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Sample records for ion-atom collisions results

  1. Ionization Phenomena in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveney, Edward Francis

    Two many-electron ion-atom collision systems are used to investigate atomic and molecular structure and collisional interactions. Electrons emitted from MeV/u C^{3+} projectile target -atom collisions were measured with a high-resolution position -sensitive electron spectrometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The electrons are predominantly ionized by direct projectile -target interactions or autoionizing (AI) from doubly excited AI levels of the ion which were excited in the collision. The energy dependence of directly scattered target electrons, binary-encounter electrons (BEE), is investigated and compared with theory. AI levels of the projectile 1s to nl single electron excited series, (1s2snl) n = 2,3,4,....infty, including the series limit are identified uniquely using energy level calculations. Original Auger yield calculations using a code by Cowan were used to discover a 1/{n^3} scaling in intensities of Auger peaks in the aforementioned series. This is explained using scattering theory. A nonstatistical population of the terms in the (1s2s2l) configuration was identified and investigated as a function of the beam energy and for four different target atoms. Two electron excited configurations are identified and investigated. The angular distribution of a correlated transfer and excitation AI state is measured and compared to theory. The final scattered charge state distributions of Kr^ {n+}, n = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, projectiles are measured following collisions with Kr targets in the Van de Graaff Laboratory here at The University of Connecticut. Average scattered charge states as high as 12 are observed. It appears that these electrons are ionized during the lifetime of the quasimolecular state but a complete picture of the ionization mechanism(s) is not known. Calculations using a statistical model of ionization, modified in several ways, are compared with the experimental results to see if it is possible to isolate whether or not the electrons originate

  2. Entropy lowering in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.; Bredy, R.; Camp, H.A.; DePaola, B.D.; Lee, T.G.; Awata, T.

    2005-06-15

    In ion-atom collisions, the charge transfer cross section is typically a strong function of the energy defect or Q value, typically with smaller energy defects giving rise to higher capture probabilities. In some theoretical treatments, for example those based on the Demkov model, the cross section is a strong function of the magnitude of the Q value, but is independent of its sign. In order to test this predicted sign independence, one must compare capture cross sections from energetically symmetric collision channels. In this work, relative capture cross sections, differential in scattering angle, are measured and compared for the energetically symmetric channels: Rb{sup +}+Rb(5s){yields}Rb(5p)+Rb{sup +} and Rb{sup +}+Rb(5p){yields}Rb(5s)+Rb{sup +}. It is found that not only are the two cross sections not equal, but that in this case the endoergic channel was 3 times more likely. That is, the entropy reducing channel was preferred. An intuitive model, based on molecular potential curves, is suggested. The endoergic propensity is found to be consistent with this model.

  3. Isotope effect in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Barragan, P.; Errea, L. F.; Mendez, L.; Rabadan, I.

    2010-09-15

    We explain the origin of the unusual large isotopic dependence found in charge-transfer cross sections for H(D,T){sup +}+Be collisions. We show that this large effect appears in a semiclassical treatment as a consequence of the mass dependence of the charge-transfer transition probabilities, which is due to the variation of the radial velocity in the region where the nonadiabatic transitions take place. The possibility of finding such a large isotope effect in other collision systems is discussed.

  4. Theoretical Aspects of Ionization in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianyi

    Mechanisms for ionization resulting from collisions between an ion (or atom) and an atom are discussed and analyzed for slow and fast collisions and for two different collision systems. The first collision system consists of an exactly solvable three-body model in which an electron moves in the field of two centers of zero range potentials travelling at constant speeds. The exact electron emission spectrum shows two important features: (a) Evidence is found for the existence of the so-called "v/2" (or ridge) electrons at intermediate collision speed. These electrons are emitted with about half the speed of the incident ion. It is shown that they are due to promotion to the continuum of the molecular orbitals. v/2 electron emission is strongly influenced by the relative interaction strengths of the electron with the two centers. (b) For fast collisions multiple scattering peaks can be seen to be a dominant feature in the ionization spectrum. Three-body effects are found to be responsible for generation of the peaks. In the second collision system the ionization spectrum resulting from electron loss by the incident ions (atoms) are studied with emphasis on large ejection angles. The ionization spectrum is shown to be composed of two parts: one is caused by the interaction of projectile electron with the mean field of the target core and the other by explicit electron-electron interaction. It is shown that for mean field ionization proper treatment of the off-energy -shell scattering matrix element is required to describe experimental data. The correlated ionization is treated via a double scattering represented by a second Born approximation. It is shown that this two-step mechanism is essential in describing the electron angular and energy distribution, especially on the low energy side of the spectrum for electron loss from atomic hydrogen. For other incident ions (like He ^+) it is found that in addition to double scattering, three-body effects are also very

  5. Manipulating ion-atom collisions with coherent electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Tom

    2002-08-26

    Laser-assisted ion-atom collisions are considered in terms of a nonperturbative quantum mechanical description of the electronic motion. It is shown for the system He(2+) - H at 2 keV/amu that the collision dynamics depend strongly on the initial phase of the laser field and the applied wavelength. Whereas electronic transitions are caused by the concurrent action of the field and the projectile ion at relatively low frequencies, they can be separated into modified collisional capture and field ionization events in the region above the one-photon ionization threshold.

  6. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  7. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  8. Progress in numerical calculations of ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Reading, J.F.; Ford, A.L.; Becker, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    An ion-atom collision produces a time dependent perturbation of a many fermion system. In this collision, excitation, ionization and charge transfer can occur. The driving mechanism for these processes may be thought of as the potentials seen by individual electrons at any given separation of the projectile and target nuclei. If we think of these potentials as belonging to the target (a nucleus and electrons) and the projectile (another nucleus and electrons) then as detected by an electron the potentials change because: (a) the target and projectile change position, and (b) electrons on the target and projectile change states. Most work in the past fifty years has concentrated on solving the independent particle model (IPM). Cracks are beginning to appear in this model which only allows for type (a) changes in the potential. But in a short review we shall have quite enough to do in understanding the progress made in the last decade on the IPM. This paper is divided into three parts. The first deals with how to reduce the IPM to the single electron model (SEM). The second is on a new method where charge transfer is important. The third confronts some standard models with modern calculations.

  9. Loss of wave-packet coherence in ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkadi, L.; Fabre, I.; Navarrete, F.; Barrachina, R. O.

    2016-03-01

    The projectile beam coherence effects occurring in ion-atom collisions are analyzed on the basis of the recent theory of Karlovets et al. [Phys. Rev. A 92, 052703 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.052703] developed for the elastic scattering of wave packets of particles off a potential field. This theory is generalized to estimate the loss of coherence for inelastically scattered projectiles in ionizing collisions. The results obtained by the suggested model are compared with experimental data for the ionization of hydrogen atoms and molecules by 75-keV proton impact. Significantly improved agreement is observed between the theory and experiment.

  10. Screening-Antiscreening Effect in Ion-Atom Collisions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulskotter, Hans-Peter G.

    1990-01-01

    In a collision between an atomic projectile carrying one or more electrons and a target atom, one of the events that may occur is the ionization of a projectile electron. Projectile ionization, usually called electron loss, is normally attributed to the Coulomb interaction between the target nucleus and projectile electron. The effect of the target electrons can be accounted for partially by introducing a screened Coulomb interaction between the target and the projectile electron. However, the target electrons can not only act coherently as screening agents, but may also act incoherently as ionizing (antiscreening) agents. We have measured the cross sections for projectile K-shell ionization for 0.75 - 3.5 MeV/Nucleon Li^{2+ }, C^{5+}, and O^{7+} projectiles, for projectile electron loss of 100 and 380 MeV/Nucleon Au^{52+} projectiles in collisions with H_2, He, and N _2, and for 380 MeV/N Au^ {75+} projectiles in collisions with H _2 and N_2 targets. We unambiguously demonstrate that for energies where the target electrons have sufficient kinetic energy in the projectile frame to ionize the projectile electron, the electron-electron interaction can lead to a significant increase in the total ionization cross section. The largest relative increase we have been able to observe is 76%. The experimental results generally agree with plane-wave Born approximation calculations by Bates and Griffing and modified by Anholt which take into account the interaction between projectile and target electrons. We also describe the properties of a new target gas cell which has been designed and built for the use at the relativistic heavy-ion accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  11. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  12. Effect of electron-nuclei interaction on internuclear motions in slow ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2015-10-01

    The electron-nuclei interaction affects the internuclear motion in slow ion-atom collisions, which in turn affects theoretical results for the cross sections of various collision processes. The results are especially sensitive to the details of the internuclear dynamics in the presence of a strong isotope effect on the cross sections, as is the case, e.g., for the charge transfer in low-energy collisions of He2+ with H, D, and T. By considering this system as an example, we show that internuclear trajectories defined by the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential in the entrance collision channel, which effectively accounts for the electron-nuclei interaction, are in much better agreement with trajectories obtained in the ab initio electron-nuclear dynamics approach [R. Cabrera-Trujillo et al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 012715 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.012715] than the corresponding Coulomb trajectories. We also show that the use of the BO trajectory instead of the Coulomb trajectory in the calculations of the charge-transfer cross sections within the adiabatic approach improves the agreement of the results with ab initio calculations.

  13. Spin-Orbit Interactions and Quantum Spin Dynamics in Cold Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tscherbul, Timur V.; Brumer, Paul; Buchachenko, Alexei A.

    2016-09-01

    We present accurate ab initio and quantum scattering calculations on a prototypical hybrid ion-atom system Yb+ -Rb, recently suggested as a promising candidate for the experimental study of open quantum systems, quantum information processing, and quantum simulation. We identify the second-order spin-orbit (SO) interaction as the dominant source of hyperfine relaxation in cold Yb+ -Rb collisions. Our results are in good agreement with recent experimental observations [L. Ratschbacher et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 160402 (2013)] of hyperfine relaxation rates of trapped Yb+ immersed in an ultracold Rb gas. The calculated rates are 4 times smaller than is predicted by the Langevin capture theory and display a weak T-0.3 temperature dependence, indicating significant deviations from statistical behavior. Our analysis underscores the deleterious nature of the SO interaction and implies that light ion-atom combinations such as Yb+ -Li should be used to minimize hyperfine relaxation and decoherence of trapped ions in ultracold atomic gases.

  14. High charge state, ion-atom collision experiments using accel-decel

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, E.M.; Clark, M.W.; Tanis, J.A.; Graham, W.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies of /sub 16/S/sup 13 +/ + He collisions between 2.5 and 200 MeV, which were made using the accel-decel technique with the Brookhaven National Laboratory coupled MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerators, are discussed. Cross sections were measured for single electron-capture and -loss as well as K x rays correlated to electron-capture. Other planned ion-atom collision experiments requiring accel-decel are also presented. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Treatment of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, M; Colgan, J; Wong, T G; Madison, D H

    2008-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge scattering quantities. Here we show that such calculations are possible using modern high-performance computing. We demonstrate the utility of our method by examining elastic scattering of protons by hydrogen and helium atoms, problems familiar to undergraduate students of atomic scattering. Application to ionization of helium using partial-wave expansions of the projectile wavefunction, which has long been desirable in heavy-ion collision physics, is thus quite feasible.

  16. Single electron capture in fast ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milojević, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Single-electron capture cross sections in collisions between fast bare projectiles and heliumlike atomic systems are investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born (CB1-4B) approximation. The prior and post transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of twodimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. The dielectronic interaction V12 = 1/r12 = 1/|r1 - r2| explicitly appears in the complete perturbation potential Vf of the post transition probability amplitude T+if. An illustrative computation is performed involving state-selective and total single capture cross sections for the p - He (prior and post form) and He2+, Li3+Be4+B5+C6+ - He (prior form) collisions at intermediate and high impact energies. We have also studied differential cross sections in prior and post form for single electron transfer from helium by protons. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. Detailed comparisons with the measurements are carried out and the obtained theoretical cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data.

  17. Correlated electron processes in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McColm, D.W. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-02-01

    This final report covers the work carried out under the LLNL Contract P.O. Number B055762, Subcontractor Regents University of California at Davis. The research carried out under this contract investigated electron processes occurring in collisions between heavy ions and atoms. The doubly-differential secondary electron yield following the impact of 3.5 to 8 MeV/uU{sup q+}(q = 38,68) ion impact on thin carbon foil targets has been investigated experimentally. The absolute electron emission yields were determined for ejection angles varied between 22.5{degree} and 157{degree} and electron energies ranging from 10 eV to 8 keV. The electron spectra are compared to previous investigations and new experimental data using lighter ion impact at MeV projectile energies. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Near-threshold photoionization of hydrogenlike uranium studied in ion-atom collisions via the time-reversed process.

    PubMed

    Stöhlker, T; Ma, X; Ludziejewski, T; Beyer, H F; Bosch, F; Brinzanescu, O; Dunford, R W; Eichler, J; Hagmann, S; Ichihara, A; Kozhuharov, C; Krämer, A; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Stachura, Z; Swiat, P; Warczak, A

    2001-02-01

    Radiative electron capture, the time-reversed photoionization process occurring in ion-atom collisions, provides presently the only access to photoionization studies for very highly charged ions. By applying the deceleration mode of the ESR storage ring, we studied this process in low-energy collisions of bare uranium ions with low- Z target atoms. This technique allows us to extend the current information about photoionization to much lower energies than those accessible for neutral heavy elements in the direct reaction channel. The results prove that for high- Z systems, higher-order multipole contributions and magnetic corrections persist even at energies close to the threshold.

  19. Near-threshold photoionization of hydrogenlike uranium studied in ion-atom collisions via the time-reversed process.

    PubMed

    Stöhlker, T; Ma, X; Ludziejewski, T; Beyer, H F; Bosch, F; Brinzanescu, O; Dunford, R W; Eichler, J; Hagmann, S; Ichihara, A; Kozhuharov, C; Krämer, A; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Stachura, Z; Swiat, P; Warczak, A

    2001-02-01

    Radiative electron capture, the time-reversed photoionization process occurring in ion-atom collisions, provides presently the only access to photoionization studies for very highly charged ions. By applying the deceleration mode of the ESR storage ring, we studied this process in low-energy collisions of bare uranium ions with low- Z target atoms. This technique allows us to extend the current information about photoionization to much lower energies than those accessible for neutral heavy elements in the direct reaction channel. The results prove that for high- Z systems, higher-order multipole contributions and magnetic corrections persist even at energies close to the threshold. PMID:11177990

  20. Wave-packet continuum-discretization approach to ion-atom collisions: Nonrearrangement scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-08-01

    A general single-center close-coupling approach based on a continuum-discretization procedure is developed to calculate excitation and ionization processes in ion-atom collisions. The continuous spectrum of the target is discretized using stationary wave packets constructed from the Coulomb wave functions, the eigenstates of the target Hamiltonian. Such continuum discretization allows one to generate pseudostates with arbitrary energies and distribution. These features are ideal for detailed differential ionization studies. The approach starts from the semiclassical three-body Schrödinger equation for the scattering wave function and leads to a set of coupled differential equations for the transition probability amplitudes. To demonstrate its utility the method is applied to calculate collisions of antiprotons with atomic hydrogen. A comprehensive set of benchmark results from integrated to fully differential cross sections for antiproton-impact ionization of hydrogen in the energy range from 1 keV to 1 MeV is provided. Contrary to previous predictions, we find that at low incident energies the singly differential cross section has a maximum away from the zero emission energy. This feature could not be seen without a fine discretization of the low-energy part of the continuum.

  1. Comment on 'Entropy lowering in ion-atom collisions'

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, V. N.

    2006-01-15

    The recent experimental result by Nguyen et al. [Phys. Rev. A 71, 062714 (2005)] on the ratio of cross sections for charge exchange processes Rb{sup +}+Rb(5s){yields}Rb(5p)+Rb{sup +} and Rb{sup +}+Rb(5p){yields}Rb(5s)+Rb{sup +} is quantitatively derived from simple considerations within the general framework of the quasimolecular theory. Contrary to the expectations, applicability of the Demkov model for charge exchange with small energy defect is not shattered.

  2. Symmetric eikonal model for projectile-electron excitation and loss in relativistic ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Voitkiv, A. B.; Najjari, B.; Shevelko, V. P.

    2010-08-15

    At impact energies > or approx. 1 GeV/u the projectile-electron excitation and loss occurring in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms is already strongly influenced by the presence of atomic electrons. To treat these processes in collisions with heavy atoms we generalize the symmetric eikonal model, used earlier for considerations of electron transitions in ion-atom collisions within the scope of a three-body Coulomb problem. We show that at asymptotically high collision energies this model leads to an exact transition amplitude and is very well suited to describe the projectile-electron excitation and loss at energies above a few GeV/u. In particular, by considering a number of examples we demonstrate advantages of this model over the first Born approximation at impact energies of {approx}1-30 GeV/u, which are of special interest for atomic physics experiments at the future GSI facilities.

  3. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, February 16, 1990--February 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from February 16, 1990 through February 15, 1993. This work involves the experimental investigation of atomic interactions in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron-correlation effects. The processes studied are of interest both from fundamental and applied points of view. In the latter case, results are obtained which are relevant to the understanding of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, highly-excited (Rydberg) and continuum states of atoms and ions, atomic structure effects, the interaction of ions with surfaces, and the development of heavy-ion storage-rings. The results obtained have provided the basis for several M.A. thesis projects at Western Michigan and several Ph.D. dissertation projects are currently underway. Summaries of work completed and work in progress are given below in Section II. This research has resulted in 26 papers (in print and in press), 12 invited presentations at national and international meetings, and 28 contributed presentations as detailed in Section III.

  4. Transport properties derived from ion-atom collisions: 6Li-6Li+ and 6Li-7Li+ Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouledroua, Moncef; Bouchelaghem, Fouzia; LPR Team

    2014-10-01

    This investigation treats quantum-mechanically the ion- atom collisions and computes the transport coefficients, such as the coefficients of mobility and diffusion. For the case of lithium, the calculations start by determining the gerade and ungerade potential curves through which ionic lithium approaches ground lithium. Then, by considering the isotopic effects and nuclear spins, the elastic and charge-transfer cross sections are calculated for the case of 6Li+and7Li+ colliding with 6Li. Finally, the temperature-dependent diffusion and mobility coefficients are analyzed, and the results are contrasted with those obtained from literature. The main results of this work have been recently published in. This work has been realized within the frames of the CNEPRU Project D01120110036 of the Algerian Ministry of Higher Education.

  5. Excitation and Ionization-Excitation of Helium in Fast Ion-Atom Collisions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuelling, Stephan R. K.

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to investigate several aspects of many-body effects in fast ion-atom collisions using the target gas helium where the projectile velocities are above the Bohr velocity. The method of high resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy has been applied in order to measure absolute state selective cross sections of emitted light from excited HeI and HeII target states. We have performed a relative intensity calibration of our 1.5 m spectrometer by comparing 1MeV C^+ + Ne spectra with those examined from a wavelength-calibrated 2.2 m grazing incidence monochromator installed at the Dynamitron Tandem Laboratory at the University of Bochum, Germany. The absolute calibration of our instrument has been accomplished with a single measurement of the Ly_alpha transition of He^+ from 200 eV e-He collisions, where the absolute cross section is known. A comparison between the two-electron processes of ionization-excitation and the one-electron process of excitation of helium following e^-, H^+ and C^{6+ } impact is made for projectile Bohr velocities (v_0) ranging between 1.5 and 9.6. Therefore, the Lyman series of He^+(np) ^2P to (1s) ^2S for n = 2 to 5 and the Rydberg series of He (1snp) ^1P to (1s^2) ^1 S for n = 2 to 5 have been measured. We have been the first to report such extensive absolute state selective cross section measurements. The absolute EUV emission cross sections for ionization-excitation show a significant difference in magnitude for projectiles e^ -, H^+ and C^ {6+} when compared at equal velocities. These differences are possibly due to interference effects between different collision processes. These differences can also be considered as interference between first and second order Born expansions terms. The cross section for electron impact at projectile velocities between 1.5 and 8 v _0 exceeds that for protons by a factor of up to about 3. The H^+ and C ^{6+} cross sections scale approximately as Z_sp{p}{3}. Finally, cross

  6. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, March 16, 1991--March 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  7. Ion-neutral chemistry at ultralow energies: dynamics of reactive collisions between laser-cooled Ca+ ions and Rb atoms in an ion-atom hybrid trap†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Felix H. J.; Eberle, Pascal; Hegi, Gregor; Raoult, Maurice; Aymar, Mireille; Dulieu, Olivier; Willitsch, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Cold chemical reactions between laser-cooled Ca+ ions and Rb atoms were studied in an ion-atom hybrid trap. Reaction rate constants were determined in the range of collision energies ⟨E coll⟩/k B=20 mK-20 K. The lowest energies were achieved in experiments using single localised Ca+ ions. Product branching ratios were studied using resonant-excitation mass spectrometry. The dynamics of the reactive processes in this system (non-radiative and radiative charge transfer as well as radiative association leading to the formation of CaRb+ molecular ions) have been analysed using high-level quantum-chemical calculations of the potential energy curves of CaRb+ and quantum-scattering calculations for the radiative channels. For the present low-energy scattering experiments, it is shown that the energy dependence of the reaction rate constants is governed by long-range interactions in line with the classical Langevin model, but their magnitude is determined by short-range non-adiabatic and radiative couplings which only weakly depend on the asymptotic energy. The quantum character of the collisions is predicted to manifest itself in the occurrence of narrow shape resonances at well-defined collision energies. The present results highlight both universal and system-specific phenomena in cold ion-neutral reactive collisions.

  8. Multiple ionization and capture in relativistic heavy-ion atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerhof, W.E.; Anholt, R.; Xu, Xiang-Yuan; Gould, H.; Feinberg, B.; McDonald, R.J.; Wegner, H.E.; Thieberger, P.

    1987-02-01

    We show that in relativistic heavy-ion collisions the independent electron model can be used to predict cross sections for multiple inner-shell ionization and capture in a single collision. Charge distributions of 82- to 200-MeV/amu Xe and 105- to 955-MeV/amu U ion beams emerging from thin solid targets were used to obtain single- and multiple-electron stripping and capture cross sections. The probabilities of stripping electrons from the K, L, or M shells were calculated using the semiclassical approximation and Dirac hydrogenic wavefunctions. For capture, a simplified model for electron capture was uded. The data generally agree with theory.

  9. Production of autoionizing Rydberg states by transfer excitation in high energy ion atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Stolterfoht, N.; Miller, P.D.; Krause, H.F.; Yamazaki, Y.; Dittner, P.F.; Pepmiller, P.L.; Sellin, I.A.; Datz, S.

    1986-01-01

    The method of zero-degree Auger spectroscopy was used to study the production of autoionizing Rydberg states in collisions of carbon and oxygen projectiles incident at several MeV on He gas and carbon foils. The autoionization electrons were measured with high resolution so that the quantum defect corresponding to the angular momenta of the Rydberg electrons could be observed. The main purpose of the present experiment is to gain information about the n and l distribution of the Rydberg electron captured in the collision. The well-known n/sup -3/ law is confirmed. For the He gas target it is found that the angular momenta p and d are predominantly produced. For the foil target the higher angular momenta are clearly enhanced. 15 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Near resonance charge exchange in ion-atom collisions of lithium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Bodo, Enrico; Dalgarno, Alexander

    2009-12-31

    Collisions of ions and atoms of (6)Li and (7)Li are explored theoretically over a wide range of energy from 10(-14) to 1 eV. Accurate ab initio calculations are carried out of the Born-Oppenheimer potentials and the nonadiabatic couplings that are responsible for the near resonance charge exchange. Scattering studies show that the calculated charge exchange cross section follows Wigner's law for inelastic processes for energies below 10(-10) eV and that the zero temperature rate constant for it is 2.1 x 10(-9) cm(3) s(-1). At collision energies much larger than the isotope shift of the ionization potentials of the atoms, we show that the near resonance charge exchange process is equivalent to the resonance charge exchange with cross sections having a logarithmic dependence on energy. A comparison with the Langevin model at intermediate energies is also presented.

  11. Classical-quantum correspondence for ionization in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. |; Reinhold, C.O.

    1994-10-01

    We analyze the interplay between classical and quantum dynamics in ionization of atoms by fast charged particles The convergence to the classical limit is studied as a function of the momentum transferred to the electron during the collision, the impact parameter. the energy and angle of the emitted electron, and the initial state of the target. One goal is to assess the validity of exact classical (CTMC) methods and approximate classical models such as the Thomson model. Applications to data for electron ejection at large angles are presented. The connection between collisional ionization by charged particles and ionization by half-cycle pulses is discussed.

  12. Charge transfer reactions in multiply charged ion-atom collisions. [in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms of hydrogen and/or helium may be rapid at thermal energies. If these reactions are rapid, they will suppress highly charged ions in H I regions and guarantee that the observed absorption features from such ions cannot originate in the interstellar gas. A discussion of such charge-transfer reactions is presented and compared with the available experimental data. The possible implications of these reactions for observations of the interstellar medium, H II regions, and planetary nebulae are outlined.

  13. L-Auger Electron Production in Krypton Ion-Atom Collisions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, Peter Jonathon

    1987-09-01

    Secondary electron production as a consequence of inner-shell vacancy decay for the Kr-Kr system has been studied. Electron-energy spectra differential in impact parameter have been obtained by detecting electrons in coincidence with projectile ions scattered through a known angle. The spectra exhibit structure attributable to Auger decay of L-shell vacancies. The collision-energy dependence of the L-Auger yields is consistent with the L-shell excitation being due to rotational coupling of the 4fsigma , 4fpi, 4fdelta and 4fvarphi orbitals of the Kr-Kr quasimolecule, as originally proposed by Shanker and coworkers.^1 The L-Auger electron energies and relative transition-group intensities suggest that L-shell vacancy decay occurs in Kr ions with initial charge states greater than +10, indicating that a surprisingly large number of electrons are emitted prior to the decay of the L-shell vacancy. These prior ionizations, most of which occur during the collision, are the source of the 100-600 eV continuum electrons which dominate the low -energy region of the electron spectrum. ftn^1 R. Shanker, U. Wille, R. Bilau, R. Hippler, W. R. McMurray, and H. O. Lutz, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys., 17 (1984) 1353.

  14. Theoretical study of electron capture in ion-ion and ion-atom collisions. Progress report, September 1, 1980-April 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lieber, M.; Chan, F.T.

    1981-04-01

    The eikonal approximation has been recently shown to be of significant utility in the study of electron capture cross sections for energetic ion-atom collisions. The method generally gives much better agreement with available experimental data than does the simple OBK approximation without substantially increasing the difficulty of computation. In the present work, the total cross section is computed for electron capture into an arbitrary nl subshell of H/sup +/, C/sup +6/, O/sup +8/, and Fe/sup +24/ ions from ground state hydrogen atoms, at energies of 40 to 200 keV/nuclear (30 to 100 keV in the H/sup +/ case). These species were selected because of their importance in fusion studies. Interesting variations with l were obtained. Cross sections for capture into an arbitrary final n-shell, or into all final bound states were also obtained. An analytical closed form expression is derived for electron capture from an arbitrary initial nlm state to an arbitrary final n'l'm' state of a hydrogenic target. Numerical results are presented for all n' = 2,3 final states in hydrogen, which may be subjected to experimental test in the near future. Extension of the eikonal method to multielectron targets was studied. There are ambiguities in the method requiring further analysis. Agreement with experimental data is nevertheless satisfactory, but the high energy results are suspect.

  15. Two-electron excitation in slow ion-atom collisions: Excitation mechanisms and interferences among autoionizing states

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, M. Rice Univ., Houston, TX . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    The two-electron capture or excitation process resulting from collisions of H{sup +} and O{sup 6+} ions with He atoms in the energy range from 0.5 keV/amu to 5 keV/amu is studied within a molecular representation. The collision dynamics for formation of doubly excited O{sup 4+} ions and He** atoms and their (n{ell}, n{prime}{ell}{prime}) populations are analyzed in conjunction with electron correlations. Autoionizing states thus formed decay through the Auger process. An experimental study of an ejected electron energy spectrum shows ample structures in addition to two characteristic peaks that are identified by atomic and molecular autoionizations. These structures are attributable to various interferences among electronic states and trajectories. We examine the dominant sources of the interferences. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Ion-neutral chemistry at ultralow energies:Dynamics of reactive collisions between laser-cooled Ca+ or Ba+ ions and Rb atoms in an ion-atom hybrid trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, O.; Hall, F. H. J.; Eberle, P.; Hegi, G.; Raoult, M.; Aymar, M.; Willitsch, S.

    2013-05-01

    Cold chemical reactions between laser-cooled Ca+ or Ba+ ions and Rb atoms were studied in an ion-atom hybrid trap. Reaction rate constants were determined in the collision energy range Ecoll /kB = 20 mK-20 K. Product branching ratios were studied using resonant-excitation mass spectrometry. The dynamics of the reactive processes including the radiative formation of CaRb+ and BaRb+ molecular ions has been analyzed using accurate potential energy curves and quantum-scattering calculations for the radiative channels. It is shown that the energy dependence of the reaction rates is governed by long-range interactions, while its magnitude is determined by short-range non-adiabatic and radiative couplings. The quantum character of the collisions is predicted to manifest itself in the occurrence of narrow shape resonances at well-defined collision energies. The present results highlight both universal and system-specific phenomena in cold ion-neutral collisions. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation and the COST Action ''Ion Traps for Tomorrow's Applications''.

  17. Measurements of scattering processes in negative ion: Atom collisions. Technical progress report, 1 September 1991--31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kvale, T.J.

    1994-09-27

    This report describes the progress made on the research objectives during the past three years of the grant. This research project is designed to study various scattering processes which occur in H{sup {minus}} collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets in the intermediate energy region. These processes include: elastic scattering, single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization. For the elastic and target inelastic processes where H{sup {minus}} is scattered intact, the experimental technique of Ion Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (IELS) will be employed to identify the final target state(s). In most of the above processes, cross sections are unknown both experimentally and theoretically. The measurements will provide total cross sections (TCS) initially, and once the angular positioning apparatus is installed, will provide angular differential cross sections (ADCS).

  18. Many-electron aspects of molecular promotion in ion-atom collisions - Production of core-excited states of Li in Li/+/-He collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elston, S. B.; Vane, C. R.; Schumann, S.

