second. This ability to locate the source in theta is useful, but more importantly increases the signal to noise relative to cosmic-ray produced neutrons that are relatively isotropic. This technique may be used in large arrays to detect neutrons at ranges up to 0.5 kilometer.

  11. An Effective Approach for Coupling Direct Analysis in Real Time with Atmospheric Pressure Drift Tube Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keelor, Joel D.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2014-09-01

    Drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) has evolved as a robust analytical platform routinely used for screening small molecules across a broad suite of chemistries ranging from food and pharmaceuticals to explosives and environmental toxins. Most modern atmospheric pressure IM detectors employ corona discharge, photoionization, radioactive, or electrospray ion sources for efficient ion production. Coupling standalone DTIMS with ambient plasma-based techniques, however, has proven to be an exceptional challenge. Device sensitivity with near-ground ambient plasma sources is hindered by poor ion transmission at the source-instrument interface, where ion repulsion is caused by the strong electric field barrier of the high potential ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) inlet. To overcome this shortfall, we introduce a new ion source design incorporating a repeller point electrode used to shape the electric field profile and enable ion transmission from a direct analysis in real time (DART) plasma ion source. Parameter space characterization studies of the DART DTIMS setup were performed to ascertain the optimal configuration for the source assembly favoring ion transport. Preliminary system capabilities for the direct screening of solid pharmaceuticals are briefly demonstrated.

  12. XPS and ion beam scattering studies of leaching in simulated waste glass containing uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, D.P.; Pronko, P.P.; Marcuso, T.L.M.; Lam, D.J.; Paulikas, A.P.

    1980-01-01

    Glass samples (consisting of 2 mole % UO/sub 3/ dissolved in a number of complex borosilicate simulated waste glasses including Battelle 76-68) were leached for varying times in distilled water at 75/sup 0/C. The glass surfaces were examined before and after leaching using x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and back-scattered ion beam profiling. Leached samples showed enhanced surface layer concentrations of several elements including uranium, titanium, zinc, iron and rare earths. An experiment involving the leaching of two glasses in the same vessel showed that the uranium surface enhancement is probably not due to redeposition from solution.

  13. Ion--dipole scattering: The differential cross section for the K/sup +/--CsCl system

    SciTech Connect

    Budenholzer, F.E.; Gislason, E.A.; Polak-Dingels, P.

    1982-05-15

    The total differential cross section has been measured for K/sup +/ scattered by CsCl over the range 10< or =Etheta< or =2000 eV deg. Classical perturbation scattering theory calculations for a realistic intermolecular potential have also been carried out and agree well with the experiments. The results show that the scattering is dominated at small angles by the ion--dipole potential and at large angles by the spherically symmetric part of the repulsive potential. No rainbow scattering is observed.

  14. Enhancing Biological Analyses with Three Dimensional Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility, Low Field Drift Tube Ion Mobility and Mass Spectrometry (μFAIMS/IMS-MS) Separations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin S.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional high throughput separations are ideal for analyzing distinct ion characteristics simultaneously in one analysis. We report on the first evaluation of a platform coupling a high speed field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry microchip (μFAIMS) with drift tube ion mobility and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). The μFAIMS/IMS-MS platform was used to analyze biological samples and simultaneously acquire multidimensional FAIMS compensation fields, IMS drift times, and accurate ion masses for the detected features. These separations thereby increased the overall measurement separation power, resulting in greater information content and more complete characterization of the complex samples. The separation conditions were optimized for sensitivity and resolving power by the selection of gas compositions and pressures in the FAIMS and IMS separation stages. The resulting performance provided three dimensional separations, benefitting both broad complex mixture studies and targeted analyses by improving isomeric separations and allowing detection of species obscured by interfering peaks. PMID:26140287

  15. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Tissues, Cells, and Microbial Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, Lara J.; Anderton, Christopher R.

    2016-03-18

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) techniques are increasingly being utilized within many biological fields, including medicine, pathology, microbial ecology, and more. Of the MSI methods available, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) offers the highest lateral resolution of any technique. Moreover, SIMS versatility in the number of different operating modes and types of mass spectrometers available has made it an increasing popular method for bio-related measurements. Here, we discuss SIMS ability to image tissues, single cells, and microbes with a particular emphasis on the types chemical and spatial information that can be ascertained by the different types of SIMS instruments and methods. The recently developed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) SIMS located at PNNL is capable of generating molecular maps of tissues with an unprecedented mass resolving power and mass accuracy, with respect to SIMS measurements. ToF-SIMS can generate chemical maps, where detection of small molecules and fragments can be acquired with an order of magnitude better lateral resolution than the FTICR-SIMS. Furthermore, many of commercially available ToF-SIMS instruments are capable of depth profiling measurements, offering the ability to attain three-dimensional information of one’s sample. The NanoSIMS instrument offers the highest lateral resolution of any MSI method available. In practice, NanoSIMS regularly achieves sub-100 nm resolution of atomic and diatomic secondary ions within biological samples. The strengths of the different SIMS methods are more and more being leveraged in both multimodal-imaging endeavors that use complementary MSI techniques as well with optical, fluorescence, and force microscopy methods.

  16. Characterization and ion-induced degradation of cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate) studied using time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M. S.; Lenghaus, K.; Gillen, G.; Tarlov, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    In this study, a series of random copolymers of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) were prepared as surface-initiated polymer (SIP) films on silicon substrates using atom transfer radical polymerization. Positive and negative ion static time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used to characterize SIP films with different MMA/EGDMA monomer ratios in an attempt to quantify their surface composition. However, matrix effects in the positive and negative ion modes led to preferential secondary ion generation from the EGDMA monomer and suppression of secondary ions characteristic of the MMA monomer, precluding accurate quantification using standard linear quantification methods. Ion-induced degradation of these films under 5 keV SF 5+ bombardment was also examined to determine the effect of cross-linking on the accumulation of ion-induced damage. Increasing incorporation of the EGDMA cross-linker in the SIP films decreased the sputter rate and increased the rate of damage accumulation under extended (>10 14 ions/cm 2) 5 keV SF 5+ bombardment. Comparison of the ion bombardment data with thermal degradation of cross-linked PMMA suggests that the presence of the cross-linker impedes degradation by depolymerization, resulting in ion-induced damage accumulation. The increased rate of ion-induced damage accumulation with increased cross-link density also suggests that polymers that can form cross-links during ion bombardment are less amenable to depth profiling using polyatomic primary ions.

  17. Liquid Extraction Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry for Analysis of Intact Proteins from Biological Substrates.

    PubMed

    Sarsby, Joscelyn; Griffiths, Rian L; Race, Alan M; Bunch, Josephine; Randall, Elizabeth C; Creese, Andrew J; Cooper, Helen J

    2015-07-07

    Previously we have shown that liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry is suitable for the analysis of intact proteins from a range of biological substrates. Here we show that LESA mass spectrometry may be coupled with high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for top-down protein analysis directly from thin tissue sections (mouse liver, mouse brain) and from bacterial colonies (Escherichia coli) growing on agar. Incorporation of FAIMS results in significant improvements in signal-to-noise and reduced analysis time. Abundant protein signals are observed in single scan mass spectra. In addition, FAIMS enables gas-phase separation of molecular classes, for example, lipids and proteins, enabling improved analysis of both sets of species from a single LESA extraction.

  18. Profiling and quantifying polar lipids in milk by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light-scattering and mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Russo, Marina; Cichello, Filomena; Ragonese, Carla; Donato, Paola; Cacciola, Francesco; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2013-05-01

    In this work, a high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection method has been developed and applied for quantification of the polar content of the lipid fraction in milk samples of different origin. From a chromatographic stand-point, a 4.6-mm I.D. hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column was employed to attain a baseline separation of major phospholipid classes contained in the various milk samples tested. Quantitative analysis was performed by the external calibration method using reference material solutions in the 5-100 mg/L concentration range. Analytical recoveries ranging from 57 to 100%, and repeatability data lower than 8.04% were obtained on a skimmed cow's milk sample. The crude cow milk was the most abundant (0.04%) in phospholipids and donkey milk was the poorest (0.004%). Quantitative differences were determined in the phospholipid content of the milk samples tested. Finally, characterization of phospholipid profile and fatty acid composition of the different samples was carried out by an ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometer and gas chromatography coupled to flame ionization and mass spectrometry detection. A thorough screening of the polar lipid composition of milk samples of different origin is here outlined, for the first time.

  19. Suppression of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in multiple-ion species inertial confinemen fusion Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P

    2007-05-14

    A long-standing problem in the field of laser-plasma interactions is to successfully employ multiple-ion species plasmas to reduce stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraum conditions. Multiple-ion species increase significantly the linear Landau damping for acoustic waves. Consequently, recent hohlraum designs for indirect-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility investigate wall liner material options so that the liner gain for parametric instabilities will be below threshold for the onset SBS. Although the effect of two-ion species plasmas on Landau damping has been directly observed with Thomson scattering, early experiments on SBS in these plasmas have suffered from competing non-linear effects or laser beam filamentation. In this study, a reduction of SBS scattering to below the percent level has been observed in hohlraums at Omega that emulate the plasma conditions in an indirect drive ICF experiments. These experiments have measured the laser-plasma interaction processes in ignition-relevant high-electron temperature regime demonstrating Landau damping as a controlling process for SBS. The hohlraums have been filled with various fractions of CO{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 8} varying the ratio of the light (H) to heavy (C and O) ion density from 0 to 2.6. They have been heated by 14.5 kJ of 351-nm light, thus increasing progressively Landau damping by an order of magnitude at constant electron density and temperature. A delayed 351-nm interaction beam, spatially smoothed to produce a 200-{micro}m laser spot at best focus, has propagated along the axis of the hohlraum. The backscattered light, both into the lens and outside, the transmitted light through the hohlraum plasma and the radiation temperature of the hohlraum has been measured. For ignition relevant laser intensities (3-9 10{sup 14} Wcm{sup -2}), we find that the SBS reflectivity scales as predicted with Landau damping from >30% to <1%. Simultaneously

  20. Comparison of sample pre-treatments for laser desorption ionization and secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging of Miscanthus x giganteus.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Bohn, Paul W; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2010-07-01

    Efforts to further the potential of the large perennial grass Miscanthusxgiganteus as a biofuel feedstock would be aided by the ability to image the chemical species present during the fuel production process. Toward this end, two mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) approaches have been investigated here-laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). As a first step, cross sections of Miscanthus were subjected to a variety of sample preparation methods to optimize conditions for MSI. For LDI-MS, a thin metal coating (2 nm thick Au) provided high quality signals of saccharide-related ions. The traditional matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization matrix, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, also showed high efficiency for the desorption of saccharide-related ions. In contrast, with alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid matrix, these ions were nearly absent in the mass spectra. Direct laser ablation of untreated Miscanthus sections was also performed. High resolution images, where the fine structure of the vascular bundle could be clearly visualized, were obtained using SIMS. Although coating the sections with a nanometer thick Au layer can greatly enhance the quality of SIMS images, the coating had limited effect on secondary ion signal enhancement. Using the optimized mass spectrometry approaches described here, information on the spatial distribution of several saccharides was obtained.

  1. Application of alpha spectrometry to the discovery of new elements by heavy-ion-beam bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1983-05-01

    Starting with polonium in 1898, ..cap alpha..-spectrometry has played a decisive role in the discovery of new, heavy elements. For even-even nuclei, ..cap alpha..-spectra have proved simple to interpret and exhibit systematic trends that allow extrapolation to unknown isotopes. The early discovery of the natural ..cap alpha..-decay series led to the very powerful method of genetically linking the decay of new elements to the well-established ..cap alpha..-emission of daughter and granddaughter nuclei. This technique has been used for all recent discoveries of new elements including Z = 109. Up to mendelevium (Z = 101), thin samples suitable for ..cap alpha..-spectrometry were prepared by chemical methods. With the advent of heavy-ion accelerators new sample preparation methods emerged. These were based on the large momentum transfer associated with heavy-ion reactions, which produced energetic target recoils that, when ejected from the target, could be thermalized in He gas. Subsequent electrical deposition or a He-jet technique yielded samples that were not only thin enough for ..cap alpha..-spectroscopy, but also for ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-recoil experiments. Many variations of these methods have been developed and are discussed. For the synthesis of element 106 an aerosol-based recoil transport technique was devised. In the most recent experiments, ..cap alpha..-spectrometry has been coupled with the magnetic analysis of the recoils. The time from production to analysis of an isotope has thereby been reduced to 10/sup -6/ s; while it was 10/sup -1/ to 10/sup 0/ s for He-jets and 10/sup 1/ to 10/sup 3/ s for rapid chemical separations. Experiments are now in progress to synthesize super heavy elements (SHE) and to analyze them with these latest techniques. Again, ..cap alpha..-spectrometry will play a major role since the expected signature for the decay of a SHE is a sequence of ..cap alpha..-decays followed by spontaneous fission.

  2. Microfabricated ion trap mass spectrometry for characterization of organics and potential biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical technique with a strong history in planetary exploration, and is the method of choice for detection and identification of organic and biological molecules. MS instrumentation can also be combined with techniques such as gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, or chiral separation, which are particularly important for analysis of complex mixtures or possible homochirality. Ion traps have several inherent advantages, including speed of analysis (important for GC-MS), MS/MS capabilities (important to identification of unknown compounds), excellent sensitivity, and ease of coupling with ambient ionization techniques that are under development for biomolecule detection. We report on progress in using microfabrication techniques to produce radiofrequency quadrupole ion traps that are much smaller, lighter, and lower power than existing instruments. We produce ion traps using an assembly of two ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are lithographically patterned with electrodes. This approach allows great flexibility in the trap geometry, and we have demonstrated working mass spectrometers with quadrupole, linear, and toroidal trapping fields. The approach also allows correction of higher-order terms in the electric field. With this system, mass resolution of up to 1300 has been demonstrated, which is adequate for identification of a wide range of potential biomarkers. Capabilities such as tandem analysis have also been demonstrated. Of particular interest is an ion trap that contains both quadrupole and toroidal trapping regions simultaneously and coaxially. Ions can be trapped as a large reservoir in the toroidal region and introduced in small batches to the quadrupole region for mass analysis. This capability is particularly valuable where the sample of interest is very small, such as microfossil with trace organics, and where the organic inventory is both complex and unknown. Development and results of this device

  3. A novel method for study of the aggregation of protein induced by metal ion aluminum(III) using resonance Rayleigh scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xiufen; Zhang, Caihua; Cheng, Jiongjia; Bi, Shuping

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel method for the study of the aggregation of protein induced by metal ion aluminum(III) using resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) technique. In neutral Tris-HCl medium, the effect of this aggregation of protein results in the enhancement of RRS intensity and the relationship between the enhancement of the RRS signal and the Al concentration is nonlinear. On this basis, we established a new method for the determination of the critical induced-aggregation concentrations ( CCIAC) of metal ion Al(III) inducing the protein aggregation. Our results show that many factors, such as, pH value, anions, salts, temperature and solvents have obvious effects. We also studied the extent of aggregation and structural changes using ultra-violet spectrometry, protein intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism to further understand the exact mechanisms of the aggregation characteristics of proteins induced by metal ion Al(III) at the molecular level, to help us to develop effective methods to investigate the toxicity of metal ion Al, and to provide theoretical and quantitative evidences for the development of appropriate treatments for neurodementia such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and dementia related to dialysis.

