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Sample records for ion transport due

  1. Ion transport through macrocapillaries - Oscillations due to charge patch formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, D. D.; Lyle, L. A. M.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2016-09-01

    We present results on ion transport through large bore capillaries (macrocapillaries) that probe both the geometric and ion-guided aspects of this ion delivery mechanism. We have demonstrated that guiding in macrocapillaries exhibits position- and angle-dependent transmission properties which are directly related to the capillary material (either metal or insulator) and geometry. Specifically, we have passed 1 keV Rb+ ions through glass and metal macrocapillaries, and have observed oscillations for the transmitted ion current passing through the insulating capillaries. Straightforward calculations show that these oscillations can be attributed to beam deflections from charge patches that form on the interior walls of the capillary. The absence of these oscillations in the metal capillary data serve as further confirmation of the role of charge patch formation.

  2. Turbulent transport of fast ions due to magnetic flux ropes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiwisch, Adam

    The transport of fast ions in magnetic flux ropes in a laboratory plasma is studied. Strong perturbing flux ropes (deltaE ~175 V/m, deltaB ~7 G) are generated by secondary cathode-anode pair at the upgraded LArge Plasma Device (LAPD). A 500-1000 eV lithium ion test beam is passed through the turbulent region and recollected by a gridded collimated analyzer, revealing enhanced fast ion broadening attributable to flux rope perturbations. The broadening is observed to be well in excess of Coulomb scattering levels. Monte Carlo simulation is performed with model electrostatic and magnetic fields, revealing negligible spreading as a result of the magnetic perturbations. Modeled electrostatic perturbations are observed to broaden the beam by 3.0 mm2 at the closest recollection plane, increasing as the transit time squared further downstream. Transport attributed to electrostatic fluctuations has been shown to decrease with energy while magnetic transport does not. Enhanced fast ion transport observed during the flux rope off phase is presently unexplained.

  3. Absorption of intense microwaves and ion acoustic turbulence due to heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    De Groot, J.S.; Liu, J.M.; Matte, J.P.

    1994-02-04

    Measurements and calculations of the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of intense microwaves are presented. The isotropic component of the electron distribution becomes flat-topped in agreement with detailed Fokker-Planck calculations. The plasma heating is reduced due to the flat-topped distributions in agreement with calculations. The calculations show that the heat flux at high microwave powers is very large, q{sub max} {approx} 0.3 n{sub e}v{sub e}T{sub e}. A new particle model to, calculate the heat transport inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence in ICF plasmas is also presented. One-dimensional PIC calculations of ion acoustic turbulence excited due to heat transport are presented. The 2-D PIC code is presently being used to perform calculations of heat flux inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence.

  4. Anomalous Electron Transport Due to Multiple High Frequency Beam Ion Driven Alfven Eigenmode

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Boozer, A.; Delgardo-Aparicio, L.; Fredrickson, E.; Kaye, S.; White, R.

    2010-07-13

    We report on the simulations of recently observed correlations of the core electron transport with the sub-thermal ion cyclotron frequency instabilities in low aspect ratio plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In order to model the electron transport of the guiding center code ORBIT is employed. A spectrum of test functions of multiple core localized Global shear Alfven Eigenmode (GAE) instabilities based on a previously developed theory and experimental observations is used to examine the electron transport properties. The simulations exhibit thermal electron transport induced by electron drift orbit stochasticity in the presence of multiple core localized GAE.

  5. Elucidating the Performance Limitations of Lithium-ion Batteries due to Species and Charge Transport through Five Characteristic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fangming; Peng, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Underutilization due to performance limitations imposed by species and charge transports is one of the key issues that persist with various lithium-ion batteries. To elucidate the relevant mechanisms, two groups of characteristic parameters were proposed. The first group contains three characteristic time parameters, namely: (1) te, which characterizes the Li-ion transport rate in the electrolyte phase, (2) ts, characterizing the lithium diffusion rate in the solid active materials, and (3) tc, describing the local Li-ion depletion rate in electrolyte phase at the electrolyte/electrode interface due to electrochemical reactions. The second group contains two electric resistance parameters: Re and Rs, which represent respectively, the equivalent ionic transport resistance and the effective electronic transport resistance in the electrode. Electrochemical modeling and simulations to the discharge process of LiCoO2 cells reveal that: (1) if te, ts and tc are on the same order of magnitude, the species transports may not cause any performance limitations to the battery; (2) the underlying mechanisms of performance limitations due to thick electrode, high-rate operation, and large-sized active material particles as well as effects of charge transports are revealed. The findings may be used as quantitative guidelines in the development and design of more advanced Li-ion batteries. PMID:27599870

  6. Transport of energetic ions due to sawteeth, Alfven eigenmodes and microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, D C; Fisher, R K; Garcia-Munoz, M; Murakami, Masanori; Park, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing an array of new diagnostics and simulation/modelling techniques, recent DIII-D experiments have elucidated a variety of energetic ion transport behaviour in the presence of instabilities ranging from large-scale sawteeth to fine spatial scale microturbulence. Important new insights include sawteeth, such as those of the ITER baseline scenario, causing major redistribution of the energetic ion population; high levels of transport induced by low-amplitude Alfven eigenmodes can be caused by the integrated effect of a large number of simultaneous modes; and microturbulence can contribute to the removal of alpha ash while having little effect on fusion alphas. This paper provides an overview of recent and upcoming results from the DIII-D Energetic Particles research programme.

  7. Observation of Photovoltaic Action from Photoacid-Modified Nafion Due to Light-Driven Ion Transport.

    PubMed

    White, William; Sanborn, Christopher D; Reiter, Ronald S; Fabian, David M; Ardo, Shane

    2017-08-30

    Replacing passive ion-exchange membranes, like Nafion, with membranes that use light to drive ion transport would allow membranes in photoelectrochemical technologies to serve in an active role. Toward this, we modified perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer membranes with organic pyrenol-based photoacid dyes to sensitize the membranes to visible light and initiate proton transport. Covalent modification of the membranes was achieved by reacting Nafion sulfonyl fluoride poly(perfluorosulfonyl fluoride) membranes with the photoacid 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-tris(2-aminoethylsulfonamide). The modified membranes were strongly colored and maintained a high selectivity for cations over anions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ion-exchange measurements together provided strong evidence of covalent bond formation between the photoacids and the polymer membranes. Visible-light illumination of the photoacid-modified membranes resulted in a maximum power-producing ionic photoresponse of ∼100 μA/cm(2) and ∼1 mV under 40 Suns equivalent excitation with 405 nm light. In comparison, membranes that did not contain photoacids and instead contained ionically associated Ru(II)-polypyridyl coordination compound dyes, which are not photoacids, exhibited little-to-no photoeffects (∼1 μA/cm(2)). These disparate photocurrents, yet similar yields for nonradiative excited-state decay from the photoacids and the Ru(II) dyes, suggest temperature gradients were not likely the cause of the observed photovoltaic action from photoacid-modified membranes. Moreover, spectral response measurements supported that light absorption by the covalently bound photoacids was required in order to observe photoeffects. These results represent the first demonstration of photovoltaic action from an ion-exchange membrane and offer promise for supplementing the power demands of electrochemical processes with renewable sunlight-driven ion transport.

  8. Phase-space dependent critical gradient behavior of fast-ion transport due to Alfvén eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Podestà, M.; White, R. B.; Kramer, G. J.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Stagner, L.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Zhu, Y. B.; The DIII-D Team

    2017-08-01

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that many overlapping small-amplitude Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) cause fast-ion transport to sharply increase above a critical threshold in beam power, leading to fast-ion density profile resilience and reduced fusion performance. The threshold is above the AE linear stability limit and varies between diagnostics that are sensitive to different parts of fast-ion phase-space. Comparison with theoretical analysis using the nova and orbit codes shows that, for the neutral particle diagnostic, the threshold corresponds to the onset of stochastic particle orbits due to wave-particle resonances with AEs in the measured region of phase space. The bulk fast-ion distribution and instability behavior was manipulated through variations in beam deposition geometry, and no significant differences in the onset threshold outside of measurement uncertainties were found, in agreement with the theoretical stochastic threshold analysis. Simulations using the ‘kick model’ produce beam ion density gradients consistent with the empirically measured radial critical gradient and highlight the importance of including the energy and pitch dependence of the fast-ion distribution function in critical gradient models. The addition of electron cyclotron heating changes the types of AEs present in the experiment, comparatively increasing the measured fast-ion density and radial gradient. These studies provide the basis for understanding how to avoid AE transport that can undesirably redistribute current and cause fast-ion losses, and the measurements are being used to validate AE-induced transport models that use the critical gradient paradigm, giving greater confidence when applied to ITER.

  9. Phase-space dependent critical gradient behavior of fast-ion transport due to Alfvén eigenmodes

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, C. S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Podestà, M.; ...

    2017-06-09

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that many overlapping small-amplitude Alfv en eigenmodes (AEs) cause fast-ion transport to sharply increase above a critical threshold, leading to fast-ion density profile resilience and reduced fusion performance. The threshold is above the AE linear stability limit and varies between diagnostics that are sensitive to different parts of fast-ion phase-space. A comparison with theoretical analysis using the nova and orbit codes shows that, for the neutral particle diagnostic, the threshold corresponds to the onset of stochastic particle orbits due to wave-particle resonances with AEs in the measured region of phase space. We manipulated themore » bulk fast-ion distribution and instability behavior through variations in beam deposition geometry, and no significant differences in the onset threshold outside of measurement uncertainties were found, in agreement with the theoretical stochastic threshold analysis. Simulations using the `kick model' produce beam ion density gradients consistent with the empirically measured radial critical gradient and highlight the importance of including the energy and pitch dependence of the fast-ion distribution function in critical gradient models. The addition of electron cyclotron heating changes the types of AEs present in the experiment, comparatively increasing the measured fast-ion density and radial gradient. Our studies provide the basis for understanding how to avoid AE transport that can undesirably redistribute current and cause fast-ion losses, and the measurements are being used to validate AE-induced transport models that use the critical gradient paradigm, giving greater confidence when applied to ITER.« less

  10. Linear gyrokinetic calculations of toroidal momentum transport in a tokamak due to the ion temperature gradient mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, A. G.; Angioni, C.

    2005-07-01

    It is shown from a symmetry in the gyrokinetic equation that for up-down symmetric tokamak equilibria and for uϕ≫ρυthi/r (where uϕ is the toroidal velocity, υthi is the thermal ion velocity, ρ is the Larmor radius, and r is the radius of the flux surface), the transport of parallel momentum can be written as the sum of a diffusive and a pinch contribution with no off-diagonal terms due to temperature and pressure gradients. The measured parallel velocity gradient in ASDEX Upgrade [O. Gruber, H.-S. Bosch, S. Günter et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 1321 (1999)] is insufficient to drive the parallel velocity shear instability. The parallel velocity is then transported by the ion temperature gradient mode. The diffusive contribution to the transport flux is investigated using a linear gyrokinetic approach, and it is found that the diffusion coefficient for parallel velocity transport divided by the ion heat conductivity coefficient is close to 1, and only weakly dependent on plasma parameters.

  11. Collective Thomson scattering measurements of fast-ion transport due to sawtooth crashes in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, S. K.; Stejner, M.; Galdon-Quiroga, J.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Geiger, B.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Jaulmes, F.; Korsholm, S. B.; Lazanyi, N.; Leipold, F.; Ryter, F.; Salewski, M.; Schubert, M.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROFusion MST1 Team

    2016-11-01

    Sawtooth instabilities can modify heating and current-drive profiles and potentially increase fast-ion losses. Understanding how sawteeth redistribute fast ions as a function of sawtooth parameters and of fast-ion energy and pitch is hence a subject of particular interest for future fusion devices. Here we present the first collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements of sawtooth-induced redistribution of fast ions at ASDEX Upgrade. These also represent the first localized fast-ion measurements on the high-field side of this device. The results indicate fast-ion losses in the phase-space measurement volume of about 50% across sawtooth crashes, in good agreement with values predicted with the Kadomtsev sawtooth model implemented in TRANSP and with the sawtooth model in the EBdyna_go code. In contrast to the case of sawteeth, we observe no fast-ion redistribution in the presence of fishbone modes. We highlight how CTS measurements can discriminate between different sawtooth models, in particular when aided by multi-diagnostic velocity-space tomography, and briefly discuss our results in light of existing measurements from other fast-ion diagnostics.

  12. Quasilinear transport due to the magnetic drift resonance with the ion temperature gradient instability in a rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Debing; Xu, Yingfeng; Wang, Shaojie

    2017-08-01

    The quasilinear transport fluxes due to the ion temperature gradient instability are calculated in a toroidal plasma, in which the magnetic drift resonance is treated rigorously. The effects of the equilibrium parallel flow and flow shear on the radial particle and heat fluxes are studied numerically in detail. In the radial component of parallel viscosity, there exist the pinches driven by the density gradient, the temperature gradient, and the curvature of the background magnetic field. The direction of these pinches is discussed. It is found that each pinch can be inward or outward, which depends crucially on the resonance condition.

  13. Momentum transport in the vicinity of q{sub min} in reverse shear tokamaks due to ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rameswar; Singh, R; Jhang, Hogun; Diamond, P. H.

    2014-01-15

    We present an analytic study of momentum transport of tokamak plasmas in the vicinity of minimum safety factor (q) position in reversed magnetic shear configuration. Slab ion temperature gradient modes with an equilibrium flow profile are considered in this study. Quasi-linear calculations of momentum flux clearly show the novel effects of q-curvature on the generation of intrinsic rotation and mean poloidal flow without invoking reflectional symmetry breaking of parallel wavenumber (k{sub ∥}). This q-curvature effect originates from the inherent asymmetry in k{sub ∥} populations with respect to a rational surface due to the quadratic proportionality of k{sub ∥} when q-curvature is taken into account. Discussions are made of possible implications of q-curvature induced plasma flows on internal transport barrier formation in reversed shear tokamaks.

  14. Accumulation of calcium in the centre of leaves of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is due to an uncoupling of water and ion transport.

    PubMed

    Kerton, Matt; Newbury, H John; Hand, David; Pritchard, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the parameters regulating calcium ion distribution in leaves. Accumulation of ions in leaf tissue is in part dependent on import from the xylem. This import via the transpiration stream is more important for ions such as calcium that are xylem but not phloem mobile and cannot therefore be retranslocated. Accumulation of calcium was measured on bulk coriander leaf tissue (Coriandrum sativum L. cv. Lemon) using ion chromatography and calcium uptake was visualized using phosphor-images of (45)Ca(2+). Leaves of plants grown in hydroponics had elevated calcium in the centre of the leaf compared with the leaf margin, while K(+) was distributed homogeneously over the leaf. This calcium was shown to be localised to the mesophyll vacuoles using EDAX. Stomatal density and evapotranspiration (water loss per unit area of leaf) were equal at inner and outer sections of the leaf. Unequal ion distribution but uniformity of water loss suggested that there was a difference in the extent of uncoupling of calcium and water transport between the inner and outer leaf. Since isolated tissue from the inner and outer leaf were able to accumulate similar amounts of calcium, it is proposed that the spatial variation of leaf calcium concentration is due to differential ion delivery to the two regions rather than tissue/cell-specific differences in ion uptake capacity. There was a positive correlation between whole leaf calcium concentration and the difference in calcium concentration between inner and outer leaf tissue. Exposing the plants to increased humidity reduced transpiration and calcium delivery to the leaf and abolished this spatial variation of calcium concentration. Mechanisms of calcium delivery to leaves are discussed. An understanding of calcium delivery and distribution within coriander will inform strategies to reduce the incidence of calcium-related syndromes such as tip-burn and provides a robust model for the transport of ions and

  15. Accumulation of calcium in the centre of leaves of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is due to an uncoupling of water and ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Kerton, Matt; Newbury, H. John; Hand, David; Pritchard, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the parameters regulating calcium ion distribution in leaves. Accumulation of ions in leaf tissue is in part dependent on import from the xylem. This import via the transpiration stream is more important for ions such as calcium that are xylem but not phloem mobile and cannot therefore be retranslocated. Accumulation of calcium was measured on bulk coriander leaf tissue (Coriandrum sativum L. cv. Lemon) using ion chromatography and calcium uptake was visualized using phosphor-images of 45Ca2+. Leaves of plants grown in hydroponics had elevated calcium in the centre of the leaf compared with the leaf margin, while K+ was distributed homogeneously over the leaf. This calcium was shown to be localised to the mesophyll vacuoles using EDAX. Stomatal density and evapotranspiration (water loss per unit area of leaf) were equal at inner and outer sections of the leaf. Unequal ion distribution but uniformity of water loss suggested that there was a difference in the extent of uncoupling of calcium and water transport between the inner and outer leaf. Since isolated tissue from the inner and outer leaf were able to accumulate similar amounts of calcium, it is proposed that the spatial variation of leaf calcium concentration is due to differential ion delivery to the two regions rather than tissue/cell-specific differences in ion uptake capacity. There was a positive correlation between whole leaf calcium concentration and the difference in calcium concentration between inner and outer leaf tissue. Exposing the plants to increased humidity reduced transpiration and calcium delivery to the leaf and abolished this spatial variation of calcium concentration. Mechanisms of calcium delivery to leaves are discussed. An understanding of calcium delivery and distribution within coriander will inform strategies to reduce the incidence of calcium-related syndromes such as tip-burn and provides a robust model for the transport of ions and other

  16. Transport properties of ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biolsi, Louis; Biolsi, David

    1987-01-01

    The strong long-range interactions between (among) charged species require the inclusion of higher order contributions to the transport properties (viscosity, thermal conductivity, diffusion) of ionized gases than are required for neutral gases. These higher order contributions have been rewritten so that they are given in terms of universal functions which can be tabulated. Tables which provide for the rapid calculation of some higher order contributions to the transport properties of both ions and electrons are given. Some results which are useful for calculating the higher order contributions to the transport properties of mixtures of ions are also given. These results are applied to the ionic species in air at high temperatures.

  17. Ion transport in pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Bellono, Nicholas W.; Oancea, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system,, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis. PMID:25034214

  18. Ion transport in pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Oancea, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Skin melanocytes and ocular pigment cells contain specialized organelles called melanosomes, which are responsible for the synthesis of melanin, the major pigment in mammals. Defects in the complex mechanisms involved in melanin synthesis and regulation result in vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired development of the visual system, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. Ion transport across cellular membranes is critical for many biological processes, including pigmentation, but the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates melanin synthesis, storage, and transfer are not understood. In this review we first discuss ion channels and transporters that function at the plasma membrane of melanocytes; in the second part we consider ion transport across the membrane of intracellular organelles, with emphasis on melanosomes. We discuss recently characterized lysosomal and endosomal ion channels and transporters associated with pigmentation phenotypes. We then review the evidence for melanosomal channels and transporters critical for pigmentation, discussing potential molecular mechanisms mediating their function. The studies investigating ion transport in pigmentation physiology open new avenues for future research and could reveal novel molecular mechanisms underlying melanogenesis.

  19. Radial Transport Characteristics of Fast Ions Due to Energetic-Particle Modes inside the Last Closed-Flux Surface in the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Kenichi; Isobe, Mitsutaka; Toi, Kazuo; Shimizu, Akihiro; Fujisawa, Akihide; Ohshima, Shunsuke; Nakano, Haruhisa; Osakabe, Masaki; Todo, Yasushi; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Chihiro; Nishimura, Shin; Yoshimura, Yasuo; Matsuoka, Keisuke; Okamura, Shoichi; Nagashima, Yoshihiko

    2008-02-15

    The internal behavior of fast ions interacting with magnetohydrodynamic bursts excited by energetic ions has been experimentally investigated in the compact helical system. The resonant convective oscillation of fast ions was identified inside the last closed-flux surface during an energetic-particle mode (EPM) burst. The phase difference between the fast-ion oscillation and the EPM, indicating the coupling strength between them, remains a certain value during the EPM burst and drives an anomalous transport of fast ions.

  20. Ion Phase Space Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Daniel Peter

    1987-09-01

    Experimental measurements are presented of ion phase space evolution in a collisionless magnetoplasma utilizing nonperturbing laser induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics. Ion configuration space and velocity space transport, and ion thermodynamic information were derived from the phase space diagrams for the following beam-plasma and obstacle-plasma systems:(UNFORMATTED TABLE OR EQUATION FOLLOWS) OBSTACLE & PLASMA SPECIES qquad disc & quad Ba ^+/e^ qquad disc & quad Ba^+/SF _6^-/e^ BEAM SPECIES & PLASMA SPECIES} qquad Ba^+ & quad Cs^+/e^ qquad Cs^+ & quad Ba^+/e^ qquad Ba^+ & quad Cs^+/SF_6 ^-/e^ qquad e^- & quad Ba^+ /e^ TABLE/EQUATION ENDS The ions were roughly mass symmetric. Plasma systems were reconstructed from multiple discrete Ba(II) ion velocity distributions with spatial, temporal, and velocity resolution of 1 mm^3, 2 musec, and 3 times 1010 cm ^3/sec^3 respectively. Phase space reconstructions indicated resonant ion response to the current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron wave (EICW) in the case of an electron beam and to the ion cyclotron-cyclotron wave in the case of ion beams. Ion energization was observed in both systems. Local particle kinetic energy densities increase far above thermal levels in the presence of the EICW and ICCW. Time-resolved measurements of the EICW identified phase space particle bunching. The nonlinear evolution of f_{rm i}(x,v,t) was investigated for both beam systems. The near wake of conducting electrically floating disc obstacle was studied. Anomalous cross field diffusion (D_bot > 10 ^4 cm^2/sec) and ion energization were correlated with strong, low-frequency turbulence generated by the obstacle. Ion perpendicular kinetic energy densities doubled over thermal levels in the near wake. Upstream of the obstacle, l ~ 50 lambda_ {rm D}, a collisionless shock was indicated; far downstream, an ion flux peak was observed. Three negative ion plasma (NIP) sources were developed and characterized in the course of research: two

  1. Ion transport by pulmonary epithelia.

    PubMed

    Hollenhorst, Monika I; Richter, Katrin; Fronius, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The lung surface of air-breathing vertebrates is formed by a continuous epithelium that is covered by a fluid layer. In the airways, this epithelium is largely pseudostratified consisting of diverse cell types such as ciliated cells, goblet cells, and undifferentiated basal cells, whereas the alveolar epithelium consists of alveolar type I and alveolar type II cells. Regulation and maintenance of the volume and viscosity of the fluid layer covering the epithelium is one of the most important functions of the epithelial barrier that forms the outer surface area of the lungs. Therefore, the epithelial cells are equipped with a wide variety of ion transport proteins, among which Na⁺, Cl⁻, and K⁺ channels have been identified to play a role in the regulation of the fluid layer. Malfunctions of pulmonary epithelial ion transport processes and, thus, impairment of the liquid balance in our lungs is associated with severe diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and pulmonary oedema. Due to the important role of pulmonary epithelial ion transport processes for proper lung function, the present paper summarizes the recent findings about composition, function, and ion transport properties of the airway epithelium as well as of the alveolar epithelium.

  2. Ion Transport by Pulmonary Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Hollenhorst, Monika I.; Richter, Katrin; Fronius, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The lung surface of air-breathing vertebrates is formed by a continuous epithelium that is covered by a fluid layer. In the airways, this epithelium is largely pseudostratified consisting of diverse cell types such as ciliated cells, goblet cells, and undifferentiated basal cells, whereas the alveolar epithelium consists of alveolar type I and alveolar type II cells. Regulation and maintenance of the volume and viscosity of the fluid layer covering the epithelium is one of the most important functions of the epithelial barrier that forms the outer surface area of the lungs. Therefore, the epithelial cells are equipped with a wide variety of ion transport proteins, among which Na+, Cl−, and K+ channels have been identified to play a role in the regulation of the fluid layer. Malfunctions of pulmonary epithelial ion transport processes and, thus, impairment of the liquid balance in our lungs is associated with severe diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and pulmonary oedema. Due to the important role of pulmonary epithelial ion transport processes for proper lung function, the present paper summarizes the recent findings about composition, function, and ion transport properties of the airway epithelium as well as of the alveolar epithelium. PMID:22131798

  3. Correlated enhancement of momentum and stochastic energetic ion transport due to multi-helicity tearing modes on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, B.; Ferraro, N.; Jardin, S.; Kramer, G.; Evans, T.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    2016-10-01

    The onset of energetic particle stochasticity has been correlated with the transition to a hollow rotation profile by scaling linear tearing modes from M3D-C1 to ECEI data and following energetic particles in the SPIRAL code. The superposition of two tearing modes of different n-number increases magnetic field line stochasticity by generating tertiary magnetic islands, even when the flux perturbation is composed of only two linearly independent solutions. Furthermore, particle orbit stochasticity increases with particle energy--a mechanism for non-ambipolar transport that modifies fluid rotation in a regime relevant to the saturated island widths, neutral beam injection energies, and physical dimensions of DIII-D. This demonstrates that energy-dependent stochastic effects operate alongside nonlinear MHD coupling and neoclassical toroidal viscosity to determine the dynamics of non-axisymmetric and tearing-unstable systems, including disruptive tokamak discharges. Supported by the U.S. DOE DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-FG02-99ER54531.

  4. Changes in ion transport in inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2006-03-29

    Ion transport is essential for maintenance of transmembranous and transcellular electric potential, fluid transport and cellular volume. Disturbance of ion transport has been associated with cellular dysfunction, intra and extracellular edema and abnormalities of epithelial surface liquid volume. There is increasing evidence that conditions characterized by an intense local or systemic inflammatory response are associated with abnormal ion transport. This abnormal ion transport has been involved in the pathogenesis of conditions like hypovolemia due to fluid losses, hyponatremia and hypokalemia in diarrhoeal diseases, electrolyte abnormalities in pyelonephritis of early infancy, septicemia induced pulmonary edema, and in hypersecretion and edema induced by inflammatory reactions of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract. Components of membranous ion transport systems, which have been shown to undergo a change in function during an inflammatory response include the sodium potassium ATPase, the epithelial sodium channel, the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and calcium activated chloride channels and the sodium potassium chloride co-transporter. Inflammatory mediators, which influence ion transport are tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, interleukins, transforming growth factor, leukotrienes and bradykinin. They trigger the release of specific messengers like prostaglandins, nitric oxide and histamine which alter ion transport system function through specific receptors, intracellular second messengers and protein kinases. This review summarizes data on in vivo measurements of changes in ion transport in acute inflammatory conditions and in vitro studies, which have explored the underlying mechanisms. Potential interventions directed at a correction of the observed abnormalities are discussed.

  5. Changes in ion transport in inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Ion transport is essential for maintenance of transmembranous and transcellular electric potential, fluid transport and cellular volume. Disturbance of ion transport has been associated with cellular dysfunction, intra and extracellular edema and abnormalities of epithelial surface liquid volume. There is increasing evidence that conditions characterized by an intense local or systemic inflammatory response are associated with abnormal ion transport. This abnormal ion transport has been involved in the pathogenesis of conditions like hypovolemia due to fluid losses, hyponatremia and hypokalemia in diarrhoeal diseases, electrolyte abnormalites in pyelonephritis of early infancy, septicemia induced pulmonary edema, and in hypersecretion and edema induced by inflammatory reactions of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract. Components of membranous ion transport systems, which have been shown to undergo a change in function during an inflammatory response include the sodium potassium ATPase, the epithelial sodium channel, the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and calcium activated chloride channels and the sodium potassium chloride co-transporter. Inflammatory mediators, which influence ion transport are tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, interleukins, transforming growth factor, leukotrienes and bradykinin. They trigger the release of specific messengers like prostaglandins, nitric oxide and histamine which alter ion transport system function through specific receptors, intracellular second messengers and protein kinases. This review summarizes data on in vivo measurements of changes in ion transport in acute inflammatory conditions and in vitro studies, which have explored the underlying mechanisms. Potential interventions directed at a correction of the observed abnormalities are discussed. PMID:16571116

  6. Ion transporters in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Damin; Zhu, Wen; Kuo, John S.; Hu, Shaoshan; Sun, Dandan

    2015-01-01

    Ion transporters are important in regulation of ionic homeostasis, cell volume, and cellular signal transduction under physiological conditions. They have recently emerged as important players in cancer progression. In this review, we discussed two important ion transporter proteins, sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter isoform 1 (NKCC-1) and sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform 1 (NHE-1) in Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and other malignant tumors. NKCC-1 is a Na+-dependent Cl− transporter that mediates the movement of Na+, K+, and Cl− ions across the plasma membrane and maintains cell volume and intracellular K+ and Cl− homeostasis. NHE-1 is a ubiquitously expressed cell membrane protein which regulates intracellular pH (pHi) and extracellular microdomain pH (pHe) homeostasis and cell volume. Here, we summarized recent pre-clinical experimental studies on NKCC-1 and NHE-1 in GBM and other malignant tumors, such as breast cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and lung cancer. These studies illustrated that pharmacological inhibition or down-regulation of these ion transporter proteins reduces proliferation, increases apoptosis, and suppresses migration and invasion of cancer cells. These new findings reveal the potentials of these ion transporters as new targets for cancer diagnosis and/or treatment. PMID:25620102

  7. Intracellular calcium modulates gallbladder ion transport.

    PubMed

    Cates, J A; Saunders, K D; Abedin, M Z; Roslyn, J J

    1991-06-01

    Although experimentally induced cholesterol gallstone formation has been associated with altered gallbladder (GB) absorption and increased biliary Ca2+, the relationship between these events remains unclear. Recent studies suggest that extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]ec) influences GB ion transport. Whether the effects of [Ca2+]ec are mediated by changes in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]ic) has not been determined. This study was designed to define the effects of altered [Ca2+]ic on GB ion transport. Prairie dog GBs were mounted in a Ussing chamber and short-circuit current (Isc), potential difference (Vms), and resistance (Rt) were recorded. Mucosal surfaces were exposed to either Dantrolene (Dt) or nickel (Ni2+). Dt "traps" [Ca2+]ic within intracellular organelles, thereby lowering cytosolic Ca2+; and Ni2+ prevents influx of [Ca2+]ec, presumably by binding Ca2+ channels. Although Dt reduced both Isc and Vms (P less than 0.01), these effects were transient. Transport recovery was probably due to increased [Ca2+]ec influx with restoration of [Ca2+]ic. Ni2+ resulted in sustained decreases in Isc and Vms (P less than 0.05) despite subsequent addition of 10 mM Ca2+. These findings are consistent with the prevention of [Ca2+]ec influx by Ni2+. We conclude that: (1) [Ca2+]ic may be a modulator of GB ion transport and (2) previously reported [Ca2+]ec effects on ion transport may be mediated through [Ca2+]ic concentration changes.

  8. Ion Transport in 2-D Graphene Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Quan; Foo, Elbert; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    Graphene membranes have recently attracted wide attention due to its great potential in water desalination and selective molecular sieving. Further developments of these membranes, including enhancing their mass transport rate and/or molecular selectivity, rely on the understanding of fundamental transport mechanisms through graphene membranes, which has not been studied experimentally before due to fabrication and measurement difficulties. Herein we report the fabrication of the basic constituent of graphene membranes, i.e. 2-D single graphene nanochannels (GNCs) and the study of ion transport in these channels. A modified bonding technique was developed to form GNCs with well-defined geometry and uniform channel height. Ion transport in such GNCs was studied using DC conductance measurement. Our preliminary results showed that the ion transport in GNCs is still governed by surface charge at low concentrations (10-6M to 10-4M). However, GNCs exhibits much higher ionic conductances than silica nanochannels with the same geometries in the surface-charge-governed regime. This conductance enhancement can be attributed to the pre-accumulation of charges on graphene surfaces. The work is supported by the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  9. Secondary ion collection and transport system for ion microprobe

    DOEpatents

    Ward, James W.; Schlanger, Herbert; McNulty, Jr., Hugh; Parker, Norman W.

    1985-01-01

    A secondary ion collection and transport system, for use with an ion microprobe, which is very compact and occupies only a small working distance, thereby enabling the primary ion beam to have a short focal length and high resolution. Ions sputtered from the target surface by the primary beam's impact are collected between two arcuate members having radii of curvature and applied voltages that cause only ions within a specified energy band to be collected. The collected ions are accelerated and focused in a transport section consisting of a plurality of spaced conductive members which are coaxial with and distributed along the desired ion path. Relatively high voltages are applied to alternate transport sections to produce accelerating electric fields sufficient to transport the ions through the section to an ion mass analyzer, while lower voltages are applied to the other transport sections to focus the ions and bring their velocity to a level compatible with the analyzing apparatus.

  10. Targeting ion transport in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, E; Gillies, R J

    2014-03-19

    The metabolism of cancer cells differs substantially from normal cells, including ion transport. Although this phenomenon has been long recognized, ion transporters have not been viewed as suitable therapeutic targets. However, the acidic pH values present in tumours which are well outside of normal limits are now becoming recognized as an important therapeutic target. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is fundamental to tumour pH regulation. CAIX is commonly expressed in cancer, but lowly expressed in normal tissues and that presents an attractive target. Here, we discuss the possibilities of exploiting the acidic, hypoxic tumour environment as possible target for therapy. Additionally, clinical experience with CAIX targeting in cancer patients is discussed.

  11. Composite oxygen ion transport element

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jack C.; Besecker, Charles J.; Chen, Hancun; Robinson, Earil T.

    2007-06-12

    A composite oxygen ion transport element that has a layered structure formed by a dense layer to transport oxygen ions and electrons and a porous support layer to provide mechanical support. The dense layer can be formed of a mixture of a mixed conductor, an ionic conductor, and a metal. The porous support layer can be fabricated from an oxide dispersion strengthened metal, a metal-reinforced intermetallic alloy, a boron-doped Mo.sub.5Si.sub.3-based intermetallic alloy or combinations thereof. The support layer can be provided with a network of non-interconnected pores and each of said pores communicates between opposite surfaces of said support layer. Such a support layer can be advantageously employed to reduce diffusion resistance in any type of element, including those using a different material makeup than that outlined above.

  12. Metrology and Transport of Multiply Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Dhruva

    . Calculations based on the geometry of the experimental setup and kinematics of the ions showed that these oscillations could be attributed to the charge patches formed on the capillary walls. Electronic excitations in solids due to energetic ions at low kinetic energy were measured by using Schottky diodes. Hot electron currents measured at the backside of an Ag/n-Si Schottky diode due to ion bombardment on the frontside were found to depend on the kinetic energy (500 eV to 1500 eV) and angle of incidence (+/-30°) of the ion (Rb+) beam. A sharp upturn in the energy dependent yield is consistent with a kinetic emission model for electronic excitations utilizing the device Schottky barrier as determined from current-voltage characteristics. Backside currents measured for ion incident angle are strongly peaked about normal incidence. Accounting for the increased transport distance for excited charges at non-normal incidence, the mean free path for electrons in silver was found to be 5.2 +/- 1.4 nm, which is consistent with values reported in the literature.

  13. Anomalous transport due to magnetic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Cardozo, N.J.L.

    1996-03-01

    Transport in a toroidal system with broken flux surfaces is considered. Flux surfaces with rational field line winding number can degenerate and form magnetic islands. The experimental evidence for the existence of magnetic structures is reviewed. If neighboring chains of islands overlap, a region of stochastic field is formed. In a stochastic field, a field line fills up a region of space and thus makes significant radial excursions. Particles following a stochastic field line may experience rapid radial transport. The problem of computing transport in a stochastic field has two stages: what is the behavior of field lines in a stochastic region? and what is the implication for particle transport? The much used formula due to Rechester & Rosenbluth for collisionless transport in a fully ergodic field is treated. It is shown that the conditions for the validity of this formula are normally not met in a tokamak. 16 refs.

  14. Influence of ion streaming instabilities on transport near plasma boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott D.

    2016-04-01

    Plasma boundary layers are susceptible to electrostatic instabilities driven by ion flows in presheaths and, when present, these instabilities can influence transport. In plasmas with a single species of positive ion, ion-acoustic instabilities are expected under conditions of low pressure and large electron-to-ion temperature ratio ({{T}e}/{{T}i}\\gg 1 ). In plasmas with two species of positive ions, ion-ion two-stream instabilities can also be excited. The stability phase-space is characterized using the Penrose criterion and approximate linear dispersion relations. Predictions for how these instabilities affect ion and electron transport in presheaths, including rapid thermalization due to instability-enhanced collisions and an instability-enhanced ion-ion friction force, are briefly reviewed. Recent experimental tests of these predictions are discussed along with research needs required for further validation. The calculated stability boundaries provide a guide to determine the experimental conditions at which these effects can be expected.

  15. Energetic ion transport by microturbulence is insignificant in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Staebler, G. M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Waltz, R. E.; Austin, M. E.; Bass, E. M.; Budny, R. V.; Gorelenkova, M.; Grierson, B. A.; McCune, D. C.; Yuan, X.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Muscatello, C. M.; Zhu, Y. B.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; Holcomb, C. T.; McKee, G. R.; and others

    2013-05-15

    Energetic ion transport due to microturbulence is investigated in magnetohydrodynamic-quiescent plasmas by way of neutral beam injection in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)]. A range of on-axis and off-axis beam injection scenarios are employed to vary relevant parameters such as the character of the background microturbulence and the value of E{sub b}/T{sub e}, where E{sub b} is the energetic ion energy and T{sub e} the electron temperature. In all cases, it is found that any transport enhancement due to microturbulence is too small to observe experimentally. These transport effects are modeled using numerical and analytic expectations that calculate the energetic ion diffusivity due to microturbulence. It is determined that energetic ion transport due to coherent fluctuations (e.g., Alfvén eigenmodes) is a considerably larger effect and should therefore be considered more important for ITER.

  16. Ion transport in a pH-regulated nanopore.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Li-Hsien; Zhang, Mingkan; Qian, Shizhi

    2013-08-06

    Fundamental understanding of ion transport phenomena in nanopores is crucial for designing the next-generation nanofluidic devices. Due to surface reactions of dissociable functional groups on the nanopore wall, the surface charge density highly depends upon the proton concentration on the nanopore wall, which in turn affects the electrokinetic transport of ions, fluid, and particles within the nanopore. Electrokinetic ion transport in a pH-regulated nanopore, taking into account both multiple ionic species and charge regulation on the nanopore wall, is theoretically investigated for the first time. The model is verified by the experimental data of nanopore conductance available in the literature. The results demonstrate that the spatial distribution of the surface charge density at the nanopore wall and the resulting ion transport phenomena, such as ion concentration polarization (ICP), ion selectivity, and conductance, are significantly affected by the background solution properties, such as the pH and salt concentration.

  17. Ion transport through a graphene nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guohui; Mao, Mao; Ghosal, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is utilized to investigate the ionic transport of NaCl in solution through a graphene nanopore under an applied electric field. Results show the formation of concentration polarization layers in the vicinity of the graphene sheet. The nonuniformity of the ion distribution gives rise to an electric pressure which drives vortical motions in the fluid if the electric field is sufficiently strong to overcome the influence of viscosity and thermal fluctuations. The relative importance of hydrodynamic transport and thermal fluctuations in determining the pore conductivity is investigated. A second important effect that is observed is the mass transport of water through the nanopore, with an average velocity proportional to the applied voltage and independent of the pore diameter. The flux arises as a consequence of the asymmetry in the ion distribution which can be attributed to differing mobilities of the sodium and chlorine ions, and, to the polarity of water molecules. The accumulation of liquid molecules in the vicinity of the nanopore due to reorientation of the water dipoles by the local electric field is seen to result in a local increase in the liquid density. Results confirm that the electric conductance is proportional to the nanopore diameter for the parameter regimes that we simulated. The occurrence of fluid vortices is found to result in an increase in the effective electrical conductance. PMID:22962262

  18. Actuation and ion transportation of polyelectrolyte gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wei; Wang, Xiao

    2010-04-01

    Consisting of charged network swollen with ionic solution, polyelectrolyte gels are known for their salient characters including ion exchange and stimuli responsiveness. The active properties of polyelectrolyte gels are mostly due to the migration of solvent molecules and solute ions, and their interactions with the fixed charges on the network. In this paper, we extend the recently developed nonlinear field theory of polyelectrolyte gels by assuming that the kinetic process is limited by the rate of the transportation of mobile species. To study the coupled mechanical deformation, ion migration, and electric field, we further specialize the model to the case of a laterally constrained gel sheet. By solving the field equations in two limiting cases: the equilibrium state and the steady state, we calculate the mechanical responses of the gel to the applied electric field, and study the dependency on various parameters. The results recover the behavior observed in experiments in which polyelectrolyte gels are used as actuators, such as the ionic polymer metal composite. In addition, the model reveals the mechanism of the selectivity in ion transportation. Although by assuming specific material laws, the reduced system resembles those in most existing models in the literature, the theory can be easily generalized by using more realistic free-energy functions and kinetic laws. The adaptability of the theory makes it suitable for studying many similar material systems and phenomena.

  19. Free Energy Wells and Barriers to Ion Transport Across Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, Susan

    2014-03-01

    The flow of ions across cellular membranes is essential to many biological processes. Ion transport is also important in synthetic materials used as battery electrolytes. Transport often involves specific ions and fast conduction. To achieve those properties, ion conduction pathways must solvate specific ions by just the ``right amount.'' The right amount of solvation avoids ion traps due to deep free energy wells, and avoids ion block due to high free energy barriers. Ion channel proteins in cellular membranes demonstrate this subtle balance in solvation of specific ions. Using ab initio molecular simulations, we have interrogated the link between binding site structure and ion solvation free energies in biological ion binding sites. Our results emphasize the surprisingly important role of the environment that surrounds ion-binding sites for fast transport of specific ions. We acknowledge support from Sandia's LDRD program. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the US DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Computational modeling of ion transport through nanopores.

    PubMed

    Modi, Niraj; Winterhalter, Mathias; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2012-10-21

    Nanoscale pores are ubiquitous in biological systems while artificial nanopores are being fabricated for an increasing number of applications. Biological pores are responsible for the transport of various ions and substrates between the different compartments of biological systems separated by membranes while artificial pores are aimed at emulating such transport properties. As an experimental method, electrophysiology has proven to be an important nano-analytical tool for the study of substrate transport through nanopores utilizing ion current measurements as a probe for the detection. Independent of the pore type, i.e., biological or synthetic, and objective of the study, i.e., to model cellular processes of ion transport or electrophysiological experiments, it has become increasingly important to understand the dynamics of ions in nanoscale confinements. To this end, numerical simulations have established themselves as an indispensable tool to decipher ion transport processes through biological as well as artificial nanopores. This article provides an overview of different theoretical and computational methods to study ion transport in general and to calculate ion conductance in particular. Potential new improvements in the existing methods and their applications are highlighted wherever applicable. Moreover, representative examples are given describing the ion transport through biological and synthetic nanopores as well as the high selectivity of ion channels. Special emphasis is placed on the usage of molecular dynamics simulations which already have demonstrated their potential to unravel ion transport properties at an atomic level.

  1. Solenoid transport for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edward

    2004-06-15

    Solenoid transport of high current, heavy ion beams is considered for several stages of a heavy ion fusion driver. In general this option is more efficient than magnetic quadrupole transport at sufficiently low kinetic energy and/or large e/m, and for this reason it has been employed in electron induction linacs. Ideally an ion beam would be transported in a state of Brillouin flow, i.e. cold in the transverse plane and spinning at one half the cyclotron frequency. The design of appropriate solenoids and the equilibrium and stability of transported ion beams are discussed. An outline of application to a fusion driver is also presented.

  2. Ion energy analyzer for measurement of ion turbulent transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V.; Sen, A. K.

    2012-10-01

    For local measurement of radial ion thermal transport, we developed a novel time-resolved gridded ion energy analyzer. The turbulent thermal flux is obtained by correlating fluctuations of ion temperature, plasma density and plasma velocity. The simultaneous measurement of the ion current fluctuations from an ion energy analyzer tilde I_{IEA} (t) and the fluctuation of ion saturation current from a conventional Langmuir probe tilde I_{LP} (t) allow us to determine local fluctuations of ion temperature tilde T_i (t). To reduce the effect of plasma potential fluctuations in the energy analyzer measurements, we use special a compensative circuit loop.

  3. Ion Move Brownian Dynamics (IMBD)--simulations of ion transport.

    PubMed

    Kurczynska, Monika; Kotulska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of the computed characteristics and physiological measurement of ion transport through transmembrane proteins could be a useful method to assess the quality of protein structures. Simulations of ion transport should be detailed but also timeefficient. The most accurate method could be Molecular Dynamics (MD), which is very time-consuming, hence is not used for this purpose. The model which includes ion-ion interactions and reduces the simulation time by excluding water, protein and lipid molecules is Brownian Dynamics (BD). In this paper a new computer program for BD simulation of the ion transport is presented. We evaluate two methods for calculating the pore accessibility (round and irregular shape) and two representations of ion sizes (van der Waals diameter and one voxel). Ion Move Brownian Dynamics (IMBD) was tested with two nanopores: alpha-hemolysin and potassium channel KcsA. In both cases during the simulation an ion passed through the pore in less than 32 ns. Although two types of ions were in solution (potassium and chloride), only ions which agreed with the selectivity properties of the channels passed through the pores. IMBD is a new tool for the ion transport modelling, which can be used in the simulations of wide and narrow pores.

  4. [Ion transport in the colon].

    PubMed

    Caprilli, R; Frieri, G; Marchetti, G; Giambartolomei, S

    1995-12-01

    The large bowel daily absorbs passively 1500 ml of water down an osmotic gradient created by active electrolyte transports. The system is sustained by the enzyme Na(+)-K+ ATPase, the so called sodium-pump, present on the basolateral membrane of colonocytes. Some pathologic conditions may increase the amount of intraluminal water by inhibiting fluid absorbtion or enhancing fluid secretion. Diarrhoea represents the clinical counterpart of these alterations. Three forms of diarrhoea can be recognized on the basis of pathophysiological alterations. Diarrhoea is due to reduced ionic absorbtion, increased secretion or increased endoluminal osmolality. The drugs used to induce bowel actions or gut lavage increase also intraluminal water content by modifying transmural ionic transports. Laxatives or purges act by increasing either water secretion on endoluminal osmolality and therefore may produce systemic idro-electrolyte imbalance. To avoid this inconvenient an isosmotic electrolyte balanced polyethylene glicol solution (PEG-ELS) has been achieved. In addition orally administred PEG-ELS solution cleans the colon during its intestinal transit without producing relevant transmural water-ionic movements. Aim of this article was to describe the normal ionic transport, and its alterations in pathologic and pharmacologic conditions. Details on PEG-ELS were also given. This solution provides for an effective colon preparation for endoscopic or surgical procedures and resulted to be safe for patients with delicate fluid-electrolyte balance.

  5. WNK Kinases, Renal Ion Transport and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    San-Cristobal, Pedro; de los Heros, Paola; Ponce-Coria, José; Moreno, Erika; Gamba, Gerardo

    2008-01-01

    Two members of a recently discovered family of protein kinases are the cause of an inherited disease known as pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII). These patients exhibit arterial hypertension together with hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis. This is a mirror image of Gitelman disease that is due to inactivating mutations of the SLC12A3 gene that encodes the thiazide-sensitive Na+: Cl− cotransporter. The uncovered genes causing PHAII encode for serine/threonine kinases known as WNK1 and WNK4. Physiological and biochemical studies have revealed that WNK1 and WNK4 modulate the activity of several transport pathways of the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron, thus increasing our understanding of how diverse renal ion transport proteins are coordinated to regulate normal blood pressure levels. Observations discussed in the present work place WNK1 and WNK4 as genes involved in the genesis of essential hypertension and as potential targets for the development of antihypertensive drugs. PMID:18547946

  6. Ion transport of Fr nuclear reaction products

    SciTech Connect

    Behr, J.A.; Cahn, S.B.; Dutta, S.B.

    1993-04-01

    Experiments planned for fundamental studies of radioactive atoms in magneto-optic traps require efficient deceleration and transport of nuclear reaction products to energies and locations where they can be trapped. The authors have built a low-energy ion transport system for Francium and other alkalis. A thick Au target is held on a W rod at 45{degrees} to the accelerator beam direction. The heavy-ion fusion reaction 115 MeV {sup 18}O + {sup 197}Au produces {sup 211,210,209}Fr recoil products which are stopped in the target. The target is heated to close to the melting point of Au to allow the Fr to diffuse to the surface, where it is ionized due to Au`s high work function, and is directly extracted by an electrode at 90{degrees} to the accelerator beam direction. The Fr is transported by electrostatic optics {approximately}1 m to a catcher viewed by an {alpha} detector: {ge}15% of the Fr produced in the target reaches the catcher. 2{times}10{sup 5} Fr/sec have been produced at the catcher, yielding at equilibrium a sample of 3x10{sup 7}Fr nuclei. This scheme physically decouples the target diffusion from the surface neutralization process, which can occur at a lower temperature more compatible with the neutral-atom trap.

  7. Thermodynamic consistent transport theory of Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latz, A.; Zausch, J.

    2011-03-01

    Most Li ion insertion batteries consist of a porous cathode, a separator filled with electrolyte and an anode, which very often also has some porous structure. The solid part especially in the cathode is usually produced by mixing a powder of the actual active particles, in which Li ions will be intercalated, binder and carbon black to enhance the electronic conductivity of the electrode. As a result the porous structure of the electrodes is very complex, leading to complex potential, ion and temperature distributions within the electrodes. The intercalation and deintercalation of ions cannot be expected to be homogeneously distributed over the electrode due to the different transport properties of electrolyte and active particles in the electrode and the complex three-dimensional pore structure of the electrode. The influence of the final microstructure on the distribution of temperature, electric potential and ions within the electrodes is not known in detail, but may influence strongly the onset of degradation mechanisms. For being able to numerically simulate the transport phenomena, the equations and interface conditions for ion, charge and heat transport within the complex structure of the electrodes and through the electrolyte filled separator are needed. We will present a rigorous derivation of these equations based exclusively on general principles of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The theory is thermodynamically consistent i.e. it guarantees strictly positive entropy production. The irreversible and reversible sources of heat are derived within the theory. Especially the various contribution to the Peltier heat due to the intercalation of ions are obtained as a result of the theory. Research highlights▶ Thermodynamic consistent transport theory for Li ion batteries ▶ Derivation of all irreversible and reversible heat sources in Li ion batteries ▶ Closed set of equations for ion, charge and heat transport in Li ion batteries ▶ Theory of Peltier

  8. ION TRANSPORT IN NITELLOPSIS OBTUSA

    PubMed Central

    MacRobbie, Enid A. C.; Dainty, J.

    1958-01-01

    The distribution and rates of exchange of the ions sodium, potassium, and chloride in single internodal cells of the ecorticate characean, Nitellopsis obtusa, have been studied. In tracer experiments three kinetic compartments were found, the outermost "free space" of the cell, a compartment we have called "protoplasmic non-free space", and the cell sap. The concentrations in the vacuole were 54 mM Na+, 113 mM K+, and 206 mM Cl-. The steady state fluxes across the vacuolar membrane were 0.4 pmole Na+/cm.2 sec., 0.25 pmole K+/cm.2 sec., and 0.5 pmole Cl-/cm.2 sec. The protoplasmic Na/K ratio is equal to that in the vacuole but protoplasmic chloride is relatively much lower. Osmotic considerations suggest a layer 4 to 6 µ thick with sodium and potassium concentrations close to those in the vacuole. The fluxes between protoplasm and external solution were of the order of 8 pmoles Na+/cm.2 sec. and 4 pmoles K+/cm.2 sec. We suggest that the protoplasm is separated from the cell wall by an outer protoplasmic membrane at which an outward sodium transport maintains the high K/Na ratio of the cell interior, and from the vacuole by the tonoplast at which an inward chloride transport maintains the high vacuolar chloride. The tonoplast appears to be the site of the principal diffusion resistance of the cell, but the outer protoplasmic membrane probably of the main part of the potential. PMID:13587917

  9. Cholinergic regulation of epithelial ion transport in the mammalian intestine

    PubMed Central

    Hirota, C L; McKay, D M

    2006-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is critical in controlling epithelial ion transport and hence water movements for gut hydration. Here we review the mechanism of cholinergic control of epithelial ion transport across the mammalian intestine. The cholinergic nervous system affects basal ion flux and can evoke increased active ion transport events. Most studies rely on measuring increases in short-circuit current (ISC = active ion transport) evoked by adding ACh or cholinomimetics to intestinal tissue mounted in Ussing chambers. Despite subtle species and gut regional differences, most data indicate that, under normal circumstances, the effect of ACh on intestinal ion transport is mainly an increase in Cl- secretion due to interaction with epithelial M3 muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs) and, to a lesser extent, neuronal M1 mAChRs; however, AChR pharmacology has been plagued by a lack of good receptor subtype-selective compounds. Mice lacking M3 mAChRs display intact cholinergically-mediated intestinal ion transport, suggesting a possible compensatory mechanism. Inflamed tissues often display perturbations in the enteric cholinergic system and reduced intestinal ion transport responses to cholinomimetics. The mechanism(s) underlying this hyporesponsiveness are not fully defined. Inflammation-evoked loss of mAChR-mediated control of epithelial ion transport in the mouse reveals a role for neuronal nicotinic AChRs, representing a hitherto unappreciated braking system to limit ACh-evoked Cl- secretion. We suggest that: i) pharmacological analyses should be supported by the use of more selective compounds and supplemented with molecular biology techniques targeting specific ACh receptors and signalling molecules, and ii) assessment of ion transport in normal tissue must be complemented with investigations of tissues from patients or animals with intestinal disease to reveal control mechanisms that may go undetected by focusing on healthy tissue only. PMID:16981004

  10. Edge rotation as governed by momentum transport due to neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusztai, Istvan; Omotani, John; Fülöp, Tünde

    2016-10-01

    Neutrals can strongly affect momentum transport even in relatively small concentrations due to their high cross-field mobility. We present a framework to calculate numerically the momentum transport due to charge-exchanging neutrals, in the closed field-line region. We couple a short mean-free-path solution of the neutral kinetic equation to neoclassical ions. We can then determine self-consistently the radial electric field and plasma rotation velocity, assuming that the neutrals dominate the momentum transport. We use the neoclassical solver PERFECT [Landreman et al. 2014 PPCF 56 045005] to compute the ion distributions. Numerical solutions allow us to consider the full range of collisionalities; typical experimental parameters fall in the intermediate region that is not well described by analytical limits. We also compute the rotation velocities of minority impurity species, to facilitate experimental comparison of the results. We find that at a fixed collisionality, the important parameter determining the radial electric field and rotation is the major radius where the neutrals are localized. Therefore changes to the location of the peak neutral density, caused by altering the fuelling location or moving the X-point for example, should allow the rotation to be manipulated. Supported by the Framework Grant for Strategic Energy Research (Dnr. 2014-5392) and the International Career Grant (Dnr. 330-2014-6313) from Vetenskapsrådet.

  11. Nanoscale hotspots due to nonequilibrium thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Sanjiv; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental and modeling efforts have been directed towards the issue of temperature localization and hotspot formation in the vicinity of nanoscale heat generating devices. The nonequilibrium transport conditions which develop around these nanoscale devices results in elevated temperatures near the heat source which can not be predicted by continuum diffusion theory. Efforts to determine the severity of this temperature localization phenomena in silicon devices near and above room temperature are of technological importance to the development of microelectronics and other nanotechnologies. In this work, we have developed a new modeling tool in order to explore the magnitude of the additional thermal resistance which forms around nanoscale hotspots from temperatures of 100-1000K. The models are based on a two fluid approximation in which thermal energy is transferred between ''stationary'' optical phonons and fast propagating acoustic phonon modes. The results of the model have shown excellent agreement with experimental results of localized hotspots in silicon at lower temperatures. The model predicts that the effect of added thermal resistance due to the nonequilibrium phonon distribution is greatest at lower temperatures, but is maintained out to temperatures of 1000K. The resistance predicted by the numerical code can be easily integrated with continuum models in order to predict the temperature distribution around nanoscale heat sources with improved accuracy. Additional research efforts also focused on the measurements of the thermal resistance of silicon thin films at higher temperatures, with a focus on polycrystalline silicon. This work was intended to provide much needed experimental data on the thermal transport properties for micro and nanoscale devices built with this material. Initial experiments have shown that the exposure of polycrystalline silicon to high temperatures may induce recrystallization and radically increase the thermal

  12. Faster Heavy Ion Transport for HZETRN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.

    2013-01-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN was developed to enable fast and accurate space radiation transport through materials. As more complex transport solutions are implemented for neutrons, light ions (Z < 2), mesons, and leptons, it is important to maintain overall computational efficiency. In this work, the heavy ion (Z > 2) transport algorithm in HZETRN is reviewed, and a simple modification is shown to provide an approximate 5x decrease in execution time for galactic cosmic ray transport. Convergence tests and other comparisons are carried out to verify that numerical accuracy is maintained in the new algorithm.

  13. Anomalous Transport due to Magnetic Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes Cardozo, Niek

    2004-03-15

    In this paper we consider transport in a toroidal system with broken flux surfaces. Flux surfaces with rational field line winding number can degenerate and form magnetic islands. Where neighbouring chains of islands overlap, a region of chaotic field forms. Thus, the generic topology of the magnetic field in a toroidal device consists of an alternation of shells with 'good' surfaces and shells with islands or chaotic field.In a chaotic field, a field line fills up a region of space and thus makes significant radial excursions. Particles following a chaotic field line may experience rapid radial transport. Recent experimental evidence for the existence of alternating layers with high and low thermal transport is presented. The implication for the determination of transport coefficients is discussed. It is shown that a transport analysis that does not resolve the fine structure of the transport coefficient yields results that are almost meaningless.

  14. Ion transport in graphene nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Xie, Quan; Xin, Fang; Park, Hyung Gyu; Duan, Chuanhua

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanofluidic structures made of carbon nanotubes or graphene/graphene oxide have shown great promise in energy and environment applications due to the newly discovered fast and selective mass transport. However, they have yet to be utilized in nanofluidic devices for lab-on-a-chip applications because of great challenges in their fabrication and integration. Herein we report the fabrication of two-dimensional planar graphene nanochannel devices and the study of ion transport inside a graphene nanochannel array. A MEMS fabrication process that includes controlled nanochannel etching, graphene wet transfer, and vacuum anodic bonding is developed to fabricate graphene nanochannels where graphene conformally coats the channel surfaces. We observe higher ionic conductance inside the graphene nanochannels compared with silica nanochannels with the same geometries at low electrolyte concentrations (10(-6) M-10(-2) M). Enhanced electroosmotic flow due to the boundary slip at graphene surfaces is attributed to the measured higher conductance in the graphene nanochannels. Our results also suggest that the surface charge on the graphene surface, originating from the dissociation of oxygen-containing functional groups, is crucial to the enhanced electroosmotic flow inside the nanochannels.

  15. Ion channels and transporters in metastasis.

    PubMed

    Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2015-10-01

    An elaborate interplay between ion channels and transporters, components of the cytoskeleton, adhesion molecules, and signaling cascades provides the basis for each major step of the metastatic cascade. Ion channels and transporters contribute to cell motility by letting through or transporting ions essential for local Ca2+, pH and--in cooperation with water permeable aquaporins--volume homeostasis. Moreover, in addition to the actual ion transport they, or their auxiliary subunits, can display non-conducting activities. They can exert kinase activity in order to phosphorylate cytoskeletal constituents or their associates. They can become part of signaling processes by permeating Ca2+, by generating local pH-nanodomains or by being final downstream effectors. A number of channels and transporters are found at focal adhesions, interacting directly or indirectly with proteins of the extracellular matrix, with integrins or with components of the cytoskeleton. We also include the role of aquaporins in cell motility. They drive the outgrowth of lamellipodia/invadopodia or control the number of β1 integrins in the plasma membrane. The multitude of interacting ion channels and transporters (called transportome) including the associated signaling events holds great potential as therapeutic target(s) for anticancer agents that are aimed at preventing metastasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  16. Dynamics of Ion Transport in Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alpha A; Kondrat, Svyatoslav; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain

    2015-09-04

    A gap in understanding the link between continuum theories of ion transport in ionic liquids and the underlying microscopic dynamics has hindered the development of frameworks for transport phenomena in these concentrated electrolytes. Here, we construct a continuum theory for ion transport in ionic liquids by coarse graining a simple exclusion process of interacting particles on a lattice. The resulting dynamical equations can be written as a gradient flow with a mobility matrix that vanishes at high densities. This form of the mobility matrix gives rise to a charging behavior that is different to the one known for electrolytic solutions, but which agrees qualitatively with the phenomenology observed in experiments and simulations.

  17. Atomic transport in ion mixed Pd/Co bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. H.; Jang, H. G.; Song, J. H.; Woo, J. J.; Choi, B. S.; Jeong, K.; Whang, C. N.

    1993-06-01

    Isotropic and anisotropic atomic transport in an ion beam mixed Pd/Co bilayer have been studied from the shifts of a marker layer in Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. A thin layer of Au (1 nm) was embedded as a marker at the interface between Pd and Co layers. 80 keV Ar + was used to irradiate the marker sample at 90K. The Pd/Co system shows near isotropic atomic transport ( JPd/ JCo = 0.86) due to the thermal spike effect. We present a simple relationship between the ration of atomic fluxes induced by ion mixing and the activation energies for the normal impurity diffusion of constituents in a bilayer to describe quantitatively the isotropic and anisotropic atomic transport in thermal spike induced ion mixing. Thermal spike induced atomic transport is closely related with the activation energy for normal impurity diffusion.

  18. Ion kinetic transport in TJ-II

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, J. L.; Tarancon, A.; Castejon, F.; Fernandez, L. A.; Martin-Mayor, V.