    1979-01-01

    Production of core-excited autoionizing states of neutral Li having configurations of the form 1snln(prime)l(prime) has been observed over the impact-energy range from 10-50 keV. Although the results for production of all such states is remarkably consistent with a quasi-molecular-excitation model proposed by Stolterfoht and Leithaeuser (1976), production of individual lines in the observed spectra exhibits collision-velocity dependencies indicative of considerably more complex processes, including processes which appear to be inherently two-electron in nature. Excitation functions are presented for (1s2s/2/)/2/S, 1s(2s2p/3/P)/2/P, 1s(2s2p/1/P)/2/P, and (1s2p/2/)/2/D core-excited state of Li and for total core excitation.

  19. Prise en compte de l'anisotropie des collisions ion-atome sur le transport des ions par simulation de Monte-Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennad, A.; Eichwald, O.; Yousfi, M.; Lamrous, O.

    1997-09-01

    This paper is devoted to the determination of the differential and integral collision cross sections needed for the calculation of the transport coefficient of ions in weakly ionized gases. In the case of Ar^+/Ar system and for energy interval varying up to 100 eV, the cross sections are obtained from the interaction potential of polarization for low energies and of Lennard-Jones for higher energies. The calculation method of the collision cross sections based on the classical mechanics has been first validated from comparisons of measured and calculated differential cross sections. Then, these cross sections have been used in a Monte-Carlo code for simulation of the transport of Ar^+ ions in Ar gas at room temperature (300 K). The obtained transport coefficients (ion mobility, drift velocity and diffusion coefficient) are in good agreement with the drift tube measurements given in the literature thus confirming the validity of the method of collision cross section calculation. Cet article est consacré à la détermination des sections efficaces différentielles et intégrales ion-atome nécessaires au calcul des coefficients de transport des ions dans les gaz faiblement ionisés. Dans le cas du système Ar^+/Ar et pour des intervalles d'énergie allant jusqu'à quelques dizaines d'eV, les sections efficaces sont obtenues à partir des potentiels d'interaction de polarisation pour les faibles énergies et de Lennard-Jones pour les énergies plus élevées. La méthode de calcul des sections efficaces basée sur la mécanique classique a d'abord été validée par comparaison des sections efficaces différentielles mesurées et calculées. Ensuite, ces sections efficaces ont été utilisées dans un code de simulation statistique de Monte-Carlo du transport des ions Ar^+ dans l'Argon à la température ambiante (300 K). Les coefficients de transport (vitesse de dérive, mobilité ionique et coefficient de diffusion) obtenus sont en bon accord avec les mesures de

  20. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period.

  1. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period. PMID:27249827

  2. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  3. BRAHMS collaboration results for relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsene, I.

    2008-12-01

    In this work we review very briefly a few of the most important results obtained by the BRAHMS Collaboration on the properties of the collisions of heavy ions at relativistic energies. The discussion is general and aims to illustrate the most important achievements of our collaboration during the RHIC run period with short discussions and references to articles that treat the subjects in more detail.

  4. Asteroid collisions: Target size effects and resultant velocity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Eileen V.

    1993-03-01

    To study the dynamic fragmentation of rock to simulate asteroid collisions, we use a 2-D, continuum damage numerical hydrocode which models two-body impacts. This hydrocode monitors stress wave propagation and interaction within the target body, and includes a physical model for the formation and growth of cracks in rock. With this algorithm we have successfully reproduced fragment size distributions and mean ejecta speeds from laboratory impact experiments using basalt, and weak and strong mortar as target materials. Using the hydrocode, we have determined that the energy needed to fracture a body has a much stronger dependence on target size than predicted from most scaling theories. In addition, velocity distributions obtained indicate that mean ejecta speeds resulting from large-body collisions do not exceed escape velocities.

  5. Ion-Atom and Ion-Molecule Hybrid Systems: Ion-Neutral Chemistry at Ultralow Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Pascal; Dörfler, Alexander D.; von Planta, Claudio; Ravi, Krishnamurthy; Haas, Dominik; Zhang, Dong; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T.; Willitsch, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    The study of chemical reactions between ions and neutral species at very low energies reveals precise informations about the dynamics of collisions and fine details of intermolecular interactions. Here, we report progress towards the development of next- generation experiments for the investigation of cold ion-neutral reactions. First, we present a new ’’dynamic” hybrid ion-atom trap which enables the study of collisions with a superior energy resolution accessing a regime in which quantum scattering resonances may become observable. Second, we discuss and numerically characterize the concept and properties of a hybrid trap for cold neutral molecules and molecular ions which paves the way for the study of ion-molecule reactions in the millikelvin regime.

  6. Lattice approach for {alpha}+H{sub 2}{sup +} collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, S.C.; Esry, B.D.

    2005-08-15

    We solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for an ion-molecule collision using a lattice approach. This method carries over naturally from similar lattice treatments of ion-atom collisions, and is free from the multicenter problems that make extensions of other ion-atom methods difficult.

  7. Compact, Highly Stable Ion Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John

    2008-01-01

    A mercury-ion clock now at the breadboard stage of development (see figure) has a stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock: In tests, the clock exhibited an Allan deviation of between 2 x 10(exp -13) and 3 x 10(exp -13) at a measurement time of 1 second, averaging to about 10(exp -15) at 1 day. However, the clock occupies a volume of only about 2 liters . about a hundredth of the volume of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling parts of the apparatus are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein only a getter pump is used to maintain the vacuum. Hence, this apparatus is a prototype of a generation of small, potentially portable high-precision clocks for diverse ground- and space-based navigation and radio science applications. Furthermore, this new ion-clock technology is about 100 times more stable and precise than the rubidium atomic clocks currently in use in the NAV STAR GPS Earth-orbiting satellites. In this clock, mercury ions are shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole linear radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, the ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a Hg-202 radio-frequency-discharge ultraviolet lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions resonant at frequency of about 40.507 GHz are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at that frequency. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling caused by wall collisions inherent to gas-cell clocks. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave- resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. The basic ion-shuttling, two-trap scheme as described thus far is not new: it has been the basis of designs of prior larger clocks. The novelty of the present development lies in major redesigns of its physics package (the ion traps and the vacuum and optical subsystems) to effect

  8. Effects of Ion Atomic Number on Single-Event Gate Rupture (SEGR) Susceptibility of Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Goldsman, Neil; Liu, Sandra; Titus, Jeffrey L.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony M.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Zafrani, Max; Sherman, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    The relative importance of heavy-ion interaction with the oxide, charge ionized in the epilayer, and charge ionized in the drain substrate, on the bias for SEGR failure in vertical power MOSFETs is experimentally investigated. The results indicate that both the charge ionized in the epilayer and the ion atomic number are important parameters of SEGR failure. Implications on SEGR hardness assurance are discussed.

  9. Selected experimental results from heavy-ion collisions at LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Singh, Ranbir; Kumar, Lokesh; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2013-01-01

    We reviewmore » a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energysNN=2.76 TeV) for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV) suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements are compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.« less

  10. Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalajian, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many…

  11. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  12. The Limpopo Mobile Belt: a Result of Continental Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, M. P. R.

    1982-08-01

    The 600-km-long Limpopo Mobile Belt is discussed within the frame of a Proterozoic supercontinent model [Piper, 1976]. Evidence is presented that the Rhodesian and Kaapvaal cratons may have been separated by distances of more than 1000 km of oceanic crust. From about 3350 Ma ago the Kaapvaal Craton appears to have been driven intermittently N, NW, and then WNW against the Rhodesian Craton forming the NE-SW trending collision zone, the Limpopo Mobile Belt, and all the major fold and fracture patterns found. This movement would be similar to the oblique movement of the Pacific plate into the Aleutian trench. When collision ceased around 2500 Ma ago, it is likely that the Great Dyke and other complexes intruded along release fractures formed at right angles to the compression.

  13. Results from {gamma}{gamma} collisions in OPAL

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, Jochen

    1998-05-29

    The production of charged hadrons and jets is measured in collisions of quasi-real photons. The data were taken with the OPAL detector at LEP at e{sup +}e{sup -} centre-of-mass energies {radical}(s{sub ee})=161 and 172 GeV. The measured cross-sections are compared to perturbative next-to-leading order QCD calculations. The separation of the direct and the resolved component of the photon is demonstrated.

  14. A contemporary theoretical view of ion-atom, -molecule interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, David

    2009-05-01

    Energetic interactions among electrons, ions, atoms, and molecules within gaseous, plasma, and even material environments are fundamental to such diverse phenomena as low temperature plasma processing of semiconductors, collapsing giant molecular clouds forming stars, fluorescent lighting, cold atom condensates, radiation treatment of disease, and the chemistry of earth's atmosphere. Consequently, they have been studied using the contemporary theoretical and computational methods of the time for many years, yet progress continues as we are confronted with challenges presented by new, often more complex systems and by the drive to understand these foundational interactions at an ever more subtle and predictive level. I will illustrate some of this progress using examples from recent work treating very simple systems, for which our knowledge has been both subtly refined and significantly changed, and more complex systems, where complementary methods based on either elaborate treatments or broadly applicable simple models can be used to advance our knowledge.

  15. Charge transfer in cold collisions of rubidium atoms with calcium and ytterbium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakovleva, S. A.; Belyaev, A. K.; Buchachenko, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Low-energy collisions of the Ca and Yb cations with Rb atoms are investigated theoretically using accurate ab initio potential energy curves and coupling matrix elements to elucidate the dominant charge transfer mechanisms. The cross sections calculated at collision energies above 10-5 cm-1 exhibit the features typical to Langevin ion-atom collision regime, including a rich structure associated with the centrifugal barrier tunnelling (orbiting) resonances. It is shown that the dominant process in Yb+ + Rb collisions is the radiative charge transfer, while in the case of Ca+ + Rb collisions nonadiabatic transitions due to spin-orbit coupling dominate. Theoretical results are in a good agreement with available experimental data.

  16. Atomic-orbital close-coupling calculations for collisions involving fusion relevant highly charged impurity ions using very large basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Igenbergs, Katharina; Wallerberger, Markus; Schweinzer, Josef; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2012-05-25

    The atomic-orbital close-coupling formalism is a well-known method for the semiclassical treatment of ion-atom collisions. Cross sections for these kinds of collisions are mainly needed in the analysis of certain spectroscopic data from nuclear fusion experiments as well as astrophysical data. We shall outline how the computational implementation can be improved in such a way that collisions involving heavy, highly charged impurity ions, such as Ar{sup 18+} can be treated. Furthermore we show and discuss exemplary results.

  17. e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions: results from PETRA

    SciTech Connect

    Hilger, E.

    1982-01-01

    A selection of most recent results obtained by the five experiments CELLO, JADE, MARK J, PLUTO, and TASSO at PETRA is presented. The many interesting new results include, for example, the observation of effects of 2nd order QCD, details of inclusive hadron production, and the measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in lepton pair production due to weak and electromagnetic interference.

  18. Recent results of k-shell ionization by ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Avaldi, L.; Milazzo, M.; Mitchell, I.V.; Trivia, G.

    1983-04-01

    The experimental K-shell ionization cross sections of /sub 48/Cd, /sub 50/Sn, /sub 52/Te, /sub 53/I and /sub 56/Ba for alpha particles, between 2.2 MeV and 2.8 MeV, and of /sub 52/Te for protons, between 1.6 and 3 MeV, are presented. The justification for making these measurements comes, on the one hand, in filling a region where, at present, data are sparse: for example, /sub 52/Te ionization cross sections by alpha particles have never been reported before, and, on the other hand, checking between previously reported and diverging sets of experimental results: for example, for alpha particles on tin. In addition, the K-shell ionization cross sections of /sub 52/Te for protons can be considered as an extension of Khelill's measurements.

  19. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrill, A. D.; van Hunen, J.; Allen, M. B.

    2012-11-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) basin on the overriding plate after initial collision. This "collisional mantle dynamic basin" (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing, material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also, during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate cause the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. Our modelled topography changes fit well with this observed uplift and subsidence.

  20. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrill, A. D.; van Hunen, J.; Allen, M. B.

    2012-07-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) deepening in the area of the back arc-basin after initial collision. This collisional mantle dynamic basin (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate causes the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. This uplift and subsidence pattern correlates well with our modelled topography changes.

  1. Comparison of L x-ray spectra from multi-stripped ions in P/sup +/ + Ar and S/sup +/ + Ar gas collisions at 100 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.S.; Furst, M.; Hayden, H.C.; Smith, W.W.

    1981-04-01

    Structure in the soft x-ray spectra from projectiles excited in ion-atom collisions at 100 keV has been observed. Previous spectral measurements on these collision systems using a curved crystal Bragg spectrometer were unable to experimentally resolve the multiplet structure. The present results are obtained with a grazing incidence monochrometer and clearly show the resolved structure from L x-rays of neon-like and flourine-like ions. The L x-ray spectra from phosphorus and sulfur ions after single collisions in argon gas targets are compared to establish x-ray line identifications. The individual spectra yield information on the collision mechanism involving the inner-shell promotion of L-shell electrons and the simultaneous outer-shell electron excitation. The model for L-shell vacancy production in asymmetric ion-atom collisions assumes that two 2p electrons of the lower-Z projectile are promoted via the 4fsigma molecular-orbital. Because this orbital is coupled to many empty molecular orbitals, the probability that one or two 2p electrons are promoted to higher orbitals is unity for ion-atom collisions where the L shells interpenetrate. The promotion leaves one or two 2p vacancies in the lower-Z atom after the collision. This model agrees well with experimental observations of energy loss and total vacancy production cross sections. However, the small L x-ray yields, which result after vacancy production, increase dramatically with the collision energy, indicating the possibility of strong outer-shell excitation mechanisms accompanying the inner-shell electron promotion.

  2. Wave packet methods for charge exchange processes in ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloı̈tcha, E.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.; Bacchus-Montabonel, M.-C.; Vaeck, N.

    2001-05-01

    The efficiency of different time-independent and time-dependent wave packet methods to calculate charge-exchange cross sections is discussed. The time-independent spectral projection method is based on the Chebyshev expansion of the resolvent function and represents an interesting alternative to the usual Fourier method which involves a time propagation. On the other hand, the flux operator method still requires propagation in time but uses the properties of absorbing potentials in order to calculate the flux operator matrix elements. We show the necessity of introducing the appropriate Hankel-Riccati functions when the full Hamiltonian contains a centrifugal term in 1/R2 in order to reduce the computational time. The collisional system Si4++He is studied as a test case.

  3. Collisions of ions in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, T. L.

    1982-03-01

    This report is a summary description of research carried out under the ONR Project 'Collisions of Ions in Gases'. The work consisted of experimental studies of collisions of low-energy ions (4 < or = E sub L < or = 500 eV) with atoms and molecules, using the ion-beam gas-target technique, and of theoretical and computational studies done in support of the experiments. Three types of experiments were carried out: (a) measurements of relative differential cross-sections for elastic and inelastic (i.e., charge transfer) scattering in collisions of the He(++) ions with Ne, Ar, and Kr atoms, over the ion energy range 8 < or = E sub L < or = 60 eV; (b) kinematical studies of charge transfer in collisions of 30 < or = E sub L < or = 373 eV Ne(+), Ar(+), and Kr(+) ions with H2, D2, O2, and N2 molecules, in which the KE-distributions of the product H2(+), etc., were measured; and (c) measurements of the absolute total cross-sections for the charge transfer process He(++) + R = He(+) + R(+), where R = Ne, Ar, Kr, over the energy range 4 < or = E sub L < or = 500 eV. The experimental results, and their interpretations in terms of appropriate quantum scattering theory (where the latter was feasible) are discussed briefly. The effects of the thermal motions of collision participants (i.e., thermal broadening) in ion-atom and similar scattering experiments were investigated in computational studies, and a new crossed ion-supersonic atom/molecule beams apparatus, designed to remove the thermal broadening effect and to give high resolution in energy and angle, is discussed.

  4. Experimental and theoretical results on electron emission in collisions between partially dressed ions with He targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, J. M.; Fiol, J.; Fregenal, D.; Fainstein, P. D.; Rivarola, R. D.; Wolff, W.; Horsdal, E.; Bernardi, G.; Suárez, S.

    2013-09-01

    Experimental and theoretical results for electron emission in 440 keV u-1 Li+ with He targets are presented. Theoretical cross-sections are obtained using extensions of the continuum distorted wave and the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state models to the case of dressed projectiles and a four-body classical trajectory Monte-Carlo. The contributions of electron emission from the different aggregates of the collision system are investigated.

  5. Influence of Earth crust composition on continental collision style in Precambrian conditions: Results of supercomputer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, Sergey; Zakharov, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A number of issues concerning Precambrian geodynamics still remain unsolved because of uncertainity of many physical (thermal regime, lithosphere thickness, crust thickness, etc.) and chemical (mantle composition, crust composition) parameters, which differed considerably comparing to the present day values. In this work, we show results of numerical supercomputations based on petrological and thermomechanical 2D model, which simulates the process of collision between two continental plates, each 80-160 km thick, with various convergence rates ranging from 5 to 15 cm/year. In the model, the upper mantle temperature is 150-200 ⁰C higher than the modern value, while the continental crust radiogenic heat production is higher than the present value by the factor of 1.5. These settings correspond to Archean conditions. The present study investigates the dependence of collision style on various continental crust parameters, especially on crust composition. The 3 following archetypal settings of continental crust composition are examined: 1) completely felsic continental crust; 2) basic lower crust and felsic upper crust; 3) basic upper crust and felsic lower crust (hereinafter referred to as inverted crust). Modeling results show that collision with completely felsic crust is unlikely. In the case of basic lower crust, a continental subduction and subsequent continental rocks exhumation can take place. Therefore, formation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks is possible. Continental subduction also occurs in the case of inverted continental crust. However, in the latter case, the exhumation of felsic rocks is blocked by upper basic layer and their subsequent interaction depends on their volume ratio. Thus, if the total inverted crust thickness is about 15 km and the thicknesses of the two layers are equal, felsic rocks cannot be exhumed. If the total thickness is 30 to 40 km and that of the felsic layer is 20 to 25 km, it breaks through the basic layer leading to

  6. Baseball-bat collisions and the resulting trajectories of spinning balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Robert G.; Baroni, Steven

    1989-01-01

    The collision between a baseball and a bat has been analyzed using the classical theory of rigid body collisions. Also computed are the ranges of batted balls for a variety of launch angles and rotation rates, accounting for both drag and lift forces. If the coefficient of friction is not too small, the batter can give the ball fairly large backspin without fouling it off by swinging under the ball by as much as 1 to 2.5 cm. The increased range resulting from backspin is large, of the order of several tens of meters. The effect of the weather on the ranges has been analyzed briefly and it is found that under extreme conditions it can be surprisingly large.

  7. Class of compound dissipative solitons as a result of collisions in one and two spatial dimensions.

    PubMed

    Descalzi, Orazio; Brand, Helmut R

    2014-08-01

    We study the interaction of quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) dissipative solitons (DSs). Starting with quasi-1D solutions of the cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation in their temporally asymptotic state as the initial condition, we find, as a function of the approach velocity and the real part of the cubic interaction of the two counterpropagating envelopes: interpenetration, one compound state made of both envelopes or two compound states. For the latter class both envelopes show DSs superposed at two different locations. The stability of this class of compound states is traced back to the quasilinear growth rate associated with the coupled system. We show that this mechanism also works for 1D coupled cubic-quintic CGL equations. For quasi-1D states that are not in their asymptotic state before the collision, a breakup along the crest can be observed, leading to nonunique results after the collision of quasi-1D states.

  8. Classical trajectory study of alignment effects in the capture process: He 2+-Li ∗(2pΣ,2pΠ) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perumal, A. N.; Tripathi, D. N.

    1998-08-01

    A simulation method (CTMC) has been used to investigate the selectivity and alignment effects on the capture process in He 2+-Li ∗(2pΣ,2pΠ) collisions. The anomalous results of the experiment (∼ 50% error) as well as the AO calculation of Gieler et al. in case of capture into He II ( n = 4) from the initial Li ∗ (2pΣ) state are not found in the present work. Relative velocity and spatial overlap together mainly control the capture process in ion-atom collisions. The n-distribution of the final capture state is also presented.

  9. Reactive two-body and three-body collisions of Ba+ in an ultracold Rb gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krükow, Artjom; Mohammadi, Amir; Härter, Arne; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    We analyze reactive collisions of a single Ba+ ion in contact with an ultracold gas of Rb atoms at low three-body collision energies of 2.2(9) mK ×kB . Mapping out the Ba+ loss rate dependence on the Rb atom density we can discern two-body reactive collisions from three-body ones and determine both rate coefficients, which are k2=3.1 (6 ) (6 ) ×10-13cm3s-1 and k3=1.04 (4 ) (45 ) ×10-24cm6s-1 , respectively (statistical and systematic errors in parentheses). Thus, the measured ternary recombination dominates over binary reactions even at moderate atom densities of n ≈1012cm-3 . The results for Ba+ and Rb are representative for a wide range of cold ion-atom systems and can serve as guidance for the future development of the field of hybrid atom-ion research.

  10. Attosecond timing the ultrafast charge-transfer process in atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.

    2011-04-15

    By solving the three-dimensional, time-dependent Schroedinger equation, we have demonstrated that the ultrafast charge-transfer process in ion-atom collisions can be mapped out with attosecond extreme uv (xuv) pulses. During the dynamic-charge transfer from the target atom to the projectile ion, the electron coherently populates the two sites of both nuclei, which can be viewed as a 'short-lived' molecular state. A probing attosecond xuv pulse can instantly unleash the delocalized electron from such a ''transient molecule,'' so that the resulting photoelectron may exhibit a ''double-slit'' interference. On the contrary, either reduced or no photoelectron interference will occur if the attosecond xuv pulse strikes well before or after the collision. Therefore, by monitoring the photoelectron interference visibility, one can precisely time the ultrafast charge-transfer process in atomic collisions with time-delayed attosecond xuv pulses.

  11. Dynamics of proton-acetylene collisions at 30 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, S. A.; Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Sabin, John. R.; Deumens, E.; Ohrn, Y.

    2002-07-01

    Collisions of protons with ground state acetylene molecules at 30 eV are studied using the electron nuclear dynamics (END) theory. This time-dependent methodology for the study of molecular processes is a nonadiabatic approach to direct dynamics, which has been successfully applied to ion-atom and ion-molecule reactive collisions. Using the minimal END theory, we calculate the direct and charge-transfer differential cross sections. Different initial conditions lead to diverse product channels, such as charge transfer, proton exchange, and collision induced dissociation. Projectile energy loss is analyzed in terms of transfer into target electronic, translational, and rovibrational excitations. The comparison of the computed results with time-of-flight measurements is discussed.

  12. How Usability Testing Resulted in Improvements to Ground Collision Software for General Aviation: Improved Ground Collision Avoidance System (IGCAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamarr, Michael; Chinske, Chris; Williams, Ethan; Law, Cameron; Skoog, Mark; Sorokowski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The NASA improved Ground Collision Avoidance System (iGCAS) team conducted an onsite usability study at Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Air Venture in Oshkosh, Wisconsin from July 19 through July 26, 2015. EAA Air Venture had approximately 550,000 attendees from which the sample pool of pilots were selected. The objectives of this study were to assess the overall appropriateness and acceptability of iGCAS as a warning system for General Aviation aircraft, usability of the iGCAS displays and audio cues, test terrain avoidance characteristics, performance, functionality, pilot response time, and correlate terrain avoidance performance and pilot response time data.

  13. Jet Results and Jet Reconstruction Techniques in p+p and Their Prospects in Pb+Pb Collisions in Cms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salur, Sevil

    Copious production of very energetic jets is expected at the LHC due to the large increase in collision energy. Jet reconstruction at these high center of mass energies will provide crucial leverage to map out the QCD evolution of parton energy loss and a unique insight into the nature of the hot QCD matter. This article presents jet reconstruction techniques and the preliminary jet results in p+p collisions at √ {s} = 7 {TeV} collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Jet reconstruction prospects for the heavy ion collisions are also discussed.

  14. PILOT RESULTS ON FORWARD COLLISION WARNING SYSTEM EFFECTIVENESS IN OLDER DRIVERS

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Benjamin D.; Sager, Lauren N.; Dawson, Jeffrey; Hacker, Sarah D.; Aksan, Nazan; Rizzo, Matthew; Kitazaki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) have largely been developed with a “one-size-fits-all” approach. This approach neglects the large inter-individual variability in perceptual and cognitive abilities that affect aging ADAS users. We investigated the effectiveness of a forward collision warning (FCW) with fixed response parameters in young and older drivers with differing levels of cognitive functioning. Drivers responded to a pedestrian stepping into the driver’s path on a simulated urban road. Behavioral metrics included response times (RT) for pedal controls and two indices of risk penetration (e.g., maximum deceleration and minimum time-to-collision (TTC)). Older drivers showed significantly slower responses at several time points compared to younger drivers. The FCW facilitated response times (RTs) for older and younger drivers. However, older drivers still showed smaller safety gains compared to younger drivers at accelerator pedal release and initial brake application when the FCW was active. No significant differences in risk metrics were observed within the condition studied. The results demonstrate older drivers likely differ from younger drivers using a FCW with a fixed parameter set. Finally, we briefly discuss how future research should examine predictive relationships between domains of cognitive functioning and ADAS responses to develop parameter sets to fit the individual. PMID:27135061

  15. Initial results of a full kinetic simulation of RF H- source including Coulomb collision process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, S.; Mattei, S.; Shibata, T.; Nishida, K.; Hatayama, A.; Lettry, J.

    2015-04-01

    In order to evaluate Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) more correctly for radio frequency inductively coupled plasma (RF-ICP) in hydrogen negative ion sources, the Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (EM-PIC) simulation code has been improved by taking into account electron-electron Coulomb collision. Binary collision model is employed to model Coulomb collision process and we have successfully modeled it. The preliminary calculation including Coulomb collision has been done and it is shown that Coulomb collision doesn't have significant effects under the condition: electron density ne ˜ 1018 m-3 and high gas pressure pH2 = 3 Pa, while it is necessary to include Coulomb collision under high electron density and low gas pressure conditions.

  16. Preliminary results of characteristic seismic anisotropy beneath Sunda-Banda subduction-collision zone

    SciTech Connect

    Wiyono, Samsul H.; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Determining of seismic anisotropy allowed us for understanding the deformation processes that occured in the past and present. In this study, we performed shear wave splitting to characterize seismic anisotropy beneath Sunda-Banda subduction-collision zone. For about 1,610 XKS waveforms from INATEWS-BMKG networks have been analyzed. From its measurements showed that fast polarization direction is consistent with trench-perpendicular orientation but several stations presented different orientation. We also compared between fast polarization direction with absolute plate motion in the no net rotation and hotspot frame. Its result showed that both absolute plate motion frame had strong correlation with fast polarization direction. Strong correlation between the fast polarization direction and the absolute plate motion can be interpreted as the possibility of dominant anisotropy is in the asthenosphere.

  17. First Results on Angular Distributions of Thermal Dileptons in Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Banicz, K.; Damjanovic, S.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; Falco, A. de; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.

    2009-06-05

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has studied dimuon production in 158A GeV In-In collisions. The strong excess of pairs above the known sources found in the complete mass region 0.2results on the associated angular distributions. Using the Collins-Soper reference frame, the structure function parameters {lambda}, {mu}, and {nu} are measured to be zero, and the projected distributions in polar and azimuth angles are found to be uniform. The absence of any polarization is consistent with the interpretation of the excess dimuons as thermal radiation from a randomized system.

  18. An estimating formula for ion-atom association rates in gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, B. K.; Johnsen, R.

    1990-01-01

    A simple estimating formula is derived for rate coefficients of three-body ion atom association in gases and compare its predictions to experimental data on ion association and three-body radiative charge transfer reactions of singly- and doubly-charged rare-gas ions. The formula appears to reproduce most experimental data quite well. It may be useful for estimating the rates of reactions that have not been studied in the laboratory.

  19. Collision induced dissociation study of azobenzene and its derivatives: computational and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaee, Mohammadreza; Compton, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Experimental and computational investigation have been performed in order to study the bond dissociation energy of azobenzene and its derivatives using collision induced dissociation method as well as other energy and structural characteristics. The results have been verified by comparing with results obtained from computational quantum chemistry. We used different density functional methods as well as the Möller-Plesset perturbation theory and the coupled cluster methods to explore geometric, electronic and the spectral properties of the sample molecules. Geometries were calculated and optimized using the 6-311 + + G(2d,2p) basis set and the B3LYP level of theory and these optimized structures have been subjected to the frequency calculations to obtain thermochemical properties by means of different density functional, Möller-Plesset, and coupled cluster theories to obtain a high accuracy estimation of the bond dissociation energy value. The results from experiments and the results obtained from computational thermochemistry are in close agreement. Physics and Astronomy Department

  20. Quasidiatomic Approach to the Collisions of Low KEV Molecular Ions with Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yenen, Orhan

    The polarization of L(,(alpha)) radiation is measured in coincidence with a charged particle scattered at specific laboratory angles, resulting from the collision induced dissociation of low keV H(,2)('+) and H(,3)('+) incident on target gases. Coincidence measurements of the polarization pattern are made for a variety of scattering angles for 3.22 keV H(,2)('+) incident on He and Ne, and for 4.83 keV H(,3)('+) incident on He. The molecular states excited during the collision are determined from the alignment of the observed polarization patterns. A quasidiatomic collision model, which is an extension of the electron promotion model of ion-atom collisions at low keV energies to molecule-atom collisional systems, is developed to interpret the experimental results. The rules of building simple quasidiatomic correlation diagrams, to qualitatively estimate the dynamical behavior of molecular collisions, are presented. The general idea of treating the molecule as an atom under certain circumstances, is applied to a molecular two-state calculation of the differential charge-transfer probabilities in H('+)-H(,2) collisions. This calculation reproduces the essential features of previous experiments.

  1. Reinterpretation of the lithospheric structure beneath the Hidaka collision zone, Hokkaido, Japan 2. - Results for the northern collision zone from Hokkaido Transect 1998-2000 -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, T.; Tsumura, N.; Ito, T.; Sato, H.; Kurashimo, E.; Hirata, N.; Arita, K.; Noda, K.; Fujiwara, A.; Abe, S.; Kikuchi, S.; Suzuki, K.