  4. Isotopologue Distributions of Peptide Product Ions by Tandem Mass Spectrometry: Quantitation of Low Levels of Deuterium Incorporation1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Benlian; Sun, Gang; Anderson, David R.; Jia, Minghong; Previs, Stephen; Anderson, Vernon E.

    2007-01-01

    Protonated molecular peptide ions and their product ions generated by tandem mass spectrometry appear as isotopologue clusters due to the natural isotopic variations of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. Quantitation of the isotopic composition of peptides can be employed in experiments involving isotope effects, isotope exchange, isotopic labeling by chemical reactions, and studies of metabolism by stable isotope incorporation. Both ion trap and quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry are shown to be capable of determining the isotopic composition of peptide product ions obtained by tandem mass spectrometry with both precision and accuracy. Tandem mass spectra obtained in profile-mode of clusters of isotopologue ions are fit by non-linear least squares to a series of Gaussian peaks (described in the accompanying manuscript) which quantify the Mn/M0 values which define the isotopologue distribution (ID). To determine the isotopic composition of product ions from their ID, a new algorithm that predicts the Mn/M0 ratios is developed which obviates the need to determine the intensity of all of the ions of an ID. Consequently a precise and accurate determination of the isotopic composition a product ion may be obtained from only the initial values of the ID, however the entire isotopologue cluster must be isolated prior to fragmentation. Following optimization of the molecular ion isolation width, fragmentation energy and detector sensitivity, the presence of isotopic excess (2H, 13C, 15N, 18O) is readily determined within 1%. The ability to determine the isotopic composition of sequential product ions permits the isotopic composition of individual amino acid residues in the precursor ion to be determined. PMID:17559791

  5. First order Raman scattering analysis of transition metal ions implanted GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Abdul; Rana, Usman Ali; Shakoor, Abdul; Ahmad, Naeem; Hassan, Najam al; Khan, Salah Ud-Din

    2016-03-01

    Transition Metal (TM) ions V, Cr, Mn and Co were implanted into GaN/sapphire films at fluences 5×1014, 5×1015 and 5×1016 cm-2. First order Raman Scattering (RS) measurements were carried out to study the effects of ion implantation on the microstructure of the materials, which revealed the appearance of disorder and new phonon modes in the lattice. The variations in characteristic modes 1GaN i.e. E2(high) and A1(LO), observed for different implanted samples is discussed in detail. The intensity of nitrogen vacancy related vibrational modes appearing at 363 and 665 cm-1 was observed for samples having different fluences. A gallium vacancy related mode observed at 277/281 cm-1 for TM ions implanted at 5×1014 cm-2 disappeared for all samples implanted with rest of fluences. The fluence dependent production of implantation induced disorder and substitution of TM ions on cationic sites is discussed, which is expected to provide necessary information for the potential use of these materials as diluted magnetic semiconductors in future spintronic devices.

  6. A novel cyanide ion sensing approach based on Raman scattering for the detection of environmental cyanides.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Gopal Reddy, C V; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes a direct optical approach based on Raman scattering for selective and sensitive detection of cyanide ions in aqueous environment without requiring time-consuming sample pretreatment and the formation of hydrogen cyanide. Due to the strong affinity between copper (I) and cyanide ion, evaporated copper (I) iodide (CuI) thin films are shown to be excellent substrates for selective recognition of free cyanide ions in aqueous matrices. The amount of cyanide ion retained by the copper (I) in the CuI thin films reflects its actual concentration in tested samples, and the subsequent Raman measurements of the substrate are shown to be capable of detecting toxic cyanide content at levels under international drinking water standard and environmental regulatory concentrations. Measurements obtained from the same batch of evaporated CuI thin films (approximately 100-nm thickness) show excellent linearity over a variety of cyanide concentrations ranging from 1.5 microM to 0.15 mM. This detection method offers the advantage of selectively detecting cyanides causing a health hazard while avoiding detection of other common interfering anions such as Cl-, Br-, PO4(3-), SO4(2-), NO2-, S2- and SCN-. Coupled with portable Raman systems that are commercially available, our detection approach will provide on-site monitoring capability with little sample preparation or instrument supervision, which will greatly expedite the assessment of potential environmental cyanide risks.

  7. Detection of tyrosine phosphorylated peptides via skimmer collision-induced dissociation/ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zolodz, Melissa D; Wood, Karl V

    2003-03-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins is an important post-translational protein modification in cellular response to environmental change and occurs in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Identification of the amino acid on individual proteins that become phosphorylated in response to extracellular stimulus is essential for understanding the mechanisms involved in the intracellular signals that these modifications facilitate. Most protein kinases catalyze the phosphorylation of proteins on serine, threonine or tyrosine. Although tyrosine phosphorylation is often the least abundant of the three major phosphorylation sites, it is important owing to its role in signal pathways. Currently available methods for the identification of phosphorylation sites can often miss low levels of tyrosine phosphorylations. This paper describes a method for the identification of phosphotyrosine-containing peptides using electrospray ionization on an ion trap mass spectrometer. Skimmer-activated collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to generate the phosphotyrosine immonium ion at m/z 216. This method is gentle enough that the protonated molecule of the intact peptide is still observed. In-trap CID was employed for the verification of the phosphotyrosine immonium ion. Using this technique, low levels of phosphotyrosine-containing peptides can be identified from peptide mixtures separated by nanoflow micro liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  8. Sizing Large Proteins and Protein Complexes by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Kaddis, Catherine S.; Lomeli, Shirley H.; Yin, Sheng; Berhane, Beniam; Apostol, Marcin I.; Kickhoefer, Valerie A.; Rome, Leonard H.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility with electrospray ionization (ESI) have the capability to measure and detect large noncovalent protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes. Using an ion mobility method termed GEMMA (Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis), protein particles representing a range of sizes can be separated by their electrophoretic mobility in air. Highly charged particles produced from a protein complex solution using electrospray can be manipulated to produce singly charged ions which can be separated and quantified by their electrophoretic mobility. Results from ESI-GEMMA analysis from our laboratory and others were compared to other experimental and theoretically determined parameters, such as molecular mass and cryoelectron microscopy and x-ray crystal structure dimensions. There is a strong correlation between the electrophoretic mobility diameter determined from GEMMA analysis and the molecular mass for protein complexes up to 12 MDa, including the 93 kDa enolase dimer, the 480 kDa ferritin 24-mer complex, the 4.6 MDa cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), and the 9 MDa MVP-vault assembly. ESI-GEMMA is used to differentiate a number of similarly sized vault complexes that are composed of different N-terminal protein tags on the MVP subunit. The average effective density of the proteins and protein complexes studied was 0.6 g/cm3. Moreover, there is evidence that proteins and protein complexes collapse or become more compact in the gas phase in the absence of water. PMID:17434746

  9. Chemical Imaging of Lipid Domains by High-Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, M L; Weber, P K; Longo, M L; Hutcheon, I D; Boxer, S G

    2005-09-30

    Lipid microdomains within supported lipid bilayers composed of binary phosphocholine mixtures were chemically imaged by high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry performed with the NanoSIMS 50 (Cameca Instruments). This instrument images the sample components based on the elemental or isotopic composition of their atomic and small molecular secondary ions. Up to five different secondary ions can be simultaneously detected, and a lateral resolution of 50 nm can be achieved with high sensitivity at high mass resolution. In our experiments, the NanoSIMS 50 extensively fragmented the supported membrane, therefore an isotopic labeling strategy was used to encode the identities of the lipid components. Supported lipid membranes that contained distinct lipid microdomains were freeze-dried to preserve their lateral organization and analyzed with the NanoSIMS 50. Lipid microdomains as small as 100 nm in diameter were successfully imaged, and this was validated by comparison to AFM images taken at the same region prior to chemical imaging. Quantitative information on the lipid distribution within the domain was also determined by calibrating against supported membranes of known composition. We believe this will be a valuable approach for analyzing the composition of complex membrane domains with high spatial resolution.

  10. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at the Cyclotron Frequency.

    PubMed

    Nagornov, Konstantin O; Kozhinov, Anton N; Tsybin, Yury O

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of ion cyclotron resonance allows for determining mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of an ensemble of ions by means of measurements of their cyclotron frequency, ω c . In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), the ω c quantity is usually unavailable for direct measurements: the resonant state is located close to the reduced cyclotron frequency (ω+), whereas the ω c and the corresponding m/z values may be calculated via theoretical derivation from an experimental estimate of the ω+ quantity. Here, we describe an experimental observation of a new resonant state, which is located close to the ω c frequency and is established because of azimuthally-dependent trapping electric fields of the recently developed ICR cells with narrow aperture detection electrodes. We show that in mass spectra, peaks close to ω+ frequencies can be reduced to negligible levels relative to peaks close to ω c frequencies. Due to reduced errors with which the ω c quantity is obtained, the new resonance provides a means of cyclotron frequency measurements with precision greater than that achieved when ω+ frequency peaks are employed. The described phenomenon may be considered for a development into an FT-ICR MS technology with increased mass accuracy for applications in basic research, life, and environmental sciences. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Peak deconvolution in high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) to characterize macromolecular conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Errol W.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2007-01-01

    Protonated poly(ethylene glycol), produced by electrospray ionization (ESI), with molecular weights ranging from 0.3 to 5 kDa and charge states from 1+ to 7+ were characterized using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS). Results for all but some of the 3+ and 4+ charge states are consistent with a single gas-phase conformer or family of unresolved conformers for each of these charge states. The FAIMS compensation voltage scans resulted in peaks that could be accurately fit with a single Gaussian for each peak. The peak widths increase linearly with compensation voltage for maximum ion transmission but do not depend on m/z or molecular weight. Fitting parameters obtained from the poly(ethylene glycol) data were used to analyze conformations of oxidized and reduced lysozyme formed from different solutions. For oxidized lysozyme formed from a buffered aqueous solution, a single conformer (or group of unresolved conformers) was observed for the 7+ and 8+ charge states. Two conformers were observed for the 9+ and 10+ charge states formed from more denaturing solutions. Data for the fully reduced form indicate the existence of up to three different conformers for each charge state produced directly by ESI and a general progression from a more extended to a more folded structure with decreasing charge state. These results are consistent with those obtained previously by proton-transfer reactivity and drift tube ion mobility experiments, although more conformers were identified for the fully reduced form of lysozyme using FAIMS.

  12. Precursor ion scan profiles of acylcarnitines by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paglia, Giuseppe; D'Apolito, Oceania; Corso, Gaetano

    2008-12-01

    The fatty acyl esters of L-carnitine (acylcarnitines) are useful biomarkers for the diagnosis of some inborn errors of metabolism analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. In this study the acylcarnitines were analyzed by atmospheric pressure thermal desorption chemical ionization using a commercial tandem mass spectrometer (APTDCI-MS/MS). The method is based on the precursor ion scan mode determination of underivatized acylcarnitines desorbed from samples by a hot desolvation gas flow and ionized by a corona pin discharge. During desorption/ionization step the temperature induces the degradation of acylcarnitines; nevertheless, the common fragment to all acylcarnitines [MH-59](+) is useful for analyzing their profile. APTDCI parameters, including angle of collection and incidence, gas flows and temperatures, were optimized for acylcarnitines. The experiments were performed drying 2 microL of an equimolar mixture of acylcarnitine standards on a glass slide. The specificity was evaluated by comparing product ion spectra and the precursor ion spectra of 85 m/z of acylcarnitines obtained by the APTDCI method and by electrospray ionization flow injection analysis (ESI-FIA). The method was also employed to analyze acylcarnitines extracted from a pathological dried blood spot and a control. The method enables analysis of biological samples and recognition of some acylcarnitines that are diagnostic markers of inherited metabolic diseases. The intrinsic high-throughput analysis of the ambient desorption ionization methods offers a new opportunity either for its potential application in clinical chemistry and for the expanded screening of some inborn errors of metabolism.

  13. Gas chromatography/ion mobility spectrometry as a hyphenated technique for improved explosives detection and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercado, AL; Marsden, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is currently being successfully applied to the problem of on-line trace detection of plastic and other explosives in airports and other facilities. The methods of sample retrieval primarily consist of batch sampling for particulate residue on a filter card for introduction into the IMS. The sample is desorbed into the IMS using air as the carrier and negative ions of the explosives are detected, some as an adduct with a reagent ion such as Cl(-). Based on studies and tests conducted by different airport authorities, this method seems to work well for low vapor pressure explosives such as RDX and PETN, as well as TNT that are highly adsorptive and can be found in nanogram quantities on contaminated surfaces. Recently, the changing terrorist threat and the adoption of new marking agents for plastic explosives has meant that the sample introduction and analysis capabilities of the IMS must be enhanced in order to keep up with other detector developments. The IMS has sufficient analytical resolution for a few threat compounds but the IMS Plasmogram becomes increasingly more difficult to interpret when the sample mixture gets more complex.

  14. Detection of Fatty Acids from Intact Microorganisms by Molecular Beam Static Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, Jani Cheri; Lehman, Richard Michael; Bauer, William Francis; O'Connell, Sean Patrick; Colwell, Frederick Scott; Shaw, Andrew D.

    2003-06-01

    We report the use of a surface analysis approach, static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) equipped with a molecular (ReO4-) ion primary beam, to analyze the surface of intact microbial cells. SIMS spectra of 28 microorganisms were compared to fatty acid profiles determined by gas chromatographic analysis of transesterfied fatty acids extracted from the same organisms. The results indicate that surface bombardment using the molecular primary beam cleaved the ester linkage characteristic of bacteria at the glycerophosphate backbone of the phospholipid components of the cell membrane. This cleavage enables direct detection of the fatty acid conjugate base of intact microorganisms by static SIMS. The limit of detection for this approach is approximately 107 bacterial cells/cm2. Multivariate statistical methods were applied in a graded approach to the SIMS microbial data. The results showed that the full data set could initially be statistically grouped based upon major differences in biochemical composition of the cell wall. The gram-positive bacteria were further statistically analyzed, followed by final analysis of a specific bacterial genus that was successfully grouped by species. Additionally, the use of SIMS to detect microbes on mineral surfaces is demonstrated by an analysis of Shewanella oneidensis on crushed hematite. The results of this study provide evidence for the potential of static SIMS to rapidly detect bacterial species based on ion fragments originating from cell membrane lipids directly from sample surfaces.