    2008-11-02

    The ion Drift Kinetic Equation (DKE) which describes the ion collisional transport is solved for the TJ-II device plasmas. This non-linear equation is computed by performing a mean field iterative calculation. In each step of the calculation, a Fokker-Planck equation is solved by means of the Langevin approach: one million particles are followed in a realistic TJ-II magnetic configuration, taking into account collisions and electric field. This allows to avoid the assumptions made in the usual neoclassical approach, namely considering radially narrow particle trajectories, diffusive transport, energy conservation and infinite parallel transport. As a consequence, global features of transport, not present in the customary neoclassical models, appear: non-diffusive transport and asymmetries on the magnetic surfaces.

  19. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  20. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward [Allentown, PA; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA; Chen, Christopher M [Allentown, PA; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew [Orefield, PA; Wahle, Harold W [North Canton, OH; Ohrn, Theodore R [Alliance, OH; Kneidel, Kurt E [Alliance, OH; Rackers, Keith Gerard [Louisville, OH; Blake, James Erik [Uniontown, OH; Nataraj, Shankar [Allentown, PA; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson [West Jordan, UT

    2012-02-14

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  1. Liners for ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Miller, Christopher Francis

    2010-08-10

    Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

  2. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2007-02-20

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  3. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system

    DOEpatents

    Stein, VanEric Edward; Carolan, Michael Francis; Chen, Christopher M.; Armstrong, Phillip Andrew; Wahle, Harold W.; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Kneidel, Kurt E.; Rackers, Keith Gerard; Blake, James Erik; Nataraj, Shankar; van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias; Wilson, Merrill Anderson

    2008-02-26

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

  4. Reverse Fluid Transport Due to Boundary Pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma, Mikhail; Schaffer, David; Chiarot, Paul; Huang, Peter

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a reverse fluid transport mechanism consisting of peristaltic flow and boundary wave reflections. The reverse flow occurs in a rectangular conduit aligned in parallel between two cylindrical channels embedded in an elastic PDMS medium. The pulsating flow in the cylindrical channels, driven by a peristaltic pump, deform the PDMS medium and induce a pulsating flow in the rectangular conduit. Waveforms along the conduit boundaries, and their transmission and reflections, can be controlled by changing the PDMS rigidity. Our results show that while the overall wave propagation direction is in the forward direction, a reverse flow in the rectangular conduit can be preferentially induced by varying the elastic rigidity in one of the cylindrical channels. We study the overall flow velocity and direction under various PDMS rigidities. The identified set of experimental parameters that leads to a reverse flow will provide insights in understanding metabolic waste transport within the arterial walls in the brain.

  5. Stopping power of charged particles due to ion wave excitations.

    PubMed

    Nitta, H; Muroki, C; Nambu, M

    2002-08-01

    Stopping power due to ion wave excitations is derived for a charged particle moving in a two-component plasma. Unlike previous theories based on ion-acoustic-wave approximation (IAWA), the excitation of short-wavelength ion waves is taken into account. The obtained stopping power has a magnitude larger than that of IAWA. Stopping power at subsonic velocities, where stopping power in IAWA disappears, is even larger than that of supersonic velocities.

  6. Stopping power of charged particles due to ion wave excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, H.; Muroki, C.; Nambu, M.

    2002-08-01

    Stopping power due to ion wave excitations is derived for a charged particle moving in a two-component plasma. Unlike previous theories based on ion-acoustic-wave approximation (IAWA), the excitation of short-wavelength ion waves is taken into account. The obtained stopping power has a magnitude larger than that of IAWA. Stopping power at subsonic velocities, where stopping power in IAWA disappears, is even larger than that of supersonic velocities.

  7. Nonperturbative methods in HZE ion transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Costen, Robert C.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1993-01-01

    A nonperturbative analytic solution of the high charge and energy (HZE) Green's function is used to implement a computer code for laboratory ion beam transport. The code is established to operate on the Langley Research Center nuclear fragmentation model used in engineering applications. Computational procedures are established to generate linear energy transfer (LET) distributions for a specified ion beam and target for comparison with experimental measurements. The code is highly efficient and compares well with the perturbation approximations.

  8. Transport of Light Ions in Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Tai, H.; Shinn, J. L.; Chun, S. Y.; Tripathi, R. K.; Sihver, L.

    1998-01-01

    A recent set of light ion experiments are analyzed using the Green's function method of solving the Boltzmann equation for ions of high charge and energy (the GRNTRN transport code) and the NUCFRG2 fragmentation database generator code. Although the NUCFRG2 code reasonably represents the fragmentation of heavy ions, the effects of light ion fragmentation requires a more detailed nuclear model including shell structure and short range correlations appearing as tightly bound clusters in the light ion nucleus. The most recent NTJCFRG2 code is augmented with a quasielastic alpha knockout model and semiempirical adjustments (up to 30 percent in charge removal) in the fragmentation process allowing reasonable agreement with the experiments to be obtained. A final resolution of the appropriate cross sections must await the full development of a coupled channel reaction model in which shell structure and clustering can be accurately evaluated.

  9. Ions channels/transporters and chloroplast regulation.

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Giovanni; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Tomizioli, Martino; Flori, Serena; Sautron, Emeline; Villanova, Valeria; Rolland, Norbert; Seigneurin-Berny, Daphné

    2015-07-01

    Ions play fundamental roles in all living cells and their gradients are often essential to fuel transports, to regulate enzyme activities and to transduce energy within and between cells. Their homeostasis is therefore an essential component of the cell metabolism. Ions must be imported from the extracellular matrix to their final subcellular compartments. Among them, the chloroplast is a particularly interesting example because there, ions not only modulate enzyme activities, but also mediate ATP synthesis and actively participate in the building of the photosynthetic structures by promoting membrane-membrane interaction. In this review, we first provide a comprehensive view of the different machineries involved in ion trafficking and homeostasis in the chloroplast, and then discuss peculiar functions exerted by ions in the frame of photochemical conversion of absorbed light energy.

  10. Ion transport in roots: measurement of fluxes using ion-selective microelectrodes to characterize transporter function.

    PubMed

    Newman, I A

    2001-01-01

    The transport of mineral ions into and out of tissues and cells is central to the life of plants. Ion transport and the plasma membrane transporters themselves have been studied using a variety of techniques. In the last 15 years, measurement of specific ion fluxes has contributed to the characterization of transport systems. Progress in molecular genetics is allowing gene identification and controlled expression of transporter molecules. However the molecular expression of transporter gene products must be characterized at the functional level. The ion-selective microelectrode technique to measure specific ion fluxes non-invasively is ideally suited to this purpose. This technique, its theory, its links with others and its application and prospects in plant science, are discussed. Ions studied include hydrogen, potassium, sodium, ammonium, calcium, chloride and nitrate. Applications discussed include: solute ion uptake by roots; gravitropism and other processes in the root cap, meristematic and elongation zones; Nod factor effect on root hairs; osmotic and salt stresses; oscillations; the effects of light and temperature. Studies have included intact roots, leaf mesophyll and other tissues, protoplasts and bacterial biofilms. A multi-ion capability of the technique will greatly assist functional genomics, particularly when coupled with imaging techniques, patch clamping and the use of suitable mutants.

  11. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  12. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Mani Sarathy, S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model's predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018.

  13. Workshop on transport for a common ion driver

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.C.; Lee, E.; Langdon, B.

    1994-12-31

    This report contains research in the following areas related to beam transport for a common ion driver: multi-gap acceleration; neutralization with electrons; gas neutralization; self-pinched transport; HIF and LIF transport, and relevance to common ion driver; LIF and HIF reactor concepts and relevance to common ion driver; atomic physics for common ion driver; code capabilities and needed improvement.

  14. Transport quantum logic gates for trapped ions

    SciTech Connect

    Leibfried, D.; Knill, E.; Ospelkaus, C.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-09-15

    Many efforts are currently underway to build a device capable of large scale quantum information processing (QIP). Whereas QIP has been demonstrated for a few qubits in several systems, many technical difficulties must be overcome in order to construct a large-scale device. In one proposal for large-scale QIP, trapped ions are manipulated by precisely controlled light pulses and moved through and stored in multizone trap arrays. The technical overhead necessary to precisely control both the ion geometrical configurations and the laser interactions is demanding. Here we propose methods that significantly reduce the overhead on laser-beam control for performing single- and multiple-qubit operations on trapped ions. We show how a universal set of operations can be implemented by controlled transport of ions through stationary laser beams. At the same time, each laser beam can be used to perform many operations in parallel, potentially reducing the total laser power necessary to carry out QIP tasks. The overall setup necessary for implementing transport gates is simpler than for gates executed on stationary ions. We also suggest a transport-based two-qubit gate scheme utilizing microfabricated permanent magnets that can be executed without laser light.

  15. Supramolecular gating of ion transport in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B V V S Pavan; Rao, K Venkata; Sampath, S; George, Subi J; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2014-11-24

    Several covalent strategies towards surface charge-reversal in nanochannels have been reported with the purpose of manipulating ion transport. However, covalent routes lack dynamism, modularity and post-synthetic flexibility, and hence restrict their applicability in different environments. Here, we introduce a facile non-covalent approach towards charge-reversal in nanochannels (<10 nm) using strong charge-transfer interactions between dicationic viologen (acceptor) and trianionic pyranine (donor). The polarity of ion transport was switched from anion selective to ambipolar to cation selective by controlling the extent of viologen bound to the pyranine. We could also regulate the ion transport with respect to pH by selecting a donor with pH-responsive functional groups. The modularity of this approach further allows facile integration of various functional groups capable of responding to stimuli such as light and temperature to modulate the transport of ions as well as molecules. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Features of ion transport in perfluorinated ion-exchange membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Timashev, S.F.

    1986-02-01

    The conditions for functioning for various systems and devices electrolyzers for ''chlorate'' electrolysis, current sources, etc.) with perfluorinated ion-exchange membranes and septums are determined to a considerable degree by the physicochemical properties of the perfluorinated materials. In this work, on the basis of concepts developed in streaming theory as to the topology of the ''infinite clusters'' (ICs), the author defines more precisely the form of the preexponential dependence of ion transport coefficients and draws conclusions on the character of heat evolution in a perfluorinated membrane when an electric current is passed through the membrane.

  17. Radii broadening due to molecular collision in focused ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komuro, Masanori

    1988-01-01

    Point exposures of poly(methyl methacrylate) resist are carried out with focused ion beams of Si++ and Au++ from a liquid AuSi ion source in order to obtain a current density distribution in the probe. All the distributions are composed of a main Gaussian distribution and a long tail dependent on r-3.3 (r means radial distance). The magnitude of this tail increases with the increase in ambient pressure of the ion-drifting space. When the probe is steered at the corner of deflection field, two types of clear ghost patterns appear: (1) circular patterns and (2) lines trailing from the main spot toward the deflection center. It is revealed that they are produced by exposures to ions or energetic neutrals generated with charge transfer collision of the primary ions with residual gas molecules. It is shown that the long tail in the current density distribution is also due to scattering with the residual gas molecules.

  18. Ion transport in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, Myung E.; Aluru, N. R.

    2014-02-28

    Graphene nanopore is a promising device for single molecule sensing, including DNA bases, as its single atom thickness provides high spatial resolution. To attain high sensitivity, the size of the molecule should be comparable to the pore diameter. However, when the pore diameter approaches the size of the molecule, ion properties and dynamics may deviate from the bulk values and continuum analysis may not be accurate. In this paper, we investigate the static and dynamic properties of ions with and without an external voltage drop in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores using molecular dynamics simulations. Ion concentration in graphene nanopores sharply drops from the bulk concentration when the pore radius is smaller than 0.9 nm. Ion mobility in the pore is also smaller than bulk ion mobility due to the layered liquid structure in the pore-axial direction. Our results show that a continuum analysis can be appropriate when the pore radius is larger than 0.9 nm if pore conductivity is properly defined. Since many applications of graphene nanopores, such as DNA and protein sensing, involve ion transport, the results presented here will be useful not only in understanding the behavior of ion transport but also in designing bio-molecular sensors.

  19. Anomalous perturbative transport in tokamaks due to drift-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Thoul, A.A. ); Similon, P.L. ); Sudan, R.N. )

    1994-03-01

    A new method for calculating the anomalous transport in tokamak plasmas is presented. The renormalized nonlinear plasma response function is derived using the direct-interaction approximation (DIA). A complete calculation for the case of electrostatic drift-wave turbulence is presented. Explicit expressions for all coefficients of the anomalous transport matrix relating particle and heat fluxes to density and temperature gradients in the plasma are obtained. The anomalous transport matrix calculated using the DIA does not have the Onsager symmetry. As an example of application, the parameters of the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) [Nucl. Technol. Fusion [bold 1], 479 (1981)] are used to evaluate all transport coefficients numerically, as well as the spectrum modulation. The relation between the theoretical results and the experimental data is discussed. Although this paper focuses on electron transport for simplicity, the method can also be used to calculate anomalous transport due to ion instabilities, such as the ion-temperature-gradient instability.

  20. High energy H- ion transport and stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During the Proton Driver design study based on an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac, a major concern is the feasibility of transport and injection of high energy H{sup -} ions because the energy of H{sup -} beam would be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This paper will focus on two key technical issues: (1) stripping losses during transport (including stripping by blackbody radiation, magnetic field and residual gases); (2) stripping efficiency of carbon foil during injection.

  1. Role of Alfven instabilities in energetic ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabei, S.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Budny, R.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Hosea, J. C.; Majeski, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Wilson, J. R.

    1999-09-20

    Experiments with plasma heating by waves at the ion cyclotron resonance of a minority species have shown that the heating efficiency degrades above a certain power threshold. It is found that this threshold is due to the destabilization of shear Alfven waves, which causes loss of fast ions. There are two distinct regimes characterized by low q{sub a} and high q{sub a}. In the first case, the fast ion distribution created by ICRF, lies entirely inside r{sub q=1}, away from the location of global TAE. This situation leads to the formation of a very strong fast ion population which stabilizes the sawteeth, but also excites Energetic Particle Modes (EPM), which transport fast ions outside r{sub q=1} causing the giant crash. At higher q{sub a}, the widening of the Alfven gap due to the steeper q profile, brings the global TAE ''in contact'' with the fast ion distribution. This results in an immediate and continuous depletion of fast ions from the core, which prevents the formation of the monster sawtooth and the excitation of EPM. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  2. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  3. Characterization of fluid transport due to multiciliary beating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukens, Sarah; Yang, Xingzhou; Fauci, Lisa

    2008-11-01

    Understanding fluid transport caused by beating cilia can give insight on biological systems such as transport of respiratory mucus, ovum transport in the oviduct, and feeding currents around unicellular organisms. Here we investigate fluid transport due to coordinated beating of motile cilia based upon a computational model that couples their internal force generating mechanisms with external fluid dynamics. Velocity field data is used to identify Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) within the domain. These coherent structures give spatial information on fluid mixing and nutrient transport within this dynamic environment.

  4. Prompt Gas Desorption Due to Ion Impact on Accelerator Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay, Sagar; Seidl, Peter A.; Faltens, Andy; Lidia, Steven M.

    2011-10-01

    The repetition rate and peak current of high intensity ion accelerators for inertial fusion or other applications may be limited under certain conditions by the desorption of gas molecules and atoms due to stray ions striking the accelerator structure. We have measured the prompt yield of atoms in close proximity to the point of impact of the ions on a surface. Using the 300-keV, K+ ion beam of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-I), ions strike a metal target in a 5-10 microsecond bunch. The collector of a Bayert-Alpert style ionization gauge is used to detect the local pressure burst several centimeters away. Pressure transients are observed on a micro-second time scale due to the initial burst of desorbed gas, and on a much longer (~1 second) timescale, corresponding to the equilibration of the pressure after many ``bounces'' of atoms in the vacuum chamber. We report on these time dependent pressure measurements, modeling of the pressure transient, and implications for high-intensity ion accelerators. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DOE by LBNL under Contract DE-AC02-05CH1123.

  5. Erosion of Extraction Electrodes of Ion Sources due to Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Naoki; Wada, Motoi

    2011-01-01

    The effects upon erosion due to implanted atoms in extraction electrodes of an ion source have been investigated through calculating the sputtering yields with a Monte Carlo simulation code, ACAT. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that the sputtering yields of extraction electrodes are substantially affected by the retention of implanted atoms depending upon the mass ratio of electrode materials and extracted ions from the source plasma. The enhanced erosion takes place as the heavier ion beam species like phosphor is implanted into lighter electrode material like carbon. Additional mixing of materials arising from ion source operation, such as hot cathode materials evaporation onto a carbon extraction electrode, can shorten the lifetime of the extraction electrodes.

  6. Erosion of Extraction Electrodes of Ion Sources due to Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi; Miyamoto, Naoki

    2011-01-07

    The effects upon erosion due to implanted atoms in extraction electrodes of an ion source have been investigated through calculating the sputtering yields with a Monte Carlo simulation code, ACAT. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that the sputtering yields of extraction electrodes are substantially affected by the retention of implanted atoms depending upon the mass ratio of electrode materials and extracted ions from the source plasma. The enhanced erosion takes place as the heavier ion beam species like phosphor is implanted into lighter electrode material like carbon. Additional mixing of materials arising from ion source operation, such as hot cathode materials evaporation onto a carbon extraction electrode, can shorten the lifetime of the extraction electrodes.

  7. Ion and water transport in charge-modified graphene nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ying-Hua; Li, Kun; Chen, Wei-Yu; Si, Wei; Tan, Qi-Yan; Chen, Yun-Fei

    2015-10-01

    Porous graphene has a high mechanical strength and an atomic-layer thickness that makes it a promising material for material separation and biomolecule sensing. Electrostatic interactions between charges in aqueous solutions are a type of strong long-range interaction that may greatly influence fluid transport through nanopores. In this study, molecular dynamic simulations were conducted to investigate ion and water transport through 1.05-nm diameter monolayer graphene nanopores, with their edges charge-modified. Our results indicated that these nanopores are selective to counterions when they are charged. As the charge amount increases, the total ionic currents show an increase-decrease profile while the co-ion currents monotonically decrease. The co-ion rejection can reach 76.5% and 90.2% when the nanopores are negatively and positively charged, respectively. The Cl- ion current increases and reaches a plateau, and the Na+ current decreases as the charge amount increases in systems in which Na+ ions act as counterions. In addition, charge modification can enhance water transport through nanopores. This is mainly due to the ion selectivity of the nanopores. Notably, positive charges on the pore edges facilitate water transport much more strongly than negative charges. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB707601 and 2011CB707605), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 50925519), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, Funding of Jiangsu Provincial Innovation Program for Graduate Education, China (Grant No. CXZZ13_0087), and the Scientific Research Foundation of Graduate School of Southeast University (Grant No. YBJJ 1322).

  8. Erosion of accel grids of ion engine due to sputteringa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M.; Hyakutake, T.; Muramoto, T.; Nishida, M.

    2010-02-01

    The erosion rates of extraction electrodes of ion sources due to ion beam irradiation are largely affected by amount of projectiles retained in the electrodes. A Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT has been used to calculate sputtering yields and reflection coefficients by simulating the accumulation effect of projectiles in a target material. The results for Xe projectiles-C target combination have indicated that both sputtering yields and reflection coefficients are largely enhanced by Xe retention, particularly at larger incident angle for the surface normal with low incident energy.

  9. Transport coefficients of He+ ions in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Rainer; Viehland, Larry; Gray, Benjamin; Wright, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    New experimental mobilities of 4He+ in 4He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, have been determined. Uncertainties in the mobilities were reduced to about 1% by using a shuttered drift tube. Comparison with previously measured values show that only one set of previous data is reliable. We demonstrate that the mobilities and diffusion coeffcients of 4He+ in 4He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N with high precision if accurate potential energy curves are available for the X2Σu+ and A2Σg+ states, and if one takes into account resonant charge transfer and corrects for quantum-mechanical effects. Potentials, obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X =6,7) basis sets using the CASSCF +MRCISD approach were found to be in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available (separately) and with experiment, and those were subsequently used in a new computer program to determine semi-classical phase shifts and transport cross sections, from which the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. A new set of data for the mobilities of alpha particles (He2+) ions was obtained as a byproduct of the experiment, but the transport theory has not yet been completed.

  10. Glycobiology of ion transport in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nowycky, Martha C; Wu, Gusheng; Ledeen, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system is richly endowed with large transmembrane proteins that mediate ion transport, including gated ion channels as well as energy-consuming pumps and transporters. Transport proteins undergo N-linked glycosylation which can affect expression, location, stability, and function. The N-linked glycans of ion channels are large, contributing between 5 and 50 % of their molecular weight. Many contain a high density of negatively charged sialic acid residues which modulate voltage-dependent gating of ion channels. Changes in the size and chemical composition of glycans are responsible for developmental and cell-specific variability in the biophysical and functional properties of many ion channels. Glycolipids, principally gangliosides, exert considerable influence on some forms of ion transport, either through direct association with ion transport proteins or indirectly through association with proteins that activate transport through appropriate signaling. Examples of both pumps and ion channels have been revealed which depend on ganglioside regulation. While some of these processes are localized in the plasma membrane, ganglioside-regulated ion transport can also occur at various loci within the cell including the nucleus. This chapter will describe ion channel and ion pump structures with a focus on the functional effects of glycosylation on ion channel availability and function, and effects of alterations in glycosylation on nervous system function. It will also summarize highlights of the research on glycolipid/ganglioside-mediated regulation of ion transport.

  11. Transport coefficients of He+ ions in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viehland, Larry A.; Johnsen, Rainer; Gray, Benjamin R.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2016-02-01

    This paper demonstrates that the transport coefficients of 4He+ in 4He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N, the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, with the same level of precision as can be obtained experimentally if sufficiently accurate potential energy curves are available for the X2Σu+ and A2Σg+ states and one takes into account resonant charge transfer. We start by computing new potential energy curves for these states and testing their accuracy by calculating spectroscopic values for the separate states. It is established that the potentials obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 6, 7) basis sets using the CASSCF+MRCISD approach are each in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available and with experiment. The potentials are then used in a new computer program to determine the semi-classical phase shifts and the transport cross sections, and from these the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. In addition, new experimental values are reported for the mobilities of 4He+ in 4He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, where careful consideration is given to minimizing various sources of uncertainty. Comparison with previously measured values establishes that only one set of previous data is reliable. Finally, the experimental and theoretical ion transport coefficients are shown to be in very good to excellent agreement, once corrections are applied to account for quantum-mechanical effects.

  12. Transport coefficients of He(+) ions in helium.

    PubMed

    Viehland, Larry A; Johnsen, Rainer; Gray, Benjamin R; Wright, Timothy G

    2016-02-21

    This paper demonstrates that the transport coefficients of (4)He(+) in (4)He can be calculated over wide ranges of E/N, the ratio of the electrostatic field strength to the gas number density, with the same level of precision as can be obtained experimentally if sufficiently accurate potential energy curves are available for the X(2)Σu (+) and A(2)Σg (+) states and one takes into account resonant charge transfer. We start by computing new potential energy curves for these states and testing their accuracy by calculating spectroscopic values for the separate states. It is established that the potentials obtained by extrapolation of results from d-aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 6, 7) basis sets using the CASSCF+MRCISD approach are each in exceptionally close agreement with the best potentials available and with experiment. The potentials are then used in a new computer program to determine the semi-classical phase shifts and the transport cross sections, and from these the gaseous ion transport coefficients are determined. In addition, new experimental values are reported for the mobilities of (4)He(+) in (4)He at 298.7 K, as a function of E/N, where careful consideration is given to minimizing various sources of uncertainty. Comparison with previously measured values establishes that only one set of previous data is reliable. Finally, the experimental and theoretical ion transport coefficients are shown to be in very good to excellent agreement, once corrections are applied to account for quantum-mechanical effects.

  13. A New Poisson-Nernst-Planck Model with Ion-Water Interactions for Charge Transport in Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Duan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we propose a new Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) model with ion-water interactions for biological charge transport in ion channels. Due to narrow geometries of these membrane proteins, ion-water interaction is critical for both dielectric property of water molecules in channel pore and transport dynamics of mobile ions. We model the ion-water interaction energy based on realistic experimental observations in an efficient mean-field approach. Variation of a total energy functional of the biological system yields a new PNP-type continuum model. Numerical simulations show that the proposed model with ion-water interaction energy has the new features that quantitatively describe dielectric properties of water molecules in narrow pores and are possible to model the selectivity of some ion channels.

  14. Ion age transport: developing devices beyond electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2014-03-01

    There is more to current devices than conventional electronics. Increasingly research into the controlled movement of ions and molecules is enabling a range of new technologies. For example, as Weihua Guan, Sylvia Xin Li and Mark Reed at Yale University explain, 'It offers a unique opportunity to integrate wet ionics with dry electronics seamlessly'. In this issue they provide an overview of voltage-gated ion and molecule transport in engineered nanochannels. They cover the theory governing these systems and fabrication techniques, as well as applications, including biological and chemical analysis, and energy conversion [1]. Studying the movement of particles in nanochannels is not new. The transport of materials in rock pores led Klinkenberg to describe an analogy between diffusion and electrical conductivity in porous rocks back in 1951 [2]. And already in 1940, Harold Abramson and Manuel Gorin noted that 'When an electric current is applied across the living human skin, the skin may be considered to act like a system of pores through which transfer of substances like ragweed pollen extract may be achieved both by electrophoretic and by diffusion phenomena' [3]. Transport in living systems through pore structures on a much smaller scale has attracted a great deal of research in recent years as well. The selective transport of ions and small organic molecules across the cell membrane facilitates a number of functions including communication between cells, nerve conduction and signal transmission. Understanding these processes may benefit a wide range of potential applications such as selective separation, biochemical sensing, and controlled release and drug delivery processes. In Germany researchers have successfully demonstrated controlled ionic transport through nanopores functionalized with amine-terminated polymer brushes [4]. The polymer nanobrushes swell and shrink in response to changes in temperature, thus opening and closing the nanopore passage to ionic

  15. Effect of Energetic-Ion-Driven MHD Instabilities on Energetic-Ion-Transport in Compact Helical System and Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Toi, K.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Shimizu, A.; Spong, Donald A; Okumura, S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes 1) representative results on excitation of energetic-particle mode (EPM) and toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) and consequent beam-ion losses in CHS, and 2) recent results on beam-ion transport and/or losses while EPMs are destabilized in LHD. Bursting EPMs and TAEs are often excited by co-injected beam ions in the high-beam ion pressure environment and give a significant effect on co-going beam ions in both experiments. It seems that in CHS, resonant beam ions are lost within a relatively short-time scale once they are anomalously transported due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes, whereas unlike CHS, redistribution of beam ions due to energetic-ion driven MHD modes is seen in LHD, suggesting that not all anomalously transported beam ions escape from the plasma.

  16. Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions generated by ion-cyclotron resonance heating in tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S. . Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences); Hammett, G.W.; Goldston, R.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Neoclassical transport of energetic minority tail ions, which are generated by high powered electromagnetic waves of the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) at the fundamental harmonic resonance, is studied analytically in tokamak geometry. The effect of Coulomb collisions on the tail ion transport is investigated in the present work. The total tail ion transport will be the sum of the present collision-driven transport and the wave-driven transport, which is due to the ICRF-wave scattering of the tail particles as reported in the literature. The transport coefficients have been calculated kinetically, and it is found that the large tail ion viscosity, driven by the localized ICRF-heating and Coulomb slowing-down collisions, induces purely convective particle transport of the tail species, while the energy transport is both convective and diffusive. The rate of radial particle transport is shown to be usually small, but the rate of radial energy transport is larger and may not be negligible compared to the Coulomb slowing-down rate. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Shear flow effects on ion thermal transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Dong, J.Q.; Kishimoto, Y.

    1995-03-01

    From various laboratory and numerical experiments, there is clear evidence that under certain conditions the presence of sheared flows in a tokamak plasma can significantly reduce the ion thermal transport. In the presence of plasma fluctuations driven by the ion temperature gradient, the flows of energy and momentum parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field are coupled with each other. This coupling manifests itself as significant off-diagonal coupling coefficients that give rise to new terms for anomalous transport. The authors derive from the gyrokinetic equation a set of velocity moment equations that describe the interaction among plasma turbulent fluctuations, the temperature gradient, the toroidal velocity shear, and the poloidal flow in a tokamak plasma. Four coupled equations for the amplitudes of the state variables radially extended over the transport region by toroidicity induced coupling are derived. The equations show bifurcations from the low confinement mode without sheared flows to high confinement mode with substantially reduced transport due to strong shear flows. Also discussed is the reduced version with three state variables. In the presence of sheared flows, the radially extended coupled toroidal modes driven by the ion temperature gradient disintegrate into smaller, less elongated vortices. Such a transition to smaller spatial correlation lengths changes the transport from Bohm-like to gyrobohm-like. The properties of these equations are analyzed. The conditions for the improved confined regime are obtained as a function of the momentum-energy deposition rates and profiles. The appearance of a transport barrier is a consequence of the present theory.

  18. Quantitative description of ion transport in Donnan ion exchange membrane systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, W.E.; Baker, B.L.

    1980-05-01

    Presented are simplified mass transfer techniques describing the transfer of ions in continuous ion selective membrane systems in which the resistance to ion transport through the membrane is small in relation to the resistance to ion transport in the solution phase. Methods are developed through the application of the transfer unit concept to the Donnan equilibrium. This equilibrium describes the equilibrium ion concentration on either side of an ion selective membrane. Data from one cation selection system is presented as evidence of the validity of these methods. Further techniques are shown that will allow the determination of ion transport given only equipment parameters and solution diffusivities. Supporting data are shown.

  19. Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, R. E.

    2004-06-02

    The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied.

  20. Fundamental Aspects of Ion Transport in Solid Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Narayanan, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    Solid electrolytes (also termed as superionic solids or fast ion conductors) are characterized by high electrical conductivity, comparable to concentrated liquid electrolytes or even molten salt electrolytes, made possible by rapid transport of ions in the crystalline lattice.

  1. Transport in Nonneutral Plasmas due to Long-Range Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, F.; Driscoll, C. F.; Hollmann, E. M.; Kriesel, J. M.; Huang, X.-P.; Dubin, D. H. E.; O'Neil, T. M.

    1997-11-01

    Recent experiments on nonneutral plasmas have measured test particle transport, bulk viscous transport, and heat transport; all three measurements show enhanced transport due to long-range interactions. Classical Boltzmann theory describes transport in terms of short-range velocity-scattering collisions with impact parameters less than the cyclotron radius, i.e. ρ < r_c. Here we observe the effects of long-range collisions with rc < ρ applteq λ_D. Experiments show that: a) The measured test particle diffusion across B is about ten times faster than predicted by classical collisional theory, in precise agreement with long-range collisional theory over a wide range of parameters. b) Viscous transport measurements obtained from plasma density profiles relaxing to thermal equilibrium indicate that bulk particle transport across the magnetic field may be enhanced by up to 10^4. c) Preliminary measurements of heat transport created by localized laser cooling or heating indicate that the thermal conductivity can be much larger than predicted by classical theory, consistent with long-range theory. Supported by ONR N00014-96-1-0239 and NSF PHY94-21318. ^**Present address: NIST, 325 Broadway Ave., Boulder CO 80303.

  2. Transport line for beam generated by ITEP Bernas ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Petrenko, S.V.; Kropachev, G.N.; Kuibeda, R.P.; Kulevoy, T.V.; Pershin, V.I.; Masunov, E.S.; Polozov, S.M.; Hershcovitch, A.; Johnson, B.M.; Poole, H.J.

    2006-03-15

    A joint research and development program is underway to investigate beam transport systems for intense steady-state ion sources for ion implanters. Two energy extremes of MeV and hundreds of eV are investigated using a modified Bernas ion source with an indirectly heated cathode. Results are presented for simulations of electrostatic systems performed to investigate the transportation of ion beams over a wide mass range: boron to decaborane.

  3. Lateral charge transport from heavy-ion tracks in integrated circuit chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Schwartz, H. R.; Nevill, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    A 256K DRAM has been used to study the lateral transport of charge (electron-hole pairs) induced by direct ionization from heavy-ion tracks in an IC. The qualitative charge transport has been simulated using a two-dimensional numerical code in cylindrical coordinates. The experimental bit-map data clearly show the manifestation of lateral charge transport in the creation of adjacent multiple-bit errors from a single heavy-ion track. The heavy-ion data further demonstrate the occurrence of multiple-bit errors from single ion tracks with sufficient stopping power. The qualitative numerical simulation results suggest that electric-field-funnel-aided (drift) collection accounts for single error generated by an ion passing through a charge-collecting junction, while multiple errors from a single ion track are due to lateral diffusion of ion-generated charge.

  4. Lateral charge transport from heavy-ion tracks in integrated circuit chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Schwartz, H. R.; Nevill, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    A 256K DRAM has been used to study the lateral transport of charge (electron-hole pairs) induced by direct ionization from heavy-ion tracks in an IC. The qualitative charge transport has been simulated using a two-dimensional numerical code in cylindrical coordinates. The experimental bit-map data clearly show the manifestation of lateral charge transport in the creation of adjacent multiple-bit errors from a single heavy-ion track. The heavy-ion data further demonstrate the occurrence of multiple-bit errors from single ion tracks with sufficient stopping power. The qualitative numerical simulation results suggest that electric-field-funnel-aided (drift) collection accounts for single error generated by an ion passing through a charge-collecting junction, while multiple errors from a single ion track are due to lateral diffusion of ion-generated charge.

  5. Ion Transport by Ameloblasts during Amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bronckers, A L J J

    2017-03-01

    Hypomineralization of developing enamel is associated with changes in ameloblast modulation during the maturation stage. Modulation (or pH cycling) involves the cyclic transformation of ruffle-ended (RE) ameloblasts facing slightly acidic enamel into smooth-ended (SE) ameloblasts near pH-neutral enamel. The mechanism of ameloblast modulation is not clear. Failure of ameloblasts of Cftr-null and anion exchanger 2 ( Ae2)-null mice to transport Cl(-) into enamel acidifies enamel, prevents modulation, and reduces mineralization. It suggests that pH regulation is critical for modulation and for completion of enamel mineralization. This report presents a review of the major types of transmembrane molecules that ameloblasts express to transport calcium to form crystals and bicarbonates to regulate pH. The type of transporter depends on the developmental stage. Modulation is proposed to be driven by the pH of enamel fluid and the compositional and/or physicochemical changes that result from increased acidity, which may turn RE ameloblasts into SE mode. Amelogenins delay outgrowth of crystals and keep the intercrystalline space open for diffusion of mineral ions into complete depth of enamel. Modulation enables stepwise removal of amelogenins from the crystal surface, their degradation, and removal from the enamel. Removal of matrix allows slow expansion of crystals. Modulation also reduces the stress that ameloblasts experience when exposed to high acid levels generated by mineral formation or by increased intracellular Ca(2+). By cyclically interrupting Ca(2+) transport by RE ameloblasts and their transformation into SE ameloblasts, proton production ceases shortly and enables the ameloblasts to recover. Modulation also improves enamel crystal quality by selectively dissolving immature Ca(2+)-poor crystals, removing impurities as Mg(2+) and carbonates, and recrystallizing into more acid-resistant crystals.

  6. Transport of intense beams of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Spadtke, P.; Tinschert, K.

    2005-10-01

    The new generation of ion sources delivers beams with intensities of several mA. This requires a careful design of the analysing system and the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) from the source to the subsequent systems. At INFN-LNS, high intensity proton sources (TRIPS [L. Celona, G. Ciavola, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1423 (2004)], PM-TRIPS [G. Ciavola, L. Celona, S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1453 (2004)]) as well as ECR ion sources for the production of highly charged high-intensity heavy ion beams are developed (SERSE [S. Gammino, G. Ciavola, L. Celona et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72(11) 4090 (2001), and references therein], GyroSERSE [S. Gammino et al ., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75(5) 1637 (2004)], MS-ECRIS [G. Ciavola et al ., (2005), 11th Int. Conf. on Ion Sources, Caen, (in press)]). In this paper, we present ion-optical design studies of various LEBT systems for ion-sources devoted to the production of intense beams. Calculations were performed using the computer codes GIOS [H. Wollnik, J. Brezina and M. Berz, NIM A 258 (1987)], GICO [M. Berz, H.C. Hoffmann, and H. Wollnik, NIM A 258 (1987)], and TRANSPORT [K.L. Brown, F. Rothacker and D.C. Carey, SLAC-R-95-462, Fermilab-Pub-95/069, UC-414 (1995)]. Simulations take into account the expected phase space growth of the beam emittance due to space-charge effects and image aberrations introduced by the magnetic elements.

  7. Mechanism Exploration of Ion Transport in Nanocomposite Cation Exchange Membranes.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Bopeng; Fan, Yilin; Chen, Yongsheng

    2017-04-19

    The origin of property enhancement of nanocomposite ion exchange membranes (IEMs) is far from being fully understood. By combining experimental work and computational modeling analysis, we could determine the influence of nanomaterials on the ion transport properties of nanocomposite cation exchange membranes (CEMs). We synthesized and characterized a series of nanocomposite CEMs by using SPPO as polymer materials and silica nanoparticles (NPs) (unsulfonated or sulfonated) as nanomaterials. We found that with the increase of NP loading, measured CEM permselectivity and swelling degree first increased and then decreased. We also found the ion exchange capacity (IEC) and ionic resistance of nanocomposite CEMs tend to be the same, regardless what type of NPs are incorporated into the membrane. Modeling analysis suggests that the change of membrane properties is related to the change in membrane microstructure. With the addition of silica NPs, membrane porosity (volume fraction of intergel phase) increases so that membranes can absorb more water. Also, volume fraction of sulfonated polymer segments increases, which can allow membranes to retain more counterions, causing membrane IEC to increase. By calculating the effective ion diffusion coefficients and membrane tortuosity factors of all the silica-NP-based CEMs synthesized in this study, along with nanocomposite CEMs from previous studies, we conclude that membrane ion transport efficiency tends to increase with the incorporation of nanomaterials. In addition, this paper presents a simulation model, which explains how the membrane property changes upon nanomaterial aggregation; the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Simulation results indicate that membrane properties are related to nanomaterial number concentration in the membrane matrices; thus, a plateau is reached for membrane ion diffusion coefficients due to the severe influence of aggregation on the increase of nanomaterial

  8. Fabrication of catalyzed ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Kibby, Charles Leonard

    2013-06-04

    Process for fabricating a catalyzed ion transport membrane (ITM). In one embodiment, an uncatalyzed ITM is (a) contacted with a non-reducing gaseous stream while heating to a temperature and for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM possessing anion mobility; (b) contacted with a reducing gaseous stream for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM having anion mobility and essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry; (c) cooled while contacting the ITM with the reducing gaseous stream to provide an ITM having essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry and no anion mobility; and (d) treated by applying catalyst to at least one of (1) a porous mixed conducting multicomponent metallic oxide (MCMO) layer contiguous with a first side of a dense layer of MCMO and (2) a second side of the dense MCMO layer. In another embodiment, these steps are carried out in the alternative order of (a), (d), (b), and (c).

  9. Analysis of the theory of high energy ion transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Procedures for the approximation of the transport of high-energy ions are discussed on the basis of available data on ion nuclear reactions. A straightahead approximation appears appropriate for space applications. The assumption that the secondary-ion-fragment velocity is equal to that of the fragmenting nucleus is inferior to straightahead theory but is of sufficient accuracy if the primary ions display a broad energy spectrum. An iterative scheme for the solution of the inhomogenous integral transport equations holds promise for practical calculation. A model calculation shows that multiple charged ion fragments penetrate to greater depths in comparison with the free path of a primary heavy ion.

  10. Stoichiometric disturbances in compound semiconductors due to ion implantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, R. E.; Fung, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    A method is developed to calculate the depth distribution of the local stoichiometric disturbance (SD) resulting from ion implantation in binary-compound substrates. The calculation includes first-order recoils considering projected range straggle of projectiles and recoils and lateral straggle of recoils. The method uses tabulated final-range statistics to infer the projectile range distributions at intermediate energies. This approach greatly simplifies the calculation with little compromise on accuracy as compared to existing procedures. As an illustration, the SD profile is calculated for implantation of boron, silicon, and aluminum in silicon carbide. The results for the latter case suggest that the SD may be responsible for otherwise unexplained distortions in the annealed aluminum profile. A comparison with calculations by other investigators using the Boltzmann transport equation shows good agreement.

  11. Measurements and modelling of fast-ion redistribution due to resonant MHD instabilities in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. M.; Cecconello, M.; McClements, K. G.; Klimek, I.; Akers, R. J.; Boeglin, W. U.; Keeling, D. L.; Meakins, A. J.; Perez, R. V.; Sharapov, S. E.; Turnyanskiy, M.; the MAST Team

    2015-12-01

    The results of a comprehensive investigation into the effects of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) and energetic particle modes on the NBI-generated fast-ion population in MAST plasmas are reported. Fast-ion redistribution due to frequency-chirping TAE in the range 50 kHz-100 kHz and frequency-chirping energetic particle modes known as fishbones in the range 20 kHz-50 kHz, is observed. TAE and fishbones are also observed to cause losses of fast ions from the plasma. The spatial and temporal evolution of the fast-ion distribution is determined using a fission chamber, a radially-scanning collimated neutron flux monitor, a fast-ion deuterium alpha spectrometer and a charged fusion product detector. Modelling using the global transport analysis code Transp, with ad hoc anomalous diffusion and fishbone loss models introduced, reproduces the coarsest features of the affected fast-ion distribution in the presence of energetic particle-driven modes. The spectrally and spatially resolved measurements show, however, that these models do not fully capture the effects of chirping modes on the fast-ion distribution.

  12. Initial assessment of the effects of energetic ion injections in the magnetosphere due to the transport of satellite power system components from low earth orbit to geosynchronous earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, S. A.; Grebowsky, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Potentially serious environmental effects exist when cargo orbital transfer vehicle (COTV) ion propulsion is used on the scale proposed in the preliminary definition studies of the Satellite Power System. These effects of the large scale injections of ion propulsion exhaust in the plasmasphere and in the outer magnetosphere were shown to be highly model dependent with major differences existing in the predicted effects of two models, the ion cloud model and the ion sheath model. The expected total number density deposition of the propellant Ar(+) in the plasmasphere, the energy spectra of the deposited Ar(+) and time dependent behavior of the Ar(+) injected into the plasmasphere by a fleet of COTV vehicles differ drastically between the two models. The ion sheath model was demonstrated to be applicable to the proposed Ar(+) beam physics if the beam was divergent and turbulent whereas the ion cloud model was not a realistic approximation for such a beam because the "frozen-field" assumption on which it is based is not valid.

  13. Membrane transport of several ions during peritoneal dialysis: mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Galach, Magda; Waniewski, Jacek

    2012-09-01

    Peritoneal dialysis utilizes a complex mass exchange device created by natural permselective membranes of the visceral and abdominal muscle tissues. In mathematical modeling of solute transport during peritoneal dialysis, each solute is typically considered as a neutral, independent particle. However, such mathematical models cannot predict transport parameters for small ions. Therefore, the impact of the electrostatic interactions between ions on the estimated transport parameters needs to be investigated. In this study, transport of sodium, chloride, and a third ion through a permselective membrane with characteristics of the peritoneal transport barrier was described using two models: a model with the Nernst-Planck (NP) equations for a set of interacting ions and a model with combined diffusive and convective transport of each ion separately (DC). Transport parameters for the NP model were calculated using the pore theory, while the parameters for the DC model were estimated by fitting the model to the predictions from the NP model. Solute concentration profiles in the membrane obtained by computer simulations based on these two models were similar, whereas the transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters and sieving coefficients) were generally different. The presence of the third ion could substantially modify the values of diffusive mass parameter for sodium and chloride ions estimated using the DC model compared with those predicted by NP. The extent of this modification depended on the molecular mass and concentration of the third ion, and the rate of volumetric flow. Closed formulas for the transport parameters of the DC model in terms of the NP model parameters, ion concentration profiles in the membrane, and volumetric flow across the membrane were derived. Their reliable approximations, which include only boundary ion concentrations instead of spatial intramembrane concentration profiles, were formulated. The precision of this approximation

  14. 78 FR 19024 - Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation Public Forum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... SAFETY BOARD Lithium Ion Batteries in Transportation Public Forum On Thursday and Friday, April 11-12... Batteries in Transportation.'' The forum will begin at 9:00 a.m. on both days and is open to all. Attendance... Inquiry. The forum is organized into three topic areas: Lithium ion battery design, development, and use...

  15. NAD(P)H oxidase and renal epithelial ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental requirement for cellular vitality is the maintenance of plasma ion concentration within strict ranges. It is the function of the kidney to match urinary excretion of ions with daily ion intake and nonrenal losses to maintain a stable ionic milieu. NADPH oxidase is a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within many cell types, including the transporting renal epithelia. The focus of this review is to describe the role of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS toward local renal tubular ion transport in each nephron segment and to discuss how NADPH oxidase-derived ROS signaling within the nephron may mediate ion homeostasis. In each case, we will attempt to identify the various subunits of NADPH oxidase and reactive oxygen species involved and the ion transporters, which these affect. We will first review the role of NADPH oxidase on renal Na+ and K+ transport. Finally, we will review the relationship between tubular H+ efflux and NADPH oxidase activity. PMID:21270341

  16. Coupled ion Binding and Structural Transitions Along the Transport Cycle of Glutamate Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Verdon, Gregory; Oh, SeCheol; Serio, Ryan N.; Boudker, Olga

    2014-05-19

    Membrane transporters that clear the neurotransmitter glutamate from synapses are driven by symport of sodium ions and counter-transport of a potassium ion. Previous crystal structures of a homologous archaeal sodium and aspartate symporter showed that a dedicated transport domain carries the substrate and ions across the membrane. We report new crystal structures of this homologue in ligand-free and ions-only bound outward- and inward-facing conformations. We then show that after ligand release, the apo transport domain adopts a compact and occluded conformation that can traverse the membrane, completing the transport cycle. Sodium binding primes the transport domain to accept its substrate and triggers extracellular gate opening, which prevents inward domain translocation until substrate binding takes place. Moreover, we describe a new cation-binding site ideally suited to bind a counter-transported ion. We suggest that potassium binding at this site stabilizes the translocation-competent conformation of the unloaded transport domain in mammalian homologues.

  17. Ion transport through electrolyte/polyelectrolyte multi-layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Femmer, Robert; Mani, Ali; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Ion transport of multi-ionic solutions through layered electrolyte and polyelectrolyte structures are relevant in a large variety of technical systems such as micro and nanofluidic devices, sensors, batteries and large desalination process systems. We report a new direct numerical simulation model coined EnPEn: it allows to solve a set of first principle equations to predict for multiple ions their concentration and electrical potential profiles in electro-chemically complex architectures of n layered electrolytes E and n polyelectrolytes PE. EnPEn can robustly capture ion transport in sub-millimeter architectures with submicron polyelectrolyte layers. We proof the strength of EnPEn for three yet unsolved architectures: (a) selective Na over Ca transport in surface modified ion selective membranes, (b) ion transport and water splitting in bipolar membranes and (c) transport of weak electrolytes.

  18. Ion transport through electrolyte/polyelectrolyte multi-layers

    PubMed Central

    Femmer, Robert; Mani, Ali; Wessling, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport of multi-ionic solutions through layered electrolyte and polyelectrolyte structures are relevant in a large variety of technical systems such as micro and nanofluidic devices, sensors, batteries and large desalination process systems. We report a new direct numerical simulation model coined EnPEn: it allows to solve a set of first principle equations to predict for multiple ions their concentration and electrical potential profiles in electro-chemically complex architectures of n layered electrolytes E and n polyelectrolytes PE. EnPEn can robustly capture ion transport in sub-millimeter architectures with submicron polyelectrolyte layers. We proof the strength of EnPEn for three yet unsolved architectures: (a) selective Na over Ca transport in surface modified ion selective membranes, (b) ion transport and water splitting in bipolar membranes and (c) transport of weak electrolytes. PMID:26111456

  19. An instability in planetary rings due to ballistic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, Richard H.

    1995-01-01

    Ballistic transport in planetary rings is the net radial transport of mass and angular momentum due to exchanges of meteoroid impact ejecta between neighboring ring regions. The detailed linear stability analysis in this paper demonstrates that ballistic transport causes wavelike disturbances to grow and propagate in an otherwise uniform ring. The growth is strongest for intermediate values of the normal ring optical depth tau = 0.1 to 1.0 and goes to zero as tau approaches 0 and tau approaches infinity. For nominal values of various physical parameters, the minimum e-folding time is approximately 10(exp 5) years for tau approximately 0.4. The direction of propagation is opposite to the sense of any asymmetry that may exist in the ejecta direction distribution (inward for prograde ejecta and outward for retrograde ejecta). The additional effect of viscous transport tends to damp wavelike perturbations strongly at short wavelengths and at high values of tau. The quantitative agreement between this analytic work and numerical simulations reported elsewhere is generally quite good. As applied to Saturn's rings, the results in this paper strengthen the earlier conclusion from numerical calculations that the 100-km structure in the inner B Ring is caused by ballistic transport. However, it is also clear that ballistic transport cannot produce the complex structure seen in the outer two-thirds of the B Ring where tau greater than or approximately 1.5. Wavelike structures in the C Ring might also be attributed to ballistic transport; but this requires further study.

  20. Plasma Transport in a Magnetic Multicusp Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    1 :15 AFIT/DS/ENP/91 -02 exic PLASMA TRANSPORT IN A MAGNETIC MULTICUSP NEGATIVE HYDROGEN ION kc.esioii Fo- SOURCE DISSERTATION P-1 TA~3 Ricky G. Jones... MULTICUSP NEGATIVE HYDROGEN ION SOURCE DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air...Approved for public release; distributio, unlimited AFIT/DS/ENP/91-02 PLASMA TRANSPORT IN A MAGNETIC MULTICUSP NEGATIVE HYDROGEN ION SOURCE Hicky G. Jones

  1. Deterministic transport calculations of dose profiles due to proton beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Filippone, W.L.; Smith, M.S.; Santoro, R.T.; Gabriel, T.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Charged-particle transport calculations are most often carried out using the Monte Carlo technique. For example, the TIGER and EGS codes are used for electron transport calculations, while HETC models the transport of protons and heavy ions. In recent years there has been considerable progress in deterministic models of electron transport. Many of these models are also applicable to protons. In this paper we present discrete ordinates solutions to the Spencer-Lewis equation for protons. In its present form, our code calculates the energy deposition profile and primary proton flux in x-y geometry due to proton beam irradiation. Proton energies up to 0.4 GeV are permissible.

  2. Heat Transport due to Long-Range Collisions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollmann, Eric M.

    1999-11-01

    Cross-magnetic-field heat transport in a quiescent pure ion plasma is found to be diffusive, with measured thermal diffusivity \\chi which is independent of magnetic field strength B and plasma density n. The measured values of \\chi are up to 100 times larger than the ``classical'' thermal diffusivity \\chic = (16 √π / 15) (n barv b^2 ) r_c^2 ln (rc / b) ∝ n^1 B-2 T-1/2 expected from velocity-scattering collisions;(M.N. Rosenbluth et al., Phys. Rev. 109), 1 (1958). but are in quantitative agreement with the thermal diffusivity \\chiL = 0.49 ( n barv b^2 ) λ_D^2 ∝ n^0 B^0 T-1/2 recently predicted to result from long-range ``guiding center'' collisions.(D.H.E. Dubin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), 3868 (1997). In these long-range collisions, which occur in plasmas with λD > r_c, particles on well-separated field lines exchange parallel kinetic energy only. In the present experiments, the maximal impact parameters are ρ <= λ_D but in larger plasmas (with cross-field dimension L > 100 λ_D) the emission and absorption of plasma waves over impact parameters ρ <= L is predicted to give a further enhancement of the heat transport. The experiments are performed by heating (or cooling) the ions locally with a laser beam to create a thermal gradient. A second laser is then used to monitor the resulting radial heat flow. Remarkably, the ions are held in steady-state for periods of weeks by an applied ``rotating wall'' drive;(X.-P. Huang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78), 875 (1997). this allows for accurate, repeatable heat transport measurements over a wide range of plasma parameters. To date, the thermal diffusivity has been measured over a range of 100 in density, 4 in magnetic field, and 10^4 in temperature; and it is found that long-range collisions dominate the heat transport over this entire range.(E.M. Hollmann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82). 4930 (1999). Separate measurements of the perp-to-parallel thermal isotropization rates show that short-range velocity

  3. Bradykinin regulates human colonic ion transport in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Baird, A W; Skelly, M M; O'Donoghue, D P; Barrett, K E; Keely, S J

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Kinins are acknowledged as important regulators of intestinal function during inflammation; however, their effects on human intestinal ion transport have not been reported. Here, we used muscle-stripped human colonic tissue and cultured T84-cell monolayers to study bradykinin (BK) actions on human intestinal ion transport. Experimental approach: Ion transport was measured as changes in short-circuit current (Isc) across colonic epithelia mounted in Ussing chambers. Key results: In intact tissue, there was a distinct polarity to BK-elicited Isc responses. Whereas basolateral BK stimulated sustained responses (EC50=0.5±0.1 μM), those to apical BK were more rapid and transient (EC50=4.1±1.2 nM). In T84 cells, responses to both apical and basolateral BK were similar to those seen upon apical addition to intact tissues. Cross-desensitization between apical and basolateral domains was not observed. BK-induced responses were largely due to Cl− secretion as shown by their sensitivity to bumetanide and removal of Cl− from the bathing solution. Studies using selective agonists and antagonists indicate responses to BK are mediated by B2 receptors. Finally, responses to basolateral BK in intact tissues were inhibited by tetrodotoxin (1 μM), atropine (1 μM), capsaicin (100 μM) and piroxicam (10 μM). BK-stimulated prostaglandin (PG)E2 release from colonic tissue. Conclusions: BK stimulates human colonic Cl− secretion by activation of apical and basolateral B2 receptors. Responses to apical BK reflect a direct action on epithelial cells, whereas those to basolateral BK are amplified by stimulation of enteric nerves and PG synthesis. PMID:18604228

  4. Nondiffusive transport regimes for suprathermal ions in turbulent plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bovet, A; Fasoli, A; Ricci, P; Furno, I; Gustafson, K

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of the transport of suprathermal ions in the presence of turbulence is important for fusion plasmas in the burning regime that will characterize reactors, and for space plasmas to understand the physics of particle acceleration. Here, three-dimensional measurements of a suprathermal ion beam in the toroidal plasma device TORPEX are presented. These measurements demonstrate, in a turbulent plasma, the existence of subdiffusive and superdiffusive transport of suprathermal ions, depending on their energy. This result stems from the unprecedented combination of uniquely resolved measurements and first-principles numerical simulations that reveal the mechanisms responsible for the nondiffusive transport. The transport regime is determined by the interaction of the suprathermal ion orbits with the turbulent plasma dynamics, and is strongly affected by the ratio of the suprathermal ion energy to the background plasma temperature.

  5. Charge accumulation due to spin transport in magnetic multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yao-Hui; Xu, Deng-Hui; Geng, Ai-Cong

    2014-08-01

    Starting with the Valet-Fert theory of the current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance, we studied the charge accumulation due to spin transport in magnetic multilayers by solving Poisson's equation analytically. Our results show that, in ferromagnetic layers, the charge accumulation has two exponential terms with opposite signs and different decaying lengths: the Thomas-Fermi screening length (on the order of angstrom) and the spin diffusion length (tens of nm in 3d ferromagnetic metals). The charge accumulation on the scale of the screening length is spin-unpolarized and also present in spin-independent transport in nonmagnetic multilayers. However, the charge accumulation on the scale of the spin diffusion length is spin-polarized and shows up only in ferromagnetic layers. Our analysis also provides new insights into the widely used quasi-neutrality approximation, which neglects the charge accumulation.

  6. Impurity transport due to electromagnetic drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Sara; Pusztai, Istvan; Mollén, Albert; Fülöp, Tünde

    2012-10-01

    In the view of an increasing interest in high β operation scenarios, such as hybrid scenarios for ITER the question of finite β effects on the impurity transport is a critical issue due to possible fuel dilution and radiative cooling in the core. Here, electromagnetic effects at finite β on impurity transport are studied through local linear gyro-kinetic simulations with gyro [J. Candy and E. Belli, General Atomics Report GA-A26818 (2011)]; in particular we investigate the parametric dependences of the impurity peaking factor (zero-flux density gradient) and the onset of the kinetic ballooning modes (KBM) and micro-tearing modes (MTM) in spherical (NSTX) and standard tokamaks (AUG and JET).

  7. Transport-limited water splitting at ion-selective interfaces during concentration polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Christoffer P.; Bruus, Henrik

    2014-04-01

    We present an analytical model of salt- and water-ion transport across an ion-selective interface based on an assumption of local equilibrium of the water-dissociation reaction. The model yields current-voltage characteristics and curves of water-ion current versus salt-ion current, which are in qualitative agreement with experimental results published in the literature. The analytical results are furthermore in agreement with direct numerical simulations. As part of the analysis, we find approximate solutions to the classical problem of pure salt transport across an ion-selective interface. These solutions provide closed-form expressions for the current-voltage characteristics, which include the overlimiting current due to the development of an extended space-charge region. Finally, we discuss how the addition of an acid or a base affects the transport properties of the system and thus provide predictions accessible to further experimental tests of the model.

  8. Transepithelial Ion Transport is Suppressed in Hypoxic Sinonasal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Angela; Zhang, Shaoyan; Chestnut, Michael; Hixon, Brian; Skinner, Daniel; Sorscher, Eric J.; Woodworth, Bradford A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Sinonasal respiratory epithelial mucociliary clearance (MCC) is dependent on the transepithelial transport of ions such as Cl−. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the role of oxygen restriction in 1) Cl− transport across primary sinonasal epithelial monolayers, 2) expression of the apical Cl− channels CFTR and TMEM16A, and 3) the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Study Design In vitro investigation. Methods Murine nasal septal epithelial (MNSE, wild type) and human sinonasal epithelial (HSNE) cultures were incubated under hypoxic conditions (1% O2, 5% CO2). Cultures were mounted in Ussing chambers for ion transport measurements. CFTR and TMEM16A expression were measured using quantitative RT-PCR. Results The change in short-circuit current (ΔISC (µA/cm2) attributable to CFTR (forskolin-stimulated) was significantly decreased due to a 12 hour hypoxia exposure in both MNSE (13.55+/− 0.46 vs. 19.23+/−0.18) and HSNE (19.55+/−0.56 vs. 25.49+/−1.48 (control); p<0.05. TMEM16A (UTP-stimulated transport) was inhibited by 48 hours of hypoxic exposure in MNSE (15.92+/−2.87 vs. 51.44+/−3.71(control) p<0.05] and by 12 hours of hypoxic exposure in HSNE (16.75+/−0.68 vs. 24.15+/−1.35 (control). Quantitative RT-PCR (reported as relative mRNA levels+/−S.D.) demonstrated significant reductions in both CFTR and TMEM16A mRNA expression in MNSE and HSNE due to airway epithelial hypoxia. Conclusions Sinonasal epithelial CFTR and TMEM16A-mediated Cl− transport and mRNA expression were robustly decreased in an oxygen restricted environment. The findings in the present study indicate persistent hypoxia may lead to acquired defects in sinonasal Cl− transport in a fashion likely to confer mucociliary dysfunction in CRS. Level of Evidence 1b PMID:22024847

  9. Transport of runaway and thermal electrons due to magnetic microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.; Strachan, J.D.

    1981-04-01

    The ratio of the runaway electron confinement to thermal electron energy confinement is derived for tokamaks where both processes are determined by free streaming along stochastic magnetic field lines. The runaway electron confinement is enhanced at high runaway electron energies due to phase averaging over the magnetic perturbations when the runaway electron drift surfaces are displaced from the magnetic surfaces. Comparison with experimental data from LT-3, Ormak, PLT, ST, and TM-3 indicates that magnetic stochasticity may explain the relative transport rates of runaways and thermal electron energy.

  10. Internal electron transport barrier due to neoclassical ambipolarity in the Helically Symmetric Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lore, J.; Guttenfelder, W.; Briesemeister, A.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Deng, C. B.; Likin, K. M.; Spong, D. A.; Talmadge, J. N.; Zhai, K.

    2010-05-01

    Electron cyclotron heated plasmas in the Helically Symmetric Experiment (HSX) feature strongly peaked electron temperature profiles; central temperatures are 2.5 keV with 100 kW injected power. These measurements, coupled with neoclassical predictions of large "electron root" radial electric fields with strong radial shear, are evidence of a neoclassically driven thermal transport barrier. Neoclassical transport quantities are calculated using the PENTA code [D. A. Spong, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056114 (2005)], in which momentum is conserved and parallel flow is included. Unlike a conventional stellarator, which exhibits strong flow damping in all directions on a flux surface, quasisymmetric stellarators are free to rotate in the direction of symmetry, and the effect of momentum conservation in neoclassical calculations may therefore be significant. Momentum conservation is shown to modify the neoclassical ion flux and ambipolar ion root radial electric fields in the quasisymmetric configuration. The effect is much smaller in a HSX configuration where the symmetry is spoiled. In addition to neoclassical transport, a model of trapped electron mode turbulence is used to calculate the turbulent-driven electron thermal diffusivity. Turbulent transport quenching due to the neoclassically predicted radial electric field profile is needed in predictive transport simulations to reproduce the peaking of the measured electron temperature profile [Guttenfelder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 215002 (2008)].

  11. Edge Vortex Flow Due to Inhomogeneous Ion Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2017-04-01

    The ion distribution of an open parallel electrode system is not known even though it is often used to measure the electrical characteristics of an electrolyte. Thus, for an open electrode system, we perform a non-steady direct multiphysics simulation based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations and find that inhomogeneous ion concentrations at edges cause vortex flows and suppress the anomalous increase in the ion concentration near the electrodes. A surprising aspect of our findings is that the large vortex flows at the edges approximately maintain the ion-conserving condition, and thus the ion distribution of an open electrode system can be approximated by the solution of a closed electrode system that considers the ion-conserving condition rather than the Gouy-Chapman solution, which neglects the ion-conserving condition. We believe that our findings make a significant contribution to the understanding of surface science.