    2013-12-01

    crust, there exists a 10-km thick reflective zone, expressing the deformation associated with the collision process. The most important finding in the present processing is a series of reflection events imaged at a 30-45 km depth below the obducted crust. These events, showing gradual increase in eastward dip to the east, are probably representing the lower crust and Moho within the Northeast Japan Arc descending down to the east under the collision zone. Refraction tomography was undertaken to map the deformed structure around the shallower part of collision zone. The obtained image is well consistent with the previous result (Iwasaki et al. 2004), showing a thick (4-5 km) undulated sediments in the hinterland, the outcrop of crystalline crust beneath the Hidaka Metamorphic Belt with higher Vp and Vp/Vs, probably expressing the obduction of the middle/lower crustal materials, and an enormously thick (>8-10 km) sedimentary package beneath the foreland. Weak later phases appearing at rather distant offsets (> 80-100 km) in the wide-angle data, which were not explained in the former study, are refractions/reflections from the descending lower crust and Moho of the Northeast Japan Arc as indicated by the CRS/MDRS imaging.

  2. PHENIX Results for J/{psi} Transverse Momentum and Rapidity Dependence in Au+Au and Cu+Cu Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, A. M.; Awes, Terry C; Batsouli, Sotiria; Cianciolo, Vince; Efremenko, Yuri; Read Jr, Kenneth F; Silvermyr, David O; Sorensen, Soren P; Stankus, Paul W; Young, Glenn R; Zhang, Chun; PHENIX, Collaboration

    2007-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured J/{psi} production in {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at forward (1.2 < |y| < 2.2) and mid (|y| < 0.35) rapidities. The most recent results for the rapidity and transverse momentum dependence of J/{psi} production are presented and compared with PHENIX baseline p + p measurements and selected theoretical calculations. We find that the J/{psi} production is significantly more suppressed, as compared to p + p, at forward rapidity than at mid rapidity in central Au+Au collisions.

  3. Recent results on W AL in longitudinally polarized p + p collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinlong; STAR Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The production of W+/- bosons in longitudinally polarized p + p collisions is a powerful tool to study the spin-flavor structure of the proton, because the spin-dependent W roduction cross section Δσ = σ (p -> p) - σ (p <- p) is directly sensitive to the polarization of the quarks and anti-quarks in the proton. This contribution will report on the recent W measurements performed at the STAR experiment at RHIC. The STAR Electromagnetic Calorimeters are used to trigger on electrons and positrons from the weak decay of the W boson and to provide a measure of the lepton energy, while the STAR Time Projection Chamber allows for reconstruction of the lepton track and its charge sign. During 2012 running period, the STAR experiment had collected an integrated luminosity of 80 pb-1 at √{ s} = 510 GeV with an average beam polarization of 55%. Preliminary results for the single-spin asymmetry, AL = Δσ / (σ (p -> p) + σ (p <- p)), from the 2012 dataset will be presented, as well as projections for the recently completed 2013 running period.

  4. N/Z Equilibration in Deep Inelastic Collisions and the Fragmentation of the Resulting Quasiprojectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keksis, August; Veselsky, Martin; Souliotis, George; Shetty, Dinesh; Jandel, Marian; Bell, Elizabeth; Ruangma, Ananya; Winchester, Eileen; Garey, Josh; Parketon, Sara; Richers, Cass; Yennello, Sherry

    2007-10-01

    When target and projectile nuclei have different N/Z, the quasiprojectiles formed in deep inelastic collisions should have a mean N/Z between that of the N/Z of the target and the N/Z of the projectile. This depends on the amount of N/Z equilibration that occurred. Six reaction systems with different N/Z between target and projectile were studied at Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute. The fragments were measured with FAUST, the Forward Array Using Silicon Technology. Two techniques were used to determine the quasiprojectile N/Z, which were then compared to a fully N/Z equilibrated system to study the amount of N/Z equilibration. The fragmentation of the quasiprojectiles was studied using isobaric, isotopic, fractional and mean N/Z yield comparisons between systems. The results show that the neutron richness of the system affects the fragment yields, with the neutron-rich nuclides populated preferentially by the neutron-rich systems. The N/Z distribution of the fragment yields was also studied and an inhomogeneous N/Z distribution between the LCPs (Z<3) and IMF's (Z>2) was observed. This research was funded in part by the Department of Energy through grant DE-FG03-93ER40773 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation through grant A-1266.

  5. Soliton-collision interferometer for the quantum nondemolition measurement of photon number: numerical results

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Y. Telephone Corporation, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180 ); Hawkins, R.J. ); Friberg, S.R. Telephone Corporation, Musashino-shi, Tokyo 180 )

    1990-02-15

    Using analytic theory and numerical experiments, we show that a quantum nondemolition measurement of the photon number of optical solitons in a single-mode optical fiber can be made. We describe the soliton-collision interferometer with which we propose to make this measurement and discuss simulations of the performance of this interferometer.

  6. Collision tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, M.P.; Ries, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The motions of lithospheric plates have produced most existing mountain ranges, but structures produced as a result of, and following the collision of continental plates need to be distinguished from those produced before by subduction. If subduction is normally only stopped when collision occurs, then most geologically ancient fold belts must be collisional, so it is essential to recognize and understand the effects of the collision process. This book consists of papers that review collision tectonics, covering tectonics, structure, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, metamorphism, and magmatism.

  7. Femtosecond laser field induced modifications of electron-transfer processes in Ne{sup +}-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhenzhong; Chen Deying; Fan Rongwei; Xia Yuanqin

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate the presence of femtosecond laser induced charge transfer in Ne{sup +}-He collisions. Electron transfer in ion-atom collisions is considerably modified when the collision is embedded in a strong laser field with the laser intensity of {approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The observed anisotropy of the He{sup +} angular distribution confirms the prediction of early work that the capture probability varies significantly with the laser polarization angle.

  8. Theoretical studies of rovibrational quenching in atom-diatom collisions: New results on old problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, P. C.; Yang, B. H.; Balakrishnan, N.; Forrey, R. C.; Bowman, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Accurate rotational and vibrational deexcitation rate coefficients due to molecular collisions are necessary for the interpretation of observations of interstellar gas from the microwave to the infrared (IR). The far-IR and submillimeter are particularly useful for studying the formation of stars, from nearby nebulae to high-redshift galaxies, which are current observational targets for the Herschel Space Observatory and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Astrophysical models rely heavily on theoretical estimates due to the difficulty of direct measurements of collisional rate coefficients. We report on our recent calculations of cross sections and rate coefficients for state-to-state transitions of CO induced by H collisions and HCl and HF induced by He collisions using quantum coupled-channel methods. In particular, issues related to the accuracy of potential energy surfaces, the effect of vibrational excitation on pure rotational quenching, and scalings by rotation, vibration, and chemical similarity will be discussed. Work at UGA and Emory is supported by NASA grant No. NNX12AF42G, at Penn State by NSF Grants No. PHY-0854838 and No. PHY-1203228, and at UNLV by NSF Grants No. PHY-0855470 and No. PHY-1205838.

  9. Energetic ion, atom, and molecule reactions and excitation in low-current H2 discharges: H(alpha) Doppler profiles.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Z Lj; Phelps, A V

    2009-12-01

    Absolute spectral emissivities for Doppler broadened H(alpha) profiles are measured and compared with predictions of energetic hydrogen ion, atom, and molecule behavior in low-current electrical discharges in H2 at very high electric field E to gas density N ratios E/N and low values of Nd , where d is the parallel-plate electrode separation. These observations reflect the energy and angular distributions for the excited atoms and quantitatively test features of multiple-scattering kinetic models in weakly ionized hydrogen in the presence of an electric field that are not tested by the spatial distributions of H(alpha) emission. Absolute spectral intensities agree well with predictions. Asymmetries in Doppler profiles observed parallel to the electric field at 4result primarily from excitation by fast H atoms directed toward the cathode and diffusely reflected from the cathode. (1 Td=10(-21) V m(2)) The effects of reflection of hydrogen particles and of changes with cathode material are modeled accurately without adjustable parameters. Maximum measured wavelength shifts result from acceleration of H+ ions and charge transfer to fast H atoms. The Doppler profiles are consistent with models of reactions among H+, H2+, H3 , H, and H2 leading to fast H atoms and then fast excited H(n=3) atoms. PMID:20365280

  10. Circular dichroism in laser-assisted proton-hydrogen collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Niederhausen, Thomas; Feuerstein, Bernold; Thumm, Uwe

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the effects of a strong laser field on the dynamics of electron capture and emission in ion-atom collisions within a reduced dimensionality model of the scattering system in which the motion of the active electron and the laser electric field vector are confined to the scattering plane. We examine the probabilities for electron capture and ionization as a function of the laser intensity, the projectile impact parameter b, and the laser phase {phi} that determines the orientation of the laser electric field with respect to the internuclear axis at the time of closest approach between target and projectile. Our results for the b-dependent ionization and capture probabilities show a strong dependence on both {phi} and the helicity of the circularly polarized laser light. For intensities above 5x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} our model predicts a noticeable circular dichroism in the capture probability for slow proton-hydrogen collisions, which persists after averaging over {phi}. Capture and electron emission probabilities defer significantly from results for laser-unassisted collisions. Furthermore, we find evidence for a charge-resonance-enhanced ionization mechanism that may enable the measurement of the absolute laser phase {phi}.

  11. Circular dichroism in laser-assisted proton-hydrogen collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederhausen, Thomas; Feuerstein, Bernold; Thumm, Uwe

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the effects of a strong laser field on the dynamics of electron capture and emission in ion-atom collisions within a reduced dimensionality model of the scattering system in which the motion of the active electron and the laser electric field vector are confined to the scattering plane. We examine the probabilities for electron capture and ionization as a function of the laser intensity, the projectile impact parameter b , and the laser phase ϕ that determines the orientation of the laser electric field with respect to the internuclear axis at the time of closest approach between target and projectile. Our results for the b -dependent ionization and capture probabilities show a strong dependence on both ϕ and the helicity of the circularly polarized laser light. For intensities above 5×1012W/cm2 our model predicts a noticeable circular dichroism in the capture probability for slow proton-hydrogen collisions, which persists after averaging over ϕ . Capture and electron emission probabilities defer significantly from results for laser-unassisted collisions. Furthermore, we find evidence for a charge-resonance-enhanced ionization mechanism that may enable the measurement of the absolute laser phase ϕ .

  12. From subduction to collision: results of French POP2 program on Taiwan-Philippine festoon

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, R.; Stephan, J.F.; Rangin, C.; Baladad, D.; Bouysse, Ph.; Chen, M.P.; Chotin, P.; Collot, J.Y.; Daniel, J.; Drouhot, J.M.; Marsset, B.; Pelletier, B.; Richard, M.; Tardy, M.

    1986-07-01

    A sea-beam, seismic, magnetic, and gravimetric survey was conducted with the R/V Jean-Charcot in three key regions off the Taiwan-Philippine festoon in the western Pacific: (1) Ryukyu active margin and its junction with Taiwan; (2) northern part of the Manila Trench and its junction with the Taiwan tectonic prism; and (3) southern termination of Manila Trench in front of Mindoro Island. Transitions between active subduction along the Manila Trench and collision of Taiwan and Mindoro, and relations between active subduction and extension in the Okinawa-Ryukyu and the northeastern Taiwan systems are particularly studied.

  13. Description of ionization in the molecular approach to atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Harel, C.; Jouin, H.; Pons, B.; Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular treatments of atomic collisions have traditionally been restricted to low nuclear velocities because of their failure to reproduce the fall of the capture cross sections at higher velocities. The limitation has recently been seen to be due to their description of ionizing processes. This feature is shown here to be a general one for multicharged ion-atom collisions. Its origin and characteristics are described and illustrated for the prototypical Li{sup 3+}+H(1s) reaction. Ionization appears as a result of the inertia of the electron cloud to adiabatically follow the nuclear motion. This gives rise to nonadiabatic transitions, which represent an ionizing flux whenever the nuclear velocity is high enough that the energy of the traveling molecular orbitals involved is positive in both moving atomic reference frames. Two strongly connected mechanisms appear, corresponding to the relative translational and rotational nuclear motions. Because of the finiteness of the basis, these mechanisms terminate with unphysical trapping effects. While interesting {ital per se}, knowledge of these features is also useful with respect to improving molecular treatments of atomic collisions with the addition of pseudostates. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Latest results of charged hadron flow measurements in CuAu collisions at RHIC-PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagomi, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Measurements of azimuthal anisotropic flow vn for inclusive charged hadrons and identified particles at mid rapidity in Cu+Au collisions at √sNN = 200GeV are presented. The data were recorded by the PHENIX experiment at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider(RHIC). Directed, elliptic and triangular flow as a function of transverse momentum pT are measured with respect to event planes. The inclusive charged hadron vi shows the negative value at high pT. The v2 and v3 are compared to those in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions. We find the v 2 and v3 follow an empirical scaling with 1/(ɛnN1/3 part). We also compare the v2 and v3 to hydrodynamical predictions. The identified particles v2 and v3 show a mass ordering in low pT region and baryon and meson splitting in high pT region. However the identified hadron v1 only shows mass ordering in mid pT region.

  15. Small UAV Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System Design Considerations and Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorokowski, Paul; Skoog, Mark; Burrows, Scott; Thomas, SaraKatie

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Armstrong Flight Research Center Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (SUAV) Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS) project demonstrated several important collision avoidance technologies. First, the SUAV Auto GCAS design included capabilities to take advantage of terrain avoidance maneuvers flying turns to either side as well as straight over terrain. Second, the design also included innovative digital elevation model (DEM) scanning methods. The combination of multi-trajectory options and new scanning methods demonstrated the ability to reduce the nuisance potential of the SUAV while maintaining robust terrain avoidance. Third, the Auto GCAS algorithms were hosted on the processor inside a smartphone, providing a lightweight hardware configuration for use in either the ground control station or on board the test aircraft. Finally, compression of DEM data for the entire Earth and successful hosting of that data on the smartphone was demonstrated. The SUAV Auto GCAS project demonstrated that together these methods and technologies have the potential to dramatically reduce the number of controlled flight into terrain mishaps across a wide range of aviation platforms with similar capabilities including UAVs, general aviation aircraft, helicopters, and model aircraft.

  16. Three-body Coulomb problem probed by mapping the Bethe surface in ionizing ion-atom collisions.

    PubMed

    Moshammer, R; Perumal, A; Schulz, M; Rodríguez, V D; Kollmus, H; Mann, R; Hagmann, S; Ullrich, J

    2001-11-26

    The three-body Coulomb problem has been explored in kinematically complete experiments on single ionization of helium by 100 MeV/u C(6+) and 3.6 MeV/u Au(53+) impact. Low-energy electron emission ( E(e)<150 eV) as a function of the projectile deflection theta(p) (momentum transfer), i.e., the Bethe surface [15], has been mapped with Delta theta(p)+/-25 nanoradian resolution at extremely large perturbations ( 3.6 MeV/u Au(53+)) where single ionization occurs at impact parameters of typically 10 times the He K-shell radius. The experimental data are not in agreement with state-of-the-art continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state theory.

  17. Results on open-charm production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meninno, E.; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is designed to study the strongly-interacting medium created in heavy-ion collisions at LHC energies, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Charm and beauty quarks are powerful probes to study the QGP in heavy-ion collisions: produced in hard partonic scattering processes on a short time scale, they are expected to traverse the QCD medium, interacting with its constituents and losing energy through radiative and collisional processes. In ALICE, open-charm production is studied through the reconstruction of the hadronic decays of D0, D+, D*+ and Ds+ mesons at mid-rapidity. The high precision tracking, good vertexing capabilities and excellent particle identification offered by ALICE allow for the measurement of particles containing heavy quarks (particularly D mesons) in a wide transverse-momentum range in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions. A review of the main results on D-meson production in pp collisions at = 7 TeV, Pb-Pb collisions at = 2.76 TeV and the most recent results in p-Pb collisions at = 5.02 TeV will be presented. In particular, the pT-differential yields and cross sections in the three collision systems, the nuclear modification factors RAA and RpPb in Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions, and the elliptic flow in Pb-Pb collisions will be discussed. The D-meson yield in pp and p-Pb collisions will also be shown as a function of charged-particle multiplicity.

  18. New results from NA52 on particle production in Pb-Pb collisions at 158 A GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenescu, R.; NA52 Collaboration; Ambrosini, G.; Arsenescu, R.; Baglin, C.; Beringer, J.; Bohm, C.; Borer, K.; Bussière, A.; Dittus, F.; Elsener, K.; Gorodetsky, Ph.; Guillaud, J. P.; Hess, P.; Kabana, S.; Klingenberg, R.; Lindén, T.; Lohmann, K. D.; Mommsen, R.; Moser, U.; Pretzl, K.; Schacher, J.; Selldén, B.; Stoffel, F.; Tuominiemi, J.; Weber, M.; Zhang, Q. P.

    1999-02-01

    We are presenting new results on and production in minimum bias lead-lead collisions at 158 A GeV/c. The measurements were performed at zero degree production angle and for a wide rapidity range. The analysis method used the full particle identification capabilities (time of flight, Cerenkov counters and hadronic calorimeter) of the spectrometer. We show K/ and ratios as a function of rapidity, as well as invariant particle production cross sections. As a particularity we observe near projectile rapidity an enhancement in the number of with respect to .

  19. Continental Crust Growth as a Result of Continental Collision: Ocean Crust Melting and Melt Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhou, S.; Zhu, D.; Dong, G.; Mo, X.; Xie, G.; Dong, X.

    2010-12-01

    The significance of the continental crust (CC) on which we live is self-evident. However, our knowledge remains limited on its origin, its way and rate of growth, and how it has acquired the “andesitic” composition from mantle derived magmas. Compared to rocks formed from mantle derived magmas in all tectonic settings, volcanic arc rocks associated with oceanic lithosphere subduction share some common features with the CC; both are relatively depleted in “fluid-insoluble” elements (e.g., Nb, Ta and Ti), but enriched in “fluid-soluble” elements (e.g., U, K and Pb). These chemical characteristics are referred to as the “arc-like signature”, and point to a genetic link between subduction-zone magmatism and CC formation, thus leading to the “island-arc” model widely accepted for the origin of the CC over the past 40 years. However, it has been recognized also that this “island-arc” model has several difficulties. These include (1) bulk arc crust (AC) is basaltic, whereas the bulk CC is andesitic [1]; (2) AC has a variably large Sr excess whereas the CC is Sr deficient [2]; and (3) AC production is mass-balanced by subduction-erosion and sediment recycling, thus contributing no new mass to CC growth, at least in the Phanerozoic [3,4]. Our data on magmatic rocks (both volcanic and intrusive) formed during the India-Asia continental collision (~65 - ~45Ma) [5] show a remarkable compositional similarity to the bulk CC with the typical “arc-like signature” [6]. Also, these syncollisional felsic rocks exhibit strong mantle isotopic signatures, implying that they were recently derived from a mantle source. The petrology and geochemistry of these syncollisional felsic rocks is most consistent with an origin via partial melting of upper oceanic crust (i.e., last fragments of underthrusting oceanic crust) under amphibolite facies conditions, adding net mantle-derived materials to form juvenile CC mass. This leads to the logical and testable hypothesis

  20. Geology of the d'Entrecasteaux-New Hebrides arc collision zone: results from a deep submersible survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collot, J.-Y.; Lallemand, S.; Pelletier, B.; Bissen, J.-P.; Glacon, G.; Fisher, M.A.; Greene, H. Gary; Boulin, J.; Daniel, J.; Monzier, M.

    1992-01-01

    During the SUBPSO1 cruise, seven submersible dives were conducted between water depths of 5350 and 900 m over the collision zone between the New Hebrides island arc and the d'Entrecasteaux Zone (DEZ). The DEZ, a topographic high on the Australian plate, encompasses the North d'Entrecasteaux Ridge (NDR) and the Bougainville guyot, both of which collide with the island-are slope. In this report we use diving observations and samples, as well as dredging results, to analyse the geology of the Bougainville guyot and the outer arc slope in the DEZ-arc collision zone, and to decipher the mechanisms of scamount subduction. These data indicate that the Bougainville guyot is a middle Eocene island arc volcano capped with reef limestones that appear to have been deposited during the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene and in Miocene-Pliocene times. This guyot possibly emerged during the Middle and Late Miocene, and started to sink in the New Hebrides trench after the Pliocene. The rocks of the New Hebrides arc slope, in the collision zone, consist primarily of Pliocene-Recent volcaniclastic rocks derived from the arc, and underlying fractured island-arc volcanic basement, possibly of Late Miocene age. However, highly sheared, Upper Oligocene to Lower Miocene nannofossil ooze and chalk are exposed at the toe of the arc slope against the northern flank of the NDR. Based on a comparison with cores collected at DSDP Site 286, the ooze and chalk can be interpreted as sediments accreted from the downgoing plate. East of the Bougainville guyot an antiform that developed in the arc slope as a consequence of the collision reveals a 500-m-thick wedge of strongly tectonized rocks, possibly accreted from the guyot or an already subducted seamount. The wedge that is overlain by less deformed volcaniclastic island-arc rocks and sediments includes imbricated layers of Late Oligocene to Early Miocene reef and micritic limestones. This wedge, which develops against the leading flank of the guyot

  1. Initial results of a full kinetic simulation of RF H{sup −} source including Coulomb collision process

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, S.; Shibata, T.; Nishida, K.; Hatayama, A.; Mattei, S.; Lettry, J.

    2015-04-08

    In order to evaluate Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) more correctly for radio frequency inductively coupled plasma (RF-ICP) in hydrogen negative ion sources, the Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (EM-PIC) simulation code has been improved by taking into account electron-electron Coulomb collision. Binary collision model is employed to model Coulomb collision process and we have successfully modeled it. The preliminary calculation including Coulomb collision has been done and it is shown that Coulomb collision doesn’t have significant effects under the condition: electron density n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} and high gas pressure p{sub H{sub 2}} = 3 Pa, while it is necessary to include Coulomb collision under high electron density and low gas pressure conditions.

  2. Thermochronologic evaluation of the Arabia-Anatolia collision: new results from Apatite (U-Th)He and Fission Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Côme; Thomson, Stuart N.; Reiners, Peter W.; Whitney, Donna L.; Teyssier, Christian

    2015-04-01

    To better understand the driving mechanisms behind the transition from collision to escape in a convergent plate tectonic setting, multiple low-temperature thermochronometers were used from the Arabia-Anatolia collisional belt. Within the accreted terranes of the Anatolian plate, Late Cretaceous and Eocene metamorphic and intrusive rocks were targeted to track regional and/or local exhumation patterns that may have occurred since collision initiated ~35-20 Ma. Forty-eight samples were collected in a ~200 km wide swath from the main Arabia-Anatolia suture, along and across three major fault zones: the East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ), the Sürgü Fault, and the Central Anatolian Fault Zone (CAFZ). We report here both Apatite (U-Th)He (AHe) and Apatite Fission Track (AFT) analyses performed on the same samples. (1) From the EAFZ, two ~1200 m high vertical transects were sampled north and south of the main fault strand within the low-grade metamorphic rocks of the Pütürge Massif. Although a majority of apatite grains had extremely low uranium contents preventing acquisition of meaningful AHe ages, results from the few uranium-rich samples indicate ages ranging from 14 to 9 Ma in the northern flank of the EAFZ while the southern flank recorded younger exhumation around 5-3 Ma suggesting differential vertical displacement along the fault since ~10 Ma. In contrast, Zircon (U-Th)He results from both sides of the fault show comparable ages around 25-18 Ma. (2) Exposed in the vicinity of the dextral Sürgü Fault, Eocene granitic bodies from the Berit Mountains were sampled within 5 km south of the fault and over 500 m elevation. AHe results yield ages between 27 and 14 Ma. (3) Along the Ecemiş segment of the CAFZ, the Late Cretaceous Niğde metamorphic complex and its deformed Paleocene-Eocene sedimentary cover show AFT and AHe ages confined between 20 and 15 Ma implying fast cooling and exhumation at this time. Further south, the Eocene Horoz pluton that intruded the

  3. Electron-Nuclear Dynamics of collision processes: Charge exchange and energy loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, Remigio; Sabin, John R.; Öhrn, Yngve; Deumens, Erik

    2004-03-01

    We present the Electron-Nuclear Dynamics (END) method for the study of time-dependent scattering processes. The END is a general approach for treating time-dependent problems which includes the dynamics of electrons and nuclei simultaneously by considering the full electron-nuclear coupling in the system and thus eliminates the necessity of constructing potential-energy surfaces. The theory approximates the time dependent Schrödinger equation starting from the time dependent variational principle by deriving a Hamiltonian dynamical system for time dependent nuclear and electronic wave function parameters. The wave function is described in a coherent state manifold, which leads to a system of Hamilton's equations of motion. Emphasis is put on electron exchange, differential cross section and energy loss (stopping cross section) of collision of ions, atoms and molecules involving H, He, C, N, O, and Ne atoms. We compare our results to available experimental data.

  4. Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, Peter E; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2010-05-01

    Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects

  5. An Experimental Investigation of the Droplet Deformation Process Resulting from Binary Collisions of a Viscous Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Keeney; Orme, Melissa

    1997-11-01

    An experimental investigation of the collisional dynamics of equal sized drops of a viscous, silicone based oil, DC 200, has been conducted for head-on impacts in a vacuum. Results show that the range of droplet Weber numbers necessary to describe the boundaries between permanent coalescence and what has been previously described as reflexive separation, is several orders of magnitude higher than has been reported in studies involving water and hydrocarbon fuel droplets. Energy dissipation during the deformation process has been measured, and the results show a wide discrepancy with available theory. Detailed observations of the post-impact deformation process reveals that in this case, the formation of multiple drops is due solely to the growth of Rayleigh instabilities on the extended fluid ligament.

  6. Electron capture and ionization processes in high-velocity Cn+ , C-Ar and Cn+ , C-He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaigt, G.; Jorge, A.; Illescas, C.; Béroff, K.; Dubois, A.; Pons, B.; Chabot, M.

    2015-04-01

    Single-electron and double-electron capture as well as projectile single-ionization and multiple-ionization processes in 125 keV u-1 Cn+-He (n = 1-5) and Cn+-Ar (n=1,2,4) collisions have been studied experimentally and theoretically. Helium target single-ionization and double-ionization cross sections are also reported for Cn+-He (n = 1, 4) collisions in the 100-400 keV u-1 impact energy domain. These results are compared with predictions from the independent atom and electron (IAE) model developed for describing cluster-atom collisions. The ion/atom-atom probabilities required for the IAE simulations have been determined by classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) and semiclassical atomic orbital close coupling (SCAOCC) calculations for the Ar and He targets, respectively. For comparison, electron capture cross sections were also measured in C-He and C-Ar collisions. In general the agreement between experiment and IAE calculations has been found to be rather good, with the exception of double-electron capture leading to anionic Cn- species.

  7. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  8. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results.

    PubMed

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A; Dearden, David V

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27220844

  9. [Demonstration of the impossibility of simultaneous Dupuytren and Destot fractures in the result of the car-pedestrian collision].

    PubMed

    Gusarov, A A; Fetisov, V A; Kucheryavets, Yu O

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the results of the commission forensic medical expertise undertaken to evaluate the possibility of severe injury to the ankle joint resulting from the road traffic accident as exemplified by the collision of a VAS 21043 car moving backward with a pedestrian. It was shown that the injury to the victim's right lower leg included the tear of the right crural deltoid ligament, the open communicated fracture of the lower third of fibular diaphysis with the displacement of the distal fragment, the lacerated wound in the lower third of the right leg, the rupture of distal tibiofibular synedesmosis, the closed communicated fracture of the posterior edge of the tibia without displacement, and outward subluxation of the right foot. According to the classification accepted in orthopedics , this variant of the injury to the ankle joint is a combination of the classical «complete» Dupuytren fracture and the Destot-type fracture. The analysis of the mechanism underlying formation of such injury has shown that it was a consequence of the indirect injurious action in the absence of the primary impact without the car running over the victim's leg. PMID:27500486

  10. Collision-induced dipoles and polarizabilities of pairs of hydrogen molecules: Ab initio calculations and results from spherical tensor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoping; Harrison, James F.; Gustafsson, Magnus; Wang, Fei; Abel, Martin; Frommhold, Lothar; Hunt, Katharine L. C.

    2012-12-01

    New ab initio results are reported for the interaction-induced changes in the dipole moments and polarizabilities of pairs of hydrogen molecules, computed using finite-field coupled-cluster methods in MOLPRO 2000 and GAMESS, with an aug-cc-pV5Z (spdf) basis set. Earlier work by X. Li, C. Ahuja, J. F. Harrison, and K. L. C. Hunt, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 214302 (2007), on collision-induced polarizabilities Δα has been extended with 170 additional geometrical configurations of the H2 pairs. In calculations of Δα, we have used a "random field" technique, with up to 120 different field strengths, having components that range from 0.001 to 0.01 a.u. Numerical tests show that the pair dipoles Δμ can be obtained accurately from calculations limited to 6 values of the field in each direction, so this approach has been used to compute Δμ by X. Li, K. L. C. Hunt, F. Wang, M. Abel, and L. Frommhold, Int. J. Spectroscopy 2010, 371201 (2010). We have evaluated the collision-induced dipoles of H2 pairs for 28 combinations of bond lengths (ranging from 0.942 a.u. to 2.801 a.u.), 7 intermolecular separations R, and 17 different relative orientations. In our work on Δα, the bond lengths are fixed at 1.449 a.u. Our results agree well with the previous ab initio work of W. Meyer, A. Borysow, and L. Frommhold, Phys. Rev. A 40, 6931 (1989), and of Y. Fu, C. G. Zheng and A. Borysow, J. Quant. Spectroscopy and Rad. Transfer, 67, 303 (2000)-where those data exist-for Δμ of H2 pairs. For Δα, our results agree well with the CCSD(T) results obtained by G. Maroulis, J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 4772 (2000) for two pair orientations and fixed R. The pair polarizability anisotropies also agree well with the small-basis self-consistent field results of D. G. Bounds, Mol. Phys. 38, 2099 (1979), although the trace of the polarizability differs by factors of 2 or more from Bounds' results. We have determined the expansion coefficients for Δμ and Δα, expressed as series in the spherical

  11. Probability of satellite collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarter, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A method is presented for computing the probability of a collision between a particular artificial earth satellite and any one of the total population of earth satellites. The collision hazard incurred by the proposed modular Space Station is assessed using the technique presented. The results of a parametric study to determine what type of satellite orbits produce the greatest contribution to the total collision probability are presented. Collision probability for the Space Station is given as a function of Space Station altitude and inclination. Collision probability was also parameterized over miss distance and mission duration.