  15. Detection of griseofulvin in a marine strain of Penicillium waksmanii by ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petit, K E; Mondeguer, F; Roquebert, M F; Biard, J F; Pouchus, Y F

    2004-07-01

    A marine strain of Penicillium waksmanii Zaleski was isolated from a sample of seawater from shellfish-farming area in the Loire estuary (France). The in vitro marine culture showed an important antifungal activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation was used to purify the crude extract. Dereplication by electrospray-ion trap/mass spectrometry (ESI-IT/MS) afforded the identification of the antifungal compound, after a semi-purification consisting of two stages. A comparison of the ionic composition between the active and the non-active fractions allowed the detection of a monocharged ion at m/z 353 containing a chlorine atom, which could be attributed to the antifungal griseofulvin [C17H17ClO6+H]+. Multi-stage fragmentation (MSn) confirmed the identity of the m/z 353 ion of the antifungal fraction as griseofulvin. It is the first description of griseofulvin production by a strain of P. waksmanii and the first chemical study of a strain of this species isolated from marine temperate cold water.

  16. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at the Cyclotron Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2017-02-01

    The phenomenon of ion cyclotron resonance allows for determining mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of an ensemble of ions by means of measurements of their cyclotron frequency, ω c . In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), the ω c quantity is usually unavailable for direct measurements: the resonant state is located close to the reduced cyclotron frequency (ω+), whereas the ω c and the corresponding m/z values may be calculated via theoretical derivation from an experimental estimate of the ω+ quantity. Here, we describe an experimental observation of a new resonant state, which is located close to the ω c frequency and is established because of azimuthally-dependent trapping electric fields of the recently developed ICR cells with narrow aperture detection electrodes. We show that in mass spectra, peaks close to ω+ frequencies can be reduced to negligible levels relative to peaks close to ω c frequencies. Due to reduced errors with which the ω c quantity is obtained, the new resonance provides a means of cyclotron frequency measurements with precision greater than that achieved when ω+ frequency peaks are employed. The described phenomenon may be considered for a development into an FT-ICR MS technology with increased mass accuracy for applications in basic research, life, and environmental sciences.

  17. Mass spectrometry analysis of etch products from CR-39 plastic irradiated by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, S.; Nanjo, D.; Kawashima, H.; Yasuda, N.; Konishi, T.; Kurano, M.; Kitamura, H.; Uchihori, Y.; Naka, S.; Ota, S.; Ideguchi, Y.; Hasebe, N.; Mori, Y.; Yamauchi, T.

    2012-09-01

    As a feasibility study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) have been applied to analyze etch products of CR-39 plastic (one of the most frequently used solid states nuclear track detector) for the understanding of track formation and etching mechanisms by heavy ion irradiation. The etch products of irradiated CR-39 dissolved in sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH) contain radiation-induced fragments. For the GC-MS analysis, we found peaks of diethylene glycol (DEG) and a small but a definitive peak of ethylene glycol (EG) in the etch products from CR-39 irradiated by 60 MeV N ion beams. The etch products of unirradiated CR-39 showed a clear peak of DEG, but no other significant peaks were found. DEG is known to be released from the CR-39 molecule as a fragment by alkaline hydrolysis reaction of the polymer. We postulate that EG was formed as a result of the breaking of the ether bond (C-O-C) of the DEG part of the CR-39 polymer by the irradiation. The mass distribution of polyallylalcohol was obtained from the etch products from irradiated and unirradiated CR-39 samples by MALDI-MS analysis. Polyallylalcohol, with the repeating mass interval of m/z = 58 Da (dalton) between m/z = 800 and 3500, was expected to be produced from CR-39 by alkaline hydrolysis. We used IAA as a matrix to assist the ionization of organic analyte in MALDI-MS analysis and found that peaks from IAA covered mass spectrum in the lower m/z region making difficult to identify CR-39 fragment peaks which were also be seen in the same region. The mass spectrometry analysis using GC-MS and MALDI-MS will be powerful tools to investigate the radiation-induced polymeric fragments and helping to understand the track formation mechanism in CR-39 by heavy ions.

  18. Analysis of Neutron Production in Passively Scattered Ion-Beam Therapy.

    PubMed

    Heo, Seunguk; Yoo, Seunghoon; Song, Yongkeun; Kim, Eunho; Shin, Jaeik; Han, Soorim; Jung, Wongyun; Nam, Sanghee; Lee, Rena; Lee, Kitae; Cho, Sungho

    2016-11-24

    A new treatment facility for heavy ion therapy since 2010 was constructed. In the broad beam, a range shifter, ridge filter and multi leaf collimator (MLC) for the generation of the spread-out Bragg peak is used. In this case, secondary neutrons produced by the interactions of the ion field with beam-modifying devices (e.g. double-scattering system, beam shaping collimators and range compensators) are very important for patient safety. Therefore, these components must be carefully examined in the context of secondary neutron yield and associated secondary cancer risk. In this article, Monte Carlo simulation has been carried out with the FLUktuierende KAskade particle transport code, the fluence and distribution of neutron generation and the neutron dose equivalent from the broad beam components are compared using carbon and proton beams. As a result, it is confirmed that the yield of neutron production using a carbon beam from all components of the broad beam was higher than using a proton beam. The ambient dose by neutrons per heavy ion and proton ion from the MLC surface was 0.12-0.18 and 0.0067-0.0087 pSv, respectively, which shows that heavy ions generate more neutrons than protons. However, ambient dose per treatment 2 Gy, which means physical dose during treatment by ion beam, is higher than carbon beam because proton therapy needs more beam flux to make 2-Gy prescription dose. Therefore, the neutron production from the MLC, which is closed to the patient, is a very important parameter for patient safety.

  19. Comparison of pulse glow discharge-ion mobility spectrometry and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry based on multiplug filtration cleanup for the analysis of tricaine mesylate residues in fish and water.

    PubMed

    Zou, Nan; Chen, Ronghua; Qin, Yuhong; Song, Shuangyu; Tang, Xinglin; Pan, Canping

    2016-09-01

    Analytical methods based on multiplug filtration cleanup coupled with pulse glow discharge-ion mobility spectrometry and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry were developed for the analysis of tricaine mesylate residue in fish and fish-raising water samples. A silica fiber holder and an appropriate new interface were designed to make the direct introduction of the fiber into the pulse glow discharge-ion mobility spectrometry introduction mechanism. The multiplug filtration cleanup method with adsorption mixtures was optimized for the determination of tricaine mesylate in fish samples. Good linear relationships were obtained by the two methods. For fish samples, limits of detection were 6 and 0.6 μg/kg by ion mobility spectrometry and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. The matrix effect of the established liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was negligible for fish samples but that of the ion mobility spectrometry method was not. The two methods were compared. The ion mobility spectrometry system could be used a rapid screening tool on site with the advantage of rapidity, simplicity, and portability, and the liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry system could be used for validation in laboratory conditions with the advantage of lower limit of detection, stability, and precision.

  20. Understanding charge transfer of Li+ and Na+ ions scattered from metal surfaces with high work function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Wu, Wen-Bin; Liu, Pin-Yang; Xiao, Yun-Qing; Li, Guo-Peng; Liu, Yi-Ran; Jiang, Hao-Yu; Guo, Yan-Ling; Chen, Xi-Meng

    2016-08-01

    For Li+ and Na+ ions scattered from high work function metal surfaces, efficient neutralization is observed, and it cannot be explained by the conventional free electron model. In order to explain these experimental data, we investigate the velocity-dependent neutral fraction with the modified Brako-Newns (BN) model. The calculated results are in agreement with the experimental data. We find that the parallel velocity effect plays an important role in neutralizing the Li+ and Na+ ions for large angle scattering. The nonmonotonic velocity behavior of neutral fraction is strongly related to the distance-dependent coupling strength between the atomic level and metal states. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11405078 and 11474140), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. lzujbky-2014-169 and lzujbky-2015-244), the Project sponsored by the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, the State Education Ministry, and the National Students’ Innovation and Entrepreneurship Training Program (Grant Nos. 201410730069 and 201510730078).

  1. Doubly excited states of molecular nitrogen by scattered electron-ion coincidence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Karin; Hasegawa, Toru; Sakai, Yasuhiro

    2017-03-01

    Scattered electron-ion coincidence measurements were performed on molecular nitrogen (N2) to study the relaxation dynamics of doubly excited states. Doubly excited states are typically so unstable that they result in either auto-ionization or a neutral dissociation. In auto-ionization, ionization and dissociation typically occur. Using a mixed-gas method, we determined the absolute values of the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) distributions using an incident electron energy of 200 eV and a scattering angle of 6°. The GOS distributions of N2+ and N+ were determined by combining the coincidence ion signals, which revealed some doubly excited states of N2. Since electron impact experiments can provide information on optically forbidden transitions, the contribution of optically forbidden states appears in the GOS distributions of both N2+ and N+. We observed auto-ionization and dissociative auto-ionization induced by excitation to the optically forbidden doubly excited states in the range of 30-40 eV.

  2. An interactive computer program for materials analysis by means of ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    The theory and operation of a program for analyzing the data obtained by the scattering of high-energy ions from a sample whose elemental depth concentration profiles are desired, are described. The region so analyzed is from the surface to depths about three microns, with a depth resolution of about 30 nm near the surface. The program, written in an enhanced BASIC system language for a desktop computer, is designed for users who are specialists in materials science. The program is highly interactive in the following ways: the user exerts direct control over program flow by means of event-initiated branching; the computer communicates with the user at the user's natural level rather than at the computer's natural level; and about 99 percent of the program lines are dedicated to input/output operations and error inhibition and handling. Detailed graphics and on-screen editing capabilities, designed specifically for the problem at hand, are integrated with the mathematical capability into a unified, single-context program. The user interates the editing of the sample composition matrix and the comparison of calculated and experimental energy spectra for the scattered ions until a satisfactory level of fit is obtained, at which time the composition matrix is deemed to be an acceptable representation of the sample and may be printed and plotted as the ultimate goal and output of the operation. An annotated listing of the program is appended.

  3. Surface Structure and Electron Density Dependence of Scattered Ne^+ Ion Fractions From the Si(100)-(2x1) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfgang, John; Nordlander, Peter; Vaquilla, Isadora; Lui, K. M.; Rabalais, J. W.

    2000-03-01

    Experimental measurements of ion neutralization rates scattered from semiconductor surfaces have shown strong dependence on local surface structure and charge density. Recent scattering experiments utilizing 4 KeV Ne^+ scattered from a Si(100)-(2x1)surface exhibit strong azmuthal anisotropy, and can be shown to directly correlate to the reconstructed silicon surface geometry. Using a simple rate equation approach, a model based on the local charge density of the silicon surface has been used to determine the final neutral ion fraction from this scattering experiment. This rate equation approach has also been applied to scattering events between 4 KeV Ne^+ and a n- or p-type Si(100)-(2x1) surface. In the case of an n-doped Si surface, little or no change in the final ion neutralization is observed, while p-doping of the Si surface presents a significant decrease in the final neutral ion fractions compared to the undoped case. This effect will be discussed using a rate equation analysis, examining contributions from modification of the valence and conduction bands as a result of Si doping upon the overall charge transfer and ion neutralization.

  4. Quantification of ion confinement and desolvation in nanoporous carbon supercapacitors with modelling and in situ X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prehal, C.; Koczwara, C.; Jäckel, N.; Schreiber, A.; Burian, M.; Amenitsch, H.; Hartmann, M. A.; Presser, V.; Paris, O.

    2017-01-01

    A detailed understanding of confinement and desolvation of ions in electrically charged carbon nanopores is the key to enable advanced electrochemical energy storage and water treatment technologies. Here, we present the synergistic combination of experimental data from in situ small-angle X-ray scattering with Monte Carlo simulations of length-scale-dependent ion arrangement. In our approach, the simulations are based on the actual carbon nanopore structure and the global ion concentrations in the electrodes, both obtained from experiments. A combination of measured and simulated scattering data provides compelling evidence of partial desolvation of Cs+ and Cl‑ ions in water even in mixed micro-mesoporous carbons with average pore size well above 1 nm. A tight attachment of the aqueous solvation shell effectively prevents complete desolvation in carbons with subnanometre average pore size. The tendency of counter-ions to change their local environment towards high confinement with increasing voltage determines conclusively the performance of supercapacitor electrodes.

  5. "RaMassays": Synergistic Enhancement of Plasmon-Free Raman Scattering and Mass Spectrometry for Multimodal Analysis of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, Ivano; Vassalini, Irene; Bertuzzi, Michela; Bontempi, Nicolò; Memo, Maurizio; Gianoncelli, Alessandra

    2016-10-04

    SiO2/TiO2 core/shell (T-rex) beads were exploited as "all-in-one" building-block materials to create analytical assays that combine plasmon-free surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) mass spectrometry (RaMassays). Such a multi-modal approach relies on the unique optical properties of T-rex beads, which are able to harvest and manage light in both UV and Vis range, making ionization and Raman scattering more efficient. RaMassays were successfully applied to the detection of small (molecular weight, M.W. <400 Da) molecules with a key relevance in biochemistry and pharmaceutical analysis. Caffeine and cocaine were utilized as molecular probes to test the combined SERS/SALDI response of RaMassays, showing excellent sensitivity and reproducibility. The differentiation between amphetamine/ephedrine and theophylline/theobromine couples demonstrated the synergistic reciprocal reinforcement of SERS and SALDI. Finally, the conversion of L-tyrosine in L-DOPA was utilized to probe RaMassays as analytical tools for characterizing reaction intermediates without introducing any spurious effects. RaMassays exhibit important advantages over plasmonic nanoparticles in terms of reproducibility, absence of interference and potential integration in multiplexed devices.

  6. Ion mobility spectrometry fingerprints: A rapid detection technology for adulteration of sesame oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Shuai, Qian; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Wen; Ding, Xiaoxia

    2016-02-01

    A simple and rapid detection technology was proposed based on ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) fingerprints to determine potential adulteration of sesame oil. Oil samples were diluted by n-hexane and analyzed by IMS for 20s. Then, chemometric methods were employed to establish discriminant models for sesame oils and four other edible oils, pure and adulterated sesame oils, and pure and counterfeit sesame oils, respectively. Finally, Random Forests (RF) classification model could correctly classify all five types of edible oils. The detection results indicated that the discriminant models built by recursive support vector machine (R-SVM) method could identify adulterated sesame oil samples (⩾ 10%) with an accuracy value of 94.2%. Therefore, IMS was shown to be an effective method to detect the adulterated sesame oils. Meanwhile, IMS fingerprints work well to detect the counterfeit sesame oils produced by adding sesame oil essence into cheaper edible oils.

  7. Ion mobility spectrometry for the simultaneous determination of diacetyl midecamycin and detergents in cleaning validation.

    PubMed

    Armenta, S; Alcalà, M; Blanco, M; González, J M

    2013-09-01

    In the present paper, we have developed two different approaches based on ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for the cleaning validation of diacetyl midecamycin in the surfaces of manufacture equipment: a semi-quantitative approach based on the use of a sample wand and a quantitative procedure based on the swab test. The simultaneous determination of the active pharmaceutical ingredient and cleaning agents has been performed without important effects of ionization suppression upon the analysis of swabs containing multiple components. Sensitivity, in the ng range, and appropriate selectivity ratify IMS as a serious alternative, a fast and serious alternative in cleaning validation. Other advantage imply its potential for at-line use to perform a semi-quantitative procedure using a sample wand which allows Teflon membranes, swabbed onto the stainless steel surfaces, to be introduced directly into the instrument with no dilution or extraction.