  12. Cigarette smoke inhibition of ion transport in canine tracheal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, M.J.

    1983-06-01

    To determine the effect of cigarette smoke on airway epithelial ion transport, the electrical properties and transepithelial Na and Cl fluxes were measured in canine tracheal epithelium. In vivo, the inhalation of the smoke from one cigarette acutely and reversibly decreased the electrical potential difference across the tracheal epithelium. In vitro, exposure of the mucosal surface of the epithelium to cigarette smoke decreased the short circuit current and transepithelial resistance. The decrease in short circuit current was due to an inhibition of the rate of Cl secretion with minimal effect on the rate of Na absorption. The effect of cigarette smoke was reversible, was not observed upon exposure of the submucosal surface to smoke, and was most pronounced when secretion was stimulated. The particulate phase of smoke was largely responsible for the inhibitory effect, since filtering the smoke minimized the effect. The effect of cigarette smoke was not prevented by addition of antioxidants to the bathing solutions, suggesting that the inhibition of Cl secretion cannot be entirely attributed to an oxidant mechanism. These results indicate that cigarette smoke acutely inhibits active ion transport by tracheal epithelium, both in vivo and in vitro. This effect may explain, in part, both the abnormal mucociliary clearance and the airway disease observed in cigarette smokers.

  13. Global anomalous transport of ICRH- and NBI-heated fast ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkie, G. J.; Pusztai, I.; Abel, I.; Dorland, W.; Fülöp, T.

    2017-04-01

    By taking advantage of the trace approximation, one can gain an enormous computational advantage when solving for the global turbulent transport of impurities. In particular, this makes feasible the study of non-Maxwellian transport coupled in radius and energy, allowing collisions and transport to be accounted for on similar time scales, as occurs for fast ions. In this work, we study the fully-nonlinear ITG-driven trace turbulent transport of locally heated and injected fast ions. Previous results indicated the existence of MeV-range minorities heated by cyclotron resonance, and an associated density pinch effect. Here, we build upon this result using the t3core code to solve for the distribution of these minorities, consistently including the effects of collisions, gyrokinetic turbulence, and heating. Using the same tool to study the transport of injected fast ions, we contrast the qualitative features of their transport with that of the heated minorities. Our results indicate that heated minorities are more strongly affected by microturbulence than injected fast ions. The physical interpretation of this difference provides a possible explanation for the observed synergy when neutral beam injection (NBI) heating is combined with ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). Furthermore, we move beyond the trace approximation to develop a model which allows one to easily account for the reduction of anomalous transport due to the presence of fast ions in electrostatic turbulence.

  14. Cross-shelf transport and dispersion due to baroclinic instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyng, Kristen; Hetland, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The dominant forcing mechanisms for the circulation in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico are largely determined by location relative to the shelf break. On the inner shelf, the flow is mostly controlled by the wind and on the outer shelf is affected by the mesoscale loop-current eddies. However, in the summer, baroclinic instabilities can develop along the boundary of the mid-shelf river plume front, leading to large eddies (~50 km length scale) that can reach across the entire shelf and strongly affect the local flow field. These instabilities advect fresher water toward the shelf edge and pull denser water back toward the coast. The details of how the flow crosses between these two regimes is of interest because it controls the flux of river-borne biogeochemical properties to the deep ocean, as well as for the potential onshore transport of oil from offshore spills. We approach this problem using a high resolution numerical model of the Texas-Louisiana shelf run using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and a Lagrangian particle tracking model (TRACMASS). By initializing drifters at the sources of fresh water (the Atchafalaya and Mississippi rivers) in the numerical model, we are able to explicitly track its trajectory through the numerical domain in time. These trajectories can then be used to characterize the cross-shelf transport and lateral dispersion due to the instabilities caused by the presence of the fresher water. We expect the transport and dispersion to be enhanced when compared with these quantities at other times of the year when the instabilities are not present, as well as with other regions of the shelf break that are farther from the plume edge area. Additionally, an idealized numerical model of a shelf break with both horizontal and vertical density gradients has been run through relevant parameter spaces to examine the range of baroclinic instabilities. Drifters are run in these simulations for comparison of transport and dispersion with

  15. Improvement in fusion reactor performance due to ion channeling

    SciTech Connect

    Emmert, G.A.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Meade, D.M.

    1994-11-01

    Ion channeling is a recent idea for improving the performance of fusion reactors by increasing the fraction of the fusion power deposited in the ions. In this paper the authors assess the effect of ion channeling on D-T and D-{sup 3}He reactors. The figures of merit used are the fusion power density and the cost of electricity. It is seen that significant ion channeling can lead to about a 50-65% increase in the fusion power density. For the Apollo D-{sup 3}He reactor concept the reduction in the cost of electricity can be as large as 30%.

  16. The Transport of Ions Across Plant Cell Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Presented is one of a series of articles designed to help science teachers keep current on ideas in specific areas of biology. This article provides information about ion transport in plant cells. (PB)

  17. The Transport of Ions Across Plant Cell Membranes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Presented is one of a series of articles designed to help science teachers keep current on ideas in specific areas of biology. This article provides information about ion transport in plant cells. (PB)

  18. Control of mucus secretion and ion transport in airways.

    PubMed

    Nadel, J A; Davis, B; Phipps, R J

    1979-01-01

    answer these questions, techniques are needed to study subunits of the airway, including isolated surface cells and submucosal glands; and sensitive methods are required to analyze the very small samples of secretions for glycoprotein and electrolyte content. Intracellular measurements of electrolyte concentrations and electrical potentials may help to elucidate the mechanisms of transepithelial ion and water movement. The control system for the production and removal of respiratory tract secretions may be altered in disease. For instance, chronic stimulation of cough receptors causes reflex secretion and may be the cause of the hyperplasia of submucosal glands and of the abnormal secretions that occur in chronic bronchitis and asthma (50, 58). The abnormally viscid mucus in cystic fibrosis may be due to a defect in Cl- transport, which provides too little water for both the gel and sol layers. These speculations are intended to identify areas for further research, which hopefully will reduce the morbidity and mortality in these common lung diseases.

  19. Ion transport and softening in a polymerized ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Bocharova, Vera; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tselev, Alexander; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Berdzinski, Stefan; Strehmel, Veronika; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Minutolo, Joseph A.; Sangoro, Joshua R.; Agapov, Alexander L.; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2014-12-01

    . Experimental data for the kinetics of charging and steady state current-voltage relations can be explained by taking into account the dissociation of ions under an applied electric field (known as the Wien effect). Onsager's theory of the Wien effect coupled with the Poisson-Nernst-Planck formalism for the charge transport is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The agreement between the theory and experiments allows us to predict structural properties of the PolyIL films. We have observed significant softening of the PolyIL films beyond certain threshold voltages and formation of holes under a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tip, through which an electric field was applied. The observed softening is explained by the theory of depression in glass transition temperature resulting from enhanced dissociation of ions with an increase in applied electric field. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the COMSOL modeling focusing on temperature distribution in polymer film under biased AFM tip, estimated of ionic conductivity using SPM and BDS measurements, Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Wien-Onsager model and thermodynamic description of the depression in melting due to the presence of ``free'' ions can be found in the ESI. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05491a

  20. Ion sampling and transport in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative accuracy and high sensitivity in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) depend on consistent and efficient extraction and transport of analyte ions from an inductively coupled plasma to a mass analyzer, where they are sorted and detected. In this review we examine the fundamental physical processes that control ion sampling and transport in ICP-MS and compare the results of theory and computerized models with experimental efforts to characterize the flow of ions through plasma mass spectrometers' vacuum interfaces. We trace the flow of ions from their generation in the plasma, into the sampling cone, through the supersonic expansion in the first vacuum stage, through the skimmer, and into the ion optics that deliver the ions to the mass analyzer. At each stage we consider idealized behavior and departures from ideal behavior that affect the performance of ICP-MS as an analytical tool.

  1. Mechanisms of ion transport across the choroid plexus

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Ernest M.

    1972-01-01

    1. Mechanisms of ion transport across the choroidal epithelium were investigated using an in vitro preparation of the frog choroid plexus. 2. Sodium was actively transported across the plexus from the vascular to the ventricular surface by an ouabain sensitive electrically silent pump. As in other epithelial membranes the rate of sodium transport was stimulated by the presence of bicarbonate ions in the Ringer solutions. Chloride and bicarbonate ions accompany the net flux of sodium across this tissue. 3. Some experiments suggest that potassium is actively transported from the ventricular to the serosal surface, and that the rate of transport is a function of the extracellular potassium concentration. 4. No evidence was obtained to suggest that calcium is actively transported across this tissue in either direction. 5. Diamox, ethoxyzolamide, pitocin, pitressin, hydrocortisone, amiloride, spironolactone and anoxia all failed to influence sodium transport. 6. The sequence of passive ion permeation across the plexus was PRb ∼ PK > PCs ∼ PNa ∼ PCl ∼ PHCO3 > PLi as deduced from diffusion potential measurements. At least for Na, K and Cl there was a good correlation between the permeability coefficients derived from unidirectional flux measurements and from electrical parameters. This indicates that exchange diffusion is unimportant as a mechanism for passive ion transport. 7. The instantaneous current—voltage curves were linear in both symmetrical and asymmetrical salt solutions and the choroid plexus conductance was found to be directly proportional to the external salt concentration. These and other lines of evidence suggest that the major route of passive ion permeation across this epithelium is via the tight junction route and not through the cell interior. 8. These results are discussed in relation to the in vivo studies of c.s.f. secretion and the mechanisms of active and passive ion transport across other epithelial membranes such as the gall

  2. The ion transport mechanism of lithium polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongli

    Lithium polymer electrolytes are of great interest for use in polymer-electrolyte rechargeable batteries. However, the lithium transport mechanism in the polymer electrolyte has not been fully understood, due partly to the lack of a means to characterize a key lithium transport property, the transference number, correctly and efficiently. This research pioneered the use of the electrophoretic nuclear magnetic resonance technique to measure the lithium transference number (TsbLi) of polymer electrolytes. The development of this technique is described. It is shown that the technique is strictly valid regardless of the degree of dissociation of the electrolyte and the measurement protocol is relatively straightforward. As a result, the accuracy of the technique is high compared to existing techniques. The lithium transport mechanism in polymer gel electrolytes are investigated systematically with complementary techniques including vibrational spectroscopy (Raman scattering), nuclear magnetic resonance, and a.c. impedance spectroscopy. The characteristic lithium transport behavior as a function of the temperature, the salt concentration, the anion type, and the polymer matrices is established. Perfluoroimide and perfluoromethide lithium salts always lead to a larger lithium transference number compared to conventional lithium salts. In poly(vinylidene fluororide-hexfloropropylene) based gel electrolytes, the perfluoroimide anion, (CFsb3SOsb3)sb2Nsp-, results in a nearly invariant TsbLi over a wide salt concentration range. In contrast, the CFsb3SOsb3sp- anion results in TsbLi decreasing monotonically with increasing salt concentration. In poly(acrylonitrile), which binds with Lisp+, the TsbLi versus LiCFsb3SOsb3 concentration curve is nearly parabolic. A qualitative model is proposed which defines the important molecular interactions underlying the lithium transport behavior and extends the Fuoss and Onsager theory to systems with extensive ion complexation.

  3. Regulation of ion transport by microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Elvira-Matelot, Emilie; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Hadchouel, Juliette

    2011-09-01

    This review aims to describe the recent findings obtained on the regulation of ion transport by microRNAs in physiological and pathological situations in different organs and organisms. The number of ion channels or transporters can be regulated by increasing or decreasing the transcription and/or translation of the corresponding genes. In this context, a new class of regulators of gene expression has emerged as an important modulator of ion transport. microRNAs are short noncoding RNAs which inhibit gene expression by enhancing the degradation or inhibiting the translation of their targets. Most of the studies published so far describe their roles during embryonic development and tumorigenesis. However, recent studies have started to unravel how microRNA-mediated modulation of ion transport could contribute not only to the development of pathological states, such as heart disease, but also to the osmotic regulation of various organisms. The contribution of microRNAs to the regulation of ion transport has only begun to be unraveled, mostly in cardiomyocytes. Only a few studies have focused on the kidney but they strongly suggest that microRNAs could play an important role in the regulation of renal ion transport in response to variation in daily food intake.

  4. Unraveling the mechanism of selective ion transport in hydrophobic subnanometer channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-09-01

    Recently reported synthetic organic nanopore (SONP) can mimic a key feature of natural ion channels, i.e., selective ion transport. However, the physical mechanism underlying the K(+)/Na(+) selectivity for the SONPs is dramatically different from that of natural ion channels. To achieve a better understanding of the selective ion transport in hydrophobic subnanometer channels in general and SONPs in particular, we perform a series of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the diffusivity of aqua Na(+) and K(+) ions in two prototype hydrophobic nanochannels: (i) an SONP with radius of 3.2 Å, and (ii) single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with radii of 3-5 Å (these radii are comparable to those of the biological potassium K(+) channels). We find that the hydration shell of aqua Na(+) ion is smaller than that of aqua K(+) ion but notably more structured and less yielding. The aqua ions do not lower the diffusivity of water molecules in CNTs, but in SONP the diffusivity of aqua ions (Na(+) in particular) is strongly suppressed due to the rugged inner surface. Moreover, the aqua Na(+) ion requires higher formation energy than aqua K(+) ion in the hydrophobic nanochannels. As such, we find that the ion (K(+) vs. Na(+)) selectivity of the (8, 8) CNT is ∼20× higher than that of SONP. Hence, the (8, 8) CNT is likely the most efficient artificial K(+) channel due in part to its special interior environment in which Na(+) can be fully solvated, whereas K(+) cannot. This work provides deeper insights into the physical chemistry behind selective ion transport in nanochannels.

  5. Unraveling the mechanism of selective ion transport in hydrophobic subnanometer channels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Francisco, Joseph S.; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Recently reported synthetic organic nanopore (SONP) can mimic a key feature of natural ion channels, i.e., selective ion transport. However, the physical mechanism underlying the K+/Na+ selectivity for the SONPs is dramatically different from that of natural ion channels. To achieve a better understanding of the selective ion transport in hydrophobic subnanometer channels in general and SONPs in particular, we perform a series of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the diffusivity of aqua Na+ and K+ ions in two prototype hydrophobic nanochannels: (i) an SONP with radius of 3.2 Å, and (ii) single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with radii of 3–5 Å (these radii are comparable to those of the biological potassium K+ channels). We find that the hydration shell of aqua Na+ ion is smaller than that of aqua K+ ion but notably more structured and less yielding. The aqua ions do not lower the diffusivity of water molecules in CNTs, but in SONP the diffusivity of aqua ions (Na+ in particular) is strongly suppressed due to the rugged inner surface. Moreover, the aqua Na+ ion requires higher formation energy than aqua K+ ion in the hydrophobic nanochannels. As such, we find that the ion (K+ vs. Na+) selectivity of the (8, 8) CNT is ∼20× higher than that of SONP. Hence, the (8, 8) CNT is likely the most efficient artificial K+ channel due in part to its special interior environment in which Na+ can be fully solvated, whereas K+ cannot. This work provides deeper insights into the physical chemistry behind selective ion transport in nanochannels. PMID:26283377

  6. Boltzmann-Langevin transport model for heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ayik, S. |

    1994-06-01

    Heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies exhibit catastrophic phenomena which requires descriptions based on stochastic transport models. First, the Boltzmann-Langevin model, which provides an example of such stochastic approaches, is briefly described. Then, a projection method for obtaining numerical solutions of the Boltzmann-Langevin equation is discussed. Finally, some applications of the model to heavy-ion collisions are presented.

  7. Radiation protection considerations along a radioactive ion beam transport line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarchiapone, Lucia; Zafiropoulos, Demetre

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the SPES project is to produce accelerated radioactive ion beams for Physics studies at “Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro” (INFN, Italy). This accelerator complex is scheduled to be built by 2016 for an effective operation in 2017. Radioactive species are produced in a uranium carbide target, by the interaction of 200 μA of protons at 40 MeV. All of the ionized species in the 1+ state come out of the target (ISOL method), and pass through a Wien filter for a first selection and an HMRS (high mass resolution spectrometer). Then they are transported by an electrostatic beam line toward a charge state breeder (where the 1+ to n+ multi-ionization takes place) before selection and reacceleration at the already existing superconducting linac. The work concerning dose evaluations, activation calculation, and radiation protection constraints related to the transport of the radioactive ion beam (RIB) from the target to the mass separator will be described in this paper. The FLUKA code has been used as tool for those calculations needing Monte Carlo simulations, in particular for the evaluation of the dose rate due to the presence of the radioactive beam in the selection/interaction points. The time evolution of a radionuclide inventory can be computed online with FLUKA for arbitrary irradiation profiles and decay times. The activity evolution is analytically evaluated through the implementation of the Bateman equations. Furthermore, the generation and transport of decay radiation (limited to gamma, beta- and beta+ emissions) is possible, referring to a dedicated database of decay emissions using mostly information obtained from NNDC, sometimes supplemented with other data and checked for consistency. When the use of Monte Carlo simulations was not feasible, the Bateman equations, or possible simplifications, have been used directly.

  8. Brownian Dynamics Simulations of Ion Transport through the VDAC

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu Il; Rui, Huan; Pastor, Richard W.; Im, Wonpil

    2011-01-01

    It is important to gain a physical understanding of ion transport through the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) because this channel provides primary permeation pathways for metabolites and electrolytes between the cytosol and mitochondria. We performed grand canonical Monte Carlo/Brownian dynamics (GCMC/BD) simulations to explore the ion transport properties of human VDAC isoform 1 (hVDAC1; PDB:2K4T) embedded in an implicit membrane. When the MD-derived, space-dependent diffusion constant was used in the GCMC/BD simulations, the current-voltage characteristics and ion number profiles inside the pore showed excellent agreement with those calculated from all-atom molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations, thereby validating the GCMC/BD approach. Of the 20 NMR models of hVDAC1 currently available, the third one (NMR03) best reproduces both experimental single-channel conductance and ion selectivity (i.e., the reversal potential). In addition, detailed analyses of the ion trajectories, one-dimensional multi-ion potential of mean force, and protein charge distribution reveal that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the channel structure and ion transport relationship. Finally, the GCMC/BD simulations of various mutants based on NMR03 show good agreement with experimental ion selectivity. The difference in ion selectivity between the wild-type and the mutants is the result of altered potential of mean force profiles that are dominated by the electrostatic interactions. PMID:21281575

  9. The importance of dehydration in determining ion transport in narrow pores.

    PubMed

    Richards, Laura A; Schäfer, Andrea I; Richards, Bryce S; Corry, Ben

    2012-06-11

    The transport of hydrated ions through narrow pores is important for a number of processes such as the desalination and filtration of water and the conductance of ions through biological channels. Here, molecular dynamics simulations are used to systematically examine the transport of anionic drinking water contaminants (fluoride, chloride, nitrate, and nitrite) through pores ranging in effective radius from 2.8 to 6.5 Å to elucidate the role of hydration in excluding these species during nanofiltration. Bulk hydration properties (hydrated size and coordination number) are determined for comparison with the situations inside the pores. Free energy profiles for ion transport through the pores show energy barriers depend on pore size, ion type, and membrane surface charge and that the selectivity sequence can change depending on the pore size. Ion coordination numbers along the trajectory showed that partial dehydration of the transported ion is the main contribution to the energy barriers. Ion transport is greatly hindered when the effective pore radius is smaller than the hydrated radius, as the ion has to lose some associated water molecules to enter the pore. Small energy barriers are still observed when pore sizes are larger than the hydrated radius due to re-orientation of the hydration shell or the loss of more distant water. These results demonstrate the importance of ion dehydration in transport through narrow pores, which increases the current level of mechanistic understanding of membrane-based desalination and transport in biological channels. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Bio-inspired smart single asymmetric hourglass nanochannels for continuous shape and ion transport control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huacheng; Hou, Xu; Yang, Zhe; Yan, Dadong; Li, Lin; Tian, Ye; Wang, Huanting; Jiang, Lei

    2015-02-18

    Inspired by biological asymmetric ion channels, new shape-tunable and pH-responsive asymmetric hourglass single nanochannel systems demonstrate unique ion-transport properties. It is found that the change in shape and pH cooperatively control the ion transport within the nanochannel ranging from asymmetric shape with asymmetric ion transport, to asymmetric shape with symmetric ion transport and symmetric shape with symmetric ion transport. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Dependence of the lateral ion transport on the driving frequency in nematic liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojmenovik, G.; Vermael, S.; Neyts, K.; Asselt, R. van; Verschueren, A. R. M.

    2004-10-01

    The presence of ions in a liquid crystal (LC) influences the transmission characteristics of LC displays. These ions follow the electric field perpendicular to the electrodes and move back and forth under the influence of the ac field. Because of their charge, they can distort the electric field, which leads to transmission changes. Recently it was discovered that due to the LC anisotropy, ion motion parallel with the plane of the electrodes (perpendicular to the electric field) is also possible, even without lateral fields. After driving a pixel for a long time, the ions will accumulate at one pixel edge, which leads to unwanted image artifacts. In this paper, we investigate the frequency dependence of the lateral ion transport in twisted nematic liquid crystal displays at high and low ion concentrations, different ion mobilities, and LC rotational viscosities, for a fixed voltage just above the LC threshold.

  12. Modeling Root Zone Effects on Preferred Pathways for the Passive Transport of Ions and Water in Plant Roots.

    PubMed

    Foster, Kylie J; Miklavcic, Stanley J

    2016-01-01

    We extend a model of ion and water transport through a root to describe transport along and through a root exhibiting a complexity of differentiation zones. Attention is focused on convective and diffusive transport, both radially and longitudinally, through different root tissue types (radial differentiation) and root developmental zones (longitudinal differentiation). Model transport parameters are selected to mimic the relative abilities of the different tissues and developmental zones to transport water and ions. For each transport scenario in this extensive simulations study, we quantify the optimal 3D flow path taken by water and ions, in response to internal barriers such as the Casparian strip and suberin lamellae. We present and discuss both transient and steady state results of ion concentrations as well as ion and water fluxes. We find that the peak in passive uptake of ions and water occurs at the start of the differentiation zone. In addition, our results show that the level of transpiration has a significant impact on the distribution of ions within the root as well as the rate of ion and water uptake in the differentiation zone, while not impacting on transport in the elongation zone. From our model results we infer information about the active transport of ions in the different developmental zones. In particular, our results suggest that any uptake measured in the elongation zone under steady state conditions is likely to be due to active transport.

  13. Modeling Root Zone Effects on Preferred Pathways for the Passive Transport of Ions and Water in Plant Roots

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Kylie J.; Miklavcic, Stanley J.

    2016-01-01

    We extend a model of ion and water transport through a root to describe transport along and through a root exhibiting a complexity of differentiation zones. Attention is focused on convective and diffusive transport, both radially and longitudinally, through different root tissue types (radial differentiation) and root developmental zones (longitudinal differentiation). Model transport parameters are selected to mimic the relative abilities of the different tissues and developmental zones to transport water and ions. For each transport scenario in this extensive simulations study, we quantify the optimal 3D flow path taken by water and ions, in response to internal barriers such as the Casparian strip and suberin lamellae. We present and discuss both transient and steady state results of ion concentrations as well as ion and water fluxes. We find that the peak in passive uptake of ions and water occurs at the start of the differentiation zone. In addition, our results show that the level of transpiration has a significant impact on the distribution of ions within the root as well as the rate of ion and water uptake in the differentiation zone, while not impacting on transport in the elongation zone. From our model results we infer information about the active transport of ions in the different developmental zones. In particular, our results suggest that any uptake measured in the elongation zone under steady state conditions is likely to be due to active transport. PMID:27446144

  14. Computer Simulations of Ion Transport in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes.

    PubMed

    Mogurampelly, Santosh; Borodin, Oleg; Ganesan, Venkat

    2016-06-07

    Understanding the mechanisms and optimizing ion transport in polymer membranes have been the subject of active research for more than three decades. We present an overview of the progress and challenges involved with the modeling and simulation aspects of the ion transport properties of polymer membranes. We are concerned mainly with atomistic and coarser level simulation studies and discuss some salient work in the context of pure binary and single ion conducting polymer electrolytes, polymer nanocomposites, block copolymers, and ionic liquid-based hybrid electrolytes. We conclude with an outlook highlighting future directions.

  15. Benchmarking of Neutron Production of Heavy-Ion Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    Remec, Igor; Ronningen, Reginald M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Accurate prediction of radiation fields generated by heavy ion interactions is important in medical applications, space missions, and in design and operation of rare isotope research facilities. In recent years, several well-established computer codes in widespread use for particle and radiation transport calculations have been equipped with the capability to simulate heavy ion transport and interactions. To assess and validate these capabilities, we performed simulations of a series of benchmark-quality heavy ion experiments with the computer codes FLUKA, MARS15, MCNPX, and PHITS. We focus on the comparisons of secondary neutron production. Results are encouraging; however, further improvements in models and codes and additional benchmarking are required.

  16. Ion transport during growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubramanian, J; Sahi, J; Rao, M C

    2000-01-01

    The major function of the adult colon is to reabsorb fluid from the chyme. This ability to conserve salt and water is especially important in newborns, where reserves are small and diarrhea is frequent. Although much is known about regulation of Cl- transport in the adult colon, postnatal changes in electrolyte transport are not well characterized. We have established an in vitro model to study colonic epithelial cells (colonocytes) at different stages of development. Primary cultures were isolated from newborn, weanling, and adult rabbit colon and properties such as growth and Cl- transport characterized. The isolation procedure yielded a crypt-enriched population of cells, and the cell yield per gram mucosa increased with age. The colonocytes also showed an age-related decrease in attachment to extracellular matrix, with maximum attachment seen with Matrigel and collagen IV. The crypt enrichment was confirmed by demonstrating that the cell population was capable of transporting Cl-, which was stimulated by agents such as forskolin and phorbol esters at all ages. Agents that increased intracellular cGMP, however, did not increase Cl- transport at any age. It was interesting to observe that the secondary bile acid, taurodeoxycholate, stimulated Cl- transport only in the adult but not newborn or weanling distal colonocytes. We have demonstrated that rabbit distal colonocytes can be kept viable in culture and transport Cl- at all ages. However, the regulation of Cl- transport changes during ontogeny and depends on the signaling pathway.

  17. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, Larry R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    A dynamical guiding-center simulation model is used to study the stormtime ion transport which leads to the formation of the ring current and diffusion in the radiation belts. Representative ions guiding-center motion in response to model storm-associated impulses in the convection electric field is traced for a range of ion mu values. The present numerical results are compared with previously formulated limiting idealization of particle transport in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For ions having drift periods that exceed the duration of the main phase of the storm, their inward transport to form the stormtime ring current is appropriately described as direct convective access. For ions having drift periods comparable to the duration of the main phase of the storm, there is a transition between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. Lower-energy ring-current ions at L of about 3 are freshly injected there from open adiabatic trajectories, whereas the higher-energy ring-current population consists of a mixture of freshly injected and previously trapped ions.

  18. Ion transport controlled by nanoparticle-functionalized membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Edward; McBride, Sean P.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Lin, Xiao-Min

    2014-12-01

    From proton exchange membranes in fuel cells to ion channels in biological membranes, the well-specified control of ionic interactions in confined geometries profoundly influences the transport and selectivity of porous materials. Here we outline a versatile new approach to control a membrane’s electrostatic interactions with ions by depositing ligand-coated nanoparticles around the pore entrances. Leveraging the flexibility and control by which ligated nanoparticles can be synthesized, we demonstrate how ligand terminal groups such as methyl, carboxyl and amine can be used to tune the membrane charge density and control ion transport. Further functionality, exploiting the ligands as binding sites, is demonstrated for sulfonate groups resulting in an enhancement of the membrane charge density. We then extend these results to smaller dimensions by systematically varying the underlying pore diameter. As a whole, these results outline a previously unexplored method for the nanoparticle functionalization of membranes using ligated nanoparticles to control ion transport.

  19. Ion transport controlled by nanoparticle-functionalized membranes.

    PubMed

    Barry, Edward; McBride, Sean P; Jaeger, Heinrich M; Lin, Xiao-Min

    2014-12-17

    From proton exchange membranes in fuel cells to ion channels in biological membranes, the well-specified control of ionic interactions in confined geometries profoundly influences the transport and selectivity of porous materials. Here we outline a versatile new approach to control a membrane's electrostatic interactions with ions by depositing ligand-coated nanoparticles around the pore entrances. Leveraging the flexibility and control by which ligated nanoparticles can be synthesized, we demonstrate how ligand terminal groups such as methyl, carboxyl and amine can be used to tune the membrane charge density and control ion transport. Further functionality, exploiting the ligands as binding sites, is demonstrated for sulfonate groups resulting in an enhancement of the membrane charge density. We then extend these results to smaller dimensions by systematically varying the underlying pore diameter. As a whole, these results outline a previously unexplored method for the nanoparticle functionalization of membranes using ligated nanoparticles to control ion transport.

  20. Ambipolarity and transport with resonant ion diffusion in EBT

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F.; Hedrick, C.L.; Hastings, D.E.; Tolliver, J.S.

    1983-10-01

    Using recently derived analytic expressions for resonant and nonresonant neoclassical transport coefficients in EBT, we calculate the ambipolar potential required to maintain quasi-charge neutrality in the presence of a high-energy ion tail produced by nonclassical heating. The electric field obeys a differential rather than an algebraic equation. Solution of this equation gives a potential proportional to the local magnetic field strength and thus a rigid rotation of low-energy ions near the magnetic axis. Radial-transport calculations using this potential give improved agreement with experimental data for neutral density and particle lifetime. However, high-energy ion orbits in the calculated potential exhibit banana widths larger than assumed in the resonant transport theory. The required density of high-energy ions is therefore larger than would be expected if realistic banana widths could be included.

  1. Physics of electron and lithium-ion transport in electrode materials for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musheng, Wu; Bo, Xu; Chuying, Ouyang

    2016-01-01

    The physics of ionic and electrical conduction at electrode materials of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are briefly summarized here, besides, we review the current research on ionic and electrical conduction in electrode material incorporating experimental and simulation studies. Commercial LIBs have been widely used in portable electronic devices and are now developed for large-scale applications in hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and stationary distributed power stations. However, due to the physical limits of the materials, the overall performance of today’s LIBs does not meet all the requirements for future applications, and the transport problem has been one of the main barriers to further improvement. The electron and Li-ion transport behaviors are important in determining the rate capacity of LIBs. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA034201), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11234013 and 11264014), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant Nos. 20133ACB21010 and 20142BAB212002), and the Foundation of Jiangxi Education Committee, China (Grant Nos. GJJ14254 and KJLD14024). C. Y. Ouyang is also supported by the “Gan-po talent 555” Project of Jiangxi Province, China.

  2. Heterogeneous processes affecting metal ion transport in the presence of organic ligands: Reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantar, Cetin

    2007-04-01

    The development of models to accurately simulate metal ion transport through saturated systems under variable chemical conditions, e.g., in systems containing organic ligands (L) such as natural organic matter (NOM), has two essential aspects: (1) establishing the ability to simulate metal ion sorption to aquifer solids over a range of metal/ligand ratios; and (2) to incorporate this ability to simulate metal speciation over a range in chemical conditions (e.g., pH, ligand activity) into mass transport models. Modeling approaches to evaluate metal ion sorption and transport in the presence of NOM include: (1) isotherm-based transport models, and (2) multicomponent (MC) transport models. The accuracy of transport models depends on how well the chemical interactions affecting metal ion transport in the presence of organic ligands (e.g., metal/ligand complexation) are described in transport equations. The isotherm-based transport models often fail to accurately describe metal ion transport in the presence of NOM since these models treat NOM as a single solute despite the fact that NOM is a multicomponent mixture of subcomponents with different chemical and polyfunctional behavior. On the other hand, the calculations presented in this study suggest that a multicomponent reactive transport model, in conjunction with a mechanistic modeling approach for the description of metal ion binding by NOM in a manner conducive to the application of surface complexation modeling (SCM), can effectively be used as an important predictive tool in simulating metal ion sorption and transport under variable chemical conditions in the presence of NOM.

  3. Microsecond simulations of DNA and ion transport in nanopores with novel ion-ion and ion-nucleotides effective potentials.

    PubMed

    De Biase, Pablo M; Markosyan, Suren; Noskov, Sergei

    2014-04-05

    We developed a novel scheme based on the grand-canonical Monte Carlo/Brownian dynamics simulations and have extended it to studies of ion currents across three nanopores with the potential for single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) sequencing: solid-state nanopore Si₃N₄, α-hemolysin, and E111N/M113Y/K147N mutant. To describe nucleotide-specific ion dynamics compatible with ssDNA coarse-grained model, we used the inverse Monte Carlo protocol, which maps the relevant ion-nucleotide distribution functions from all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Combined with the previously developed simulation platform for Brownian dynamics simulations of ion transport, it allows for microsecond- and millisecond-long simulations of ssDNA dynamics in the nanopore with a conductance computation accuracy that equals or exceeds that of all-atom MD simulations. In spite of the simplifications, the protocol produces results that agree with the results of previous studies on ion conductance across open channels and provide direct correlations with experimentally measured blockade currents and ion conductances that have been estimated from all-atom MD simulations.

  4. Sodium Ion Production, Acceleration and Transport in Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, D. J.; Schriver, D.; Travnicek, P. M.; Hellinger, P.; Richard, R. L.; Raines, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Observations made by the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury have shown that sodium ions can form a significant portion of the plasma population in the magnetosphere, in particular in the dayside cusp and the nightside magnetotail plasma sheet. The sodium ions, as well as other heavy ions observed in and around Mercury, are of planetary origin and can be created by a number of different processes, including photo stimulated desorption (PSD), electron stimulated desorption (ESD), solar wind sputtering (SWS) and micro-meteorite impact vaporization (MIV). For all of these possible source mechanisms, sodium ions are born cold, with eV energies at most, yet when the sodium ions are observed in Mercury's magnetosphere they tend to have much higher energies, i.e., 10-10000 eV. Using global kinetic simulations, the origin, acceleration, transport and loss of sodium ions is examined for the different source mechanisms. In general it is found that PSD is a major contributor of sodium ions with energies of order 10-100 eV to the dayside regions of Mercury's magnetosphere, while ESD-created sodium ions generally gain higher energies (1-10 keV) and tend primarily to populate the magnetotail plasma sheet. The acceleration mechanisms and general transport properties of sodium ions will be discussed along with comparisons with MESSENGER observations.

  5. Controlling FAMA by the Ptolemy II model of ion beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvanović, R.; Rađenović, B.; Beličev, P.; Nešković, N.

    2009-08-01

    FAMA is a facility for modification and analysis of materials with ion beams. Due to the wide range of ion beams and energies used in the facility and its future expansion, the need has arisen for faster tuning of ion beams transport control parameters. With this aim, a new approach to modeling ion-beam transport system was developed, based on the Ptolemy II modeling and design framework. A model in Ptolemy II is a hierarchical aggregation of components called actors, which communicate with other actors using tokens, or pieces of data. Each ion optical element is modeled by a composite actor implementing beam matrix transformation function, while tokens carry beam matrix data. A basic library of models of typical ion optical elements is developed, and a complex model of FAMA ion beam transport system is hierarchically integrated with bottom-up approach. The model is extended to include control functions. The developed model is modular, flexible and extensible. The results obtained by simulation on the model demonstrate easy and efficient tuning of beam line control parameters. Fine tuning of control parameters, due to uncertainties inherent to modeling, still has to be performed on-line.

  6. Novel aspects of cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Sandra; Diener, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic receptors are not only expressed by excitable tissues, but have been identified in various epithelia. One aim of this study was to investigate the expression of nicotinic receptors and their involvement in the regulation of ion transport across colonic epithelium. Ussing chamber experiments with putative nicotinic agonists and antagonists were performed at rat colon combined with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) detection of nicotinic receptor subunits within the epithelium. Dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) and nicotine induced a tetrodotoxin-resistant anion secretion leading to an increase in short-circuit current (Isc) across colonic mucosa. The response was suppressed by the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium. RT-PCR experiments revealed the expression of α2, α4, α5, α6, α7, α10, and β4 nicotinic receptor subunits in colonic epithelium. Choline, the product of acetylcholine hydrolysis, is known for its affinity to several nicotinic receptor subtypes. As a strong acetylcholinesterase activity was found in colonic epithelium, the effect of choline on Isc was examined. Choline induced a concentration-dependent, tetrodotoxin-resistant chloride secretion which was, however, resistant against hexamethonium, but was inhibited by atropine. Experiments with inhibitors of muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors revealed that choline-evoked secretion was mainly due to a stimulation of epithelial M3 receptors. Although choline proved to be only a partial agonist, it concentration-dependently desensitized the response to acetylcholine, suggesting that it might act as a modulator of cholinergically induced anion secretion. Thus the cholinergic regulation of colonic ion transport – up to now solely explained by cholinergic submucosal neurons stimulating epithelial muscarinic receptors – is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:26236483

  7. Role of ion transport in control of apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Lang, Florian; Hoffmann, Else K

    2012-07-01

    Cell shrinkage is a hallmark and contributes to signaling of apoptosis. Apoptotic cell shrinkage requires ion transport across the cell membrane involving K(+) channels, Cl(-) or anion channels, Na(+)/H(+) exchange, Na(+),K(+),Cl(-) cotransport, and Na(+)/K(+)ATPase. Activation of K(+) channels fosters K(+) exit with decrease of cytosolic K(+) concentration, activation of anion channels triggers exit of Cl(-), organic osmolytes, and HCO3(-). Cellular loss of K(+) and organic osmolytes as well as cytosolic acidification favor apoptosis. Ca(2+) entry through Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels may result in apoptosis by affecting mitochondrial integrity, stimulating proteinases, inducing cell shrinkage due to activation of Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels, and triggering cell-membrane scrambling. Signaling involved in the modification of cell-volume regulatory ion transport during apoptosis include mitogen-activated kinases p38, JNK, ERK1/2, MEKK1, MKK4, the small G proteins Cdc42, and/or Rac and the transcription factor p53. Osmosensing involves integrin receptors, focal adhesion kinases, and tyrosine kinase receptors. Hyperosmotic shock leads to vesicular acidification followed by activation of acid sphingomyelinase, ceramide formation, release of reactive oxygen species, activation of the tyrosine kinase Yes with subsequent stimulation of CD95 trafficking to the cell membrane. Apoptosis is counteracted by mechanisms involved in regulatory volume increase (RVI), by organic osmolytes, by focal adhesion kinase, and by heat-shock proteins. Clearly, our knowledge on the interplay between cell-volume regulatory mechanisms and suicidal cell death is still far from complete and substantial additional experimental effort is needed to elucidate the role of cell-volume regulatory mechanisms in suicidal cell death. 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:2037-2061, 2012.

  8. Ion Transport in Nanostructured Block Copolymer/Ionic Liquid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoarfrost, Megan Lane

    is incredible freedom in designing the block copolymer architecture in order to optimize the mechanical and other properties of the membrane without sacrificing conductivity. The derived scaling relationships are shown to be general for many block copolymer and ionic liquid chemistries. In certain cases, the mechanism of ion conduction in the ionic liquid is affected by block copolymer nanoconfinement. The introduction of excess neutral imidazole to [Im][TFSI] leads to enhanced proton conductivity as well as a high H+ transference number due to facilitated proton hopping between imidazole molecules. We show that there is increased proton hopping when the nonstoichiometric ionic liquid is confined to lamellar block copolymer nanodomains, which we hypothesize is due to changes in the hydrogen bond structure of the ionic liquid under confinement. This, in combination with unique ion aggregation behavior, leads to a lower activation energy for macroscopic ion transport compared to that in a corresponding homopolymer/ionic liquid mixture. Through this work, we further the understanding of the relationship between membrane composition, structure, and ion transport. The findings presented herein portend the rational design of nanostructured membranes having improved mechanical properties and conductivity.

  9. Phylogeny and cloning of ion transporters in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Pullikuth, Ashok K; Filippov, Valeri; Gill, Sarjeet S

    2003-11-01

    Membrane transport in insect epithelia appears to be energized through proton-motive force generated by the vacuolar type proton ATPase (V-ATPase). However, secondary transport mechanisms that are coupled to V-ATPase activity have not been fully elucidated. Following a blood meal, the female mosquito regulates fluid and ion homeostasis through a series of characteristic behaviors that require brain-derived factors to regulate ion secretion. Despite the knowledge on the behaviors of the mosquito, little is known of the targets of several factors that have been implicated in cellular changes following a blood meal. This review discusses current models of membrane transport in insects and specific data on mosquito ion regulation together with the molecular aspects of membrane transport systems that are potentially linked to V-ATPase activity, which collectively determine the functioning of mosquito midgut and Malpighian tubules. Ion transport mechanisms will be discussed from a comparative physiology perspective to gain appreciation of the exquisite mechanisms of mosquito ion regulation.

  10. Ion mixing, hydration, and transport in aqueous ionic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Voth, Gregory A.; Witten, Thomas A.

    2015-05-14

    The enhancement effect on the ion mobility of fluoride (and that of chloride) in a polycationic system, as the chloride content increases, is shown to also exist in other more simple ionic systems with cations such as the cesium ion and an organic ammonium ion. As the chloride content increases, in addition to the finding that there is more unbound water associated with the cation, we also observe that the average lifetime of a hydrogen bond decreases. This change to the hydrogen bonds is correlated to significant changes to both the structural and dynamical properties of water. The more disordered water structure and faster water dynamics are hypothesized to be also responsible for the enhanced ion mobilities. Furthermore, when either the chloride content or hydration level is changed, the self-diffusion constant of each co-ion changes by almost the same factor, implying the existence of a single universal transport mechanism that determines ion mobilities.

  11. Ion transport in circulatory and/or septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Sayeed, M.M.

    1987-05-01

    This review surveys investigations of membrane ion transport in animals in hemorrhagic, endotoxic, or bacteremic shock. The focus of the review is on ion transport studies in the skeletal muscle and liver. Skeletal muscle Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport alterations have been shown during the induction of shock via hemorrhage, endotoxin, or live Gram-negative bacteria in the rodent, canine, and primate species. These alterations include impairment of active cellular K/sup +/ accumulation, increased permeability to /sup 24/Na/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/, and membrane depolarization. The ion transport alterations in the skeletal muscle are compatible with movement of extracellular fluid into the intracellular compartment. Such fluid movements can potentially lead to decreases in circulating plasma volume and thus to circulatory deficits in shock. Studies in the liver of rats subjected to hemorrhagic or endotoxic shock indicated the failure of electrogenic Na/sup +/ pump. Although the hepatic cellular membrane permeability to Na/sup +/ relative to permeability to K/sup +/ appeared unaltered in hemorrhagic shock, endotoxic shock caused an increase in permeability to Na/sup +/. Hepatic cellular /sup 45/Ca/sup +/ regulation also appeared to be adversely affected during endotoxic shock. Alterations in hepatic Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ transport and Ca/sup +/ regulation could contribute to impairment in hepatic glucose production during shock. Although mechanisms of altered membrane ion transport during shock states remain unknown, such changes could occur prior to any substantial loss of cellular metabolic energy.

  12. Membrane ion transport in non-excitable tissues.

    PubMed

    Nehrke, Keith

    2014-12-23

    The facilitated movement of ions across cell membranes can be characterized as occurring through active (ATP-dependent), secondary active (coupled), or passive transport processes. Each of these processes is mediated by a diverse group of membrane proteins. Over the past fifteen years, studies of membrane transport in C. elegans have benefited from the fact that worms are anatomically simple, easily and economically cultured, and genetically tractable. These experimental advantages have been instrumental in defining how membrane transport processes contribute to whole organism physiology. The focus of this review is to survey the recent advances in our understanding of membrane transport that have arisen from integrative physiological approaches in the nematode C. elegans.

  13. Fast Ion Transport in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonofiglo, P. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Capecchi, W.; Kim, J.; Sears, S. H.; Egedal, J.

    2016-10-01

    The reversed field pinch (RFP) provides a unique environment to study fast ion confinement and transport. The magnetic topology of the RFP establishes guiding center drifts along flux surfaces, resulting in naturally well-confined fast ions. Past experiments reveal reduced confinement and a redistribution of fast ions with beam-driven instabilities or transition to a 3D equilibrium state. A fast ion transport model characterized by a temporally and spatially dependent diffusion profile describes the fast ion evolution. The diffusion coefficient varies as the square of the measured mode amplitude, and the width is inferred from comparison with correlated density fluctuations. In studying multiple interacting modes, the model reproduces the dynamic NPA-measured 20 % drop in core fast ion concentration. In the case of long-lived frequency chirping modes, there is a consistent time evolution of the fast ion distribution and measured mode frequency on a spatially varying Alfven continuum. Additional studies probe the dynamics of energetic particle modes (EPMs) during the growth of the core-localized kink mode and the rapid loss of fast ion confinement as a transition to a 3D equilibrium occurs. This research is supported by US DOE.

  14. Gyrokinetic simulations of ion and impurity transport

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R.E.

    2005-02-01

    A systematic study of turbulent particle and energy transport in both pure and multicomponent plasmas is presented. In this study, gyrokinetic results from the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] are supplemented with those from the GLF23 [R. E. Waltz, G. M. Staebler, W. Dorland et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)] transport model, as well as from quasilinear theory. Various results are obtained. The production of a particle pinch driven by temperature gradients (a thermal pinch) is demonstrated, and further shown to be weakened by finite electron collisionality. Helium transport and the effects of helium density gradient and concentration in a deuterium plasma are examined. Interestingly, it is found that the simple D-v (diffusion versus convective velocity) model of impurity flow is consistent with results obtained from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Also studied is the transport in a 50-50 deuterium-tritium plasma, where a symmetry breaking is observed indicating the potential for fuel separation in a burning plasma. Quasilinear theory together with linear simulations shows that the symmetry breaking which enhances the tritium confinement arises largely from finite-Larmor-radius effects. To justify the numerical methods used in the paper, a variety of linear benchmarks and nonlinear grid refinement studies are detailed.

  15. Gyrokinetic simulations of ion and impurity transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2005-02-01

    A systematic study of turbulent particle and energy transport in both pure and multicomponent plasmas is presented. In this study, gyrokinetic results from the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] are supplemented with those from the GLF23 [R. E. Waltz, G. M. Staebler, W. Dorland et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 2482 (1997)] transport model, as well as from quasilinear theory. Various results are obtained. The production of a particle pinch driven by temperature gradients (a thermal pinch) is demonstrated, and further shown to be weakened by finite electron collisionality. Helium transport and the effects of helium density gradient and concentration in a deuterium plasma are examined. Interestingly, it is found that the simple D-v (diffusion versus convective velocity) model of impurity flow is consistent with results obtained from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Also studied is the transport in a 50-50 deuterium-tritium plasma, where a symmetry breaking is observed indicating the potential for fuel separation in a burning plasma. Quasilinear theory together with linear simulations shows that the symmetry breaking which enhances the tritium confinement arises largely from finite-Larmor-radius effects. To justify the numerical methods used in the paper, a variety of linear benchmarks and nonlinear grid refinement studies are detailed.

  16. Neoclassical electron and ion transport in toroidally rotating plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, H.; Horton, W.

    1997-06-01

    Neoclassical transport processes of electrons and ions are investigated in detail for toroidally rotating axisymmetric plasmas with large flow velocities on the order of the ion thermal speed. The Onsager relations for the flow-dependent neoclassical transport coefficients are derived from the symmetry properties of the drift kinetic equation with the self-adjoint collision operator. The complete neoclassical transport matrix with the Onsager symmetry is obtained for the rotating plasma consisting of electrons and single-species ions in the Pfirsch{endash}Schl{umlt u}ter and banana regimes. It is found that the inward banana fluxes of particles and toroidal momentum are driven by the parallel electric field, which are phenomena coupled through the Onsager symmetric off-diagonal coefficients to the parallel currents caused by the radial thermodynamic forces conjugate to the inward fluxes, respectively. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Nonlinear ion transport in liquid and solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roling, B.; Patro, L. N.; Burghaus, O.; Gräf, M.

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes nonlinear ion transport properties of liquid and solid electrolytes. Typically, the relation between ionic current density and electric field becomes nonlinear at electric fields above 50-100 kV/cm. We review the 1st and 2nd Wien effect found in classical strong and weak electrolyte solutions as well as the strong nonlinear ion transport effects observed for inorganic glasses and for polymer electrolytes. Furthermore, we give an overview over models describing nonlinear ion transport in electrolyte solutions, in glasses and in polymers. Recent results are presented for the nonlinear ionic conductivity of supercooled ionic liquids. We show that supercooled ionic liquids exhibit anomalous Wien effects, which are clearly distinct from the classical Wien effects. We also discuss the frequency dependence of higher-order conductivity and permittivity spectra of these liquids.

  18. Ion channels and transporters in tumour cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Albrecht; Stock, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is a central component of the metastatic cascade requiring a concerted action of ion channels and transporters (migration-associated transportome), cytoskeletal elements and signalling cascades. Ion transport proteins and aquaporins contribute to tumour cell migration and invasion among other things by inducing local volume changes and/or by modulating Ca2+ and H+ signalling. Targeting cell migration therapeutically bears great clinical potential, because it is a prerequisite for metastasis. Ion transport proteins appear to be attractive candidate target proteins for this purpose because they are easily accessible as membrane proteins and often overexpressed or activated in cancer. Importantly, a number of clinically widely used drugs are available whose anticipated efficacy as anti-tumour drugs, however, has now only begun to be evaluated. PMID:24493750

  19. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-12-21

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. Here, we utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through the systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Lastly, our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries.

  20. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; ...

    2015-12-21

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. Here, we utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through themore » systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Lastly, our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries.« less

  1. Dust particle diffusion in ion beam transport region

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, N.; Okajima, Y.; Romero, C. F.; Kuwata, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2016-02-15

    Dust particles of μm size produced by a monoplasmatron ion source are observed by a laser light scattering. The scattered light signal from an incident laser at 532 nm wavelength indicates when and where a particle passes through the ion beam transport region. As the result, dusts with the size more than 10 μm are found to be distributed in the center of the ion beam, while dusts with the size less than 10 μm size are distributed along the edge of the ion beam. Floating potential and electron temperature at beam transport region are measured by an electrostatic probe. This observation can be explained by a charge up model of the dust in the plasma boundary region.

  2. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-12-21

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Some recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. We utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through the systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Furthermore, our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries.

  3. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; ...

    2015-12-21

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Some recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. We utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through themore » systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Furthermore, our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries.« less

  4. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-08-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well. COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy.

  5. Engineering Heteromaterials to Control Lithium Ion Transport Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Vishniakou, Siarhei; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Dayeh, Shadi A.

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficient operation of lithium ion batteries requires precisely directed flow of lithium ions and electrons to control the first directional volume changes in anode and cathode materials. Understanding and controlling the lithium ion transport in battery electrodes becomes crucial to the design of high performance and durable batteries. Recent work revealed that the chemical potential barriers encountered at the surfaces of heteromaterials play an important role in directing lithium ion transport at nanoscale. Here, we utilize in situ transmission electron microscopy to demonstrate that we can switch lithiation pathways from radial to axial to grain-by-grain lithiation through the systematic creation of heteromaterial combinations in the Si-Ge nanowire system. Our systematic studies show that engineered materials at nanoscale can overcome the intrinsic orientation-dependent lithiation, and open new pathways to aid in the development of compact, safe, and efficient batteries. PMID:26686655

  6. Ion transport in porous media studied by NMR.

    PubMed

    Pel, L; Huinink, H P; Kopinga, K; Rijniers, L A; Kaasschieter, E F

    2001-01-01

    Moisture and salt transport in masonry can give rise to damages. Therefore a detailed knowledge of the moisture and salt transport is essential for understanding the durability of masonry. A special NMR apparatus has been made allowing quasi-simultaneous measurements of both moisture and Na profiles in porous building materials. Using this apparatus both the absorption of a 4 M NaCl solution in a calcium silicate brick and the drying of a 3 M NaCl capillary saturated fired-clay brick have been studied. It was found that during the absorption process the Na ions clearly stay behind, which this is caused by adsorption of these ions to the pore surface. For the drying it was found that at the beginning of the drying process the ions accumulate near the surface. As the drying rate decreases, diffusion becomes dominant and the ion profile levels off again.

  7. Transport Properties of Negative Ions in HBR Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojanovic, Vladimir; Ivanovic, Nenad; Radmilovic-Radjenovic, Marija; Raspopovic, Zoran; Bojarov, Aleksandar; Petrovic, Zoran

    2014-10-01

    Low temperature plasma in halogenated gases is standard environment for dry etching of semiconductors. Amount of negative ions in HBr plasmas determines electronegativity so modeling etching devices requires data for anion transport properties. In this work we present cross section set for Br- ions in HBr assembled by using Denpoh-Nanbu theory. The threshold energy values were calculated by known heats of formation. The calculated total cross section accounts for ion-induced-dipole and ion-permanent-dipole interaction by using the local-dipole model. The total cross section was corrected to fit the reduced mobility obtained by SACM (Statistical Adiabatic Channel Model) approximation. Existing cross section measurements were used to scale calculated cross sections. Finally, we used Monte Carlo method to determine transport parameters for Br- as a function of reduced electric fields that can be used in fluid and hybrid plasma models.

  8. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Spädtke, Peter

    2014-02-15

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  9. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-11-01

    In this report we calculate time-independent fields of solenoidal magnets that are suitable for ion beam transport and focusing. There are many excellent Electricity and Magnetism textbooks that present the formalism for magnetic field calculations and apply it to simple geometries [1-1], but they do not include enough relevant detail to be used for designing a charged particle transport system. This requires accurate estimates of fringe field aberrations, misaligned and tilted fields, peak fields in wire coils and iron, external fields, and more. Specialized books on magnet design, technology, and numerical computations [1-2] provide such information, and some of that is presented here. The AIP Conference Proceedings of the US Particle Accelerator Schools [1-3] contain extensive discussions of design and technology of magnets for ion beams - except for solenoids. This lack may be due to the fact that solenoids have been used primarily to transport and focus particles of relatively low momenta, e.g. electrons of less than 50 MeV and protons or H- of less than 1.0 MeV, although this situation may be changing with the commercial availability of superconducting solenoids with up to 20T bore field [1-4]. Internal reports from federal laboratories and industry treat solenoid design in detail for specific applications. The present report is intended to be a resource for the design of ion beam drivers for Inertial Fusion Energy [1-5] and Warm Dense Matter experiments [1-6], although it should also be useful for a broader range of applications. The field produced by specified currents and material magnetization can always be evaluated by solving Maxwell's equations numerically, but it is also desirable to have reasonably accurate, simple formulas for conceptual system design and fast-running beam dynamics codes, as well as for general understanding. Most of this report is devoted to such formulas, but an introduction to the Tosca{copyright} code [1-7] and some numerical

  10. Fast ion profile stiffness due to the resonance overlap of multiple Alfvén eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todo, Y.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2016-11-01

    Fast ion pressure profiles flattened by multiple Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) are investigated for various neutral beam deposition powers in a multi-phase simulation, which is a combination of classical simulation and hybrid simulation for energetic particles interacting with a magnetohydrodynamic fluid. Monotonic degradation of fast ion confinement and fast ion profile stiffness is found with increasing beam deposition power. The confinement degradation and profile stiffness are caused by a sudden increase in fast ion transport flux brought about by AEs for fast ion pressure gradients above a critical value. The critical pressure gradient and the corresponding beam deposition power depend on the radial location. The fast ion pressure gradient stays moderately above the critical value, and the profiles of the fast ion pressure and fast ion transport flux spread radially outward from the inner region, where the beam is injected. It is found that the square root of the MHD fluctuation energy is proportional to the beam deposition power. Analysis of the time evolutions of the fast ion energy flux profiles reveals that intermittent avalanches take place with contributions from the multiple eigenmodes. Surface of section plots demonstrate that the resonance overlap of multiple eigenmodes accounts for the sudden increase in fast ion transport with increasing beam power. The critical gradient and critical beam power for the profile stiffness are substantially higher than the marginal stability threshold.

  11. Ca2+ channel blockade inhibits gallbladder ion transport.

    PubMed

    Saunders, K D; Cates, J A; Abedin, M Z; Kleinman, R; Roslyn, J J

    1990-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that cholesterol gallstone (GS) formation is characterized by altered gallbladder epithelial ion transport and increased gallbladder (GB) luminal Ca2+. Moreover, intracellular Ca2+ has been reported to be an important modulator of intestinal ion transport. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of Ca2+ channel inhibition on GB ion transport. Prairie dog GBs were mounted in a Ussing chamber and bathed in warm oxygenated Ringer's solution, and short-circuit current (Isc), transepithelial potential difference (Vms), and tissue resistance (Rt) were recorded. Following stabilization, the mucosal surfaces of the GBs were exposed to 1 or 0.1 mM verapamil (VER). Effects on Isc were apparent within 10 sec with nadir values reached in 5 +/- 1 min. Profound (76%) inhibition of Isc was seen with 1 mM verapamil exposure (26 +/- 6 microA.cm-2) as compared to baseline values (170 +/- 6 microA.cm-2) (P less than 0.001). Verapamil exposure (1 mM) also led to a marked inhibition of Vms (P less than 0.001, vs baseline) and a significant increase in Rt (P less than 0.05 vs baseline). Similar trends were seen using 0.1 mM verapamil (Isc nadir 133 +/- 13 microA.cm-2). Verapamil-induced effects on gallbladder electrophysiology were largely reversible (75-90% recovery of baseline Isc after tissue washing). These data suggest that (1) verapamil induces rapid but reversible inhibition of ion transport and (2) Ca2+ channel blockade inhibits ion transport in a dose-dependent fashion. We would propose that intracellular Ca2+ may be a regulator of GB ion transport.

  12. Modification of SRIM-calculated dose and injected ion profiles due to sputtering, injected ion buildup and void swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bailey, Nathan; Garner, Frank A.; Gigax, Jonathan; Shao, Lin

    2016-11-01

    In radiation effects on materials utilizing self-ion irradiations, it is necessary to calculate the local displacement damage level and ion injection profile because of the short distance that self-ions travel in a material and because of the strong variation of displacement rate with depth in a specimen. The most frequently used tool for this is the software package called Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM). A SRIM-calculated depth-dependent dose level is usually determined under the implicit assumption that the target does not undergo any significant changes in volume during the process, in particular SRIM ignores the effect of sputtering, injected ions, and void swelling on the redistribution of the dose and injected ion profiles. This approach become increasingly invalid as the ion fluence reaches ever higher levels, especially for low energy ion irradiations. The original surface is not maintained due to sputter-induced erosion, while within the irradiated region of the specimen, injected ions are adding material, and if void swelling is occurring, it is creating empty space. An iterative mathematical treatment of SRIM outputs to produce corrected dose and injected ion profiles based on these phenomenon and without regard to diffusion is presented along with examples of differences between SRIM-calculated values and corrected values over a range of typical ion energies. The intent is to provide the reader with a convenient tool for more accurately calculating dose and injected ion profiles for heavy-ion irradiations.

  13. Realistic modeling of chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Grote, D.P.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.

    2003-05-01

    Transport of intense heavy-ion beams to an inertial-fusion target after final focus is simulated here using a realistic computer model. It is found that passing the beam through a rarefied plasma layer before it enters the fusion chamber can largely neutralize the beam space charge and lead to a usable focal spot for a range of ion species and input conditions.

  14. Alkali ion transport of primycin modified erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Blaskó, K; Györgyi, S

    1981-01-01

    The effects of the antibiotic primycin on alkali cation transport of human erythrocytes were investigated. Primycin selectively increases the permeability of erythrocytes to alkali-cations according to the sequence: Cs+ greater than Rb+ approximately K+ greater than Na+. The time course of the cation effluxes depends on the antibiotic concentration and can be altered by negatively charged SDS. Some evidence is given for the mechanism of primycin-membrane interaction.

  15. Constraints on Transportable Ion Beam Power.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-12

    17. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of the abstract ent*,od in Block 20, It dlffo-ent from Report) 10. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES *Present address: JAYCOR, Inc., 205...loss Transport System studyStability, \\ 20. ABSTRACT (Continue or reverse side If neceesry and Identify by block number) . A ’Constraints on...be replaced by a much more complicated expressione because of the more complex chemistry and radiation processes in higher atomic number gases. The

  16. Role of Alfvén Instabilities in Energetic Ion Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, M.G.; Bernabei, S.; Budny, R.; Darrow, D.; Fredrickson, E.D.; et al.

    1998-11-01

    Experiments of plasma heating at the ion cyclotron resonance of a minority specie have shown that the heating efficiency degrades above a certain power threshold. It is found that this threshold is due to the destabilization of a branch of shear Alfvén waves which causes a diffusive loss of fast ions, the Energetic Particle Modes. These modes not only play a fundamental role in the transport of the fast ions, but appear closely related to the formation of the giant sawteeth.

  17. Design and Characterization of a Neutralized-Transport Experiment for Heavy-Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, E; Eylon, S; Roy, P; Yu, S S; Anders, A; Bieniosek, F M; Greenway, W G; Logan, B G; MacGill, R A; Shuman, D B; Vanecek, D L; Waldron, W L; Sharp, W M; Houck, T L; Davidson, R C; Efthimion, P C; Gilson, E P; Sefkow, A B; Welch, D R; Rose, D V; Olson, C L

    2004-05-24

    In heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the fusion chamber to hit millimeter-sized spots on the target. Effective plasma neutralization of intense ion beams in this final transport is essential for a heavy-ion fusion power plant to be economically competitive. The physics of neutralized drift has been studied extensively with particle-in-cell simulations. To provide quantitative comparisons of theoretical predictions with experiment, the Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX). The experiment consists of three main sections, each with its own physics issues. The injector is designed to generate a very high-brightness, space-charge-dominated potassium beam while still allowing variable perveance by a beam aperturing technique. The magnetic-focusing section, consisting of four pulsed magnetic quadrupoles, permits the study of beam tuning, as well as the effects of phase space dilution due to higher-order nonlinear fields. In the final section, a converging ion beam exiting the magnetic section is transported through a drift region with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we discuss the design and characterization of the three sections in detail and present the first results from the experiment.