  12. Three-pion interferometry results from central Pb+Pb collisions at 158A GeV/c.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, M M; Agnihotri, A; Ahammed, Z; Angelis, A L; Antonenko, V; Arefiev, V; Astakhov, V; Avdeitchikov, V; Awes, T C; Baba, P V; Badyal, S K; Barlag, C; Bathe, S; Batiounia, B; Bernier, T; Bhalla, K B; Bhatia, V S; Blume, C; Bock, R; Bohne, E M; Böröcz, Z; Bucher, D; Buijs, A; Büsching, H; Carlen, L; Chalyshev, V; Chattopadhyay, S; Cherbatchev, R; Chujo, T; Claussen, A; Das, A C; Decowski, M P; Delagrange, H; Djordjadze, V; Donni, P; Doubovik, I; Dutt, S; Dutta Majumdar, M R; El Chenawi, K; Eliseev, S; Enosawa, K; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Ganti, M S; Garpman, S; Gavrishchuk, O; Geurts, F J; Ghosh, T K; Glasow, R; Gupta, S K; Guskov, B; Gustafsson, H A; Gutbrod, H H; Higuchi, R; Hrivnacova, I; Ippolitov, M; Kalechofsky, H; Kamermans, R; Kampert, K H; Karadjev, K; Karpio, K; Kato, S; Kees, S; Klein-Bösing, C; Knoche, S; Kolb, B W; Kosarev, I; Koutcheryaev, I; Krümpel, T; Kugler, A; Kulinich, P; Kurata, M; Kurita, K; Kuzmin, N; Langbein, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, Y Y; Löhner, H; Luquin, L; Mahapatra, D P; Manko, V; Martin, M; Martínez, G; Maximov, A; Mgebrichvili, G; Miake, Y; Mir, M F; Mishra, G C; Miyamoto, Y; Mohanty, B; Mora, M J; Morrison, D; Mukhopadhyay, D S; Naef, H; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Neumaier, S; Nianine, A; Nikitine, V; Nikolaev, S; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nomokonov, P; Nystrand, J; Obenshain, F E; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Pachr, M; Pavliouk, S; Peitzmann, T; Petracek, V; Pinganaud, W; Plasil, F; von Poblotzki, U; Purschke, M L; Rak, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ramamurthy, V S; Rao, N K; Retiere, F; Reygers, K; Roland, G; Rosselet, L; Roufanov, I; Roy, C; Rubio, J M; Sako, H; Sambyal, S S; Santo, R; Sato, S; Schlagheck, H; Schmidt, H R; Schutz, Y; Shabratova, G; Shah, T H; Sibiriak, I; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Sinha, B C; Slavine, N; Söderström, K; Solomey, N; Sørensen, S P; Stankus, P; Stefanek, G; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Stüken, D; Sumbera, M; Svensson, T; Trivedi, M D; Tsvetkov, A; Tykarski, L; Urbahn, J; Pijll, E C; Eijndhoven, N; Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Vinogradov, A; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopianov, A; Vörös, S; Wysłouch, B; Yagi, K; Yokota, Y; Young, G R

    2000-10-01

    Three-particle correlations have been measured for identified pi(-) from central 158A GeV Pb+Pb collisions by the WA98 experiment at CERN. A substantial contribution of the genuine three-body correlation has been found as expected for a mainly chaotic and symmetric source. PMID:11005962

  13. Investigation of Charge Transfer in Low Energy D2+ + H Collisions using Merged Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianarijaona, Vola M; Rada, J. J.; Rejoub, Riad A; Havener, Charles C

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The hydrogen - hydrogen (deuterium) molecular ion is the most fundamental ion-molecule two-electron system. Charge transfer proceeds through dynamically coupled electronic, vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom. Using the ion-atom merged-beams apparatus at Oak Ridge National Laboratory absolute charge transfer cross sections for D2+ + H are measured from keV/u collision energies where the collision is considered "ro-vibrationally frozen" to meV/u energies where collision times are long enough to sample vibrational and rotational modes. The measurements benchmark high energy theory and vibrationally specific adiabatic theory.

  14. Early Cretaceous paleomagnetic and geochronologic results from the Tethyan Himalaya: Insights into the Neotethyan paleogeography and the India-Asia collision.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yiming; Yang, Tianshui; Bian, Weiwei; Jin, Jingjie; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Huaichun; Li, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the Neotethyan paleogeography, a paleomagnetic and geochronological study has been performed on the Early Cretaceous Sangxiu Formation lava flows, which were dated from ~135.1 Ma to ~124.4 Ma, in the Tethyan Himalaya. The tilt-corrected site-mean characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) direction for 26 sites is Ds = 296.1°, Is = -65.7°, ks = 51.7, α95 = 4.0°, corresponding to a paleopole at 5.9°S, 308.0°E with A95 = 6.1°. Positive fold and reversal tests prove that the ChRM directions are prefolding primary magnetizations. These results, together with reliable Cretaceous-Paleocene paleomagnetic data observed from the Tethyan Himalaya and the Lhasa terrane, as well as the paleolatitude evolution indicated by the apparent polar wander paths (APWPs) of India, reveal that the Tethyan Himalaya was a part of Greater India during the Early Cretaceous (135.1-124.4 Ma) when the Neotethyan Ocean was up to ~6900 km, it rifted from India sometime after ~130 Ma, and that the India-Asia collision should be a dual-collision process including the first Tethyan Himalaya-Lhasa terrane collision at ~54.9 Ma and the final India-Tethyan Himalaya collision at ~36.7 Ma.

  15. Early Cretaceous paleomagnetic and geochronologic results from the Tethyan Himalaya: Insights into the Neotethyan paleogeography and the India–Asia collision

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yiming; Yang, Tianshui; Bian, Weiwei; Jin, Jingjie; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Huaichun; Li, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the Neotethyan paleogeography, a paleomagnetic and geochronological study has been performed on the Early Cretaceous Sangxiu Formation lava flows, which were dated from ~135.1 Ma to ~124.4 Ma, in the Tethyan Himalaya. The tilt-corrected site-mean characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) direction for 26 sites is Ds = 296.1°, Is = −65.7°, ks = 51.7, α95 = 4.0°, corresponding to a paleopole at 5.9°S, 308.0°E with A95 = 6.1°. Positive fold and reversal tests prove that the ChRM directions are prefolding primary magnetizations. These results, together with reliable Cretaceous-Paleocene paleomagnetic data observed from the Tethyan Himalaya and the Lhasa terrane, as well as the paleolatitude evolution indicated by the apparent polar wander paths (APWPs) of India, reveal that the Tethyan Himalaya was a part of Greater India during the Early Cretaceous (135.1–124.4 Ma) when the Neotethyan Ocean was up to ~6900 km, it rifted from India sometime after ~130 Ma, and that the India-Asia collision should be a dual-collision process including the first Tethyan Himalaya-Lhasa terrane collision at ~54.9 Ma and the final India-Tethyan Himalaya collision at ~36.7 Ma. PMID:26883692

  16. Early Cretaceous paleomagnetic and geochronologic results from the Tethyan Himalaya: Insights into the Neotethyan paleogeography and the India-Asia collision.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yiming; Yang, Tianshui; Bian, Weiwei; Jin, Jingjie; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Huaichun; Li, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the Neotethyan paleogeography, a paleomagnetic and geochronological study has been performed on the Early Cretaceous Sangxiu Formation lava flows, which were dated from ~135.1 Ma to ~124.4 Ma, in the Tethyan Himalaya. The tilt-corrected site-mean characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) direction for 26 sites is Ds = 296.1°, Is = -65.7°, ks = 51.7, α95 = 4.0°, corresponding to a paleopole at 5.9°S, 308.0°E with A95 = 6.1°. Positive fold and reversal tests prove that the ChRM directions are prefolding primary magnetizations. These results, together with reliable Cretaceous-Paleocene paleomagnetic data observed from the Tethyan Himalaya and the Lhasa terrane, as well as the paleolatitude evolution indicated by the apparent polar wander paths (APWPs) of India, reveal that the Tethyan Himalaya was a part of Greater India during the Early Cretaceous (135.1-124.4 Ma) when the Neotethyan Ocean was up to ~6900 km, it rifted from India sometime after ~130 Ma, and that the India-Asia collision should be a dual-collision process including the first Tethyan Himalaya-Lhasa terrane collision at ~54.9 Ma and the final India-Tethyan Himalaya collision at ~36.7 Ma. PMID:26883692

  17. Early Cretaceous paleomagnetic and geochronologic results from the Tethyan Himalaya: Insights into the Neotethyan paleogeography and the India-Asia collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yiming; Yang, Tianshui; Bian, Weiwei; Jin, Jingjie; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Huaichun; Li, Haiyan

    2016-02-01

    To better understand the Neotethyan paleogeography, a paleomagnetic and geochronological study has been performed on the Early Cretaceous Sangxiu Formation lava flows, which were dated from ~135.1 Ma to ~124.4 Ma, in the Tethyan Himalaya. The tilt-corrected site-mean characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) direction for 26 sites is Ds = 296.1°, Is = -65.7°, ks = 51.7, α95 = 4.0°, corresponding to a paleopole at 5.9°S, 308.0°E with A95 = 6.1°. Positive fold and reversal tests prove that the ChRM directions are prefolding primary magnetizations. These results, together with reliable Cretaceous-Paleocene paleomagnetic data observed from the Tethyan Himalaya and the Lhasa terrane, as well as the paleolatitude evolution indicated by the apparent polar wander paths (APWPs) of India, reveal that the Tethyan Himalaya was a part of Greater India during the Early Cretaceous (135.1-124.4 Ma) when the Neotethyan Ocean was up to ~6900 km, it rifted from India sometime after ~130 Ma, and that the India-Asia collision should be a dual-collision process including the first Tethyan Himalaya-Lhasa terrane collision at ~54.9 Ma and the final India-Tethyan Himalaya collision at ~36.7 Ma.

  18. Elastic Collisions and Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Steven

    2009-04-01

    Elastic collisions are fascinating demonstrations of conservation principles. The mediating force must be conservative in an elastic collision. Truly elastic collisions take place only when the objects in collision do not touch, e.g. magnetic bumpers on low friction carts. This requires that we define a collision as a momentum transfer. Elastic collisions in 1-D can be solved in general and the implications are quite remarkable. For example, a heavy object moving initially towards a light object followed by an elastic collision results in a final velocity of the light object greater than either initial velocity. This is easily demonstrated with low friction carts. Gravitational elastic collisions involving a light spacecraft and an extremely massive body like a moon or planet can be approximated as 1-D collisions, such as the ``free return'' trajectory of Apollo 13 around the moon. The most fascinating gravitational collisions involve the gravitational slingshot effect used to boost spacecraft velocities. The maximum gravitational slingshot effect occurs when approaching a nearly 1-D collision, revealing that the spacecraft can be boosted to greater than twice the planet velocity, enabling the spacecraft to travel much further away from the Sun.

  19. Experimental and theoretical results on electron emission in collisions between He targets and dressed Liq+ (q = 1, 2) projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregenal, D.; Monti, J. M.; Fiol, J.; Fainstein, P. D.; Rivarola, R. D.; Bernardi, G.; Suárez, S.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the electron emission in collisions between He atoms and L{{i}^{q+}} (q = 1, 2) projectiles at intermediate to high incident energies. We report on measured absolute values of double-differential cross-sections, as a function of the emitted electron energy and angle, at a collision energy of 440 keV u-1. The different contributions from target ionization, projectile ionization, and simultaneous target-projectile ionization are calculated with the quantum-mechanical continuum distorted wave and continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state models, and with classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations. There is an overall good agreement of the calculations with the experimental data for electron emission cross-sections.

  20. Isospin Effects in Heavy-Ion Collisions: Some Results From CHIMERA Experiments At LNS And Perspectives With Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Verde, G.; Amorini, F.; Cavallaro, S.; Lombardo, I.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Anzalone, A.; Maiolino, C.; Arena, N.; Geraci, E.; Grassi, L.; Lo Nigro, S.; Politi, G.; Auditore, L.

    2009-05-04

    CHIMERA is a 4{pi} multidetector for charged particles available at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS). A new method to measure the time scale of the emission of nuclear fragments is described, together with some applications in the field of the isospin dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. Competition between fusion-like and binary reactions near the energy threshold for nuclear multifragmentation is discussed. Opportunities are pointed out to use the detector at low and intermediate energies using the kinematical-coincidence method.

  1. Electron energy spectra of H{sup {minus}} autodetaching states resulting from collisions of H{sup {minus}} with He at 1 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, M.; Sato, H. |; Hino, K.; Matsuzawa, M.

    1995-06-01

    Electron energy spectra for H{sup {minus}} autodetaching states resulting from collisions H{sup {minus}} with He at 1 keV are rigorously calculated by including couplings between doubly excited states and continuum states and their interference with direct detachment processes. An energy sampling procedure, based on the Gauss quadratures, is used to discretize continuum states. The present theoretical result, for the first time, clarifies mechanisms of excitation to doubly excited states, quantitatively reproduces the experimental spectra first observed by Risley and Geballe in 1974, separates the contributions from each of three autodetaching states, and identifies the cause of the interference between autodetaching and direct-detaching excitation channels.

  2. Arc-arc Collision Structure in the Southernmost Part of the Kuril Trench Region -Results from Integrated Analyses of the 1998-2000 Hokkaido Transect Seismic Data-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Takaya; Tsumura, Noriko; Ito, Tanio; Sato, Hiroshi; Kurashimo, Eiji; Hirata, Naoshi; Arita, Kazunori; Noda, Katsuya; Fujiwara, Akira; Abe, Susumu; Kikkuchi, Shunsuke; Suzuki, Kazuko

    2015-04-01

    -10 km) are interpreted to be fragments of Cretaceous subduction/arc complexes or deformation interfaces branched from the HMT. The refraction/wide-angle reflection analysis revealed a series of eastward dipping interfaces at depths of 15-30 km east of the HMT, some of which show a very large Vp contrast exceeding 0.5-1.0 km/s. The subducted NE Japan arc meets the Kuril arc 20-40 km east of the HMT at a depth of 20-30 km. The above mentioned high Vp contrasts may result from the mixture of the upper crustal (low Vp) materials of the NE Japan arc and lower crustal (high Vp) materials of the Kuril arc. Seismic reflection image in the southern HCZ reprocessed by almost the same techniques confirms a clear crustal delamination, where the upper 23-km crust is thrust up along the HMT while the lower part of the crust descends down to the subducted PAC plate. At the moment, the results in the northern HCZ do not provide positive evidence on shallow crustal delamination as found in the case of the southern HCZ, suggesting regional difference in collision style along the HMT.

  3. Finite strain calculations of continental deformation. I - Method and general results for convergent zones. II - Comparison with the India-Asia collision zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, G.; England, P.

    1986-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to perform numerical experiments on a rheologically simple continuum model for the continental lithosphere. It is attempted to obtain a better understanding of the dynamics of continental deformation. Calculations are presented of crustal thickness distributions, stress, strain, strain rate fields, latitudinal displacements, and finite rotations, taking into account as basis a model for continental collision which treats the litoshphere as a thin viscous layer subject to indenting boundary conditions. The results of this paper support the conclusions of England and McKenzie (1982) regarding the role of gravity in governing the deformation of a thin viscous layer subject to indenting boundary conditions. The results of the experiments are compared with observations of topography, stress and strain rate fields, and palaeomagnetic latitudinal displacements in Asia.

  4. Linear Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkiewicz, T. A.; Newby, N. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of linear collisions between two or three objects is related to a junior-level course in analytical mechanics. The theoretical discussion uses a geometrical approach that treats elastic and inelastic collisions from a unified point of view. Experiments with a linear air track are described. (Author/TS)

  5. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  6. Preheating in bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Piao Yunsong

    2010-08-15

    In a landscape with metastable minima, the bubbles will inevitably nucleate. We show that when the bubbles collide, due to the dramatic oscillation of the field at the collision region, the energy deposited in the bubble walls can be efficiently released by the explosive production of the particles. In this sense, the collision of bubbles is actually highly inelastic. The cosmological implications of this result are discussed.

  7. Planck Constant Deduced from Metrical Results of Doppler Effect of Moving Particle— Uncertainty Principle Caused byCollision of a Particle with CMB Photons and Virtual Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    Put two counters at origin O and particle P respectively, the wave-number difference counted by two counters at same moment is the length x between P and O (as a rod). The metrical result of known Doppler effect is: x(θ) = x0 (1+ β cos θ) (1). β= v/c, v is the velocity of counter to light-source, c = c+ = c -is the metrical one-way velocity of light, v • n = v cos θ, θ is the angle between v and unit-vector n of light-beam pointing to counter from light-source, x0 is the metrical length when v = 0. The result counted by a counter in one second is the light-wave frequency: f(θ) = f0 (1 -β cos θ) (2). f0 is the metrical frequency when v = 0. From Eq.(1) and Eq (2): x 2 (θ) = x0 2 (1+2 β cos θ + β 2 cos2 θ); f 2 (θ) = f 0 2 (1-2 β cos θ + β 2 cos2 θ). Define the square-difference root of the metrical results in two contrary directions: ∆x = (x 2 (0) -x 2 (π)) 1/2 = 2 x0 β 1/2 (3); ∆f = (f 2 (0) -f 2 (π))1/2 = i 2 f0 β 1/2 (4); ∆x • ∆f = i 4 x0 f0 β (5). From p = m v and the variance in absolute average value of Eq.(2) ∆f= 2 f0 ∆v/π c, Eq.(5) changes into: ∆x•∆p= 2 π x0 p (6). Once a particle collides with CMB photon, its velocity will change as in a quasi-Brownian motion. Let S be the average space-distance between CMB photons, the time-interval between two collisions is S / v, v is the velocity of particle. Because x0 is the length of an imaginary resting rod, i.e., after every collision the origin O must be reset jumpily at a new position and the jumpy distance (S/v) • ∆v is just the displacement of particle x0 , ∆v is the variance in velocity caused by each collision. The variance in momentum of particle ∆p in each collision is the average momentum p0 of CMB photon, then we obtain: x0 = S ∆v / v = S ∆p /p = S p0 /p and Eq.(6) changes into: ∆x•∆p= 2 π p0 S (7). The average energy and average momentum of CMB photon in 2.7K are: e0 = k T= 3.72•10-16 erg; p0 = e0 /c =1.24•10 -26 g cm s -1 . The

  8. Infrared absorption by molecular gases as a probe of nanoporous silica xerogel and molecule-surface collisions: Low-pressure results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Auwera, J.; Ngo, N. H.; El Hamzaoui, H.; Capoen, B.; Bouazaoui, M.; Ausset, P.; Boulet, C.; Hartmann, J.-M.

    2013-10-01

    Transmission spectra of gases confined (but not adsorbed) within the pores of a 1.4-cm-thick silica xerogel sample have been recorded between 2.5 and 5 μm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. This was done for pure CO, CO2, N2O, H2O, and CH4 at room temperature and pressures of a few hectopascals. Least-squares fits of measured absorption lines provide the optical-path lengths within the confined (LC) and free (LF) gas inside the absorption cell and the half width at half maximum ΓC of the lines of the confined gases. The values of LC and LF retrieved using numerous transitions of all studied species are very consistent. Furthermore, LC is in satisfactory agreement with values obtained from independent measurements, thus showing that reliable information on the open porosity volume can be retrieved from an optical experiment. The values of ΓC, here resulting from collisions of the molecules with the inner surfaces of the xerogel pores, are practically independent of the line for each gas and inversely proportional to the square root of the probed-molecule molar mass. This is a strong indication that, for the studied transitions, a single collision of a molecule with a pore surface is sufficient to change its rotational state. A previously proposed simple model, used for the prediction of the line shape, leads to satisfactory agreement with the observations. It also enables a determination of the average pore size, bringing information complementary to that obtained from nitrogen adsorption porosimetry.

  9. The Loyalty—New Hebrides Arc collision: Effects on the Loyalty Ridge and basin system, Southwest Pacific (first results of the ZoNéCo programme)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafoy, Yves; Missegue, Francois; Cluzel, Dominique; Le Suave, Raymond

    1996-06-01

    The ZoNéCo 1 and 2 cruises of Ifremer's Research Vessel L'Atalante, collected new swath bathymetry and geophysical data over the southern and northern segments of the basins and ridges forming the Loyalty system. Between the two surveyed areas, previous studies found evidence for the resistance of the Loyalty Ridge to subduction beneath the New Hebrides trench near 22°S 169°E. On the subducted plate, except for seismicity related to the downbending of the Australian plate, recorded shallow seismicity is sparse within the Loyalty system (Ridge and Basin) where reliable focal mechanism solutions are almost absent. Swath bathymetry, seismic reflection and magnetic data acquired during the ZoNéCo 1 and 2 cruises revealed a transverse asymmetric morphology in the Loyalty system, and an along-strike horst and graben structure on the discontinuous Loyalty Ridge. South of 23°50'S and at 20°S, the two WSW-ENE-trending fault systems, respectively, sinistral and dextral, that crosscut the southern and northern segments of the Loyalty system, are interpreted as due to the early effects of collision with the New Hebrides Arc. A NNW-SSE trend, evident along the whole Loyalty system and on the island of New Caledonia, is interpreted as an inherited structural trend that may have been reactivated through flexure of the Australian lithospheric plate at the subduction zone. Overall then, the morphology, structure and evolution of the southern and northern segments of the Loyalty system probably result from the combined effects of the Australian plate lithospheric bulge, the active Loyalty-New Hebrides collision and the overthrust of the New Caledonian ophiolite.

  10. Electron-Nuclear Dynamics of atomic and molecular collisions: Charge exchange and energy loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, Remigio; Sabin, John R.; Ohrn, Yngve; Deumens, Erik

    2004-05-01

    Processes like electron exchange (capture and loss), bond breaking, and chemical reactions are difficult to visualize and treat in a time-independent approach. In this work, we present the Electron-Nuclear Dynamics (END) method for the study of time-dependent scattering processes. The END is a general approach for treating time-dependent problems which includes the dynamics of electrons and nuclei simultaneously by considering the full electron-nuclear coupling in the system and thus eliminates the necessity of constructing potential-energy surfaces. The theory approximates the time dependent Schrödinger equation starting from the time dependent variational principle (TDVP) by deriving a Hamiltonian dynamical system for time dependent nuclear and electronic wave function parameters. The wave function is described in a coherent state manifold, which leads to a system of Hamilton's equations of motion. The resulting system of coupled, first order, ordinary differential equations approximates the Schrödinger equation. A detailed analysis of the END equations is given for the case of a single-determinantal state for the electrons and a classical treatment of the nuclei. Emphasis is put on electron exchange, differential cross section and energy loss (stopping cross section) of collision of ions, atoms and molecules involving H, He, C, N, O, and Ne atoms. We compare our results to available experimental data.

  11. Fore-arc deformation at the transition between collision and subduction: results from first 3D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, D. A.; Oncken, O.; Ustaszewski, K. M.; Cruden, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    3-D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments of arc-continent collision investigate the deformation of the fore-arc at the transition between collision and subduction. The deformation of the plates in the collision area propagates into the subduction-collision transition zone via along-strike coupling of the neighboring segments of the plate boundary. The largest along-strike gradient of trench-perpendicular compression produced by a passive margin turning by 90 degrees does not generate sufficiently localized shear strain in the transition zone to cause a strike-slip system because of the fast propagation of arc lithosphere failure. Deformation is thus continuous along-strike, but the deformation mechanism is three-dimensional and progressive structural variations arise because the coupling between neighboring segment induces either advanced or delayed failure of the arc lithosphere and passive margin. During the initial stage of collision, the accretionary wedge is partially subducted, the interplate zone is lubricated, and shear traction drops. Thus large convergence obliquity does not produce a migrating fore-arc sliver. Instead, the fore-arc motion is due to the pressure force generated by subduction of the buoyant continental crust. It follows that convergence obliquity does not yield trench-parallel deformation of the fore-arc and its influence on the collision process is limited. However, convergence obliquity may have shaped the active margin during the stage of oceanic subduction stage, prior to collision, and inherited structures may impact the propagation mechanism.

  12. Auto Body and Collision Damage Repairer (Branch 1). Apprenticeship Training Standards = Reparateur de carrossiers et de dommages resultant d'une collision (categorie 1). Normes de formation en apprentissage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of Skills Development, Toronto.

    This manual presents training standards for auto body and collision damage repairers (branch 1) and is intended to be used by apprentice/trainees, instructors, and companies in Ontario, Canada as a blueprint for training or as a prerequisite for accreditation/certification. The training standards identify skills required for this occupation and…

  13. Launch Collision Probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D.

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes the probability of a launch vehicle colliding with one of the nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the Earth, given that an object on a near-collision course with the launch vehicle has been identified. Knowledge of the probability of collision throughout the launch window can be used to avoid launching at times when the probability of collision is unacceptably high. The analysis in this report assumes that the positions of the orbiting objects and the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time and therefore that any tracked object which comes close to the launch vehicle can be identified. The analysis further assumes that the position uncertainty of the launch vehicle and the approaching space object can be described with position covariance matrices. With these and some additional simplifying assumptions, a closed-form solution is developed using two approaches. The solution shows that the probability of collision is a function of position uncertainties, the size of the two potentially colliding objects, and the nominal separation distance at the point of closest approach. ne impact of the simplifying assumptions on the accuracy of the final result is assessed and the application of the results to the Cassini mission, launched in October 1997, is described. Other factors that affect the probability of collision are also discussed. Finally, the report offers alternative approaches that can be used to evaluate the probability of collision.

  14. Combined results of searches for the standard model Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-03-01

    Combined results are reported from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV in five Higgs boson decay modes: gamma pair, b-quark pair, tau lepton pair, W pair, and Z pair. The explored Higgs boson mass range is 110-600 GeV. The analysed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6-4.8 inverse femtobarns. The expected excluded mass range in the absence of the standard model Higgs boson is 118-543 GeV at 95% CL. The observed results exclude the standard model Higgs boson in the mass range 127-600 GeV at 95% CL, and in the mass range 129-525 GeV at 99% CL. An excess of events above the expected standard model background is observed at the low end of the explored mass range making the observed limits weaker than expected in the absence of a signal. The largest excess, with a local significance of 3.1 sigma, is observed for a Higgs boson mass hypothesis of 124 GeV. The global significance of observing an excess with a local significance greater than 3.1 sigma anywhere in the search range 110-600 (110-145) GeV is estimated to be 1.5 sigma (2.1 sigma). More data are required to ascertain the origin of this excess.

  15. Preliminary result of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes in the Molucca collision zone with a 3D velocity model

    SciTech Connect

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash E-mail: h.a.shiddiqi@gmail.com; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono,; Sutiyono,; Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-24

    We have relocated hypocenters of earthquakes occurring in the Molucca collision zone and surrounding region taken from the BMKG catalog using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD). We used P-wave arrival times of local, regional, and teleseismic events recorded at 304 recording stations. Over 7,000 earthquakes were recorded by the BMKG seismographicnetworkin the study region from April, 2009 toJune, 2014. We used a 3D regional-global nested velocity modelresulting fromprevious global tomographystudy. In this study, the3D seismic velocity model was appliedto theIndonesian region, whilethe1D seismicvelocity model (ak135)wasused for regions outside of Indonesia. Our relocation results show a better improvement in travel-time RMS residuals comparedto those of the BMKG catalog.Ourresultsalso show that relocation shifts were dominated intheeast-west direction, whichmaybeinfluenced by theexistingvelocity anomaly related to the reversed V-shaped slabbeneaththestudy region. Our eventrelocation results refine the geometry of slabs beneath the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs.

  16. [The specific features of a lethal injury to the driver and the passenger of a scooter resulting from the collision with a car moving in the same direction].

    PubMed

    Fetisov, V A; Smirenin, S A; Khabova, Z S

    2014-01-01

    Forensic medical diagnostics of the injuries inflicted to the drivers and the passengers of bicycles (scooters, mopeds, quadrocycles, etc.) remains a serious challenge for the specialists involved in forensic medical and combined medico-autotechnical expertises. The present article is an overview of materials pertinent to the analysis of this form of traffic injuries. The approach to the analysis is exemplified by the case of repeated panel expertise with the purpose of elucidation of the mechanisms and the sequence of events leading to a combined blunt injury in the driver and the passenger of a scooter resulting from the collision with a car moving at a high speed in the same direction. Both victims presented with a whiplash injury to the brain stem region responsible for their immediate death at the scene of the accident. The results of the expertise allowed to differentiate between the driver and the passenger in terms of the extent of the injury. The authors emphasize the necessity of and good prospects for further traffic injury research bearing in mind a great variety of the aforementioned means of transportation.