  8. Quantitative analysis of biomolecules by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry: Fundamental considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Muddiman, D.C.; Nicola, A.J.; Proctor, A.

    1995-12-31

    Static Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has been applied to investigate an extensive assortment of analytical systems; from semiconductors to DNA sequencing. Recently, the TOF-SIMS method has been successfully applied to real biological systems. This report focuses on some important aspects that must be taken into consideration when conducting measurements on biomaterials in order to observe the potential the TOF-SIMS method affords. The current data are presented using Cyclosporin A (CsA, 1202 Da) and cocaine (303 Da) as model compounds. CsA is observed in the TOF-SIMS mass spectrum predominately as a Ag-cationized species and cocaine as a protonated species; thus, they are complementary probe molecules.

  9. An expert system/ion trap mass spectrometry approach for life support systems monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Wong, Carla M.; Yost, Richard A.; Johnson, Jodie V.; Yates, Nathan A.; Story, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Efforts to develop sensor and control system technology to monitor air quality for life support have resulted in the development and preliminary testing of a concept based on expert systems and ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS). An ITMS instrument provides the capability to identify and quantitate a large number of suspected contaminants at trace levels through the use of a variety of multidimensional experiments. An expert system provides specialized knowledge for control, analysis, and decision making. The system is intended for real-time, on-line, autonomous monitoring of air quality. The key characteristics of the system, performance data and analytical capabilities of the ITMS instrument, the design and operation of the expert system, and results from preliminary testing of the system for trace contaminant monitoring are described.

  10. Liquid chromatography/coordination ion spray-mass spectrometry for the analysis of rubber vulcanization products.

    PubMed

    Hayen, Heiko; Alvarez-Grima, M Montserrat; Debnath, Subhas C; Noordermeer, Jacques W M; Karst, Uwe

    2004-02-15

    Liquid chromatography/coordination ion spray-mass spectrometry has been used for the identification of reaction products in a model rubber vulcanization process. After LC separation using reversed-phase conditions, AgBF(4) in acetonitrile was added, and strong signals were observed for silica-rubber coupling agents and products of the reaction between these and alkenes. The method performs best for substances containing sulfur chains with chain lengths between two and eight sulfur atoms, but sulfur-free compounds containing triethoxysilyl groups were detected as well. For the latter, the postcolumn addition of NaBF(4) proved to be a suitable alternative. Besides the coupling agents, various reaction products, including sulfur-chain bridged alkenes were identified.

  11. Rapid determination of drugs and semivolatile organics by direct thermal desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Ilgner, R.H.; Buchanan, M.V.; Guerin, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Direct thermal desorption of analytes into an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) is being investigated as a technique for the rapid screening of a wide variety of samples for target semivolatile organic compounds. This includes the direct detection of drugs in physiological fluids, semivolatile organic pollutants in water and waste samples, and air pollutants collected on sorbent cartridges. In order to minimize the analysis time, chromatographic separation is not performed on the sample prior to introduction into the ITMS. Instead, selective chemical ionization and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) are used achieve the specificity required for the target analytes. Detection limits are typically 10--50 ppb using a 1 uL aliquot of a liquid sample without preconcentration. Sample turn-around time is 2 to 5 minutes and 3 to 5 target analytes can be quantitatively determined simultaneously. 6 figs.

  12. Probing nanoparticles and nanoparticle-conjugated biomolecules using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Pil; Shon, Hyun Kyong; Shin, Seung Koo; Lee, Tae Geol

    2015-01-01

    Bio-conjugated nanoparticles have emerged as novel molecular probes in nano-biotechnology and nanomedicine and chemical analyses of their surfaces have become challenges. The time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been one of the most powerful surface characterization techniques for both nanoparticles and biomolecules. When combined with various nanoparticle-based signal enhancing strategies, TOF-SIMS can probe the functionalization of nanoparticles as well as their locations and interactions in biological systems. Especially, nanoparticle-based SIMS is an attractive approach for label-free drug screening because signal-enhancing nanoparticles can be designed to directly measure the enzyme activity. The chemical-specific imaging analysis using SIMS is also well suited to screen nanoparticles and nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates in complex environments. This review presents some recent applications of nanoparticle-based TOF-SIMS to the chemical analysis of complex biological systems.

  13. Speciation of chromium in waste water using ion chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zuliang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravendra

    2007-04-30

    Ion chromatography (IC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was systematically investigated for determining the speciation of chromium in environmental samples. Firstly, the stability of complexes formed by Cr(III) with various aminopolycarboxylic acids was studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The results showed that [Cr(EDTA)](-) was stable in solution. Secondly, various mobile phases were examined to separate Cl(-) from chromium species by IC to avoid Cl(-) interference. The separation of [Cr(EDTA)](-) and Cr(VI) was achieved on a new anion-exchange column (G3154A/102) using a mobile phase containing 20mM NH(4)NO(3) and 10mM NH(4)H(2)PO(4) at pH 7.0 without Cl(-) interference. Detection limits for chromium species were below 0.2 microg/L with a direct injection of sample and without prior removal of interferences from the matrix. Finally, the proposed method was used for the determination of chromium species in contaminated waters.

  14. Active learning for convenient annotation and classification of secondary ion mass spectrometry images.

    PubMed

    Hanselmann, Michael; Röder, Jens; Köthe, Ullrich; Renard, Bernhard Y; Heeren, Ron M A; Hamprecht, Fred A

    2013-01-02

    Digital staining for the automated annotation of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) data has previously been achieved using state-of-the-art classifiers such as random forests or support vector machines (SVMs). However, the training of such classifiers requires an expert to label exemplary data in advance. This process is time-consuming and hence costly, especially if the tissue is heterogeneous. In theory, it may be sufficient to only label a few highly representative pixels of an MS image, but it is not known a priori which pixels to select. This motivates active learning strategies in which the algorithm itself queries the expert by automatically suggesting promising candidate pixels of an MS image for labeling. Given a suitable querying strategy, the number of required training labels can be significantly reduced while maintaining classification accuracy. In this work, we propose active learning for convenient annotation of MSI data. We generalize a recently proposed active learning method to the multiclass case and combine it with the random forest classifier. Its superior performance over random sampling is demonstrated on secondary ion mass spectrometry data, making it an interesting approach for the classification of MS images.

  15. Multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry of volatile metabolites emitted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Halbfeld, Christoph; Ebert, Birgitta E; Blank, Lars M

    2014-09-05

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during microbial fermentations determine the flavor of fermented food and are of interest for the production of fragrances or food additives. However, the microbial synthesis of these compounds from simple carbon sources has not been well investigated so far. Here, we analyzed the headspace over glucose minimal salt medium cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS). The high sensitivity and fast data acquisition of the MCC-IMS enabled online analysis of the fermentation off-gas and 19 specific signals were determined. To four of these volatile compounds, we could assign the metabolites ethanol, 2-pentanone, isobutyric acid, and 2,3-hexanedione by MCC-IMS measurements of pure standards and cross validation with thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements. Despite the huge biochemical knowledge of the biochemistry of the model organism S. cerevisiae, only the biosynthetic pathways for ethanol and isobutyric acid are fully understood, demonstrating the considerable lack of research of volatile metabolites. As monitoring of VOCs produced during microbial fermentations can give valuable insight into the metabolic state of the organism, fast and non-invasive MCC-IMS analyses provide valuable data for process control.

  16. Detection and identification of sugar alcohol sweeteners by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Browne, Christopher A; Forbes, Thomas P; Sisco, Edward

    2016-07-28

    The rapid and sensitive detection of sugar alcohol sweeteners was demonstrated using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). IMS provides a valuable alternative in sensitivity, cost, and analysis speed between the lengthy gold-standard liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technique and rapid point-of-measurement disposable colorimetric sensors, for the Food and Nutrition industry's quality control and other "foodomics" area needs. The IMS response, characteristic signatures, and limits of detection for erythritol, pentaerythritol, xylitol, inositol, sorbitol, mannitol, and maltitol were evaluated using precise inkjet printed samples. IMS system parameters including desorption temperature, scan time, and swipe substrate material were examined and optimized, demonstrating a strong dependence on the physicochemical properties of the respective sugar alcohol. The desorption characteristics of each compound were found to dominate the system response and overall sensitivity. Sugar alcohol components of commercial products - chewing gum and a sweetener packet - were detected and identified using IMS. IMS is demonstrated to be an advantageous field deployable instrument, easily operated by non-technical personnel, and enabling sensitive point-of-measurement quality assurance for sugar alcohols.

  17. Degradation study of enniatins by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A B; Meca, G; Font, G; Ferrer, E

    2013-12-15

    Enniatins A, A1, B and B1 (ENs) are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium spp. and are normal contaminants of cereals and derivate products. In this study, the stability of ENs was evaluated during food processing by simulation of pasta cooking. Thermal treatments at different incubation times (5, 10 and 15 min) and different pH (4, 7 and 10) were applied in an aqueous system and pasta resembling system (PRS). The concentrations of the targeted mycotoxins were determined using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. High percentages of ENs reduction (81-100%) were evidenced in the PRS after the treatments at 5, 10 and 15 min of incubation. In contrast to the PRS, an important reduction of the ENs was obtained in the aqueous system after 15 min of incubation (82-100%). In general, no significant differences were observed between acid, neutral and basic solutions. Finally, several ENs degradation products were identified using the technique of liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

  18. Multi-Capillary Column-Ion Mobility Spectrometry of Volatile Metabolites Emitted by Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Halbfeld, Christoph; Ebert, Birgitta E.; Blank, Lars M.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during microbial fermentations determine the flavor of fermented food and are of interest for the production of fragrances or food additives. However, the microbial synthesis of these compounds from simple carbon sources has not been well investigated so far. Here, we analyzed the headspace over glucose minimal salt medium cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS). The high sensitivity and fast data acquisition of the MCC-IMS enabled online analysis of the fermentation off-gas and 19 specific signals were determined. To four of these volatile compounds, we could assign the metabolites ethanol, 2-pentanone, isobutyric acid, and 2,3-hexanedione by MCC-IMS measurements of pure standards and cross validation with thermal desorption–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements. Despite the huge biochemical knowledge of the biochemistry of the model organism S. cerevisiae, only the biosynthetic pathways for ethanol and isobutyric acid are fully understood, demonstrating the considerable lack of research of volatile metabolites. As monitoring of VOCs produced during microbial fermentations can give valuable insight into the metabolic state of the organism, fast and non-invasive MCC-IMS analyses provide valuable data for process control. PMID:25197771

  19. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Energetics of Intermediates that Guide Polyproline Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E.; Glover, Matthew S.; Ewing, Michael A.; Russell, David H.; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Proline favors trans-configured peptide bonds in native proteins. Although cis/ trans configurations vary for non-native and unstructured states, solvent also influences these preferences. Water induces the all- cis right-handed polyproline-I (PPI) helix of polyproline to fold into the all- trans left-handed polyproline-II (PPII) helix. Our recent work has shown that this occurs via a sequential mechanism involving six resolved intermediates [Shi, L., Holliday, A.E., Shi, H., Zhu, F., Ewing, M.A., Russell, D.H., Clemmer, D.E.: Characterizing intermediates along the transition from PPI to PPII using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 12702-12711 (2014)]. Here, we use ion mobility-mass spectrometry to make the first detailed thermodynamic measurements of the folding intermediates, which inform us about how and why this transition occurs. It appears that early intermediates are energetically favorable because of the hydration of the peptide backbone, whereas late intermediates are enthalpically unfavorable. However, folding continues, as the entropy of the system increases upon successive formation of each new structure. When PPII is immersed in 1-propanol, the PPII→PPI transition occurs, but this reaction occurs through a very different mechanism. Early on, the PPII population splits onto multiple pathways that eventually converge through a late intermediate that continues on to the folded PPI helix. Nearly every step is endothermic. Folding results from a stepwise increase in the disorder of the system, allowing a wide-scale search for a critical late intermediate. Overall, the data presented here allow us to establish the first experimentally determined energy surface for biopolymer folding as a function of solution environment.

  20. Towards practical time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry lignocellulolytic enzyme assays

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a surface sensitive mass spectrometry technique with potential strengths as a method for detecting enzymatic activity on solid materials. In particular, ToF-SIMS has been applied to detect the enzymatic degradation of woody lignocellulose. Proof-of-principle experiments previously demonstrated the detection of both lignin-degrading and cellulose-degrading enzymes on solvent-extracted hardwood and softwood. However, these preliminary experiments suffered from low sample throughput and were restricted to samples which had been solvent-extracted in order to minimize the potential for mass interferences between low molecular weight extractive compounds and polymeric lignocellulose components. Results The present work introduces a new, higher-throughput method for processing powdered wood samples for ToF-SIMS, meanwhile exploring likely sources of sample contamination. Multivariate analysis (MVA) including Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Multivariate Curve Resolution (MCR) was regularly used to check for sample contamination as well as to detect extractives and enzyme activity. New data also demonstrates successful ToF-SIMS analysis of unextracted samples, placing an emphasis on identifying the low-mass secondary ion peaks related to extractives, revealing how extractives change previously established peak ratios used to describe enzyme activity, and elucidating peak intensity patterns for better detection of cellulase activity in the presence of extractives. The sensitivity of ToF-SIMS to a range of cellulase doses is also shown, along with preliminary experiments augmenting the cellulase cocktail with other proteins. Conclusions These new procedures increase the throughput of sample preparation for ToF-SIMS analysis of lignocellulose and expand the applications of the method to include unextracted lignocellulose. These are important steps towards the practical use of ToF-SIMS as a tool to

  1. Use of monoatomic and polyatomic projectiles for the characterisation of polylactic acid by static secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Boschmans, Bart; Van Royen, Pieter; Van Vaeck, Luc

    2005-01-01

    The application of polyatomic primary ions is a strongly developing branch of static secondary ion mass spectrometry (S-SIMS), since these projectiles allow a significant increase in the secondary ion yields to be achieved. However, the different limitations and possibilities of certain polyatomic primary ions for use on specific functional classes of samples are still not completely known. This paper compares the use of monoatomic and polyatomic primary ions in S-SIMS for thin layers of polylactic acid (PLA), obtained by spin-coating solutions on silicon wafers. Bombardment with Ga+, Xe+ and SF5+ primary ions allowed the contribution of the projectile mass and number of atoms in the gain in ion yield and molecular specificity (relative importance of high m/z and low m/z signals) to be assessed. Samples obtained by spin-coating solutions with increasing concentration showed that optimal layer thickness depended on the primary ion used. In comparison with the use of Ga+ projectiles, the yield of structural ions increased by a factor of about 1.5 to 2 and by about 7 to 12 when Xe+ and SF5+ primary ion bombardment were applied, respectively. A detailed fragmentation pattern was elaborated to interpret ion signal intensity changes for different projectiles in terms of energy deposition and collective processes in the subsurface, and the internal energy of radical and even-electron precursor ions.