  18. Design and characterization of a neutralized-transport experiment for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Greenway, W.G.; Logan, B.G.; MacGill, R.A.; Shuman, D.B.; Vanecek, D.L.; Waldron, W.L.; Sharp, W.M.; Houck, T.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Sefkow, A.B.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2004-03-14

    In heavy-ion inertial-confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the fusion chamber to hit millimeter-sized spots on the target. Effective plasma neutralization of intense ion beams in this final transport is essential for a heavy-ion fusion power plant to be economically competitive. The physics of neutralized drift has been studied extensively with particle-in-cell simulations. To provide quantitative comparisons of theoretical predictions with experiment, the Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX). The experiment consists of three main sections, each with its own physics issues. The injector is designed to generate a very high-brightness, space-charge-dominated potassium beam while still allowing variable perveance by a beam aperturing technique. The magnetic-focusing section, consisting of four pulsed magnetic quadrupoles, permits the study of beam tuning, as well as the effects of phase space dilution due to higher-order nonlinear fields. In the final section, the converging ion beam exiting the magnetic section is transported through a drift region with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we discuss the design and characterization of the three sections in detail and present initial results from the experiment.

  19. Recent Progress in the Research on Ion and Electron Transport in Gases at Swarm Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Urquijo, Jaime de

    2004-12-01

    This paper deals with the presentation and discussion of recent research on the transport of electrons and ions in gases at low energies. Particular emphasis is placed on electron swarm experiments related with the negative differential conductivity of electrons in some gas mixtures, and with secondary ionisation processes due to the impact of metastables with neutrals (Penning ionisation). Ion transport is firstly addressed through some recent measurements on atomic and molecular systems for which both theory and experiment have reached a high degree of agreement, and also on those in which the ranges of the density-normalized electric field intensity E/N have been increased substantiality. Also, the recent advances on the application of transport theories dealing with inelastic collisions are presented, as well as some recent measurements of negative ions and charged clusters in gaseous mixtures, leading to the successful test of Blanc's law at low fields, to the experimental mobilities.

  20. Chaotic electroconvection near ion-selective membranes: investigation of transport dynamics from a 3D DNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzgalski, Clara; Mani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    We have investigated the transport dynamics of an electrokinetic instability that occurs when ions are driven from bulk fluids to ion-selective membranes due to externally applied electric fields. This phenomenon is relevant to a wide range of electrochemical applications including electrodialysis for fresh water production. Using data from our 3D DNS, we show how electroconvective instability, arising from concentration polarization, results in a chaotic flow that significantly alters the net ion transport rate across the membrane surface. The 3D DNS results, which fully resolve the spatiotemporal scales including the electric double layers, enable visualization of instantaneous snapshots of current density directly on the membrane surface, as well as analysis of transport statistics such as concentration variance and fluctuating advective fluxes. Furthermore, we present a full spectral analysis revealing broadband spectra in both concentration and flow fields and deduce the key parameter controlling the range of contributing scales.

  1. Mechanism of electrodialytic ion transport through solvent extraction membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Moskvin, L.N.; Shmatko, A.G.; Krasnoperov, V.M.

    1987-02-01

    The authors construct a mathematical model for electrodialysis and solvent extraction via an ion-selective ion exchange membrane and accounts for the electrochemical, ion exchange, and diffusional behavior of the processes including their dependence on component concentration and current and voltage. The model is tested against experimental data for the electrodialytic transport of anionic platinum complexes of chlorides from hydrochloric acid solution through tributylphosphate membranes. The platinum concentration in the aqueous solution was determined by gamma spectroscopy obtained via platinum 191 as a radiotracer.

  2. Brownian dynamics study of ion transport in the vestibule of membrane channels.

    PubMed

    Li, S C; Hoyles, M; Kuyucak, S; Chung, S H

    1998-01-01

    Brownian dynamics simulations have been carried out to study the transport of ions in a vestibular geometry, which offers a more realistic shape for membrane channels than cylindrical tubes. Specifically, we consider a torus-shaped channel, for which the analytical solution of Poisson's equation is possible. The system is composed of the toroidal channel, with length and radius of the constricted region of 80 A and 4 A, respectively, and two reservoirs containing 50 sodium ions and 50 chloride ions. The positions of each of these ions executing Brownian motion under the influence of a stochastic force and a systematic electric force are determined at discrete time steps of 50 fs for up to 2.5 ns. All of the systematic forces acting on an ion due to the other ions, an external electric field, fixed charges in the channel protein, and the image charges induced at the water-protein boundary are explicitly included in the calculations. We find that the repulsive dielectric force arising from the induced surface charges plays a dominant role in channel dynamics. It expels an ion from the vestibule when it is deliberately put in it. Even in the presence of an applied electric potential of 100 mV, an ion cannot overcome this repulsive force and permeate the channel. Only when dipoles of a favorable orientation are placed along the sides of the transmembrane segment can an ion traverse the channel under the influence of a membrane potential. When the strength of the dipoles is further increased, an ion becomes detained in a potential well, and the driving force provided by the applied field is not sufficient to drive the ion out of the well. The trajectory of an ion navigating across the channel mostly remains close to the central axis of the pore lumen. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings for the transport of ions across the membrane.

  3. Two-Dimensional Porous Carbon: Synthesis and Ion-Transport Properties.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaoyu; Luo, Jiayan; Lv, Wei; Wang, Da-Wei; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2015-09-23

    Their chemical stability, high specific surface area, and electric conductivity enable porous carbon materials to be the most commonly used electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors (also known as supercapacitors). To further increase the energy and power density, engineering of the pore structures with a higher electrochemical accessible surface area, faster ion-transport path and a more-robust interface with the electrolyte is widely investigated. Compared with traditional porous carbons, two-dimensional (2D) porous carbon sheets with an interlinked hierarchical porous structure are a good candidate for supercapacitors due to their advantages in high aspect ratio for electrode packing and electron transport, hierarchical pore structures for ion transport, and short ion-transport length. Recent progress on the synthesis of 2D porous carbons is reported here, along with the improved electrochemical behavior due to enhanced ion transport. Challenges for the controlled preparation of 2D porous carbons with desired properties are also discussed; these require precise tuning of the hierarchical structure and a clarification of the formation mechanisms. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Electrokinetic ion transport in confined micro-nanochannel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junyao; Liu, Chong; Xu, Zheng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a confined micronanochannel is presented to concentrate ions in a restricted zone. A general model exploiting the Poisson-Nernst-Plank equations coupled with the Navier-Stokes equation is employed to simulate the electrokinetic ion transport. The influences of the micronanochannel dimension and the surface charge density on the potential distribution, the ion concentration, and the fluid flow are investigated. The numerical results show that the potential drop depends mainly on the nanochannel, instead of the confined channel. Both decreasing the width and increasing the length enhance the ion enrichment performance. For a given nanochannel, ultimate value of ion concentration may be determined by the potential at the center point of the nanochannel. The study also shows that the enrichment stability can be improved by increasing the micronanochannel width, decreasing the micronanochannel length and reducing the surface charge density.

  5. Membrane Assembly and Ion Transport Ability of a Fluorinated Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Godbout, Raphaël; Légaré, Sébastien; Auger, Maud; Carpentier, Claudia; Otis, François; Auger, Michèle; Lagüe, Patrick; Voyer, Normand

    2016-01-01

    A novel 21-residue peptide incorporating six fluorinated amino acids was prepared. It was designed to fold into an amphiphilic alpha helical structure of nanoscale length with one hydrophobic face and one fluorinated face. The formation of a fluorous interface serves as the main vector for the formation of a superstructure in a bilayer membrane. Fluorescence assays showed this ion channel's ability to facilitate the translocation of alkali metal ions through a phospholipid membrane, with selectivity for sodium ions. Computational studies showed that a tetramer structure is the most probable and stable supramolecular assembly for the active ion channel structure. The results illustrate the possibility of exploiting multiple Fδ-:M+ interactions for ion transport and using fluorous interfaces to create functional nanostructures. PMID:27835700

  6. Membrane Assembly and Ion Transport Ability of a Fluorinated Nanopore.

    PubMed

    Godbout, Raphaël; Légaré, Sébastien; Auger, Maud; Carpentier, Claudia; Otis, François; Auger, Michèle; Lagüe, Patrick; Voyer, Normand

    2016-01-01

    A novel 21-residue peptide incorporating six fluorinated amino acids was prepared. It was designed to fold into an amphiphilic alpha helical structure of nanoscale length with one hydrophobic face and one fluorinated face. The formation of a fluorous interface serves as the main vector for the formation of a superstructure in a bilayer membrane. Fluorescence assays showed this ion channel's ability to facilitate the translocation of alkali metal ions through a phospholipid membrane, with selectivity for sodium ions. Computational studies showed that a tetramer structure is the most probable and stable supramolecular assembly for the active ion channel structure. The results illustrate the possibility of exploiting multiple Fδ-:M+ interactions for ion transport and using fluorous interfaces to create functional nanostructures.

  7. Origins and Transport of Ions during Magnetospheric Substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Peroomian, Vahe; Raeder, Joachim; Walker, Ray J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.

    1999-01-01

    We investigate the origins and the transport of ions observed in the near-Earth plasma sheet during the growth and expansion phases of a magnetospheric substorm that occurred on November 24, 1996. Ions observed at Geotail were traced backward in time in time-dependent magnetic and electric fields to determine their origins and the acceleration mechanisms responsible for their energization. Results from this investigation indicate that, during the growth phase of the substorm, most of the ions reaching Geotail had origins in the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL) and had alread@, entered the magnetosphere when the growth phase began. Late in the growth phase and in the expansion phase a higher proportion of the ions reaching Geotail had their origin in the plasma mantle. Indeed, during the expansion phase more than 90% of the ions seen by Geotail were from the mantle. The ions were accelerated enroute to the spacecraft; however, most of the ions' energy gain was achieved by non-adiabatic acceleration while crossing the equatorial current sheet just prior to their detection by Geotail. In general, the plasma mantle from both southern and northern hemispheres supplied non-adiabatic ions to Geotail, whereas the LLBL supplied mostly adiabatic ions to the distributions measured by the spacecraft.

  8. Hall transport of divalent metal ion modified DNA lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Lee, Keun Woo; Yoo, Sanghyun; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Bashar, Saima; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Si Joon; Jung, Joohye; Jung, Tae Soo; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2015-06-29

    We investigate the Hall transport characteristics of double-crossover divalent metal ion (Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and Co{sup 2+})-modified DNA (M-DNA) lattices grown on silica via substrate-assisted growth. The electronic characteristics of the M-DNA lattices are investigated by varying the concentration of the metal ions and then conducting Hall measurements, including resistivity, Hall mobility, carrier concentration, and magneto resistance. The tendency of the resistivity and Hall mobility was to initially decrease as the ion concentration increased, until reaching the saturation concentration (C{sub s}) of each metal ion, and then to increase as the ion concentration increased further. On the other hand, the carrier concentration revealed the opposite tendency as the resistivity and Hall mobility. The specific binding (≤C{sub s}) and the nonspecific aggregates (>C{sub s}) of the ions into the DNA lattices were significantly affected by the Hall characteristics. The numerical ranges of the Hall parameters revealed that the M-DNA lattices with metal ions had semiconductor-like characteristics. Consequently, the distinct characteristics of the electrical transport through M-DNA lattices will provide useful information on the practical use of such structures in physical devices and chemical sensors.

  9. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  10. Transport, charge exchange and loss of energetic heavy ions in the earth's radiation belts - Applicability and limitations of theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spjeldvik, W. N.

    1981-01-01

    Computer simulations of processes which control the relative abundances of ions in the trapping regions of geospace are compared with observations from discriminating ion detectors. Energy losses due to Coulomb collisions between ions and exospheric neutrals are considered, along with charge exchange losses and internal charge exchanges. The time evolution of energetic ion fluxes of equatorially mirroring ions under radial diffusion is modelled to include geomagnetic and geoelectric fluctutations. Limits to the validity of diffusion transport theory are discussed, and the simulation is noted to contain provisions for six ionic charge states and the source effect on the radiation belt oxygen ion distributions. Comparisons are made with ion flux data gathered on Explorer 45 and ISEE-1 spacecraft and results indicate that internal charge exchanges cause the radiation belt ion charge state to be independent of source charge rate characteristics, and relative charge state distribution is independent of the radially diffusive transport rate below the charge state redistribution zone.

  11. Ion transport and selectivity in biomimetic nanopores with pH-tunable zwitterionic polyelectrolyte brushes.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenping; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Zhang, Mingkan; Qian, Shizhi

    2015-10-28

    Inspired by nature, functionalized nanopores with biomimetic structures have attracted growing interests in using them as novel platforms for applications of regulating ion and nanoparticle transport. To improve these emerging applications, we study theoretically for the first time the ion transport and selectivity in short nanopores functionalized with pH tunable, zwitterionic polyelectrolyte (PE) brushes. In addition to background salt ions, the study takes into account the presence of H(+) and OH(-) ions along with the chemistry reactions between functional groups on PE chains and protons. Due to ion concentration polarization, the charge density of PE layers is not homogeneously distributed and depends significantly on the background salt concentration, pH, grafting density of PE chains, and applied voltage bias, thereby resulting in many interesting and unexpected ion transport phenomena in the nanopore. For example, the ion selectivity of the biomimetic nanopore can be regulated from anion-selective (cation-selective) to cation-selective (anion-selective) by diminishing (raising) the solution pH when a sufficiently small grafting density of PE chains, large voltage bias, and low background salt concentration are applied.

  12. Ion transport and selectivity in biomimetic nanopores with pH-tunable zwitterionic polyelectrolyte brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhenping; Yeh, Li-Hsien; Zhang, Mingkan; Qian, Shizhi

    2015-10-01

    Inspired by nature, functionalized nanopores with biomimetic structures have attracted growing interests in using them as novel platforms for applications of regulating ion and nanoparticle transport. To improve these emerging applications, we study theoretically for the first time the ion transport and selectivity in short nanopores functionalized with pH tunable, zwitterionic polyelectrolyte (PE) brushes. In addition to background salt ions, the study takes into account the presence of H+ and OH- ions along with the chemistry reactions between functional groups on PE chains and protons. Due to ion concentration polarization, the charge density of PE layers is not homogeneously distributed and depends significantly on the background salt concentration, pH, grafting density of PE chains, and applied voltage bias, thereby resulting in many interesting and unexpected ion transport phenomena in the nanopore. For example, the ion selectivity of the biomimetic nanopore can be regulated from anion-selective (cation-selective) to cation-selective (anion-selective) by diminishing (raising) the solution pH when a sufficiently small grafting density of PE chains, large voltage bias, and low background salt concentration are applied.

  13. Intracavity Optical Damage Due To Electrons, Ions And Ultraviolet Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglund, Richard F.

    1988-06-01

    Many of the damage problems experienced by intracavity laser optics, particularly for discharge-pumped and electron-beam-pumped laser systems, arise from the electronic interactions of low-energy electrons, ions and ultraviolet photons with the surface and near-surface regions of the optical material. We shall describe results of recent experiments which display some of the electronic mechanisms involved in these processes, through which incident electronic energy is absorbed, localized, transformed and ultimately dissipated in ways which change the surface composition and electronic structure of model wide bandgap optical materials. We consider discuss recent experimental results on the metallization of dielectric surfaces, the effects of adsorbed overlayers in inhibiting desorption of excited neutral atoms, and the effects of glass processing on response to electron and ion irradiation. We also point out some of the ways in which the changes in the optical surfaces wrought by the low-energy and low-intensity irradiation arising from the laser pumping mechanism can influence thermal, chemical and plasma properties of the surface in ways which alter the surface response to intense laser radiation.

  14. Simulation of target response due to uranium ion beam impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, H.; Noah, E.; Aiginger, H.; Poljanc, K.

    2009-12-01

    Metal targets were irradiated at GSI with a highly focused uranium ion beam with a kinetic energy of 350MeV/u. Out of these targets two copper samples, that had been irradiated multiple times with a maximum intensity of 2.36 · 109 , were chosen for simulations. In order to characterize the behavior of the target under the load of the ion beam, FLUKA was used to generate the initial distribution of deposited energy which was in turn used as an input for ANSYS AUTODYN to calculate the dynamic response of the target. In the simulations of the first sample a good approximation of the so-called hydrodynamic tensile limit, the crucial parameter for target failure, was found to be -1.08 GPa. This acquired value was used for the simulation of the second sample which had been irradiated with two high-intensity shots. These simulations resulted in the full penetration of the sample which was in agreement with metallurgical examinations. This paper presents the performed simulations.

  15. Ion acceleration and transport mechanisms in the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yeh-Kai

    This thesis examines the role of ion transport and acceleration in the earth's magnetosphere in two important areas: (1) the entry of solar wind ions in the cusp region on the dayside, and (2) the outflow of ions in the form of ion conics from the pre-midnight aurora. On November 15, 1996, the Polar and FAST satellites were in magnetic conjunction in the cusp region near magnetic local noon. The ion data show that the solar wind plasma injections were bursty in time, but were spatially coherent for 5 hours of magnetic local time. Ion sensors on the two satellites measured particle populations of different energies, but a time-of-flight analysis indicated that Polar and FAST were observing the same bursts of plasma injections from the reconnection region. A convection model was used to estimate the size of the plasma bursts observed. A plasma width of 2412 km was mapped out to the magnetopause to obtain a reconnection injection region latitudinal width of 1.4 to 1.5 RE. On the nightside, the FAST satellite has observed large ion outflow fluxes (>108 cm-2 s-1) in the form of auroral ion conics adjacent to the polar cap boundary. A statistical study was performed to quantify the occurrence of the ion conics in magnetic local time, the relation of the ion conics to substorms, and the total contribution of the ion conics to the plasma sheet. The ion conics occur near magnetic midnight and are associated with substorm expansion phase but not exclusively. Furthermore, using Polar UVI images to estimate the width of the ion conics in local time and FAST ion data to determine the outflow fluxes and latitudinal extent, an estimate of 1022 to 1024 ions/sec is calculated for the outflow. When this outflow is assumed to persist over the duration of a 1000 sec substorm, the total contribution of 1025 to 1027 ions is only 0.01% to 0.1% of the plasma sheet ion number 1030 ions. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  16. Electrochemical control of ion transport through a mesoporous carbon membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Surwade, Sumedh P; Chai, Songhai; Choi, Jai-Pil; Wang, Xiqing; Lee, Jeseung; Vlassiouk, Ivan V; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The transport of fluids through nanometer scale channels typically on the order of 1 -100 nm often exhibit unique properties compared to the bulk fluid. These phenomena occur because the channel dimensions and molecular size become comparable to the range of several important forces including electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Small changes in properties such as the electric double layer or surface charge can significantly affect molecular transport through the channels. Based on these emerging properties, a variety of nanofluidic devices such as nanofluidic transistors, nanofluidic diodes or lab-on-a-chip devices have been developed3-7 with a diverse range of applications including water purification, biomolecular sensing, DNA separation, and rectified ion transport. Nanofluidic devices are typically fabricated using expensive lithography techniques or sacrificial templates. Here we report a carbon-based, three-dimensional nanofluidic transport membrane that enables gated, or on/off, control of the transport of organic molecular species and metal ions using an applied electrical potential. In the absence of an applied potential, both cationic and anionic molecules freely diffuse across the membrane via a concentration gradient. However, when an electrochemical potential is applied, the transport of ions through the membrane is inhibited.

  17. Roles of ion transport in control of cell motility.

    PubMed

    Stock, Christian; Ludwig, Florian T; Hanley, Peter J; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Cell motility is an essential feature of life. It is essential for reproduction, propagation, embryonic development, and healing processes such as wound closure and a successful immune defense. If out of control, cell motility can become life-threatening as, for example, in metastasis or autoimmune diseases. Regardless of whether ciliary/flagellar or amoeboid movement, controlled motility always requires a concerted action of ion channels and transporters, cytoskeletal elements, and signaling cascades. Ion transport across the plasma membrane contributes to cell motility by affecting the membrane potential and voltage-sensitive ion channels, by inducing local volume changes with the help of aquaporins and by modulating cytosolic Ca(2+) and H(+) concentrations. Voltage-sensitive ion channels serve as voltage detectors in electric fields thus enabling galvanotaxis; local swelling facilitates the outgrowth of protrusions at the leading edge while local shrinkage accompanies the retraction of the cell rear; the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration exerts its main effect on cytoskeletal dynamics via motor proteins such as myosin or dynein; and both, the intracellular and the extracellular H(+) concentration modulate cell migration and adhesion by tuning the activity of enzymes and signaling molecules in the cytosol as well as the activation state of adhesion molecules at the cell surface. In addition to the actual process of ion transport, both, channels and transporters contribute to cell migration by being part of focal adhesion complexes and/or physically interacting with components of the cytoskeleton. The present article provides an overview of how the numerous ion-transport mechanisms contribute to the various modes of cell motility.

  18. Ion transport through block copolymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Scott; Panday, Ashoutosh; Balsara, Nitash

    2009-03-01

    Poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (SEO) is a candidate material for electrolytes for rechargeable lithium metal batteries. The PS phase suppresses lithium dendrite growth on the anode during recharge, and the PEO phase solvates lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide (LiTFSI) salt to form conducting pathways. Complete electrochemical characterization of PEO/LiTFSI mixtures requires measurement of conductivity, salt diffusion coefficient, and lithium ion transference number. The present study covers SEO copolymers that exhibit lamellar and cylindrical morphologies in the absence of salt. The addition of salt affects morphology but the relationships between morphology and electrochemical characteristics have not yet been clarified. Some aspects of these relationships will be presented.

  19. Anomalous transport due to shear-Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.; Chance, M.S.; Okuda, H.

    1980-10-01

    The behavior of shear-Alfven eigenmodes and the accompanied anomalous transport have been investigated. In the particle simulation, equilibrium thermal fluctuations associated with the eigenmodes have been observed to nullify the zeroth-order shear near the rational surface through the induced second-order eddy current, and, in turn, give rise to the formation of magnetic islands which cause rapid electron energy transport in the region. The theoretical verification of the observed behavior is discussed.

  20. Ion heat pinch due to the magnetic drift resonance with the ion temperature gradient instability in a rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Debing; Xu, Yingfeng; Wang, Shaojie

    2017-03-01

    The ion heat pinch due to the magnetic drift resonance with the ion temperature gradient instability is investigated by using the Lie-transform method. In a tokamak plasma with an equilibrium parallel flow, the total heat flux is found to direct inward with a strong flow shear. The proposed heat pinch can provide possible explanations for some experimental observations.

  1. Numerical analysis of H(-) ion transport processes in Cs-seeded negative ion sources.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, D; Takado, N; Hatayama, A; Inoue, T

    2008-02-01

    The H(-) ion transport processes are numerically simulated to understand the extraction process of surface-produced H(-) ions. The three-dimensional transport code using Monte Carlo method has been applied to calculate the H(-) ion extraction probabilities in the model geometry of the JAEA 10 ampere negative ion source. The roles of (1) filter magnetic field and (2) collisions with neutrals (H(0) atoms and H(2) molecules) on the H(-) ion extraction are systematically studied. The results show that H(-) ions are extracted mainly by the filter magnetic field under the low gas pressure condition. The simulation results of extracted H(-) ion beam intensity in the JAEA 10 ampere negative ion source without the magnetic filter tend to be smaller than the experimental results, especially under the low pressure condition. Further model improvements, e.g., modeling and implementation of the effects of the electric field near the extraction aperture, will be required to understand the extraction process of the H(-) ions under the low gas pressure condition.

  2. Ion beam transport in tissue-like media using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT.

    PubMed

    Gudowska, Irena; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Andreo, Pedro; Belkić, Dzevad; Brahme, Anders

    2004-05-21

    The development of the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT (heavy ion transport) for the simulation of the transport of protons and heavier ions in tissue-like media is described. The code SHIELD-HIT, a spin-off of SHIELD (available as RSICC CCC-667), extends the transport of hadron cascades from standard targets to that of ions in arbitrary tissue-like materials, taking into account ionization energy-loss straggling and multiple Coulomb scattering effects. The consistency of the results obtained with SHIELD-HIT has been verified against experimental data and other existing Monte Carlo codes (PTRAN, PETRA), as well as with deterministic models for ion transport, comparing depth distributions of energy deposition by protons, 12C and 20Ne ions impinging on water. The SHIELD-HIT code yields distributions consistent with a proper treatment of nuclear inelastic collisions. Energy depositions up to and well beyond the Bragg peak due to nuclear fragmentations are well predicted. Satisfactory agreement is also found with experimental determinations of the number of fragments of a given type, as a function of depth in water, produced by 12C and 14N ions of 670 MeV u(-1), although less favourable agreement is observed for heavier projectiles such as 16O ions of the same energy. The calculated neutron spectra differential in energy and angle produced in a mimic of a Martian rock by irradiation with 12C ions of 290 MeV u(-1) also shows good agreement with experimental data. It is concluded that a careful analysis of stopping power data for different tissues is necessary for radiation therapy applications, since an incorrect estimation of the position of the Bragg peak might lead to a significant deviation from the prescribed dose in small target volumes. The results presented in this study indicate the usefulness of the SHIELD-HIT code for Monte Carlo simulations in the field of light ion radiation therapy.

  3. Regulation of airway surface liquid volume and mucus transport by active ion transport.

    PubMed

    Tarran, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Mucus clearance is an important component of the lung's innate defense against disease, and the ability of the airways to clear mucus is strongly dependent on the volume of liquid on airway surfaces. Whether airway surface liquid (ASL) volume is maintained by passive surface forces or by active ion transport is controversial yet crucial to the understanding of how this system operates in both health and disease. In support of active ion transport being the major determinant of ASL volume, we have demonstrated that normal airway epithelia sense and autoregulate ASL height (volume) by adjusting the rates of Na+ absorption and Cl- secretion to maintain mucus transport.

  4. Alpha characterization inside pipes using ion-transport technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, S. P.; Rawool-Sullivan, M. W.; Williams, K. G.; Vaccarella, J. A.

    Many DOE facilities have several miles of waste pipe systems that are internally contaminated with various and often undetermined radio nuclides. Unfortunately, currently acceptable alpha detection technologies are inefficient, time consuming, and do not address the problems presented by small diameter or curved pipes. In general, the problem of detecting alpha contamination on the inside surface of pipes is complicated by the fact that alphas do not penetrate the pipe walls. Unlike their conventional counterparts, alpha detectors based on ion transport technology sense alpha particles by collecting the ions created in ambient air as the particle loses its kinetic energy. The ions inside the pipe are transported by a fan-generated air current to an electrode inside the detector, which is attached to one end of the pipe. The collected charge at the electrode is proportional to the number of ions created inside the pipe, which in turn is proportional to the number of alphas emitted. Typically, monitoring for alpha contamination inside pipes or ductwork involves disrupting the operation to access as much surface area as possible for standard alpha monitoring. The detector based on ion transport technology effectively minimizes such disruption and in many circumstances will allow for in situ monitoring of a system that might otherwise not be practically accessible to standard methods.

  5. Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul [Allentown, PA; Makitka, III, Alexander; Carolan, Michael Francis [Allentown, PA

    2012-04-03

    An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

  6. Ion transport barriers triggered by plasma polarization in gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, A.; Sarazin, Y.; Zarzoso, D.; Abiteboul, J.; Brun, A. S.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Passeron, C.; Thomine, O.

    2013-07-01

    The creation of ion transport barriers by externally induced sheared E × B flows is investigated with the global, full-f and flux-driven gyrokinetic code GYSELA. A gyrokinetic source of vorticity is designed and proves to be efficient in polarizing the plasma. Induced sheared electric fields develop in the turbulent core and are accompanied by the creation of a transport barrier. The barrier and the sheared flow relax quasi-periodically because of zonal flow activity and a destabilizing temperature anisotropy induced by the vorticity source. A new cyclic mechanism leading to the relaxation of transport barriers in tokamaks is discovered.

  7. Facilitated Ion Transport in Smectic Ordered Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hong; Han, Kee Sung; Lee, Je Seung; Lee, Albert S; Park, Seo Kyung; Hong, Sung Yun; Lee, Jong-Chan; Mueller, Karl T; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2016-11-01

    A novel ionic mixture of an imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquid containing ethylene-oxide-functionalized phosphite anions is fabricated, which, when doped with lithium salt, self-assembles into a smectic-ordered ionic liquid crystal through Coulombic interactions between the ion species. Interestingly, the smectic order in the ionic-liquid-crystal ionogel facilitates ionic transport.

  8. Magnetic and Transport Properties of Mn-ion implanted Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preisler, V.; Ogawa, M.; Han, X.; Wang, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic and transport properties of Mn-ion implanted Si. Both temperature dependent and field dependent measurements of the samples using a SQUID magnometer reveal ferromagnetic properties at room temperature. Magnetotransport measurements show a large positive magnetoresistance up to 4.5 T with no signs of saturation.

  9. Physics of gas breakdown for ion beam transport in gas

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.L.; Poukey, J.W.; Hinshelwood, D.D.; Rose, D.V.; Hubbard, R.F.; Lampe, M.; Neri, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.; Slinker, S.P.; Stephanakis, S.J.; Young, F.C.; Welch, D.R.

    1993-06-01

    Detailed analysis, experiments, and computer simulations are producing a new understanding of gas breakdown during intense ion beam transport in neutral gas. Charge neutralization of beam micro clumps is shown to limit the net clump potentials to a non-zero value {phi}{sub min}, which can lead to divergence growth and axial energy spreading. At pressures {approx_gt} 1 Torr, plasma shielding should substantially reduce this effect. Current neutralization has been studied in experiments on the GAMBLE II accelerator. The importance of fast electrons (knockons and runaways) has been established in IPROP simulations, which are in agreement with the experiments. For light ion fusion parameters with pressures {approx_gt} 1 Torr, very small net current fractions ({much_lt} 1%) appear feasible, permitting ballistic transport in gas. Self-pinched transport requires higher net current fractions ({ge} 2%) and preliminary IPROP code results indicate that this appears achievable for small-radius intense beams in lower pressure gases ({approx_lt}Torr). Several self-pinched transport concepts look promising. The importance of these results for both light ion fusion and heavy ion fusion is discussed.

  10. Excess surface area in bioelectrochemical systems causes ion transport limitations

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Davenport, Emily K.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: 1) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200 mM increased current linearly up to a total of +273% vs. 0 mM NaCl under advective conditions, 2) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200 mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and 3) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steady-state current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential at the electrode surface. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant. PMID:25421463

  11. Excess surface area in bioelectrochemical systems causes ion transport limitations.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Timothy D; Babauta, Jerome T; Davenport, Emily K; Renslow, Ryan S; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-05-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: (i) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200 mM increased current linearly up to a total of +273% vs. 0 mM NaCl under advective conditions; (ii) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200 mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and (iii) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steady-state current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Excess Surface Area in Bioelectrochemical Systems Causes ion Transport Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Davenport, Emily K.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-05-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: (i) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200mM increased current linearly up to a total of þ273% vs. 0mM NaCl under advective conditions; (ii) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and (iii) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steadystate current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant.

  13. Reduced Fast Ion Transport Model For The Tokamak Transport Code TRANSP

    SciTech Connect

    Podesta,, Mario; Gorelenkova, Marina; White, Roscoe

    2014-02-28

    Fast ion transport models presently implemented in the tokamak transport code TRANSP [R. J. Hawryluk, in Physics of Plasmas Close to Thermonuclear Conditions, CEC Brussels, 1 , 19 (1980)] are not capturing important aspects of the physics associated with resonant transport caused by instabilities such as Toroidal Alfv en Eigenmodes (TAEs). This work describes the implementation of a fast ion transport model consistent with the basic mechanisms of resonant mode-particle interaction. The model is formulated in terms of a probability distribution function for the particle's steps in phase space, which is consistent with the MonteCarlo approach used in TRANSP. The proposed model is based on the analysis of fast ion response to TAE modes through the ORBIT code [R. B. White et al., Phys. Fluids 27 , 2455 (1984)], but it can be generalized to higher frequency modes (e.g. Compressional and Global Alfv en Eigenmodes) and to other numerical codes or theories.

  14. Facilitated Ion Transport in Smectic Ordered Ionic Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jin Hong; Han, Kee Sung; Lee, Je Seung; Lee, Albert S.; Park, Seo Kyung; Hong, Sung Yun; Lee, Jong-Chan; Mueller, Karl T.; Hong, Soon Man; Koo, Chong Min

    2016-09-08

    We investigated a novel ionic mixture of an imidazolium-based room temperature IL containing ethylene oxide functionalized phosphite anion and a lithium salt that self-assembles into a smectic-ordered IL crystal. The two key features in this work are the unique origin of the smectic order of the ionic mixtures and the facilitated ion transport behavior in the smectic ordered IL crystal. In fact, the IL crystals are self-assembled through Coulombic interactions between ion species, not through the hydrophilic-phobic interactions between charged ion heads and hydrophobic long alkyl pendants or the steric interaction between mesogenic moieties. Furthermore, the smectic order in the IL crystal ionogel facilitates exceptional and remarkable ionic transport. Large ionic conductivity, viscoelastic robustness, and additional electrochemical stability of the IL crystal ionogels provide promising opportunities for future electrochemical applications.

  15. Water, proton, and ion transport: from nanotubes to proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummer, Gerhard

    Remarkably, protein channels transporting polar substances such as water, protons, and ions are often lined by predominantly non-polar residues. The unique structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties of water and ions in molecular confinement help explain this puzzling observation. Computer simulations of solvated nanotubes and proteins show that weakly polar cavities can be filled by water at equilibrium, but such filling is highly sensitive to small variations in the polarity of the cavity. In the filled state, water forms wires and clusters held together by tight hydrogen bonds. Simulations on quantum energy surfaces also show that 1D water wires in hydrophobic environments facilitate rapid proton motion. The unique properties of water in weakly polar channels help explain the rapid flow of water through molecular pores, the controlled proton flow in enzymes, the gating of ion transport through membrane channels, and the function of mitochondrial proton pumps.

  16. Homology modeling of transporter proteins (carriers and ion channels).

    PubMed

    Ravna, Aina Westrheim; Sylte, Ingebrigt

    2012-01-01

    Transporter proteins are divided into channels and carriers and constitute families of membrane proteins of physiological and pharmacological importance. These proteins are targeted by several currently prescribed drugs, and they have a large potential as targets for new drug development. Ion channels and carriers are difficult to express and purify in amounts for X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, and few carrier and ion channel structures are deposited in the PDB database. The scarcity of atomic resolution 3D structures of carriers and channels is a problem for understanding their molecular mechanisms of action and for designing new compounds with therapeutic potentials. The homology modeling approach is a valuable approach for obtaining structural information about carriers and ion channels when no crystal structure of the protein of interest is available. In this chapter, computational approaches for constructing homology models of carriers and transporters are reviewed.

  17. Isothermal titration calorimetry of ion-coupled membrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Boudker, Olga; Oh, SeCheol

    2015-04-01

    Binding of ligands, ranging from proteins to ions, to membrane proteins is associated with absorption or release of heat that can be detected by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Such measurements not only provide binding affinities but also afford direct access to thermodynamic parameters of binding--enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity. These parameters can be interpreted in a structural context, allow discrimination between different binding mechanisms and guide drug design. In this review, we introduce advantages and limitations of ITC as a methodology to study molecular interactions of membrane proteins. We further describe case studies where ITC was used to analyze thermodynamic linkage between ions and substrates in ion-coupled transporters. Similar type of linkage analysis will likely be applicable to a wide range of transporters, channels, and receptors.

  18. Radial transport of storm time ring current ions

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, A.T.Y. )

    1993-01-01

    Radial transport of energetic ions for the development of the main phase of geomagnetic storms is investigated with data from the medium energy particle analyzer (MEPA) on the Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft, which monitored protons (E[sub p] > 56 keV), helium ions (E[sub He] > 72 keV), and the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen group, which is mostly dominated by oxygen ions (E[sub O] > 137 keV). From a study of four geomagnetic storms, we show that the flux increase of these ions in the inner ring current region (L [approx lt] 5) can be accounted for by an inward displacement of the ring current population by [approximately]0.5 to 3.5 R[sub E]. There is a general trend that a larger inward displacement occurs at higher L shells than at lower ones. These results are in agreement with previous findings. The radially injected population consists of the prestorm population modified by substorm injections which occur on a much shorter rime scale than that of a storm main phase. It is also found that the inward displacement is relatively independent of ion mass and energy, suggesting that the radial transport of these energetic ions is effected primarily by convective motion from a large electric field or by diffusion resulting from magnetic field fluctuations. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Observation of Critical-Gradient Behavior in Alfvén-Eigenmode-Induced Fast-Ion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Austin, M. E.; Kramer, G. J.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Stagner, L.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; White, R. B.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that fast-ion transport suddenly becomes stiff above a critical threshold in the presence of many overlapping small-amplitude Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). The threshold is phase-space dependent and occurs when particle orbits become stochastic due to resonances with AEs. Above threshold, equilibrium fast-ion density profiles are unchanged despite increased drive, and intermittent fast-ion losses are observed. Fast-ion D α spectroscopy indicates radially localized transport of the copassing population at radii that correspond to the location of midcore AEs. The observation of stiff fast-ion transport suggests that reduced models can be used to effectively predict alpha profiles, beam ion profiles, and losses to aid in the design of optimized scenarios for future burning plasma devices.

  20. Observation of Critical-Gradient Behavior in Alfvén-Eigenmode-Induced Fast-Ion Transport.

    PubMed

    Collins, C S; Heidbrink, W W; Austin, M E; Kramer, G J; Pace, D C; Petty, C C; Stagner, L; Van Zeeland, M A; White, R B; Zhu, Y B

    2016-03-04

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that fast-ion transport suddenly becomes stiff above a critical threshold in the presence of many overlapping small-amplitude Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). The threshold is phase-space dependent and occurs when particle orbits become stochastic due to resonances with AEs. Above threshold, equilibrium fast-ion density profiles are unchanged despite increased drive, and intermittent fast-ion losses are observed. Fast-ion Dα spectroscopy indicates radially localized transport of the copassing population at radii that correspond to the location of midcore AEs. The observation of stiff fast-ion transport suggests that reduced models can be used to effectively predict alpha profiles, beam ion profiles, and losses to aid in the design of optimized scenarios for future burning plasma devices.

  1. Temperature dependence of ion transport: the compensated Arrhenius equation.

    PubMed

    Petrowsky, Matt; Frech, Roger

    2009-04-30

    The temperature-dependent conductivity originating in a thermally activated process is often described by a simple Arrhenius expression. However, this expression provides a poor description of the data for organic liquid electrolytes and amorphous polymer electrolytes. Here, we write the temperature dependence of the conductivity as an Arrhenius expression and show that the experimentally observed non-Arrhenius behavior is due to the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant contained in the exponential prefactor. Scaling the experimentally measured conductivities to conductivities at a chosen reference temperature leads to a "compensated" Arrhenius equation that provides an excellent description of temperature-dependent conductivities. A plot of the prefactors as a function of the solvent dielectric constant results in a single master curve for each family of solvents. These data suggest that ion transport in these and related systems is governed by a single activated process differing only in the activation energy for each family of solvents. Connection is made to the shift factor used to describe electrical and mechanical relaxation in a wide range of phenomena, suggesting that this scaling procedure might have broad applications.

  2. Ionizing radiation, ion transports, and radioresistance of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Stephan M.; Butz, Lena; Stegen, Benjamin; Klumpp, Dominik; Braun, Norbert; Ruth, Peter; Eckert, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment of many tumor entities comprises fractionated radiation therapy which applies ionizing radiation to the tumor-bearing target volume. Ionizing radiation causes double-strand breaks in the DNA backbone that result in cell death if the number of DNA double-strand breaks exceeds the DNA repair capacity of the tumor cell. Ionizing radiation reportedly does not only act on the DNA in the nucleus but also on the plasma membrane. In particular, ionizing radiation-induced modifications of ion channels and transporters have been reported. Importantly, these altered transports seem to contribute to the survival of the irradiated tumor cells. The present review article summarizes our current knowledge on the underlying mechanisms and introduces strategies to radiosensitize tumor cells by targeting plasma membrane ion transports. PMID:23966948

  3. Percolating ion transport in binary mixtures with high dielectric loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brohede, U.; Strømme, M.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the ion transport percolation properties of a binary system of an ion conductor (NaCl) and an insulator (ethyl cellulose) for which the ac component of the conductivity is non-negligible over the entire measured frequency range. We find that the dc conductivity, extracted from a well-defined range of frequencies, can be described by a low percolation threshold, ϕc=0.06 three-dimensional conducting network. The low ϕc was explained by the water-layer-assisted ion conduction in micrometer-sized ethyl cellulose channels between NaCl grains. The present findings provide valuable knowledge for the analysis and design of a broad class of ion conducting functional materials.

  4. Does Membrane Thickness Affect the Transport of Selective Ions Mediated by Ionophores in Synthetic Membranes?

    PubMed

    Lomora, Mihai; Dinu, Ionel Adrian; Itel, Fabian; Rigo, Serena; Spulber, Mariana; Palivan, Cornelia G

    2015-08-31

    Biomimetic polymer nanocompartments (polymersomes) with preserved architecture and ion-selective membrane permeability represent cutting-edge mimics of cellular compartmentalization. Here it is studied whether the membrane thickness affects the functionality of ionophores in respect to the transport of Ca(2+) ions in synthetic membranes of polymersomes, which are up to 2.6 times thicker than lipid membranes (5 nm). Selective permeability toward calcium ions is achieved by proper insertion of ionomycin, and demonstrated by using specific fluorescence markers encapsulated in their inner cavities. Preservation of polymersome architecture is shown by a combination of light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. By using a combination of stopped-flow and fluorescence spectroscopy, it is shown that ionomycin can function and transport calcium ions across polymer membranes with thicknesses in the range 10.7-13.4 nm (7.1-8.9 times larger than the size of the ionophore). Thicker membranes induce a decrease in transport, but do not block it due to the intrinsic flexibility of these synthetic membranes. The design of ion selective biomimetic nanocompartments represents a new path toward the development of cellular ion nanosensors and nano-reactors, in which calcium sensitive biomacromolecules can be triggered for specific biological functions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Functions of Ion Transport Peptide and Ion Transport Peptide-Like in the Red Flour Beetle Tribolium castaneum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ion transport peptide (ITP) and ITP-like (ITPL) are highly conserved neuropeptides in insects and crustaceans. We investigated the alternatively spliced variants of ITP/ITPL in Tribolium castaneum to understand their functions. We identified three alternatively spliced transcripts named itp, itpl-...

  6. Decoupling Mechanical and Ion Transport Properties in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Lucas D.

    Polymer electrolytes are mixtures of a polar polymer and salt, in which the polymer replaces small molecule solvents and provides a dielectric medium so that ions can dissociate and migrate under the influence of an external electric field. Beginning in the 1970s, research in polymer electrolytes has been primarily motivated by their promise to advance electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices, such as lithium ion batteries, flexible organic solar cells, and anhydrous fuel cells. In particular, polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) can improve both safety and energy density by eliminating small molecule, volatile solvents and enabling an all-solid-state design of electrochemical cells. The outstanding challenge in the field of polymer electrolytes is to maximize ionic conductivity while simultaneously addressing orthogonal mechanical properties, such as modulus, fracture toughness, or high temperature creep resistance. The crux of the challenge is that flexible, polar polymers best-suited for polymer electrolytes (e.g., poly(ethylene oxide)) offer little in the way of mechanical robustness. Similarly, polymers typically associated with superior mechanical performance (e.g., poly(methyl methacrylate)) slow ion transport due to their glassy polymer matrix. The design strategy is therefore to employ structured electrolytes that exhibit distinct conducting and mechanically robust phases on length scales of tens of nanometers. This thesis reports a remarkably simple, yet versatile synthetic strategy---termed polymerization-induced phase separation, or PIPS---to prepare PEMs exhibiting an unprecedented combination of both high conductivity and high modulus. This performance is enabled by co-continuous, isotropic networks of poly(ethylene oxide)/ionic liquid and highly crosslinked polystyrene. A suite of in situ, time-resolved experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism by which this network morphology forms, and it appears to be tied to the

  7. Synthetic ion transporters can induce apoptosis by facilitating chloride anion transport into cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sung-Kyun; Kim, Sung Kuk; Share, Andrew; Lynch, Vincent M; Park, Jinhong; Namkung, Wan; Van Rossom, Wim; Busschaert, Nathalie; Gale, Philip A; Sessler, Jonathan L; Shin, Injae

    2014-10-01

    Anion transporters based on small molecules have received attention as therapeutic agents because of their potential to disrupt cellular ion homeostasis. However, a direct correlation between a change in cellular chloride anion concentration and cytotoxicity has not been established for synthetic ion carriers. Here we show that two pyridine diamide-strapped calix[4]pyrroles induce coupled chloride anion and sodium cation transport in both liposomal models and cells, and promote cell death by increasing intracellular chloride and sodium ion concentrations. Removing either ion from the extracellular media or blocking natural sodium channels with amiloride prevents this effect. Cell experiments show that the ion transporters induce the sodium chloride influx, which leads to an increased concentration of reactive oxygen species, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria and apoptosis via caspase activation. However, they do not activate the caspase-independent apoptotic pathway associated with the apoptosis-inducing factor. Ion transporters, therefore, represent an attractive approach for regulating cellular processes that are normally controlled tightly by homeostasis.

  8. Synthetic ion transporters can induce apoptosis by facilitating chloride anion transport into cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Sung-Kyun; Kim, Sung Kuk; Share, Andrew; Lynch, Vincent M.; Park, Jinhong; Namkung, Wan; van Rossom, Wim; Busschaert, Nathalie; Gale, Philip A.; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Shin, Injae

    2014-10-01

    Anion transporters based on small molecules have received attention as therapeutic agents because of their potential to disrupt cellular ion homeostasis. However, a direct correlation between a change in cellular chloride anion concentration and cytotoxicity has not been established for synthetic ion carriers. Here we show that two pyridine diamide-strapped calix[4]pyrroles induce coupled chloride anion and sodium cation transport in both liposomal models and cells, and promote cell death by increasing intracellular chloride and sodium ion concentrations. Removing either ion from the extracellular media or blocking natural sodium channels with amiloride prevents this effect. Cell experiments show that the ion transporters induce the sodium chloride influx, which leads to an increased concentration of reactive oxygen species, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria and apoptosis via caspase activation. However, they do not activate the caspase-independent apoptotic pathway associated with the apoptosis-inducing factor. Ion transporters, therefore, represent an attractive approach for regulating cellular processes that are normally controlled tightly by homeostasis.

  9. Transport of ions injected by AMPTE magnetotail releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cladis, J. B.; Francis, W. E.

    1989-01-01

    The BA and Li ions released in the magnetotail by the AMPTE IRM satellite were not observed in the inner magnetosphere with the AMPTE CCE satellite. In an effort to understand these results, Cladis and Francis (1988) modeled the expansion and ionization of the released atoms and computed several hundred guiding-center trajectories of the ions to sample the motion of each ion cloud. Here, the transport calculations are improved, principally by computing the full gyration motion of the ions in a more realistic model of the geomagnetic tail. The results indicate that the Ba(+) ions were convected inward along a narrow corridor, which was at least 2 earth radii away from the satellite in the case of the first Ba release and at least 3 earth radii away in the case of the second Ba release. Even if the ions had reached the satellite, their energies would have been too low to be detected. The Li(+) ions from both releases drifted inward over broad regions which overlapped the satellite in space and time. However, their fluxes at the satellite were somewhat too low to be detected.

  10. Mechanism of unassisted ion transport across membrane bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    To establish how charged species move from water to the nonpolar membrane interior and to determine the energetic and structural effects accompanying this process, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the transport of Na+ and Cl- across a lipid bilayer located between two water lamellae. The total length of molecular dynamics trajectories generated for each ion was 10 ns. Our simulations demonstrate that permeation of ions into the membrane is accompanied by the formation of deep, asymmetric thinning defects in the bilayer, whereby polar lipid head groups and water penetrate the nonpolar membrane interior. Once the ion crosses the midplane of the bilayer the deformation "switches sides"; the initial defect slowly relaxes, and a defect forms in the outgoing side of the bilayer. As a result, the ion remains well solvated during the process; the total number of oxygen atoms from water and lipid head groups in the first solvation shell remains constant. A similar membrane deformation is formed when the ion is instantaneously inserted into the interior of the bilayer. The formation of defects considerably lowers the free energy barrier to transfer of the ion across the bilayer and, consequently, increases the permeabilities of the membrane to ions, compared to the rigid, planar structure, by approximately 14 orders of magnitude. Our results have implications for drug delivery using liposomes and peptide insertion into membranes.

  11. Mechanism of unassisted ion transport across membrane bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, M. A.; Pohorille, A.

    1996-01-01

    To establish how charged species move from water to the nonpolar membrane interior and to determine the energetic and structural effects accompanying this process, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the transport of Na+ and Cl- across a lipid bilayer located between two water lamellae. The total length of molecular dynamics trajectories generated for each ion was 10 ns. Our simulations demonstrate that permeation of ions into the membrane is accompanied by the formation of deep, asymmetric thinning defects in the bilayer, whereby polar lipid head groups and water penetrate the nonpolar membrane interior. Once the ion crosses the midplane of the bilayer the deformation "switches sides"; the initial defect slowly relaxes, and a defect forms in the outgoing side of the bilayer. As a result, the ion remains well solvated during the process; the total number of oxygen atoms from water and lipid head groups in the first solvation shell remains constant. A similar membrane deformation is formed when the ion is instantaneously inserted into the interior of the bilayer. The formation of defects considerably lowers the free energy barrier to transfer of the ion across the bilayer and, consequently, increases the permeabilities of the membrane to ions, compared to the rigid, planar structure, by approximately 14 orders of magnitude. Our results have implications for drug delivery using liposomes and peptide insertion into membranes.

  12. Enhanced momentum delivery by electric force to ions due to collisions of ions with neutrals

    SciTech Connect

    Makrinich, G.; Fruchtman, A.

    2013-04-15

    Ions in partially ionized argon, nitrogen, and helium gas discharges are accelerated across a magnetic field by an applied electric field, colliding with neutrals during the acceleration. The momentum delivered by the electric force to the ions, which is equal to the momentum carried by the mixed ion-neutral flow, is found by measuring the force exerted on a balance force meter by that flow exiting the discharge. The power deposited in the ions is calculated by measuring the ion flux and the accelerating voltage. The ratio of force over power is found for the three gases, while the gas flow rates and magnetic field intensities are varied over a wide range of values, resulting in a wide range of gas pressures and applied voltages. The measurements for the three different gases confirm our previous suggestion [G. Makrinich and A. Fruchtman, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 181504 (2009)] that the momentum delivered to the ions for a given power is enhanced by ion-neutral collisions during the acceleration and that this enhancement is proportional to the square root of the number of ion-neutral collisions.

  13. Impurity transport due to electromagnetic drift wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, S.; Pusztai, I.; Mollén, A.; Fülöp, T.

    2012-03-01

    Finite β effects on impurity transport are studied through local linear gyrokinetic simulations with GYRO [J. Candy and E. Belli, General Atomics Report No. GA-A26818, 2011]; in particular, we investigate the parametric dependences of the impurity peaking factor (zero-flux density gradient) and the onset of the kinetic ballooning modes (KBMs). We find that electromagnetic effects even at low β can have significant impact on the impurity transport. The KBM instability threshold depends on the plasma parameters, particularly strongly on plasma shape. We have shown that magnetic geometry significantly influences the results, and the commonly used s-α model overestimates the KBM growth rates and ITG stabilization at high β. In the β range, where the KBM is the dominant instability the impurity peaking factor is strongly reduced, with very little dependence on β and the impurity charge.

  14. Toroidal momentum transport in a tokamak due to profile shearing

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, R.; Grosshauser, S. R.; Hornsby, W. A.; Migliano, P.; Peeters, A. G.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.

    2014-06-15

    The effect of profile shearing on toroidal momentum transport is studied in linear and non-linear gyro-kinetic simulations. Retaining the radial dependence of both plasma and geometry parameters leads to a momentum flux that has contributions both linear in the logarithmic gradients of density and temperature, as well as contributions linear in the derivatives of the logarithmic gradients. The effect of the turbulence intensity gradient on momentum transport is found to be small for the studied parameters. Linear simulations at fixed normalized toroidal wave number predict a weak dependence of the momentum flux on the normalized Larmor radius ρ{sub *}=ρ/R. Non-linear simulations, however, at sufficiently small ρ{sub *} show a linear scaling of the momentum flux with ρ{sub *}. The obtained stationary rotation gradients are in the range of, although perhaps smaller than, current experiments. For a reactor plasma, however, a rather small rotation gradient should result from profile shearing.

  15. Characterization of Rat Meibomian Gland Ion and Fluid Transport

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongfang; Davis, Richard M.; Aita, Megumi; Burns, Kimberlie A.; Clapp, Phillip W.; Gilmore, Rodney C.; Chua, Michael; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Schlegel, Richard; Randell, Scott H.; C. Boucher, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We establish novel primary rat meibomian gland (MG) cell culture systems and explore the ion transport activities of the rat MG. Methods Freshly excised rat MG tissues were characterized as follows: (1) mRNA expression of selected epithelial ion channels/transporters were measured by RT-PCR, (2) localization of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) mRNAs was performed by in situ hybridization, and (3) protein expression and localization of βENaC, the Na+/K+/Cl− cotransporter (NKCC), and the Na+/K+ ATPase were evaluated by immunofluorescence. Primary isolated rat MG cells were cocultured with 3T3 feeder cells and a Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor (Y-27632) for expansion. Passaged rat MG cells were cultured as planar sheets under air-liquid interface (ALI) conditions for gene expression and electrophysiologic studies. Passaged rat MG cells also were cultured in matrigel matrices to form spheroids, which were examined ultrastructurally by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and functionally using swelling assays. Results Expression of multiple ion channel/transporter genes was detected in rat MG tissues. β-ENaC mRNA and protein were localized more to MG peripheral acinar cells than central acinar cells or ductular epithelial cells. Electrophysiologic studies of rat MG cell planar cultures demonstrated functional sodium, chloride, and potassium channels, and cotransporters activities. Transmission electron microscopic analyses of rat MG spheroids revealed highly differentiated MG cells with abundant lysosomal lamellar bodies. Rat MG spheroids culture-based measurements demonstrated active volume regulation by ion channels. Conclusions This study demonstrates the presence and function of ion channels and volume transport by rat MG. Two novel primary MG cell culture models that may be useful for MG research were established. PMID:27127933

  16. Visualizing ion relaxation in the transport of short DNA fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, S A; Wang, H; Laue, T M; Wilson, T J; Wooll, J O

    1999-01-01

    Ion relaxation plays an important role in a wide range of phenomena involving the transport of charged biomolecules. Ion relaxation is responsible for reducing sedimentation and diffusion constants, reducing electrophoretic mobilities, increasing intrinsic viscosities, and, for biomolecules that lack a permanent electric dipole moment, provides a mechanism for orienting them in an external electric field. Recently, a numerical boundary element method was developed to solve the coupled Navier-Stokes, Poisson, and ion transport equations for a polyion modeled as a rigid body of arbitrary size, shape, and charge distribution. This method has subsequently been used to compute the electrophoretic mobilities and intrinsic viscosities of a number of model proteins and DNA fragments. The primary purpose of the present work is to examine the effect of ion relaxation on the ion density and fluid velocity fields around short DNA fragments (20 and 40 bp). Contour density as well as vector field diagrams of the various scalar and vector fields are presented and discussed at monovalent salt concentrations of 0.03 and 0.11 M. In addition, the net charge current fluxes in the vicinity of the DNA fragments at low and high salt concentrations are briefly examined and discussed. PMID:10233066

  17. Transportation behavior of alkali ions through a cell membrane ion channel. A quantum chemical description of a simplified isolated model.

    PubMed

    Billes, Ferenc; Mohammed-Ziegler, Ildikó; Mikosch, Hans

    2012-08-01

    Quantum chemical model calculations were carried out for modeling the ion transport through an isolated ion channel of a cell membrane. An isolated part of a natural ion channel was modeled. The model channel was a calixarene derivative, hydrated sodium and potassium ions were the models of the transported ion. The electrostatic potential of the channel and the energy of the channel-ion system were calculated as a function of the alkali ion position. Both attractive and repulsive ion-channel interactions were found. The calculations - namely the dependence of the system energy and the atomic charges of the water molecules with respect to the position of the alkali ion in the channel - revealed the molecular-structural background of the potassium selectivity of this artificial ion channel. It was concluded that the studied ion channel mimics real biological ion channel quite well.

  18. Noise-induced transport in the motion of trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormick, Cecilia; Schmiegelow, Christian T.

    2016-11-01

    The interplay of noise and quantum coherence in transport gives rise to rich dynamics relevant for a variety of systems. In this work, we put forward a proposal for an experiment testing noise-induced transport in the vibrational modes of a chain of trapped ions. We focus on the case of transverse modes, considering multiple-isotope chains and an "angle trap," where the transverse trapping varies along the chain. This variation induces localization of the motional modes and therefore suppresses transport. By suitably choosing the action of laser fields that couple to the internal and external degrees of freedom of the ions, we show how to implement effective local dephasing on the modes, broadening the vibrational resonances. This leads to an overlap of the local mode frequencies, giving rise to a pronounced increase in the transport of excitations along the chain. We propose an implementation and measurement scheme which require neither ground-state cooling nor low heating rates, and we illustrate our results with a simulation of the dynamics for a chain of three ions.

  19. Light-induced modification of plant plasma membrane ion transport.

    PubMed

    Marten, I; Deeken, R; Hedrich, R; Roelfsema, M R G

    2010-09-01

    Light is not only the driving force for electron and ion transport in the thylakoid membrane, but also regulates ion transport in various other membranes of plant cells. Light-dependent changes in ion transport at the plasma membrane and associated membrane potential changes have been studied intensively over the last century. These studies, with various species and cell types, revealed that apart from regulation by chloroplasts, plasma membrane transport can be controlled by phytochromes, phototropins or channel rhodopsins. In this review, we compare light-dependent plasma membrane responses of unicellular algae (Eremosphaera and Chlamydomonas), with those of a multicellular alga (Chara), liverworts (Conocephalum), mosses (Physcomitrella) and several angiosperm cell types. Light-dependent plasma membrane responses of Eremosphaera and Chara are characterised by the dominant role of K(+) channels during membrane potential changes. In most other species, the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of plasma membrane anion channels represents a general light-triggered event. Cell type-specific responses are likely to have evolved by modification of this general response or through the development of additional light-dependent signalling pathways. Future research to elucidate these light-activated signalling chains is likely to benefit from the recent identification of S-type anion channel genes and proteins capable of regulating these channels.

  20. Transport effects due to particle erosion mechanisms. [in planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Various processes can erode the surfaces of planetary ring particles. Recent estimates for Saturn's rings suggest that a centimeter-thick surface layer could be eroded from an isolated ring particle in less than 1000 yr by meteoroid impacts alone. The atoms, molecules, and chips ejected from ring particles by erosion will arc across the rings along elliptical orbits. For moderate ring optical depths, ejecta will be absorbed or inelastically scattered upon reintersecting the ring plane. Continuous exchange of ejecta between different ring regions can lead to net radial transport of mass and angular momentum, to changes in particle sizes, and to the buildup of chip regoliths several centimeters deep on the surfaces of ring particles. Because most of the erosional ejecta are not lost but merely exchanged over short distances, the net erosion rate of the surfaces of these ring particles will be much less than that estimated for an isolated particle. Numerical solutions for time-dependent ballistic transport under various assumptions suggest pile-up and spillover effects especially near regions of preexisting high optical depth contrast, such as the inner edges of A and B rings. Global redistribution could be significant over billions of years. Other features in planetary ring systems may be influenced by ballistic transport.

  1. Substrate Profile and Metal-ion Selectivity of Human Divalent Metal-ion Transporter-1*

    PubMed Central

    Illing, Anthony C.; Shawki, Ali; Cunningham, Christopher L.; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is a H+-coupled metal-ion transporter that plays essential roles in iron homeostasis. DMT1 exhibits reactivity (based on evoked currents) with a broad range of metal ions; however, direct measurement of transport is lacking for many of its potential substrates. We performed a comprehensive substrate-profile analysis for human DMT1 expressed in RNA-injected Xenopus oocytes by using radiotracer assays and the continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence with the metal-sensitive PhenGreen SK fluorophore. We provide validation for the use of PhenGreen SK fluorescence quenching as a reporter of cellular metal-ion uptake. We determined metal-ion selectivity under fixed conditions using the voltage clamp. Radiotracer and continuous measurement of transport by fluorescence assays revealed that DMT1 mediates the transport of several metal ions that were ranked in selectivity by using the ratio Imax/K0.5 (determined from evoked currents at −70 mV): Cd2+ > Fe2+ > Co2+, Mn2+ ≫ Zn2+, Ni2+, VO2+. DMT1 expression did not stimulate the transport of Cr2+, Cr3+, Cu+, Cu2+, Fe3+, Ga3+, Hg2+, or VO+. 55Fe2+ transport was competitively inhibited by Co2+ and Mn2+. Zn2+ only weakly inhibited 55Fe2+ transport. Our data reveal that DMT1 selects Fe2+ over its other physiological substrates and provides a basis for predicting the contribution of DMT1 to intestinal, nasal, and pulmonary absorption of metal ions and their cellular uptake in other tissues. Whereas DMT1 is a likely route of entry for the toxic heavy metal cadmium, and may serve the metabolism of cobalt, manganese, and vanadium, we predict that DMT1 should contribute little if at all to the absorption or uptake of zinc. The conclusion in previous reports that copper is a substrate of DMT1 is not supported. PMID:22736759

  2. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongfang; Thelin, William R.; Rogers, Troy D.; Stutts, M. Jackson; Randell, Scott H.; Grubb, Barbara R.