  17. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    -coincidence technique / T. Kaneyasu, T. Azuma and K. Okuno. Recent developments in proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry / A. Wisthaler ... [et al.]. Interferences in electron emission from H[symbol] induced by fast ions / N. Stolterfoht. Atomic realization of the young single electron interference process in individual autoionization collisions / R. O. Barrachina and M. Šitnik. Multiple ionization processes related to irradiation of biological tissue / M. E. Galassi ... [et al.]. Atom-diatom collisions at cold and ultra-cold temperatures / F. D. Colavecchia, G. A. Parker and R. T. Pack. Interactions of ions with hydrogen atoms / A. Luca, G. Borodi and D. Gerlich. Analysis of all structures in the elastic and charge transfer cross sections for proton-hydrogen collisions in the range of 10[symbol]-10øeV / P. S. Krstić ... [et al.]. Ab-initio ion-atom collision calculations for many-electron systems / J. Anton and B. Fricke. Fully differential studies on single ionization of helium by slow proton impact / A. Hasan ... [et al.]. Dipole polarization effects on highly-charged-ion-atom electron capture / C. C. Havener ... [et al.]. Proton-, antiproton-, and photon-he collisions in the context of ultra fast processes / T. Morishita ... [et al.]. Impact parameter dependent charge exchange studies with channeled heavy ions / D. Dauvergne ... [et al.]. Crystal assisted atomic physics experiments using heavy ions / K. Komaki -- Collisions involving clusters and surfaces. Structure and dynamics of Van der Waal complexes: from triatomic to medium size clusters / G. Delgado Barrio ... [et al.]. Evaporation, fission and multifragmentation processes of multicharged C[symbol] ions versus excitation energies / S. Martin ... [et al.]. Fragmentation of collisionally excited fullerenes / M. Alcami, S. Diaz-Tendero and F. Martín. Lifetimes of C[symbol] and C[symbol] dianions in a storage ring / S. Tomita ... [et al.]. Clusters and clusters of clusters in collisions / B. Manil ... [et al

  18. Geochemical Interpretation of Collision Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Julian

    2014-05-01

    Collision volcanism can be defined as volcanism that takes place during an orogeny from the moment that continental subduction starts to the end of orogenic collapse. Its importance in the Geological Record is greatly underestimated as collision volcanics are easily misinterpreted as being of volcanic arc, extensional or mantle plume origin. There are many types of collision volcanic province: continent-island arc collision (e.g. Banda arc); continent-active margin collision (e.g. Tibet, Turkey-Iran); continent-rear-arc collision (e.g. Bolivia); continent-continent collision (e.g. Tuscany); and island arc-island arc collision (e.g. Taiwan). Superimposed on this variability is the fact that every orogeny is different in detail. Nonetheless, there is a general theme of cyclicity on different time scales. This starts with syn-collision volcanism resulting from the subduction of an ocean-continent transition and continental lithosphere, and continues through post-collision volcanism. The latter can be subdivided into orogenic volcanism, which is related to thickened crust, and post-orogenic, which is related to orogenic collapse. Typically, but not always, collision volcanism is preceded by normal arc volcanism and followed by normal intraplate volcanism. Identification and interpretation of collision volcanism in the Geologic Record is greatly facilitated if a dated stratigraphic sequence is present so that the petrogenic evolution can be traced. In any case, the basis of fingerprinting collision terranes is to use geochemical proxies for mantle and subduction fluxes, slab temperatures, and depths and degrees of melting. For example, syn-collision volcanism is characterized by a high subduction flux relative to mantle flux because of the high input flux of fusible sediment and crust coupled with limited mantle flow, and because of high slab temperatures resulting from the decrease in subduction rate. The resulting geochemical patterns are similar regardless of

  19. A new technique for the study of charge transfer in multiply charged ion-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shinpaugh, J.L.; Meyer, F.W.; Datz, S.

    1994-12-31

    While large cross sections (>10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2}) have been predicted for resonant charge transfer in ion-ion collisions, no experimental data exist for multiply charged systems. A novel technique is being developed at the ORNL ECR facility to allow study of symmetric charge exchange in multiply charged ion-ion collisions using a single ion source. Specific intra-beam charge transfer collisions occurring in a well-defined interaction region labeled by negative high voltage are identified and analyzed by electrostatic analysis in combination with ion time-of-flight coincidence detection of the collision products. Center-of-mass collision energies from 400 to 1000 eV are obtained by varying source and labeling-cell voltages. In addition, by the introduction of a target gas into the high-voltage cell, this labeling-voltage method allows measurement of electron-capture and -loss cross sections for ion-atom collisions. Consequently, higher collision energies can be investigated without the requirement of placing the ECR source on a high-voltage platform.

  20. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  2. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The research program of Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom, ion-ion, and ion-molecule collisions. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-core interaction can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. Winter has focussed on intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), in which many electron states are strongly coupled during the collision and a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. Alston has concentrated on higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies), or asymmetric collision systems, for which the coupling of the projectile is weaker with, however, many more target states being coupled together so that high-order perturbation theory is essential. Several calculations by Winter and Alston are described, as set forth in the original proposal.

  3. Charge transfer in cold Yb++Rb collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayfutyarova, Elvira R.; Buchachenko, Alexei A.; Yakovleva, Svetlana A.; Belyaev, Andrey K.

    2013-05-01

    Charge-transfer cold Yb++ Rb collision dynamics is investigated theoretically using high-level ab initio potential energy curves, dipole moment functions, and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. Within the scalar-relativistic approximation, the radiative transitions from the entrance A1Σ+ to the ground X1Σ+ state are found to be the only efficient charge-transfer pathway. The spin-orbit coupling does not open other efficient pathways, but alters the potential energy curves and the transition dipole moment for the A-X pair of states. The radiative, as well as the nonradiative, charge-transfer cross sections calculated within the 10-3-10 cm-1 collision energy range exhibit all features of the Langevin ion-atom collision regime, including a rich structure associated with centrifugal barrier tunneling (orbiting) resonances. Theoretical rate coefficients for two Yb isotopes agree well with those measured by immersing Yb+ ions in an ultracold Rb ensemble in a hybrid trap. Possible origins of discrepancy in the product distributions and relations to previously studied similar processes are discussed.

  4. Dynamic screening and wake effects on electronic excitation in ion-solid and ion-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. . Dept. of Physics Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1991-01-01

    The collective electronic response in a solid effectively alters ionic and atomic potentials giving rise to dynamic screening and to a wake'' of density fluctuations trailing ions as they propagate through the solid. The presence of dynamic screening modifies electronic excitation processes of projectiles in ion-solid collisions as compared to binary ion-atom collisions. We review recent theoretical and experimental studies directed at the search for and identification of signatures of dynamic screening and wake effects. Examples include the formation of excited projectile bound states under channeling conditions, radiative electron capture, the search for wake riding'' electrons in antiproton-solid collisions, and the neutralization of highly charged ions near surfaces. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Recent STAR results on W boson production in polarized p+p collisions at √s=500 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balewski, Jan

    2012-10-01

    The production of W^± bosons in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions is an ideal tool to study the spin-flavor structure of the proton, because the spin-dependent W production cross section δσ=σ(p p) - σ(p p) is directly sensitive to the polarization of the quarks and anti-quarks in the proton. At leading order in the standard model, W^± production proceeds through u+d ->W^+ and d+u ->W^-. The STAR Electromagnetic Calorimeter is used to trigger on electrons and positrons from the weak decay of the W boson and to provide a measure of the lepton energy, while the STAR Time Projection Chamber allowes for reconstruction of the lepton track and its charge sign. Background events from QCD processes were suppressed by isolation cuts around a candidate lepton track as well as vetoing on transverse energy opposite in azimuth of the candidate. The STAR experiment has collected about 100 pb-1 of W boson events from collisions of protons at √s= 500 GeV, longitudinally polarized at 50%, during 2009-2012 running periods. We will present progress on determination of the single-spin asymmetry, AL=δσ/(σ(p p) +

  6. Single-photon emission associated with double electron capture in F9 ++C collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkafrawy, T.; Simon, A.; Tanis, J. A.; Warczak, A.

    2016-10-01

    Radiative double electron capture (RDEC), the one-step process occurring in ion-atom collisions, has been investigated for bare fluorine ions colliding with carbon. RDEC is completed when two target electrons are captured to a bound state of a projectile simultaneously with the emission of a single photon. This work is a follow-up to our earlier measurement of RDEC for bare oxygen projectiles, thus providing a recipient system free of electron-related Coulomb fields in both cases and allowing for the comparison between the two collision systems as well as with available theoretical studies. The most significant mechanisms of x-ray emission that may contribute to the RDEC energy region as background processes are also addressed.

  7. Hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions

    PubMed

    Froelich; Jonsell; Saenz; Zygelman; Dalgarno

    2000-05-15

    Matter-antimatter interactions are investigated using hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions as an example. Cross sections for elastic scattering and for the antihydrogen loss (either through the rearrangement reaction, resulting in formation of protonium and positronium according to H+&Hmacr;-->p&pmacr;+e(+)e(-), or via annihilation in flight) are calculated for the first time in a fully quantum mechanical approach. Implications for experiments intending to trap and cool antihydrogen are discussed.

  8. Recent STAR Results from Charged Pion Production in Polarized pp Collisions at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kocoloski, Adam

    2009-08-04

    The STAR experiment at RHIC measures the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} for a variety of final states in collisions of longitudinally polarized protons to constrain the polarized gluon distribution in the proton. Asymmetries for mid-rapidity charged pion production benefit from large cross-sections and the excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities of the STAR Time Projection Chamber. This contribution presents a measurement of the ratio of cross sections for inclusive {pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +} production using data collected in 2005, as well as a new measurement of A{sub LL} for charged pions opposite a jet obtained from the 2006 RHIC run.

  9. Collision-Induced Absorption by H2 Pairs in the Second Overtone Band at 298 and 77.5 K: Comparison between Experimental and Theoretical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodbeck, C.; Bouanich, J.-P.; van-Thanh, Nguyen; Fu, Y.; Borysow, A.

    1999-01-01

    The collision-induced spectra of hydrogen in the region of the second overtone at 0.8 microns have been recorded at temperatures of 298 and 77.5 K and for gas densities ranging from 100 to 800 amagats. The spectral profile defined by the absorption coefficient per squared density varies significantly with the density, so that the binary absorption coefficient has been determined by extrapolations to zero density of the measured profiles. Our extrapolated measurements and our recent ab initio quantum calculation are in relatively good agreement with one another. Taking into account the very weak absorption of the second overtone band, the agreement is, however, not as good as it has become (our) standard for strong bands.

  10. Recent CDF results on heavy and exotic baryons in p-pbar collisions at s**(1/2)=1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Curbis, F.; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2005-01-01

    Since March 2001 a new period of CDF data taking (called Run II) began at the p{bar p} Tevatron collider. The upgrade of Collider Detector at Fermilab improved the tracking system: the vertexing, triggering and particle identification capabilities. This has allowed a further development of B physics, because the B{sub s} and {Lambda}{sub b} are produced in hadronic collisions. Here measurements of the mass and lifetime of {Lambda}{sub b} in two decay channels are presented. Using particle identification (PID) information from the time of flight and the dE/dx, CDF performed pentaquark searches for {Theta}{sup +}, {Xi}{sub 3/2}{sup --,0} and {Theta}{sub c}{sup 0}, following the recent interest in exotic baryon spectroscopy.

  11. Triple Collision and Close Triple Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldvogel, Joerg

    In gravitational systems of point masses binary collisions are mathematically simple and well understood. Collisions of three or more particles are much more complicated, i.e. a dramatic increase of complexity occurs when the number N of particles involved in a collision increases from 2 to 3. Collisions of more than three particles seem to be of the same complexity as triple collisions. However, there are still unanswered questions concerning general N-body collisions.The reason for the complexity of triple collision is the inherent sensitivity to initial conditions for solutions passing near triple collision, even after a short time. Specifically, a solution passing near triple collision may change dramatically if the initial conditions prior to the close encounter are modified infinitesimally. In contrast, this is not the case for a binary collision.We use the planar three-body problem as a model in order to discuss the main features of triple collision of point masses and of its realistic counterpart, the close triple encounter. This comparatively simple model allows us to study all important aspects of close encounters of N > 2 gravitationally interacting point masses.In Chapters 1 and 2 we discuss classical results, beginning with the equations of motion, then studying relationships between the total angular momentum and triple collision. C. L. Siegel's famous series for triple collision solutions, one time considered the highlight of the theory of triple collision, conclude the traditional part of these lectures.Chapter 3 is devoted to studying the relationship between solutions engaging in a sharp triple collision and neighbouring solutions. The variational equation gives a rough idea of what is happening. A complete understanding can be achieved by means of R. McGehee's concept of the collision manifold, which arises by introducing special coordinates blowing up all possible states close to triple collision. In this context, possibilities of regularizing

  12. Ternary drop collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterbichler, Hannes; Planchette, Carole; Brenn, Günter

    2015-10-01

    It has been recently proposed to use drop collisions for producing advanced particles or well-defined capsules, or to perform chemical reactions where the merged drops constitute a micro-reactor. For all these promising applications, it is essential to determine whether the merged drops remain stable after the collision, forming a single entity, or if they break up. This topic, widely investigated for binary drop collisions of miscible and immiscible liquid, is quite unexplored for ternary drop collisions. The current study aims to close this gap by experimentally investigating collisions between three equal-sized drops of the same liquid arranged centri-symmetrically. Three drop generators are simultaneously operated to obtain controlled ternary drop collisions. The collision outcomes are observed via photographs and compared to those of binary collisions. Similar to binary collisions, a regime map is built, showing coalescence and bouncing as well as reflexive and stretching separation. Significant differences are observed in the transitions between these regimes.

  13. Chronic widespread pain after motor vehicle collision typically occurs through immediate development and nonrecovery: results of an emergency department-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hu, JunMei; Bortsov, Andrey V; Ballina, Lauren; Orrey, Danielle C; Swor, Robert A; Peak, David; Jones, Jeffrey; Rathlev, Niels; Lee, David C; Domeier, Robert; Hendry, Phyllis; Parry, Blair A; McLean, Samuel A

    2016-02-01

    Motor vehicle collision (MVC) can trigger chronic widespread pain (CWP) development in vulnerable individuals. Whether such CWP typically develops through the evolution of pain from regional to widespread or through the early development of widespread pain with nonrecovery is currently unknown. We evaluated the trajectory of CWP development (American College of Rheumatology criteria) among 948 European-American individuals who presented to the emergency department (ED) for care in the early aftermath of MVC. Pain extent was assessed in the ED and 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after MVC on 100%, 91%, 89%, and 91% of participants, respectively. Individuals who reported prior CWP at the time of ED evaluation (n = 53) were excluded. Trajectory modeling identified a 2-group solution as optimal, with the Bayes Factor value (138) indicating strong model selection. Linear solution plots supported a nonrecovery model. Although the number of body regions with pain in the non-CWP group steadily declined, the number of body regions with pain in the CWP trajectory group (192/895, 22%) remained relatively constant over time. These data support the hypothesis that individuals who develop CWP after MVC develop widespread pain in the early aftermath of MVC, which does not remit.

  14. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  15. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Georgia, Athens, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  16. Comparison of cross sections from the quasi-classical trajectory method and the j(z)-conserving centrifugal sudden approximation with accurate quantum results for an atom-rigid nonlinear polyatomic collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of a series of calculations of state-to-state integral cross sections for collisions between O and nonvibrating H2O in the gas phase on a model nonreactive potential energy surface. The dynamical methods used include converged quantum mechanical scattering calculations, the j(z) conserving centrifugal sudden (j(z)-CCS) approximation, and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations. We consider three total energies 0.001, 0.002, and 0.005 E(h) and the nine initial states with rotational angular momentum less than or equal to 2 (h/2 pi). The j(z)-CCS approximation gives good results, while the QCT method can be quite unreliable for transitions to specific rotational sublevels. However, the QCT cross sections summed over final sublevels and averaged over initial sublevels are in better agreement with the quantum results.

  17. Radiative double electron capture in collisions of fully-stripped fluorine ions with thin carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkafrawy, Tamer Mohammad Samy

    Radiative double electron capture (RDEC) is a one-step process in ion-atom collisions occurring when two target electrons are captured to a bound state of the projectile simultaneously with the emission of a single photon. The emitted photon has approximately double the energy of the photon emitted due to radiative electron capture (REC), which occurs when a target electron is captured to a projectile bound state with simultaneous emission of a photon. REC and RDEC can be treated as time-reversed photoionization (PI) and double photoionization (DPI), respectively, if loosely-bound target electrons are captured. This concept can be formulated with the principle of detailed balance, in which the processes of our interest can be described in terms of their time-reversed ones. Fully-stripped ions were used as projectiles in the performed RDEC experiments, providing a recipient system free of electron-related Coulomb fields. This allows the target electrons to be transferred without interaction with any of the projectile electrons, enabling accurate investigation of the electron-electron interaction in the vicinity of electromagnetic field. In this dissertation, RDEC was investigated during the collision of fully-stripped fluorine ions with a thin carbon foil and the results are compared with the recent experimental and theoretical studies. In the current work, x rays associated with projectile charge-changing by single and double electron capture and no charge change by F9+ ions were observed and compared with recent work for O8+ ions and with theory. Both the F 9+ and O8+ ions had energies in the ˜MeV/u range. REC, in turn, was investigated as a means to compare with the theoretical predictions of the RDEC/REC cross section ratio. The most significant background processes including various mechanisms of x-ray emission that may interfere with the energy region of interest are addressed in detail. This enables isolation of the contributions of REC and RDEC from the

  18. Search for resonant electron transfer and double excitation in Kr{sup 34+} + H{sub 2} collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zaharakis, K.E.; Haar, R.R.; Tanis, J.A.; Clark, M.W.; Plano, V.L.

    1992-12-31

    Resonant electron transfer and double excitation (RME) is a correlated electron process which is expected to occur in an ion-atom collision when electron capture is accompanied by the simultaneous excitation of two inner-shell electrons. RT2 is similar to resonant transfer excitation (RTE) in which only a single electron is excited. RT2E was investigated experimentally for 38--42 MeV/u Kr{sup 34} + H{sub 2} collisions by observing x-ray emission associated with single-electron capture. No events associated with Kr K x rays (near 13 keV were observed; however, events do occur at about twice (> 22 keV) the Kr K x-ray energy. Several possible sources of these latter x rays have been considered.

  19. Comparative study of collision cross-sections and ion transport coefficients from several He+/He interaction potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicheportiche, A.; Lepetit, B.; Benhenni, M.; Gadea, F. X.; Yousfi, M.

    2013-03-01

    Ion-atom collision cross-sections and transport coefficients are computed from several He2+ interaction potentials. Differential and integral momentum transfer cross-sections are obtained with a close-coupling quantum method using several literature interaction potentials. These collision cross-sections are used in an optimized Monte Carlo code to calculate the ion transport coefficients over a wide range of reduced electric field considering first the scattering anisotropy by using a differential cross-section and then an isotropic scattering approximation based on momentum transfer cross-section. Reduced mobilities are compared with available experimental data. This allows us to segregate accurate potentials which provide reduced mobilities falling within experimental error bars.

  20. Heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jacak, B.V.

    1994-11-01

    Heavy ion collisions at very high energies provide an opportunity to recreate in the laboratory the conditions which existed very early in the universe, just after the big bang. We prepare matter at very high energy density and search for evidence that the quarks and gluons are deconfined. I describe the kinds of observables that are experimentally accessible to characterize the system and to search for evidence of new physics. A wealth of information is now available from CERN and BNL heavy ion experiments. I discuss recent results on two particle correlations, strangeness production, and dilepton and direct photon distributions.

  1. Hydrogen-Antihydrogen Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, P.; Jonsell, S.; Saenz, A.; Zygelman, B.; Dalgarno, A.

    2000-05-15

    Matter-antimatter interactions are investigated using hydrogen-antihydrogen collisions as an example. Cross sections for elastic scattering and for the antihydrogen loss (either through the rearrangement reaction, resulting in formation of protonium and positronium according to H+H(bar sign){yields}p p(bar sign)+e{sup +}e{sup -} , or via annihilation in flight) are calculated for the first time in a fully quantum mechanical approach. Implications for experiments intending to trap and cool antihydrogen are discussed. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. A problem of collision avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Cliff, E. M.; Grantham, W. J.; Peng, W. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Collision avoidance between two vehicles of constant speed with limited turning radii, moving in a horizontal plane is investigated. Collision avoidance is viewed as a game by assuming that the operator of one vehicle has perfect knowledge of the state of the other, whereas the operator of the second vehicle is unaware of any impending danger. The situation envisioned is that of an encounter between a commercial aircraft and a small light aircraft. This worse case situation is examined to determine the conditions under which the commercial aircraft should execute a collision avoidance maneuver. Three different zones of vulnerability are defined and the boundaries, or barriers, between these zones are determined for a typical aircraft encounter. A discussion of the methods used to obtain the results as well as some of the salient features associated with the resultant barriers is included.

  3. Restricted Collision List method for faster Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrossan, Michael N.

    2016-08-01

    The 'Restricted Collision List' (RCL) method for speeding up the calculation of DSMC Variable Soft Sphere collisions, with Borgnakke-Larsen (BL) energy exchange, is presented. The method cuts down considerably on the number of random collision parameters which must be calculated (deflection and azimuthal angles, and the BL energy exchange factors). A relatively short list of these parameters is generated and the parameters required in any cell are selected from this list. The list is regenerated at intervals approximately equal to the smallest mean collision time in the flow, and the chance of any particle re-using the same collision parameters in two successive collisions is negligible. The results using this method are indistinguishable from those obtained with standard DSMC. The CPU time saving depends on how much of a DSMC calculation is devoted to collisions and how much is devoted to other tasks, such as moving particles and calculating particle interactions with flow boundaries. For 1-dimensional calculations of flow in a tube, the new method saves 20% of the CPU time per collision for VSS scattering with no energy exchange. With RCL applied to rotational energy exchange, the CPU saving can be greater; for small values of the rotational collision number, for which most collisions involve some rotational energy exchange, the CPU may be reduced by 50% or more.

  4. Numerical Simulations of Drop Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobari, M. R. H.; Tryggvason, G.

    1994-01-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of the off-axis collisions of two drops are presented. The full Navier-Stokes equations are solved by a Front-Tracking/Finite-Difference method that allows a fully deformable fluid interface and the inclusion of surface tension. The drops are accelerated towards each other by a body force that is turned off before the drops collide. Depending on whether the interface between the drops is ruptured or not, the drops either bounce or coalesce. For drops that coalesce, the impact parameter, which measures how far the drops are off the symmetry line, determines the eventual outcome of the collision. For low impact parameters, the drops coalesce permanently, but for higher impact parameters, a grazing collision, where the drops coalesce and then stretch apart again is observed. The results are in agreement with experimental observations.

  5. Disequilibration by Planetary Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Jutzi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Molten planets equilibrate gravitationally, chemically, and thermally. Large scale collisions (a.k.a. giant impacts, similar-sized collisions) can upset the apple cart by bringing core material, late in the game, into mixture with mantle products, and by shredding stratified planets into strands of mantle and clumps of core (c.g. Asphaug et al. Nature 2006). Atmophiles and volatiles come along for the ride, and can find themselves in disequilibrium mixtures not anticipated by one-dimensional models of planetary evolution, or by planet growth models in which planets stick, merge, and mix perfectly in the aftermath of a collision. We present very high resolution case studies of such collisions.

  6. A summary of recent experimental results from Mark J: High energy e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collisions at PETRA: Report Number 131

    SciTech Connect

    Adeva, B.; Barber, D.P.; Becker, U.; Berdugo, J.; Bohm, A.; Branson, J.G.; Burger, J.D.; Capell, M.; Cerrada, M.; Chang, C.C.

    1983-12-01

    The PETRA electron-positron collider at DESY in Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, began operating in 1978, with four intersection regions devoted to experiments. In the intervening five years, five detector devices, CELLO, JADE, MARK-J, PLUTO and TASSO have accumulated and published a substantial variety of experimental results. The limits of validity of Quantum Electro-Dynamics (QED) have been extended; the pointlike nature of leptons and quarks have been probed at exceedingly small distances; the Glashow, Weinberg and Salam (GWS) '' standard electroweak model'' has been tested and found to describe interactions remarkably well; the predicted interference between electromagnetic and weak forces has been conclusively demonstrated; events with three jets have been discovered and interpreted as resulting from gluons, as predicted by Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD); the sixth, ''top,'' quark has not been found yet, although an energy search for ''toponium'' (top + antitop) has been carried out up to 43.1 GeV center of mass energy. An integrated luminosity of about 100 pb/sup /minus/1/ mostly at energies above 30 GeV, has produced a very large sample of events. The present paper is a complete review and up-dating of all MARK-J physics results either published or unpublished. Since the amount of interesting information is so large, we realized that a coherent summation could be of substantial usefulness to the community. In order that this review can serve many needs, we include, a brief description of the apparatus and the data acquisition and analysis.

  7. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  8. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  9. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  10. Rubidium-Strontium collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, Michaela; Potter, Garrett; Whitehead, Marc; McEntee, Elyse; Koll, Christopher J.

    2010-03-01

    The invention of the magneto-optical trap (MOT) in 1987 - which was awarded the Noble Price in Physics 10 years later - has enabled many new and exciting experiments. Among them are precision measurements of basic atomic properties, ultracold collisions, Bose-Einstein Condensates, atom lasers, etc.. Recent developments in the field of atomic and molecular physics have included the creation of diatomic (homo- and heteronuclear) molecules. These ultracold molecules promise to revolutionize physical chemistry, few-body physics, precision measurements and quantum information processing, similar to how ultracold atoms revolutionized AMO physics several years ago. We will present our first results of a mixed alkaline (rubidium) and alkaline-earth (strontium) magneto-optical trap.

  11. Bubble collision with gravitation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Dong-il; Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; Yeom, Dong-han E-mail: bhl@sogang.ac.kr E-mail: innocent.yeom@gmail.com

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we study vacuum bubble collisions with various potentials including gravitation, assuming spherical, planar, and hyperbolic symmetry. We use numerical calculations from double-null formalism. Spherical symmetry can mimic the formation of a black hole via multiple bubble collisions. Planar and especially hyperbolic symmetry describes two bubble collisions. We study both cases, when two true vacuum regions have the same field value or different field values, by varying tensions. For the latter case, we also test symmetric and asymmetric bubble collisions, and see details of causal structures. If the colliding energy is sufficient, then the vacuum can be destabilized, and it is also demonstrated. This double-null formalism can be a complementary approach in the context of bubble collisions.

  12. Collision risk assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Ortiz, N.; Belló Mora, M.; Graziano, M.; Pina Caballero, F.; Sánchez Pérez, J. M.; Klinkrad, H.

    2001-10-01

    Avoidance of near misses or collisions is required for almost all satellites on orbit, but it is of particular interest for manned missions and spacecraft at densely populated regions. In order to avoid these possible collisions, it is needed to determine a possible conjunction and its associated uncertainty. Two main constraints must be taken into account when a tool to forecast the collision risk of an object is being developed: the high number of objects in space and the accuracy of the catalogued object data. The number of objects on Earth orbit makes impossible to propagate all the catalogued objects, thus filtering and parallel processing techniques are presented. The accuracy of the catalogued object data and the propagation of the error over the time identify a position ellipsoid of error, whose behaviour has an important influence on some parameters on the filtering techniques and the way the collision probability is computed. Some collision probability methods are presented.

  13. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzene–benzene vs benzene–rare gas atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jie; Krems, Roman V.; Li, Zhiying

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom–molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom–benzene calculations with those for benzene–benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  14. Secondary Electrons from Water Vapor with the Impact of 6.0 MeV/u He2+ Ions: Atomic Data and their Application to Biomedical Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Y.; Soga, F.; Ohsawa, D.; Higashi, A.; Kawauchi, H.; Hirabayashi, M.; Okada, Y.; Uehara, S.; Nikjoo, H.

    2005-05-27

    We measured the energy and angular distributions (7 eV-10 keV and 20 degree sign -160 degree sign ) of secondary electrons produced in collisions of 6.0 MeV/u He2+ ions with water vapor. Binary-encounter collision peaks were clearly observed at the calculated energies at angles of <90 degree sign , as well as the K-LL Auger peak of oxygen at about 500 eV for all angles. From these measurements, the doubly differential cross sections (DDCS) of electron emissions were deduced with an estimated uncertainty of {+-}13%. The energy distribution (SDCS) was also obtained by integrating the DDCS values with respect to the ejected angles, and compared with an empirical model of Rudd. The energy spectrum (SDCS) showed good agreement with the model of Rudd in the energy range of secondary electrons of <100 eV. However, in the 100-1000 eV energy range, the experimental spectrum shows significant discrepancies, smaller by 30%, and is nearly twice greater in the region >3keV. To assess the new cross sections, these values were incorporated in the kurbuc Monte-Carlo track structure code system for a simulation of secondary electrons. Radial dose distributions for 6.0 MeV/u He2+ ions were obtained by analyzing the tracks generated by the code kurbuc using the new DDCS values. In the core with a radius (r) of less than 1 nm, the dose is very high due mainly to excitation events, induced by low-energy electrons. The penumbra shows a well-known r-2 dependence.

  15. Late Triassic paleomagnetic result from the Baoshan Terrane, West Yunnan of China: Implication for orientation of the East Paleotethys suture zone and timing of the Sibumasu-Indochina collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Huang, Baochun; Yan, Yonggang; Zhang, Donghai

    2015-11-01

    In order to better understand the paleogeographic position of the Baoshan Terrane in the northernmost part of the Sibumasu Block during formation of the Pangea supercontinent, a paleomagnetic study has been conducted on Late Triassic basaltic lavas from the southern part of the Baoshan Terrane in the West Yunnan region of Southwest China. Following detailed rock magnetic investigations and progressive thermal demagnetization, stable characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRMs) were successfully isolated from Late Triassic Niuhetang lava flows. The ChRMs are of dual polarity and pass fold and reversal tests with magnetic carriers dominated by magnetite and subordinate oxidation-induced hematite; we thus interpret them as a primary remanence. This new paleomagnetic result indicates that the Baoshan Terrane was located at low paleolatitudes of ∼15°N in the Northern Hemisphere during Late Triassic times. Together with available paleomagnetic data from the Baoshan Terrane and surrounding areas, a wider paleomagnetic comparison supports the view that the East Paleotethys Ocean separated the Sibumasu and Indochina blocks and closed no later than Late Triassic times. We argue that the currently approximately north-to-south directed Changning-Menglian suture zone is very likely to have been oriented nearly east-to-west at the time of the Sibumasu-Indochina collision.

  16. Cosmic bubble collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleban, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    I briefly review the physics of cosmic bubble collisions in false-vacuum eternal inflation. My purpose is to provide an introduction to the subject for readers unfamiliar with it, focussing on recent work related to the prospects for observing the effects of bubble collisions in cosmology. I will attempt to explain the essential physical points as simply and concisely as possible, leaving most technical details to the references. I make no attempt to be comprehensive or complete. I also present a new solution to Einstein's equations that represents a bubble universe after a collision, containing vacuum energy and ingoing null radiation with an arbitrary density profile.