  2. Lithium formate ion clusters formation during electrospray ionization: Evidence of magic number clusters by mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-14

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry. Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed with the general formulae, (HCOOLi)nLi+, (HCOOLi)nLimm+, (HCOOLi)nHCOO- and (HCOOLi)n(HCOO)mm-. Several magic number cluster ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi)3Li+ being the most abundant and stable cluster ions. Fragmentations of singly charged clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi)2) followed by sequential loss of monomer units (HCOOLi). In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi)3Li+ at higher collision energies which later fragments to dimer and monomer ions in lower abundance. Quantum mechanical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.

  3. Characterisation of polyacetylenes isolated from carrot (Daucus carota) extracts by negative ion tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rai, Dilip K; Brunton, Nigel P; Koidis, Anastasios; Rawson, Ashish; McLoughlin, Padraig; Griffiths, William J

    2011-08-15

    The potential use of negative electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) in the characterisation of the three polyacetylenes common in carrots (Daucus carota) has been assessed. The MS scans have demonstrated that the polyacetylenes undergo a modest degree of in-source decomposition in the negative ionisation mode while the positive ionisation mode has shown predominantly sodiated ions and no [M+H](+) ions. Tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) studies have shown that the polyacetylenes follow two distinct fragmentation pathways: one that involves cleavage of the C3-C4 bond and the other with cleavage of the C7-C8 bond. The cleavage of the C7-C8 bond generated product ions m/z 105.0 for falcarinol, m/z 105/107.0 for falcarindiol, m/z 147.0/149.1 for falcarindiol-3-acetate. In addition to these product ions, the transitions m/z 243.2 → 187.1 (falcarinol), m/z 259.2 → 203.1 (falcarindiol), m/z 301.2 → 255.2/203.1 (falcarindiol-3-acetate), mostly from the C3-C4 bond cleavage, can form the basis of multiple reaction monitoring (MRM)-quantitative methods which are poorly represented in the literature. The 'MS(3) ' experimental data confirmed a less pronounced homolytic cleavage site between the C11-C12 bond in the falcarinol-type polacetylenes. The optimised liquid chromatography (LC)/MS conditions have achieved a baseline chromatographic separation of the three polyacetylenes investigated within 40 min total run-time.

  4. Automated anatomical interpretation of ion distributions in tissue: linking imaging mass spectrometry to curated atlases.

    PubMed

    Verbeeck, Nico; Yang, Junhai; De Moor, Bart; Caprioli, Richard M; Waelkens, Etienne; Van de Plas, Raf

    2014-09-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a prime tool for studying the distribution of biomolecules in tissue. Although IMS data sets can become very large, computational methods have made it practically feasible to search these experiments for relevant findings. However, these methods lack access to an important source of information that many human interpretations rely upon: anatomical insight. In this work, we address this need by (1) integrating a curated anatomical data source with an empirically acquired IMS data source, establishing an algorithm-accessible link between them and (2) demonstrating the potential of such an IMS-anatomical atlas link by applying it toward automated anatomical interpretation of ion distributions in tissue. The concept is demonstrated in mouse brain tissue, using the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas as the curated anatomical data source that is linked to MALDI-based IMS experiments. We first develop a method to spatially map the anatomical atlas to the IMS data sets using nonrigid registration techniques. Once a mapping is established, a second computational method, called correlation-based querying, gives an elementary demonstration of the link by delivering basic insight into relationships between ion images and anatomical structures. Finally, a third algorithm moves further beyond both registration and correlation by providing automated anatomical interpretation of ion images. This task is approached as an optimization problem that deconstructs ion distributions as combinations of known anatomical structures. We demonstrate that establishing a link between an IMS experiment and an anatomical atlas enables automated anatomical annotation, which can serve as an important accelerator both for human and machine-guided exploration of IMS experiments.

  5. On-line analysis of diesel engine exhaust gases by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, David; Spanĕl, Patrik; Dabill, David; Cocker, John; Rajan, Bob

    2004-01-01

    Selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) has been used to analyse on-line and in real time the exhaust gas emissions from a Caterpillar 3304 diesel engine under different conditions of load (idle and 50% of rated load) and speed (910, 1500 and 2200 rpm) using three types of fuel: an ultra-low-sulphur diesel, a rapeseed methyl ester and gas oil. SIFT-MS analyses of the alkanes, alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons in the headspace of these fuels were also performed, but the headspace of the rapeseed methyl ester consists mainly of methanol and a compound with the molecular formula C4H8O. The exhaust gases were analysed for NO and NO2 using O2+* reagent ions and for HNO2 using H3O+ reagent ions. The following aldehydes and ketones in the exhaust gases were quantified by using the combination of H3O+ and NO+ reagent ions: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propenal, propanal, acetone, butanal, pentanal, butanone and pentanone. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and pentenal, all known respiratory irritants associated with sensitisation to asthma of workers exposed to diesel exhaust, are variously present within the range 100-2000 ppb. Hydrocarbons in the exhaust gases accessible to SIFT-MS analyses were also quantified as total concentrations of the various isomers of C3H4, C3H6, C4H6, C5H8, C5H10, C6H8, C6H10, C7H14, C6H6, C7H8, C8H10 and C9H12.

  6. Automated Anatomical Interpretation of Ion Distributions in Tissue: Linking Imaging Mass Spectrometry to Curated Atlases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a prime tool for studying the distribution of biomolecules in tissue. Although IMS data sets can become very large, computational methods have made it practically feasible to search these experiments for relevant findings. However, these methods lack access to an important source of information that many human interpretations rely upon: anatomical insight. In this work, we address this need by (1) integrating a curated anatomical data source with an empirically acquired IMS data source, establishing an algorithm-accessible link between them and (2) demonstrating the potential of such an IMS-anatomical atlas link by applying it toward automated anatomical interpretation of ion distributions in tissue. The concept is demonstrated in mouse brain tissue, using the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas as the curated anatomical data source that is linked to MALDI-based IMS experiments. We first develop a method to spatially map the anatomical atlas to the IMS data sets using nonrigid registration techniques. Once a mapping is established, a second computational method, called correlation-based querying, gives an elementary demonstration of the link by delivering basic insight into relationships between ion images and anatomical structures. Finally, a third algorithm moves further beyond both registration and correlation by providing automated anatomical interpretation of ion images. This task is approached as an optimization problem that deconstructs ion distributions as combinations of known anatomical structures. We demonstrate that establishing a link between an IMS experiment and an anatomical atlas enables automated anatomical annotation, which can serve as an important accelerator both for human and machine-guided exploration of IMS experiments. PMID:25153352

  7. A study of the spiropyran-merocyanine system using ion mobility-mass spectrometry: experimental support for the cisoid conformation.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Robert A; Rodier, Allison R; Stanley, Jake A; Douglas, Nick A; Li, Xiaopeng; Brittain, William J

    2014-04-04

    The spiropyran-merocyanine system was studied using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and three major conformers were identified. Assignment of conformers is based on DFT-B3LYP energy minimized structures and collision cross-sections as light-induced changes in IM-MS. The three conformers were assigned to the spiropyran, cisoid and transoid structures.

  8. The surfaces of Mo bicrystals studied by low-energy ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolov, S. N.; Jansen, W. P. A.; Markin, S. N.; Glebovsky, V. G.; Brongersma, H. H.

    2002-07-01

    Molybdenum bicrystals having two crystallographic orientations at the surface were studied by low-energy ion scattering (LEIS). Since the surfaces are part of the same specimen, their history and treatments are identical and thus provide an ideal possibility to compare segregation and annealing processes and to verify the quantification of LEIS. The crystallographic orientation of the seeds, the grown bicrystals and the bicrystalline samples was checked by means of X-ray Laue patterns as well as LEED patterns. The misorientation angles were about 1-2°. Because of the high surface sensitivity of LEIS, the scattered ion signals for the Mo(1 1 0)/Mo(1 0 0) bicrystal grains should reflect the atomic densities of the outermost atomic layers of their surfaces. The atomic density of the (1 0 0) surface is found to be 76% of that of the (1 1 0) surface. The difference with the theoretical value for the outer surface (71%) is ascribed to a small contribution of the second atomic layer for the open (1 0 0) surface. For the faces of a Mo(1 1 0)/Mo(1 1 0) bicrystal identical signals are found. At higher ion doses the bombardment leads to (partial) amorphization of the surface. It is found that the annealing of this layer starts already at 700 K for the (1 1 0), but at 1300 K for the (1 0 0) surface. A strong carbon segregation is already found at 1100 K for Mo(1 0 0), while there is still no segregation for the (1 1 0) surface. The results are explained in terms of differences in surface free energies, atomic mobilities and crystal structure.

  9. Simultaneous depth-profiling of electrical and elemental properties of ion-implanted arsenic in silicon by combining secondary-ion mass spectrometry with resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, N. S.; Wong, C. S.; McNally, P. J.

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to extract the electrical data for surface doping profiles of semiconductors in unison with the chemical profile acquired by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)—a method we call SIMSAR (secondary-ion mass spectrometry and resistivity). The SIMSAR approach utilizes the inherent sputtering process of SIMS, combined with sequential four-point van der Pauw resistivity measurements, to surmise the active doping profile as a function of depth. The technique is demonstrated for the case of ion-implanted arsenic doping profiles in silicon. Complications of the method are identified, explained, and corrections for these are given. While several techniques already exist for chemical dopant profiling and numerous for electrical profiling, since there is no technique which can measure both electrical and chemical profiles in parallel, SIMSAR has significant promise as an extension of the conventional dynamic SIMS technique, particularly for applications in the semiconductor industry.

  10. Simultaneous depth-profiling of electrical and elemental properties of ion-implanted arsenic in silicon by combining secondary-ion mass spectrometry with resistivity measurements.

    PubMed

    Bennett, N S; Wong, C S; McNally, P J

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to extract the electrical data for surface doping profiles of semiconductors in unison with the chemical profile acquired by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)-a method we call SIMSAR (secondary-ion mass spectrometry and resistivity). The SIMSAR approach utilizes the inherent sputtering process of SIMS, combined with sequential four-point van der Pauw resistivity measurements, to surmise the active doping profile as a function of depth. The technique is demonstrated for the case of ion-implanted arsenic doping profiles in silicon. Complications of the method are identified, explained, and corrections for these are given. While several techniques already exist for chemical dopant profiling and numerous for electrical profiling, since there is no technique which can measure both electrical and chemical profiles in parallel, SIMSAR has significant promise as an extension of the conventional dynamic SIMS technique, particularly for applications in the semiconductor industry.

  11. Enhancing Biological Analyses with Three Dimensional Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility, Low Field Drift Time Ion Mobility and Mass Spectrometry (µFAIMS/IMS-MS) Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin Shammel

    2015-06-30

    We report the first evaluation of a platform coupling a high speed field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry microchip (µFAIMS) with drift tube ion mobility and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). The µFAIMS/IMS-MS platform was used to analyze biological samples and simultaneously acquire multidimensional information of detected features from the measured FAIMS compensation fields and IMS drift times, while also obtaining accurate ion masses. These separations thereby increase the overall separation power, resulting increased information content, and provide more complete characterization of more complex samples. The separation conditions were optimized for sensitivity and resolving power by the selection of gas compositions and pressures in the FAIMS and IMS separation stages. The resulting performance provided three dimensional separations, benefitting both broad complex mixture studies and targeted analyses by e.g. improving isomeric separations and allowing detection of species obscured by “chemical noise” and other interfering peaks.

  12. High-Field Asymmetric-Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Electron Detachment Dissociation of Isobaric Mixtures of Glycosaminoglycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailemia, Muchena J.; Park, Melvin; Kaplan, Desmond A.; Venot, Andre; Boons, Geert-Jan; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is shown to be capable of resolving isomeric and isobaric glycosaminoglycan negative ions and to have great utility for the analysis of this class of molecules when combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry. Electron detachment dissociation (EDD) and other ion activation methods for tandem mass spectrometry can be used to determine the sites of labile sulfate modifications and for assigning the stereochemistry of hexuronic acid residues of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). However, mixtures with overlapping mass-to-charge values present a challenge, as their precursor species cannot be resolved by a mass analyzer prior to ion activation. FAIMS is shown to resolve two types of mass-to-charge overlaps. A mixture of chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) oligomers with 4-10 saccharides units produces ions of a single mass-to-charge by electrospray ionization, as the charge state increases in direct proportion to the degree of polymerization for these sulfated carbohydrates. FAIMS is shown to resolve the overlapping charge. A more challenging type of mass-to-charge overlap occurs for mixtures of diastereomers. FAIMS is shown to separate two sets of epimeric GAG tetramers. For the epimer pairs, the complexity of the separation is reduced when the reducing end is alkylated, suggesting that anomers are also resolved by FAIMS. The resolved components were activated by EDD and the fragment ions were analyzed by FTICR-MS. The resulting tandem mass spectra were able to distinguish the two epimers from each other.

  13. Boosting Sensitivity in Liquid Chromatography-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Product Ion Analysis of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Kitajima, Mariko; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    In metabolomics, the analysis of product ions in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is noteworthy to chemically assign structural information. However, the development of relevant analytical methods are less advanced. Here, we developed a method to boost sensitivity in liquid chromatography-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-tandem mass spectrometry analysis (MS/MS boost analysis). To verify the MS/MS boost analysis, both quercetin and uniformly labeled (13)C quercetin were analyzed, revealing that the origin of the product ions is not the instrument, but the analyzed compounds resulting in sensitive product ions. Next, we applied this method to the analysis of monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs). The comparative analyses of MIAs having indole basic skeleton (ajmalicine, catharanthine, hirsuteine, and hirsutine) and oxindole skeleton (formosanine, isoformosanine, pteropodine, isopteropodine, rhynchophylline, isorhynchophylline, and mitraphylline) identified 86 and 73 common monoisotopic ions, respectively. The comparative analyses of the three pairs of stereoisomers showed more than 170 common monoisotopic ions in each pair. This method was also applied to the targeted analysis of MIAs in Catharanthus roseus and Uncaria rhynchophylla to profile indole and oxindole compounds using the product ions. This analysis is suitable for chemically assigning features of the metabolite groups, which contributes to targeted metabolome analysis.