    2012-01-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expression was characterized by RT-PCR. ENaC proteins were measured by Western blot. Prespecified regions (palpebral, fornical, and bulbar) of freshly isolated conjunctival tissues and cell cultures were studied electrophysiologically with Ussing chambers. The transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) of the ocular surface was also measured in vivo. The effect of amiloride and UTP on the tear volume was evaluated in lacrimal gland excised rats. All selected genes were detected but with different expression patterns. We detected αENaC protein in all tissues, βENaC in palpebral and fornical conjunctiva, and γENaC in all tissues except lacrimal glands. Electrophysiological studies of conjunctival tissues and cell cultures identified functional ENaC, SLC5A1, CFTR, and TMEM16. Fornical conjunctiva exhibited the most active ion transport under basal conditions amongst conjunctival regions. PD measurements confirmed functional ENaC-mediated Na+ transport on the ocular surface. Amiloride and UTP increased tear volume in lacrimal gland excised rats. This study demonstrated that the different regions of the conjunctiva exhibited a spectrum of ion transport activities. Understanding the specific functions of distinct regions of the conjunctiva may foster a better understanding of the physiology maintaining hydration of the ocular surface. PMID:22814399

  3. Regional differences in rat conjunctival ion transport activities.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dongfang; Thelin, William R; Rogers, Troy D; Stutts, M Jackson; Randell, Scott H; Grubb, Barbara R; Boucher, Richard C

    2012-10-01

    Active ion transport and coupled osmotic water flow are essential to maintain ocular surface health. We investigated regional differences in the ion transport activities of the rat conjunctivas and compared these activities with those of cornea and lacrimal gland. The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), sodium/glucose cotransporter 1 (Slc5a1), transmembrane protein 16 (Tmem16a, b, f, and g), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr), and mucin (Muc4, 5ac, and 5b) mRNA expression was characterized by RT-PCR. ENaC proteins were measured by Western blot. Prespecified regions (palpebral, fornical, and bulbar) of freshly isolated conjunctival tissues and cell cultures were studied electrophysiologically with Ussing chambers. The transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) of the ocular surface was also measured in vivo. The effect of amiloride and UTP on the tear volume was evaluated in lacrimal gland excised rats. All selected genes were detected but with different expression patterns. We detected αENaC protein in all tissues, βENaC in palpebral and fornical conjunctiva, and γENaC in all tissues except lacrimal glands. Electrophysiological studies of conjunctival tissues and cell cultures identified functional ENaC, SLC5A1, CFTR, and TMEM16. Fornical conjunctiva exhibited the most active ion transport under basal conditions amongst conjunctival regions. PD measurements confirmed functional ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport on the ocular surface. Amiloride and UTP increased tear volume in lacrimal gland excised rats. This study demonstrated that the different regions of the conjunctiva exhibited a spectrum of ion transport activities. Understanding the specific functions of distinct regions of the conjunctiva may foster a better understanding of the physiology maintaining hydration of the ocular surface.

  4. Polysiloxane-graft-PEG/Phosphonium Ionomer Morphology and Ion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Michael; Liang, Siwei; Bartels, Joshua; Runt, James; Colby, Ralph; Winey, Karen

    2013-03-01

    A series of random polysiloxane-based copolymer single ion conductors with phosphonium and polyethylene glycol side chains have been synthesized at various compositions and counterions. Morphology is investigated via X-ray scattering, and reveals microphase separation on extremely small length scales. Despite the low molecular weight of the PEG side chain, polysiloxane and PEG assemble into microdomains with covalently bound phosphonium cations at the interface. Exceptionally low glass transition temperatures in these microphase separated ionomers allow for high ionic mobility for both bulky, charge delocalized counterions as well as small, electronegative counterions. Morphology interpretation is complemented by measurement of ion transport properties via dielectric relaxation spectroscopy.

  5. Internal Transport Barrier Driven by Redistribution of Energetic Ions

    SciTech Connect

    K.L. Wong; W.W. Heidbrink; E. Ruskov; C.C. Petty; C.M. Greenfield; R. Nazikian; R. Budny

    2004-11-12

    Alfven instabilities excited by energetic ions are used as a means to reduce the central magnetic shear in a tokamak via redistribution of energetic ions. When the central magnetic shear is low enough, ballooning modes become stable for any plasma pressure gradient and an internal transport barrier (ITB) with a steep pressure gradient can exist. This mechanism can sustain a steady-state ITB as demonstrated by experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. It can also produce a shear in toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. Possible application of this technique to use the energetic alpha particles for improvement of burning plasma performance is discussed.

  6. Transport induced by ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Debing Xu, Yingfeng; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-11-15

    The Vlasov equation, which includes the effect of the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) waves, can be written as the Fokker-Planck equation which describes the quasilinear transport in phase space by using the Lie-transform method. The radial transport fluxes of particle, energy and parallel momentum driven by ICRF waves in the slab geometry have been derived. The results show that the ICRF-induced radial redistributions of particle, energy and parallel momentum are driven by the inhomogeneity in energy of the equilibrium distribution function, and related to the correlation between the excursion in the real space and the excursion in energy. For the case with strong asymmetry of k{sub y} spectrum, the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the energy inhomogeneity dominates the ICRF-induced radial transport driven by the spatial inhomogeneity.

  7. Modification of SRIM-calculated dose and injected ion profiles due to sputtering, injected ion buildup and void swelling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bailey, Nathan; Garner, Frank A.; Gigax, Jonathan; Shao, Lin

    2016-11-01

    In radiation effects on materials utilizing self-ion irradiations, it is necessary to calculate the local displacement damage level and ion injection profile because of the short distance that self-ions travel in a material and because of the strong variation of displacement rate with depth in a specimen. The most frequently used tool for this is the software package called Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM). A SRIM-calculated depth-dependent dose level is usually determined under the implicit assumption that the target does not undergo any significant changes in volume during the process, in particular SRIM ignores the effect of sputtering, injected ions, and void swelling on the redistribution of the dose and injected atom profiles. This approach become increasingly invalid as the ion fluence reaches ever higher levels, especially for low energy ion irradiations. The original surface is not maintained due to sputter-induced erosion, while within the irradiated region of the specimen, injected ions are adding material, and if void swelling is occurring, it is creating empty space. An iterative mathematical treatment of SRIM outputs to produce corrected dose and injected atom profiles is presented along with examples differences between SRIM-calculated values and corrected values over a range of typical ion energies.

  8. Stanniocalcin-1 Controls Ion Regulation Functions of Ion-transporting Epithelium Other than Calcium Balance

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ming-Yi; Lin, Chia-Hao; Chao, Pei-Lin; Hung, Jo-Chi; Cruz, Shelly A.; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1) was first identified to involve in Ca2+ homeostasis in teleosts, and was thought to act as a hypocalcemic hormone in vertebrate. Recent studies suggested that STC-1 exhibits broad effects on ion balance, not confines to Ca2+, but the mechanism of this regulation process remains largely unknown. Here, we used zebrafish embryos as an alternative in vivo model to investigate how STC-1 regulates transepithelial ion transport function in ion-transporting epithelium. Expression of stc-1 mRNA in zebrafish embryos was increased in high-Ca2+ environments but decreased by acidic and ion-deficient treatments while overexpression of stc-1 impaired the hypotonic acclimation by decreasing whole body Ca2+, Na+, and Cl- contents and H+ secretion ability. Injection of STC-1 mRNA also down-regulated mRNA expressions of epithelial Ca2+ channel, H+-ATPase, and Na+-Cl- cotransporter, suggesting the roles of STC-1 in regulation of ions other than Ca2+. Knockdown of STC-1 caused an increase in ionocyte progenitors (foxi3a as the marker) and mature ionocytes (ion transporters as the markers), but did not affect epithelium stem cells (p63 as the marker) in the embryonic skin. Overexpression of STC-1 had the corresponding opposite effect on ionocyte progenitors, mature ionocytes in the embryonic skin. Taken together, STC-1 negatively regulates the number of ionocytes to reduce ionocyte functions. This process is important for body fluid ionic homeostasis, which is achieved by the regulation of ion transport functions in ionocytes. The present findings provide new insights into the broader functions of STC-1, a hypocalcemic hormone. PMID:25561895

  9. Studies on Molecular and Ion Transport in Silicalite Membranes and Applications as Ion Separator for Redox Flow Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruidong

    Microporous zeolite membranes have been widely studied for molecular separations based on size exclusion or preferential adsorption-diffusion mechanisms. The MFI-type zeolite membranes were also demonstrated for brine water desalination by molecular sieving effect. In this research, the pure silica MFI-type zeolite (i.e. silicalite) membrane has been for the first time demonstrated for selective permeation of hydrated proton (i.e. H3O+) in acidic electrolyte solutions. The silicalite membrane allows for permeation of H 3O+ ions, but is inaccessible to the large hydrated multivalent vanadium ions due to steric effect. The silicalite membrane has been further demonstrated as an effective ion separator in the all-vanadium redox flow battery (RFB).The silicalite is nonionic and its proton conductivity relies on the electric field-driven H3O+ transport through the sub nanometer-sized pores under the RFB operation conditions. The silicalite membrane displayed a significantly reduced self-discharge rate because of its high proton-to-vanadium ion transport selectivity. However, the nonionic nature of the silicalite membrane and very small diffusion channel size render low proton conductivity and is therefore inefficient as ion exchange membranes (IEMs) for practical applications. The proton transport efficiency may be improved by reducing the membrane thickness. However, the zeolite thin films are extremely fragile and must be supported on mechanically strong and rigid porous substrates. In this work, silicalite-Nafion composite membranes were synthesized to achieve a colloidal silicalite skin on the Nafion thin film base. The "colloidal zeolite-ionic polymer" layered composite membrane combines the advantages of high proton-selectivity of the zeolite layer and the mechanical flexibility and low proton transport resistance of the ionic polymer membrane. The composite membrane exhibited higher proton/vanadium ion separation selectivity and lower electrical resistance than

  10. STOPPING AND BARYON TRANSPORT IN HEAVY ION REACTIONS.

    SciTech Connect

    VIDEBAEK, F.

    2005-02-05

    In this report I will give an experimental overview on nuclear stopping in hadron collisions, and relate observations to understanding of baryon transport. Baryon number transport is not only evidenced via net-proton distributions but also by the enhancement of strange baryons near mid-rapidity. Although the focus is on high-energy data obtained from pp and heavy ions from RHIC, relevant data from SPS and ISR will be considered. A discussion how the available data at higher energy relates and gives information on baryon junction, quark-diquark breaking will be made.

  11. Modeling of negative ion transport in a plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riz, David; Paméla, Jérôme

    1998-08-01

    A code called NIETZSCHE has been developed to simulate the negative ion transport in a plasma source, from their birth place to the extraction holes. The ion trajectory is calculated by numerically solving the 3-D motion equation, while the atomic processes of destruction, of elastic collision H-/H+ and of charge exchange H-/H0 are handled at each time step by a Monte-Carlo procedure. This code can be used to calculate the extraction probability of a negative ion produced at any location inside the source. Calculations performed with NIETZSCHE have allowed to explain, either quantitatively or qualitatively, several phenomena observed in negative ion sources, such as the isotopic H-/D- effect, and the influence of the plasma grid bias or of the magnetic filter on the negative ion extraction. The code has also shown that in the type of sources contemplated for ITER, which operate at large arc power densities (>1 W cm-3), negative ions can reach the extraction region provided if they are produced at a distance lower than 2 cm from the plasma grid in the case of «volume production» (dissociative attachment processes), or if they are produced at the plasma grid surface, in the vicinity of the extraction holes.

  12. Familial orthostatic tachycardia due to norepinephrine transporter deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; Flattem, N.; Tellioglu, T.; Carson, R.; Garland, E.; Shannon, J. R.; Jordan, J.; Jacob, G.; Blakely, R. D.; Biaggioni, I.

    2001-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) or postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a syndrome primarily affecting young females, and is characterized by lightheadedness, palpitations, fatigue, altered mentation, and syncope primarily occurring with upright posture and being relieved by lying down. There is typically tachycardia and raised plasma norepinephrine levels on upright posture, but little or no orthostatic hypotension. The pathophysiology of OI is believed to be very heterogeneous. Most studies of the syndrome have focused on abnormalities in norepinephrine release. Here the hypothesis that abnormal norepinephrine transporter (NET) function might contribute to the pathophysiology in some patients with OI was tested. In a proband with significant orthostatic symptoms and tachycardia, disproportionately elevated plasma norepinephrine with standing, impaired systemic, and local clearance of infused tritiated norepinephrine, impaired tyramine responsiveness, and a dissociation between stimulated plasma norepinephrine and DHPG elevation were found. Studies of NET gene structure in the proband revealed a coding mutation that converts a highly conserved transmembrane domain Ala residue to Pro. Analysis of the protein produced by the mutant cDNA in transfected cells demonstrated greater than 98% reduction in activity relative to normal. NE, DHPG/NE, and heart rate correlated with the mutant allele in this family. CONCLUSION: These results represent the first identification of a specific genetic defect in OI and the first disease linked to a coding alteration in a Na+/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporter. Identification of this mechanism may facilitate our understanding of genetic causes of OI and lead to the development of more effective therapeutic modalities.

  13. Familial orthostatic tachycardia due to norepinephrine transporter deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, D.; Flattem, N.; Tellioglu, T.; Carson, R.; Garland, E.; Shannon, J. R.; Jordan, J.; Jacob, G.; Blakely, R. D.; Biaggioni, I.

    2001-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance (OI) or postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a syndrome primarily affecting young females, and is characterized by lightheadedness, palpitations, fatigue, altered mentation, and syncope primarily occurring with upright posture and being relieved by lying down. There is typically tachycardia and raised plasma norepinephrine levels on upright posture, but little or no orthostatic hypotension. The pathophysiology of OI is believed to be very heterogeneous. Most studies of the syndrome have focused on abnormalities in norepinephrine release. Here the hypothesis that abnormal norepinephrine transporter (NET) function might contribute to the pathophysiology in some patients with OI was tested. In a proband with significant orthostatic symptoms and tachycardia, disproportionately elevated plasma norepinephrine with standing, impaired systemic, and local clearance of infused tritiated norepinephrine, impaired tyramine responsiveness, and a dissociation between stimulated plasma norepinephrine and DHPG elevation were found. Studies of NET gene structure in the proband revealed a coding mutation that converts a highly conserved transmembrane domain Ala residue to Pro. Analysis of the protein produced by the mutant cDNA in transfected cells demonstrated greater than 98% reduction in activity relative to normal. NE, DHPG/NE, and heart rate correlated with the mutant allele in this family. CONCLUSION: These results represent the first identification of a specific genetic defect in OI and the first disease linked to a coding alteration in a Na+/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporter. Identification of this mechanism may facilitate our understanding of genetic causes of OI and lead to the development of more effective therapeutic modalities.

  14. In Situ Investigation of Li and Na Ion Transport with Single Nanowire Electrochemical Devices.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Yan, Mengyu; Tian, Xiaocong; Yang, Chuchu; Shi, Mengzhu; Wei, Qiulong; Xu, Lin; Mai, Liqiang

    2015-06-10

    In the past decades, Li ion batteries are widely considered to be the most promising rechargeable batteries for the rapid development of mobile devices and electric vehicles. There arouses great interest in Na ion batteries, especially in the field of static grid storage due to their much lower production cost compared with Li ion batteries. However, the fundamental mechanism of Li and Na ion transport in nanoscale electrodes of batteries has been rarely experimentally explored. This insight can guide the development and optimization of high-performance electrode materials. In this work, single nanowire devices with multicontacts are designed to obtain detailed information during the electrochemical reactions. This unique platform is employed to in situ investigate and compare the transport properties of Li and Na ions at a single nanowire level. To give different confinement for ions and electrons during the electrochemical processes, two different configurations of nanowire electrode are proposed; one is to fully immerse the nanowire in the electrolyte, and the other is by using photoresist to cover the nanowire with only one end exposed. For both configurations, the conductivity of nanowire decreases after intercalation/deintercalation for both Li and Na ions, indicating that they share the similar electrochemical reaction mechanisms in layered electrodes. However, the conductivity degradation and structure destruction for Na ions is more severe than those of Li ions during the electrochemical processes, which mainly results from the much larger volume of Na ions and greater energy barrier encountered by the limited layered spaces. Moreover, the battery performances of coin cells are compared to further confirm this conclusion. The present work provides a unique platform for in situ electrochemical and electrical probing, which will push the fundamental and practical research of nanowire electrode materials for energy storage applications.

  15. Hormonal regulation of ion and water transport in anuran amphibians.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Minoru; Konno, Norifumi

    2006-05-15

    Amphibians occupy a wide variety of ecological habitats, and their adaptation is made possible through the specialization of the epithelia of their osmoregulatory organs, such as the skin, kidney, and urinary bladder, which control the hydromineral and acid-base balance of their internal medium. Amphibians can change drastically plasma Na+, Cl-, and urea levels and excretion rates in response to environmental stimuli such as acute desiccation and changes in external salinity. Several hormones and the autonomic nervous system act to control osmoregulation. Several ion channels including an epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), a urea transporter (UT), and water channels (AQPs) are found in epithelial tissues of their osmoregulatory organs. This mini review examines the currents status of our knowledge about hormone receptors for arginine vasotocin, angiotensin II and aldosterone, and membrane ion channels and transporters, such as ENaC, UT, and AQPs in amphibians.

  16. Transport of radioactive ions in soil by electrokinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, M.F.; Surma, J.E.; Virden, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    An electrokinetic approach is being evaluated for in situ soil remediation at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. This approach uses an applied electric field to induce transport of both radioactive and hazardous waste ions in soil. The work discussed in this paper involves the development of a new method to monitor the movement of the radioactive ions within the soil during the electrokinetic process. A closed cell and a gamma counter were used to provide iii situ measurements of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co movement in Hanford soil. Preliminary results show that for an applied potential of 200 V over approximately 200 hr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}60 were transported a distance of 4 to 5 in. The monitoring technique demonstrated the feasibility of using electrokinetics for soil separation applications.

  17. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Minford, Eric; Waldron, William Emil

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  18. Gated ion transport through dense carbon nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Funke, Hans H; Falconer, John L; Noble, Richard D

    2010-06-23

    Gated ion diffusion is found widely in hydrophobic biological nanopores, upon changes in ligand binding, temperature, transmembrane voltage, and mechanical stress. Because water is the main media for ion diffusion in these hydrophobic biological pores, ion diffusion behavior through these nanochannels is expected to be influenced significantly when water wettability in hydrophobic biological nanopores is sensitive and changes upon small external changes. Here, we report for the first time that ion diffusion through highly hydrophobic nanopores (approximately 3 nm) showed a gated behavior due to change of water wettability on hydrophobic surface upon small temperature change or ultrasound. Dense carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes with both 3-nm CNTs and 3-nm interstitial pores were prepared by a solvent evaporation process and used as a model system to investigate ion diffusion behavior. Ion diffusion through these membranes exhibited a gated behavior. The ion flux was turned on and off, apparently because the water wettability of CNTs changed. At 298 K, ion diffusion through dense CNT membranes stopped after a few hours, but it dramatically increased when the temperature was increased 20 K or the membrane was subjected to ultrasound. Likewise, water adsorption on dense CNT membranes increased dramatically at a water activity of 0.53 when the temperature increased from 293 to 306 K, indicating capillary condensation. Water adsorption isotherms of dense CNT membranes suggest that the adsorbed water forms a discontinuous phase at 293 K, but it probably forms a continuous layer, probably in the interstitial CNT regions, at higher temperatures. When the ion diffusion channel was opened by a temperature increase or ultrasound, ions diffused through the CNT membranes at a rate similar to bulk diffusion in water. This finding may have implications for using CNT membrane for desalination and water treatment.

  19. Predicting Carbonate Ion Transport in Alkaline Anion Exchange Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Schematic of the permeation cell experiment used to measure transient CO2 flux across the polymer electrolyte membrane. Experimental result vs. model trend...Microstructure on Charge Transfer, Mass Transfer, and Electrochemical Reactions in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells ; Part 2. Ion and Water Transport in Alkaline Anion...through the use of the Fuel Cell Technologies Test Station such as the relative humidity and flow rate of the feed gases, the cell temperature, and the

  20. Ion transport in porous electrodes with mixed conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebova, N. V.; Krasnova, A. O.; Tomasov, A. A.; Zelenina, N. K.; Nechitailov, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    A method for studying dc ion transport in porous mixed-conductivity electrodes in the course of the electrochemical reaction taking place in them has been suggested. The dependences of the proton conductivity of porous electrodes used in direct electrochemical energy converters (electrolyzers, fuel cells) on their composition and structure have been presented. These data are of practical importance and can be used to analyze ohmic losses in the electrodes and membrane electrode assembly and also to devise novel electrode materials.

  1. Sources of inner radiation zone energetic helium ions: cross-field transport versus in-situ nuclear reactions.

    PubMed

    Spjeldvik, W N; Pugacheva, G I; Gusev, A A; Martin, I M; Sobolevsky, N M

    1998-01-01

    Radial transport theory for inner radiation zone MeV He ions has been extended by combining radial diffusive transport, losses due to Coulomb friction and charge exchange reaction with local generation of 3He and 4He ions due to nuclear reactions taking place on the inner edge of the inner radiation zone. From interactions between high energy trapped protons and upper atmospheric constituents we have included a nuclear reaction yield helium flux source that was numerically derived from a nuclear reaction model originally developed at the Institute of Nuclear Researches of Moscow, Russia and implemented in the computer system at the University of Campinas, Brazil. Magnetospheric transport computations have been made covering the L-shell range L=1.0 to 1.6 and the resulting MeV He ion flux distributions show a strong influence of the local nuclear source mechanism on the inner zone energetic He ion content.

  2. Fast ion transport induced by saturated infernal mode

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, V. S.

    2014-05-15

    Tokamak discharges with extended weak-shear central core are known to suffer from infernal modes when the core safety factor approaches the mode ratio. These modes can cause an outward convection of the well-passing energetic ions deposited in the core by fusion reactions and/or neutral beam injection. Convection mechanism consists in collisional slowing down of energetic ions trapped in the Doppler-precession resonance with a finite-amplitude infernal mode. Convection velocity can reach a few m/s in modern spherical tori. Possible relation of this transport with the enhanced fast ion losses in the presence of “long lived modes” in the MAST tokamak [I. T. Chapman et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 045007 (2010)] is discussed.

  3. Bivalent ion transport through graphene/PET nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Huijun; Cheng, Yaxiong; Zeng, Jian; Mo, Dan; Duan, Jinglai; Liu, Jiande; Zhai, Pengfei; Sun, Youmei; Liu, Jie

    2016-05-01

    The PET suspended single graphene nanopore (G/PET) was produced by heavy ion irradiation and asymmetric chemical etching. The solutions of NiSO4, NiCl2, CuSO4 and CuCl2 with different concentration were adopted to study the transport properties of bivalent ion in single G/PET nanopore by measuring the I-V curves. The perfect "diode effect" and excellent rectification effect of G/PET nanopore were observed, and the huge rectification ratio up to 43.3 was obtained in NiSO4 solution. The great solution selectivity and ion current magnification effect of graphene/PET nanopore were also confirmed in our study.

  4. Fe(2+) substrate transport through ferritin protein cage ion channels influences enzyme activity and biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Behera, Rabindra K; Torres, Rodrigo; Tosha, Takehiko; Bradley, Justin M; Goulding, Celia W; Theil, Elizabeth C

    2015-09-01

    Ferritins, complex protein nanocages, form internal iron-oxy minerals (Fe2O3·H2O), by moving cytoplasmic Fe(2+) through intracage ion channels to cage-embedded enzyme (2Fe(2+)/O2 oxidoreductase) sites where ferritin biomineralization is initiated. The products of ferritin enzyme activity are diferric oxy complexes that are mineral precursors. Conserved, carboxylate amino acid side chains of D127 from each of three cage subunits project into ferritin ion channels near the interior ion channel exits and, thus, could direct Fe(2+) movement to the internal enzyme sites. Ferritin D127E was designed and analyzed to probe properties of ion channel size and carboxylate crowding near the internal ion channel opening. Glu side chains are chemically equivalent to, but longer by one -CH2 than Asp, side chains. Ferritin D127E assembled into normal protein cages, but diferric peroxo formation (enzyme activity) was not observed, when measured at 650 nm (DFP λ max). The caged biomineral formation, measured at 350 nm in the middle of the broad, nonspecific Fe(3+)-O absorption band, was slower. Structural differences (protein X-ray crystallography), between ion channels in wild type and ferritin D127E, which correlate with the inhibition of ferritin D127E enzyme activity include: (1) narrower interior ion channel openings/pores; (2) increased numbers of ion channel protein-metal binding sites, and (3) a change in ion channel electrostatics due to carboxylate crowding. The contributions of ion channel size and structure to ferritin activity reflect metal ion transport in ion channels are precisely regulated both in ferritin protein nanocages and membranes of living cells.

  5. Light ion components of the galactic cosmic rays: Nuclear interactions and transport theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badhwar, G. D.; Dubey, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Light nuclei are present in the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and are produced in thick targets due to projectile or target fragmentation from both nucleon and heavy induced reactions. In the primary GCR, He-4 is the most abundant nucleus after H-1. However, there are also a substantial fluxes of H-2 and He-3. In this paper we describe theoretical models based on quantum multiple scattering theory for the description of light ion nuclear interactions. The energy dependence of the light ion fragmentation cross section is considered with comparisons of inclusive yields and secondary momentum distributions to experiments described. We also analyze the importance of a fast component of lights ions from proton and neutron induced target fragementation. These theoretical models have been incorporated into the cosmic ray transport code HZETRN and will be used to analyze the role of shielding materials in modulating the production and the energy spectrum of light ions.

  6. Light ion components of the galactic cosmic rays: Nuclear interactions and transport theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Badhwar, G. D.; Dubey, R. R.

    1996-01-01

    Light nuclei are present in the primary galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and are produced in thick targets due to projectile or target fragmentation from both nucleon and heavy induced reactions. In the primary GCR, He-4 is the most abundant nucleus after H-1. However, there are also a substantial fluxes of H-2 and He-3. In this paper we describe theoretical models based on quantum multiple scattering theory for the description of light ion nuclear interactions. The energy dependence of the light ion fragmentation cross section is considered with comparisons of inclusive yields and secondary momentum distributions to experiments described. We also analyze the importance of a fast component of lights ions from proton and neutron induced target fragementation. These theoretical models have been incorporated into the cosmic ray transport code HZETRN and will be used to analyze the role of shielding materials in modulating the production and the energy spectrum of light ions.

  7. Regulation of lysosomal ion homeostasis by channels and transporters.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomes are the major organelles that carry out degradation functions. They integrate and digest materials compartmentalized by endocytosis, phagocytosis or autophagy. In addition to more than 60 hydrolases residing in the lysosomes, there are also ion channels and transporters that mediate the flux or transport of H(+), Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) across the lysosomal membranes. Defects in ionic exchange can lead to abnormal lysosome morphology, defective vesicle trafficking, impaired autophagy, and diseases such as neurodegeneration and lysosomal storage disorders. The latter are characterized by incomplete lysosomal digestion and accumulation of toxic materials inside enlarged intracellular vacuoles. In addition to degradation, recent studies have revealed the roles of lysosomes in metabolic pathways through kinases such as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transcriptional regulation through calcium signaling molecules such as transcription factor EB (TFEB) and calcineurin. Owing to the development of new approaches including genetically encoded fluorescence probes and whole endolysosomal patch clamp recording techniques, studies on lysosomal ion channels have made remarkable progress in recent years. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge of lysosome-resident ion channels and transporters, discuss their roles in maintaining lysosomal function, and evaluate how their dysfunction can result in disease.

  8. Ion Transport in Polymerized Ionic Liquid Block and Random Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabd, Yossef; Ye, Yuesheng; Choi, Jae-Hong; Winey, Karen

    2012-02-01

    Polymerized ionic liquid (PIL) block copolymers, a new type of solid-state polymer electrolyte, are of interest for energy conversion and storage devices, such as fuel cells, batteries, supercapacitors, and solar cells. In this study, a series of PIL diblock and random copolymers with various PIL compositions were synthesized. These consisted of an IL monomer and a non-ionic monomer, 1-[(2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-3-butylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (MEBIm-TFSI) and methyl methacrylate (MMA), and 1-[(2-acryloyloxy)ethyl]-3-butylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (AEBIm-TFSI) and styrene (S), respectively, were synthesized. The anion conductivity (ion transport) and morphology were measured in all of the polymers with EIS, SAXS/WAXS, and TEM. Ion transport in block copolymers are significantly higher than random copolymers at the same PIL composition and are highly dependent on the block copolymer nanostructure. The relationship between ion transport mechanisms and the phase behavior of these materials will be discussed.

  9. Ion transport and rectification in a charged nanoscale cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Li; Mao, Qian; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    The possibility of rectification for ion transport in nanofluidic systems offers a potential route for developing a nanofluidic diode that mimics a semiconductor diode or captures some features of a biological ion channel. The rectification phenomenon, in which a solution would be enriched in one ion, results from asymmetric effects in ionic transport that can be realized by discontinuities in surface charge, concentration differences across a pore, or an asymmetric pore shape such as a cone. In this paper, we focus on the latter two effects and seek to capture the rectification effect in simple terms with a non-dimensional model representative of the many systems studied to date. Specifically, we analyze the rectification phenomenon in a charged nanoscale cone with a concentration difference and/or an electrical potential difference across the pore. Based on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck model and the assumption of one-dimensional transport, we derive a model based on two coupled ordinary differential equations to determine significant parameters such as ionic current. We identify several dimensionless parameters that have not been recognized previously and study the influence of the dimensionless parameters on the rectification. The authors would like to thank The Center for Combustion Energy (CCE) of Tsinghua University for supporting this project.

  10. Regulation of lysosomal ion homeostasis by channels and transporters

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X.

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are the major organelles that carry out degradation functions. They integrate and digest materials compartmentalized by endocytosis, phagocytosis or autophagy. In addition to more than 60 hydrolases residing in the lysosomes, there are also ion channels and transporters that mediate the flux or transport of H+, Ca2+, Na+, K+, and Cl− across the lysosomal membranes. Defects in ionic exchange can lead to abnormal lysosome morphology, defective vesicle trafficking, impaired autophagy, and diseases such as neurodegeneration and lysosomal storage disorders. The latter are characterized by incomplete lysosomal digestion and accumulation of toxic materials inside enlarged intracellular vacuoles. In addition to degradation, recent studies have revealed the roles of lysosomes in metabolic pathways through kinases such as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transcriptional regulation through calcium signaling molecules such as transcription factor EB (TFEB) and calcineurin. Owing to the development of new approaches including genetically encoded fluorescence probes and whole endolysosomal patch clamp recording techniques, studies on lysosomal ion channels have made remarkable progress in recent years. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge of lysosome-resident ion channels and transporters, discuss their roles in maintaining lysosomal function, and evaluate how their dysfunction can result in disease. PMID:27430889

  11. Glial Na(+) -dependent ion transporters in pathophysiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Boscia, Francesca; Begum, Gulnaz; Pignataro, Giuseppe; Sirabella, Rossana; Cuomo, Ornella; Casamassa, Antonella; Sun, Dandan; Annunziato, Lucio

    2016-10-01

    Sodium dynamics are essential for regulating functional processes in glial cells. Indeed, glial Na(+) signaling influences and regulates important glial activities, and plays a role in neuron-glia interaction under physiological conditions or in response to injury of the central nervous system (CNS). Emerging studies indicate that Na(+) pumps and Na(+) -dependent ion transporters in astrocytes, microglia, and oligodendrocytes regulate Na(+) homeostasis and play a fundamental role in modulating glial activities in neurological diseases. In this review, we first briefly introduced the emerging roles of each glial cell type in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia, Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and myelin diseases. Then, we discussed the current knowledge on the main roles played by the different glial Na(+) -dependent ion transporters, including Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchangers, Na(+) /H(+) exchangers, Na(+) -K(+) -Cl(-) cotransporters, and Na(+) - HCO3- cotransporter in the pathophysiology of the diverse CNS diseases. We highlighted their contributions in cell survival, synaptic pathology, gliotransmission, pH homeostasis, and their role in glial activation, migration, gliosis, inflammation, and tissue repair processes. Therefore, this review summarizes the foundation work for targeting Na(+) -dependent ion transporters in glia as a novel strategy to control important glial activities associated with Na(+) dynamics in different neurological disorders. GLIA 2016;64:1677-1697. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Lithium-ion transport in inorganic solid state electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Gao; Yu-Sheng, Zhao; Si-Qi, Shi; Hong, Li

    2016-01-01

    An overview of ion transport in lithium-ion inorganic solid state electrolytes is presented, aimed at exploring and designing better electrolyte materials. Ionic conductivity is one of the most important indices of the performance of inorganic solid state electrolytes. The general definition of solid state electrolytes is presented in terms of their role in a working cell (to convey ions while isolate electrons), and the history of solid electrolyte development is briefly summarized. Ways of using the available theoretical models and experimental methods to characterize lithium-ion transport in solid state electrolytes are systematically introduced. Then the various factors that affect ionic conductivity are itemized, including mainly structural disorder, composite materials and interface effects between a solid electrolyte and an electrode. Finally, strategies for future material systems, for synthesis and characterization methods, and for theory and calculation are proposed, aiming to help accelerate the design and development of new solid electrolytes. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51372228), the Shanghai Pujiang Program, China (Grant No. 14PJ1403900), and the Shanghai Institute of Materials Genome from the Shanghai Municipal Science and Technology Commission, China (Grant No. 14DZ2261200).

  13. Validation of Heavy Ion Transport Capabilities in PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronningen, Reginald M.

    2007-03-01

    The performance of the Monte Carlo code system PHITS is validated for heavy ion transport capabilities by performing simulations and comparing results against experimental data from heavy ion reactions of benchmark quality. These data are from measurements of secondary neutron production cross sections in reactions of Xe at 400 MeV/u with lithium and lead targets, measurements of neutrons outside of thick concrete and iron shields, and measurements of isotope yields produced in the fragmentation of a 140 MeV/u 48Ca beam on a beryllium target and on a tantalum target. A practical example that tests magnetic field capabilities is shown for a simulated 48Ca beam at 500 MeV/u striking a lithium target to produce the rare isotope 44Si, with ion transport through a fragmentation-reaction magnetic pre-separator. The results of this study show that PHITS performs reliably for the simulation of radiation fields that is necessary for designing safe, reliable and cost effective future high-powered heavy-ion accelerators in rare isotope beam facilities.

  14. An improved Green's function for ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam transport theory allows testing of material transmission properties in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators. This is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are the main emphasis of the present work. In consequence, an analytic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation is pursued in the form of a Green's function allowing flexibility in application to a broad range of boundary value problems. It has been established that simple solutions can be found for high charge and energy (HZE) ions by ignoring nuclear energy downshifts and dispersion. Such solutions were found to be supported by experimental evidence with HZE ion beams when multiple scattering was added. Lacking from the prior solutions were range and energy straggling and energy downshift with dispersion associated with nuclear events. Recently, we have found global solutions including these effects providing a broader class of HZE ion solutions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. An improved Green's function for ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam transport theory allows testing of material transmission properties in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators. This is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are the main emphasis of the present work. In consequence, an analytic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation is pursued in the form of a Green's function allowing flexibility in application to a broad range of boundary value problems. It has been established that simple solutions can be found for high charge and energy (HZE) ions by ignoring nuclear energy downshifts and dispersion. Such solutions were found to be supported by experimental evidence with HZE ion beams when multiple scattering was added. Lacking from the prior solutions were range and energy straggling and energy downshift with dispersion associated with nuclear events. Recently, we have found global solutions including these effects providing a broader class of HZE ion solutions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ion transport in broad bean leaf mesophyll under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Percey, William J; Shabala, Lana; Breadmore, Michael C; Guijt, Rosanne M; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-10-01

    Salt stress reduces the ability of mesophyll tissue to respond to light. Potassium outward rectifying channels are responsible for 84 % of Na (+) induced potassium efflux from mesophyll cells. Modulation in ion transport of broad bean (Vicia faba L.) mesophyll to light under increased apoplastic salinity stress was investigated using vibrating ion-selective microelectrodes (the MIFE technique). Increased apoplastic Na(+) significantly affected mesophyll cells ability to respond to light by modulating ion transport across their membranes. Elevated apoplastic Na(+) also induced a significant K(+) efflux from mesophyll tissue. This efflux was mediated predominately by potassium outward rectifying channels (84 %) and the remainder of the efflux was through non-selective cation channels. NaCl treatment resulted in a reduction in photosystem II efficiency in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In particular, reductions in Fv'/Fm' were linked to K(+) homeostasis in the mesophyll tissue. Increased apoplastic Na(+) concentrations induced vanadate-sensitive net H(+) efflux, presumably mediated by the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. It is concluded that the observed pump's activation is essential for the maintenance of membrane potential and ion homeostasis in the cytoplasm of mesophyll under salt stress.

  17. Plasma Channel Transport for Heavy Ion Fusion: Investigation of Beam Transport, Channel Initiation and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauschwitz, Andreas; Niemann, Christoph; Penache, Dan; Birkner, Richard; Hoffmann, Dieter H. H.; Kobloch, Renate; Neff, Stefan; Presura, Radu; Ponce, Dave; Rosmej, Frank; Yu, Simon

    2002-12-01

    For final beam transport in an IFE reactor three alternatives are mainly discussed. These are neutralized ballistic transport, self-pinched transport, and plasma channel transport. Discharge plasma channels were investigated in the recent years at GSI Darmstadt and at LBNL Berkeley in a number of experiments. Different initiation mechanisms for gas discharges of up to 60 kA were studied and compared. In the Berkeley experiments laser ionization of organic vapors in a buffer gas was used to initiate and direct the discharge while at GSI laser gas heating and ion beam induced gas ionization were tested as initiation mechanisms. Measurements of temperature, electron density, gas density, and magnetic field distribution in the channels are compared with results of beam transport experiments at the GSI UNILAC accelerator and with MHD simulations of the 1D-fluidcode CYCLOPS, which was developed in Berkeley. Good agreement between plasma diagnostics results, measured ion optical properties and MHD simulations was found. Parameters that are required for a reactor application are a discharge current of 50 kA, a channel diameter below 1 cm, a pointing stability better than 500 μm, and MHD stability for more than 10 μs. These parameters have been demonstrated in the recent experiments. The results imply that transport channels work with sufficient stability, reproducibility and ion optical properties in a wide pressure range and for various discharge gases.

  18. Biophysical Model of Ion Transport across Human Respiratory Epithelia Allows Quantification of Ion Permeabilities

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Guilherme J.M.; Boucher, Richard C.; Elston, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Lung health and normal mucus clearance depend on adequate hydration of airway surfaces. Because transepithelial osmotic gradients drive water flows, sufficient hydration of the airway surface liquid depends on a balance between ion secretion and absorption by respiratory epithelia. In vitro experiments using cultures of primary human nasal epithelia and human bronchial epithelia have established many of the biophysical processes involved in airway surface liquid homeostasis. Most experimental studies, however, have focused on the apical membrane, despite the fact that ion transport across respiratory epithelia involves both cellular and paracellular pathways. In fact, the ion permeabilities of the basolateral membrane and paracellular pathway remain largely unknown. Here we use a biophysical model for water and ion transport to quantify ion permeabilities of all pathways (apical, basolateral, paracellular) in human nasal epithelia cultures using experimental (Ussing Chamber and microelectrode) data reported in the literature. We derive analytical formulas for the steady-state short-circuit current and membrane potential, which are for polarized epithelia the equivalent of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for single isolated cells. These relations allow parameter estimation to be performed efficiently. By providing a method to quantify all the ion permeabilities of respiratory epithelia, the model may aid us in understanding the physiology that regulates normal airway surface hydration. PMID:23442922

  19. Biophysical model of ion transport across human respiratory epithelia allows quantification of ion permeabilities.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Guilherme J M; Boucher, Richard C; Elston, Timothy C

    2013-02-05

    Lung health and normal mucus clearance depend on adequate hydration of airway surfaces. Because transepithelial osmotic gradients drive water flows, sufficient hydration of the airway surface liquid depends on a balance between ion secretion and absorption by respiratory epithelia. In vitro experiments using cultures of primary human nasal epithelia and human bronchial epithelia have established many of the biophysical processes involved in airway surface liquid homeostasis. Most experimental studies, however, have focused on the apical membrane, despite the fact that ion transport across respiratory epithelia involves both cellular and paracellular pathways. In fact, the ion permeabilities of the basolateral membrane and paracellular pathway remain largely unknown. Here we use a biophysical model for water and ion transport to quantify ion permeabilities of all pathways (apical, basolateral, paracellular) in human nasal epithelia cultures using experimental (Ussing Chamber and microelectrode) data reported in the literature. We derive analytical formulas for the steady-state short-circuit current and membrane potential, which are for polarized epithelia the equivalent of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equation for single isolated cells. These relations allow parameter estimation to be performed efficiently. By providing a method to quantify all the ion permeabilities of respiratory epithelia, the model may aid us in understanding the physiology that regulates normal airway surface hydration. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neutral gas heating and ion transport in a constricted plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Teck Seng; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2017-08-01

    Ion-neutral charge exchange collisions are demonstrated to be the dominant heating mechanism in a weakly ionised ˜1 Torr Ar capacitively coupled radiofrequency plasma flowing through a cylinder. In this rarefied regime, thermal conduction is ineffective. The neutral gas temperature is significantly higher in the plasma bulk than in the plasma sheath due to different plasma parameters and ion transport behaviours in these regions. This study is achieved in a computational fluid dynamics and plasma simulation, and is applicable to similar plasmas at different pressures and physical scales.

  1. Effects of electrolytes on ion transport in Chitosan membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupiasih, N. N.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, charged polymer membranes are widely used for water purification applications involving control of water and ion transport, such as reverse osmosis and electrodialysis. In this study, we have explored the effects of electrolyte solutions on ion transport properties of chitosan synthetic membranes via concentration gradient driven transport. Also, the water uptake of those membranes, before (control) as well used membranes have studied. The membrane used was chitosan membrane 2%. The electrolyte solutions used were HCl, KCl, CaCl2, MgCl2 and AlCl3, with various concentrations of 0.1 mM, 1 mM, 10 mM, 100 mM and 1000 mM. Ion transport experiments were carried out in a cell membrane model which composed of two compartments and the potential difference of membrane was measured using Ag/AgCl calomel electrodes. Those measurements were conducted at ambient temperature 28.8 °C. The results showed that the current density (J) increased with increased in concentration gradient of solution. The current density was higher in electrolyte solution which has higher molar conductivity than those of a solution with a small molar conductivity. Meanwhile the current density was smaller in electrolyte solution which has larger Stokes radii than those of a solution with small Stokes radii. Except membrane which has been used in HCl solution, the water uptakes of the used membranes were greater than the control membrane. These results can develop and validate a common framework to interpret data of concentration gradient driven transport in chitosan synthetic membranes and to use it to design of membranes with improved performance.

  2. The high current transport experiment for heavy ion inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, L.R.; Baca, D.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Seidl, P.A.; Waldron, W.L.; Cohen, R.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Morse, E.

    2004-05-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is part of the US program to explore heavy-ion beam transport at a scale representative of the low-energy end of an induction linac driver for fusion energy production. The primary mission of this experiment is to investigate aperture fill factors acceptable for the transport of space-charge-dominated heavy-ion beams at high intensity (line charge density {approx} 0.2 {micro}C/m) over long pulse durations (4 {micro}s) in alternating gradient focusing lattices of electrostatic or magnetic quadrupoles. This experiment is testing transport issues resulting from nonlinear space-charge effects and collective modes, beam centroid alignment and steering, envelope matching, image charges and focusing field nonlinearities, halo and, electron and gas cloud effects. We present the results for a coasting 1 MeV K{sup +} ion beam transported through ten electrostatic quadrupoles. The measurements cover two different fill factor studies (60% and 80% of the clear aperture radius) for which the transverse phase-space of the beam was characterized in detail, along with beam energy measurements and the first halo measurements. Electrostatic quadrupole transport at high beam fill factor ({approx}80%) is achieved with acceptable emittance growth and beam loss, even though the initial beam distribution is not ideal (but the emittance is low) nor in thermal equilibrium. We achieved good envelope control, and rematching may only be needed every ten lattice periods (at 80% fill factor) in a longer lattice of similar design. We also show that understanding and controlling the time dependence of the envelope parameters is critical to achieving high fill factors, notably because of the injector and matching section dynamics.

  3. Internal Friction Due to Localized Relaxation around Y-ions in Single Crystal Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Michihiro; Kirimoto, Kenta; Nobugai, Kohji; Wigmore, J. Keith; Miyasato, Tatsuro

    2001-09-01

    The internal friction in single crystal yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) doped with 9.5 mol% Y2O3 was measured for longitudinal sound waves in the frequency range from 10 Hz to 800 Hz using a vibrating reed technique. In the temperature range from 300 K to 700 K, observations of internal friction reveal two closely overlapping absorption peaks, confirming the existence of two relaxation modes in YSZ@. One of the peaks is due to diffusion relaxation, which is known to be responsible for long-range transport of O-ions. The second peak shows clearly the existence of localized relaxation, which is attributed to bound oxygen vacancies within the local structure which is formed around an Y-ion due to symmetry breaking. The absorption peak caused by the localized relaxation exhibits anisotropy resulting from the asymmetric local structure, and the strength of this peak changes with temperature reflecting the number of bound oxygen vacancies.

  4. Final Report - Ion Production and Transport in Atmospheric Pressure Ion Source Mass Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, Paul B.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2014-05-14

    This document is the final report on a project that focused in the general theme of atmospheric-pressure ion production and transport for mass spectrometry. Within that general theme there were two main projects: the fundamental study of the transport of elemental ions through the vacuum interface of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS), and fundamental studies of the ionization mechanisms in ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) sources for molecular mass spectrometry. In both cases the goal was to generate fundamental understanding of key instrumental processes that would lead to the development of instruments that were more sensitive and more consistent in their performance. The emphasis on consistency derives from the need for instruments that have the same sensitivity, regardless of sample type. In the jargon of analytical chemistry, such instruments are said to be free from matrix effects. In the ICPMS work each stage of ion production and of ion transport from the atmospheric pressure to the high-vacuum mass analyzer was studied. Factors controlling ion transport efficiency and consistency were identified at each stage of pressure reduction. In the ADI work the interactions between an electrospray plume and a fluorescent sample on a surface were examined microscopically. A new mechanism for analyte ion production in desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) was proposed. Optical spectroscopy was used to track the production of reactive species in plasmas used as ADI sources. Experiments with mixed-gas plasmas demonstrated that the addition of a small amount of hydrogen to a helium ADI plasma could boost the sensitivity for some analytes by over an order of magnitude.

  5. Extension of operational regime in high-temperature plasmas and effect of ECRH on ion thermal transport in the LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Nagaoka, K.; Murakami, S.; Osakabe, M.; Nakano, H.; Ida, K.; Tsujimura, T. I.; Kubo, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Tanaka, K.; Seki, R.; Takeiri, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Maeta, S.; Nakata, M.; Yoshinuma, M.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Tsuchiya, H.; Tokuzawa, T.; Goto, M.; Oishi, T.; Morita, S.; Suzuki, C.; Emoto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Ikeda, K.; Kisaki, M.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Makino, R.; Seki, T.; Kasahara, H.; Saito, K.; Kamio, S.; Nagasaki, K.; Mutoh, T.; Kaneko, O.; Morisaki, T.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2017-08-01

    A simultaneous high ion temperature (T i) and high electron temperature (T e) regime was successfully extended due to an optimized heating scenario in the LHD. Such high-temperature plasmas were realized by the simultaneous formation of an electron internal transport barrier (ITB) and an ion ITB by the combination of high power NBI and ECRH. Although the ion thermal confinement was degraded in the plasma core with an increase of T e/T i by the on-axis ECRH, it was found that the ion thermal confinement was improved at the plasma edge. The normalized ion thermal diffusivity {χ\\text{i}}/T\\text{i}1.5 at the plasma edge was reduced by 70%. The improvement of the ion thermal confinement at the edge led to an increase in T i in the entire plasma region, even though the core transport was degraded.

  6. Biotin dependency due to a defect in biotin transport

    PubMed Central

    Mardach, Rebecca; Zempleni, Janos; Wolf, Barry; Cannon, Martin J.; Jennings, Michael L.; Cress, Sally; Boylan, Jane; Roth, Susan; Cederbaum, Stephen; Mock, Donald M.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a 3-year-old boy with biotin dependency not caused by biotinidase, holocarboxylase synthetase, or nutritional biotin deficiency. We sought to define the mechanism of his biotin dependency. The child became acutely encephalopathic at age 18 months. Urinary organic acids indicated deficiency of several biotin-dependent carboxylases. Symptoms improved rapidly following biotin supplementation. Serum biotinidase activity and Biotinidase gene sequence were normal. Activities of biotin-dependent carboxylases in PBMCs and cultured skin fibroblasts were normal, excluding biotin holocarboxylase synthetase deficiency. Despite extracellular biotin sufficiency, biotin withdrawal caused recurrent abnormal organic aciduria, indicating intracellular biotin deficiency. Biotin uptake rates into fresh PBMCs from the child and into his PBMCs transformed with Epstein Barr virus were about 10% of normal fresh and transformed control cells, respectively. For fresh and transformed PBMCs from his parents, biotin uptake rates were consistent with heterozygosity for an autosomal recessive genetic defect. Increased biotin breakdown was ruled out, as were artifacts of biotin supplementation and generalized defects in membrane permeability for biotin. These results provide evidence for a novel genetic defect in biotin transport. This child is the first known with this defect, which should now be included in the identified causes of biotin dependency. PMID:12070309

  7. Arabidopsis thaliana cyclic nucleotide gated channel 3 forms a non-selective ion transporter involved in germination and cation transport.

    PubMed

    Gobert, Anthony; Park, Graeme; Amtmann, Anna; Sanders, Dale; Maathuis, Frans J M

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains 20 cyclic nucleotide gated channel (CNGC) genes encoding putative non-selective ion channels. Classical and reverse genetic approaches have revealed that two members of this family (CNGC2 and CNGC4) play a role in plant defence responses whereas CNGC1 and CNGC10 may participate in heavy metal and cation transport. Yet, it remains to be resolved how the ion transport attributes of CNGCs are integrated into their physiological function. In this study, CNGC3 is characterized through heterologous expression, GUS- and GFP-reporter gene fusions, and by adopting a reverse genetics approach. A CNGC3-GFP fusion protein shows that it is mainly targeted to the plasma membrane. Promoter GUS studies demonstrate CNGC3 expression predominantly in the cortical and epidermal root cells, but also a ubiquitous presence in shoot tissues. Expression of CNGC3 in yeast indicates it can function as a Na(+) uptake and a K(+) uptake mechanism. cngc3 null mutations decreased seed germination in the presence of NaCl but not KCl. Relative to the wild type, mutant seedling growth is more resistant to the presence of toxic concentrations of NaCl and KCl. The ionic composition and ion uptake characteristics of wild-type and mutant seedlings suggests that the growth advantage in these conditions may be due to restricted ion influx in mutant plants, and that CNGC3 functions in the non-selective uptake of monovalent cations in Arabidopsis root tissue.

  8. Modeling plasmalemma ion transport of the aquatic plant Egeria densa.

    PubMed

    Buschmann, P; Sack, H; Köhler, A E; Dahse, I

    1996-11-01

    Fresh-water plants generate extraordinarily high electric potential differences at the plasma membrane. For a deeper understanding of the underlying transport processes a mathematical model of the electrogenic plasmalemma ion transport was developed based on experimental data mainly obtained from Egeria densa. The model uses a general nonlinear network approach and assumes coupling of the transporters via membrane potential. A proton pump, an outward-rectifying K+ channel, an inward-rectifying K+ channel, a Cl- channel and a (2H-Cl)+ symporter are considered to be elements of the system. The model takes into consideration the effects of light, external pH and ionic content of the bath medium on ion transport. As a result it does not only satisfactorily describe the membrane potential as a function of these external physiological factors but also succeeds in simulating the effects of specific inhibitors as well as I-V-curves obtained with the patch-clamp technique in the whole cell mode. The quality of the model was checked by stability and sensitivity analyses.

  9. A Green's function method for heavy ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Schimmerling, W.; Shavers, M. R.; Miller, J.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Badavi, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    The use of Green's function has played a fundamental role in transport calculations for high-charge high-energy (HZE) ions. Two recent developments have greatly advanced the practical aspects of implementation of these methods. The first was the formulation of a closed-form solution as a multiple fragmentation perturbation series. The second was the effective summation of the closed-form solution through nonperturbative techniques. The nonperturbative methods have been recently extended to an inhomogeneous, two-layer transport media to simulate the lead scattering foil present in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL) biomedical beam line used for cancer therapy. Such inhomogeneous codes are necessary for astronaut shielding in space. The transport codes utilize the Langley Research Center atomic and nuclear database. Transport code and database evaluation are performed by comparison with experiments performed at the LBL Bevalac facility using 670 A MeV 20Ne and 600 A MeV 56Fe ion beams. The comparison with a time-of-flight and delta E detector measurement for the 20Ne beam and the plastic nuclear track detectors for 56Fe show agreement up to 35%-40% in water and aluminium targets, respectively.

  10. A Green's function method for heavy ion beam transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Schimmerling, W.; Shavers, M. R.; Miller, J.; Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Badavi, F. F.

    1995-01-01

    The use of Green's function has played a fundamental role in transport calculations for high-charge high-energy (HZE) ions. Two recent developments have greatly advanced the practical aspects of implementation of these methods. The first was the formulation of a closed-form solution as a multiple fragmentation perturbation series. The second was the effective summation of the closed-form solution through nonperturbative techniques. The nonperturbative methods have been recently extended to an inhomogeneous, two-layer transport media to simulate the lead scattering foil present in the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (LBL) biomedical beam line used for cancer therapy. Such inhomogeneous codes are necessary for astronaut shielding in space. The transport codes utilize the Langley Research Center atomic and nuclear database. Transport code and database evaluation are performed by comparison with experiments performed at the LBL Bevalac facility using 670 A MeV 20Ne and 600 A MeV 56Fe ion beams. The comparison with a time-of-flight and delta E detector measurement for the 20Ne beam and the plastic nuclear track detectors for 56Fe show agreement up to 35%-40% in water and aluminium targets, respectively.

  11. Ion Transport Dynamics in Acid Variable Charge Subsoils

    SciTech Connect

    Qafoku, Nik; Sumner, Malcolm E.; Toma, Mitsuru

    2005-06-06

    This is a mini-review of the research work conducted by the authors with the objective of studying ion transport in variable charge subsoils collected from different areas around the world. An attempt is made in these studies to relate the unique behavior manifested during ionic transport in these subsoils with their mineralogical, physical and chemical properties, which are markedly different from those in soils from temperate regions. The variable charge subsoils have a relatively high salt sorption capacity and anion exchange capacity (AEC) that retards anions downward movement. The AEC correlates closely with the anion retardation coefficients. Ca2+ applied with gypsum in topsoil may be transported to the subsoil and may improve the subsoil chemical properties. These results may help in developing appropriate management strategies under a range of mineralogical, physical, and chemical conditions.

  12. Ionic requirements of proximal tubular sodium transport. II. Hydrogen ion.

    PubMed

    Green, R; Giebisch, G

    1975-11-01

    Simultaneous perfusion to proximal convoluted tubules and peritubular capillaries was used to study the effects of different perfusion fluids on sodium reabsorption and hydrogen secretion, which was calculated as bicarbonate reabsorption and titratable acid. Results show that sodium reabsorption was not tightly coupled to hydrogen secretion. Bicarbonate stimulates both sodium reabsorption and hydrogen secretion, but Tris stimulates only sodium reabsorption. Imposing an adverse chloride gradient across the proximal tubule (C1- peritubular greater than C1- luminal) decreased sodium reabsorption but did not diminish hydrogen secretion. Diamox inhibited both net sodium and hydrogen transport. It is concluded that there is not firm linkage between sodium reabsorption and hydrogen secretion and that bicarbonate probably stimulates sodium transport by a number of mechanisms, including an effect on the sodium transport unrelated to its ability to increase hydrogen ion secretion.

  13. Test particle study of ion transport in drift type turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.

    2013-12-15

    Ion transport regimes in drift type turbulence are determined in the frame of a realistic model for the turbulence spectrum based on numerical simulations. The model includes the drift of the potential with the effective diamagnetic velocity, turbulence anisotropy, and dominant waves. The effects of the zonal flow modes are also analyzed. A semi-analytical method that is able to describe trajectory stochastic trapping or eddying is used for obtaining the transport coefficients as function of the parameters of the turbulence. Analytical approximations of the transport coefficients are derived from the results. They show the transition from Bohm to gyro-Bohm scaling as plasma size increases in very good agreement with the numerical simulations.

  14. Modeling of negative ion transport in a plasma source (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riz, David; Paméla, Jérôme

    1998-02-01

    A code called NIETZSCHE has been developed to simulate the negative ion transport in a plasma source, from their birth place to the extraction holes. The H-/D- trajectory is calculated by numerically solving the 3D motion equation, while the atomic processes of destruction, of elastic collision with H+/D+ and of charge exchange with H0/D0 are handled at each time step by a Monte Carlo procedure. This code can be used to calculate the extraction probability of a negative ion produced at any location inside the source. Calculations performed with NIETZSCHE have been allowed to explain, either quantitatively or qualitatively, several phenomena observed in negative ion sources, such as the isotopic H-/D- effect, and the influence of the plasma grid bias or of the magnetic filter on the negative ion extraction. The code has also shown that, in the type of sources contemplated for ITER, which operate at large arc power densities (>1 W cm-3), negative ions can reach the extraction region provided they are produced at a distance lower than 2 cm from the plasma grid in the case of volume production (dissociative attachment processes), or if they are produced at the plasma grid surface, in the vicinity of the extraction holes.

  15. Transport of energetic ions by low-n magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1992-10-01

    The stochastic transport of MeV ions induced by low-n magnetic perturbations is studied, focussing chiefly on the stochastic mechanism operative for passing particles in low frequency perturbations. Beginning with a single-harmonic form for the perturbing field, it iii first shown numerically and analytically that the stochastic threshold of energetic particles can be much lower than that of the magnetic field, contrary to earlier expectations, so that MHD perturbations could cause appreciable loss of energetic ions without destroying the bulk confinement. The analytic theory is then extended in a number of directions, to darity the relation of the present stochaistic mechanism to instances already found, to allow for more complex perturbations, and to consider the more general relationship between the stochasticity of magnetic fields, and that of particles of differing energies (and pitch angles) moving in those fields. It is shown that the stochastic threshold is in general a nonmonotonic function of energy, whose form can to some extent be tailored to achieve desired goals (e.g., burn control or ash removal) by a judicious choice of the perturbation. Illustrative perturbations are exhibited which are stochastic for low but not for high-energy ions, for high but not for low-energy ions, and for intermediate-energy ions, but not for low or high energy. The second possibility is the behavior needed for burn control; the third provides a possible mechanism for ash removal.

  16. Transport of energetic ions by low-n magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Mynick, H.E.

    1992-10-01

    The stochastic transport of MeV ions induced by low-n magnetic perturbations is studied, focussing chiefly on the stochastic mechanism operative for passing particles in low frequency perturbations. Beginning with a single-harmonic form for the perturbing field, it iii first shown numerically and analytically that the stochastic threshold of energetic particles can be much lower than that of the magnetic field, contrary to earlier expectations, so that MHD perturbations could cause appreciable loss of energetic ions without destroying the bulk confinement. The analytic theory is then extended in a number of directions, to darity the relation of the present stochaistic mechanism to instances already found, to allow for more complex perturbations, and to consider the more general relationship between the stochasticity of magnetic fields, and that of particles of differing energies (and pitch angles) moving in those fields. It is shown that the stochastic threshold is in general a nonmonotonic function of energy, whose form can to some extent be tailored to achieve desired goals (e.g., burn control or ash removal) by a judicious choice of the perturbation. Illustrative perturbations are exhibited which are stochastic for low but not for high-energy ions, for high but not for low-energy ions, and for intermediate-energy ions, but not for low or high energy. The second possibility is the behavior needed for burn control; the third provides a possible mechanism for ash removal.

  17. Stormtime transport of ring current and radiation belt ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Margaret W.; Schulz, Michael; Lyons, L. R.; Gorney, David J.

    1993-01-01

    This is an investigation of stormtime particle transport that leads to formation of the ring current. Our method is to trace the guiding-center motion of representative ions (having selected first adiabatic invariants mu) in response to model substorm-associated impulses in the convection electric field. We compare our simulation results qualitatively with existing analytically tractable idealizations of particle transport (direct convective access and radial diffusion) in order to assess the limits of validity of these approximations. For mu approximately less than 10 MeV/G (E approximately less than 10 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period on the final (ring-current) drift shell of interest (L equivalent to 3) exceeds the duration of the main phase of our model storm, and we find that the transport of ions to this drift shell is appropriately idealized as direct convective access, typically from open drift paths. Ion transport to a final closed drift path from an open (plasma-sheet) drift trajectory is possible for those portions of that drift path that lie outside the mean stormtime separatrix between closed and open drift trajectories, For mu approximately 10-25 MeV/G (110 keV approximately less than E approximately less than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the drift period at L equivalent to 3 is comparable to the postulated 3-hr duration of the storm, and the mode of transport is transitional between direct convective access and transport that resembles radial diffusion. (This particle population is transitional between the ring current and radiation belt). For mu approximately greater than 25 MeV/G (radiation-belt ions having E approximately greater than 280 keV at L equivalent to 3) the ion drift period is considerably shorter than the main phase of a typical storm, and ions gain access to the ring-current region essentially via radial diffusion. By computing the mean and mean-square cumulative changes in 1/L among (in this case) 12 representative

  18. Transport of bromide and other inorganic ions by infiltrating storm water beneath a farmland plot

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, M.Z.; Krothe, N.C.