  17. COLLIDE: Collisions into Dust Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.

    1999-01-01

    The Collisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) was completed and flew on STS-90 in April and May of 1998. After the experiment was returned to Earth, the data and experiment were analyzed. Some anomalies occurred during the flight which prevented a complete set of data from being obtained. However, the experiment did meet its criteria for scientific success and returned surprising results on the outcomes of very low energy collisions into powder. The attached publication, "Low Velocity Microgravity Impact Experiments into Simulated Regolith," describes in detail the scientific background, engineering, and scientific results of COLLIDE. Our scientific conclusions, along with a summary of the anomalies which occurred during flight, are contained in that publication. We offer it as our final report on this grant.

  18. Molecular vibrational states during a collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Recamier, Jose A.; Jauregui, Rocio

    1995-01-01

    Alternative algebraic techniques to approximate a given Hamiltonian by a harmonic oscillator are described both for time-independent and time-dependent systems. We apply them to the description of a one dimensional atom-diatom collision. From the resulting evolution operator, we evaluate vibrational transition probabilities as well as other time-dependent properties. As expected, the ground vibrational state becomes a squeezed state during the collision.

  19. Kink Collisions in Curved Field Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlqvist, Pontus; Eckerle, Kate; Greene, Brian

    2015-04-01

    We study bubble universe collisions in the ultrarelativistic limit with the new feature of allowing for nontrivial curvature in field space. We establish a simple geometrical interpretation of such collisions in terms of a double family of field profiles whose tangent vector fields stand in mutual parallel transport. This provides a generalization of the well-known flat field space limit of the free passage approximation. We investigate the limits of this approximation and illustrate our analytical results with numerical simulations.

  20. Modelling Coulomb Collisions in Anisotropic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Collisional transport in anisotropic plasmas is investigated comparing the theoretical transport coefficients (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2009) for anisotropic particles with the results of the corresponding Langevin equation, obtained as a generalization of Manheimer et al. (1997). References: Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2009), On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 16, 054501. Manheimer, W. M., M. Lampe and G. Joyce (1997), Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions in PIC simulations, J. Comput. Phys., 138, 563-584.

  1. Icy Collisions - Planet Building beyond the snowline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Sabrina; Hill, Catherine; Heisselmann, Daniel; Blum, Juergen; Fraser, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Collisions of small icy and dust particles beyond the “snow-line” are a key step in planet formation. Whilst the physical forces that underpin the aggregation of the smallest grains (van der Waals) and the largest planetessimals (gravity) are well understood, the processes involving mm - cm sized particles remain a mystery.In a unique set of experiments, we investigated low velocity collisions of dust and icy particles in this size range under microgravity conditions - utilizing parabolic flight (e.g. Salter 2009, Hill 2015 (a) & (b)). Experiments were performed at cryogenic temperatures (below 140 K) for icy aggregates and ambient as well as cryogenic temperatures (80 - 220 K) for dust aggregates.The kinetic analysis of the observed collisions of different aggregate types in different shapes and sizes revealed astonishing results - as the collisional properties of all investigated particles differ strongly from the usual assumptions in models of planet formation.Here, we present a summary of the results on the collisions of icy particles as well as first results on the collisions of dust aggregates. Focus will be on the coefficient of restitution, which measures the loss of translational energy in bouncing collisions and is a key parameter in models of planet formation.

  2. Recent results from LHCf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menjo, H.; Adriani, O.; Berti, E.; Bonechi, L.; Bongi, M.; Castellini, G.; D'Alessandro, R.; Del Prete, M.; Haguenauer, M.; Itow, Y.; Kasahara, K.; Kawade, K.; Makino, Y.; Masuda, K.; Matsubayashi, E.; Mitsuka, G.; Muraki, Y.; Papini, P.; Perrot, A.-L.; Pfeiffer, D.; Ricciarini, S.; Sako, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Sugiura, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tamura, T.; Tiberio, A.; Torii, S.; Tricomi, A.; Turner, W. C.; Zhou, Q.

    2015-08-01

    The LHCf experiment is one of the LHC forward experiments. The aim of LHCf is to provide critical calibration data of hadronic intraction models used in air shower simulations. The LHCf has completed the operations for p-p collisions with a collision energy of √s = 0.9 and 7 TeV p-p in 2010 and for p-Pb collisions with a collision energy per nucleon of √sNN = 5.02. The recent LHCf result of forward neutron energy spectra at 7 TeV p-p collision and forward π0 spectra at p-Pb collisions are presented in this paper.

  3. Newton's Strange Collisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    1995-01-01

    Discusses Newton's apparent oversight of the role of energy considerations in collisions between two spherical bodies related to the third corollary of his "Laws of Motion." Investigates several theories that provide solutions to the mysterious oversight. (LZ)

  4. The Sandbag Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xueli

    2006-10-01

    As physics teachers, we all know that many introductory physics students have difficulties in understanding conservation of energy during inelastic collisions where the difficult-to-visualize concept of internal energy is involved. An interesting approach using a pair of model carts1,2 has been developed to help students visualize and understand the concept of internal thermal energy involved during an inelastic collision. This paper will illustrate a sandbag collision experiment that uses visible deformation of the sandbag to help students visualize where the kinetic energy goes during an inelastic collision. This experiment problem (as shown in Fig. 1) can be broken into three small subparts: 1) The pendulum bob swings down until right before hitting the box—a conservation of energy problem; 2) The bob collides with the box—a conservation of momentum problem; 3) The box slides on the table until it comes to a stop—a conservation of energy problem or a dynamics problem.

  5. Visually guided collision avoidance and collision achievement.

    PubMed

    Regan; Gray

    2000-03-01

    To survive on today's highways, a driver must have highly developed skills in visually guided collision avoidance. To play such games as cricket, tennis or baseball demands accurate, precise and reliable collision achievement. This review discusses evidence that some of these tasks are performed by predicting where an object will be at some sharply defined instant, several hundred milliseconds in the future, while other tasks are performed by utilizing the fact that some of our motor actions change what we see in ways that obey lawful relationships, and can therefore be learned. Several monocular and binocular visual correlates of the direction of an object's motion relative to the observer's head have been derived theoretically, along with visual correlates of the time to collision with an approaching object. Although laboratory psychophysics can identify putative neural mechanisms by showing which of the known correlates are processed by the human visual system independently of other visual information, it is only field research on, for example, driving, aviation and sport that can show which visual cues are actually used in these activities. This article reviews this research and describes a general psychophysically based rational approach to the design of such field studies.

  6. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, Laura; Pearson, Erik A.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. Methods: A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the SKANECT software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0° , while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in PINNACLE, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)—a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Results: Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation

  7. Ion Collision, Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.

    2013-09-11

    The outcome of a collision between an ion and neutral species depends on the chemical and physical properties of the two reactants, their relative velocities, and the impact parameter of their trajectories. These include elastic and inelastic scattering of the colliding particles, charge transfer (including dissociative charge transfer), atom abstraction, complex formation and dissociation of the colliding ion. Each of these reactions may be characterized in terms of their energy-dependent rate coefficients, cross sections and reaction kinetics. A theoretical framework that emphasizes simple models and classical mechanics is presented for these processes. Collision processes are addressed in two categories of low-energy and high-energy collisions. Experiments under thermal or quasi-thermal conditions–swarms, drift tubes, chemical ionization and ion cyclotron resonance are strongly influenced by long-range forces and often involve collisions in which atom exchange and extensive energy exchange are common characteristics. High-energy collisions are typically impulsive, involve short-range intermolecular forces and are direct, fast processes.

  8. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeNure, Charles R.

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  9. Collision of cosmic superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Firouzjahi, H.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2008-03-15

    We study the formation of three-string junctions between (p,q)-cosmic superstrings, and collisions between such strings and show that kinematic constraints analogous to those found previously for collisions of Nambu-Goto strings apply here too, with suitable modifications to take account of the additional requirements of flux conservation. We examine in detail several examples involving collisions between strings with low values of p and q, and also examine the rates of growth or shrinkage of strings at a junction. Finally, we briefly discuss the formation of junctions for strings in a warped space, specifically with a Klebanov-Strassler throat, and show that similar constraints still apply with changes to the parameters taking account of the warping and the background flux.

  10. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapiditymore » spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.« less

  11. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapidity spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.

  12. Hydrodynamic evolution and jet energy loss in Cu + Cu collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-04-15

    We present results from a hybrid description of Cu + Cu collisions using (3 + 1)-dimensional hydrodynamics (music) for the bulk evolution and a Monte Carlo simulation (martini) for the evolution of high-momentum partons in the hydrodynamical background. We explore the limits of this description by going to small system sizes and determine the dependence on different fractions of wounded nucleon and binary collisions scaling of the initial energy density. We find that Cu + Cu collisions are well described by the hybrid description at least up to 20% central collisions.

  13. Jets and Vector Bosons in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, Begoña

    2013-11-01

    This paper reviews experimental results on jets and electroweak boson (photon,Wand Z) production in heavy-ion collisions, from the CMS and ATLAS detectors, using data collected during 2011 PbPb run and pp data collected at an equivalent energy. By comparing the two collision systems, the energy loss of the partons propagating through the medium produced in PbPb collisions can be studied. Its characterization is done using dijet events and isolated photon-jet pairs. Since the electroweak gauge bosons do not participate in the strong interaction, and are thus unmodified by the nuclear medium, they serve as clean probes of the initial state in the collision.

  14. Zero Degree Target Electron Spectroscopy: Double Excitation-Autoionization of Helium in Fast Electron, Hydrogen Ion, HELIUM(+) Ion and HELIUM(+2) Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Houle

    The purpose of this work is to investigate few -body dynamical effects in fast ion-atom and electron-atom collisions using zero-degree high-resolution Auger electron spectroscopy. In this study we report the first zero degree high-resolution spectra and double differential cross sections (DDCS) measurement for double excitation-autoionization of He target atoms. We also measured direct ionization DDCS at zero degree observation angle. All of our cross sections are absolutely calibrated. The projectiles used in this work are energetic electrons in the energy range 150 to 1000eV, 100KeV to 1.5MeV protons, 400KeV to 1.5MeV He^+ and 400KeV to 1.6MeV He ^{2+}. The zero degree observation angle provide a unique opportunity to maximize interaction between the emitted electron, the ionized target atom and the charged projectile particle. Using an equal or better than 0.2% instrumental energy resolution allows us to study the autoionization line profiles. In particular the doubly excited autoionizing (2lnl') states of He have been observed as a function of the collision conditions such as impact velocity, projectile charge sign and type of projectile, specifically for dominating (2p^2)^1 Dto(1sepsilon d) and (2s2p)^1P ^circto(1sepsilon p) channels. The results of our measurement clearly indicate that the three-body Coulomb interaction in the final state (CIFS) not only affect autoionizing resonance energies and line widths but also strongly influences the interference of the transition amplitudes between competing processes such as direct ionization and autoionization. We found that the Fano or Shore parametrization generally fails for zero degree autoionization by positive ion impact at medium to high projectile energy. Therefore a new post collisional three-body CIFS model has been developed as a parametrization procedure. This model has been successfully applied to double excitation processes to study single differential cross sections of the (2p^2) ^1D and (2s2p)^1P

  15. Dynamical resonant electron capture in atom surface collisions: H- formation in H-Al(111) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. G.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1992-05-01

    The formation of H- ion by grazing-angle collisions of hydrogen on an Al(111) surface is investigated with the newly developed coupled angular mode method. The capture process involves a dynamical resonant process induced by the collision velocity. All the resonance properties of the H- level in front of an Al(111) surface are determined: position, width, and angular distribution of ejected electrons. The results are shown to account for the recent observations on H- formation by Wyputta, Zimny, and Winter.

  16. Formation of rings by galactic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puerari, I.; Aguilar, L.

    2009-05-01

    We study the formation and evolution of rings in disk galaxies by the impact of a spherical companion. This study is carried out by using numerical simulations and fully self-consistent models. We have tested a number of target disk galaxies with different radial scalelengths or central radial velocity dispersion, and a number of companions with different masses and radial scalelengths. We also have tested a large number of initial conditions to produce collisions with different velocities, inclinations and impact parameters. Our main results are: (a) strong interactions (high companion mass and/or slow impact velocity) result in rings with constant expansion velocity; (b) our tested collisions are very effective to heat the disk, increasing the radial velocity dispersion; (c) the rings created by collisions are certainly density waves; (d) inclined-central collisions create inclined rings, but they are not effective to displace the nucleus of the target; (e) perpendicular-peripheral collisions are more effective to displace the nucleus, as well as to create inclined rings, which remain inclined for a long period of time (some 10^8 years).

  17. Space collision threat mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatezalo, Aleksandar; Stipanović, Dušan; Mehra, Raman K.; Pham, Khanh

    2014-06-01

    Mitigation of possible collision threats to current and future operations in space environments is an important an challenging task considering high nonlinearity of orbital dynamics and discrete measurement updates. Such discrete observations are relatively scarce with respect to space dynamics including possible unintentional or intentional rocket propulsion based maneuvers even in scenarios when measurement collections are focused to a one single target of interest. In our paper, this problem is addressed in terms of multihypothesis and multimodel estimation in conjunction with multi-agent multigoal game theoretic guaranteed evasion strategies. Collision threat estimation is formulated using conditional probabilities of time dependent hypotheses and spacecraft controls which are computed using Liapunov-like approach. Based on this formulation, time dependent functional forms of multi-objective utility functions are derived given threat collision risk levels. For demonstrating developed concepts, numerical methods are developed using nonlinear filtering methodology for updating hypothesis sets and corresponding conditional probabilities. Space platform associated sensor resources are managed using previously developed and demonstrated information-theoretic objective functions and optimization methods. Consequently, estimation and numerical methods are evaluated and demonstrated on a realistic Low Earth Orbit collision encounter.

  18. Exotics from Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Akira; Jido, Daisuke; Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Yazaki, Koichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-10-21

    Discriminating hadronic molecular and multi-quark states is a long standing problem in hadronic physics. We propose here to utilize relativistic heavy ion collisions to resolve this problem, as exotic hadron yields are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model, we find that the exotic hadron yield relative to the statistical model result is typically an order of magnitude smaller for a compact multi-quark state, and larger by a factor of two or more for a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured at RHIC and LHC.

  19. Automobile Collisions, Kinematics and Related Injury Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    It has been determined clinically that fatalities and injury severity resulting from automobile collisions have decreased during the last five years for low impact speeds. This reduction is a direct result of the application of biomechanics and occupant kinematics, as well as changes in automobile design. The paper defines terminology used in the field of mechanics and develops examples and illustrations of the physical concepts of acceleration, force strength, magnitude duration, rate of onset and others, as they apply to collision phenomena and injury. The mechanism of injury pattern reduction through the use of restraint systems is illustrated. PMID:5059661

  20. Fully dynamical simulation of central nuclear collisions.

    PubMed

    van der Schee, Wilke; Romatschke, Paul; Pratt, Scott

    2013-11-27

    We present a fully dynamical simulation of central nuclear collisions around midrapidity at LHC energies. Unlike previous treatments, we simulate all phases of the collision, including the equilibration of the system. For the simulation, we use numerical relativity solutions to anti-de Sitter space/conformal field theory for the preequilibrium stage, viscous hydrodynamics for the plasma equilibrium stage, and kinetic theory for the low-density hadronic stage. Our preequilibrium stage provides initial conditions for hydrodynamics, resulting in sizable radial flow. The resulting light particle spectra reproduce the measurements from the ALICE experiment at all transverse momenta. PMID:24329444

  1. Collision effects on high-n ballooning modes with a full Lorentz collision operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianxun; Chen, Shaoyong; Tang, Changjian

    2012-02-01

    The dispersion relation for high-n ballooning modes is obtained from the customary drift gyro-kinetic equation employing the energy-dependent Lorenz collision operator. There are significant differences between our results and those with the Krook collision operator. The present results show that collision seems to have much weaker stabilizing effects, if any, on the high-n ballooning modes than those with the Krook collision operator when the collisionality, υ*e, is smaller than a critical value. However, contrary to the phenomenon, the collision shows strong stabilizing effects on the ballooning mode once the collisionality exceeds a critical value. These differences are supposed to arise from boundary layer behaviour which refers to the electron perturbation at the boundary between trapped and passing electrons in velocity space, but the physical process cannot be described by non-conserving Krook collision operators. This destabilizing mechanism of boundary layer behaviour is discussed in this paper. In addition, the critical value shows a considerably strong dependence on ηe (ηe ≡ d ln Te/d ln Ne).

  2. Rotation as an origin of high energy particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2016-01-01

    We consider collision of two particles in rotating spacetimes without horizons. If the metric coefficient responsible for rotation of spacetime is big enough, the energy of collisions in the center of mass frame can be as large as one likes. This can happen in the ergoregion only. The results are model-independent and apply both to relativistic stars and wormholes.

  3. Crabbed Waist Collisions in DAFNE and Super-B Design

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.O.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, Giovanni; Milardi, C.; /Frascati /Orsay, LAL /CERN /Rome III U. /Rome U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /KEK, Tsukuba /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Cosenza /SLAC /Frascati

    2011-11-02

    The new idea of increasing the luminosity of a collider with crab waist collisions and first experimental results from the DA{Phi}NE {Phi}-Factory at LNF, Frascati, using this concept are presented. Consequences for the design of future factories will be discussed. An outlook to the performance reach with crab waist collisions is given, with emphasis on future B Factories.

  4. High energy nuclear collisions: Theory overview

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, R.J.

    2010-08-01

    We review some basic concepts of relativistic heavy-ion physics and discuss our understanding of some key results from the experimental program at the relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC). We focus in particular on the early time dynamics of nuclear collisions, some result from lattice QCD, hard probes and photons.

  5. Modelling of a collision between two smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, V. L. B.; Sasaki, D. G. G.

    2016-09-01

    In the predominant approach in physics textbooks, the collision between particles is treated as a black box, where no physical quantity can be measured. This approach becomes even more evident in experimental classes where collisions are the simplest and most common way of applying the theorem of conservation of linear momentum in the asymptotic behavior. In this paper we develop and analyse an experiment on collisions using only two smartphones. The experimental setup is amazingly simple; the two devices are aligned on a horizontal table of lacquered wood, in order to slide more easily. At the edge of one of them a piece of common sponge is glued using double-sided tape. By using a free smartphone application, the values generated by the accelerometer of the two devices in full motion are measured and tabulated. Through numerical iteration, the speed graphs of the smartphones before, during, and after the collision are obtained. The main conclusions were: (i) the demonstration of the feasibility of using smartphones as an alternative to air tracks and electronic sensors employed in a teaching lab, (ii) the possibility of investigating the collision itself, its characteristics and effects; this is the great advantage of the use of smartphones over traditional experiments, (iii) the compatibility of the results with the impulse-momentum theorem, within the margin of uncertainty.

  6. Collisions of solid ice in planetesimal formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, J.; Teiser, J.

    2016-03-01

    We present collision experiments of centimetre projectiles on to decimetre targets, both made up of solid ice, at velocities of 15-45 m s-1 at an average temperature of {T_{avg}}=255.8 ± 0.7 K. In these collisions, the centimetre body gets disrupted and part of it sticks to the target. This behaviour can be observed up to an upper threshold, that depends on the projectile size, beyond which there is no mass transfer. In collisions of small particles, as produced by the disruption of the centimetre projectiles, we also find mass transfer to the target. In this way, the larger body can gain mass, although the efficiency of the initial mass transfer is rather low. These collision results can be applied to planetesimal formation near the snowline, where evaporation and condensation is expected to produce solid ice. In free fall collisions at velocities up to about 7 m s-1, we investigated the threshold to fragmentation and coefficient of restitution of centimetre ice spheres.

  7. High energy density in multisoliton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadatmand, Danial; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.

    2015-09-01

    Solitons are very effective in transporting energy over great distances and collisions between them can produce high energy density spots of relevance to phase transformations, energy localization and defect formation among others. It is then important to study how energy density accumulation scales in multisoliton collisions. In this study, we demonstrate that the maximal energy density that can be achieved in collision of N slowly moving kinks and antikinks in the integrable sine-Gordon field, remarkably, is proportional to N2, while the total energy of the system is proportional to N . This maximal energy density can be achieved only if the difference between the number of colliding kinks and antikinks is minimal, i.e., is equal to 0 for even N and 1 for odd N and if the pattern involves an alternating array of kinks and antikinks. Interestingly, for odd (even) N the maximal energy density appears in the form of potential (kinetic) energy, while kinetic (potential) energy is equal to zero. The results of the present study rely on the analysis of the exact multisoliton solutions for N =1 ,2 , and 3 and on the numerical simulation results for N =4 ,5 ,6 , and 7. The effect of weak Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian perturbations on the maximal energy density in multikink collisions is also discussed as well as that of the collision relative phase. Based on these results one can speculate that the soliton collisions in the sine-Gordon field can, in principle, controllably produce very high energy density. This can have important consequences for many physical phenomena described by the Klein-Gordon equations.

  8. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  9. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-10-15

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  10. Active Collision Avoidance for Planetary Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Hannan, Mike; Srinivasan, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Present day robotic missions to other planets require precise, a priori knowledge of the terrain to pre-determine a landing spot that is safe. Landing sites can be miles from the mission objective, or, mission objectives may be tailored to suit landing sites. Future robotic exploration missions should be capable of autonomously identifying a safe landing target within a specified target area selected by mission requirements. Such autonomous landing sites must (1) 'see' the surface, (2) identify a target, and (3) land the vehicle. Recent advances in radar technology have resulted in small, lightweight, low power radars that are used for collision avoidance and cruise control systems in automobiles. Such radar systems can be adapted for use as active hazard avoidance systems for planetary landers. The focus of this CIF proposal is to leverage earlier work on collision avoidance systems for MSFC's Mighty Eagle lander and evaluate the use of automotive radar systems for collision avoidance in planetary landers.

  11. Neutrino quantum kinetic equations: The collision term

    DOE PAGES

    Blaschke, Daniel N.; Cirigliano, Vincenzo

    2016-08-25

    We derive the collision term relevant for neutrino quantum kinetic equations in the early universe and compact astrophysical objects, displaying its full matrix structure in both flavor and spin degrees of freedom. We include in our analysis neutrino-neutrino processes, scattering and annihilation with electrons and positrons, and neutrino scattering off nucleons (the latter in the low-density limit). After presenting the general structure of the collision terms, we take two instructive limiting cases. The one-flavor limit highlights the structure in helicity space and allows for a straightforward interpretation of the off-diagonal entries in terms of the product of scattering amplitudes ofmore » the two helicity states. As a result, the isotropic limit is relevant for studies of the early universe: in this case the terms involving spin coherence vanish and the collision term can be expressed in terms of two-dimensional integrals, suitable for computational implementation.« less

  12. Elliptic flow from collision geometry and rescattering

    SciTech Connect

    Boeggild, H.; Hansen, Ole; Humanic, T. J.

    2009-04-15

    Calculations of elliptic flow based on two initial state models of Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s)=200 GeV/n coupled with a hadronic rescattering calculation are presented. The two initial state models used are a thermal model and a partonic model. Results from these calculations are compared with experiments and it is found that both initial state models give satisfactory representations of elliptic flow measurements, provided that the rescattering is started early enough in the collision process. It is also found that the present hadronic model studies do not show the jet suppression observed experimentally.

  13. Collision Avoidance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Ames Research Center teamed with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to study human performance factors associated with the use of the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance system (TCAS II) in an operational environment. TCAS is designed to alert pilots of the presence of other aircraft in their vicinity, to identify and track those who could be a threat, and to recommend action to avoid a collision. Ames conducted three laboratory experiments. The first showed that pilots were able to use the TCAS II correctly in the allowable time. The second tested pilots' response to changes in the avoidance advisories, and the third examined pilots' reactions to alternative displays. After a 1989 congressional mandate, the FAA ruled that TCAS would be required on all passenger carrying aircraft (to be phased in completely by 1995).

  14. Operational Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will describe the early days of the EOS Aqua and Aura operational collision avoidance process. It will highlight EOS debris avoidance maneuvers, EOS high interest event statistic and A-Train systematic conjunctions and conclude with future challenges. This is related to earlier e-DAA (tracking number 21692) that an abstract was submitted to a different conference. Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager has reviewed and approved this presentation on May 6, 2015

  15. Super high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, W.M.

    1987-12-01

    Basic theoretical ideas on a phase transition to a plasma of free quarks and gluons in heavy ion collisions are outlined. First results from experiments with oxygen beams at 14.5 GeV/c/N (BNL), 60 and 200 GeV/c/N (CERN) are discussed. 30 refs., 9 figs.

  16. Collision of Bose Condensate Dark Matter structures

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F. S.

    2008-12-04

    The status of the scalar field or Bose condensate dark matter model is presented. Results about the solitonic behavior in collision of structures is presented as a possible explanation to the recent-possibly-solitonic behavior in the bullet cluster merger. Some estimates about the possibility to simulate the bullet cluster under the Bose Condensate dark matter model are indicated.

  17. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  18. Development of a collision risk assessment tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alarcon Rodriguez, J.; Martinez Fadrique, F.; Klinkrad, H.

    The avoidance of near misses and catastrophic collisions is of particular interest to manned missions and to valuable assets at densely populated altitude regions. GMV has developed a software tool for ESOC, ESA's European Space Operations Centre, which forecasts close conjunctions of selected spacecraft with over 8,000 objects included in the USSPACECOM catalog. The Collision Risk Assessment Tool (CRASS) generates collision risk estimates and collision warnings based on collision probability for a time span on the order of one week. In the framework of this activity, several collision probability algorithms have been implemented and tested. Considerable effort has also been placed in the characterisation of orbit determination errors and covariance propagation. The direct comparison of orbits of several spacecraft against a large catalog is an extremely computation intensive task. As a consequence, pre-filtering and parallel computing techniques have been proposed and used in the past as a means to reduce the computing time. However, the "smart sieve" algorithm devised and implemented by GMV retains the reliability of a "direct" method while drastically reducing the computing time. Therefore, the "smart sieve" is far more reliable than traditional pre-filtering techniques with no need for parallel computing. Besides, the method presents no constraints or singularities for any terrestrial orbit, as it is not based on simplifying assumptions. In summary, the method's main characteristics are general applicability, high reliability, and high computing efficiency. As a result of the increased efficiency, the field of application of the tool can be extended to other challenging problems. For instance, all to all comparisons of objects within a large catalog, or comparisons of a single spacecraft against a complete catalog over long periods of time can be completed in a reasonable time.

  19. Affordable MMW aircraft collision avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almsted, Larry D.; Becker, Robert C.; Zelenka, Richard E.

    1997-06-01

    Collision avoidance is of concern to all aircraft, requiring the detection and identification of hazardous terrain or obstacles in sufficient time for clearance maneuvers. The collision avoidance requirement is even more demanding for helicopters, as their unique capabilities result in extensive operations at low-altitude, near to terrain and other hazardous obstacles. TO augment the pilot's visual collision avoidance abilities, some aircraft are equipped with 'enhanced-vision' systems or terrain collision warning systems. Enhanced-vision systems are typically very large and costly systems that are not very covert and are also difficult to install in a helicopter. The display is typically raw images from infrared or radar sensors, and can require a high degree of pilot interpretation and attention. Terrain collision warning system that rely on stored terrain maps are often of low resolution and accuracy and do not represent hazards to the aircraft placed after map sampling. Such hazards could include aircraft parked on runway, man- made towers or buildings and hills. In this paper, a low cost dual-function scanning pencil-beam, millimeter-wave radar forward sensor is used to determine whether an aircraft's flight path is clear of obstructions. Due to the limited space and weight budget in helicopters, the system is a dual function system that is substituted in place of the existing radar altimeter. The system combines a 35 GHz forward looking obstacle avoidance radar and a 4.3 GHz radar altimeter. The forward looking 35 GHz 3D radar's returns are used to construct a terrain and obstruction database surrounding an aircraft, which is presented to the pilot as a synthetic perspective display. The 35 GHz forward looking radar and the associated display was evaluated in a joint NASA Honeywell flight test program in 1996. The tests were conducted on a NASA/Army test helicopter. The test program clearly demonstrated the systems potential usefulness for collision avoidance.

  20. Direct numerical simulations of collision efficiency of cohesive sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin-Feng; Maa, Jerome P.-Y.; Zhang, Qing-He; Shen, Xiao-Teng

    2016-09-01

    A clear understanding of the collision efficiency of cohesive sediment particles is critical for more accurate simulation of the flocculation processes. It is difficult, if not impossible, to carry out laboratory experiments to determine the collision efficiency for small particles. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is a relatively feasible approach to describe the motion of spherical particles under gravity in calm water, and thus, to study the collision efficiency of these particles. In this study, the Lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is used to calculate the relative trajectories of two approaching particles with different ratios of sizes and densities. Results show that the inter-molecular forces (i.e., van der Waals attractive force, electrostatic repulsive/attractive force, and displacement force), which are usually neglected in previous studies, would affect the trajectories, and thus, lead to an overestimation of the collision efficiency. It is found that to increase the particle size ratio from 0.1 to 0.8 only slightly increases the collision efficiency, since the force caused by fluid-solid interaction between these two particles is reduced. To increase the submerged particle density ratio from 1 to 22, however, would significantly decrease the collision efficiency. Earlier analytical formulations of collision efficiency, which only consider the effects of particle size ratio, have significantly overestimated the collision efficiency (change from 0.01 to 0.6) when the particle size ratio is around 0.5.