  14. Boosting Sensitivity in Liquid Chromatography–Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance–Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Product Ion Analysis of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Kitajima, Mariko; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    In metabolomics, the analysis of product ions in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is noteworthy to chemically assign structural information. However, the development of relevant analytical methods are less advanced. Here, we developed a method to boost sensitivity in liquid chromatography–Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance–tandem mass spectrometry analysis (MS/MS boost analysis). To verify the MS/MS boost analysis, both quercetin and uniformly labeled 13C quercetin were analyzed, revealing that the origin of the product ions is not the instrument, but the analyzed compounds resulting in sensitive product ions. Next, we applied this method to the analysis of monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs). The comparative analyses of MIAs having indole basic skeleton (ajmalicine, catharanthine, hirsuteine, and hirsutine) and oxindole skeleton (formosanine, isoformosanine, pteropodine, isopteropodine, rhynchophylline, isorhynchophylline, and mitraphylline) identified 86 and 73 common monoisotopic ions, respectively. The comparative analyses of the three pairs of stereoisomers showed more than 170 common monoisotopic ions in each pair. This method was also applied to the targeted analysis of MIAs in Catharanthus roseus and Uncaria rhynchophylla to profile indole and oxindole compounds using the product ions. This analysis is suitable for chemically assigning features of the metabolite groups, which contributes to targeted metabolome analysis. PMID:26734034

  15. Matrix-Assisted Ionization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry: Selective Analysis of a Europium-PEG Complex in a Crude Mixture.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Joshua L; Lutomski, Corinne A; El-Baba, Tarick J; Siriwardena-Mahanama, Buddhima N; Weidner, Steffen M; Falkenhagen, Jana; Allen, Matthew J; Trimpin, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The analytical utility of a new and simple to use ionization method, matrix-assisted ionization (MAI), coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS) is used to characterize a 2-armed europium(III)-containing poly(ethylene glycol) (Eu-PEG) complex directly from a crude sample. MAI was used with the matrix 1,2-dicyanobenzene, which affords low chemical background relative to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI). MAI provides high ion abundance of desired products in comparison to ESI and MALDI. Inductively coupled plasma-MS measurements were used to estimate a maximum of 10% of the crude sample by mass was the 2-arm Eu-PEG complex, supporting evidence of selective ionization of Eu-PEG complexes using the new MAI matrix, 1,2-dicyanobenzene. Multiply charged ions formed in MAI enhance the IMS gas-phase separation, especially relative to the singly charged ions observed with MALDI. Individual components are cleanly separated and readily identified, allowing characterization of the 2-arm Eu-PEG conjugate from a mixture of the 1-arm Eu-PEG complex and unreacted starting materials. Size-exclusion chromatography, liquid chromatography at critical conditions, MALDI-MS, ESI-MS, and ESI-IMS-MS had difficulties with this analysis, or failed. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  16. Analysis of bacterial spore permeability to water and ions using Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, S; Fallon, S; Leighton, T; Wheeler, K; Hutcheon, I; Weber, P K

    2005-11-17

    Regulation of bacterial spore solvent and solute permeability is a fundamental feature of dormancy but is poorly understood. Here we present a new technique, nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) that allows the direct visualization and quantification of chemical gradients within spores. Using NanoSIMS, we demonstrate the penetration of water and a simple ionic salt, LiF, into the core of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) spores. The results demonstrate chemical gradients spanning the outer coat to the inner spore core that are driven by concentration-dependent ionic fluxes. Using deuterated water (D{sub 2}O), we have shown that external water is either retained or exchanged with water contained within the spore. Hydration and exchange are rapid, on a timescale of < 1 minute. Our results suggest a permeation mechanism by which short-time scale diffusion into and out of the spore can occur along hydration pathways. Additional studies are in progress to define the flux rates and mechanisms controlling these processes.

  17. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J. ); Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M. )

    1994-01-15

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He[sup +] ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the [l angle]100[r angle] direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., [approx]0.9 for 53 MeV B[sup 4+] and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces.

  18. High Spatial Resolution Isotopic Abundance Measurements by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry: Status and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeegan, K. D.

    2007-12-01

    Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, SIMS or ion microprobe analysis, has become an important tool for geochemistry because of its ability study the distributions of elemental and isotopic abundances in situ on polished samples with high (typically a few microns to sub-micron) spatial resolution. In addition, SIMS exhibits high sensitivity for a wide range of elements (H to Pu) so that isotope analyses can sometimes be performed for elements that comprise only trace quantities of some mineral phase (e.g., Pb in zircon) or on major and/or minor elements in very small samples (e.g., presolar dust grains). Offsetting these positive attributes are analytical difficulties due to the complexity of the sputtering source of analyte ions: (1) relatively efficient production of molecular ion species (especially from a complex matrix such as most natural minerals) that cause interferences at the same nominal mass as atomic ions of interest, and (2) quantitation problems caused by variations in the ionization efficiencies of different elements and/or isotopes depending upon the chemical state of the sample surface during sputtering--the so-called "matrix effects". Despite the availability of high mass resolution instruments (e.g., SHRIMP II/RG, CAMECA 1270/1280/NanoSIMS), the molecular ion interferences effectively limit the region of the mass table that can be investigated in most samples to isotope systems at Ni or lighter or at Os or heavier. The matrix effects and the sensitivity of instrumental mass discrimination to the physical state of the sample surface can hamper reproducibility and have contributed to a view that SIMS analyses, especially for so- called stable isotopes, are most appropriate for extraterrestrial samples which are often small, rare, and can exhibit large magnitude isotopic effects. Recent improvements in instrumentation and technique have extended the scope of SIMS isotopic analyses and applications now range from geochronology to paleoclimatology to

  19. Lithium formate ion clusters formation during electrospray ionization: Evidence of magic number clusters by mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anil; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-14

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry (collision-induced dissociation with N2). Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed in both positive and negative ion modes with the general formulae, (HCOOLi)nLi(+), (HCOOLi)nLim (m+), (HCOOLi)nHCOO(-), and (HCOOLi)n(HCOO)m (m-). Several magic number cluster (MNC) ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi)3Li(+) being the most abundant and stable cluster ion. Fragmentations of singly charged positive clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi)2) followed by the loss of monomer units (HCOOLi) although the former remains the dominant dissociation process. In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi)3Li(+) as the most abundant fragment ion at higher collision energies which then fragments further to dimer and monomer ions at lower abundances. In the negative ion mode, however, singly charged clusters dissociated via sequential loss of monomer units. Multiply charged clusters in both positive and negative ion modes dissociated mainly via Coulomb repulsion. Quantum chemical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the central lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.

  20. Lithium formate ion clusters formation during electrospray ionization: Evidence of magic number clusters by mass spectrometry and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-14

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry (collision-induced dissociation with N{sub 2}). Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed in both positive and negative ion modes with the general formulae, (HCOOLi){sub n}Li{sup +}, (HCOOLi){sub n}Li{sub m}{sup m+}, (HCOOLi){sub n}HCOO{sup −}, and (HCOOLi){sub n}(HCOO){sub m}{sup m−}. Several magic number cluster (MNC) ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi){sub 3}Li{sup +} being the most abundant and stable cluster ion. Fragmentations of singly charged positive clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi){sub 2}) followed by the loss of monomer units (HCOOLi) although the former remains the dominant dissociation process. In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi){sub 3}Li{sup +} as the most abundant fragment ion at higher collision energies which then fragments further to dimer and monomer ions at lower abundances. In the negative ion mode, however, singly charged clusters dissociated via sequential loss of monomer units. Multiply charged clusters in both positive and negative ion modes dissociated mainly via Coulomb repulsion. Quantum chemical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the central lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.

  1. Establishing ion ratio thresholds based on absolute peak area for absolute protein quantification using protein cleavage isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Loziuk, Philip L; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L; Muddiman, David C

    2014-11-07

    Quantitative mass spectrometry has become central to the field of proteomics and metabolomics. Selected reaction monitoring is a widely used method for the absolute quantification of proteins and metabolites. This method renders high specificity using several product ions measured simultaneously. With growing interest in quantification of molecular species in complex biological samples, confident identification and quantitation has been of particular concern. A method to confirm purity or contamination of product ion spectra has become necessary for achieving accurate and precise quantification. Ion abundance ratio assessments were introduced to alleviate some of these issues. Ion abundance ratios are based on the consistent relative abundance (RA) of specific product ions with respect to the total abundance of all product ions. To date, no standardized method of implementing ion abundance ratios has been established. Thresholds by which product ion contamination is confirmed vary widely and are often arbitrary. This study sought to establish criteria by which the relative abundance of product ions can be evaluated in an absolute quantification experiment. These findings suggest that evaluation of the absolute ion abundance for any given transition is necessary in order to effectively implement RA thresholds. Overall, the variation of the RA value was observed to be relatively constant beyond an absolute threshold ion abundance. Finally, these RA values were observed to fluctuate significantly over a 3 year period, suggesting that these values should be assessed as close as possible to the time at which data is collected for quantification.

  2. Identification of sites of ubiquitination in proteins: a fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry approach.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Helen J; Heath, John K; Jaffray, Ellis; Hay, Ronald T; Lam, Tukiet T; Marshall, Alan G

    2004-12-01

    Structural elucidation of posttranslationally modified peptides and proteins is of key importance in the understanding of an array of biological processes. Ubiquitination is a reversible modification that regulates many cellular functions. Consequences of ubiquitination depend on whether a single ubiquitin or polyubiquitin chain is added to the tagged protein. The lysine residue through which the polyubiquitin chain is formed is also critical for biological activity. Robust methods are therefore required to identify sites of ubiquitination modification, both in the target protein and in ubiquitin. Here, we demonstrate the suitability of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, in conjunction with activated ion electron capture dissociation (AI ECD) or infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), for the analysis of ubiquitinated proteins. Polyubiquitinated substrate protein GST-Ubc5 was generated in vitro. Tryptic digests of polyubiquitinated species contain modified peptides in which the ubiquitin C-terminal Gly-Gly residues are retained on the modified lysine residues. Direct infusion microelectrospray FT-ICR of the digest and comparison with an in silico digest enables identification of modified peptides and therefore sites of ubiquitination. Fifteen sites of ubiquitination were identified in GST-Ubc5 and four sites in ubiquitin. Assignments were confirmed by AI ECD or IRMPD. The Gly-Gly modification is stable and both tandem mass spectrometric techniques are suitable, providing extensive sequence coverage and retention of the modification on backbone fragments.

  3. Characterization of impurities in tylosin using dual liquid chromatography combined with ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Shruti; Van Schepdael, Ann; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin

    2013-03-15

    Investigation of unknown impurities in a tylosin sample was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Separation was performed according to the recently described LC-UV method of Ashenafi et al. (2011) [14]. This method was reported to have a good selectivity as it was able to separate the four main components of tylosin from the already known and 23 unknown impurities. However, as this method uses a mobile phase with non-volatile constituents, direct characterization of these impurities using LC/MS was not possible. The impurity fractions were therefore first collected and then desalted before sending them to the MS. Identification of the impurities in the tylosin sample was performed with a quadruple ion trap (IT) MS, with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source in the positive ion mode. The structure of the impurities was deduced by comparing their fragmentation pattern with those of the main components of tylosin. As several peaks in the LC-UV method contained multiple compounds, using this method in total 41 new impurities were (partly) characterized.

  4. Membrane-Extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry for In-Situ Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai; Zhang, Wei; Whitten, William B; Li, Haiyang; Watson, David B; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry (ME-IMS) has been developed for in-situ sampling and analysis of trace chlorinated hydrocarbons in water in a single procedure. The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a spiral hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a vapor flow through the membrane tube. The extracted analyte flows into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) chamber and is analyzed in a home-made IMS analyzer. PDMS membrane is found to effectively extract chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents from liquid phase to vapor. The specialized IMS analyzer has been found to have resolutions of R=33 and 41, respectively, for negative- and positive-modes and is capable of detecting aqueous tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as low as 80 g/L and 74 g/L in negative ion mode, respectively. The time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of TCE are both experimentally and theoretically studied for various concentrations, membrane lengths, and flow rates. These characteristics demonstrate that membrane-extraction IMS is feasible for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  5. [Analysis of mouse liver membrane proteins using multidimensional ion exchange chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuowei; Peng, Fuli; Wang, Yuan; Tong, Wei; Ren, Yan; Xu, Ningzhi; Liu, Siqi

    2010-02-01

    The analysis of membrane proteins is still a technical obstacle in proteomic investigation. A fundamental question is how to allow the hydrophobic proteins fully solubilizing in a proper solvent environment. We propose that the denatured membrane proteins in high denaturant solution are fully ionized and separated through ion exchange chromatography. The membrane proteins prepared from a mouse liver were dissolved in 4 mol/L urea, 20 mmol/L Tris-HCl buffer (pH 9.0), and loaded onto a tandem chromatography coupled with Q-Sepharose FF and Sephacryl S-200HR. With a linear NaCl gradient elution, the bound proteins were eluted and collected followed by sodium-dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to further separate the eluted proteins. The protein bound on SDS-PAGE were excised and in-gel digested by trypsin, while the digested peptides were delivered to reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ion-trap mass spectrometry for the peptide identifications. Of a total of 392 proteins identified, 306 were membrane proteins or membrane associated proteins reported by literature. Based on the calculation of hydrophobicity, the GRAVY (grand average of hydropathicity) scores of 83 proteins are over or equal to 0.00. Taking all the evidence, we have established an effective approach which is feasible in the investigation towards mouse liver membrane proteomics.

  6. Multi-residue determination of pesticides in vegetables by gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tao, C-J; Hu, J-Y; Li, J-Z; Zheng, S-S; Liu, W; Li, C-J

    2009-01-01

    To monitor possible contamination of edible vegetables by common pesticides, an analytical method using gas chromatography combined with ion trap spectrometry (GC-IT/MS) was developed to measure simultaneously up to 39 pesticide residues, belonging to organophosphors, organochlorines, pyrethroids or carbamates classes, left on four kinds of popular vegetables. The procedure entails addition of acetone, dichloromethane, and sodium chloride to a small amount of vegetable, then the mixture was shaken intensively and centrifuged for phase separation. An aliquot of the organic layer was cleanup using solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges filled with graphitized carbon black (GCB) in combination with acidic aluminum oxide. Gas chromatography with ion trap mass spectrometer was then used for qualitative and quantitative determination of the pesticides. The GCB combination with acidic aluminum oxide was found more suitable than florisil, aluminum oxide and silicon dioxide for sample cleanup with recoveries above 70% for most pesticides in removing the majority of co-extracted matrices. Variation coefficients of the repeatability typically smaller than 20% have been achieved for a wide range of the investigated pesticides. A set of critical instrument parameters for the GC-IT/MS Varian system in the MS mode was established. Based on optimization work conducted in this study, the 39 pesticides were separated successively with the limits of detection between 0.02 and 0.1 mg/kg.

  7. Bradbury-Nielsen-gate-grid structure for further enhancing the resolution of ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Du, Yongzhai; Wang, Weiguo; Li, Haiyang

    2012-07-03

    In our previous work we proposed a three-zone theory for the Bradbury-Nielsen (BN) gate and proved with a grid-BN structure ion mobility drift tube that enhancements of the three-zone features led to higher resolutions and sometimes higher sensitivities. In this work we continued to seek further improvements of the resolution performance by adopting a BN-grid structure in the same drift tube. The postgate grid works both for confinement of the BN gate induced electric field and for isolation of the injection field from the drift field. This makes it possible to obtain better resolutions by further enhancing the compression electric field and lowering the injection field. It was found in the following experiments that reducing the injection field led to higher resolutions yet lower sensitivities. At an injection field of 140 V/cm, the inverse compression coefficient was found to be much larger than that in the grid-BN structure at all gating voltage differences (GVDs). At GVD = 350 V and a gate pulse width of 0.34 ms, the ion mobility spectrometry efficiency R(m)/R(c) reached as high as 221% in the BN-grid structure, presenting a further increase compared to 182% in the grid-BN structure. Finally, two examples are given to show the separation power improvements with good resolutions.