    1996-11-01

    A hydrogeochemical study in the clay-soil mantled portion of a karst terrane in southern Indiana demonstrated preferential flow of soil water through macropore structures that are of higher permeability than the soil matrix. Variable transport of several inorganic ions, such as Cl{sup {minus}}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, Na{sup +}, Ca{sup ++}, and Mg{sup ++}, through the unsaturated zone was observed immediately after a major storm event in April, 1992. A KBr salt spray experiment during the storm led to recovery of bromide, a nonreactive, conservative ion, at a depth of 10 ft within 24 hours after the storm. The observed Br{sup {minus}} transport rate (5 in/hr) is approximately six times greater than the expected rate of transport in the absence of preferential flow. Temporal changes in cation to anion ratios demonstrated that anions are more mobile due to the process of anionic exclusion which drives more anions out of the clay matrix whereas cations are attenuated by adsorption on the clay particles due to their charge differences. In the absence of storm-water infiltration, the ion transport proceeds largely by matrix flow of soil water. The storm event also initiated considerable mixing of ground water through lateral flow within the aquifer. The ions, such as Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, Ca{sup ++}, and Mg{sup ++}, showed immediate dilution by storm water. Subsequently, ion concentrations in the aquifer increased to the initial level because of reequilibrium with soil matrix water released from the lower part of the unsaturated zone.

  19. Evidence for ion transport and molecular ion dominance in the Venus ionotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Brace, L. H.; Cloutier, P. A.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Knudsen, W. C.; Strangeway, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    We present analyses from the five Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma experiments and the plasma wave experiment when a patch of plasma with enhanced densities was encountered in the near-Venus ionotail during atmospheric entry at an altitude of approximately 1100 km in the nightside ionosphere. Our analyses of the thermal and superthermal ion measurements in this plasma feature provides the first evidence that at times molecular ions in the 28-32 amu mass range are dominant over atomic mass species thus yielding evidence for a transport mechanism that reaches into the lower ionosphere. Analysis of plasma analyzer (OPA) observations at this time indicates the presence of ions measured in the rest frame of the spacecraft at approximately 27 and 37 volt energy per unit charge steps. In the rest frame of the planet these superthermal ions are flowing from the dawn direction at speeds (assuming they are O2(+)) of approximately 8 km/s and with a flow component downward (perpendicular to the ecliptic plane) at speeds of approximately 2 km/s. OPA analyses also determine the ion number flux, energy, flow angles, and angular distributions. Plasma wave bursts appear to indicate that plasma density decreases within and on the equatorward edge of the patch of enhanced plasma densities are associated with ion acoustic waves and relative ion streaming.

  20. Evidence for ion transport and molecular ion dominance in the Venus ionotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Brace, L. H.; Cloutier, P. A.; Grebowsky, J. M.; Hartle, R. E.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Knudsen, W. C.; Strangeway, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    We present analyses from the five Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma experiments and the plasma wave experiment when a patch of plasma with enhanced densities was encountered in the near-Venus ionotail during atmospheric entry at an altitude of approximately 1100 km in the nightside ionosphere. Our analyses of the thermal and superthermal ion measurements in this plasma feature provides the first evidence that at times molecular ions in the 28-32 amu mass range are dominant over atomic mass species thus yielding evidence for a transport mechanism that reaches into the lower ionosphere. Analysis of plasma analyzer (OPA) observations at this time indicates the presence of ions measured in the rest frame of the spacecraft at approximately 27 and 37 volt energy per unit charge steps. In the rest frame of the planet these superthermal ions are flowing from the dawn direction at speeds (assuming they are O2(+)) of approximately 8 km/s and with a flow component downward (perpendicular to the ecliptic plane) at speeds of approximately 2 km/s. OPA analyses also determine the ion number flux, energy, flow angles, and angular distributions. Plasma wave bursts appear to indicate that plasma density decreases within and on the equatorward edge of the patch of enhanced plasma densities are associated with ion acoustic waves and relative ion streaming.

  1. Asymmetric ion transport through ion-channel-mimetic solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Lei

    2013-12-17

    Both scientists and engineers are interested in the design and fabrication of synthetic nanofluidic architectures that mimic the gating functions of biological ion channels. The effort to build such structures requires interdisciplinary efforts at the intersection of chemistry, materials science, and nanotechnology. Biological ion channels and synthetic nanofluidic devices have some structural and chemical similarities, and therefore, they share some common features in regulating the traverse ionic flow. In the past decade, researchers have identified two asymmetric ion transport phenomena in synthetic nanofluidic structures, the rectified ionic current and the net diffusion current. The rectified ionic current is a diode-like current-voltage response that occurs when switching the voltage bias. This phenomenon indicates a preferential direction of transport in the nanofluidic system. The net diffusion current occurs as a direct product of charge selectivity and is generated from the asymmetric diffusion through charged nanofluidic channels. These new ion transport phenomena and the elaborate structures that occur in biology have inspired us to build functional nanofluidic devices for both fundamental research and practical applications. In this Account, we review our recent progress in the design and fabrication of biomimetic solid-state nanofluidic devices with asymmetric ion transport behavior. We demonstrate the origin of the rectified ionic current and the net diffusion current. We also identify several influential factors and discuss how to build these asymmetric features into nanofluidic systems by controlling (1) nanopore geometry, (2) surface charge distribution, (3) chemical composition, (4) channel wall wettability, (5) environmental pH, (6) electrolyte concentration gradient, and (7) ion mobility. In the case of the first four features, we build these asymmetric features directly into the nanofluidic structures. With the final three, we construct

  2. Secondary Flows and Sediment Transport due to Wave - Current Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Nabil; Wiegel, Robert

    2015-04-01

    expression, ρs is the seawater mass density, ρ is the river current mass density, a0 is the deep water wave amplitude, g is the acceleration of gravity, Cg is the wave group velocity, L is the deep water wave length, h is the average water depth near the river mouth, C0 is the deep water wave phase velocity, U is the average jet exit velocity and w is the river or the tidal inlet effective width. The values of the above number were found to be in the range between 1.0 and 6.0-8.0 for the examined laboratory and field case studies for non-buoyant jets. Upper bound corresponds to cases of higher wave activity on the coast while the lower bound corresponds to cases of tidal currents with minimum wave activity, Coastal Processes Modifications due to River and Ebb Current Interaction with Opposing Waves: Confirmation of the obtained theoretical expression was obtained by comparison against field data for shoreline variability at river mouths and the formation of accretion shoals and erosion spots at tidal inlets and ocean outfalls in the USA and the Nile delta coastline. The predicted extent of the coast reshaping process, due to shoreline erosion and subsequent accretion, due to the absence of the river Nile current after 1965, east of the Rosetta headland, was determined. The obtained shoreline erosion spatial extent using the above correlation showed that the long term length of coastline recession would be in the neighborhood of 16-20 km east of Rosetta headland (1990-2014). Such results were further confirmed by the recent satellite data (Ghoneim, et al, 2015). The results of the present work were well compared to the data on Fort Pierce Inlet, Florida, where severe erosion is known to exist on both sides of the inlet (Joshi, 1983). The current results are qualitatively in parallel to that obtained recently by the numerical model Delft3D coupled with the wave model SWAN ( Nardin, et al, 2013) on wave- current interaction at river mouths and the formation of mouth bars

  3. Self-pinched chamber transport of heavy ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.; Oliver, B. V.; Yu, S. S.; Olson, C. L.

    2001-10-01

    Self-pinched heavy ion beams are being examined as a chamber transport scheme for heavy-ion-driven inertial confinement fusion. In this scheme, beam-impact-ionization of a low-density background gas provides neutralizing electrons. For certain ranges of background gas pressures the beam is essentially charge-neutralized but incomplete current-neutralization allows the self-magnetic field of the beam to act as a pinch force, confining the beam divergence. Equilibrium transport modes for a Pb^+65 ion beam propagating through low density Xe gas are being studied with particle-in-cell simulations using the LSP code [1]. Time dependent evolution of the beam net current and pinched beam radius as a function of Xe chamber pressure from the simulations is examined. [1] T. P. Hughes, R. E. Clark, and S. S. Yu, Phys. Rev. ST-AB 2, 110401 (1999); D. R. Welch, D. V. Rose, B. V. Oliver, and R. E. Clark, Nucl. Inst. Meth. Phys. Res. A 242, 134 (2001).

  4. An Improved Green's Function for Ion Beam Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tweed, J.; Wilson, J. W.; Tripathi, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    Ion beam transport theory allows testing of material transmission properties in the laboratory environment generated by particle accelerators. This is a necessary step in materials development and evaluation for space use. The approximations used in solving the Boltzmann transport equation for the space setting are often not sufficient for laboratory work and those issues are the main emphasis of the present work. In consequence, an analytic solution of the linear Boltzmann equation is pursued in the form of a Green's function allowing flexibility in application to a broad range of boundary value problems. It has been established that simple solutions can be found for the high charge and energy (HZE) by ignoring nuclear energy downshifts and dispersion. Such solutions were found to be supported by experimental evidence with HZE ion beams when multiple scattering was added. Lacking from the prior solutions were range and energy straggling and energy downshift with dispersion associated with nuclear events. Recently, we have found global solutions including these effects providing a broader class of HZE ion solutions.

  5. Can the Transport Properties of Molten Salts and Ionic Liquids Be Used To Determine Ion Association?

    PubMed

    Harris, Kenneth R

    2016-12-01

    There have long been arguments supporting the concept of ion association in molten salts and ionic liquids, largely based on differences between the conductivity and that predicted from self-diffusion coefficients by the Nernst-Einstein equation for noninteracting ions. It is known from molecular dynamics simulations that even simple models based on charged hard spheres show such a difference due to the (anti)-correlation of ion motions. Formally this is expressed as a difference between the velocity cross-correlation coefficient of the oppositely charged ions and the mean of those for the two like-charged ions. This article examines molten salt and ionic liquid transport property data, comparing simple and model associated salts (ZnCl2, PbCl2, and TlCl) including weakly dissociated molecular liquids (H2O, HCOOH, H2SO4). Analysis employing Laity resistance coefficients (rij) shows that the common ion-association rationalization is flawed, consistent with recent direct measurements of the degree of ionicity in ionic liquid chlorides and with theoretical studies. However, the protic ionic liquids [PyrOMe][BF4] and [DBUH][CH3SO3] have larger than usual NE deviation parameters (>0.5), and large negative like-ion rii, analogous to those of ZnCl2. Structural, spectroscopic, and theoretical studies are suggested to determine whether these are indeed genuine examples of association.

  6. Electrokinetic ion transport through unsaturated soil: 1. Theory, model development, and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattson, Earl D.; Bowman, Robert S.; Lindgren, Eric R.

    2002-01-01

    An electromigration transport model for non-reactive ion transport in unsaturated soil was developed and tested against laboratory experiments. This model assumed the electric potential field was constant with respect to time, an assumption valid for highly buffered soil, or when the electrode electrolysis reactions are neutralized. The model also assumed constant moisture contents and temperature with respect to time, and that electroosmotic and hydraulic transport of water through the soil was negligible. A functional relationship between ionic mobility and the electrolyte concentration was estimated using the chemical activity coefficient. Tortuosity was calculated from a mathematical relationship fitted to the electrical conductivity of the bulk pore water and soil moisture data. The functional relationship between ionic mobility, pore-water concentration, and tortuosity as a function of moisture content allowed the model to predict ion transport in heterogeneous unsaturated soils. The model was tested against laboratory measurements assessing anionic electromigration as a function of moisture content. In the test cell, a strip of soil was spiked with red dye No 40 and monitored for a 24-h period while a 10-mA current was maintained between the electrodes. Electromigration velocities predicted by the electromigration transport model were in agreement with laboratory experimental results. Both laboratory-measured and model-predicted dye migration results indicated a maximum transport velocity at moisture contents less than saturation due to competing effects between current density and tortuosity as moisture content decreases.

  7. Electrokinetic ion transport through unsaturated soil: 1. Theory, model development, and testing.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Earl D; Bowman, Robert S; Lindgren, Eric R

    2002-01-01

    An electromigration transport model for non-reactive ion transport in unsaturated soil was developed and tested against laboratory experiments. This model assumed the electric potential field was constant with respect to time, an assumption valid for highly buffered soil, or when the electrode electrolysis reactions are neutralized. The model also assumed constant moisture contents and temperature with respect to time, and that electroosmotic and hydraulic transport of water through the soil was negligible. A functional relationship between ionic mobility and the electrolyte concentration was estimated using the chemical activity coefficient. Tortuosity was calculated from a mathematical relationship fitted to the electrical conductivity of the bulk pore water and soil moisture data. The functional relationship between ionic mobility, pore-water concentration, and tortuosity as a function of moisture content allowed the model to predict ion transport in heterogeneous unsaturated soils. The model was tested against laboratory measurements assessing anionic electromigration as a function of moisture content. In the test cell, a strip of soil was spiked with red dye No 40 and monitored for a 24-h period while a 10-mA current was maintained between the electrodes. Electromigration velocities predicted by the electromigration transport model were in agreement with laboratory experimental results. Both laboratory-measured and model-predicted dye migration results indicated a maximum transport velocity at moisture contents less than saturation due to competing effects between current density and tortuosity as moisture content decreases.

  8. Stochastic Orbit Loss of Neutral Beam Ions From NSTX Due to Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode Avalanches

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D S; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; Gorelenkova, M; Kubota, S; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Shi, L

    2012-07-11

    Short toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) avalanche bursts in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) cause a drop in the neutron rate and sometimes a loss of neutral beam ions at or near the full injection energy over an extended range of pitch angles. The simultaneous loss of wide ranges of pitch angle suggests stochastic transport of the beam ions occurs. When beam ion orbits are followed with a guiding center code that incorporates plasma's magnetic equilibrium plus the measured modes, the predicted ranges of lost pitch angle are similar to those seen in the experiment, with distinct populations of trapped and passing orbits lost. These correspond to domains where the stochasticity extends in the orbit phase space from the region of beam ion deposition to the loss boundary.

  9. The microstructural evolution of ultrananocrystalline diamond films due to P ion implantation process—the annealing effect

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Sheng-Chang; Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Kurian, Joji; Lin, I.-Nan; Dong, Chung-Li; Niu, Huan

    2014-11-14

    The microstructural evolution of UNCD films which are P-ion implanted and annealed at 600 °C (or 800 °C) is systematically investigated. The difference of interaction that the UNCD content undergoes along the trajectory of the incident P-ions is reflected in the alteration of the granular structure. In regions where the P-ions reside, the “interacting zone,” which is found at about 300 nm beneath the surface of the films, coalescence of diamond grains occurs inducing nano-graphitic clusters. The annealing at 600 °C (or 800 °C) heals the defects and, in some cases, forms interconnected graphitic filaments that result in the decrease in surface resistance. However, the annealing at 600 °C (800 °C) induces marked UNCD-to-Si layers interaction. This interaction due to the annealing processes hinders the electron transport across the interface and degrades the electron field emission properties of the UNCD films. These microstructural evolution processes very well account for the phenomenon elaborating that, in spite of enhanced conductivity of the UNCD films along the film's surface due to the P-ion implantation and annealing processes, the electron field emission properties for these UNCD films do not improve.

  10. Overview of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport Code System PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji; Matsuda, Norihiro; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Furuta, Takuya; Noda, Shusaku; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Fukahori, Tokio; Okumura, Keisuke; Kai, Tetsuya; Chiba, Satoshi; Sihver, Lembit

    2014-06-01

    A general purpose Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, is being developed through the collaboration of several institutes in Japan and Europe. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency is responsible for managing the entire project. PHITS can deal with the transport of nearly all particles, including neutrons, protons, heavy ions, photons, and electrons, over wide energy ranges using various nuclear reaction models and data libraries. It is written in Fortran language and can be executed on almost all computers. All components of PHITS such as its source, executable and data-library files are assembled in one package and then distributed to many countries via the Research organization for Information Science and Technology, the Data Bank of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency, and the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center. More than 1,000 researchers have been registered as PHITS users, and they apply the code to various research and development fields such as nuclear technology, accelerator design, medical physics, and cosmic-ray research. This paper briefly summarizes the physics models implemented in PHITS, and introduces some important functions useful for specific applications, such as an event generator mode and beam transport functions.

  11. Ion transport and softening in a polymerized ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Bocharova, Vera; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tselev, Alexander; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Berdzinski, Stefan; Strehmel, Veronika; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Minutolo, Joseph A; Sangoro, Joshua R; Agapov, Alexander L; Sokolov, Alexei P; Kalinin, Sergei V; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2015-01-21

    Polymerized ionic liquids (PolyILs) are promising materials for various solid state electronic applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells, lithium batteries, actuators, field-effect transistors, light emitting electrochemical cells, and electrochromic devices. However, fundamental understanding of interconnection between ionic transport and mechanical properties in PolyILs is far from complete. In this work, local charge transport and structural changes in films of a PolyIL are studied using an integrated experiment-theory based approach. Experimental data for the kinetics of charging and steady state current-voltage relations can be explained by taking into account the dissociation of ions under an applied electric field (known as the Wien effect). Onsager's theory of the Wien effect coupled with the Poisson-Nernst-Planck formalism for the charge transport is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The agreement between the theory and experiments allows us to predict structural properties of the PolyIL films. We have observed significant softening of the PolyIL films beyond certain threshold voltages and formation of holes under a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tip, through which an electric field was applied. The observed softening is explained by the theory of depression in glass transition temperature resulting from enhanced dissociation of ions with an increase in applied electric field.

  12. Regulation of gallbladder ion transport: role of biliary lipids.

    PubMed

    Roslyn, J J; Abedin, M Z; Strichartz, S D; Abdou, M S; Palant, C E

    1989-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that biliary lipids influence in vivo gallbladder absorption and solute-coupled water flow. To clarify the electrophysiologic effects that underlie this phenomenon, prairie dog gallbladders were mounted in an Ussing-type chamber, and the influence of bile acids and varying ratios of bile acids and biliary phospholipids on transepithelial potential difference (Vms), resistance (Rt), and short-circuit current (Isc) was examined. Exposure to 5 mmol/L taurodeoxycholate (TDC) resulted in inhibition of Vms (p less than 0.01) and Isc (p less than 0.01) and an increase (p less than 0.05) in Rt. Subsequent perfusion with bile acids and phospholipids (5 mmol/L TDC + 0.3 mmol/L phosphatidylcholine [PC]) led to continued inhibition of ion transport. In contrast, exposure to 5 mmol/L TDC + 1.7 mmol/L PC resulted in a significant increase in transport, as manifested by an increase in Vms (p less than 0.02) and Isc (p less than 0.01) and a decrease in Rt (p less than 0.05) compared with bile acids. These results indicate that the ratio of phospholipids to bile salts modulates ion transport across prairie dog gallbladder and that this ratio may be an important determinant of gallbladder absorption in health and disease.

  13. Study of negative ion transport phenomena in a plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riz, D.; Paméla, J.

    1996-07-01

    NIETZSCHE (Negative Ions Extraction and Transport ZSimulation Code for HydrogEn species) is a negative ion (NI) transport code developed at Cadarache. This code calculates NI trajectories using a 3D Monte-Carlo technique, taking into account the main destruction processes, as well as elastic collisions (H-/H+) and charge exchanges (H-/H0). It determines the extraction probability of a NI created at a given position. According to the simulations, we have seen that in the case of volume production, only NI produced close to the plasma grid (PG) can be extracted. Concerning the surface production, we have studied how NI produced on the PG and accelerated by the plasma sheath backward into the source could be extracted. We demonstrate that elastic collisions and charge exchanges play an important role, which in some conditions dominates the magnetic filter effect, which acts as a magnetic mirror. NI transport in various conditions will be discussed: volume/surface production, high/low plasmas density, tent filter/transverse filter.

  14. Osmoregulation in zebrafish: ion transport mechanisms and functional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Guh, Ying-Jey; Lin, Chia-Hao; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2015-01-01

    Fish, like mammals, have to maintain their body fluid ionic and osmotic homeostasis through sophisticated iono-/osmoregulation mechanisms, which are conducted mainly by ionocytes of the gill (the skin in embryonic stages), instead of the renal tubular cells in mammals. Given the advantages in terms of genetic database availability and manipulation, zebrafish is an emerging model for research into regulatory and integrative physiology. At least five types of ionocytes, HR, NaR, NCC, SLC26, and KS cells, have been identified to carry out Na+ uptake/H+ secretion/NH4+ excretion, Ca2+ uptake, Na+/Cl- uptake, K+ secretion, and Cl- uptake/HCO3- secretion, respectively, through distinct sets of transporters. Several hormones, namely isotocin, prolactin, cortisol, stanniocalcin-1, calcitonin, endothelin-1, vitamin D, parathyorid hormone 1, catecholamines, and the renin-angiotensin-system, have been demonstrated to positively or negatively regulate ion transport through specific receptors at different ionocytes stages, at either the transcriptional/translational or posttranslational level. The knowledge obtained using zebrafish answered many long-term contentious or unknown issues in the field of fish iono-/osmoregulation. The homology of ion transport pathways and hormone systems also means that the zebrafish model informs studies on mammals or other animal species, thereby providing insights into related fields. PMID:26600749

  15. Ion transport and softening in a polymerized ionic liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Kumar, Rajeev; Bocharova, Vera; Strelcov, Evgheni; ...

    2014-11-13

    Polymerized ionic liquids (PolyILs) are promising materials for various solid state electronic applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells, lithium batteries, actuators, field-effect transistors, light emitting electrochemical cells, and electrochromic devices. However, fundamental understanding of interconnection between ionic transport and mechanical properties in PolyILs is far from complete. In this paper, local charge transport and structural changes in films of a PolyIL are studied using an integrated experiment-theory based approach. Experimental data for the kinetics of charging and steady state current–voltage relations can be explained by taking into account the dissociation of ions under an applied electric field (known as themore » Wien effect). Onsager's theory of the Wien effect coupled with the Poisson–Nernst–Planck formalism for the charge transport is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The agreement between the theory and experiments allows us to predict structural properties of the PolyIL films. We have observed significant softening of the PolyIL films beyond certain threshold voltages and formation of holes under a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tip, through which an electric field was applied. Finally, the observed softening is explained by the theory of depression in glass transition temperature resulting from enhanced dissociation of ions with an increase in applied electric field.« less

  16. Ion transport and softening in a polymerized ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajeev; Bocharova, Vera; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tselev, Alexander; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Berdzinski, Stefan; Strehmel, Veronika; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Minutolo, Joseph A.; Sangoro, Joshua R.; Agapov, Alexander L.; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2014-11-13

    Polymerized ionic liquids (PolyILs) are promising materials for various solid state electronic applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells, lithium batteries, actuators, field-effect transistors, light emitting electrochemical cells, and electrochromic devices. However, fundamental understanding of interconnection between ionic transport and mechanical properties in PolyILs is far from complete. In this paper, local charge transport and structural changes in films of a PolyIL are studied using an integrated experiment-theory based approach. Experimental data for the kinetics of charging and steady state current–voltage relations can be explained by taking into account the dissociation of ions under an applied electric field (known as the Wien effect). Onsager's theory of the Wien effect coupled with the Poisson–Nernst–Planck formalism for the charge transport is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The agreement between the theory and experiments allows us to predict structural properties of the PolyIL films. We have observed significant softening of the PolyIL films beyond certain threshold voltages and formation of holes under a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tip, through which an electric field was applied. Finally, the observed softening is explained by the theory of depression in glass transition temperature resulting from enhanced dissociation of ions with an increase in applied electric field.

  17. IUPAP Award: Ion transport in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenzhong

    Intercalation in 2D materials drastically influences both physical and chemical properties, which leads to a new degree of freedom for fundamental studies and expands the potential applications of 2D materials. In this talk, I will discuss our work in the past two years related to ion intercalation of 2D materials, including insertion of Li and Na ions in graphene and MoS2. We focused on both fundamental mechanism and potential application, e.g. we measured in-situ optical transmittance spectra and electrical transport properties of few-layer graphene (FLG) nanostructures upon electrochemical lithiation/delithiation. By observing a simultaneous increase of both optical transmittance and DC conductivity, strikingly different from other materials, we proposed its application as a next generation transparent electrode.

  18. Ion transport through a T-intersection of nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Daiguji, Hirofumi; Adachi, Takuma; Tatsumi, Naoya

    2008-08-01

    Ion transport through a T-intersection of two silica nanochannels (a main channel, 5-mum long and 30-nm wide, and a subchannel, 5-microm long and 15-nm wide) with a surface charge distribution was investigated based on continuum dynamics calculations. The surface charge within 250 nm of the intersection in the main channel and the entire subchannel was positive and that in the main channel outside this intersection region was negative. This nanofluidic system is analogous to a p-n-p transistor. The calculation results revealed that, by adjusting the electric potentials at the ends of the nanochannels, the ionic current could be (1) cut off, (2) regulated in the main channel, (3) diverged into the main and subchannels, (4) turned from the main channel to the subchannel, and (5) merged into the subchannel. A series connection of this nanofluidic system can therefore be used in biotechnological applications for electrophoretic separation and for sorting of ions and biomolecules.

  19. Auxin effects on ion transport in Chara corallina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyun; de Boer, Albertus H; van Duijn, Bert

    2016-04-01

    The plant hormone auxin has been widely studied with regard to synthesis, transport, signaling and functions among the land plants while there is still a lack of knowledge about the possible role for auxin regulation mechanisms in algae with "plant-like" structures. Here we use the alga Chara corallina as a model to study aspects of auxin signaling. In this respect we measured auxin on membrane potential changes and different ion fluxes (K(+), H(+)) through the plasma membrane. Results showed that auxin, mainly IAA, could hyperpolarize the membrane potential of C. corallina internodal cells. Ion flux measurements showed that the auxin-induced membrane potential change may be based on the change of K(+) permeability and/or channel activity rather than through the activation of proton pumps as known in land plants.

  20. Effects due to adsorbed atoms upon angular and energy distributions of surface produced negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, M.; Bacal, M.; Kasuya, T.; Kato, S.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2013-02-01

    Exposure to Cs added hydrogen discharge makes surface of plasma grid of a negative hydrogen ion source covered with Cs and hydrogen. A Monte-Carlo particle simulation code ACAT was run to evaluate the effects due to adsorbed Cs and H atoms upon the angular and energy distributions of H atoms leaving the surface. Accumulation of H atoms on the surface reduces particle reflection coefficients and the mean energy of backscattered H atoms. Angular distributions of H atoms reflected from the hydrogen covered surface tend to be under-cosine at lower energies. Desorption of adsorbed H atoms is more efficient for hydrogen positive ions than for Cs positive ions at lower incident energy. At higher energy more than 100 eV, Cs ions desorb adsorbed H atoms more efficiently than hydrogen ions.

  1. Energetic O+ and H+ Ions in the Plasma Sheet: Implications for the Transport of Ionospheric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Nose, M.; Christon, S. P.; Lui, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    The present study statistically examines the characteristics of energetic ions in the plasma sheet using the Geotail/Energetic Particle and Ion Composition data. An emphasis is placed on the O+ ions, and the characteristics of the H+ ions are used as references. The following is a summary of the results. (1) The average O+ energy is lower during solar maximum and higher during solar minimum. A similar tendency is also found for the average H+ energy, but only for geomagnetically active times; (2) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities are several times higher during solar maximum than during solar minimum; (3) The average H+ and O+ energies and the O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities all increase with geomagnetic activity. The differences among different solar phases not only persist but also increase with increasing geomagnetic activity; (4) Whereas the average H+ energy increases toward Earth, the average O+ energy decreases toward Earth. The average energy increases toward dusk for both the H+ and O+ ions; (5) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities increase toward Earth during all solar phases, but most clearly during solar maximum. These results suggest that the solar illumination enhances the ionospheric outflow more effectively with increasing geomagnetic activity and that a significant portion of the O+ ions is transported directly from the ionosphere to the near ]Earth region rather than through the distant tail.

  2. Energetic O+ and H+ Ions in the Plasma Sheet: Implications for the Transport of Ionospheric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Nose, M.; Christon, S. P.; Lui, A. T.

    2011-01-01

    The present study statistically examines the characteristics of energetic ions in the plasma sheet using the Geotail/Energetic Particle and Ion Composition data. An emphasis is placed on the O+ ions, and the characteristics of the H+ ions are used as references. The following is a summary of the results. (1) The average O+ energy is lower during solar maximum and higher during solar minimum. A similar tendency is also found for the average H+ energy, but only for geomagnetically active times; (2) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities are several times higher during solar maximum than during solar minimum; (3) The average H+ and O+ energies and the O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities all increase with geomagnetic activity. The differences among different solar phases not only persist but also increase with increasing geomagnetic activity; (4) Whereas the average H+ energy increases toward Earth, the average O+ energy decreases toward Earth. The average energy increases toward dusk for both the H+ and O+ ions; (5) The O+ -to -H+ ratios of number and energy densities increase toward Earth during all solar phases, but most clearly during solar maximum. These results suggest that the solar illumination enhances the ionospheric outflow more effectively with increasing geomagnetic activity and that a significant portion of the O+ ions is transported directly from the ionosphere to the near ]Earth region rather than through the distant tail.

  3. Ion transport into cells exposed to monopolar and bipolar nanosecond pulses

    PubMed Central

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; Pakhomov, Andrei G.; Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N.; Ibey, Bennet L.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments with CHO cells exposed to 60 and 300 ns pulsed electric fields with amplitudes in the range from several kV/cm to tens of kV/cm, showed a decrease of the uptake of calcium ions by more than an order of magnitude when, immediately after a first pulse, a second one of opposite polarity was applied. This effect is assumed to be due to the reversal of the electrophoretic transport of ions through the electroporated membrane during the second phase of the bipolar pulse. This assumption, however, is only valid if electrophoresis is the dominant transport mechanism, rather than diffusion. Comparison of calculated calcium ion currents with experimental results showed that for nanosecond pulses, electrophoresis is at least as important as diffusion. By delaying the second pulse with respect to the first one, the effect of reverse electrophoresis is reduced. Consequently, separating nanosecond pulses of opposite polarity by up to approximately hundred microseconds allows us to vary the uptake of ions from very small values to that obtained with two pulses of the same polarity. The measured calcium ion uptake obtained with bipolar pulses also allowed us to determine the membrane pore recovery time. The calculated recovery time constants are on the order of ten microseconds. PMID:25212701

  4. Ion transport into cells exposed to monopolar and bipolar nanosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Schoenbach, Karl H; Pakhomov, Andrei G; Semenov, Iurii; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N; Ibey, Bennett L

    2015-06-01

    Experiments with CHO cells exposed to 60 and 300 ns pulsed electric fields with amplitudes in the range from several kV/cm to tens of kV/cm showed a decrease of the uptake of calcium ions by more than an order of magnitude when, immediately after a first pulse, a second one of opposite polarity was applied. This effect is assumed to be due to the reversal of the electrophoretic transport of ions through the electroporated membrane during the second phase of the bipolar pulse. This assumption, however, is only valid if electrophoresis is the dominant transport mechanism, rather than diffusion. Comparison of calculated calcium ion currents with experimental results showed that for nanosecond pulses, electrophoresis is at least as important as diffusion. By delaying the second pulse with respect to the first one, the effect of reverse electrophoresis is reduced. Consequently, separating nanosecond pulses of opposite polarity by up to approximately hundred microseconds allows us to vary the uptake of ions from very small values to those obtained with two pulses of the same polarity. The measured calcium ion uptake obtained with bipolar pulses also allowed us to determine the membrane pore recovery time. The calculated recovery time constants are on the order of 10 μs.

  5. Initial binding of ions to the interhelical loops of divalent ion transporter CorA: replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Mu, Yuguang

    2012-01-01

    Crystal structures of Thermotoga maritima magnesium transporter CorA, reported in 2006, revealed its homo-pentameric constructions. However, the structure of the highly conserved extracellular interhelical loops remains unsolved, due to its high flexibility. We have explored the configurations of the loops through extensive replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent model with the presence of either Co(III) Hexamine ions or Mg(2+) ions. We found that there are multiple binding sites available on the interhelical loops in which the negatively charged residues, E316 and E320, are located notably close to the positively charged ions during the simulations. Our simulations resolved the distinct binding patterns of the two kinds of ions: Co(III) Hexamine ions were found to bind stronger with the loop than Mg(2+) ions with binding free energy -7.3 kJ/mol lower, which is nicely consistent with the previous data. Our study provides an atomic basis description of the initial binding process of Mg(2+) ions on the extracellular interhelical loops of CorA and the detailed inhibition mechanism of Co(III) Hexamine ions on CorA ions transportation.

  6. Initial Binding of Ions to the Interhelical Loops of Divalent Ion Transporter CorA: Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Mu, Yuguang

    2012-01-01

    Crystal structures of Thermotoga maritima magnesium transporter CorA, reported in 2006, revealed its homo-pentameric constructions. However, the structure of the highly conserved extracellular interhelical loops remains unsolved, due to its high flexibility. We have explored the configurations of the loops through extensive replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent model with the presence of either Co(III) Hexamine ions or Mg2+ ions. We found that there are multiple binding sites available on the interhelical loops in which the negatively charged residues, E316 and E320, are located notably close to the positively charged ions during the simulations. Our simulations resolved the distinct binding patterns of the two kinds of ions: Co(III) Hexamine ions were found to bind stronger with the loop than Mg2+ ions with binding free energy −7.3 kJ/mol lower, which is nicely consistent with the previous data. Our study provides an atomic basis description of the initial binding process of Mg2+ ions on the extracellular interhelical loops of CorA and the detailed inhibition mechanism of Co(III) Hexamine ions on CorA ions transportation. PMID:22952795

  7. Toroidal ripple transport of beam ions in the mega-ampère spherical tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClements, K. G.; Hole, M. J.

    2012-07-01

    The transport of injected beam ions due to toroidal magnetic field ripple in the mega-ampère spherical tokamak (MAST) is quantified using a full orbit particle tracking code, with collisional slowing-down and pitch-angle scattering by electrons and bulk ions taken into account. It is shown that the level of ripple losses is generally rather low, although it depends sensitively on the major radius of the outer midplane plasma edge; for typical values of this parameter in MAST plasmas, the reduction in beam heating power due specifically to ripple transport is less than 1%, and the ripple contribution to beam ion diffusivity is of the order of 0.1 m2 s-1 or less. It is concluded that ripple effects make only a small contribution to anomalous transport rates that have been invoked to account for measured neutron rates and plasma stored energies in some MAST discharges. Delayed (non-prompt) losses are shown to occur close to the outer midplane, suggesting that banana-drift diffusion is the most likely cause of the ripple-induced losses.

  8. Toroidal ripple transport of beam ions in the mega-ampere spherical tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    McClements, K. G.

    2012-07-15

    The transport of injected beam ions due to toroidal magnetic field ripple in the mega-ampere spherical tokamak (MAST) is quantified using a full orbit particle tracking code, with collisional slowing-down and pitch-angle scattering by electrons and bulk ions taken into account. It is shown that the level of ripple losses is generally rather low, although it depends sensitively on the major radius of the outer midplane plasma edge; for typical values of this parameter in MAST plasmas, the reduction in beam heating power due specifically to ripple transport is less than 1%, and the ripple contribution to beam ion diffusivity is of the order of 0.1 m{sup 2} s{sup -1} or less. It is concluded that ripple effects make only a small contribution to anomalous transport rates that have been invoked to account for measured neutron rates and plasma stored energies in some MAST discharges. Delayed (non-prompt) losses are shown to occur close to the outer midplane, suggesting that banana-drift diffusion is the most likely cause of the ripple-induced losses.

  9. Experimental evidence of the increased transport due to the wall bounded magnetic drift in low temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gaboriau, F. Baude, R.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2014-05-26

    This paper presents experimental results on plasma transport across the magnetic field (B) in magnetized low-temperature plasma sources. Due to the presence of chamber walls, this transport can be complex even in a non-turbulent regime. In particular, in configurations without cylindrical symmetry, the magnetic drifts tend to be bounded by the chamber walls, thereby inducing plasma asymmetry and reducing magnetic confinement. In this work, we measure electron and ion current densities at metal chamber walls bounding a rectangular magnetic filter and demonstrate that these current densities are asymmetrically nonuniform. We also provide an experimental confirmation of model predictions of increased cross-field electron transport in such filter configuration, scaling as 1/B rather than the classical 1/B{sup 2} scaling.

  10. What's new in ion transports in the cochlea?

    PubMed

    Couloigner, Vincent; Sterkers, Olivier; Ferrary, Evelyne

    2006-10-01

    Recent advances in the field of the physiology of inner ear fluids permitted the characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in critical processes such as the absorption of K(+) through cochlear sensory hair cells (mechanoelectrical transduction) or the secretion of K(+) by marginal cells of the stria vascularis. In addition, new pathways for ion circulations were evidenced. Mutations of transporters involved in some of these pathways, especially in K(+) recycling through gap junction systems, and in local pH regulation, are among the most frequent etiologies of genetic deafness in humans.

  11. 8 GeV H- ions: Transport and injection

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Bryant, H.; Drozhdin, A.; Hill, C.; Kostin, M.; Macek, R.; Ostiguy, J.-F.; Rees, G.H.; Tang, Z.; Yoon, P.; /Fermilab /New Mexico U. /Los Alamos /Rutherford /Rochester U.

    2005-05-01

    Fermilab is working on the design of an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac called the Proton Driver. The energy of H{sup -} beam will be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This brings up a number of technical challenges to transport and injection of H{sup -} ions. This paper will focus on the subjects of stripping losses (including stripping by blackbody radiation, field and residual gas) and carbon foil stripping efficiency, along with a brief discussion on other issues such as Stark states lifetime of hydrogen atoms, single and multiple Coulomb scattering, foil heating and stress, radiation activation, collimation and jitter correction, etc.

  12. Ion plateau transport near the tokamak magnetic axis

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1998-04-01

    Conventional neoclassical transport theory does not pertain near the magnetic axis, where orbital variation of the minor radius and the poloidal field markedly change the nature of guiding-center trajectories. Instead of the conventional tokamak banana-shaped trajectories, near-axis orbits, called potato orbits, are radially wider and lead to distinctive kinetic considerations. Here it is shown that there is a plateau regime for the near-axis case; the corresponding potato-plateau ion thermal conductivity is computed. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Charge transport studies of proton and ion conducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versek, Craig Wm

    The development of a high-throughput impedance spectroscopy instrumentation platform for conductivity characterization of ion transport materials is outlined. Collaborative studies using this system are summarized. Charge conduction mechanisms and conductivity data for small molecule proton conducting liquids, pyrazole, imidazole, 1,2,3-triazole, 1,2,4-triazole, and select mixtures of these compounds are documented. Furthermore, proton diffusivity measurements using a Pulse Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR) technique for imidazole and 1,2,3-triazole binary mixtures are compared. Studies of azole functionalized discotic and linear mesogens with conductivity, structural, and thermal characterizations are detailed.

  14. Preliminary Results of Low Energy Sputter Yields of Boron Nitride due to Xenon Ion Bombardment (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-07

    distribution of sputtered material J. App. Phys. 31 177-9 30Chini T K Tanemura M and Okuyama F 1996 Angular distribution of sputtered Ge atoms by low...ion incidence angle relative to target normal ∆ m = mass loss due to ion beam exposure φ = azimuthal angle of sputtered particle ρ = density of...modifications. The ion source and QCM are housed within a 0.125 m 3 stainless steel vacuum chamber (43 cm ID x 76 cm long main section), equipped with a

  15. Measuring ion transport activities in Xenopus oocytes using the ion-trap technique.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Maxime G; Longpré, Jean-Philippe; Wallendorff, Bernadette; Lapointe, Jean-Yves

    2008-11-01

    The ion-trap technique is an experimental approach allowing measurement of changes in ionic concentrations within a restricted space (the trap) comprised of a large-diameter ion-selective electrode apposed to a voltage-clamped Xenopus laevis oocyte. The technique is demonstrated with oocytes expressing the Na(+)/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) using Na(+)- and H(+)-selective electrodes and with the electroneutral H(+)/monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1). In SGLT1-expressing oocytes, bath substrate diffused into the trap within 20 s, stimulating Na(+)/glucose influx, which generated a measurable decrease in the trap Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)](T)) by 0.080 +/- 0.009 mM. Membrane hyperpolarization produced a further decrease in [Na(+)](T), which was proportional to the increased cotransport current. In a Na(+)-free, weakly buffered solution (pH 5.5), H(+) drives glucose transport through SGLT1, and this was monitored with a H(+)-selective electrode. Proton movements can also be clearly detected on adding lactate to an oocyte expressing MCT1 (pH 6.5). For SGLT1, time-dependent changes in [Na(+)](T) or [H(+)](T) were also detected during a membrane potential pulse (150 ms) in the presence of substrate. In the absence of substrate, hyperpolarization triggered rapid reorientation of SGLT1 cation binding sites, accompanied by cation capture from the trap. The resulting change in [Na(+)](T) or [H(+)](T) is proportional to the pre-steady-state charge movement. The ion-trap technique can thus be used to measure steady-state and pre-steady-state transport activities and provides new opportunities for studying electrogenic and electroneutral ion transport mechanisms.

  16. Cancellation of the ion deflection due to electron-suppression magnetic field in a negative-ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Chitarin, G; Agostinetti, P; Aprile, D; Marconato, N; Veltri, P

    2014-02-01

    A new magnetic configuration is proposed for the suppression of co-extracted electrons in a negative-ion accelerator. This configuration is produced by an arrangement of permanent magnets embedded in one accelerator grid and creates an asymmetric local magnetic field on the upstream and downstream sides of this grid. Thanks to the "concentration" of the magnetic field on the upstream side of the grid, the resulting deflection of the ions due to magnetic field can be "intrinsically" cancelled by calibrating the configuration of permanent magnets. At the same time, the suppression of co-extracted electrons can be improved.

  17. Ion radial transport induced by ICRF waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Vaclavik, J.; Hammett, G.W.

    1987-05-01

    The wave-induced fluxes of energetic-trapped ions during ICRF heating of tokamak plasmas are calculated using quasilinear equations. A simple single particle model of this transport mechanism is also given. Both a convective flux proportional to k/sub phi/vertical bar E/sub +/vertical bar/sup 2/ and a diffusive flux proportional to k/sub phi//sup 2/vertical bar E/sub +/vertical bar/sup 2/ are found. Here, k/sub phi/ is the toroidal wave number and E/sub +/ is the left-hand polarized wave field. The convective flux may become significant for large k/sub phi/ if the wave spectrum is asymmetric in k/sub phi/. But for the conditions of most previous experiments, these calculations indicate that radial transport driven directly by the ICRF wave is unimportant.

  18. Ion Transport in Isolated Protoplasts from Tobacco Suspension Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mettler, Irvin J.; Leonard, Robert T.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted into the feasibility of using enzymically isolated protoplasts from suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana glutinosa L. to study ion transport. Transport of K+ (86Rb), 36Cl−, H232PO4− and 45Ca2+ from 1 millimolar salt solutions was determined after separation of intact protoplasts from nonabsorbed tracers by centrifugation through a Ficoll step gradient. Influx of K+, Cl−, and H2PO4− measured over a 30-minute period was reduced (up to 99%) by respiratory inhibitors such as 5 micrograms per milliliter oligomycin, 0.1 millimolar dinitrophenol, 0.1 millimolar cyanide, or N2 gas. In contrast, Ca2+ influx was not tightly coupled to respiratory energy production. The influx of K+ was highest between pH 6.5 and 7.5 whereas the influx of H2PO4− and Cl− was greatest between pH 4.5 and 5.5. Influx of K+ and Cl− was maximal at 35 and 45 C, respectively, and was almost completely inhibited below 10 C. Fusicoccin (0.01 millimolar) stimulated K+ influx by more than 200% but had no effect on the influx of either Cl− or H2PO4−. Apparent H+ efflux, as measured by decrease in solution pH, was enhanced by K+, stimulated further by 0.01 millimolar fusicoccin, and inhibited by 0.1 millimolar dinitrophenol or 5 micrograms per milliliter oligomycin. The measured ionic fluxes into protoplasts were similar to those obtained with intact cultured cells. The results indicate that enzymic removal of the cell wall produced no significant alteration in the transport properties of the protoplast, and that it is feasible to use isolated protoplasts for studies on ion transport. Images PMID:16660675

  19. Modeling of plasma transport and negative ion extraction in a magnetized radio-frequency plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fubiani, G.; Garrigues, L.; Hagelaar, G.; Kohen, N.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    Negative ion sources for fusion are high densities plasma sources in large discharge volumes. There are many challenges in the modeling of these sources, due to numerical constraints associated with the high plasma density, to the coupling between plasma and neutral transport and chemistry, the presence of a magnetic filter, and the extraction of negative ions. In this paper we present recent results concerning these different aspects. Emphasis is put on the modeling approach and on the methods and approximations. The models are not fully predictive and not complete as would be engineering codes but they are used to identify the basic principles and to better understand the physics of the negative ion sources.

  20. Depth profiling and stoichiometric changes due to high-fluence ion bombardments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, S. T.; Yamamura, Y.

    1988-06-01

    In order to investigate the depth profiles and stoichiometric changes of two component targets due to high-fluence bombardments, the ACAT-DIFFUSE code has been developed. This ACAT-DIFFUSE code is composed of the ACAT code (slowing down process) and a part of the DIFFUSE code (diffusion process of thermalized particles). This ACAT-DIFFUSE code is applied to calculations of depth profiles and stoichiometric changes due to low energy Ar ion bombardments on two component target. It is found that the replacement reaction and ion-induced diffusion play a role in the stoichiometric change due to high-fluence ion bombardment, and reasonable agreement with experimental results is obtained.

  1. Error in trapped-ion quantum gates due to spontaneous photon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeri, R.; Langer, C.; Jost, J. D.; Blakestad, R. B.; Britton, J.; Chiaverini, J.; Hume, D.; Itano, W. M.; Knill, E.; Leibfried, D.; Reichle, R.; Seidelin, S.; Wesenberg, J. H.; Wineland, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    Quantum bits that are encoded into hyperfine states of trapped ions are a promising system for Quantum Information Processing (QIP). Quantum gates performed on trapped ions use laser induced stimulated Raman transitions. The spontaneous scattering of photons therefore sets a fundamental limit to the gate fidelity. Here we present a calculation that explores these limits. Errors are shown to arise from two sources. The first is due to spin relaxation (spontaneous Raman photon-scattering events) and the second due to the momentum-recoil that is imparted to the trapped ions in the scattering process. It is shown that the gate error due to spontaneous photon scattering can be reduced to very small values with the use of high laser power. It is further shown that error levels required for fault-tolerant QIP are within reach of experimentally realistic laser parameters.

  2. Ion transport in a model gramicidin channel. Structure and thermodynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Roux, B; Karplus, M

    1991-01-01

    The potential of mean force for Na+ and K+ ions as a function of position in the interior of a periodic poly(L,D)-alanine model for the gramicidin beta-helix is calculated with a detailed atomic model and realistic interactions. The calculated free energy barriers are 4.5 kcal/mol for Na+ and 1.0 kcal/mol for K+. A decomposition of the free energy demonstrates that the water molecules make a significant contribution to the free energy of activation. There is an increase in entropy at the transition state associated with greater fluctuations. Analysis reveals that the free energy profile of ions in the periodic channel is controlled not by the large interaction energy involving the ion but rather by the weaker water-water, water-peptide and peptide-peptide hydrogen bond interactions. The interior of the channel retains much of the solvation properties of a liquid in its interactions with the cations. Of particular importance is the flexibility of the helix, which permits it to respond to the presence of an ion in a fluidlike manner. The distortion of the helix is local (limited to a few carbonyls) because the structure is too flexible to transmit a perturbation to large distances. The plasticity of the structure (i.e., the property to deform without generating a large energy stress) appears to be an essential factor in the transport of ions, suggesting that a rigid helix model would be inappropriate. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 10 PMID:1714305

  3. Ion and solute transport by Prestin in Drosophila and Anopheles.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Taku; Czapar, Anna; Brin, Lauren; Haritonova, Alyona; Bondeson, Daniel P; Linser, Paul; Cabrero, Pablo; Thompson, James; Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2012-04-01

    The gut and Malpighian tubules of insects are the primary sites of active solute and water transport for controlling hemolymph and urine composition, pH, and osmolarity. These processes depend on ATPase (pumps), channels and solute carriers (Slc proteins). Maturation of genomic databases enables us to identify the putative molecular players for these processes. Anion transporters of the Slc4 family, AE1 and NDAE1, have been reported as HCO(3)(-) transporters, but are only part of the story. Here we report Dipteran (Drosophila melanogaster (d) and Anopheles gambiae (Ag)) anion exchangers, belonging to the Slc26 family, which are multi-functional anion exchangers. One Drosophila and two Ag homologues of mammalian Slc26a5 (Prestin) and Slc26a6 (aka, PAT1, CFEX) were identified and designated dPrestin, AgPrestinA and AgPrestinB. dPrestin and AgPrestinB show electrogenic anion exchange (Cl(-)/nHCO(3)(-), Cl(-)/SO(4)(2-) and Cl(-)/oxalate(2-)) in an oocyte expression system. Since these transporters are the only Dipteran Slc26 proteins whose transport is similar to mammalian Slc26a6, we submit that Dipteran Prestin are functional and even molecular orthologues of mammalian Slc26a6. OSR1 kinase increases dPrestin ion transport, implying another set of physiological processes controlled by WNK/SPAK signaling in epithelia. All of these mRNAs are highly expressed in the gut and Malpighian tubules. Dipteran Prestin proteins appear suited for central roles in bicarbonate, sulfate and oxalate metabolism including generating the high pH conditions measured in the Dipteran midgut lumen. Finally, we present and discuss Drosophila genetic models that integrate these processes.

  4. Ion and solute transport by prestin in Drosophila and Anopheles

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Taku; Czapar, Anna; Brin, Lauren R.; Haritonova, Alyona; Bondeson, Daniel P.; Linser, Paul J.; Cabrero, Pablo; Dow, Julian A. T.; Romero, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    The gut and Malpighian tubules of insects are the primary sites of active solute and water transport for controlling hemolymph and urine composition, pH, and osmolarity. These processes depend on ATPase (pumps), channels and solute carriers (Slc proteins). Maturation of genomic databases enables us to identify the putative molecular players for these processes. Anion transporters of the Slc4 family, AE1 and NDAE1, have been reported as HCO3− transporters, but are only part of the story. Here we report Dipteran (Drosophila melanogaster (d) and Anopheles gambiae (Ag)) anion exchangers, belonging to the Slc26 family, which are multi-functional anion exchangers. One Drosophila and two Ag homologues of mammalian Slc26a5 (prestin) and Slc26a6 (aka, PAT1, CFEX) were identified and designated dPrestin, AgPrestinA and AgPrestinB. dPrestin and AgPrestinB show electrogenic anion exchange (Cl−/nHCO3−, Cl−/SO42− and Cl−/oxalate2−) in an oocyte expression system. Since these transporters are the only Dipteran Slc26 proteins whose transport is similar to mammalian Slc26a6, we submit that Dipteran Prestin are functional and even molecular orthologues of mammalian Slc26a6. OSR1 kinase increases dPrestin ion transport, implying another set of physiological processes controlled by WNK/SPAK signaling in epithelia. All of these mRNAs are highly expressed in the gut and Malpighian tubules. Dipteran Prestin proteins appear suited for central roles in bicarbonate, sulfate and oxalate metabolism including generating the high pH conditions measured in the Dipteran midgut lumen. Finally, we present and discuss Drosophila genetic models that integrate these processes. PMID:22321763

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of ion transport of the high strain ionomer with conducting powder electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xingxi; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-04-01

    The transport of charge due to electric stimulus is the primary mechanism of actuation for a class of polymeric active materials known as ionomeric polymer transducers (IPT). At low frequency, strain response is strongly related to charge accumulation at the electrodes. Experimental results demonstrated using conducting powder, such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), polyaniline (PANI) powders, high surface area RuO II, carbon black electrodes etc. as an electrode increases the mechanical deformation of the IPT by increasing the capacitance of the material. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulation of a two-dimensional ion hopping model has been built to describe ion transport in the IPT. The shape of the conducting powder is assumed to be a sphere. A step voltage is applied between the electrodes of the IPT, causing the thermally-activated hopping between multiwell energy structures. Energy barrier height includes three parts: the energy height due to the external electric potential, intrinsic energy, and the energy height due to ion interactions. Finite element method software-ANSYS is employed to calculate the static electric potential distribution inside the material with the powder sphere in varied locations. The interaction between ions and the electrodes including powder electrodes is determined by using the method of images. At each simulation step, the energy of each cation is updated to compute ion hopping rate which directly relates to the probability of an ion moving to its neighboring site. Simulation ends when the current drops to constant zero. Periodic boundary conditions are applied when ions hop in the direction perpendicular to the external electric field. When an ion is moved out of the simulation region, its corresponding periodic replica enters from the opposite side. In the direction of the external electric field, parallel programming is achieved in C augmented with functions that perform message-passing between processors using Message

  6. Disassociation of electrons from partially stripped ion beams due to strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tepikian, S.; Lee, S.Y.

    1989-01-01

    We study the probability of dissociating an electron from partially stripped ions in the AGS. Our calculation indicates that the probability for electron disassociation due to the strong external magnetic field in the AGS is very small for tightly bounded electrons. Two methods are used to estimate this effect: a one-dimensional JWKB method; an energy density approximation. Both methods yield a consistent picture to support the idea of accelerating the partially stripped ions in the AGS, which requires some upgrade in the vacuum pressure due to other processes such as electron capture and ionization. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Transport of ions through a (6,6) carbon nanotube under electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li; Xu, Zhen; Zhou, Zhe-Wei; Hu, Guo-Hui

    2014-11-01

    The transport of water and ions through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is crucial in nanotechnology and biotechnology. Previous investigation indicated that the ions can hardly pass through (6,6) CNTs due to their hydrated shells. In the present study, utilizing molecular dynamics simulation, it is shown that the energy barrier mainly originating from the hydrated water molecules could be overcome by applying an electric field large enough in the CNT axis direction. Potential of mean force is calculated to show the reduction of energy barrier when the electric field is present for (Na+, K+, Cl-) ions. Consequently, ionic flux through (6,6) CNTs can be found once the electric field becomes larger than a threshold value. The variation of the coordination numbers of ions at different locations from the bulk to the center of the CNT is also explored to elaborate this dynamic process. The thresholds of the electric field are different for Na+, K+, and Cl- due to their characteristics. This consequence might be potentially applied in ion selectivity in the future.

  8. Shortcuts to Adiabaticity in Transport of a Single Trapped Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Shuoming; Lv, Dingshun; Campo, Adolfo Del; Kim, Kihwan

    2015-05-01

    We report an experimental study on shortcuts to adiabaticity in the transport of a single 171Yb+ ion trapped in a harmonic potential. In these driving schemes, the application of a force induces a nonadiabatic dynamics in which excitations are tailored so as to preserve the ion motional state in the ground state upon completion of the process. We experimentally apply the laser induced force and realize three different protocols: (1) a transitionless driving with a counterdiabatic term out of phase with the displacement force, (2) a classical protocol assisted by counterdiabatic fields in phase with the main force, (3) and an engineered transport protocol based on the Fourier transform of the trap acceleration. We experimentally compare and discuss the robustness of these protocols under given experimental limitations such as trap frequency drifts. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grants No. 2011CBA00300 (No. 2011CBA00301), the National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178, and the University of Massachusetts Boston (No. P20150000029279).

  9. Modeling Fast Ion Transport in TAE Avalanches in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E D; Bell, R E; Darrow, D; Gorelenkov, N N; Kramer, G; Kubota, S; Levinton, F M; Liu, D; Medley, S S; Podesta, M; Tritz, K

    2009-08-17

    Experiments on the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557 ] have found strong bursts of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) activity correlated with abrupt drops in the neutron rate. A fairly complete data set offers the opportunity to benchmark the NOVA [C. Z. Cheng, Phys. Reports 211, 1-51 (1992)] and ORBIT [R. B. White and M. S. Chance, Phys. Fluids 27, 2455 (1984)] codes in the low aspect ratio tokamak (ST) geometry. The internal structure of TAE were modeled with NOVA and good agreement is found with measurements made with an array of five fixed-frequency reflectometers. The fast-ion transport resulting from these bursts of multiple TAE were then modeled with the ORBIT code. The simulations are reasonably consistent with the observed drop in neutron rate. While these results represent our best attempts to find agreement, we believe that further refinements in both the simulation of the TAE structure and in the modeling of the fast ion transport are needed. Benchmarking stability codes against present experiments is an important step in developing the predictive capability needed to plan future experiments.

  10. Magnetic stochasticity and transport due to nonlinearly excited subdominant microtearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, D. R.; Jenko, F.; Doerk, H.; Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, P. W.; Nevins, W. M.

    2013-01-15

    Subdominant, linearly stable microtearing modes are identified as the main mechanism for the development of magnetic stochasticity and transport in gyrokinetic simulations of electromagnetic ion temperature gradient driven plasma microturbulence. The linear eigenmode spectrum is examined in order to identify and characterize modes with tearing parity. Connections are demonstrated between microtearing modes and the nonlinear fluctuations that are responsible for the magnetic stochasticity and electromagnetic transport, and nonlinear coupling with zonal modes is identified as the salient nonlinear excitation mechanism. A simple model is presented, which relates the electromagnetic transport to the electrostatic transport. These results may provide a paradigm for the mechanisms responsible for electromagnetic stochasticity and transport, which can be examined in a broader range of scenarios and parameter regimes.

  11. Mycoplasma pulmonis Inhibits Electrogenic Ion Transport across Murine Tracheal Epithelial Cell Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Linda C.; Trummell, Hoa Q.; Singh, Ashvani; Cassell, Gail H.; Bridges, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    Murine chronic respiratory disease is characterized by persistent colonization of tracheal and bronchial epithelial cell surfaces by Mycoplasma pulmonis, submucosal and intraluminal immune and inflammatory cells, and altered airway activity. To determine the direct effect of M. pulmonis upon transepithelial ion transport in the absence of immune and inflammatory cell responses, primary mouse tracheal epithelial cell monolayers (MTEs) were apically infected and assayed in Ussing chambers. M. pulmonis-infected MTEs, but not those infected with a nonmurine mycoplasma, demonstrated reductions in amiloride-sensitive Na+ absorption, cyclic AMP, and cholinergic-stimulated Cl− secretion and transepithelial resistance. These effects were shown to require interaction of viable organisms with the apical surface of the monolayer and to be dependent upon organism number and duration of infection. Altered transport due to M. pulmonis was not merely a result of epithelial cell death as evidenced by the following: (i) active transport of Na+ and Cl−, albeit at reduced rates; (ii) normal cell morphology, including intact tight junctions, as demonstrated by electron microscopy; (iii) maintenance of a mean transepithelial resistance of 440 Ω/cm2; and (iv) lack of leakage of fluid from the basolateral to the apical surface of the monolayer. Alteration in epithelial ion transport in vitro is consistent with impaired pulmonary clearance and altered airway function in M. pulmonis-infected animals. Furthermore, the ability of M. pulmonis to alter transport without killing the host cell may explain its successful parasitism and long-term persistence in the host. Further study of the MTE-M. pulmonis model should elucidate the molecular mechanisms which mediate this reduction in transepithelial ion transport. PMID:9423868

  12. Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W M; Niller, D A C; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Welch, D R; Rose, D V; Olson, C L

    2002-08-02

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  13. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-01

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  14. Sugar-activated ion transport in canine lingual epithelium. Implications for sugar taste transduction

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    There is good evidence indicating that ion-transport pathways in the apical regions of lingual epithelial cells, including taste bud cells, may play a role in salt taste reception. In this article, we present evidence that, in the case of the dog, there also exists a sugar- activated ion-transport pathway that is linked to sugar taste transduction. Evidence was drawn from two parallel lines of experiments: (a) ion-transport studies on the isolated canine lingual epithelium, and (b) recordings from the canine chorda tympani. The results in vitro showed that both mono- and disaccharides in the mucosal bath stimulate a dose-dependent increase in the short-circuit current over the concentration range coincident with mammalian sugar taste responses. Transepithelial current evoked by glucose, fructose, or sucrose in either 30 mM NaCl or in Krebs-Henseleit buffer (K-H) was partially blocked by amiloride. Among current carriers activated by saccharides, the current response was greater with Na than with K. Ion flux measurements in K-H during stimulation with 3-O-methylglucose showed that the sugar-evoked current was due to an increase in the Na influx. Ouabain or amiloride reduced the sugar-evoked Na influx without effect on sugar transport as measured with tritiated 3-O-methylglucose. Amiloride inhibited the canine chorda tympani response to 0.5 M NaCl by 70-80% and the response to 0.5 M KCl by approximately 40%. This agreed with the percent inhibition by amiloride of the short-circuit current supported in vitro by NaCl and KCl. Amiloride also partially inhibited the chorda tympani responses to sucrose and to fructose. The results indicate that in the dog: (a) the ion transporter subserving Na taste also subserves part of the response to K, and (b) a sugar-activated, Na- preferring ion-transport system is one mechanism mediating sugar taste transduction. Results in the literature indicate a similar sweet taste mechanism for humans. PMID:3171536

  15. Activation of ion transport systems during cell volume regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eveloff, J.L.; Warnock, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    This review discusses the activation of transport pathways during volume regulation, including their characteristics, the possible biochemical pathways that may mediate the activation of transport pathways, and the relations between volume regulation and transepithelial transport in renal cells. Many cells regulate their volume when exposed to an anisotonic medium. The changes in cell volume are caused by activation of ion transport pathways, plus the accompanying osmotically driven water movement such that cell volume returns toward normal levels. The swelling of hypertonically shrunken cells is termed regulatory volume increase (RVI) and involves an influx of NaCl into the cell via either activation of Na-Cl, Na-K-2Cl cotransport systems, or Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchangers. The reshrinking of hypotonically swollen cells is termed regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and involves an efflux of KCl and water from the cell by activation of either separate K/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/ conductances, a K-Cl cotransport system, or parallel K/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchangers. The biochemical mechanisms involved in the activation of transport systems are largely unknown, however, the phosphoinositide pathway may be implicated in RVI; phorbol esters, cGMP, and Ca/sup 2 +/ affect the process of volume regulation. Renal tubular cells, as well as the blood cells that transverse the medulla, are subjected to increasing osmotic gradients from the corticomedullary junction to the papillary tip, as well as changing interstitial and tubule fluid osmolarity, depending on the diuretic state of the animal. Medullary cells from the loop of Henle and the papilla can volume regulate by activating Na-K-2Cl cotransport or Na/sup +/-H/sup +/ and Cl/sup -/-HCO/sub 3//sup -/ exchange systems.