  1. A gyrokinetic collision operator for magnetized Lorentz plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Qin, Hong; Ma, Chenhao; Yu, Xiongjie

    2011-03-01

    A gyrocenter collision operator for magnetized Lorentz plasmas is derived using the Fokker-Plank method. The gyrocenter collision operator consists of drift and diffusion terms in the gyrocenter coordinates, including the diffusion of the gyrocenter, which does not exist for the collision operator in the particle phase space coordinates. The gyrocenter collision operator also depends on the transverse electric field explicitly, which is crucial for the correct treatment of collisional effects and transport in the gyrocenter coordinates. The gyrocenter collision operator derived is applied to calculate the particle and heat transport fluxes in a magnetized Lorentz plasma with an electric field. The particle and heat transport fluxes calculated from our gyrocenter collision operator agree exactly with the classical Braginskii's result [S. I. Braginskii, Reviews of Plasma Physics (Consultants Bureau, New York, 1965), Vol. 1, p. 205: P. Helander and D. J. Sigmar, Collisional Transport in Magnetized Plasmas (Cambridge University, Cambridge, 2002), p. 65], which validates the correctness of our collision operator. To calculate the transport fluxes correctly, it is necessary to apply the pullback transformation associated with gyrocenter coordinate transformation in the presence of collisions, which also serves as a practical algorithm for evaluating collisional particle and heat transport fluxes in the gyrocenter coordinates.

  2. Toward a Physical Characterization of Raindrop Collision Outcome Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Testik, F. Y.; Barros, Ana P.; Bilven, Francis L.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive raindrop collision outcome regime diagram that delineates the physical conditions associated with the outcome regimes (i.e., bounce, coalescence, and different breakup types) of binary raindrop collisions is proposed. The proposed diagram builds on a theoretical regime diagram defined in the phase space of collision Weber numbers We and the drop diameter ratio p by including critical angle of impact considerations. In this study, the theoretical regime diagram is first evaluated against a comprehensive dataset for drop collision experiments representative of raindrop collisions in nature. Subsequently, the theoretical regime diagram is modified to explicitly describe the dominant regimes of raindrop interactions in (We, p) by delineating the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of distinct types of collision-induced breakup (neck/filament, sheet, disk, and crown breakups) based on critical angle of impact consideration. Crown breakup is a subtype of disk breakup for lower collision kinetic energy that presents distinctive morphology. Finally, the experimental results are analyzed in the context of the comprehensive collision regime diagram, and conditional probabilities that can be used in the parameterization of breakup kernels in stochastic models of raindrop dynamics are provided.

  3. Collision model for non-Markovian quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretschmer, Silvan; Luoma, Kimmo; Strunz, Walter T.

    2016-07-01

    We study the applicability of collisional models for non-Markovian dynamics of open quantum systems. By allowing interactions between the separate environmental degrees of freedom in between collisions we are able to construct a collision model that allows us to study quantum memory effects in open system dynamics. We also discuss the possibility to embed non-Markovian collision model dynamics into Markovian collision model dynamics in an extended state space. As a concrete example we show how, using the proposed class of collision models, we can discretely model non-Markovian amplitude damping of a qubit. In the time-continuous limit, we obtain the well-known results for spontaneous decay of a two-level system into a structured zero-temperature reservoir.

  4. Postcollision extension in arc-continent collision zones, eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, T. R.

    1991-01-01

    Postcollisional extension superimposed on arc-continent collision complexes is a common feature in the orogenic belts of eastern Indonesia. In the southern Banda arc, the arc-continent collision event is essentially a Pliocene and younger feature, but already an element of extension is being superimposed on the compressional structures of the collision complex. It is thus likely that the extension commences within a very short period (<5 m.y.) after the initiation of collision-related compressional deformation. A similar history of fold-belt development immediately followed by extension can be inferred for the Lengguru fold belt and the adjacent Wandamen-Wondiwoi terranes of Irian Jaya and for the Gulf of Bone in Sulawesi. It is suggested that the extension results from decoupling of the subducting oceanic lithosphere from the unsubductable continental lithosphere and that the superimposition of extension is a virtually unavoidable consequence of the arc-continent collision.

  5. The nonlinear dust potential and collision frequencies in dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. P.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2016-10-01

    The nonlinear modification to the Debye-Hückel potential of a dust grain depends on the thermodynamic properties of the background plasma. When the grain carries more than one electronic charge, the nonlinear self-interaction of the potential substantially modifies the ion-dust collision frequency. The electron-negatively charged dust collision frequency on the other hand remains largely unaffected by such a nonlinear modification. In the absence of nonlinear modification, collisions between the electrons and the negatively charged dust cease completely when the potential energy is four times the electron thermal energy. Thus once the dust acquires maximum charge, it will encounter electrons only because of its induced dipole field. Our electron-dust collision frequency agrees well with the previously known result whereas ion-dust collision frequency is always small compared with the known fitting formula.

  6. Molecular collisions coming into focus.

    PubMed

    Onvlee, Jolijn; Vogels, Sjoerd N; von Zastrow, Alexander; Parker, David H; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2014-08-14

    The Stark deceleration method exploits the concepts of charged particle accelerator physics to produce beams of neutral polar molecules with an almost perfect quantum state purity, a tunable velocity and a narrow velocity distribution. These monochromatic molecular beams offer interesting perspectives for precise studies of molecular scattering processes, in particular when used in conjunction with state-of-the-art laser-based detection techniques such as velocity map imaging. Here, we describe crossed beam scattering experiments in which the Stark deceleration method is combined with the velocity map imaging technique. The narrow velocity spread of Stark-decelerated molecular beams results in scattering images with unprecedented velocity and angular resolution. We demonstrate this by resolving quantum diffraction oscillations in state-to-state inelastic differential scattering cross sections for collisions between NO radicals and rare gas atoms. We describe the future prospects of this "best-of-two-worlds" combination, ranging from scattering studies at low collision energies to bimolecular scattering using two decelerators, and discuss the challenges that lie ahead to achieve these goals. PMID:24967721

  7. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  8. Kuang's Semi-Classical Formalism for Electron Capture Cross-Sections in Ion-Ion Collisions at Approximately to MeV/amu: Application to ENA Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discovery by STEREO A/B of energetic neutral hydrogen is spurring an interest and need for reliable estimates of electron capture cross sections at few MeVs per nucleon as well as for multi-electron ions. Required accuracy in such estimates necessitates detailed and involved quantum-mechanical calculations or expensive numerical simulations. For ENA modeling and similar purposes, a semi-classical approach offers a middle-ground approach. Kuang's semiclassical formalism to calculate electron-capture cross sections for single and multi-electron ions is an elegant and efficient method, but has so far been applied to limited and specific laboratory measurements and at somewhat lower energies. Our goals are to test and extend Kuang s method to all ion-atom and ion-ion collisions relevant to ENA modeling, including multi-electron ions and for K-shell to K-shell transitions.

  9. Resonant-transfer-and-excitation for highly charged ions (16 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 23) in collisions with helium

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.; Bernstein, E.M.; Oglesby, C.S.; Graham, W.G.; Clark, M.; McFarland, R.H.; Morgan, T.J.; Stockli, M.P.; Berkner, K.H.; Johnson, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    Significant new evidence is presented for resonant-transfer-and-excitation (RTE) in ion-atom collisions. This process occurs when a target electron is captured simultaneously with the excitation of the projectile followed by deexcitation via photon emission. RTE, which is analogous to dielectronic recombination (DR), proceeds via the inverse of an Auger transition, and is expected to be resonant for projectile velocities corresponding to the energy of the ejected electron in the Auger process. RTE was investigated by measuring cross sections for projectile K x-ray emission coincident with single electron capture for 15 to 200 MeV /sub 16/S/sup 13 +/, 100 to 360 MeV /sub 20/Ca/sup 16 +/ /sup 17 +/ /sup 18 +/ and 180 to 460 MeV /sub 23/V/sup 19 +/ /sup 20 +/ /sup 21 +/ ions colliding with helium. Strong resonant behavior, in agreement with theoretical calculations of RTE, was observed in the coincidence cross sections.

  10. Strangeness production in AA and pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castorina, Paolo; Satz, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Boost-invariant hadron production in high-energy collisions occurs in causally disconnected regions of finite space-time size. As a result, globally conserved quantum numbers (charge, strangeness, baryon number) are conserved locally in spatially restricted correlation clusters. Their size is determined by two time scales: the equilibration time specifying the formation of a quark-gluon plasma, and the hadronization time, specifying the onset of confinement. The expected values for these scales provide the theoretical basis for the suppression observed for strangeness production in elementary interactions ( pp , e^+e^- below LHC energies. In contrast, the space-time superposition of individual collisions in high-energy heavy-ion interactions leads to higher energy densities, resulting in much later hadronization and hence much larger hadronization volumes. This largely removes the causality constraints and results in an ideal hadronic resonance gas in full chemical equilibrium. In the present paper, we determine the collision energies needed for that; we also estimate when pp collisions reach comparable hadronization volumes and thus determine when strangeness suppression should disappear there as well.

  11. Sensor management for collision alert in orbital object tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peiran; Chen, Huimin; Charalampidis, D.; Shen, Dan; Chen, Genshe; Blasch, Erik; Pham, Khanh

    2011-06-01

    Given the increasingly dense environment in both low-earth orbit (LEO) and geostationary orbit (GEO), a sudden change in the trajectory of any existing resident space object (RSO) may cause potential collision damage to space assets. With a constellation of electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) sensor platforms and ground radar surveillance systems, it is important to design optimal estimation algorithms for updating nonlinear object states and allocating sensing resources to effectively avoid collisions among many RSOs. Previous work on RSO collision avoidance often assumes that the maneuver onset time or maneuver motion of the space object is random and the sensor management approach is designed to achieve efficient average coverage of the RSOs. Few attempts have included the inference of an object's intent in the response to an RSO's orbital change. We propose a game theoretic model for sensor selection and assume the worst case intentional collision of an object's orbital change. The intentional collision results from maximal exposure of an RSO's path. The resulting sensor management scheme achieves robust and realistic collision assessment, alerts the impending collisions, and identifies early RSO orbital change with lethal maneuvers. We also consider information sharing among distributed sensors for collision alert and an object's intent identification when an orbital change has been declared. We compare our scheme with the conventional (non-game based) sensor management (SM) scheme using a LEO-to-LEO space surveillance scenario where both the observers and the unannounced and unplanned objects have complete information on the constellation of vulnerable assets. We demonstrate that, with adequate information sharing, the distributed SM method can achieve the performance close to that of centralized SM in identifying unannounced objects and making early warnings to the RSO for potential collision to ensure a proper selection of collision avoidance action.

  12. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2016-07-12

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  13. Catching Collisions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Fruguiele, Claudia; Hirschauer, Jim

    2015-06-16

    Now that the Large Hadron Collider has officially turned back on for its second run, within every proton collision could emerge the next new discovery in particle physics. Learn how the detectors on the Compact Muon Solenoid, or CMS, experiment capture and track particles as they are expelled from a collision. Talking us through these collisions are Claudia Fruguiele and Jim Hirschauer of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the largest U.S. institution collaborating on the LHC.

  14. Chemical activation through super energy transfer collisions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan M; Nikow, Matthew; Ma, Jianqiang; Wilhelm, Michael J; Han, Yong-Chang; Sharma, Amit R; Bowman, Joel M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2014-02-01

    Can a molecule be efficiently activated with a large amount of energy in a single collision with a fast atom? If so, this type of collision will greatly affect molecular reactivity and equilibrium in systems where abundant hot atoms exist. Conventional expectation of molecular energy transfer (ET) is that the probability decreases exponentially with the amount of energy transferred, hence the probability of what we label "super energy transfer" is negligible. We show, however, that in collisions between an atom and a molecule for which chemical reactions may occur, such as those between a translationally hot H atom and an ambient acetylene (HCCH) or sulfur dioxide, ET of chemically significant amounts of energy commences with surprisingly high efficiency through chemical complex formation. Time-resolved infrared emission observations are supported by quasi-classical trajectory calculations on a global ab initio potential energy surface. Results show that ∼10% of collisions between H atoms moving with ∼60 kcal/mol energy and HCCH result in transfer of up to 70% of this energy to activate internal degrees of freedom.

  15. Computations of drop collision and coalescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Juric, Damir; Nobari, Mohammed H. R.; Nas, Selman

    1994-01-01

    Computations of drops collision and coalescence are presented. The computations are made possible by a recently developed finite difference/front tracking technique that allows direct solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for a multi-fluid system with complex, unsteady internal boundaries. This method has been used to examine the boundaries between the various collision modes for drops of equal size and two examples, one of a 'reflective' collision and another of a 'grazing' collision is shown. From drops of unequal size, coalescence can result in considerable mixing between the fluid from the small and the large drop. This problem is discussed and one example showed. In many cases it is necessary to account also for heat transfer along with the fluid mechanics. We show two preliminary results where we are using extensions of the method to simulate such a problem. One example shows pattern formation among many drops moving due to thermal migration, the other shows unstable evolution of a solidification front.

  16. Real-time collision avoidance in space: the GETEX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Eckhard; Rossmann, Juergen; Schluse, Michael

    2000-10-01

    Intelligent autonomous robotic systems require efficient safety components to assure system reliability during the entire operation. Especially if commanded over long distances, the robotic system must be able to guarantee the planning of safe and collision free movements independently. Therefore the IRF developed a new collision avoidance methodology satisfying the needs of autonomous safety systems considering the dynamics of the robots to protect. To do this, the collision avoidance system cyclically calculates the actual collision danger of the robots with respect to all static and dynamic obstacles in the environment. If a robot gets in collision danger the methodology immediately starts an evasive action to avoid the collision and guides the robot around the obstacle to its target position. This evasive action is calculated in real-time in a mathematically exact way by solving a quadratic convex optimization problem. The secondary conditions of this optimization problem include the potential collision danger of the robots kinematic chain including all temporarily attached grippers and objects and the dynamic constraints of the robots. The result of the optimization procedure are joint accelerations to apply to prevent the robot from colliding and to guide it to its target position. This methodology has been tested very successfully during the Japanese/German space robot project GETEX in April 1999. During the mission, the collision avoidance system successfully protected the free flying Japanese robot ERA on board the satellite ETS-VII at all times. The experiments showed, that the developed system is fully capable of ensuring the safety of such autonomous robotic systems by actively preventing collisions and generating evasive actions in cases of collision danger.

  17. Meson interferometry in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: Recent HBT results form CERN experiment NA44; interferometry results from E802/E859/E866; recent results on two particle correlations from E814; source sizes from CERN data; intermittency and interferometry; Bose-Einstein correlations in 200A GeV S+Au collisions; HBT correlations at STAR; HBT interferometry with PHENIX; HBT calculations from ARC; three pion correlations; and pion correlations in proton-induced reactions.

  18. Collision detection for spacecraft proximity operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Robin M.; Bergmann, Edward V.; Walker, Bruce K.

    1991-04-01

    A new collision detection algorithm has been developed for use when two spacecraft are operating in the same vicinity. The two spacecraft are modeled as unions of convex polyhedra, where the resulting polyhedron many be either convex or nonconvex. The relative motion of the two spacecraft is assumed to be such that one vehicle is moving with constant linear and angular velocity with respect to the other. Contacts between the vertices, faces, and edges of the polyhedra representing the two spacecraft are shown to occur when the value of one or more of a set of functions is zero. The collision detection algorithm is then formulated as a search for the zeros (roots) of these functions. Special properties of the functions for the assumed relative trajectory are exploited to expedite the zero search. The new algorithm is the first algorithm that can solve the collision detection problem exactly for relative motion with constant angular velocity. This is a significant improvement over models of rotational motion used in previous collision detection algorithms.

  19. Behavioral training to improve collision detection

    PubMed Central

    DeLoss, Denton J.; Bian, Zheng; Watanabe, Takeo; Andersen, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Young drivers are a high-risk group for vehicle crashes due to inexperience in detecting an impending collision and are one group that may benefit from perceptual learning (PL) training. The present study assessed whether PL could be used to improve performance in collision detection. Ten college-aged subjects participated in the first experiment, which consisted of seven 1-hr sessions conducted on separate days. Thresholds at three observer/object speeds were measured prior to training using a two-alternative forced choice procedure during which they indicated whether an approaching object would result in a collision or noncollision event. Participants were then trained near threshold at one of these speeds for 5 days. After training, participants showed a significant reduction in the time needed to detect a collision at the trained speed. This improvement was also found to transfer to the higher observer speed condition. A second experiment was conducted to determine whether this improvement was due to training near threshold or whether this improvement was merely due to practice with the task. Training with stimuli well above threshold showed no significant improvement in performance, indicating that the improvement seen in the first experiment was not solely due to task practice. PMID:26230917

  20. Kinetic effects on geodesic acoustic mode from combined collisions and impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shangchuan; Xie, Jinlin Liu, Wandong

    2015-04-15

    The dispersion relation for geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is derived by applying a gyrokinetic model that accounts for the effects from both collisions and impurities. Based on the dispersion relation, an analysis is performed for the non-monotonic behavior of GAM damping versus the characteristic collision rate at various impurity levels. As the effective charge increases, the maximum damping rate is found to shift towards lower collision rates, nearer to the parameter range of a typical tokamak edge plasma. The relative strengths of ion-ion and impurity-induced collision effects, which are illustrated by numerical calculations, are found to be comparable. Impurity-induced collisions help decrease the frequency of GAM, while their effects on the damping rate are non-monotonic, resulting in a weaker total damping in the high collision regime. The results presented suggest considering collision effects as well as impurity effects in GAM analysis.

  1. Experimental observation of the collision of three vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, R. H.; Monsalve, E.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate for the first time the motion, interaction and simultaneous collision between three initially stable vortex rings arranged symmetrically, making an angle of 120 degrees between their straight path lines. We report results with laminar vortex rings in air and water obtained through measurements of the ring velocity field with a hot-wire anemometer, both in free flight and during the entire collision. In the air experiment, our flow visualizations allowed us to identify two main collision stages. A first ring-dominated stage where the rings slowdown progressively, increasing their diameter rapidly, followed by secondary vortex structures resulting after the rings make contact. Local portions of the vortex tubes of opposite circulation are coupled together thus creating local arm-like vortex structures moving radially in outward directions, rapidly dissipating kinetic energy. From a similar water experiment, we provide detailed shadowgraph visualizations of both the ring bubble and the full size collision, showing clearly the final expanding vortex structure. It is accurately resolved that the physical contact between vortex ring tubes gives rise to three symmetric expanding vortex arms but also the vortex reconnection of the top and lower vortex tubes. The central collision zone was found to have the lowest kinetic energy during the entire collision and therefore it can be identified as a safe zone. The preserved collision symmetries leading to the weak kinematic activity in the safe zone is the first step into the development of an intermittent hydrodynamic trap for small and lightweight particles.

  2. Collective phenomena in non-central nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Voloshin, Sergei A.; Poskanzer, Arthur M.; Snellings, Raimond

    2008-10-20

    Recent developments in the field of anisotropic flow in nuclear collision are reviewed. The results from the top AGS energy to the top RHIC energy are discussed with emphasis on techniques, interpretation, and uncertainties in the measurements.

  3. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  4. Collision in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    On June 25, 1997, the Russian supply spacecraft Progress 234 collided with the Mir space station, rupturing Mir's pressure hull, throwing it into an uncontrolled attitude drift, and nearly forcing evacuation of the station. Like many high-profile accidents, this collision was the consequence of a chain of events leading to the final piloting errors that were its immediate cause. The discussion in this article does not resolve the relative contributions of the actions and decisions in this chain. Neither does it suggest corrective measures, many of which are straightforward and have already been implemented by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Russian Space Agency. Rather, its purpose is to identify the human factors that played a pervasive role in the incident. Workplace stress, fatigue, and sleep deprivation were identified by NASA as contributory factors in the Mir-Progress collision (Culbertson, 1997; NASA, forthcoming), but other contributing factors, such as requiring crew to perform difficult tasks for which their training is not current, could potentially become important factors in future situations.

  5. Recognition of movement object collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiao Tsu; Sun, Geng-tian; Zhang, Yan

    1991-03-01

    The paper explores the collision recognition of two objects in both crisscross and revolution motions A mathematical model has been established based on the continuation theory. The objects of any shape may be regarded as being built of many 3siniplexes or their convex hulls. Therefore the collision problem of two object in motion can be reduced to the collision of two corresponding 3siinplexes on two respective objects accordingly. Thus an optimized algorithm is developed for collision avoidance which is suitable for computer control and eliminating the need for vision aid. With this algorithm computation time has been reduced significantly. This algorithm is applicable to the path planning of mobile robots And also is applicable to collision avoidance of the anthropomorphic arms grasping two complicated shaped objects. The algorithm is realized using LISP language on a VAX8350 minicomputer.

  6. SPH-based simulation of multi-material asteroid collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maindl, T. I.; Schäfer, C.; Speith, R.; Süli, Á.; Forgács-Dajka, E.; Dvorak, R.

    2013-11-01

    We give a brief introduction to smoothed particle hydrodynamics methods for continuum mechanics. Specifically, we present our 3D SPH code to simulate and analyze collisions of asteroids consisting of two types of material: basaltic rock and ice. We consider effects like brittle failure, fragmentation, and merging in different impact scenarios. After validating our code against previously published results we present first collision results based on measured values for the Weibull flaw distribution parameters of basalt.

  7. Division B Commission 14 Working Group: Collision Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Gillian; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.; Barklem, Paul S.

    2016-04-01

    Since our last report (Peach & Dimitrijević 2012), a large number of new publications on the results of research in atomic and molecular collision processes and spectral line broadening have been published. Due to the limited space available, we have only included work of importance for astrophysics. Additional relevant papers, not included in this report, can be found in the databases at the web addresses provided in Section 6. Elastic and inelastic collisions between electrons, atoms, ions, and molecules are included, as well as charge transfer in collisions between heavy particles which can be very important.

  8. Determination of electron-nucleus collisions geometry with forward neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Aschenauer, E.; Lee, J. H.

    2014-12-29

    There are a large number of physics programs one can explore in electron-nucleus collisions at a future electron-ion collider. Collision geometry is very important in these studies, while the measurement for an event-by-event geometric control is rarely discussed in the prior deep-inelastic scattering experiments off a nucleus. This paper seeks to provide some detailed studies on the potential of tagging collision geometries through forward neutron multiplicity measurements with a zero degree calorimeter. As a result, this type of geometry handle, if achieved, can be extremely beneficial in constraining nuclear effects for the electron-nucleus program at an electron-ion collider.

  9. A space-based concept for a collision warning sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talent, David L.; Vilas, Faith

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a concept for a space-based collision warning sensor experiment, the Debris Collision Warning Sensor (DCWS) experiment, in which the sensor will rely on passive sensing of debris in optical and IR passband. The DCWS experiment will be carried out under various conditions of solar phase angle and pass geometry; debris from 1.5 m to 1 mm diam will be observable. The mission characteristics include inclination in the 55-60 deg range and an altitude of about 500 km. The results of the DCWS experiment will be used to generate collision warning scenarios for the Space Station Freedom.

  10. Collisions of Planetesimals and Formation of Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Rudolf; Maindl, Thomas I.; Süli, Áron; Schäfer, Christoph M.; Speith, Roland; Burger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results of models of terrestrial planet formation using on the one hand classical numerical integration of hundreds of small bodies on CPUs and on the other hand-for comparison-the results of our GPU code with thousands of small bodies which then merge to larger ones. To be able to determine the outcome of collision events we use our smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code which tracks how water is lost during such events.

  11. Femtoscopy in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lisa, M; Pratt, S; Soltz, R A; Wiedemann, U

    2005-07-29

    Analyses of two-particle correlations have provided the chief means for determining spatio-temporal characteristics of relativistic heavy ion collisions. We discuss the theoretical formalism behind these studies and the experimental methods used in carrying them out. Recent results from RHIC are put into context in a systematic review of correlation measurements performed over the past two decades. The current understanding of these results are discussed in terms of model comparisons and overall trends.

  12. Collision detection for planning collision-free motion of two robot arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basta, Robert A.; Mehrotra, Rajiv; Varanasi, Murali R.

    1988-01-01

    The authors focus on collision detection for planning collision-free motion of two robot arms in a common workspace. A collision-free motion is obtained by detecting collisions along the straight-line trajectories of the robots using a sphere model for the wrists and then replanning the paths and/or trajectories of one or both of the robots to avoid collisions. A novel approach to collision detection is presented and a discussion on collision avoidance is given.

  13. The nature of mutations induced by replication–transcription collisions.

    PubMed

    Sankar, T Sabari; Wastuwidyaningtyas, Brigitta D; Dong, Yuexin; Lewis, Sarah A; Wang, Jue D

    2016-07-01

    The DNA replication and transcription machineries share a common DNA template and thus can collide with each other co-directionally or head-on. Replication–transcription collisions can cause replication fork arrest, premature transcription termination, DNA breaks, and recombination intermediates threatening genome integrity. Collisions may also trigger mutations, which are major contributors to genetic disease and evolution. However, the nature and mechanisms of collision-induced mutagenesis remain poorly understood. Here we reveal the genetic consequences of replication–transcription collisions in actively dividing bacteria to be two classes of mutations: duplications/deletions and base substitutions in promoters. Both signatures are highly deleterious but are distinct from the previously well-characterized base substitutions in the coding sequence. Duplications/deletions are probably caused by replication stalling events that are triggered by collisions; their distribution patterns are consistent with where the fork first encounters a transcription complex upon entering a transcription unit. Promoter substitutions result mostly from head-on collisions and frequently occur at a nucleotide that is conserved in promoters recognized by the major σ factor in bacteria. This substitution is generated via adenine deamination on the template strand in the promoter open complex, as a consequence of head-on replication perturbing transcription initiation. We conclude that replication–transcription collisions induce distinct mutation signatures by antagonizing replication and transcription, not only in coding sequences but also in gene regulatory elements.

  14. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degreemore » Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)« less

  15. Azimuthal anisotropy in U+U collisions at STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hui; Sorensen, Paul

    2014-10-06

    The azimuthal anisotropy of particle production is commonly used in high-energy nuclear collisions to study the early evolution of the expanding system. The prolate shape of uranium nuclei makes it possible to study how the geometry of the colliding nuclei affects final state anisotropies. It also provides a unique opportunity to understand how entropy is produced in heavy ion collisions. In this paper, the two- and four- particle cumulant v2 (v2{2} and v2{4}) from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV for inclusive charged hadrons will be presented. The STAR Zero Degree Calorimeters are used to select very central collisions. Differences were observed between the multiplicity dependence of v2{2} for most central Au+Au and U+U collisions. The multiplicity dependence of v2{2} in central collisions were compared to Monte Carlo Glauber model predictions and it was seen that this model cannot explain the present results. (auth)

  16. Systematics of Global Observables in Cu+Cu and Au+Au Collisions at RHIC Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Nouicer, Rachid

    2006-07-11

    Charged particles produced in Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 and 62.4 GeV have been measured in the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC. The comparison of the results for Cu+Cu and Au+Au for the most central collisions at the same energy reveals that the particle density per nucleon participant pair and the extended longitudinal scaling behavior are similar in both systems. This implies that for the most central events in symmetric nucleus-nucleus collisions the particle density per nucleon participant pair does not depend on the size of the two colliding nuclei but only on the collision energy. Also the extended longitudinal scaling seems independent of the colliding energy and species for central collisions. In addition, there is an overall factorization of dNch/d{eta} shapes as a function of collision centraliry between Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at the same energy.

  17. Burnup calculation by the method of first-flight collision probabilities using average chords prior to the first collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpushkin, T. Yu.

    2012-12-01

    A technique to calculate the burnup of materials of cells and fuel assemblies using the matrices of first-flight neutron collision probabilities rebuilt at a given burnup step is presented. A method to rebuild and correct first collision probability matrices using average chords prior to the first neutron collision, which are calculated with the help of geometric modules of constructed stochastic neutron trajectories, is described. Results of calculation of the infinite multiplication factor for elementary cells with a modified material composition compared to the reference one as well as calculation of material burnup in the cells and fuel assemblies of a VVER-1000 are presented.

  18. Geosynchronous satellite collision avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, W.

    1985-01-01

    The increases in the number of satellite systems, the growing dependency on these systems, and the potentially hazardous conjunctions in space, dictates careful management of satellite positions. The potential for satellite collision increases as more objects are placed in orbit. At geosynchronous altitudes active satellites maintain fixed longitudinal station-keeping control while inactive satellites and debris generally drift around the globe or oscillate about two geopotential stable points. Portions of the total objects in geosynchronous orbit are tracked by ground stations while a significant number of additional pieces of space debris regularly pass through geosynchronous orbit altitudes. The probability of an operational satellite colliding with another satellite or a piece of space debris will increase in the number of space objects, their sizes, and on-orbit lifetimes.

  19. Comparison of measured and calculated collision efficiencies at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagare, B.; Marcolli, C.; Stetzer, O.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-12-01

    Interactions of atmospheric aerosols with clouds influence cloud properties and modify the aerosol life cycle. Aerosol particles act as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles or become incorporated into cloud droplets by scavenging. For an accurate description of aerosol scavenging and ice nucleation in contact mode, collision efficiency between droplets and aerosol particles needs to be known. This study derives the collision rate from experimental contact freezing data obtained with the ETH CoLlision Ice Nucleation CHamber (CLINCH). Freely falling 80 μm diameter water droplets are exposed to an aerosol consisting of 200 and 400 nm diameter silver iodide particles of concentrations from 500 to 5000 and 500 to 2000 cm-3, respectively, which act as ice nucleating particles in contact mode. The experimental data used to derive collision efficiency are in a temperature range of 238-245 K, where each collision of silver iodide particles with droplets can be assumed to result in the freezing of the droplet. An upper and lower limit of collision efficiency is also estimated for 800 nm diameter kaolinite particles. The chamber is kept at ice saturation at a temperature range of 236 to 261 K, leading to the slow evaporation of water droplets giving rise to thermophoresis and diffusiophoresis. Droplets and particles bear charges inducing electrophoresis. The experimentally derived collision efficiency values of 0.13, 0.07 and 0.047-0.11 for 200, 400 and 800 nm particles are around 1 order of magnitude higher than theoretical formulations which include Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, thermophoretic, diffusiophoretic and electric forces. This discrepancy is most probably due to uncertainties and inaccuracies in the description of thermophoretic and diffusiophoretic processes acting together. This is, to the authors' knowledge, the first data set of collision efficiencies acquired below 273 K. More such experiments with different droplet and

  20. An Approach Toward Understanding Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvaitis, John A.; Tash, Jeffrey P.