  8. Sodium Cation Affinities of Commonly Used MALDI Matrices Determined by Guided Ion Beam Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinthaka, S. D. M.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2012-04-01

    The sodium cation affinities of six commonly used MALDI matrices are determined here using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques. The collision-induced dissociation behavior of six sodium cationized MALDI matrices, Na+(MALDI), with Xe is studied as a function of kinetic energy. The MALDI matrices examined here include: nicotinic acid, quinoline, 3-aminoquinoline, 4-nitroaniline, picolinic acid, and 3-hydroxypicolinic acid. In all cases, the primary dissociation pathway corresponds to endothermic loss of the intact MALDI matrix. The cross section thresholds are interpreted to yield zero and 298 K Na+-MALDI bond dissociation energies (BDEs), or sodium cation affinities, after accounting for the effects of multiple ion-neutral collisions, the kinetic and internal energy distributions of the reactants, and dissociation lifetimes. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G* and MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G* levels of theory are used to characterized the structures and energetics for these systems. The calculated BDEs exhibit very good agreement with the measured values for most systems. The experimental and theoretical Na+-MALDI BDEs determined here are compared with those previously measured by cation transfer equilibrium methods.

  9. Direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry (DSITMS). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This report describes the cost, performance, and other key characteristics of an innovative technology for determining the presence or absence, and measuring the concentration, of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in groundwater and soil, and in gaseous remediation process streams at hazardous waste sites. This new technology is Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (DSITMS). DSITMS introduces sample materials directly into an ion trap mass spectrometer by means of a very simple interface, such as a capillary restrictor or a polymer membrane. There is typically very little, if any, sample preparation and no chromatographic separation of the sample constituents. This means that the response of the instrument to the analytes or contaminants in a sample is nearly instantaneous, and that analytical methods based on DSITMS are fast. Analyses are typically completed in less than five minutes, and the analysis cost is generally 50% or less than the amount charged by commercial laboratories using Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis methods.

  10. Determination of cannabinoids in cannabis products using liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Stolker, A A M; van Schoonhoven, J; de Vries, A J; Bobeldijk-Pastorova, I; Vaes, W H J; van den Berg, R

    2004-11-26

    A method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of five cannabinoids, viz. cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidiol acid (CBD-COOH), cannabinol (CBN), delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and 3'-carboxy-delta9-all-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) in cannabis products. The cannabinoids were extracted from the grinded cannabis samples with a mixture of methanol-chloroform and analysed using liquid chromatography with ion-trap-mass-spectrometry (LC-IT-MSn). For quantification the two most abundant diagnostic MS-MS ions of the analyte in the sample and external standard were monitored. For confirmation purposes the EU criteria as described in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC were followed. Fully satisfactory results were obtained, that is, unequivocal confirmation according to the most stringent EU criteria was possible. The limits of quantification were 0.1 g/kg for CBD, 0.04 g/kg for CBD-COOH, 0.03 g/kg for CBN, 0.28 g/kg for THC and 9.9 g/kg for THC-COOH. The repeatabilities, defined by R.S.D., were 2% for CBN, THC and THC-COOH at the concentration levels of respectively 0.023, 3.3 and 113 g/kg and 5% for CBD-COOH at the level of 0.34 g/kg (n = 6).

  11. Analysis of lung surfactant model systems with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Bourdos, N; Kollmer, F; Benninghoven, A; Ross, M; Sieber, M; Galla, H J

    2000-01-01

    An often-used model lung surfactant containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), and the surfactant protein C (SP-C) was analyzed as Langmuir-Blodgett film by spatially resolved time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to directly visualize the formation and composition of domains. Binary lipid and lipid/SP-C systems were probed for comparison. TOF-SIMS spectra revealed positive secondary ions (SI) characteristic for DPPC and SP-C, but not for DPPG. SI mapping results in images with domain structures in DPPC/DPPG and DPPG/SP-C, but not in DPPC/SP-C films. We are able to distinguish between the fluid and condensed areas probably due to a matrix effect. These findings correspond with other imaging techniques, fluorescence light microscopy (FLM), scanning force microscopy (SFM), and silver decoration. The ternary mixture DPPC/DPPG/SP-C transferred from the collapse region exhibited SP-C-rich domains surrounding pure lipid areas. The results obtained are in full accordance with our earlier SFM picture of layered protrusions that serve as a compressed reservoir for surfactant material during expansion. Our study demonstrates once more that SP-C plays a unique role in the respiration process. PMID:10866961

  12. Development of an Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Prost, Spencer A.; Wojcik, Roza; Norheim, Randolph V.; Baker, Erin S.; Rusyn, Ivan; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-12-20

    Complex samples benefit from multidimensional measurements where higher resolution enables more complete characterization of biological and environmental systems. To address this challenge, we developed a drift tube-based ion mobility spectrometry-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (IMS-Orbitrap MS) platform. To circumvent the time scale disparity between the fast IMS separation and the much slower Orbitrap MS acquisition, we utilized a dual gate and pseudorandom sequences to multiplexed injection of ions and allowing operation in signal averaging (SA), single multiplexing (SM) and double multiplexing (DM) IMS modes to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurements. For the SM measurements, a previously developed algorithm was used to reconstruct the IMS data. A new algorithm was developed for the DM analyses involving a two-step process that first recovers the SM data and then decodes the SM data. The algorithm also performs multiple refining procedures in order to minimize demultiplexing artifacts. The new IMS-Orbitrap MS platform was demonstrated by the analysis of proteomic and petroleum samples, where the integration of IMS and high mass resolution proved essential for accurate assignment of molecular formulae.

  13. A New Radio Frequency Plasma Oxygen Primary Ion Source on Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Improved Lateral Resolution and Detection of Electropositive Elements at Single Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Julien; Penen, Florent; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Frank, Julia; Hause, Gerd; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Gontier, Etienne; Horréard, François; Hillion, François; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2016-07-19

    An important application field of secondary ion mass spectrometry at the nanometer scale (NanoSIMS) is the detection of chemical elements and, in particular, metals at the subcellular level in biological samples. The detection of many trace metals requires an oxygen primary ion source to allow the generation of positive secondary ions with high yield in the NanoSIMS. The duoplasmatron oxygen source is commonly used in this ion microprobe but cannot achieve the same quality of images as the cesium primary ion source used to produce negative secondary ions (C(-), CN(-), S(-), P(-)) due to a larger primary ion beam size. In this paper, a new type of an oxygen ion source using a rf plasma is fitted and characterized on a NanoSIMS50L. The performances of this primary ion source in terms of current density and achievable lateral resolution have been characterized and compared to the conventional duoplasmatron and cesium sources. The new rf plasma oxygen source offered a net improvement in terms of primary beam current density compared to the commonly used duoplasmatron source, which resulted in higher ultimate lateral resolutions down to 37 nm and which provided a 5-45 times higher apparent sensitivity for electropositive elements. Other advantages include a better long-term stability and reduced maintenance. This new rf plasma oxygen primary ion source has been applied to the localization of essential macroelements and trace metals at basal levels in two biological models, cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Arabidopsis thaliana.

  14. A new approach for detection of explosives based on ion mobility spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzishchin, Yury; Kotkovskii, Gennadii; Martynov, Igor; Dovzhenko, Dmitriy; Chistyakov, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a new way for detection ultralow concentration of explosives in this study. It combines an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and a promising method of laser desorption/ionization on silicon (DIOS). The DIOS is widely used in mass spectrometry due to the possibility of small molecule detection and high sensitivity. It is known that IMS based on laser ion source is a power method for the fast detection of ultralow concentration of organic molecules. However requirement of using high energy pulse ultraviolet laser increases weight and size of the device. The use of DIOS in an ion source of IMS could decrease energy pulse requirements and allows one to construct both compact and high sensitive device for analyzing gas and liquid probes. On the other hand mechanisms of DIOS in gas media is poorly studied, especially in case of nitroaromatic compounds. The investigation of the desorption/ionization on porous silicon (pSi) surface of nitroaromatic compounds has been carried out for 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) using IMS and mass spectrometry (MS). It has been demonstrated that TNT ion formation in a gas medium is a complicated process and includes both an electron emission from the pSi surface with subsequent ion-molecular reactions in a gas phase and a proton transfer between pSi surface and TNT molecule.

  15. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake.

    PubMed

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Donohoe, Gregory C; Valentine, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H](3-) and [M - 5H](5-) insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å(2) and 808 ± 2 Å(2). [M - 4H](4-) ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å(2)) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å(2)) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H](4-) and [M - 5H](5-) ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis.

  16. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 3. Estimating Surface Area Exposure by Deuterium Uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX), collision cross section (CCS) measurement, and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) techniques were utilized to develop and compare three methods for estimating the relative surface area exposure of separate peptide chains within bovine insulin ions. Electrosprayed [M - 3H]3- and [M - 5H]5- insulin ions produced a single conformer type with respective collision cross sections of 528 ± 5 Å2 and 808 ± 2 Å2. [M - 4H]4- ions were comprised of more compact (Ω = 676 ± 3 Å2) and diffuse (i.e., more elongated, Ω = 779 ± 3 Å2) ion conformer types. Ions were subjected to HDX in the drift tube using D2O as the reagent gas. Collision-induced dissociation was used to fragment mobility-selected, isotopically labeled [M - 4H]4- and [M - 5H]5- ions into the protein subchains. Deuterium uptake levels of each chain can be explained by limited inter-chain isotopic scrambling upon collisional activation. Using nominal ion structures from MDS and a hydrogen accessibility model, the deuterium uptake for each chain was correlated to its exposed surface area. In separate experiments, the per-residue deuterium content for the protonated and deprotonated ions of the synthetic peptide KKDDDDDIIKIIK were compared. The differences in deuterium content indicated the regional HDX accessibility for cations versus anions. Using ions of similar conformational type, this comparison highlights the complementary nature of HDX data obtained from positive- and negative-ion analysis.

  17. Multistage fragmentation of ion trap mass spectrometry system and pseudo-MS3 of triple quadrupole mass spectrometry characterize certain (E)-3-(dimethylamino)-1-arylprop-2-en-1-ones: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Abdelhameed, Ali S; Kadi, Adnan A; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Angawi, Rihab F; Attwa, Mohamed W; Al-Rashood, Khalid A

    2014-01-01

    A new approach was recently introduced to improve the structure elucidation power of tandem mass spectrometry simulating the MS(3) of ion trap mass spectrometry system overcoming the different drawbacks of the latter. The fact that collision induced dissociation in the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer system provides richer fragment ions compared to those achieved in the ion trap mass spectrometer system utilizing resonance excitation. Moreover, extracting comprehensive spectra in the ion trap needs multistage fragmentation, whereas similar fragment ions may be acquired from one stage product ion scan using the triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The new strategy was proven to enhance the qualitative performance of tandem mass spectrometry for structural elucidation of different chemical entities. In the current study we are endeavoring to prove our hypothesis of the efficiency of the new pseudo-MS(3) technique via its comparison with the MS(3) mode of ion trap mass spectrometry system. Ten pharmacologically and synthetically important (E)-3-(dimethylamino)-1-arylprop-2-en-1-ones (enaminones 4a-j) were chosen as model compounds for this study. This strategy permitted rigorous identification of all fragment ions using triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with sufficient specificity. It can be used to elucidate structures of different unknown components. The data presented in this paper provide clear evidence that our new pseudo-MS(3) may simulate the MS(3) of ion trap spectrometry system.

  18. Co-localization of the Ganglioside GM1 and Cholesterol Detected by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Mónica M.; Liu, Zhao; Sunnick, Eva; Janshoff, Andreas; Kumar, Krishna; Boxer, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of the lateral organization of components in biological membranes and the evolution of this arrangement in response to external triggers remains a major challenge. The concept of lipid rafts is widely invoked, however, direct evidence of the existence of these ephemeral entities remains elusive. We report here the use of Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) to image the cholesterol-dependent cohesive phase separation of the ganglioside GM1 into nano and micro-scale assemblies in a canonical lipid raft composition of lipids. This assembly of domains was interrogated in a model membrane system composed of palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM), cholesterol, and an unsaturated lipid (dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, DOPC). Orthogonal isotopic labeling of every lipid bilayer component and monofluorination of GM1 allowed generation of molecule specific images using a NanoSIMS. Simultaneous detection of six different ion species in SIMS, including secondary electrons, was used to generate ion ratio images whose signal intensity values could be correlated to composition through the use of calibration curves from standard samples. Images of this system provide the first direct, molecule specific, visual evidence for the co-localization of cholesterol and GM1 in supported lipid bilayers and further indicate the presence of three compositionally distinct phases: (1) the interdomain region; (2) micrometer-scale domains (d>3 μm); and, (3) nanometer-scale domains (d=100 nm − 1 μm) localized within the micrometer-scale domains and the interdomain region. PSM-rich, nanometer-scale domains prefer to partition within the more ordered, cholesterol-rich/DOPC-poor/GM1-rich micrometer-scale phase, while GM1-rich, nanometer-scale domains prefer to partition within the surrounding, disordered, cholesterol-poor/PSM-rich/DOPC-rich interdomain phase. PMID:23514537

  19. The effect of pre-evaporation on ion distributions in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shulan; Beauchemin, Diane

    2006-02-01

    The connecting tube (2 or 5-mm i. d., 11-cm long) between the spray chamber and the torch was heated (to 400 °C) to investigate the effect of pre-evaporation on the distribution of ions in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Axial and radial profiles of analyte ions (Al +, V +, Cr +, Ni +, Zn +, Mn +, Zn +, As +, Se +, Mo +, Cd +, Sb +, La +, Pb +) in 1% HNO 3 as well as some polyatomic ions (LaO +, ArO +, ArN +, CO 2+) were simultaneously obtained on a time-of-flight ICP-MS instrument. Upon heating the connecting tube, the optimal axial position of all elements shifted closer to the load coil. Without the heated tube, 3.5 mm was the compromise axial position for multielemental analysis, which was optimal for 6 analytes. With the heated tube, this position became 1.5 mm, which was then optimal for 9 of the 14 analytes. Furthermore, the radial profiles, which were wide with a plateau in their middle without heating, became significantly narrower and Gaussian-like with a heated tube. This narrowing, which was most important for the 5-mm tube, slightly (by a factor of two at the most) yet significantly (at the 95% confidence level) improved the sensitivity of all elements but Mn upon optimisation of the axial position for compromise multi-element analysis. Furthermore, a concurrent decrease in the standard deviation of the blank was significant at the 95% confidence level for 9 of the 14 analytes. For most of the analytes, this translated into a two-fold to up to an order of magnitude improvement in detection limit, which is commensurate with a reduction of noise resulting from the smaller droplets entering the plasma after traversing the pre-evaporation tube.