  16. Ion potential in warm dense matter: wake effects due to streaming degenerate electrons.

    PubMed

    Moldabekov, Zhandos; Ludwig, Patrick; Bonitz, Michael; Ramazanov, Tlekkabul

    2015-02-01

    The effective dynamically screened potential of a classical ion in a stationary flowing quantum plasma at finite temperature is investigated. This is a key quantity for thermodynamics and transport of dense plasmas in the warm-dense-matter regime. This potential has been studied before within hydrodynamic approaches or based on the zero temperature Lindhard dielectric function. Here we extend the kinetic analysis by including the effects of finite temperature and of collisions based on the Mermin dielectric function. The resulting ion potential exhibits an oscillatory structure with attractive minima (wakes) and, thus, strongly deviates from the static Yukawa potential of equilibrium plasmas. This potential is analyzed in detail for high-density plasmas with values of the Brueckner parameter in the range 0.1≤r(s)≤1 for a broad range of plasma temperature and electron streaming velocity. It is shown that wake effects become weaker with increasing temperature of the electrons. Finally, we obtain the minimal electron streaming velocity for which attraction between ions occurs. This velocity turns out to be less than the electron Fermi velocity. Our results allow for reliable predictions of the strength of wake effects in nonequilibrium quantum plasmas with fast streaming electrons showing that these effects are crucial for transport under warm-dense-matter conditions, in particular for laser-matter interaction, electron-ion temperature equilibration, and stopping power.

  17. Fast-Ion Losses due to High-Frequency MHD Perturbations in the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Munoz, M.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Guenter, S.; Igochine, V.; Maraschek, M.; Zohm, H.; Mantsinen, M. J.; Martin, P.; Piovesan, P.; Sassenberg, K.

    2008-02-08

    Time-resolved energy and pitch angle measurements of fast-ion losses correlated in frequency and phase with high-frequency magnetohydrodynamic perturbations have been obtained for the first time in a magnetic fusion device and are presented here. A detailed analysis of fast-ion losses due to toroidal Alfven eigenmodes has revealed the existence of a new core-localized magnetohydrodynamic perturbation, the sierpes mode. The sierpes mode is a non-Alfvenic instability which dominates the losses of fast ions in ion cyclotron resonance heated discharges, and it is named for its footprint in the spectrograms ('sierpes' means 'snake' in Spanish). The sierpes mode has been reconstructed by means of highly resolved multichord soft-x-ray measurements.

  18. Identification of intestinal ion transport defects in microvillus inclusion disease.

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, Dmitri V; Ahsan, Md Kaimul; Kumari, Vandana; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C D; Reyes-Mugica, Miguel; Kumar, Anoop; Gujral, Tarunmeet; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Ameen, Nadia A

    2016-07-01

    Loss of function mutations in the actin motor myosin Vb (Myo5b) lead to microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) and death in newborns and children. MVID results in secretory diarrhea, brush border (BB) defects, villus atrophy, and microvillus inclusions (MVIs) in enterocytes. How loss of Myo5b results in increased stool loss of chloride (Cl(-)) and sodium (Na(+)) is unknown. The present study used Myo5b loss-of-function human MVID intestine, polarized intestinal cell models of secretory crypt (T84) and villus resembling (CaCo2BBe, C2BBe) enterocytes lacking Myo5b in conjunction with immunofluorescence confocal stimulated emission depletion (gSTED) imaging, immunohistochemical staining, transmission electron microscopy, shRNA silencing, immunoblots, and electrophysiological approaches to examine the distribution, expression, and function of the major BB ion transporters NHE3 (Na(+)), CFTR (Cl(-)), and SLC26A3 (DRA) (Cl(-)/HCO3 (-)) that control intestinal fluid transport. We hypothesized that enterocyte maturation defects lead villus atrophy with immature secretory cryptlike enterocytes in the MVID epithelium. We investigated the role of Myo5b in enterocyte maturation. NHE3 and DRA localization and function were markedly reduced on the BB membrane of human MVID enterocytes and Myo5bKD C2BBe cells, while CFTR localization was preserved. Forskolin-stimulated CFTR ion transport in Myo5bKD T84 cells resembled that of control. Loss of Myo5b led to YAP1 nuclear retention, retarded enterocyte maturation, and a cryptlike phenotype. We conclude that preservation of functional CFTR in immature enterocytes, reduced functional expression of NHE3, and DRA contribute to Cl(-) and Na(+) stool loss in MVID diarrhea.

  19. EmrE, a model for studying evolution and mechanism of ion-coupled transporters.

    PubMed

    Schuldiner, Shimon

    2009-05-01

    EmrE is a small (110 residues) SMR transporter from Escherichia coli that extrudes positively charged aromatic drugs in exchange for two protons, thus rendering bacteria resistant to a variety of toxic compounds. Due to its size, stability and retention of its function upon solubilization in detergent, EmrE provides a unique experimental paradigm for the biochemical and biophysical studies of membrane based ion-coupled transporters. In addition, EmrE has been in center stage in the past two years because it provides also a paradigm for the study of the evolution of membrane proteins. Controversy around this topic is still going on and some novel concepts are surfacing that may contribute to our understanding of evolution of topology of membrane proteins. Furthermore, based on the findings that the cell multidrug transporters interact functionally we introduce the concept of a cell Resistosome.

  20. Rigorous upper bounds for fluid and plasma transport due to passive advection

    SciTech Connect

    Krommes, J.A.; Smith, R.A.; Kim, C.B.

    1987-07-01

    The formulation of variational principles for transport due to passive advection is described. A detailed account of the work has been published elsewhere. In the present paper, the motivations, philosophy, and implications of the method are briefly discussed. 15 refs.

  1. Neutron Transport Models and Methods for HZETRN and Coupling to Low Energy Light Ion Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, S.R.; Slaba, T.C.; Heinbockel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircraft exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETCHEDS and FLUKA, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light ion (A<4) transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  2. Neutron Transport Models and Methods for HZETRN and Coupling to Low Energy Light Ion Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blattnig, S.R.; Slaba, T.C.; Heinbockel, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Exposure estimates inside space vehicles, surface habitats, and high altitude aircraft exposed to space radiation are highly influenced by secondary neutron production. The deterministic transport code HZETRN has been identified as a reliable and efficient tool for such studies, but improvements to the underlying transport models and numerical methods are still necessary. In this paper, the forward-backward (FB) and directionally coupled forward-backward (DC) neutron transport models are derived, numerical methods for the FB model are reviewed, and a computationally efficient numerical solution is presented for the DC model. Both models are compared to the Monte Carlo codes HETCHEDS and FLUKA, and the DC model is shown to agree closely with the Monte Carlo results. Finally, it is found in the development of either model that the decoupling of low energy neutrons from the light ion (A<4) transport procedure adversely affects low energy light ion fluence spectra and exposure quantities. A first order correction is presented to resolve the problem, and it is shown to be both accurate and efficient.

  3. Modulation Effects of Curcumin on Erythrocyte Ion-Transporter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin ((1E,6E)-1,7-Bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione), the yellow biphenolic pigment isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa), has various medicinal benefits through antioxidation, anti-inflammation, cardiovascular protection, immunomodulation, enhancing of the apoptotic process, and antiangiogenic property. We explored the effects of curcumin in vitro (10−5 M to 10−8 M) and in vivo (340 and 170 mg/kg b.w., oral) on Na+/K+ ATPase (NKA), Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE) activity, and membrane lipid hydroperoxides (ROOH) in control and experimental oxidative stress erythrocytes of Wistar rats. As a result, we found that curcumin potently modulated the membrane transporters activity with protecting membrane lipids against hydro-peroxidation in control as well as oxidatively challenged erythrocytes evidenced by stimulation of NKA, downregulation of NHE, and reduction of ROOH in the membrane. The observed results corroborate membrane transporters activity with susceptibility of erythrocyte membrane towards oxidative damage. Results explain the protective mechanism of curcumin against oxidative stress mediated impairment in ions-transporters activity and health beneficial effects. PMID:26421014

  4. Intestinal calcium transport: An ion microscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Fullmer, C.S.; Chandra, S.; Smith, C.A.; Morrison, G.H.; Wasserman, R.H. )

    1990-02-26

    Ion microscopy is a direct imaging mass spectrometry technique which reveals elemental (mass) distribution in relation to tissue morphology. The influence of vitamin D on intestinal Ca transport was examined in parallel experiments by injecting either {sup 47}Ca or {sup 44}Ca into the duodenal lumen of vitamin D-deficient ({minus}D) and vitamin D-replete (+D) chicks for varying periods of time. {sup 47}Ca data provided a quantitative index of tissue retention and absorption, whereas {sup 44}Ca imaging allowed visual localization of Ca specifically in transit from the lumen versus ambient tissue {sup 40}Ca which was also imaged. Luminally-administered Ca rapidly (2.5 minutes) entered the intestinal cells in both the {minus}D and +D chicks, localizing primarily in the area subjacent to the limiting membrane. For the +D chicks, the concentration of {sup 44}Ca in this region dissipated with time, leading to a more homogeneous intracellular distribution as transport proceeded. In contrast, {sup 44}Ca continued to accumulate in the apical cell region in the {minus}D chicks for up to 20 minutes, although a slight inwardly-directed gradient developed. These approaches provide unique information concerning the sequential localization of Ca during intestinal transport and the dynamics of the action of vitamin D thereon.

  5. Animal toxins and renal ion transport: Another dimension in tropical nephrology.

    PubMed

    Sitprija, Visith; Sitprija, Siravit

    2016-05-01

    Renal vascular and tubular ion channels and transporters involved in toxin injury are reviewed. Vascular ion channels modulated by animal toxins, which result in haemodynamic alterations and changes in blood pressure, include ENaC/Degenerin/ASIC, ATP sensitive K channels (KATP ), Ca activated K channels (Kca) and voltage gated Ca channels, mostly L-type. Renal tubular Na channels and K channels are also targeted by animal toxins. NHE3 and ENaC are two important targets. NCC and NKCC may be involved indirectly by vasoactive mediators induced by inflammation. Most renal tubular K channels including voltage gated K channels (Kv1), KATP , ROMK1, BK and SK are blocked by scorpion toxins. Few are inhibited by bee, wasp and spider venoms. Due to small envenoming, incomplete block and several compensatory mechanisms in renal tubules, serum electrolyte charges are not apparent. Changes in serum electrolytes are observed in injury by large amount of venom when several channels or transporters are targeted. Envenomings by scorpions and bees are examples of toxins targeting multiple ion channels and transporters. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  6. Enhancement of band gap and photoconductivity in gamma indium selenide due to swift heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sreekumar, R.; Jayakrishnan, R.; Sudha Kartha, C.; Vijayakumar, K. P.; Khan, S. A.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2008-01-15

    {gamma}-In{sub 2}Se{sub 3} thin films prepared at different annealing temperatures ranging from 100 to 400 deg. C were irradiated using 90 MeV Si ions with a fluence of 2x10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. X-ray diffraction analysis proved that there is no considerable variation in structural properties of the films due to the swift heavy ion irradiation. However, photosensitivity and sheet resistance of the samples increased due to irradiation. It was observed that the sample, which had negative photoconductivity, exhibited positive photoconductivity, after irradiation. The negative photoconductivity was due to the combined effect of trapping of photoexcited electrons, at traps 1.42 and 1.26 eV, above the valence band along with destruction of the minority carriers, created during illumination, through recombination. Photoluminescence study revealed that the emission was due to the transition to a recombination center, which was 180 meV above the valence band. Optical absorption study proved that the defects present at 1.42 and 1.26 eV were annealed out by the ion beam irradiation. This allowed photoexcited carriers to reach conduction band, which resulted in positive photoconductivity. Optical absorption study also revealed that the band gap of the material could be increased by ion beam irradiation. The sample prepared at 400 deg. C had a band gap of 2 eV and this increased to 2.8 eV, after irradiation. The increase in optical band gap was attributed to the annihilation of localized defect bands, near the conduction and valence band edges, on irradiation. Thus, by ion beam irradiation, one could enhance photosensitivity as well as the optical band gap of {gamma}-In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, making the material suitable for applications such as window layer in solar cells.

  7. A finite element numerical solution of the multispecies relativistic heavy ion transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandini, Vincent John

    1998-09-01

    The energy deposition characteristics of heavy ions and the availability of modern particle accelerators, have sparked a revival of interest in the use of these particles as a treatment tool for certain types of cancers. The presence of these high energy particles in the cosmic radiation has also been a concern of spacecraft designers since the advent of space flight. Collisions between projectile ions and the nuclei of target atoms can result in ion fragments that are different from the original projectile species. The energy deposition characteristics of these fragments differ from those of the original ion in a manner that increases their range beyond that of the original particle. Projectile loss due to the fragmentation process also affects the dose deposition profile in a target. An accurate dose calculation requires that these effects be taken into account. In order to bypass difficulties associated with Monte Carlo calculations and traditional discretization methods, the recently developed exponential discontinuous (ED) finite element technique has been applied to the calculation of the dose deposition by relativistic heavy ion projectiles and their fragments. The ELDRHIT code package has been developed to solve the relativistic heavy ion transport equations in space and energy using the straight ahead approximation with conservation of velocity. Energy loss is treated with the continuous slowing down approximation. Absorption and fragmentation cross sections and stopping powers are taken as piece-wise constant in each phase space cell. Initial results indicated that the ED method could not capture the Bragg peak of the primary ion. This result is due to numerical diffusion of the particle energy inherent to the method. However, a hybrid approach, using a characteristic based solution for the primary particle coupled with an ED solution for the fragments, has demonstrated very good agreement with experimental results.

  8. Polaronic Transport in Phosphate Glasses Containing Transition Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark

    The goal of this dissertation is to characterize the basic transport properties of phosphate glasses containing various amounts of TIs and to identify and explain any electronic phase transitions which may occur. The P2 O5-V2O5-WO3 (PVW) glass system will be analyzed to find the effect of TI concentration on conduction. In addition, the effect of the relative concentrations of network forming ions (SiO2 and P2O5) on transport will be studied in the P2O5-SiO2-Fe2O 3 (PSF) system. Also presented is a numerical study on a tight-binding model adapted for the purposes of modelling Gaussian traps, mimicking TI's, which are arranged in an extended network. The results of this project will contribute to the development of fundamental theories on the electronic transport in glasses containing mixtures of transition oxides as well as those containing multiple network formers without discernible phase separation. The present study on the PVW follows up on previous investigation into the effect on mixed transition ions in oxide glasses. Past research has focused on glasses containing transition metal ions from the 3d row. The inclusion of tungsten, a 5d transition metal, adds a layer of complexity through the mismatch of the energies of the orbitals contributing to localized states. The data have indicated that a transition reminiscent of a metal-insulator transition (MIT) occurs in this system as the concentration of tungsten increases. As opposed to some other MIT-like transitions found in phosphate glass systems, there seems to be no polaron to bipolaron conversion. Instead, the individual localization parameter for tungsten noticeably decreases dramatically at the transition point as well as the adiabaticity. Another distinctive feature of this project is the study of the PSF system, which contains two true network formers, phosphorous pentoxide (P2O 5) and silicon dioxide (SiO2). It is not usually possible to do a reliable investigation of the conduction properties of

  9. Development of an applied-magnetic-field diode for ion-beam-transport experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Young, F.C.; Neri, J.M.; Boller, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    An applied-magnetic-field ion diode (ABD) is being developed to study the transport of intense ion beams for light-ion inertial confinement fusion. Initially, the beam from this diode will be used to test the concept of self-pinched transport (SPT). The design goal is diode operation at 1.5 MV and 250-kA total current on the Gamble 2 generator at NRL. For SPT experiments, the beam is extracted from the diode and focused into a transport channel. The ATHETA code is used to calculate B-field configurations in the diode and ion-beam trajectories. Shaping of the anode surface to aim the beam and to counteract focusing due to self B-field and solenoidal-lens effects results in a convex anode surface. Most of the beam can be focused within a spot size of 1.4-cm diameter at 65 cm from the anode. The B-field is generated with inner and outer cathode coils connected in series and driven by a 100-{micro}s risetime, 50-kA pulse. A shunt inductor in parallel with the outer coil is used to control the ratio of the currents in the two coils. To cancel flux penetration of the aluminum anode by the main B-field, a current pulse of opposite polarity with a 1-ms risetime is applied prior to the main pulse. This current is adjusted to place the B-field separatrix on the ion emission surface in the diode gap, accounting for anode plasma expansion. A grooved-anode flashover source is planned for initial experiments. Preliminary results are presented.

  10. Electron/Ion Transport Enhancer in High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    DOE PAGES

    Kwon, Yo Han; Minnici, Krysten; Huie, Matthew M.; ...

    2016-08-30

    In this paper, magnetite (Fe3O4) was used as a model high capacity metal oxide active material to demonstrate advantages derived from consideration of both electron and ion transport in the design of composite battery electrodes. The conjugated polymer, poly[3-(potassium-4-butanoate) thiophene] (PPBT), was introduced as a binder component, while polyethylene glycol (PEG) was coated onto the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The introduction of PEG reduced aggregate size, enabled effective dispersion of the active materials and facilitated ionic conduction. As a binder for the composite electrode, PPBT underwent electrochemical doping which enabled the formation of effective electrical bridges between the carbon andmore » Fe3O4 components, allowing for more efficient electron transport. Additionally, the PPBT carboxylic moieties effect a porous structure, and stable electrode performance. Finally, the methodical consideration of both enhanced electron and ion transport by introducing a carboxylated PPBT binder and PEG surface treatment leads to effectively reduced electrode resistance, which improved cycle life performance and rate capabilities.« less

  11. Electron/Ion Transport Enhancer in High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Yo Han; Minnici, Krysten; Huie, Matthew M.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.; Marschilok, Amy C.; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2016-08-30

    In this paper, magnetite (Fe3O4) was used as a model high capacity metal oxide active material to demonstrate advantages derived from consideration of both electron and ion transport in the design of composite battery electrodes. The conjugated polymer, poly[3-(potassium-4-butanoate) thiophene] (PPBT), was introduced as a binder component, while polyethylene glycol (PEG) was coated onto the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The introduction of PEG reduced aggregate size, enabled effective dispersion of the active materials and facilitated ionic conduction. As a binder for the composite electrode, PPBT underwent electrochemical doping which enabled the formation of effective electrical bridges between the carbon and Fe3O4 components, allowing for more efficient electron transport. Additionally, the PPBT carboxylic moieties effect a porous structure, and stable electrode performance. Finally, the methodical consideration of both enhanced electron and ion transport by introducing a carboxylated PPBT binder and PEG surface treatment leads to effectively reduced electrode resistance, which improved cycle life performance and rate capabilities.

  12. Electron/Ion Transport Enhancer in High Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Yo Han; Minnici, Krysten; Huie, Matthew M.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.; Marschilok, Amy C.; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2016-08-30

    In this paper, magnetite (Fe3O4) was used as a model high capacity metal oxide active material to demonstrate advantages derived from consideration of both electron and ion transport in the design of composite battery electrodes. The conjugated polymer, poly[3-(potassium-4-butanoate) thiophene] (PPBT), was introduced as a binder component, while polyethylene glycol (PEG) was coated onto the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The introduction of PEG reduced aggregate size, enabled effective dispersion of the active materials and facilitated ionic conduction. As a binder for the composite electrode, PPBT underwent electrochemical doping which enabled the formation of effective electrical bridges between the carbon and Fe3O4 components, allowing for more efficient electron transport. Additionally, the PPBT carboxylic moieties effect a porous structure, and stable electrode performance. Finally, the methodical consideration of both enhanced electron and ion transport by introducing a carboxylated PPBT binder and PEG surface treatment leads to effectively reduced electrode resistance, which improved cycle life performance and rate capabilities.

  13. A parallel finite element simulator for ion transport through three-dimensional ion channel systems.

    PubMed

    Tu, Bin; Chen, Minxin; Xie, Yan; Zhang, Linbo; Eisenberg, Bob; Lu, Benzhuo

    2013-09-15

    A parallel finite element simulator, ichannel, is developed for ion transport through three-dimensional ion channel systems that consist of protein and membrane. The coordinates of heavy atoms of the protein are taken from the Protein Data Bank and the membrane is represented as a slab. The simulator contains two components: a parallel adaptive finite element solver for a set of Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations that describe the electrodiffusion process of ion transport, and a mesh generation tool chain for ion channel systems, which is an essential component for the finite element computations. The finite element method has advantages in modeling irregular geometries and complex boundary conditions. We have built a tool chain to get the surface and volume mesh for ion channel systems, which consists of a set of mesh generation tools. The adaptive finite element solver in our simulator is implemented using the parallel adaptive finite element package Parallel Hierarchical Grid (PHG) developed by one of the authors, which provides the capability of doing large scale parallel computations with high parallel efficiency and the flexibility of choosing high order elements to achieve high order accuracy. The simulator is applied to a real transmembrane protein, the gramicidin A (gA) channel protein, to calculate the electrostatic potential, ion concentrations and I - V curve, with which both primitive and transformed PNP equations are studied and their numerical performances are compared. To further validate the method, we also apply the simulator to two other ion channel systems, the voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC) and α-Hemolysin (α-HL). The simulation results agree well with Brownian dynamics (BD) simulation results and experimental results. Moreover, because ionic finite size effects can be included in PNP model now, we also perform simulations using a size-modified PNP (SMPNP) model on VDAC and α-HL. It is shown that the size effects in SMPNP can

  14. Multiple ion temperature gradient driven modes in transport barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, M. K.; Wang, Zheng-Xiong; Dong, J. Q.; Du, Huarong

    2017-04-01

    The ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in transport barriers (TBs) of tokamak plasmas are numerically studied with a code solving gyrokinetic integral eigenvalue equations in toroidal configurations. It is found that multiple ITG modes with conventional and unconventional ballooning mode structures can be excited simultaneously in TBs with steep gradients of ion temperature and density. The characteristics of the modes, including the dependence of the mode frequencies, growth rate and structure on plasma parameters, are systematically investigated. Unconventional modes with large mode-number l (where l denotes a certain parity and peak number in ballooning space) dominate in the large {{k}θ}{ρs} region ({{k}θ}{ρs}≥slant 1.2 ), while the conventional mode with l=0 dominates in the medium {{k}θ}{ρs} region (0.4≤slant {{k}θ}{ρs}<1.2 ), and unconventional modes with small mode-number l dominate in the small {{k}θ}{ρs} region ({{k}θ}{ρs}<0.4 ). Thus, the {{k}θ}{ρs} spectra of these conventional and unconventional modes at steep gradients are qualitatively different from those of the conventional ITG modes at small or medium gradients, in which the growth rate of the only ITG mode with l=0 reaches maximum at the medium value {{k}θ}{ρs}=0.6 . Through scanning ion temperature gradient {{\\varepsilon}T\\text{i}} and density gradient {{\\varepsilon}n} separately, it is proven that the synergetic effect of {{\\varepsilon}T\\text{i}} and {{\\varepsilon}n} , rather than {{\\varepsilon}T\\text{i}} alone, drives the unconventional ITG modes in TBs. Moreover, it is found that the critical value of {{\\varepsilon}n} for driving the unconventional ITG modes with large l number increases with increasing {{k}θ}{ρs} . In addition, the effects of magnetic shear on conventional and unconventional ITG modes in the high confinement regime (H-mode) are analyzed in detail, and compared with equivalent effects on conventional modes in the low and intermediate gradient

  15. Mechanism of Radial Redistribution of Energetic Trapped Ions Due to m=2/n=1 Internal Reconnection in Joint European Torus Shear Optimized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    N.N. Gorelenkov; A. Gondhalekar; A.A. Korotkov; S.E. Sharapov; D. Testa; and Contributors to the EFDA-JET Workprogramme

    2002-01-18

    Internal radial redistribution of MeV energy ICRF-driven hydrogen minority ions was inferred from neutral particle analyzer measurements during large amplitude MHD activity leading to internal reconnection in Shear Optimized plasmas in the Joint European Torus (JET). A theory is developed for energetic ion redistribution during a reconnection driven by an m=2/n=1 internal kink mode. Plasma motion during reconnection generates an electric field which can change the energy and radial position of the energetic ions. The magnitude of ion energy change depends on the value of the safety factor at the plasma core from which the energetic ions are redistributed. A relation is found for corresponding change in canonical momentum. P(subscript phi), which leads to radial displacement of the ions. The model yields distinctive new features of energetic ion redistribution under such conditions. Predicted characteristics of ion redistribution are compared with the NPA measurements, and good correlation is found. Sometimes fast ions were transported to the plasma edge due to interaction with a long-lived magnetic island which developed after the reconnection and had chirping frequency in the laboratory frame. Convection of resonant ions trapped in a radially moving phase-space island is modeled to understand the physics of such events.

  16. Understanding ion transport in ion-containing polymers for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, U. Hyeok

    A molecular-level understanding of dynamics in ion-containing polymers is of considerable interest for electromechanical transduction devices and electrochemical membranes. One example is the study of ion transport in ionomers which are polymers with one type of ion covalently bonded to the chain, allowing only the unattached counterions to move rapidly in response to an applied electric field. Since designing ionomers for facile ion transport is a great challenge, it is necessary to investigate structures, dynamics, and ionic interactions, giving rise to better understanding of the generation and transport processes of ionic carriers in ionomers. Therefore, the goal of this dissertation is to understand in detail the structure-property relations of single-ion conductors through morphological, electric, dielectric, and mechanical measurements. Polymerizable imidazolium-based ionic liquids and their polymers were characterized to study the effect of different pendent structures and different counterions on ionic conductivity, dielectric constant, and morphology. The larger counterions (Tf2N-) display higher ionic conductivity and mobility than the smaller counterions (PF6 - or BF4 -), owing to a lower glass transition temperature, as anticipated by ab initio calculations that show that the imidazolium cation is less prone to aggregation with Tf2N- counterions than with PF6 - or BF4 - counterions. This is also observed by rheological measurements, as the terminal relaxation time increases with decreasing size of counterions, attributed to the increase of ionic interactions. The diethyleneoxy units on the imidazlium cation afford higher mobility than the butyl or dodecyl terminal Nsubstituents, for both monomers and polymers, owing to a lower binding energy between the imidazolium cation and the counterions. All monomers and polymers studied exhibit two dipolar relaxations, assigned to the usual segmental motion (alpha ) associated with the glass transition and a

  17. Mutant of a Light-Driven Sodium Ion Pump Can Transport Cesium Ions.

    PubMed

    Konno, Masae; Kato, Yoshitaka; Kato, Hideaki E; Inoue, Keiichi; Nureki, Osamu; Kandori, Hideki

    2016-01-07

    Krokinobacter eikastus rhodopsin 2 (KR2) is a light-driven Na(+) pump found in marine bacterium. KR2 pumps Li(+) and Na(+), but it becomes an H(+) pump in the presence of K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). Site-directed mutagenesis of the cytoplasmic surface successfully converted KR2 into a light-driven K(+) pump, suggesting that ion selectivity is determined at the cytoplasmic surface. Here we extended this research and successfully created a light-driven Cs(+) pump. KR2 N61L/G263F pumps Cs(+) as well as other monovalent cations in the presence of a protonophore. Ion-transport activities correlated with the additive volume of the residues at 61 and 263. The result suggests that an ion-selectivity filter is affected by these two residues and functions by strict exclusion of K(+) and larger cations in the wild type (N61/G263). In contrast, introduction of large residues possibly destroys local structures of the ion-selectivity filter, leading to the permeation of K(+) (P61/W263) and Cs(+) (L61/F263).

  18. Anomalous perturbative transport in tokamaks due to drift-Alfven-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Thoul, A.A. ); Similon, P.L. ); Sudan, R.N. )

    1994-03-01

    The method developed in Thoul, Similon, and Sudan [Phys. Plasmas [bold 1], 579 (1994)] is used to calculate the transport due to drift-Alfven-wave turbulence, in which electromagnetic effects such as the fluttering of the magnetic field lines are important. Explicit expressions are obtained for all coefficients of the anomalous transport matrix relating particle and heat fluxes to density and temperature gradients in the plasma. Although the magnetic terms leave the transport by trapped electrons unaffected, they are important for the transport by circulating electrons.

  19. Anomalous perturbative transport in tokamaks due to drift-Alfvén-wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoul, Anne A.; Similon, P. L.; Sudan, R. N.

    1994-03-01

    The method developed in Thoul, Similon, and Sudan [Phys. Plasmas 1, 579 (1994)] is used to calculate the transport due to drift-Alfvén-wave turbulence, in which electromagnetic effects such as the fluttering of the magnetic field lines are important. Explicit expressions are obtained for all coefficients of the anomalous transport matrix relating particle and heat fluxes to density and temperature gradients in the plasma. Although the magnetic terms leave the transport by trapped electrons unaffected, they are important for the transport by circulating electrons.

  20. Transport rates and momentum isotropization of gluon matter in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2007-08-15

    To describe momentum isotropization of gluon matter produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions, the transport rate of gluon drift and the transport collision rates of elastic (gg{r_reversible}gg) as well as inelastic (gg{r_reversible}ggg) perturbative quantum chromodynamics- (pQCD) scattering processes are introduced and calculated within the kinetic parton cascade Boltzmann approach of multiparton scatterings (BAMPS), which simulates the space-time evolution of partons. We define isotropization as the development of an anisotropic system as it reaches isotropy. The inverse of the introduced total transport rate gives the correct time scale of the momentum isotropization. The contributions of the various scattering processes to the momentum isotropization can be separated into the transport collision rates. In contrast to the transport cross section, the transport collision rate has an indirect but correctly implemented relationship with the collision-angle distribution. Based on the calculated transport collision rates from BAMPS for central Au+Au collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider energies, we show that pQCD gg{r_reversible}ggg bremsstrahlung processes isotropize the momentum five times more efficiently than elastic scatterings. The large efficiency of the bremsstrahlung stems mainly from its large momentum deflection. Due to kinematics, 2{yields}N (N>2) production processes allow more particles to become isotropic in momentum space and thus kinetically equilibrate more quickly than their back reactions or elastic scatterings. We also show that the relaxation time in the relaxation time approximation, which is often used, is strongly momentum dependent and thus cannot serve as a global quantity that describes kinetic equilibration.

  1. Ion Emittance Growth Due to Focusing Modulation from Slipping Electron Bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.

    2015-02-17

    Low energy RHIC operation has to be operated at an energy ranging from γ = 4.1 to γ = 10. The energy variation causes the change of revolution frequency. While the rf system for the circulating ion will operate at an exact harmonic of the revolution frequency (h=60 for 4.5 MHz rf and h=360 for 28 MHz rf.), the superconducting rf system for the cooling electron beam does not have a frequency tuning range that is wide enough to cover the required changes of revolution frequency. As a result, electron bunches will sit at different locations along the ion bunch from turn to turn, i.e. the slipping of the electron bunch with respect to the circulating ion bunch. At cooling section, ions see a coherent focusing force due to the electrons’ space charge, which differs from turn to turn due to the slipping. We will try to estimate how this irregular focusing affects the transverse emittance of the ion bunch.

  2. Temperatures of individual ion species and heating due to charge exchange in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jhoon; Nagy, Andrew F.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    The coupled electron and multispecies ion energy equations were solved for daytime conditions in the Venus ionosphere. The heating rates due to charge exchange between hot oxygen atoms and thermal oxygen ions were calculated and incorporated into the energy equations. The combination of the traditional EUV heating and this hot oxygen energy source leads to calculated electron and individual ion temperatures significantly lower than the measured values during solar cycle maximum conditions. Calculations were also carried out for solar cycle minimum conditions, which led to considerably lower temperatures; no data are available which would allow direct comparisons of these results with measurements. In order to obtain calculated temperature values consistent with the observed ones, for solar cycle maximum conditions, topside heat inflows into the ion and electron gases have to be introduced or the thermal conductivity must be reduced by considering the effect of steady and fluctuating magnetic fields, as was done in previous studies. The addition of hot oxygen heating leads to minor increases in the calculated ion temperatures except for the case of reduced thermal conductivities. Separate temperatures were calculated for each ion species for a number of different conditions and in general the differences were found to be relatively small.

  3. Temperatures of individual ion species and heating due to charge exchange in the ionosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jhoon; Nagy, Andrew F.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    The coupled electron and multispecies ion energy equations were solved for daytime conditions in the Venus ionosphere. The heating rates due to charge exchange between hot oxygen atoms and thermal oxygen ions were calculated and incorporated into the energy equations. The combination of the traditional EUV heating and this hot oxygen energy source leads to calculated electron and individual ion temperatures significantly lower than the measured values during solar cycle maximum conditions. Calculations were also carried out for solar cycle minimum conditions, which led to considerably lower temperatures; no data are available which would allow direct comparisons of these results with measurements. In order to obtain calculated temperature values consistent with the observed ones, for solar cycle maximum conditions, topside heat inflows into the ion and electron gases have to be introduced or the thermal conductivity must be reduced by considering the effect of steady and fluctuating magnetic fields, as was done in previous studies. The addition of hot oxygen heating leads to minor increases in the calculated ion temperatures except for the case of reduced thermal conductivities. Separate temperatures were calculated for each ion species for a number of different conditions and in general the differences were found to be relatively small.

  4. Effects of double-layer polarization on ion transport.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, A H; Hladky, S B

    1987-01-01

    It has been proposed that changes in ionic strength will alter the shape of current-voltage relations for ion transport across a lipid membrane. To investigate this effect, we measured currents across glyceryl monooleate membranes at applied potentials between 10 and 300 mV using either gramicidin and 1 mM NaCl or valinomycin and 1 mM KCl. A bridge circuit with an integrator as null detector was used to separate the capacitative and ionic components of the current. The changes in the current-voltage relations when ionic strength is varied between 1 and 100 mM are compared with predictions of Gouy-Chapman theory for the effects of these variations on polarization of the electrical diffuse double-layer. Double-layer polarization accounts adequately for the changes observed using membranes made permeable by either gramicidin or valinomycin.

  5. Effects of double-layer polarization on ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Hainsworth, A H; Hladky, S B

    1987-01-01

    It has been proposed that changes in ionic strength will alter the shape of current-voltage relations for ion transport across a lipid membrane. To investigate this effect, we measured currents across glyceryl monooleate membranes at applied potentials between 10 and 300 mV using either gramicidin and 1 mM NaCl or valinomycin and 1 mM KCl. A bridge circuit with an integrator as null detector was used to separate the capacitative and ionic components of the current. The changes in the current-voltage relations when ionic strength is varied between 1 and 100 mM are compared with predictions of Gouy-Chapman theory for the effects of these variations on polarization of the electrical diffuse double-layer. Double-layer polarization accounts adequately for the changes observed using membranes made permeable by either gramicidin or valinomycin. PMID:2432953

  6. [Sodium ion transportation system and its possible mechanisms in bacteria].

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Fu; Zhao, Bai-Suo; Yang, Su-Sheng

    2007-12-01

    Sodium ion with high concentration is toxic to living cells, and microorganisms adapt to the environment containing high concentration of salt by the strategies of salt-in-cytoplasm and compatible solutes. The Na+ extrusion system plays important roles in maintaining cytoplasmic Na+ homeostasis and pH level in microbial cells. Two possible mechanisms of Na+ circulation across the cytoplasmic membrane have been proposed, namely primary Na+ pump and secondary Na+/H+ antiporter. Primary sodium pumps coupled the extrusion of Na+ to respiration, and the activity of which was insensitive to uncoupler CCCP ( carbonyl-cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone). There were two types of secondary Na+/H+ antiporters-encoding genes designated single gene and multiple subunits, respectively. The types of transportation systems for Na+, possible mechanisms of Na+ extrusion, and projects for further study in bacteria are reviewed.

  7. Alfv?nic Instabilities and Fast Ion Transport in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zeeland, M; Heidbrink, W; Nazikian, R; Austin, M; Berk, H; Gorelenkov, N; Holcomb, C; Kramer, G; Lohr, J; Luo, Y; Makowski, M; McKee, G; Petty, C; Prater, R; Solomon, W; White, R

    2008-10-14

    Neutral beam injection into reversed magnetic shear DIII-D plasmas produces a variety of Alfvenic activity including Toroidicity and Ellipticity induced Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE/EAE, respectively) and Reversed Shear Alfven Eigenmodes (RSAE) as well as their spatial coupling. These modes are typically studied during the discharge current ramp phase when incomplete current penetration results in a high central safety factor and strong drive due to multiple higher order resonances. During this same time period Fast-Ion D{sub {alpha}} (FIDA) spectroscopy shows that the central fast ion profile is flattened, the degree of which depends on the Alfven eigenmode amplitude. Interestingly, localized electron cyclotron heating (ECH) near the mode location stabilizes RSAE activity and results in significantly improved fast ion confinement relative to discharges with ECH deposition on axis. In these discharges, RSAE activity is suppressed when ECH is deposited near the radius of the shear reversal point and enhanced with deposition near the axis. To simulate the observed neutral beam ion redistribution, NOVA calculations of the 3D eigenmode structures are matched with experimental measurements and used in combination with the ORBIT guiding center following code. For fixed frequency eigenmodes, it is found that ORBIT calculations cannot explain the observed beam ion transport with experimentally measured mode amplitudes. Possible explanations are considered including recent simulation results incorporating eigenmodes with time dependent frequencies.

  8. Ankyrin-based Cellular Pathways for Cardiac Ion Channel and Transporter Targeting and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Shane R.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The coordinate activities of ion channels and transporters regulate myocyte membrane excitability and normal cardiac function. Dysfunction in cardiac ion channel and transporter function may result in cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. While the past fifteen years have linked defects in ion channel biophysical properties with human disease, more recent findings illustrate that ion channel and transporter localization within cardiomyocytes is equally critical for normal membrane excitability and tissue function. Ankyrins are a family of multifunctional adapter proteins required for the expression, membrane localization, and regulation of select cardiac ion channels and transporters. Notably, loss of ankyrin expression in mice, and ankyrin loss-of-function in humans is now associated with defects in myocyte excitability and cardiac physiology. Here, we provide an overview of the roles of ankyrin polypeptides in cardiac physiology, as well as review other recently identified pathways required for the membrane expression and regulation of key cardiac ion channels and transporters. PMID:20934528

  9. In-situ Investigation of Vanadium Ion Transport in Redox Flow Battery

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Qingtao; Li, Liyu; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Wei, Xiaoliang; Li, Bin; Chen, Baowei; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-06-27

    We will show a new method to differentiate the vanadium transport from concentration gradient and that from electric field. Flow batteries with vanadium and iron redox couples as the electro-active species were employed to investigate the transport behavior of vanadium ions in the presence of electric field. It was shown that electric field accelerated the positive-to-negative and reduced the negative-to-positive vanadium ions transport in charge process and affected the vanadium ions transport in an opposite way in discharge process. In addition, a method was designed to differentiate the concentration gradient-driven vanadium ions diffusion and electric field-driven vanadium ions migration. Simplified mathematical model was established to simulate the vanadium ions transport in real charge-discharge operation of flow battery. The concentration gradient diffusion coefficients and electric-migration coefficients of V2+, V3+, VO2+, and VO2+ across Nafion membrane were obtained by fitting the experimental data.

  10. Effects of electromagnetic fields on membrane ion transport of cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, T; Yamaguchi, H; Miyamoto, H

    1998-08-01

    We have studied the mechanisms of ion transport mediated by Na+/K(+)-pump and Na+,K+,Cl(-)-cotransport pathway of HeLa cells using Rb+ as an analog for K+, and proposed models of binding of ions for the transport pathways. Also, we clarified the relation between ion and water movements in the cells. Based on these findings, we have studied the effects of homogeneous and time-varying magnetic fields on the ion transport activity. The research presented here covers (i) brief explanations of our kinetic studies on the ion transport pathways for promoting understanding of the effects of magnetic fields on the pathways, (ii) our and other reports of the effects of magnetic fields on ion transport systems.

  11. Complement activation of electrogenic ion transport in isolated rat colon.

    PubMed

    McCole, D F; Otti, B; Newsholme, P; Baird, A W

    1997-11-15

    The complement cascade is an important component in many immune and inflammatory reactions and may contribute to both the diarrhoea and inflammation associated with inflammatory bowel disease. Isolated rat colonic mucosae were voltage clamped in Ussing chambers. Basolateral addition of zymosan-activated whole human serum (ZAS) induced a rapid onset, transient inward short circuit current (SCC). This response was concentration dependent and was significantly attenuated by pre-heating ZAS at 60 degrees C for 30 min. Depletion of complement from normal human serum with cobra venom factor (CVF) significantly lowered SCC responses. Chloride was the primary charge carrying ion as responses to ZAS were abolished in the presence of the loop diuretic bumetanide. The complement component C3a stimulated ion transport but not to the same extent as whole serum. Exogenous C5 was without effect. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor piroxicam significantly attenuated the response to ZAS. These findings support the possibility that complement activation may contribute to the pathophysiology of secretory diarrhoea since activation of electrogenic chloride secretion converts intestinal epithelia to a state of net fluid secretion.

  12. Ion transport through a T-intersection of nanofluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daiguji, Hirofumi; Adachi, Takuma; Tatsumi, Naoya

    2008-08-01

    Ion transport through a T-intersection of two silica nanochannels (a main channel, 5-μm long and 30-nm wide, and a subchannel, 5-μm long and 15-nm wide) with a surface charge distribution was investigated based on continuum dynamics calculations. The surface charge within 250nm of the intersection in the main channel and the entire subchannel was positive and that in the main channel outside this intersection region was negative. This nanofluidic system is analogous to a p-n-p transistor. The calculation results revealed that, by adjusting the electric potentials at the ends of the nanochannels, the ionic current could be (1) cut off, (2) regulated in the main channel, (3) diverged into the main and subchannels, (4) turned from the main channel to the subchannel, and (5) merged into the subchannel. A series connection of this nanofluidic system can therefore be used in biotechnological applications for electrophoretic separation and for sorting of ions and biomolecules.

  13. Electroosmotically induced hydraulic pumping on microchips: differential ion transport

    PubMed

    Culbertson; Ramsey; Ramsey

    2000-05-15

    The theory behind and operation of an electroosmotically induced hydraulic pump for microfluidic devices is reported. This microchip functional element consists of a tee intersection with one inlet channel and two outlet channels. The inlet channel is maintained at high voltage while one outlet channel is kept at ground and the other channel has no electric potential applied. A pressure-induced flow of buffer is created in both outlet channels of the tee by reducing electroosmosis in the ground channel relative to that of the inlet channel. Spatially selective reduction of electroosmosis is accomplished by coating the walls of the ground channel with a viscous polymer. The pump is shown to differentially transport ions down the two outlet channels. This ion discrimination ability of the pump is examined as a function of an analyte's electrophoretic velocity. In addition, we demonstrate that an anion can be rejected from the ground channel and made to flow only into the field-free channel if the electrophoretic velocity of the anion is greater than the pressure-generated flow in the ground channel. The velocity threshold at which anion rejection occurs can be selectively tuned by changing the flow resistance in the field-free channel relative to the ground channel.

  14. Controlling polymer translocation and ion transport via charge correlations.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2014-11-04

    We develop a correlation-corrected transport theory in order to predict ionic and polymer transport properties of membrane nanopores under physical conditions where mean-field electrostatics breaks down. The experimentally observed low KCl conductivity of open α-hemolysin pores is quantitatively explained by the presence of surface polarization effects. Upon the penetration of a DNA molecule into the pore, these polarization forces combined with the electroneutrality of DNA sets a lower boundary for the ionic current, explaining the weak salt dependence of blocked pore conductivities at dilute ion concentrations. The addition of multivalent counterions to the solution results in the reversal of the polymer charge and the direction of the electroosmotic flow. With trivalent spermidine or quadrivalent spermine molecules, the charge inversion is strong enough to stop the translocation of the polymer and to reverse its motion. This mechanism can be used efficiently in translocation experiments in order to improve the accuracy of DNA sequencing by minimizing the translocation velocity of the polymer.

  15. Lateral Transport of Ions into the Xylem of Corn Roots

    PubMed Central

    Läuchli, André; Spurr, Arthur R.; Epstein, Emanuel

    1971-01-01

    When an excised corn (Zea mays) root pretreated with chloride was exposed for 10 minutes to pulse labeling with 30Cl and then transferred to unlabeled chloride, the activity in the xylem exudate reached a maximum about 4 minutes after pulse labeling was discontinued and then declined sharply. The rate at which labeled chloride was transported across the root into the xylem and basipetally therein was on the order of 75 to 250 centimeters per hour. Consequently, symplasmic movement of chloride in corn roots is fast and may not be rate-limiting in transfer from the root surface to the xylem. Experiments on pulse labeling with 22Na gave similar results. A large fraction of the absorbed 22Na was not translocated into the exudate but was tightly sequestered in a cell compartment, probably the vacuole. Electron probe analysis was used to reveal the pattern of potassium distribution in cross sections taken 10 to 11 millimeters from the tip. The cytoplasm and vacuoles of the xylem parenchyma cells accumulated potassium to a much greater extent than cortical and other stelar cells. Ultrastructural studies showed that the cytoplasm of the xylem parenchyma cells contains numerous membrane systems. It was concluded that the xylem parenchyma cells secrete ions from the symplasm into the conducting vessels, and it was suggested that this secretion is driven across the plasmalemma by a carrier-mediated transport. Images PMID:16657747

  16. Effects of ozone on airway epithelial permeability and ion transport.

    PubMed

    Bromberg, P A; Ranga, V; Stutts, M J

    1991-12-01

    Ozone is a highly reactive form of oxygen produced in the atmosphere by photochemical reactions involving substrates emitted from automobile engines. Outdoor air concentrations as high as 0.4 parts per million (ppm) occur. The respiratory tract extracts about 90% of inhaled ozone. From the chemical reactivity of ozone, it is expected to attack organic molecules located on or near the respiratory surfaces. The airways are covered with a cohesive layer of epithelial cells that forms the boundary between the external environment and the respiratory tissues. One important role of this epithelial layer is its barrier function. Airborne particles that deposit (and dissolve) in the airway surface liquid are not readily absorbed, and soluble tissue components are excluded from the surface liquid. The epithelium also controls the volume and composition of the surface liquid. One important process in this regard is the absorption and secretion of ions and water. We have studied the effects of inhalation of ozone on the barrier function (permeability to dissolved molecules) and the ion transport activity of epithelium using both in vivo and in vitro techniques. All our experiments were performed with male Hartley strain guinea pigs. Conscious, unrestrained animals were exposed to a concentration of ozone of 1 ppm for three hours in controlled environmental chambers in the Health Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Research Triangle Park, NC. Such exposures caused a marked increase in the rate of appearance in blood of various water-soluble compounds instilled onto the surface of the trachea, indicating increased permeability of the airway epithelium. This interpretation was supported by electron microscopy, which showed that the tracer molecule horseradish peroxidase was present in the intercellular spaces of tracheal epithelium from ozone-exposed, but not air-exposed (control), animals. However, when the tracheas were excised after ozone

  17. Effect of Track Potentials on the Movement of Secondary Electrons due to Irradiation of Heavy Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moribayashi, Kengo

    2017-02-01

    This paper quantitatively discusses the effect of positive nuclear track potentials on the motion of secondary electrons due to heavy-ion irradiation using a simulation model. This model reproduces the tendency of measurement of the number of secondary electrons. Using this model, physical phenomena can be treated closer to reality than those using the conventional models. Here, the track potential is defined as the potential formed from the electric field near the track of a heavy ion. This effect is expected to be given as functions of not only the mean paths (τ) between incident ion impact ionization events but also the average initial secondary electron energies. The results shown in this paper indicate that the effect of the track potential is mainly determined by τ.

  18. Anomalous Transport Coefficients Due to the Ion-Ion Two-Stream Plasma Microinstability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-25

    MaxwelHan Distribution on the Computer Kesh . p-*£) \\ j. T^jh^fO ££(£*) (F.5) &* tfLr gfZA^c ou-rZ/b fr*». «?,*) -" -"*&;))) *1[ fx^l- > w^W^tf- (F...NINE POINTS ARE USED IN THE FINITE DIFFERENCE EQUATION FOR THE i"> POINT) Flg. F-2. Kesh Point Numbering Scheme in the Method of Lines. 125

  19. Nanoscale transport of electrons and ions in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynton, Paul Christopher

    The following dissertation discusses the theoretical study of water on the nanoscale, often involved with essential biological molecules such as DNA and proteins. First I introduce the study of water on the nanoscale and how experimentalists approach confinement with nanopores and nanogaps. Then I discuss the theoretical method we choose for understanding this important biological medium on the molecular level, namely classical molecular dynamics. This leads into transport mechanisms that utilize water on the nanoscale, in our case electronic and ionic transport. On the scale of mere nanometers or less electronic transport in water enters the tunneling regime, requiring the use of a quantum treatment. In addition, I discuss the importance of water in ionic transport and its known effects on biological phenomena such as ion selectivity. Water also has great influence over DNA and proteins, which are both introduced in the context of nanopore sequencing. Several techniques for nanopore sequencing are examined and the importance of protein sequencing is explained. In Chapter 2, we study the effect of volumetric constraints on the structure and electronic transport properties of distilled water in a nanopore with embedded electrodes. Combining classical molecular dynamics simulations with quantum scattering theory, we show that the structural motifs water assumes inside the pore can be probed directly by tunneling. In Chapter 3, we propose an improvement to the original sequencing by tunneling method, in which N pairs of electrodes are built in series along a synthetic nanochannel. Each current time series for each nucleobase is cross-correlated together, reducing noise in the signals. We show using random sampling of data from classical molecular dynamics, that indeed the sequencing error is significantly reduced as the number of pairs of electrodes, N, increases. In Chapter 4, we propose a new technique for de novo protein sequencing that involves translocating a

  20. Copper ion redox state is critical for its effects on ion transport pathways and methaemoglobin formation in trout erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, Anna Yu; Gassmann, Max; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2002-01-22

    We have studied the mechanism of copper uptake by the cells, its oxidative action and effects on ion transport systems using rainbow trout erythrocytes. Cupric ions enter trout erythrocytes as negatively charged complexes with chloride and hydroxyl anions via the band 3-mediated Cl-/HCO3- exchanger. Replacement of Cl- by gluconate, and complexation of cupric ions with histidine abolish rapid Cu2+ uptake. Within the cell cupric ions interact with haemoglobin, causing methaemoglobin formation by direct electron transfer from heme Fe2+ to Cu2+, and consecutive proton release. Ascorbate-mediated reduction of cupric ions to cuprous decreases copper-induced metHb formation and proton release. Moreover, cuprous ions stimulate Na+H+ exchange and residual Na+ transport causing net Na+ accumulation in the cells. The effect requires copper binding to an externally facing thiol group. Copper-induced Na+ accumulation is accompanied by K+ loss occurring mainly via K+-Cl- cotransporter. Taurine efflux is also stimulated by copper exposure. However, net loss of osmolytes is not as pronounced as Na+ uptake and modest swelling of the cells occurs after 5 min of copper exposure. Taken together the results indicate that copper toxicity, including copper transport into the cells and its interactions with ion transport processes, depend on the valency and complex formation of copper ions.

  1. Chemotherapy drugs form ion pores in membranes due to physical interactions with lipids.

    PubMed

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad; Tseng, Chih-Yuan; Duszyk, Marek; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate the effects on membrane of the tubulin-binding chemotherapy drugs: thiocolchicoside and taxol. Electrophysiology recordings across lipid membranes in aqueous phases containing drugs were used to investigate the drug effects on membrane conductance. Molecular dynamics simulation of the chemotherapy drug-lipid complexes was used to elucidate the mechanism at an atomistic level. Both drugs are observed to induce stable ion-flowing pores across membranes. Discrete pore current-time plots exhibit triangular conductance events in contrast to rectangular ones found for ion channels. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that drugs and lipids experience electrostatic and van der Waals interactions for short periods of time when found within each other's proximity. The energies from these two interactions are found to be similar to the energies derived theoretically using the screened Coulomb and the van der Waals interactions between peptides and lipids due to mainly their charge properties while forming peptide-induced ion channels in lipid bilayers. Experimental and in silico studies together suggest that the chemotherapy drugs induce ion pores inside lipid membranes due to drug-lipid physical interactions. The findings reveal cytotoxic effects of drugs on the cell membrane, which may aid in novel drug development for treatment of cancer and other diseases.

  2. Isotopic dependence of impurity transport driven by ion temperature gradient turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weixin; Wang, Lu; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogenic ion mass effects, namely, the isotopic effects on impurity transport driven by ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence are investigated using gyrokinetic theory. For non-trace impurities, changing from hydrogen (H) to deuterium (D), and to tritium (T) plasmas, the outward flux for lower (higher) ionized impurities or for lighter (heavier) impurities is found to decrease (increase), although isotopic dependence of the ITG linear growth rate is weak. This is mainly due to the decrease of outward (inward) convection, while the isotopic dependence of diffusion is relatively weak. In addition, the isotopic effects reduce (enhance) the impurity flux of fully ionized carbon (C6+) for weaker (stronger) magnetic shear. In the trace impurity limit, the isotopic effects are found to reduce the accumulation of high-Z tungsten (W). Moreover, the isotopic effects on the peaking factor of trace high-Z W get stronger with stronger magnetic shear.

  3. Controlling interlayer interactions in vanadium pentoxide-poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites for enhanced magnesium-ion charge transport and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, Sanjaya D.; Archer, Randall B.; Damin, Craig A.; Mendoza-Cruz, Rubén; Rhodes, Christopher P.

    2017-03-01

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries provide the potential for lower cost and improved safety compared with lithium-ion batteries, however obtaining cathode materials with highly reversible Mg-ion capacities is hindered by the high polarizability of divalent Mg-ions and slow solid-state Mg-ion diffusion. We report that incorporating poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) between the layers of hydrated vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) xerogels results in significantly improved reversible Mg-ion capacities. X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy show that the interlayer spacing between V2O5 layers was increased by PEO incorporation. Vibrational spectroscopy supports that the polymer interacts with the V2O5 lattice. The V2O5-PEO nanocomposite exhibited a 5-fold enhancement in Mg-ion capacity, improved stability, and improved rate capabilities compared with V2O5 xerogels. The Mg-ion diffusion coefficient of the nanocomposite was increased compared with that of V2O5 xerogels which is attributed to enhanced Mg-ion mobility due to the shielding interaction of PEO with the V2O5 lattice. This study shows that beyond only interlayer spacing, the nature of interlayer interactions of Mg-ions with V2O5, PEO, and H2O are key factors that affect Mg-ion charge transport and storage in layered materials. The design of layered materials with controlled interlayer interactions provides a new approach to develop improved cathodes for magnesium batteries.

  4. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate regulation of ion transport in porcine vocal fold mucosae.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Nofziger, Charity; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie

    2008-08-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an important biological molecule that regulates ion transport and inflammatory responses in epithelial tissue. The present study examined whether the adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, would increase cAMP concentration in porcine vocal fold mucosa and whether the effects of increased cAMP would be manifested as a functional increase in transepithelial ion transport. Additionally, changes in cAMP concentrations following exposure to an inflammatory mediator, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) were investigated. In vitro experimental design with matched treatment and control groups. Porcine vocal fold mucosae (N = 30) and tracheal mucosae (N = 20) were exposed to forskolin, TNFalpha, or vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide) treatment. cAMP concentrations were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Ion transport was measured using electrophysiological techniques. Thirty minute exposure to forskolin significantly increased cAMP concentration and ion transport in porcine vocal fold and tracheal mucosae. However, 30-minute and 2-hour exposure to TNFalpha did not significantly alter cAMP concentration. We demonstrate that forskolin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase is present in vocal fold mucosa, and further, that the product, cAMP increases vocal fold ion transport. The results presented here contribute to our understanding of the intracellular mechanisms underlying vocal fold ion transport. As ion transport is important for maintaining superficial vocal fold hydration, data demonstrating forskolin-stimulated ion transport in vocal fold mucosa suggest opportunities for developing pharmacological treatments that increase surface hydration.

  5. Poster 5: Day to night ion transport flow and its variation with SLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingjuan; Nagy, Andy F.

    2016-06-01

    In this presentation, we will examine the day to night ion transport flow at Titan based on 3D MHD model results. As this flow is influenced by the relative direction of the upstream co-rotation plasma flow as Titan moved along its orbit, we will present and compare the day-to-night ion transport flow at four different SLTs.

  6. Investigations of Atomic Transport Induced by Heavy Ion Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banwell, Thomas Clyde

    The mechanisms of atomic transport induced by ion irradiation generally fall into the categories of anisotropic or isotropic processes. Typical examples of these are recoil implantation and cascade mixing, respectively. We have measured the interaction of these processes in the mixing of Ti/SiO(,2)/Si, Cr/SiO(,2)/Si and Ni/SiO(,2)/Si multi-layers irradiated with Xe at fluences of 0.01 - 10 x 10('15)cm('-2). The fluence dependence of net metal transport into the underlying layers was measured with different thicknesses of SiO(,2) and different sample temperatures during irradiation (-196 to 500C). There is a linear dependence at low fluences. At high fluences, a square-root behavior predominates. For thin SiO(,2) layers (<20nm), the cross -over point depends on the SiO(,2) thickness. These results are readily interpreted in terms of competition between the flux of injected atoms and diffusion of the accumulating metal. The detailed analysis allows us to speculate on the role of chemical reaction kinetics in controlling the outcome of intra-cascade processes. There is no significant correlation between the reactivity of the metal with SiO(,2) and the amount of mixing observed when the irradiations are performed at 25C or below. The contribution from primary recoils is quite pronounced since the gross mixing is small. A significant correlation exists between the mixing and the energy deposited through elastic collisions F(,D ). Several models are examined in an attempt to describe the transport process in Ni/SiO(,2). It is likely that injection of Ni by secondary recoil implantation is primarily responsible for getting Ni into the SiO(,2). Secondary recoil injection is thought to scale with F(,D). Trends in the mixing rates indicate that the dominant mechanism for Ti and Cr could be the same as for Ni. The processes of atomic transport and phase formation clearly fail to be separable at higher temperatures. A positive correlation with chemical reactivity emerges at

  7. Salinity tolerance in plants. Quantitative approach to ion transport starting from halophytes and stepping to genetic and protein engineering for manipulating ion fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport is the fundamental factor determining salinity tolerance in plants. The Review starts from differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes. The comparison provides introductory information for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion fluxes. Further steps require knowledge about mechanisms of ion transport and individual genes of ion transport proteins. Initially, the Review describes methods to measure ion fluxes, the independent set of techniques ensures robust and reliable basement for quantitative approach. The Review briefly summarizes current data concerning Na+ and K+ concentrations in cells, refers to primary thermodynamics of ion transport and gives special attention to individual ion channels and transporters. Simplified scheme of a plant cell with known transport systems at the plasma membrane and tonoplast helps to imagine the complexity of ion transport and allows choosing specific transporters for modulating ion transport. The complexity is enhanced by the influence of cell size and cell wall on ion transport. Special attention is given to ion transporters and to potassium and sodium transport by HKT, HAK, NHX, and SOS1 proteins. Comparison between non-selective cation channels and ion transporters reveals potential importance of ion transporters and the balance between the two pathways of ion transport. Further on the Review describes in detail several successful attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to promising candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. Potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters using single point mutations is discussed and

  8. Salinity tolerance in plants. Quantitative approach to ion transport starting from halophytes and stepping to genetic and protein engineering for manipulating ion fluxes.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ion transport is the fundamental factor determining salinity tolerance in plants. The Review starts from differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes. The comparison provides introductory information for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion fluxes. Further steps require knowledge about mechanisms of ion transport and individual genes of ion transport proteins. Initially, the Review describes methods to measure ion fluxes, the independent set of techniques ensures robust and reliable basement for quantitative approach. The Review briefly summarizes current data concerning Na(+) and K(+) concentrations in cells, refers to primary thermodynamics of ion transport and gives special attention to individual ion channels and transporters. Simplified scheme of a plant cell with known transport systems at the plasma membrane and tonoplast helps to imagine the complexity of ion transport and allows choosing specific transporters for modulating ion transport. The complexity is enhanced by the influence of cell size and cell wall on ion transport. Special attention is given to ion transporters and to potassium and sodium transport by HKT, HAK, NHX, and SOS1 proteins. Comparison between non-selective cation channels and ion transporters reveals potential importance of ion transporters and the balance between the two pathways of ion transport. Further on the Review describes in detail several successful attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to promising candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. Potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters using single point mutations is discussed and

  9. Quantitative description of ion transport via plasma membrane of yeast and small cells

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of ion transport via plasma membrane needs identification and quantitative understanding of the involved processes. Brief characterization of main ion transport systems of a yeast cell (Pma1, Ena1, TOK1, Nha1, Trk1, Trk2, non-selective cation conductance) and determining the exact number of molecules of each transporter per a typical cell allow us to predict the corresponding ion flows. In this review a comparison of ion transport in small yeast cell and several animal cell types is provided. The importance of cell volume to surface ratio is emphasized. The role of cell wall and lipid rafts is discussed in respect to required increase in spatial and temporary resolution of measurements. Conclusions are formulated to describe specific features of ion transport in a yeast cell. Potential directions of future research are outlined based on the assumptions. PMID:26113853

  10. Quantitative description of ion transport via plasma membrane of yeast and small cells.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of ion transport via plasma membrane needs identification and quantitative understanding of the involved processes. Brief characterization of main ion transport systems of a yeast cell (Pma1, Ena1, TOK1, Nha1, Trk1, Trk2, non-selective cation conductance) and determining the exact number of molecules of each transporter per a typical cell allow us to predict the corresponding ion flows. In this review a comparison of ion transport in small yeast cell and several animal cell types is provided. The importance of cell volume to surface ratio is emphasized. The role of cell wall and lipid rafts is discussed in respect to required increase in spatial and temporary resolution of measurements. Conclusions are formulated to describe specific features of ion transport in a yeast cell. Potential directions of future research are outlined based on the assumptions.