  20. New supercharging reagents produce highly charged protein ions in native mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Going, Catherine C; Xia, Zijie; Williams, Evan R

    2015-11-07

    The effectiveness of two new supercharging reagents for producing highly charged ions by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions in which proteins have native structures and reactivities were investigated. In aqueous solution, 2-thiophenone and 4-hydroxymethyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-one (HD) at a concentration of 2% by volume can increase the average charge of cytochrome c and myoglobin by up to 163%, resulting in even higher charge states than those that are produced from water/methanol/acid solutions in which these proteins are denatured. The greatest extent of supercharging occurs in pure water, but these supercharging reagents are also highly effective in aqueous solutions containing 200 mM ammonium acetate buffer commonly used in native mass spectrometry (MS). These reagents are less effective supercharging reagents than m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA) and propylene carbonate (PC) when ions are formed from water/methanol/acid. The extent to which loss of the heme group from myoglobin occurs is related to the extent of supercharging. Results from guanidine melts of cytochrome c monitored with tryptophan fluorescence show that the supercharging reagents PC, sulfolane and HD are effective chemical denaturants in solution. These results provide additional evidence for the role of protein structural changes in the electrospray droplet as the primary mechanism for supercharging with these reagents in native MS. These results also demonstrate that for at least some proteins, the formation of highly charged ions from native MS is no longer a significant barrier for obtaining structural information using conventional tandem MS methods.

  1. Strategies for the chemical analysis of highly porous bone scaffolds using secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daming; Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; van den Bergh, Wouter; Chater, Richard J; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Jones, Julian R; McPhail, David S

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the distribution of critical elements (e.g. silicon and calcium) within silica-based bone scaffolds synthesized by different methods is central to the optimization of these materials. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has been used to determine this information due to its very high surface sensitivity and its ability to map all the elements and compounds in the periodic table with high spatial resolution. The SIMS image data can also be combined with depth profiles to construct three-dimensional chemical maps. However, the scaffolds have interconnected pore networks, which are very challenging structures for the SIMS technique. To overcome this problem two experimental methodologies have been developed. The first method involved the use of the focused ion beam technique to obtain clear images of the regions of interest and subsequently mark them by introducing fiducial marks; the samples were then analysed using the ToF-SIMS technique to yield the chemical analyses of the regions of interest. The second method involved impregnating the pores using a suitable reagent so that a flat surface could be achieved, and this was followed by secondary ion mapping and 3D chemical imaging with ToF-SIMS. The samples used in this work were sol-gel 70S30C foam and electrospun fibres and calcium-containing silica/gelatin hybrid scaffolds. The results demonstrate the feasibility of both these experimental methodologies and indicate that these methods can provide an opportunity to compare various artificial bone scaffolds, which will be of help in improving scaffold synthesis and processing routes. The techniques are also transferable to many other types of porous material.

  2. Advances in Charge-Compensation in Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervig, R. L.; Chen, J.; Schauer, S.; Stanley, B. D.; Moore, G. M.; Roggensack, K.

    2012-12-01

    In secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), a sample is bombarded by a charged particle beam (the primary ion) and sputtered positive or negative secondary ions are analyzed in a mass spectrometer. When the target is not conducting (like many geological materials), sample charging can result in variable deflection of secondary ions away from the mass spectrometer and a low, unstable, or absent signal. Applying a thin conducting coat (e.g., C, Au) to polished samples is required, and if the primary ion beam is negatively-charged, the build-up of negative charge can be alleviated by secondary electrons draining to the conducting coat at the edge of the crater (if a positive potential is applied to the sample for the collection of positive secondary ions) or accelerated away from the crater (if a negative potential is applied for negative ion study). Unless the sputtered crater in the conducting coat becomes too large, sample charging can be kept at a controllable level, and high-quality trace element analyses and isotope ratios have been obtained using this technique over the past 3+ decades. When a positive primary beam is used, the resulting build-up of positive charge in the sample requires an electron gun to deliver sufficient negative charge to the sputtered crater. While there are many examples of successful analyses using this approach, the purpose of this presentation is to describe a very simple technique for aligning the electron gun on Cameca nf and 1270/80 SIMS instruments. This method allows reproducible analyses of insulating phases with a Cs+ primary beam and detection of negative secondary ions. Normally, the filament voltage on the E-gun is the same as the sample voltage; thus electrons do not strike the sample except when a positive charge has built up (e.g., in the analysis crater!). In this method, we decrease the sample voltage by 3 or more kV, so that the impact energy of the electrons is sufficient to induce a cathodoluminescent (CL) image on an

  3. An Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Investigation of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1

    PubMed Central

    Schenauer, Matthew R.; Leary, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    In the present article we describe the gas-phase dissociation behavior of the dimeric form of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) using quadrupole-traveling wave ion mobility-time of flight mass spectrometry (q-TWIMS-TOF MS) (Waters Synapt™). Through investigation of the 9+ charge state of the dimer, we were able to monitor dissociation product ion (monomer) formation as a function of activation energy. Using ion mobility, we were able to observe precursor ion structural changes occurring throughout the activation process. Arrival time distributions (ATDs) for the 5+ monomeric MCP-1 product ions, derived from the gas-phase dissociation of the 9+ dimer, were then compared with ATDs obtained for the 5+ MCP-1 monomer isolated directly from solution. The results show that the dissociated monomer is as compact as the monomer arising from solution, regardless of the trap collision energy (CE) used in the dissociation. The solution-derived monomer, when collisionally activated, also resists significant unfolding within measure. Finally, we compared the collisional activation data for the MCP-1 dimer with an MCP-1 dimer non-covalently bound to a single molecule of the semi-synthetic glycosaminoglycan (GAG) analog Arixtra™; the latter a therapeutic anti-thrombin III-activating pentasaccharide. We observed that while dimeric MCP-1 dissociated at relatively low trap CEs, the Arixtra-bound dimer required much higher energies, which also induced covalent bond cleavage in the bound Arixtra molecule. Both the free and Arixtra-bound dimers became less compact and exhibited longer arrival times with increasing trap CEs, albeit the Arixtra-bound complex at slightly higher energies. That both dimers shifted to longer arrival times with increasing activation energy, while the dissociated MCP-1 monomers remained compact, suggests that the longer arrival times of the Arixtra-free and Arixtra-bound dimers may represent a partial breach of non-covalent interactions between the

  4. Reactive ion etching-assisted surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements on the single nanoparticle level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Si-Yi; Jiang, Xiang-Xu; Wei, Xin-Pan; Lee, Shuit-Tong E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; He, Yao E-mail: yaohe@suda.edu.cn; Xu, Ting-Ting

    2014-06-16

    Single-nanoparticle surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurement is of essential importance for both fundamental research and practical applications. In this work, we develop a class of single-particle SERS approaches, i.e., reactive ion etching (RIE)-assisted SERS measurements correlated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) strategy (RIE/SERS/SEM), enabling precise and high-resolution identification of single gold nanoparticle (AuNP) in facile and reliable manners. By using AuNP-coated silicon wafer and quartz glass slide as models, we further employ the developed RIE/SERS/SEM method for interrogating the relationship between SERS substrates and enhancement factor (EF) on the single particle level. Together with theoretical calculation using an established finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method, we demonstrate silicon wafer as superior SERS substrates, facilitating improvement of EF values.

  5. Low-energy extensions of the eikonal approximation to heavy-ion scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Aguiar, C.E.; Aguiar, C.E.; Zardi, F.; Vitturi, A.

    1997-09-01

    We discuss different schemes devised to extend the eikonal approximation to the regime of low bombarding energies (below 50 MeV per nucleon) in heavy-ion collisions. From one side we consider the first- and second-order corrections derived from Wallace{close_quote}s expansion. As an alternative approach we examine the procedure of accounting for the distortion of the eikonal straight-line trajectory by shifting the impact parameter to the corresponding classical turning point. The two methods are tested for different combinations of colliding systems and bombarding energies, by comparing the angular distributions they provide with the exact solution of the scattering problem. We find that the best results are obtained with the shifted trajectories, the Wallace expansion showing a slow convergence at low energies, in particular for heavy systems characterized by a strong Coulomb field. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Double scattering production of two positron-electron pairs in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Szczurek, Antoni

    2016-12-01

    We present first measurable predictions for electromagnetic (two-photon) double scattering production of two positron-electron pairs in ultraperipheral heavy-ion collisions at LHC. Measurable cross sections are obtained with realistic cuts on electron/positron (pseudo)rapidities and transverse momenta for the ALICE and ATLAS or CMS experiments. The predictions for total and differential cross sections are presented. We show also two-dimensional distributions in rapidities of the opposite-sign (from the same or different subcollisions) and of the same-sign (e+e+ or e-e-) electrons and in rapidity distance between them. Expected number of events are presented and discussed. Our calculations strongly suggest that relevant measurements with the help of ATLAS, CMS and ALICE detectors are possible in a near future. We show and compare energy dependence of the cross sections for one-pair and two-pair production.

  7. Extracting water and ion distributions from solution x-ray scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung T; Pabit, Suzette A; Pollack, Lois; Case, David A

    2016-06-07

    Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements can provide valuable information about the solvent environment around biomolecules, but it can be difficult to extract solvent-specific information from observed intensity profiles. Intensities are proportional to the square of scattering amplitudes, which are complex quantities. Amplitudes in the forward direction are real, and the contribution from a solute of known structure (and from the waters it excludes) can be estimated from theory; hence, the amplitude arising from the solvent environment can be computed by difference. We have found that this "square root subtraction scheme" can be extended to non-zero q values, out to 0.1 Å(-1) for the systems considered here, since the phases arising from the solute and from the water environment are nearly identical in this angle range. This allows us to extract aspects of the water and ion distributions (beyond their total numbers), by combining experimental data for the complete system with calculations for the solutes. We use this approach to test molecular dynamics and integral-equation (3D-RISM (three-dimensional reference interaction site model)) models for solvent structure around myoglobin, lysozyme, and a 25 base-pair duplex DNA. Comparisons can be made both in Fourier space and in terms of the distribution of interatomic distances in real space. Generally, computed solvent distributions arising from the MD simulations fit experimental data better than those from 3D-RISM, even though the total small-angle X-ray scattering patterns are very similar; this illustrates the potential power of this sort of analysis to guide the development of computational models.

  8. Detection of Large Ions in Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: Effects of Ion Mass and Acceleration Voltage on Microchannel Plate Detector Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2014-08-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Here, the response of an MCP detector as a function of ion mass and acceleration voltage is characterized, for singly charged peptide/protein ions ranging from 1 to 290 kDa in mass, and for acceleration voltages from 5 to 25 kV. A nondestructive inductive charge detector (ICD) employed in parallel with MCP detection provides a reliable reference signal to allow accurate calibration of the MCP response. MCP detection efficiencies were very close to unity for smaller ions at high acceleration voltages (e.g., angiotensin, 1046.5 Da, at 25 kV acceleration voltage), but decreased to ~11% for the largest ions examined (immunoglobulin G (IgG) dimer, 290 kDa) even at the highest acceleration voltage employed (25 kV). The secondary electron yield γ (average number of electrons produced per ion collision) is found to be proportional to mv3.1 (m: ion mass, v: ion velocity) over the entire mass range examined, and inversely proportional to the square root of m in TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that although MCP detectors indeed offer superlative performance in the detection of smaller peptide/protein species, their performance does fall off substantially for larger proteins, particularly under conditions of low acceleration voltage.

  9. Detection of large ions in time-of-flight mass spectrometry: effects of ion mass and acceleration voltage on microchannel plate detector response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-08-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Here, the response of an MCP detector as a function of ion mass and acceleration voltage is characterized, for singly charged peptide/protein ions ranging from 1 to 290 kDa in mass, and for acceleration voltages from 5 to 25 kV. A nondestructive inductive charge detector (ICD) employed in parallel with MCP detection provides a reliable reference signal to allow accurate calibration of the MCP response. MCP detection efficiencies were very close to unity for smaller ions at high acceleration voltages (e.g., angiotensin, 1046.5 Da, at 25 kV acceleration voltage), but decreased to ~11% for the largest ions examined (immunoglobulin G (IgG) dimer, 290 kDa) even at the highest acceleration voltage employed (25 kV). The secondary electron yield γ (average number of electrons produced per ion collision) is found to be proportional to mv(3.1) (m: ion mass, v: ion velocity) over the entire mass range examined, and inversely proportional to the square root of m in TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that although MCP detectors indeed offer superlative performance in the detection of smaller peptide/protein species, their performance does fall off substantially for larger proteins, particularly under conditions of low acceleration voltage.

  10. Structural Characterization of Methylenedianiline Regioisomers by Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Strategies: I. Electrospray Spectra of 2-Ring Isomers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purified methylenedianiline (MDA) regioisomers were structurally characterized and differentiated using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), and IM-MS/MS in conjunction with computational methods. It was determined that protonation sites on the isomers can vary depending on the position of amino groups, and the resulting protonation sites play a role in the gas-phase stability of the isomer. We also observed differences in the relative distributions of protonated conformations depending on experimental conditions and instrumentation, which is consistent with previous studies on aniline in the gas phase. This work demonstrates the utility of a multifaceted approach for the study of isobaric species and elucidates why previous MDA studies may have been unable to detect and/or differentiate certain isomers. Such analysis may prove useful in the characterization of larger MDA multimeric species, industrial MDA mixtures, and methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) mixtures used in polyurethane synthesis. PMID:24678803

  11. Characterization of TATP gas phase product ion chemistry via isotope labeling experiments using ion mobility spectrometry interfaced with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Wooten, Alfred; Kozole, Joseph; Deline, James; Beresford, Pamela; Stairs, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Identification of the fragment ion species associated with the ion reaction mechanism of triacetone triperoxide (TATP), a homemade peroxide-based explosive, is presented. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has proven to be a key analytical technique in the detection of trace explosive material. Unfortunately, IMS alone does not provide chemical identification of the ions detected; therefore, it is unknown what ion species are actually formed and separated by the IMS. In IMS, ions are primarily characterized by their drift time, which is dependent on the ion׳s mass and molecular cross-section; thus, IMS as a standalone technique does not provide structural signatures, which is in sharp contrast to the chemical and molecular information that is generally obtained from other customary analytical techniques, such as NMR, Raman and IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. To help study the ion chemistry that gives rise to the peaks observed in IMS, the hardware of two different commercial IMS instruments has been directly coupled to triple quadrupole (QQQ) mass spectrometers, in order to ascertain each ion׳s corresponding mass/charge (m/z) ratios with different dopants at two temperatures. Isotope labeling was then used to help identify and confirm the molecular identity of the explosive fragment and adduct ions of TATP. The m/z values and isotope labeling experiments were used to help propose probable molecular formulas for the ion fragments. In this report, the fragment and adduct ions m/z 58 and 240 of TATP have been confirmed to be [C3H6NH·H](+) and [TATP·NH4](+), respectively; while the fragment ions m/z 73 and 89 of TATP are identified as having the molecular formulas [C4H9NH2](+) and [C4H9O2](+), respectively. It is anticipated that the work in this area will not only help to facilitate improvements in mobility-based detection (IMS and MS), but also aid in the development and optimization of MS-based detection algorithms for TATP.

  12. Incoherent scatter measurements of ring-ion beam distributions produced by space shuttle exhaust injections into the iono