  11. Explaining the isotope effect on heat transport in L-mode with the collisional electron-ion energy exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P. A.; Bustos, A.; Hennequin, P.; Ryter, F.; Bernert, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M. G.; Fischer, R.; Görler, T.; Happel, T.; Igochine, V.; Kurzan, B.; Lebschy, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Morel, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-06-01

    In ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), the normalised gyroradius {ρ\\star} was varied via a hydrogen isotope scan while keeping other dimensionless parameters constant. This was done in L-mode, to minimise the impact of pedestal stability on confinement. Power balance and perturbative transport analyses reveal that the electron heat transport is unaffected by the differences in isotope mass. Nonlinear simulations with the Gene code suggest that these L-mode discharges are ion temperature gradient (ITG) dominated. The different gyroradii due to the isotope mass do not necessarily result in a change of the predicted heat fluxes. This result is used in simulations with the Astra transport code to match the experimental profiles. In these simulations the experimental profiles and confinement times are reproduced with the same transport coefficients for hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. The mass only enters in the energy exchange term between electrons and ions. These numerical observations are supported by additional experiments which show a lower ion energy confinement compared to that of the electrons. Additionally, hydrogen and deuterium plasmas have a similar confinement when the energy exchange time between electrons and ions is matched. This strongly suggests that the observed isotope dependence in L-mode is not dominated by a gyroradius effect, but a consequence of the mass dependence in the collisional energy exchange between electrons and ions.

  12. The role of zinc ions in reverse transport mediated by monoamine transporters.

    PubMed

    Scholze, Petra; Nørregaard, Lene; Singer, Ernst A; Freissmuth, Michael; Gether, Ulrik; Sitte, Harald H

    2002-06-14

    The human dopamine transporter (hDAT) contains an endogenous high affinity Zn2+ binding site with three coordinating residues on its extracellular face (His193, His375, and Glu396). Upon binding to this site, Zn2+ causes inhibition of [3H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ([3H]MPP+) uptake. We investigated the effect of Zn2+ on outward transport by superfusing hDAT-expressing HEK-293 cells preloaded with [3H]MPP+. Although Zn2+ inhibited uptake, Zn2+ facilitated [3H]MPP+ release induced by amphetamine, MPP+, or K+-induced depolarization specifically at hDAT but not at the human serotonin and the norepinephrine transporter (hNET). Mutation of the Zn2+ coordinating residue His(193) to Lys (the corresponding residue in hNET) eliminated the effect of Zn2+ on efflux. Conversely, the reciprocal mutation (K189H) conferred Zn2+ sensitivity to hNET. The intracellular [3H]MPP+ concentration was varied to generate saturation isotherms; these showed that Zn2+ increased V(max) for efflux (rather than K(M-Efflux-intracellular)). Thus, blockage of inward transport by Zn2+ is not due to a simple inhibition of the transporter turnover rate. The observations provide evidence against the model of facilitated exchange-diffusion and support the concept that inward and outward transport represent discrete operational modes of the transporter. In addition, they indicate a physiological role of Zn2+, because Zn2+ also facilitated transport reversal of DAT in rat striatal slices.

  13. The Influence of the Driving Voltage and Ion Concentration on the Lateral Ion Transport in Nematic Liquid Crystal Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojmenovik, Goran; Neyts, Kristiaan; Vermael, Stefaan; Verschueren, Alwin R. M.; van Asselt, Rob

    2005-08-01

    Nematic liquid crystal displays (LCDs) contain ions that influence the electrooptical characteristics of the display. A typical super-twisted nematic (STN) display for mobile phone applications becomes darker at a standard driving frequency if it contains many impurity ions. We have discovered that ions can travel in the plane of the glass plates in the absence of a lateral electric field, leading to lateral nonhomogeneity in transmission (dark and bright stripes). In this paper, we present our research on the lateral ion transport dependence on the driving square wave (SQW) amplitude and dc component at a wide range of ion concentrations. The existence of a dc component, a high ion concentration and high SQW amplitudes increase the lateral ion speed.

  14. Development of ion transport and glycoprotein secretion in sheep trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, R.J.; Torrealba, P.J.; Wanner, A.

    1986-03-05

    The authors studied postnatal changes in ion and water transport, and glycoprotein secretion (GPS) in tracheal tissues (mounted in vitro) from sheep 0,2,4 and 8 weeks old (n=5 each group) and compared values to those from adult sheep. Cl/sup -/, Na/sup +/ and water fluxes were measured under open-circuit (OC) and short-circuit (SC) conditions. For GPS the authors added /sup 35/SO/sub 4/ and /sup 3/H-threonine to the serosa, and measured GP-bound-/sup 35/S and -/sup 3/H output on the mucosa. In newborns (0 weeks) there was net Cl/sup -/ secretion (mean +/-SD: 1.0+/-0.7, ..mu..Eq/cm/sup 2//h) but no net Na/sup +/ movement at SC: net Cl/sup -/ secretion remained under OC, coupled with net water secretion (12 +/- 21 ..mu..l/cm/sup 2//h). Net Cl/sup -/ secretion at SC did not change significantly with age, while net Na/sup +/ absorption developed by 2 weeks and approached adult values (1.6 +/- 0.5 ..mu..Eq/cm/sup 2//h) by 8 weeks (1.1 +/- 0.9 ..mu..Eq/cm/sup 2//h). There was no OC net flux of water except in newborn tissues. Basal GPS, especially of SO/sub 4/-GP, was greatly increased in newborns (p<0.05), but decreased to near adult values by 2 weeks. The /sup 35/S: /sup 3/H ratio gradually decreased from 4.2 +/- 1.3 at 0 weeks to 2.0 +/- 0.7 at 8 weeks. These results show that in sheep, tracheal ion transport and GPS approach adult values by 4-8 weeks. Values at 0 weeks were similar to those reported for fetal sheep trachea (a Cl/sup -//liquid-secreting tissue), and confirm the clinical observation of mucus hypersecretion in the airways of newborns; this mucus may have abnormal biochemical properties.

  15. Transport of Zn(OH4)(2-) Ions Across a Polyolefin Microporous Membrane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-22

    O_____I___-_-- A UL "OdYAI ULmfo 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) Transport of Zn(OH)2- ions through modified microporous polypropylene membranes was...ion exclusion and good conductivity. Polypropylene membranes were chosen as suitable microporous separators which were then coated with Nafion to...NUMBERS Transport of Zn(OH)2- ions across a polyolefin microporous membrane C _______________________________________________ N00014-91-J1058 6

  16. Numerical Analysis of Plasma Transport in Tandem Volume Magnetic Multicusp Ion Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    oDTIC ELECTE 0 ~OF NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF PLASMA TRANSPORT IN TANDEM VOLUME MAGNETIC MULTICUSP ION SOURCES THESIS Todd Roland Vitko Captain, USAF AFIT...TANDEM VOLUME MAGNETIC MULTICUSP ION SOURCES THESIS Todd Roland Vitko Captain, USAF AFIT/GEP/ENP/92M-01 Approved for public release; distribution...unlimited. AFIT/GEP/ENP/92M-01 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF PLASMA TRANSPORT IN TANDEM VOLUME MAGNETIC MULTICUSP ION SOURCES THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the

  17. Ion Transport Properties of Mechanically Stable symmetric ABCBA Pentablock Copolymers with Quaternary Ammonium Functionalized Midblock

    SciTech Connect

    Ertem, S. Piril; Caire, Benjamin R.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Zeng, Di; Vandiver, Melissa A.; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Seifert, Soenke; Hayward, Ryan C.; Weber, Adam Z.; Herring , Andrew M.; Coughlin, E. Bryan; Liberatore, Matthew W.

    2017-01-01

    Anion exchange membranes (AEMs) are a promising class of materials for applications that require selective ion transport, such as fuel cells, water purification, and electrolysis devices. Studies of structure–morphology–property relationships of ion-exchange membranes revealed that block copolymers exhibit improved ion conductivity and mechanical properties due to their microphase-separated morphologies with well-defined ionic domains. While most studies focused on symmetric diblock or triblock copolymers, here, the first example of a midblock quaternized pentablock AEM is presented. A symmetric ABCBA pentablock copolymer was functionalized to obtain a midblock brominated polymer. Solution cast films were then quaternized to obtain AEMs with resulting ion exchange capacities (IEC) ranging from 0.4 to 0.9 mmol/g. Despite the relatively low IEC, the polymers were highly conductive (up to 60 mS/cm Br2 at 90 8C and 95%RH) with low water absorption (<25 wt %) and maintained adequate mechanical properties in both dry and hydrated conditions. Xray scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed formation of cylindrical non-ionic domains in a connected ionic phase.

  18. Modeling Metallic Ion Transport During the Lifetime of an Intermediate Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, R. L.; Earle, G. D.

    2001-05-01

    Intermediate layers are one of several phenomena that occur at midlatitudes in the nighttime E region. These ionization layers which typically form on the bottomside of the F region, are frequently observed by the Arecibo Incoherent Scatter Facility. Although their occurrence is relatively common, they exhibit diverse structure. Their altitude of formation, vertical thickness, and motion show significant nightly variations. Layer structure is influenced by a number of factors including composition, electric fields, and fluctuations in the neutral wind field. A numerical simulation has been employed to investigate the effects of composition on layer development. Specifically, the simulation, named LEAD (Layer Evolution And Dynamics), explores the transport of metallic ions during the formation and subsequent motion of a layer due to a time varying meridional wind field. We discuss the relative molecular/metallic ratio inside the layer during its evolution, the time scales for metallic ion dominance within the layer, and the motion of metallic ions in the adjacent altitude regions. We present animated results from LEAD which allow detailed inspection of ion composition variations throughout the process of layer evolution and descent.

  19. The Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the initial phase of an investigation that was originally selected by NASA Headquarters for funding by a grant but was later transferred to NASA GSFC for continued funding under a new and separate contract. The principal objective of the investigation, led by Dr. O.W. Lennartsson, is to extract information about the solar origin plasma in Earth's magnetosphere, specifically about the entry and transport of this plasma, using energetic (10 eV/e to 18 keV/e) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the NASA/ESA International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite. These data were acquired many years ago, from November 1977 through March of 1982, but, because of subsequent failures of similar experiments on several other spacecraft, they are still the only substantial ion composition data available from Earth's magnetotail, beyond 10 RE, in the critically important sub-kev to keV energy range. All of the Lockheed data now exist in a compacted scientific format, suitable for large-scale statistical investigations, which has been archived both at Lockheed Martin in Palo Alto and at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in Greenbelt. The completion of the archiving, by processing the remaining half of the data, was made possible by separate funding through a temporary NASA program for data restoration and was given priority over the data analysis by a no-cost extension of the subject grant. By chance, the period of performance coincided with an international study of source and loss processes of magnetospheric plasma, sponsored by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland, for which Dr. Lennartsson was invited to serve as one of 12 co-chairs. This study meshed well with the continued analysis of the NASA/Lockheed ISEE ion composition data and provided a natural forum for a broader discussion of the results from this unique experiment. What follows is arranged, for the most part, in

  20. The Transport of Solar Ions Through the Earth's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennartsson, O. W.

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the initial phase of an investigation that was originally selected by NASA Headquarters for funding by a grant but was later transferred to NASA GSFC for continued funding under a new and separate contract. The principal objective of the investigation, led by Dr. O.W. Lennartsson, is to extract information about the solar origin plasma in Earth's magnetosphere, specifically about the entry and transport of this plasma, using energetic (10 eV/e to 18 keV/e) ion composition data from the Lockheed Plasma Composition Experiment on the NASA/ESA International Sun-Earth Explorer One (ISEE 1) satellite. These data were acquired many years ago, from November 1977 through March of 1982, but, because of subsequent failures of similar experiments on several other spacecraft, they are still the only substantial ion composition data available from Earth's magnetotail, beyond 10 R(sub E), in the critically important sub-kev to keV energy range. All of the Lockheed data now exist in a compacted scientific format, suitable for large-scale statistical investigations, which has been archived both at Lockheed Martin in Palo Alto and at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in Greenbelt. The completion of the archiving, by processing the remaining half of the data, was made possible by separate funding through a temporary NASA program for data restoration and was given priority over the data analysis by a no-cost extension of the subject grant. By chance, the period of performance coincided with an international study of source and loss processes of magnetospheric plasma, sponsored by the International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland, for which Dr. Lennartsson was invited to serve as one of 12 co-chairs. This study meshed well with the continued analysis of the NASA/Lockheed ISEE ion composition data and provided a natural forum for a broader discussion of the results from this unique experiment. What follows is arranged, for the most

  1. (In)validity of the constant field and constant currents assumptions in theories of ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Syganow, A; von Kitzing, E

    1999-01-01

    Constant electric fields and constant ion currents are often considered in theories of ion transport. Therefore, it is important to understand the validity of these helpful concepts. The constant field assumption requires that the charge density of permeant ions and flexible polar groups is virtually voltage independent. We present analytic relations that indicate the conditions under which the constant field approximation applies. Barrier models are frequently fitted to experimental current-voltage curves to describe ion transport. These models are based on three fundamental characteristics: a constant electric field, negligible concerted motions of ions inside the channel (an ion can enter only an empty site), and concentration-independent energy profiles. An analysis of those fundamental assumptions of barrier models shows that those approximations require large barriers because the electrostatic interaction is strong and has a long range. In the constant currents assumption, the current of each permeating ion species is considered to be constant throughout the channel; thus ion pairing is explicitly ignored. In inhomogeneous steady-state systems, the association rate constant determines the strength of ion pairing. Among permeable ions, however, the ion association rate constants are not small, according to modern diffusion-limited reaction rate theories. A mathematical formulation of a constant currents condition indicates that ion pairing very likely has an effect but does not dominate ion transport. PMID:9929480

  2. Electro- and Magneto-Modulated Ion Transport through Graphene Oxide Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    The control of ion trans-membrane transport through graphene oxide (GO) membranes is achieved by electric and magnetic fields. Electric field can either increase or decrease the ion transport through GO membranes depending on its direction, and magnetic field can enhance the ion penetration monotonically. When electric field is applied across GO membrane, excellent control of ion fluidic flows can be done. With the magnetic field, the effective anchoring of ions is demonstrated but the modulation of the ion flowing directions does not occur. The mechanism of the electro- and magneto-modulated ion trans-membrane transport is investigated, indicating that the electric fields dominate the ion migration process while the magnetic fields tune the structure of nanocapillaries within GO membranes. Results also show that the ion selectivity of GO membranes can be tuned with the electric fields while the transport of ions can be enhanced synchronously with the magnetic fields. These excellent properties make GO membranes promising in areas such as field-induced mass transport control and membrane separation. PMID:25347969

  3. Solid-State Laser, Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (Rilis) and Laser Beam Transport at Radioactive Ion Beam Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, J.; Bricault, P.; Dombsky, M.; Izdebski, F.; Lavoie, J. P.; Gillner, M.; Gottwald, T.; Hellbusch, F.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Voss, A.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2009-03-01

    The inception of laser resonance ionization spectroscopy and its application as a resonant ionization laser ion source (RILIS) took place merely 20 years ago with pulsed dye lasers [1-5]. By now next generation radioactive ion beam (RIB) facilities are being planned or built. Understanding and considering the unique RILIS requirements in the layout of next generation RIB facilities will allow for cost-effective implementation of this versatile ion source. This discussion touches on laser beam transport and RILIS requirements not necessarily obvious to experts in conventional ion sources.

  4. A synthetic ion transporter that disrupts autophagy and induces apoptosis by perturbing cellular chloride concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busschaert, Nathalie; Park, Seong-Hyun; Baek, Kyung-Hwa; Choi, Yoon Pyo; Park, Jinhong; Howe, Ethan N. W.; Hiscock, Jennifer R.; Karagiannidis, Louise E.; Marques, Igor; Félix, Vítor; Namkung, Wan; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Gale, Philip A.; Shin, Injae

    2017-07-01

    Perturbations in cellular chloride concentrations can affect cellular pH and autophagy and lead to the onset of apoptosis. With this in mind, synthetic ion transporters have been used to disturb cellular ion homeostasis and thereby induce cell death; however, it is not clear whether synthetic ion transporters can also be used to disrupt autophagy. Here, we show that squaramide-based ion transporters enhance the transport of chloride anions in liposomal models and promote sodium chloride influx into the cytosol. Liposomal and cellular transport activity of the squaramides is shown to correlate with cell death activity, which is attributed to caspase-dependent apoptosis. One ion transporter was also shown to cause additional changes in lysosomal pH, which leads to impairment of lysosomal enzyme activity and disruption of autophagic processes. This disruption is independent of the initiation of apoptosis by the ion transporter. This study provides the first experimental evidence that synthetic ion transporters can disrupt both autophagy and induce apoptosis.

  5. Mitochondrial Ion Channels/Transporters as Sensors and Regulators of Cellular Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Shin-Young; Jhun, Bong Sook; Hurst, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Mitochondrial ion channels/transporters and the electron transport chain (ETC) serve as key sensors and regulators for cellular redox signaling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) in mitochondria, and balancing cell survival and death. Although the functional and pharmacological characteristics of mitochondrial ion transport mechanisms have been extensively studied for several decades, the majority of the molecular identities that are responsible for these channels/transporters have remained a mystery until very recently. Recent Advances: Recent breakthrough studies uncovered the molecular identities of the diverse array of major mitochondrial ion channels/transporters, including the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter pore, mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel. This new information enables us to form detailed molecular and functional characterizations of mitochondrial ion channels/transporters and their roles in mitochondrial redox signaling. Critical Issues: Redox-mediated post-translational modifications of mitochondrial ion channels/transporters and ETC serve as key mechanisms for the spatiotemporal control of mitochondrial ROS/RNS generation. Future Directions: Identification of detailed molecular mechanisms for redox-mediated regulation of mitochondrial ion channels will enable us to find novel therapeutic targets for many diseases that are associated with cellular redox signaling and mitochondrial ion channels/transporters. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 987–1006. PMID:24180309

  6. Regulation of the divalent metal ion transporter via membrane budding

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, KimberlyD; Foot, Natalie J; Anand, Sushma; Dalton, Hazel E; Chaudhary, Natasha; Collins, Brett M; Mathivanan, Suresh; Kumar, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    The release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) is important for both normal physiology and disease. However, a basic understanding of the targeting of EV cargoes, composition and mechanism of release is lacking. Here we present evidence that the divalent metal ion transporter (DMT1) is unexpectedly regulated through release in EVs. This process involves the Nedd4-2 ubiquitin ligase, and the adaptor proteins Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 via different budding mechanisms. We show that mouse gut explants release endogenous DMT1 in EVs. Although we observed no change in the relative amount of DMT1 released in EVs from gut explants in Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 deficient mice, the extent of EVs released was significantly reduced indicating an adaptor role in biogenesis. Furthermore, using Arrdc1 or Arrdc4 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we show that both Arrdc1 and Arrdc4 are non-redundant positive regulators of EV release. Our results suggest that DMT1 release from the plasma membrane into EVs may represent a novel mechanism for the maintenance of iron homeostasis, which may also be important for the regulation of other membrane proteins. PMID:27462458

  7. Shielding analysis for a heavy ion beam chamber with plasma channels for ion transport

    SciTech Connect

    Sawan, M.E.; Peterson, R.R.; Yu, S.

    2000-06-28

    Neutronics analysis has been performed to assess the shielding requirements for the insulators and final focusing magnets in a modified HYLIFE-II target chamber that utilizes pre-formed plasma channels for heavy ion beam transport. Using 65 cm thick Flibe jet assemblies provides adequate shielding for the electrical insulator units. Additional shielding is needed in front of the final focusing superconducting quadrupole magnets. A shield with a thickness varying between 45 and 90 cm needs to be provided in front of the quadrupole unit. The final laser mirrors located along the channel axis are in the direct line-of-sight of source neutrons. Neutronics calculations were performed to determine the constraints on the placement of these mirrors to be lifetime components.

  8. Temperature dependent dielectric properties and ion transportation in solid polymer electrolyte for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengwa, R. J.; Dhatarwal, Priyanka; Choudhary, Shobhna

    2016-05-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) film consisted of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blend matrix with lithium tetrafluroborate (LiBF4) as dopant ionic salt and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as plasticizer has been prepared by solution casting method followed by melt pressing. Dielectric properties and ionic conductivity of the SPE film at different temperatures have been determined by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. It has been observed that the dc ionic conductivity of the SPE film increases with increase of temperature and also the decrease of relaxation time. The temperature dependent relaxation time and ionic conductivity values of the electrolyte are governed by the Arrhenius relation. Correlation observed between dc conductivity and relaxation time confirms that ion transportation occurs with polymer chain segmental dynamics through hopping mechanism. The room temperature ionic conductivity is found to be 4 × 10-6 S cm-1 which suggests the suitability of the SPE film for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  9. Vacancies driven magnetic ordering in ZnO nanoparticles due to low concentrated Co ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Kuldeep Chand; Bhatia, Ravi; Kumar, Sanjeev; Kotnala, R. K.

    2016-07-01

    The lattice defects due to oxygen vacancies in ZnO nanoparticles with low doping of Co ions are investigated. The low concentrated Co ions in ZnO are responsible to the free charge carriers and oxygen vacancies to induce long-range ferromagnetic ordering. We have synthesized Zn1-x Co x O [x = 0.002, 0.004, 0.006 and 0.008] nanoparticles by a sol-gel process. X-ray fluorescence analysis detects the chemical composition of Zn, Co and O atoms. Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction pattern could confirm the wurtzite ZnO structure and the lattice constants with Co doping. The nanoparticles dimensions as well lattice spacing of ZnO are enhanced with Co substitution. Fourier transform infrared vibrational modes involve some organic groups to induce lattice defects and the ionic coordination among Zn, Co and O atoms. The room temperature Raman active mode E2 indicates frequency shifting with Co to induce stress in the wurtzite lattice. Photoluminescence spectra have a strong near-band-edge emission due to band gap energy and defects related to oxygen vacancies. X-ray photoelectron spectra confirm that the low dopant Co ions in ZnO lattice occupied Zn atoms by introducing oxygen vacancies and the valance states Zn2+, Co2,3+. The zero-field and field cooling magnetic measurement at 500 Oe in Co:ZnO samples indicate long-range ferromagnetism that is enhanced at 10 K due to antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic ordering. The lattice defects/vacancies due to oxygen act as the medium of magnetic interactions which is explained by the bound magnetic polaron model.

  10. A model of ion transport processes along and across the neuronal membrane.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Z X; Liu, G Z; Tang, C X; Yan, L X

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we provide a foundational model of ion transport processes in the intracellular and extracellular compartments of neurons at the nanoscale. There are two different kinds of ionic transport processes: (i) ionic transport across the neuronal membrane (trans-membrane), and (ii) ionic transport along both the intracellular and extracellular surfaces of the membrane. Brownian dynamics simulations are used to give a description of ionic trans-membrane transport. Electro-diffusion is used to model ion transport along the membrane surface, and the two transport processes can be linked analytically. In our model, we found that the interactions between ions and ion channels result in high-frequency ionic oscillations during trans-membrane transport. In ion transport along the membrane, high-frequency ionic oscillations may be evoked on both the intracellular and extracellular surfaces of the plasma membrane. The electric field caused by Coulomb interactions between the ions is found to be the most likely origin of those ionic oscillations.

  11. Expression of the thyroid hormone transporters monocarboxylate transporter-8 (SLC16A2) and organic ion transporter-14 (SLCO1C1) at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lori M; Woodford, Kathleen; Zhou, Mei; Black, Deborah S; Haggerty, Jill E; Tate, Emily H; Grindstaff, Kent K; Mengesha, Wondwessen; Raman, Chandrasekaran; Zerangue, Noa

    2008-12-01

    Thyroid hormones require transport across cell membranes to carry out their biological functions. The importance of transport for thyroid hormone signaling was highlighted by the discovery that inactivating mutations in the human monocarboxylate transporter-8 (MCT8) (SLC16A2) cause severe psychomotor retardation due to thyroid hormone deficiency in the central nervous system. It has been reported that Mct8 expression in the mouse brain is restricted to neurons, leading to the model that organic ion transporter polypeptide-14 (OATP14, also known as OATP1C1/SLCO1C1) is the primary thyroid hormone transporter at the blood-brain barrier, whereas MCT8 mediates thyroid hormone uptake into neurons. In contrast to these reports, we report here that in addition to neuronal expression, MCT8 mRNA and protein are expressed in cerebral microvessels in human, mouse, and rat. In addition, OATP14 mRNA and protein are strongly enriched in mouse and rat cerebral microvessels but not in human microvessels. In rat, Mct8 and Oatp14 proteins localize to both the luminal and abluminal microvessel membranes. In human and rodent choroid plexus epithelial cells, MCT8 is concentrated on the epithelial cell apical surface and OATP14 localizes primarily to the basal-lateral surface. Mct8 and Oatp14 expression was also observed in mouse and rat tanycytes, which are thought to form a barrier between hypothalamic blood vessels and brain. These results raise the possibility that reduced thyroid hormone transport across the blood-brain barrier contributes to the neurological deficits observed in affected patients with MCT8 mutations. The high microvessel expression of OATP14 in rodent compared with human brain may contribute to the relatively mild phenotype observed in Mct8-null mice, in contrast to humans lacking functional MCT8.

  12. Crystal structure of a SLC11 (NRAMP) transporter reveals the basis for transition-metal ion transport.

    PubMed

    Ehrnstorfer, Ines A; Geertsma, Eric R; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Dutzler, Raimund

    2014-11-01

    Members of the SLC11 (NRAMP) family transport iron and other transition-metal ions across cellular membranes. These membrane proteins are present in all kingdoms of life with a high degree of sequence conservation. To gain insight into the determinants of ion selectivity, we have determined the crystal structure of Staphylococcus capitis DMT (ScaDMT), a close prokaryotic homolog of the family. ScaDMT shows a familiar architecture that was previously identified in the amino acid permease LeuT. The protein adopts an inward-facing conformation with a substrate-binding site located in the center of the transporter. This site is composed of conserved residues, which coordinate Mn2+, Fe2+ and Cd2+ but not Ca2+. Mutations of interacting residues affect ion binding and transport in both ScaDMT and human DMT1. Our study thus reveals a conserved mechanism for transition-metal ion selectivity within the SLC11 family.

  13. An optical technique to measure ion engine grid distortion due to differential thermal expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trava-Airoldi, V. J.; Garner, C. E.; Pivirotto, T. J.; Brophy, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an optical technique developed for measuring small differential grid displacements due to thermal expansion of an ion thruster accelerator system. The technique is based on confocal scanning optical microscope type II. For the measurements of small displacements where there are distances on the order of a meter or more between the lens plane and the sample, some of the optical components are moved while the sample is kept fixed. The feasibility of applying this technique to measure the thermally induced ion thruster grid displacements was demonstrated in a bench-top simulation. It is noted that this technique can also provide information on grid movement resulting from thermal transients such as the start-up.

  14. An optical technique to measure ion engine grid distortion due to differential thermal expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trava-Airoldi, V. J.; Garner, C. E.; Pivirotto, T. J.; Brophy, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an optical technique developed for measuring small differential grid displacements due to thermal expansion of an ion thruster accelerator system. The technique is based on confocal scanning optical microscope type II. For the measurements of small displacements where there are distances on the order of a meter or more between the lens plane and the sample, some of the optical components are moved while the sample is kept fixed. The feasibility of applying this technique to measure the thermally induced ion thruster grid displacements was demonstrated in a bench-top simulation. It is noted that this technique can also provide information on grid movement resulting from thermal transients such as the start-up.

  15. Electrode architectures for efficient electronic and ionic transport pathways in high power lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulkner, Ankita Shah

    As the demand for clean energy sources increases, large investments have supported R&D programs aimed at developing high power lithium ion batteries for electric vehicles, military, grid storage and space applications. State of the art lithium ion technology cannot meet power demands for these applications due to high internal resistances in the cell. These resistances are mainly comprised of ionic and electronic resistance in the electrode and electrolyte. Recently, much attention has been focused on the use of nanoscale lithium ion active materials on the premise that these materials shorten the diffusion length of lithium ions and increase the surface area for electrochemical charge transfer. While, nanomaterials have allowed significant improvements in the power density of the cell, they are not a complete solution for commercial batteries. Due to their large surface area, they introduce new challenges such as a poor electrode packing densities, high electrolyte reactivity, and expensive synthesis procedures. Since greater than 70% of the cost of the electric vehicle is due to the cost of the battery, a cost-efficient battery design is most critical. To address the limitations of nanomaterials, efficient transport pathways must be engineered in the bulk electrode. As a part of nanomanufacturing research being conducted the Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing at Northeastern University, the first aim of the proposed work is to develop electrode architectures that enhance electronic and ionic transport pathways in large and small area lithium ion electrodes. These architectures will utilize the unique electronic and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes to create robust electrode scaffolding that improves electrochemical charge transfer. Using extensive physical and electrochemical characterization, the second aim is to investigate the effect of electrode parameters on electrochemical performance and evaluate the performance against standard commercial

  16. Transport implementation of the Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm with ion qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallek, S. D.; Herold, C. D.; McMahon, B. J.; Maller, K. M.; Brown, K. R.; Amini, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    Using trapped ion quantum bits in a scalable microfabricated surface trap, we perform the Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm. Our architecture takes advantage of the ion transport capabilities of such a trap. The algorithm is demonstrated using two- and three-ion chains. For three ions, an improvement is achieved compared to a classical system using the same number of oracle queries. For two ions and one query, we correctly determine an unknown bit string with probability 97.6(8)%. For three ions, we succeed with probability 80.9(3)%.

  17. Transport in JET H-mode Plasmas with Beam and Ion Cyclotron Heating

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny, et. al.

    2012-07-13

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) Range of Frequency waves and neutral beam (NB) injection are planned for heating in ITER and other future tokamaks. It is important to understand transport in plasmas with NB and IC to plan, predict, and improve transport and confinement. Transport predictions require simulations of the heating profiles, and for this, accurate modeling of the IC and NB heating is needed.

  18. Influence of asymmetric donor-receiver ion concentration upon transscleral iontophoretic transport.

    PubMed

    Li, S Kevin; Zhang, Yanhui; Zhu, Honggang; Higuchi, William I; White, Henry S

    2005-04-01

    Recent in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested transscleral iontophoresis as a means for non-invasive drug delivery to the eye. However, there remains a lack of information of the iontophoretic transport behavior of the sclera. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of permeant concentration upon transscleral iontophoretic transport. Constant current direct current (DC) iontophoresis was conducted with rabbit sclera in vitro at permeant concentration ranging from 0.015 to 1.0 M in the donor chamber without background electrolyte at 0.4-4 mA (current density: 2-20 mA/cm2). PBS (0.15 M) was the receiver solution. Salicylate (SA) and tetraethylammonium (TEA) were the model ionic permeants, and mannitol was the neutral probe permeant. Conductivity experiments of SA and TEA solutions were performed to determine the effects of ion concentration upon SA and TEA electromobilities. Model simulations were carried out and compared with the experimental data. It was found that the fluxes of the ionic permeants increased linearly with the electric current but were relatively independent of their donor concentrations. Electric field-induced convective solvent flow (electroosmosis) in the sclera was observed to be from the anode to cathode, suggesting that the sclera is net negatively charge at neutral pH. For the studied permeants, electrophoresis was the main transport enhancing mechanism with electroosmosis as a secondary effect. No significant interaction between the permeants and sclera was observed that significantly altered electroosmosis in the membrane. Under the asymmetric donor and receiver conditions, the transference of the permeants could not be predicted by the concentrations of the ions in the donor and receiver chambers with the assumption of constant electric field in the membrane. The membrane ion concentrations were different from those in the chambers due to the requirement of charge neutrality in the membrane. Copyright (c

  19. Molecular mechanism of ion-ion and ion-substrate coupling in the Na+-dependent leucine transporter LeuT.

    PubMed

    Caplan, David A; Subbotina, Julia O; Noskov, Sergei Yu

    2008-11-15

    Ion-coupled transport of neurotransmitter molecules by neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) play an important role in the regulation of neuronal signaling. One of the major events in the transport cycle is ion-substrate coupling and formation of the high-affinity occluded state with bound ions and substrate. Molecular mechanisms of ion-substrate coupling and the corresponding ion-substrate stoichiometry in NSS transporters has yet to be understood. The recent determination of a high-resolution structure for a bacterial homolog of Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters, LeuT, offers a unique opportunity to analyze the functional roles of the multi-ion binding sites within the binding pocket. The binding pocket of LeuT contains two metal binding sites. The first ion in site NA1 is directly coupled to the bound substrate (Leu) with the second ion in the neighboring site (NA2) only approximately 7 A away. Extensive, fully atomistic, molecular dynamics, and free energy simulations of LeuT in an explicit lipid bilayer are performed to evaluate substrate-binding affinity as a function of the ion load (single versus double occupancy) and occupancy by specific monovalent cations. It was shown that double ion occupancy of the binding pocket is required to ensure substrate coupling to Na(+) and not to Li(+) or K(+) cations. Furthermore, it was found that presence of the ion in site NA2 is required for structural stability of the binding pocket as well as amplified selectivity for Na(+) in the case of double ion occupancy.

  20. Turbulence and Transport in Multi-Ion Species Plasmas in the Large Plasma Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    Understanding of turbulence and transport in multi-ion-species plasmas is important for establishing predictive capability for burning tokamak plasmas with comparable densities of D and T. Fundamental modifications to drift-wave instabilities and resulting turbulence are expected from theoretical studies, including new instabilities driven by dissimilar ion density gradients. Even in pure ion species plasmas, transport mysteries remain regarding dependence on ion mass such as the isotope scaling of turbulent transport. Recently, experiments have been performed on the Large Plasma Device at UCLA in which mixed Hydrogen-Helium plasmas were created and the relative concentration was varied systematically. The properties of edge turbulence and transport rates were documented and initial results will be presented. Experimental results are will also be compared to linear drift-wave instability theory in plasmas with multiple ion species.

  1. Selective transport of copper(II) ions across a liquid membrane mediated by Piroxicam.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Susan; Mohammadzadeh, Darush; Imampur, Jalal Shakhs

    2005-09-01

    Piroxicam was found to be a highly selective carrier for uphill transport of Cu2+ ions through a chloroform liquid membrane. The transport occurs via a counterflow of protons from the receiving phase to the source phase. The effects of several parameters on the transport of Cu2+ ions, such as the carrier concentration, pH of the source phase, composition of the receiving phase, and duration are described. A high transport efficiency (98+/-2%) was provided by the carrier for Cu2+ ions in a receiving phase of 0.01 mol l(-1) sulfuric acid after 4 h. Different metal ion transport experiments showed that Cu2+ ions were selectively transported over other ions, such as Co2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, UO2(2+) and ZrO2(2+) . In the presence of fluoride ions (used as a suitable masking agent in the source phase), the interfering effects of UO2(2+) and ZrO2(2+) ions were eliminated. The applicability of the method was tested on a real sample, and the results obtained show that it is potentially useful for solvent extraction of copper.

  2. Experimental verification of gain drop due to general ion recombination for a carbon-ion pencil beam

    SciTech Connect

    Tansho, Ryohei Furukawa, Takuji; Hara, Yousuke; Mizushima, Kota; Saotome, Naoya; Saraya, Yuichi; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate dose measurement in radiotherapy is critically dependent on correction for gain drop, which is the difference of the measured current from the ideal saturation current due to general ion recombination. Although a correction method based on the Boag theory has been employed, the theory assumes that ionized charge density in an ionization chamber (IC) is spatially uniform throughout the irradiation volume. For particle pencil beam scanning, however, the charge density is not uniform, because the fluence distribution of a pencil beam is not uniform. The aim of this study was to verify the effect of the nonuniformity of ionized charge density on the gain drop due to general ion recombination. Methods: The authors measured the saturation curve, namely, the applied voltage versus measured current, using a large plane-parallel IC and 24-channel parallel-plate IC with concentric electrodes. To verify the effect of the nonuniform ionized charge density on the measured saturation curve, the authors calculated the saturation curve using a method which takes into account the nonuniform ionized charge density and compared it with the measured saturation curves. Results: Measurement values of the different saturation curves in the different channels of the concentric electrodes differed and were consistent with the calculated values. The saturation curves measured by the large plane-parallel IC were also consistent with the calculation results, including the estimation error of beam size and of setup misalignment. Although the impact of the nonuniform ionized charge density on the gain drop was clinically negligible with the conventional beam intensity, it was expected that the impact would increase with higher ionized charge density. Conclusions: For pencil beam scanning, the assumption of the conventional Boag theory is not valid. Furthermore, the nonuniform ionized charge density affects the prediction accuracy of gain drop when the ionized charge density is

  3. Experimental verification of gain drop due to general ion recombination for a carbon-ion pencil beam.

    PubMed

    Tansho, Ryohei; Furukawa, Takuji; Hara, Yousuke; Mizushima, Kota; Saotome, Naoya; Saraya, Yuichi; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    2016-02-01

    Accurate dose measurement in radiotherapy is critically dependent on correction for gain drop, which is the difference of the measured current from the ideal saturation current due to general ion recombination. Although a correction method based on the Boag theory has been employed, the theory assumes that ionized charge density in an ionization chamber (IC) is spatially uniform throughout the irradiation volume. For particle pencil beam scanning, however, the charge density is not uniform, because the fluence distribution of a pencil beam is not uniform. The aim of this study was to verify the effect of the nonuniformity of ionized charge density on the gain drop due to general ion recombination. The authors measured the saturation curve, namely, the applied voltage versus measured current, using a large plane-parallel IC and 24-channel parallel-plate IC with concentric electrodes. To verify the effect of the nonuniform ionized charge density on the measured saturation curve, the authors calculated the saturation curve using a method which takes into account the nonuniform ionized charge density and compared it with the measured saturation curves. Measurement values of the different saturation curves in the different channels of the concentric electrodes differed and were consistent with the calculated values. The saturation curves measured by the large plane-parallel IC were also consistent with the calculation results, including the estimation error of beam size and of setup misalignment. Although the impact of the nonuniform ionized charge density on the gain drop was clinically negligible with the conventional beam intensity, it was expected that the impact would increase with higher ionized charge density. For pencil beam scanning, the assumption of the conventional Boag theory is not valid. Furthermore, the nonuniform ionized charge density affects the prediction accuracy of gain drop when the ionized charge density is increased by a higher dose rate and

  4. Polystyrene nanoparticles activate ion transport in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, J; Gong, X; Nahirney, D; Duszyk, M; Radomski, MW

    2011-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, nanotechnology has provided researchers with new nanometer materials, such as nanoparticles, which have the potential to provide new therapies for many lung diseases. In this study, we investigated the acute effects of polystyrene nanoparticles on epithelial ion channel function. Methods Human submucosal Calu-3 cells that express cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and baby hamster kidney cells engineered to express the wild-type CFTR gene were used to investigate the actions of negatively charged 20 nm polystyrene nanoparticles on short-circuit current in Calu-3 cells by Ussing chamber and single CFTR Clchannels alone and in the presence of known CFTR channel activators by using baby hamster kidney cell patches. Results Polystyrene nanoparticles caused sustained, repeatable, and concentration-dependent increases in short-circuit current. In turn, these short-circuit current responses were found to be biphasic in nature, ie, an initial peak followed by a plateau. EC50 values for peak and plateau short-circuit current responses were 1457 and 315.5 ng/mL, respectively. Short-circuit current was inhibited by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate, a CFTR Cl− channel blocker. Polystyrene nanoparticles activated basolateral K+ channels and affected Cl− and HCO3 − secretion. The mechanism of short-circuit current activation by polystyrene nanoparticles was found to be largely dependent on calcium-dependent and cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphorylation of CFTR Cl− channels. Recordings from isolated inside-out patches using baby hamster kidney cells confirmed the direct activation of CFTR Cl− channels by the nanoparticles. Conclusion This is the first study to identify the activation of ion channels in airway cells after exposure to polystyrene-based nanomaterials. Thus, polystyrene nanoparticles cannot be considered as a simple neutral vehicle for drug delivery for the treatment of lung diseases, due to the fact

  5. Effects of long-acting beta adrenergic agonists on vocal fold ion transport.

    PubMed

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie

    2009-03-01

    Inhaled medications prescribed for the hypersensitive airway typically combine corticosteroids and long-acting beta2 adrenergic agonists (LABAs). The phonatory side effects of these combination treatments are widely recognized. However, there is limited understanding of the physiological changes induced by these medications that underlie the phonatory side effects. The objective of this study was to investigate the distinct effects of corticosteroids and LABAs on vocal fold mucosal physiology. Understanding the physiological changes to the vocal folds after corticosteroid and LABA treatments is necessary to prevent the prevalent vocal decrement associated with these medications. Experimental in vitro design with treatment and control groups. Native porcine vocal fold mucosae (N = 38) were exposed to corticosteroid or LABA treatments. Ion transport was measured continuously at baseline and after treatment. To quantify the nature of ion transport, vocal folds were also treated with chloride and sodium channel inhibitors. Corticosteroid treatment did not alter ion transport. Conversely, exposure to LABAs significantly increased ion transport. This increase in ion transport was transient, observed immediately after treatment in all tissue and associated with increased chloride secretion. The distinct effects of corticosteroids and LABAs on vocal fold physiology have not been examined to date. This study demonstrates that short-term treatment with LABAs, but not corticosteroids, significantly increases ion transport. These findings suggest that one underlying physiological mechanism for phonatory changes associated with inhaled treatments may be related to acute alterations in vocal fold ion transport and surface hydration.

  6. One dimensional heavy ion beam transport: Energy independent model. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Hamidullah

    1990-01-01

    Attempts are made to model the transport problem for heavy ion beams in various targets, employing the current level of understanding of the physics of high-charge and energy (HZE) particle interaction with matter are made. An energy independent transport model, with the most simplified assumptions and proper parameters is presented. The first and essential assumption in this case (energy independent transport) is the high energy characterization of the incident beam. The energy independent equation is solved and application is made to high energy neon (NE-20) and iron (FE-56) beams in water. The numerical solutions is given and compared to a numerical solution to determine the accuracy of the model. The lower limit energy for neon and iron to be high energy beams is calculated due to Barkas and Burger theory by LBLFRG computer program. The calculated values in the density range of interest (50 g/sq cm) of water are: 833.43 MeV/nuc for neon and 1597.68 MeV/nuc for iron. The analytical solutions of the energy independent transport equation gives the flux of different collision terms. The fluxes of individual collision terms are given and the total fluxes are shown in graphs relative to different thicknesses of water. The values for fluxes are calculated by the ANASTP computer code.

  7. One dimensional heavy ion beam transport: Energy independent model. M. S. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Farhat, H.

    1990-04-01

    Attempts are made to model the transport problem for heavy ion beams in various targets, employing the current level of understanding of the physics of high-charge and energy (HZE) particle interaction with matter are made. An energy independent transport model, with the most simplified assumptions and proper parameters is presented. The first and essential assumption in this case (energy independent transport) is the high energy characterization of the incident beam. The energy independent equation is solved and application is made to high energy neon (NE-20) and iron (FE-56) beams in water. The numerical solutions is given and compared to a numerical solution to determine the accuracy of the model. The lower limit energy for neon and iron to be high energy beams is calculated due to Barkas and Burger theory by LBLFRG computer program. The calculated values in the density range of interest (50 g/sq cm) of water are: 833.43 MeV/nuc for neon and 1597.68 MeV/nuc for iron. The analytical solutions of the energy independent transport equation gives the flux of different collision terms. The fluxes of individual collision terms are given and the total fluxes are shown in graphs relative to different thicknesses of water. The values for fluxes are calculated by the ANASTP computer code.

  8. Change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Saiyouri, N.; Hicher, P. Y.

    2010-06-01

    The compressibility of engineered barrier clays is, to a large extent, controlled by microstructure change due to the presence of chemical ions in clay-water system. This paper aims to investigate the change of microstructure of clays due to the presence of heavy metal ions in pore water. We use two pure clays (kaolinite and bentonite) in the study. One-dimensional consolidation tests were performed on reconstituted samples, which are prepared with distilled water and three types of heavy metal solutions (Pb(NO3)2, Cu(NO3)2, Zn(NO3)2,). In order to better understand the impact of chemical pore fluid on microstructure of the two clays, following the consolidation test, scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations and mercury intrusion pore size distribution measurements (MIP) were conducted. Due to the measurement range of MIP, which is only allowed to measure the minimal pore size 20 Å, BET method by gas sorption, whose measurement pore size range is from 3.5 Å to 500 Å, is used to measure the micropore size distribution. By this method, specific surface area of the soils can be also determined. It can be employed to demonstrate the difference of creep performance between the soils. Furthermore, a series of batch equilibrium tests were conducted to better understand the physical-chemical interactions between the particles of soils and the heavy metal ions. With the further consideration of the interparticle electrical attractive and repulsive force, an attempt has been made to predict the creep behaviour by using the modified Gouy-Chapman double layer theory. The results of calculation were compared with that of tests. The comparison shows that the prediction of compressibility of the clays according to the modified double diffuse layer theory can be reasonably agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Propionate alters ion transport by rabbit distal colon

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, P.J.; Weiser, M.M.; Duffey, M.E.

    1986-03-01

    The primary anions of the colon are short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) produced by intestinal microorganisms from endogenous secretions and dietary fiber. The effects of the SCFA propionate on ion transport by the epithelium of rabbit distal colon were studied on tissues stripped of underlying musculature and mounted in Ussing chambers. When tissues were bathed with NaCl Ringer's solutions at 37/sup 0/C (5% CO/sub 2/-21mM HCO/sub 3/, pH 7.4) replacement of 33mM Cl/sup -/ in both tissue baths by propionate reduced short-circuit current (Isc) from 86 to 35 ..mu..A/cm/sup 2/ and increased transepithelial conductance (G/sub t/) from 3.6 to 5.6mS/cm/sup 2/. Unidirectional /sup 14/C-propionate flux measurements revealed that this ion was secreted at a rate of 0.5..mu..Eq/cm/sup 2/hr. Intracellular measurements with potential and pH sensitive microelectrodes showed that propionate reduced intracellular pH (PH/sub i/) from 6.84 to 6.68 (P < 0.02), depolarized the apical membrane potential (phi/sub a/) by 4mV (P < 0.02) and decreased the membrane fractional resistance (f/sub R/) from .78 to .71 (P < 0.001). Addition of 0.1mM amiloride to the mucosal bath reversed Isc to -18..mu..A/cm/sup 2/, decreased G/sub t/ to 5.3mS/cm/sup 2/, hyperpolarized phi/sub a/ by 5mV (P < 0.05) and increased f/sub R/ to 0.85 (P < 0.001). Amiloride had no effect on pH/sub i/. These results show that propionate can be secreted by rabbit distal colon and that exposure to this SCFA causes cell acidification and electrophysiological changes consistent with H/sup +/ secretion.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide scavenger, catalase, alleviates ion transport dysfunction in murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Kim E; McCole, Declan F

    2016-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) contribute to epithelial damage and ion transport dysfunction (key events in inflammatory diarrhoea) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The aim of this study was to identify if H2 O2 mediates suppression of colonic ion transport function in the murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis model by using the H2 O2 degrading enzyme, catalase. Colitis was induced by administering DSS (4%) in drinking water for 5 days followed by 3 days on normal H2 O. Mice were administered either pegylated catalase or saline at day -1, 0 and +1 of DSS treatment. Ion transport responses to the Ca(2+) -dependent agonist, carbachol (CCh), or the cAMP-dependent agonist, forskolin, were measured across distal colonic mucosa mounted in Ussing chambers. Parameters of DSS-induced inflammation (loss in body weight, decreased colon length, altered stool consistency), were only partially alleviated by catalase while histology was only minimally improved. However, catalase significantly reversed the DSS-induced reduction in baseline ion transport as well as colonic Isc responses to CCh. However, ion transport responses to forskolin were not significantly restored. Catalase also reduced activation of ERK MAP kinase in the setting of colitis, and increased expression of the Na(+) -K(+) -2Cl(-) cotransporter, NKCC1, consistent with restoration of ion transport function. Ex vivo treatment of inflamed colonic mucosae with catalase also partially restored ion transport function. Therefore, catalase partially prevents, and rescues, the loss of ion transport properties in DSS colitis even in the setting of unresolved tissue inflammation. These findings indicate a prominent role for ROS in ion transport dysfunction in colitis and may suggest novel strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diarrhoea. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Transport and extraction of radioactive ions stopped in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. X.; Dendooven, P.; Gloos, K.; Takahashi, N.; Arutyunov, K.; Pekola, J. P.; Äystö, J.

    2003-05-01

    A new approach to convert a high energy beam to a low energy one, which is essential for the next generation radioactive ion beam facilities, has been proposed and tested at Jyväskylä, Finland. An open 223Ra alpha-decay-recoil source has been used to produce radioactive ions in superfluid helium. The alpha spectra demonstrate that the recoiling 219Rn ions have been extracted out of liquid helium. This first observation of the extraction of heavy positive ions across the superfluid helium surface was possible thanks to the high sensitivity of radioactivity detection. An efficiency of 36% was obtained for the ion extraction out of liquid helium.

  12. Understanding Ion Transport in Polymerized Ionic Liquids using Dielectric Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeok Choi, U.; Chen, Hong; Liu, Wenjuan; Elabd, Yossef A.; Colby, Ralph H.

    2009-03-01

    In order to deduce the mechanism of ion conduction in ion-containing polymers, not only the conductivity needs to be measured but also the number density and mobility of conducting ions must be determined using broadband dielectric spectroscopy, covering broad frequency and temperature ranges. To obtain a transference number of unity, one ionic charge is covalently bonded to the polymer so that only the counterions can contribute to ion conduction. In this study, imidazolium-containing monomer was synthesized and polymerized to make a cationic homopolymer with either tetrafluoroborate or bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anionic counterions. These ions can associate into pairs and larger aggregates. The degree of ion pairing can be estimated from the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant and knowledge of the dipole moment of the ion pair, using the 1936 Onsager equation. Using the 1953 Macdonald model makes it possible to determine concentration and mobility of mobile counterions from analysis of electrode polarization in dielectric spectroscopy.

  13. A coral polyp model of photosynthesis, respiration and calcification incorporating a transcellular ion transport mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Nadaoka, K.; Watanabe, A.

    2013-09-01

    A numerical simulation model of coral polyp photosynthesis, respiration and calcification was developed. The model is constructed with three components (ambient seawater, coelenteron and calcifying fluid), and incorporates photosynthesis, respiration and calcification processes with transcellular ion transport by Ca-ATPase activity and passive transmembrane CO2 transport and diffusion. The model calculates dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity in the ambient seawater, coelenteron and calcifying fluid, dissolved oxygen (DO) in the seawater and coelenteron and stored organic carbon (CH2O). To reconstruct the drastic variation between light and dark respiration, respiration rate dependency on DO in the coelenteron is incorporated. The calcification rate depends on the aragonite saturation state in the calcifying fluid (Ω a cal). Our simulation result was a good approximation of "light-enhanced calcification." In our model, the mechanism is expressed as follows: (1) DO in the coelenteron is increased by photosynthesis, (2) respiration is stimulated by increased DO in the light (or respiration is limited by DO depletion in the dark), then (3) calcification increases due to Ca-ATPase, which is driven by the energy generated by respiration. The model simulation results were effective in reproducing the basic responses of the internal CO2 system and DO. The daily calcification rate, the gross photosynthetic rate and the respiration rate under a high-flow condition increased compared to those under the zero-flow condition, but the net photosynthetic rate decreased. The calculated calcification rate responses to variations in the ambient aragonite saturation state (Ω a amb) were nonlinear, and the responses agreed with experimental results of previous studies. Our model predicted that in response to ocean acidification (1) coral calcification will decrease, but will remain at a higher value until Ω a amb decreases to 1, by maintaining a higher Ω a cal due to

  14. Combined structural and compositional evolution of planetary rings due to micrometeoroid impacts and ballistic transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Paul R.; Durisen, Richard H.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Morgan, Demitri A.

    2015-05-01

    We introduce improved numerical techniques for simulating the structural and compositional evolution of planetary rings due to micrometeoroid bombardment and subsequent ballistic transport of impact ejecta. Our current, robust code is capable of modeling structural changes and pollution transport simultaneously over long times on both local and global scales. In this paper, we describe the methodology based on the original structural code of Durisen et al. (Durisen, R.H. et al. [1989]. Icarus 80, 136-166) and on the pollution transport code of Cuzzi and Estrada (Cuzzi, J.N., Estrada, P.R. [1998]. Icarus 132, 1-35). We provide demonstrative simulations to compare with, and extend upon previous work, as well as examples of how ballistic transport can maintain the observed structure in Saturn's rings using available Cassini occultation optical depth data. In particular, we explicitly verify the claim that the inner B (and presumably A) ring edge can be maintained over long periods of time due to an ejecta distribution that is heavily biased in the prograde direction through a balance between the sharpening effects of ballistic transport and the broadening effects of viscosity. We also see that a "ramp"-like feature forms over time just inside that edge. However, it does not remain linear for the duration of the runs presented here unless a less steep ejecta velocity distribution is adopted. We also model the C ring plateaus and find that their outer edges can be maintained at their observed sharpness for long periods due to ballistic transport. We hypothesize that the addition of a significant component of a retrograde-biased ejecta distribution may help explain the linearity of the ramp and could provide a mechanism for maintaining the sharpness of C ring plateau inner edges. This component would arise for the subset of micrometeoroid impacts which are destructive rather than merely cratering. Such a distribution will be introduced in future work.

  15. Combined Structural and Compositional Evolution of Planetary Rings Due to Micrometeoroid Impacts and Ballistic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estrada, Paul R.; Durisen, Richard H.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Morgan, Demitri A.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce improved numerical techniques for simulating the structural and compositional evolution of planetary rings due to micrometeoroid bombardment and subsequent ballistic transport of impact ejecta. Our current, robust code is capable of modeling structural changes and pollution transport simultaneously over long times on both local and global scales. In this paper, we describe the methodology based on the original structural code of Durisen et al. (1989, Icarus 80, 136-166) and on the pollution transport code of Cuzzi and Estrada (1998, Icarus 132, 1-35). We provide demonstrative simulations to compare with, and extend upon previous work, as well as examples of how ballistic transport can maintain the observed structure in Saturn's rings using available Cassini occultation optical depth data. In particular, we explicitly verify the claim that the inner B (and presumably A) ring edge can be maintained over long periods of time due to an ejecta distribution that is heavily biased in the prograde direction through a balance between the sharpening effects of ballistic transport and the broadening effects of viscosity. We also see that a "ramp"-like feature forms over time just inside that edge. However, it does not remain linear for the duration of the runs presented here unless a less steep ejecta velocity distribution is adopted. We also model the C ring plateaus and find that their outer edges can be maintained at their observed sharpness for long periods due to ballistic transport. We hypothesize that the addition of a significant component of a retrograde-biased ejecta distribution may help explain the linearity of the ramp and is probably essential for maintaining the sharpness of C ring plateau inner edges. This component would arise for the subset of micrometeoroid impacts which are destructive rather than merely cratering. Such a distribution will be introduced in future work.

  16. Critical Gradient Threshold for Alfvén Eigenmode Induced Fast-Ion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidbrink, W. W.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have identified how multiple simultaneous Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) lead to overlapping wave-particle resonances and stochastic fast ion transport in fusion grade plasmas. The behavior results in a sudden increase in fast ion transport at a threshold that is well above the linear stability threshold for Alfvén instability. This causes fast ion transport to become stiff, leading to virtually unchanged equilibrium fast-ion density profiles as beam drive increases further. A novel beam modulation technique in conjunction with an array of fast-ion diagnostics probes the critical gradient by measuring the fast-ion flux in different phase-space volumes. Above a threshold, which occurs when more than four AEs are simultaneously destabilized, the modulated flux suddenly increases. Fast-ion D α (FIDA) spectroscopy indicates the peak of the modulated flux is localized to mid-core radii, corresponding to the radial location of AEs. As distributions and instability behavior are manipulated further through variations in electron cyclotron heating and beam deposition, measured thresholds track the resulting shifts in resonances. Well above threshold, the fast-ion losses often become intermittent and exhibit a bursty behavior. Theoretical analysis confirms that fast-ion orbits become stochastic in the measured modes. This critical gradient transport, wherein the fast-ion pressure gradient destabilizes AEs and the fast ions respond by diffusing in phase space to flatten the pressure profile, suggests that reduced models for fast ion transport in ITER can effectively describe the fusion alpha and beam ion profiles. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  17. A Green's function method for high charge and energy ion transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, S. Y.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    A heavy-ion transport code using Green's function methods is developed. The low-order perturbation terms exhibiting the greatest energy variation are used as dominant energy-dependent terms, and the higher order collision terms are evaluated using nonperturbative methods. The recently revised NUCFRG database is used to evaluate the solution for comparison with experimental data for 625A MeV 20Ne and 517A MeV 40Ar ion beams. Improved agreements with the attenuation characteristics for neon ions are found, and reasonable agreement is obtained for the transport of argon ions in water.

  18. Using fluorometry and ion-sensitive microelectrodes to study the functional expression of heterologously-expressed ion channels and transporters in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Musa-Aziz, Raif; Boron, Walter F.; Parker, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    The Xenopus laevis oocyte is a model system for the electrophysiological study of exogenous ion transporters. Three main reasons make the oocyte suitable for this purpose: (a) it has a large cell size (~1 mm diameter), (b) it has an established capacity to produce—from microinjected mRNAs or cRNAs—exogenous ion transporters with close-to-physiological post-translational modifications and actions, and (c) its membranes contain endogenous ion-transport activities which are usually smaller in magnitude than the activities of exogenously-expressed ion transporters. The expression of ion-transporters as green-fluorescent-protein fusions allows the fluorometric assay of transporter yield in living oocytes. Monitoring of transporter-mediated movement of ions such as Cl−, H+ (and hence base equivalents like OH−1 and HCO3−), K+, and Na+ is achieved by positioning the tips of ion-sensitive microelectrodes inside the oocyte and/or at the surface of the oocyte plasma membrane. The use of ion-sensitive electrodes is critical for studying net ion-movements mediated by electroneutral transporters. The combined use of fluorometry and electrophysiology expedites transporter study by allowing measurement of transporter yield prior to electrophysiological study and correlation of relative transporter yield with transport rates. PMID:20051266

  19. Particle simulations of ion generation and transport in microelectromechanical systems and microthrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyaswamy, Venkattraman

    Field emission and evaporation are processes of electron and ion generation due to intense electric fields. This work presents a particle-based computational approach using the particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions (PIC/MCC) and the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to study ion generation and transport in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and field emission electric propulsion (FEEP) microthrusters. Electrostatically actuated MEMS operate in intense electric fields > 107 V/m thereby resulting in electron emission from the cathode that has important implications on reliability and performance of these devices. The PIC/MCC method is used to develop compact models to provide closure to a mathematical model for the modified Paschen law which bridges breakdown in macroscale gaps with field emission driven breakdown at nano/microscales. The models have the capability to account for the influence of operating parameters including pressure, composition and cathode properties making it suitable for the analysis and design of electrostatic MEMS. This work also deals with the modeling of field emission ion thrusters used for in-space propulsion. Particle simulations are used to study performance parameters such as thrust and plume characteristics by comparison with experiments. While PIC simulations predict thrust values in excellent agreement with measurements, comparisons with measurements of current distribution in the plume indicate that ion-neutral collisions become increasingly important as the current increases. Good agreement for current distribution is obtained if the elastic scattering of ions by background neutrals in the vacuum chamber is included thereby providing a numerical framework for the design and optimization of these thrusters.

  20. Bombardment induced ion transport. Part I: Numerical investigation of bombardment induced ion transport through glasses and membranes on the basis of the Nernst-Planck-Poisson equations.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, M; Weitzel, K-M

    2011-12-07

    The bombardment of condensed matter by low energy ion beams induces ion transport through the material. A general theory for bombardment induced ion transport (BIIT) based on numerical solutions of the well known Nernst-Planck-Poisson equations is presented. The theory is applicable to polymer membranes as well as ion-conducting glasses with the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions. The fundamental properties of the theory, i.e. the capability to describe the potential, the field and the concentration/charge density profile within the two classes of materials mentioned above are demonstrated. In particular, the theory is capable of describing experimental observables which will be further elaborated in part II of this miniseries.