    2008-10-01

    Among the most conspicuous environmental effects of roads are vehicle-related mortalities of wildlife. Research to understand the factors that contribute to wildlife-vehicle collisions can be partitioned into several major themes, including (i) characteristics associated with roadkill hot spots, (ii) identification of road-density thresholds that limit wildlife populations, and (iii) species-specific models of vehicle collision rates that incorporate information on roads (e.g., proximity, width, and traffic volume) and animal movements. We suggest that collision models offer substantial opportunities to understand the effects of roads on a diverse suite of species. We conducted simulations using collision models and information on Blanding’s turtles ( Emydoidea blandingii), bobcats ( Lynx rufus), and moose ( Alces alces), species endemic to the northeastern United States that are of particular concern relative to collisions with vehicles. Results revealed important species-specific differences, with traffic volume and rate of movement by candidate species having the greatest influence on collision rates. We recommend that future efforts to reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions be more proactive and suggest the following protocol. For species that pose hazards to drivers (e.g., ungulates), identify collision hot spots and implement suitable mitigation to redirect animal movements (e.g., underpasses, fencing, and habitat modification), reduce populations of problematic game species via hunting, or modify driver behavior (e.g., dynamic signage that warns drivers when animals are near roads). Next, identify those species that are likely to experience additive (as opposed to compensatory) mortality from vehicle collisions and rank them according to vulnerability to extirpation. Then combine information on the distribution of at-risk species with information on existing road networks to identify areas where immediate actions are warranted.

  1. Collision avoidance sensor skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to totally eliminate the possibility of a robot (or any mechanism for that matter) inducing a collision in space operations. We were particularly concerned that human beings were safe under all circumstances. This was apparently accomplished, and it is shown that GSFC has a system that is ready for space qualification and flight. However, it soon became apparent that much more could be accomplished with this technology. Payloads could be made invulnerable to collision avoidance and the blind spots behind them eliminated. This could be accomplished by a simple, non-imaging set of 'Capaciflector' sensors on each payload. It also is evident that this system could be used to align and dock the system with a wide margin of safety. Throughout, lighting problems could be ignored, and unexpected events and modeling errors taken in stride. At the same time, computational requirements would be reduced. This can be done in a simple, rugged, reliable manner that will not disturb the form factor of space systems. It will be practical for space applications. The lab experiments indicate we are well on the way to accomplishing this. Still, the research trail goes deeper. It now appears that the sensors can be extended to end effectors to provide precontact information and make robot docking (or any docking connection) very smooth, with minimal loads impacted back into the mating structures. This type of ability would be a major step forward in basic control techniques in space. There are, however, baseline and restructuring issues to be tackled. The payloads must get power and signals to them from the robot or from the astronaut servicing tool. This requires a standard electromechanical interface. Any of several could be used. The GSFC prototype shown in this presentation is a good one. Sensors with their attendant electronics must be added to the payloads, end effectors, and robot arms and integrated into the system.

  2. Patterns of bird-window collisions inform mitigation on a university campus.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Peñuela, Natalia; Winton, R Scott; Wu, Charlene J; Zambello, Erika; Wittig, Thomas W; Cagle, Nicolette L

    2016-01-01

    Bird-window collisions cause an estimated one billion bird deaths annually in the United States. Building characteristics and surrounding habitat affect collision frequency. Given the importance of collisions as an anthropogenic threat to birds, mitigation is essential. Patterned glass and UV-reflective films have been proven to prevent collisions. At Duke University's West campus in Durham, North Carolina, we set out to identify the buildings and building characteristics associated with the highest frequencies of collisions in order to propose a mitigation strategy. We surveyed six buildings, stratified by size, and measured architectural characteristics and surrounding area variables. During 21 consecutive days in spring and fall 2014, and spring 2015, we conducted carcass surveys to document collisions. In addition, we also collected ad hoc collision data year-round and recorded the data using the app iNaturalist. Consistent with previous studies, we found a positive relationship between glass area and collisions. Fitzpatrick, the building with the most window area, caused the most collisions. Schwartz and the Perk, the two small buildings with small window areas, had the lowest collision frequencies. Penn, the only building with bird deterrent pattern, caused just two collisions, despite being almost completely made out of glass. Unlike many research projects, our data collection led to mitigation action. A resolution supported by the student government, including news stories in the local media, resulted in the application of a bird deterrent film to the building with the most collisions: Fitzpatrick. We present our collision data and mitigation result to inspire other researchers and organizations to prevent bird-window collisions. PMID:26855877

  3. Patterns of bird-window collisions inform mitigation on a university campus.

    PubMed

    Ocampo-Peñuela, Natalia; Winton, R Scott; Wu, Charlene J; Zambello, Erika; Wittig, Thomas W; Cagle, Nicolette L

    2016-01-01

    Bird-window collisions cause an estimated one billion bird deaths annually in the United States. Building characteristics and surrounding habitat affect collision frequency. Given the importance of collisions as an anthropogenic threat to birds, mitigation is essential. Patterned glass and UV-reflective films have been proven to prevent collisions. At Duke University's West campus in Durham, North Carolina, we set out to identify the buildings and building characteristics associated with the highest frequencies of collisions in order to propose a mitigation strategy. We surveyed six buildings, stratified by size, and measured architectural characteristics and surrounding area variables. During 21 consecutive days in spring and fall 2014, and spring 2015, we conducted carcass surveys to document collisions. In addition, we also collected ad hoc collision data year-round and recorded the data using the app iNaturalist. Consistent with previous studies, we found a positive relationship between glass area and collisions. Fitzpatrick, the building with the most window area, caused the most collisions. Schwartz and the Perk, the two small buildings with small window areas, had the lowest collision frequencies. Penn, the only building with bird deterrent pattern, caused just two collisions, despite being almost completely made out of glass. Unlike many research projects, our data collection led to mitigation action. A resolution supported by the student government, including news stories in the local media, resulted in the application of a bird deterrent film to the building with the most collisions: Fitzpatrick. We present our collision data and mitigation result to inspire other researchers and organizations to prevent bird-window collisions.

  4. Patterns of bird-window collisions inform mitigation on a university campus

    PubMed Central

    Winton, R. Scott; Wu, Charlene J.; Zambello, Erika; Wittig, Thomas W.; Cagle, Nicolette L.

    2016-01-01

    Bird-window collisions cause an estimated one billion bird deaths annually in the United States. Building characteristics and surrounding habitat affect collision frequency. Given the importance of collisions as an anthropogenic threat to birds, mitigation is essential. Patterned glass and UV-reflective films have been proven to prevent collisions. At Duke University’s West campus in Durham, North Carolina, we set out to identify the buildings and building characteristics associated with the highest frequencies of collisions in order to propose a mitigation strategy. We surveyed six buildings, stratified by size, and measured architectural characteristics and surrounding area variables. During 21 consecutive days in spring and fall 2014, and spring 2015, we conducted carcass surveys to document collisions. In addition, we also collected ad hoc collision data year-round and recorded the data using the app iNaturalist. Consistent with previous studies, we found a positive relationship between glass area and collisions. Fitzpatrick, the building with the most window area, caused the most collisions. Schwartz and the Perk, the two small buildings with small window areas, had the lowest collision frequencies. Penn, the only building with bird deterrent pattern, caused just two collisions, despite being almost completely made out of glass. Unlike many research projects, our data collection led to mitigation action. A resolution supported by the student government, including news stories in the local media, resulted in the application of a bird deterrent film to the building with the most collisions: Fitzpatrick. We present our collision data and mitigation result to inspire other researchers and organizations to prevent bird-window collisions. PMID:26855877

  5. Collisions in the Oort Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.A.

    1988-03-01

    The present assessment of the consequentiality of physical collisions between Oort Cloud objects by a first-generation model indicates that natural power-law population structures produce significant numbers of collisions between each comet and smaller objects over the age of the solar system. These collisions are held to constitute a feedback mechanism for small debris production. The impacts yield extensive comet surface evolution in the cloud, in conditions where the number of small orbiting objects conforms to the standard power-law populations. 16 references.

  6. Properties of compacton-anticompacton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Andres; Mihaila, Bogdan; Cooper, Fred; Saxena, Avadh

    2011-06-15

    We study the properties of compacton-anticompacton collision processes. We compare and contrast results for the case of compacton-anticompacton solutions of the K(l,p) Rosenau-Hyman (RH) equation for l=p=2, with compacton-anticompacton solutions of the L(l,p) Cooper-Shepard-Sodano (CSS) equation for p=1 and l=3. This study is performed using a Pade discretization of the RH and CSS equations. We find a significant difference in the behavior of compacton-anticompacton scattering. For the CSS equation, the scattering can be interpreted as 'annihilation' as the wake left behind dissolves over time. In the RH equation, the numerical evidence is that multiple shocks form after the collision, which eventually lead to 'blowup' of the resulting wave form.

  7. Classical gluon production amplitude in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirilli, Giovanni Antonio

    2016-03-01

    The distribution of quarks and gluons produced in the initial stages of nuclear collisions, known as the initial condition of the Quark-Gluon Plasma formation, is the fundamental building block of heavy-ion theory. I will present the scattering amplitude, beyond the leading order, of the classical gluon produced in heavy-ion collisions. The result is obtained in the framework of saturation physics and Wilson lines formalism.

  8. The collision singularity in a perturbed n-body problem.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sperling, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    Collision of all bodies in a perturbed n-body problem is analyzed by an extension of the author's results for a perturbed two-body problem (1969). A procedure is set forth to prove that the absolute value of energy in a perturbed n-body system remains bounded until the moment of collision. It is shown that the characteristics of motion in both perturbed problems are basically the same.

  9. Towards collisions of inhomogeneous shockwaves in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We perform a numerical simulation of the evolution of inhomogeneities with transverse profile in a collision of gravitational shockwaves in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetime. This constitutes a step closer towards an accurate holographic description of the thermalization of a strongly coupled plasma, which can model the dynamics of heavy ion collisions. The results indicate that the considered inhomogeneities typically become hydrodynamical earlier or at the same moment when hydrodynamics applies to the background, even though they decay slowly.

  10. Control of Ultracold Collisions with Frequency-Chirped Light

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M.J.; Gould, P.L.; Gensemer, S.D.; Vala, J.; Kosloff, R.

    2005-08-05

    We report on ultracold atomic collision experiments utilizing frequency-chirped laser light. A rapid chirp below the atomic resonance results in adiabatic excitation to an attractive molecular potential over a wide range of internuclear separation. This leads to a transient inelastic collision rate which is large compared to that obtained with fixed-frequency excitation. The combination of high efficiency and temporal control demonstrates the benefit of applying the techniques of coherent control to the ultracold domain.

  11. High p{sub T} jet production in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Eskola, K.J.; Wang, X.N.

    1995-07-01

    Production rates of large p{sub T} jets in pp collisions at RHIC and LHC energies are studied using the next-to-leading order calculation of S. D. Ellis, Z. Zunszt and D. Soper. The computed inclusive one-jet cross sections are compared against the CERN and Fermilab jet data from p{bar p} and pp collisions. The dependence of the results on the choice of the parton distributions and renormalization/factorization scales is investigated.

  12. Modification of Atomic Collision Dynamics by Intense Ultrashort Laser Pulses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizer, Theodore, II

    During the past decade there has been a great deal of effort put toward demonstrating that the dynamics of atomic collisions can be modified by the presence of intense laser fields. The term "modified collision dynamics" means here that the potential energy surfaces which govern the collision dynamics are actually distorted by the ac -Stark effect induced by the intense laser field. This results in altered probabilities for the scatterers to end up in certain outgoing channels. The attractiveness of the idea of modified collisions, of course, lies in the possibility of selectively controlling physical or chemical processes by judicious choice of laser frequency and intensity. If one uses laser pulses whose duration is less than an individual collision then the experimenter can actively change the shape of the potentials during the collision. In principle, if one can open and close reactive channels at appropriate times during the collision, one can strongly influence its outcome. In this thesis the first experimental observation of the modification of atomic collision dynamics by ultrashort laser pulses is reported. In order to more fully understand the interaction of the ultrashort laser field with the colliding atomic system, a theoretical model was developed using a solution to Schroedinger's equation in Bloch equation form. The numerical solution was then averaged over various uncontrollable parameters present in the experiment when using a thermally random distribution of atoms. Averaging over these parameters as well as using a realistic temporal pulse shape and spatial beam profile has proven to be extremely important in modeling the experimental outcome. The output of a dye oscillator-amplifier combination was used to study the collision process Na(3s) + Ar + (H/2PI)(omega) (--->) Na(3P(, 1/2)) + Ar. It has been found that at fixed laser intensity the efficiency of exciting the Na(3P(, 1/2)) state is higher for pulses shorter than a collision duration than

  13. Intuitive understanding of the relationship between the elasticity of objects and kinematic patterns of collisions.

    PubMed

    Vicovaro, Michele; Burigana, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Horizontal collisions have long been used as a tool for exploring people's intuitive understanding of elementary physical laws. Here, we explored intuitive understanding of the relationship between the kinematic patterns of collisions and the elasticity of the colliding objects. In Experiment 1A, we manipulated the simulated materials of two virtually colliding spheres and asked the participants to judge whether the simulated collisions appeared "natural" or "unnatural." We did the same in Experiments 1B and 2, but asked the participants to adjust the velocities until the collisions appeared to be "perfectly natural." In Experiment 3, we removed pictorial cues to the materials of the colliding spheres and asked the participants to rate the bounciness of the materials, in view of the kinematics of simulated collisions. Overall, the results showed that observers intuitively understood that collisions between more elastic objects subtend a higher coefficient of restitution than collisions between objects with lesser elasticity. The results also highlighted some discrepancies between the intuitive and Newtonian physics of collisions. Observers were somewhat insensitive to violations of the principle of energy conservation, and their responses were influenced by irrelevant kinematic features of the collisions, such as the collision type and precollision velocity. We discuss our experimental results in relation to salient theoretical perspectives on intuitive physics. PMID:26659806

  14. A virtual simulator designed for collision prevention in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hyunuk; Kum, Oyeon; Han, Youngyih Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Jin Sung; Choi, Doo Ho

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: In proton therapy, collisions between the patient and nozzle potentially occur because of the large nozzle structure and efforts to minimize the air gap. Thus, software was developed to predict such collisions between the nozzle and patient using treatment virtual simulation. Methods: Three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a gantry inner-floor, nozzle, and robotic-couch was performed using SolidWorks based on the manufacturer’s machine data. To obtain patient body information, a 3D-scanner was utilized right before CT scanning. Using the acquired images, a 3D-image of the patient’s body contour was reconstructed. The accuracy of the image was confirmed against the CT image of a humanoid phantom. The machine components and the virtual patient were combined on the treatment-room coordinate system, resulting in a virtual simulator. The simulator simulated the motion of its components such as rotation and translation of the gantry, nozzle, and couch in real scale. A collision, if any, was examined both in static and dynamic modes. The static mode assessed collisions only at fixed positions of the machine’s components, while the dynamic mode operated any time a component was in motion. A collision was identified if any voxels of two components, e.g., the nozzle and the patient or couch, overlapped when calculating volume locations. The event and collision point were visualized, and collision volumes were reported. Results: All components were successfully assembled, and the motions were accurately controlled. The 3D-shape of the phantom agreed with CT images within a deviation of 2 mm. Collision situations were simulated within minutes, and the results were displayed and reported. Conclusions: The developed software will be useful in improving patient safety and clinical efficiency of proton therapy.

  15. Thinking Problems of the Present Collision Warning Work by Analyzing the Intersection Between Cosmos 2251 and Iridium 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R. L.; Liu, W.; Yan, R. D.; Gong, J. C.

    2013-08-01

    After Cosmos 2251 and Iridium 33 collision breakup event, the institutions at home and abroad began the collision warning analysis for the event. This paper compared the results from the different research units and discussed the problems of the current collision warning work, then gave the suggestions of further study.

  16. Improved Collision Search for Hash Functions: New Advanced Message Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Yusuke; Ohta, Kazuo; Kunihiro, Noboru

    In this paper, we discuss the collision search for hash functions, mainly in terms of their advanced message modification. The advanced message modification is a collision search tool based on Wang et al.'s attacks. Two advanced message modifications have previously been proposed: cancel modification for MD4 and MD5, and propagation modification for SHA-0. In this paper, we propose a new concept of advanced message modification, submarine modification. As a concrete example combining the ideas underlying these modifications, we apply submarine modification to the collision search for SHA-0. As a result, we show that this can reduce the collision search attack complexity from 239 to 236 SHA-0 compression operations.

  17. An improved collision efficiency model for particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Aaron; Franks, George; Biggs, Simon; Jameson, Graeme J.

    2006-11-01

    A generalized geometric model is presented which describes the collision efficiency factor of aggregation (the probability of a binary particle or aggregate collision resulting in adhesion) for systems comprised of two oppositely charged species. Application of the general model to specific systems requires calculation of the area of each species available for collision with a second species. This is in contrast to previous models developed for polymer-particle flocculation that are based on the fractional surface coverage of adsorbed polymer. The difference between these approaches is suggested as an explanation for previously observed discrepancies between theory and observation. In the current work the specific case of oppositely charged nondeformable spherical particles (heteroaggregation) is quantitatively addressed. The optimum concentration of oppositely charged particles for rapid aggregation (maximum collision efficiency) as a function of relative particle size is calculated and an excellent correlation is found with data taken from literature.

  18. An improved collision efficiency model for particle aggregation.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Aaron; Franks, George; Biggs, Simon; Jameson, Graeme J

    2006-11-14

    A generalized geometric model is presented which describes the collision efficiency factor of aggregation (the probability of a binary particle or aggregate collision resulting in adhesion) for systems comprised of two oppositely charged species. Application of the general model to specific systems requires calculation of the area of each species available for collision with a second species. This is in contrast to previous models developed for polymer-particle flocculation that are based on the fractional surface coverage of adsorbed polymer. The difference between these approaches is suggested as an explanation for previously observed discrepancies between theory and observation. In the current work the specific case of oppositely charged nondeformable spherical particles (heteroaggregation) is quantitatively addressed. The optimum concentration of oppositely charged particles for rapid aggregation (maximum collision efficiency) as a function of relative particle size is calculated and an excellent correlation is found with data taken from literature. PMID:17115794

  19. Continental collisions and seismic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, R.; Wever, Th.; Sadowiak, P.

    1991-04-01

    Reflection seismics in compressional belts has revealed the structure of crustal shortening and thickening processes, showing complex patterns of indentation and interfingering of colliding crusts and subcrustal lithospheres. Generally, in the upper crust large zones of detachments develop, often showing duplexes and 'crocodile' structures. The lower crust from zones of active collision (e.g. Alps, Pyrenees) is characterized by strongly dipping reflections. The base of the crust with the Moho must be continuously equilibrating after orogenic collapse as areas of former continental collision exhibit flat Mohos and subhorizontal reflections. The depth to the Moho increases during collision and decreases after the onset of post-orogenic extension, until finally the crustal root disappears completely together with the erosion of the mountains. Processes, active during continental collisions and orogenic collapse, create distinct structures which are imaged by reflection seismic profiling. Examples are shown and discussed.

  20. Milky Way's Head On Collision

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation depicts the collision between our Milky Way galaxy and the Andromeda galaxy. Hubble Space Telescope observations indicate that the two galaxies, pulled together by their mutual gravi...

  1. Theoretical studies of molecular collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouri, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: (1) total integral reactive cross sections and vibrationally resolved reaction probabilities for F + H2 = HF + H; (2) a theoretical study of inelastic O + N2 collisions; (3) body frame close coupling wave packet approach to gas phase atom-rigit rotor inelastic collisions; (4) wave packet study of gas phase atom-rigit motor scattering; (5) the application of optical potentials for reactive scattering; (6) time dependent, three dimensional body frame quantal wave packet treatment of the H + H2 exchange reaction; (7) a time dependent wave packet approach to atom-diatom reactive collision probabilities; (8) time dependent wave packet for the complete determination of s-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions; (9) a comparison of three time dependent wave packet methods for calculating electron-atom elastic scattering cross sections; and (10) a numerically exact full wave packet approach to molecule-surface scattering.

  2. Do cloud-cloud collisions trigger high-mass star formation? I. Small cloud collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Takahira, Ken; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Habe, Asao

    2014-09-01

    We performed sub-parsec (∼0.06 pc) scale simulations of two idealized molecular clouds with different masses undergoing a collision. Gas clumps with densities greater than 10{sup –20} g cm{sup –3} (0.3 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}) were identified as pre-stellar cores and tracked throughout the simulation. The colliding system showed a partial gas arc morphology with core formation in the oblique shock front at the collision interface. These characteristics support NANTEN observations of objects suspected to be colliding giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We investigated the effect of turbulence and collision speed on the resulting core population and compared the cumulative mass distribution to cores in observed GMCs. Our results suggest that a faster relative velocity increases the number of cores formed but that cores grow via accretion predominately while in the shock front, leading to a slower shock being more important for core growth. The core masses obey a power-law relation with index γ = –1.6, in good agreement with observations. This suggests that core production through collisions should follow a similar mass distribution as quiescent formation, albeit at a higher mass range. If cores can be supported against collapse during their growth, then the estimated ram pressure from gas infall is of the right order to counter the radiation pressure and form a star of 100 M {sub ☉}.

  3. Do Cloud-Cloud Collisions Trigger High-mass Star Formation? I. Small Cloud Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahira, Ken; Tasker, Elizabeth J.; Habe, Asao

    2014-09-01

    We performed sub-parsec (~0.06 pc) scale simulations of two idealized molecular clouds with different masses undergoing a collision. Gas clumps with densities greater than 10-20 g cm-3 (0.3 × 104 cm-3) were identified as pre-stellar cores and tracked throughout the simulation. The colliding system showed a partial gas arc morphology with core formation in the oblique shock front at the collision interface. These characteristics support NANTEN observations of objects suspected to be colliding giant molecular clouds (GMCs). We investigated the effect of turbulence and collision speed on the resulting core population and compared the cumulative mass distribution to cores in observed GMCs. Our results suggest that a faster relative velocity increases the number of cores formed but that cores grow via accretion predominately while in the shock front, leading to a slower shock being more important for core growth. The core masses obey a power-law relation with index γ = -1.6, in good agreement with observations. This suggests that core production through collisions should follow a similar mass distribution as quiescent formation, albeit at a higher mass range. If cores can be supported against collapse during their growth, then the estimated ram pressure from gas infall is of the right order to counter the radiation pressure and form a star of 100 M ⊙.

  4. Collision of Dual Aggregates (CODA): Experimental observations of low-velocity collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorges, Jeffery; Dove, Adrienne; Colwell, Josh E.

    2016-10-01

    Low-velocity collisions are one of the driving factors that determine the particle size distribution and particle size evolution in planetary ring systems and in the early stages of planet formation. Collisions of sub-micron to decimeter-sized objects may result in particle growth by accretion, rebounding, or erosive processes that result in the production of additional smaller particles. Numerical simulations of these systems are limited by a need to understand these collisional parameters over a range of conditions. We present the results of a sequence of laboratory experiments designed to explore collisions over a range of parameter space . We are able to observe low-velocity collisions by conducting experiments in vacuum chambers in our 0.8-sec drop tower apparatus. Initial experiments utilize a variety of impacting spheres, including glass, Teflon, aluminum, stainless steel, and brass. These spheres are either used in their natural state or are "mantled" - coated with a few-mm thick layer of a cohesive powder. A high-speed, high-resolution video camera is used to record the motion of the colliding bodies. We track the particles to determine impactor speeds before and after collision, the impact parameter, and the collisional outcome. In the case of the mantled impactors, we can assess how much rotation is generated by the collision and estimate how much powder is released (i.e. how much mass is lost) due to the collision. We also determine how the coefficient of restitution varies as a function of material type, morphology, and impact velocity. With impact velocities ranging from about 20-100 cm/s we observe that mantling of particles significantly reduces their coefficients of restitution, but we see basically no dependence of the coefficient of restitution on the impact velocity, impact parameter, or system mass. The results of this study will contribute to a better empirical model of collisional outcomes that will be refined with numerical simulation of the

  5. Simple treatment of ultracold polar molecule collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, John; Quèmèner, Goulven; Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Julienne, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Collisions of polar molecules at ultracold (< μK) temperatures open the way for prospects of manipulating collision dynamics, including chemical reactions, by by varying an electric field. To understand such processes, one needs a scattering theory that accounts sufficiently accurately for the long-range van der Waals and dipolar forces acting between the molecules, but that also has a reasonable parametrization of the short-range physics when the molecules actually encounter one another. In this presentation we discuss a theory that marries a quantum-defect-theory parametrization of short-range physics, to a modified Langevin-like model that has successfully estimated the effect of electric fields. We discuss the character of the resulting scattering, including field-dependent chemical reaction rates and resonances.

  6. Radio frequency field assisted cold collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yijue; D'Incao, Jose; Greene, Chris

    2016-05-01

    The radio frequency (RF) field is a promising but less developed tool to control cold collisions. From the few-body perspective, we study cold atom collisions in an external magnetic field and a single-color RF field. We employ the multi-channel quantum defect theory and the hyperspherical toolkit to solve the two-body and three-body Schrödinger equations. Our results show that RF fields can effectively control the two-body scattering length through Feshbach resonances. Such RF induced Feshbach resonances can be applied to quenching experiments or spinor condensates. Analogous to photo association, RF fields can also associate cold atoms into molecules with a reasonable rate. Moreover, we will discuss the feasibility of using RF fields to control three-body recombination, which may improve the experimental timescale by suppressing three-body losses. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  7. US Coast Guard collision at sea.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, B G

    1985-01-01

    The collision between the USCGC Cuyahoga and the motor vessel Santa Cruz II resulted in psychological distress among the Coast Guard crewmen. The US Navy Special Psychiatric Rapid Intervention Team (SPRINT) was activated to provide mental health services to the Coast Guard survivors and others who had been affected by the disaster. The psychiatric records of the 18 survivors were examined and summarized, and combined with anecdotal comments made by SPRINT members. The most prominent psychological reactions among the survivors were shock, anger, sadness, and guilt. Spouses of the survivors dealt with bereavement and strove to understand their husbands' reactions. Variables identified by the SPRINT as being important to their success were communication with and support from the training center command, assurances of confidentiality to the survivors, and commencement of their work almost immediately following the collision.

  8. Anomalons, honey, and glue in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gyulassy, M.

    1982-12-01

    In these lectures, selected topics in nuclear collisions in the energy range 10/sup -1/ to 10/sup 3/ GeV per nucleon are discussed. The evidence for anomalous projectile fragments with short mean free paths is presented. Theoretical speculations on novel topological nuclear excitation and on quark-nuclear complexes in connection with anomalons are discussed. Recent tests for pion field instabilities are presented. Then evidence for collective nuclear flow phenomena are reviewed. Global event analysis and cascade simulations are presented. We address the question of whether nuclear flow is like viscous honey. Finally, the criteria for the production of a quark-gluon plasma are discussed. Nuclear stopping power and longitudinal growth at high energies are considered. Results from cosmic ray data show that nuclear collision at TeV per nucleon energies are likely to product a plasma.

  9. Theory of Electron-Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Donald C

    2009-10-02

    Collisions of electrons with atoms and ions play a crucial role in the modeling and diagnostics of fusion plasmas. In the edge and divertor regions of magnetically confined plasmas, data for the collisions of electrons with neutral atoms and low charge-state ions are of particular importance, while in the inner region, data on highly ionized species are needed. Since experimental measurements for these collisional processes remain very limited, data for such processes depend primarily on the results of theoretical calculations. Over the period of the present grant (January 2006 - August 2009), we have made additional improvements in our parallel scattering programs, generated data of direct fusion interest and made these data available on The Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center Web site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition, we have employed these data to do collsional-radiative modeling studies in support of a variety of experiments with magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

  10. The collision of India with Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, L. T.; Lister, G. S.

    2012-05-01

    We review the relative motion of India and Asia for the last 100 million years and present a revised reconstruction for the India-Antarctica-Africa-North America-Eurasia plate circuit based on published motion histories. Deformation of these continental masses during this time introduces uncertainties, as does error in oceanic isochron age and location. Neglecting these factors, the data ipso facto allow the inference that the motion of India relative to Eurasia was distinctly episodic. Although motion is likely to have varied more smoothly than these results would allow, the geological record also suggests a sequence of distinct episodes, at about the same times. Hence we suggest that no single event should be regarded as the collision of India with Asia. The deceleration of the Indian plate commencing at ˜65 Ma is matched by an equally significant prior acceleration and this aspect must be taken into account in geodynamic scenarios proposed to explain the collision of India with Asia.

  11. Dependence of elastic hadron collisions on impact parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procházka, Jiří; Lokajíček, Miloš V.; Kundrát, Vojtěch

    2016-05-01

    Elastic proton-proton collisions represent probably the greatest ensemble of available measured data, the analysis of which may provide a large amount of new physical results concerning fundamental particles. It is, however, necessary to analyze first some conclusions concerning pp collisions and their interpretations differing fundamentally from our common macroscopic experience. It has been argued, e.g., that elastic hadron collisions have been more central than inelastic ones, even if any explanation of the existence of so different processes, i.e., elastic and inelastic (with hundreds of secondary particles) collisions, under the same conditions has not been given until now. The given conclusion has been based on a greater number of simplifying mathematical assumptions (already done in earlier calculations), without their influence on physical interpretation being analyzed and entitled; the corresponding influence has started to be studied in the approach based on the eikonal model. The possibility of a peripheral interpretation of elastic collisions will be demonstrated and the corresponding results summarized. The arguments will be given on why no preference may be given to the mentioned centrality against the standard peripheral behaviour. The corresponding discussion on the contemporary description of elastic hadronic collision in dependence on the impact parameter will be summarized and the justification of some important assumptions will be considered.

  12. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number.

    PubMed

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We's, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets. PMID:19905206

  13. Binary droplet collision at high Weber number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Chou, Ping-Chung; Tseng, Yu-Jen

    2009-09-01

    By using the techniques developed for generating high-speed droplets, we have systematically investigated binary droplet collision when the Weber number (We) was increased from the range usually tested in previous studies on the order of 10 to a much larger value of about 5100 for water (a droplet at 23 m/s with a diameter of 0.7 mm). Various liquids were also used to explore the effects of viscosity and surface tension. Specifically, beyond the well-known regimes at moderate We’s, which exhibited coalescence, separation, and separation followed by satellite droplets, we found different behaviors showing a fingering lamella, separation after fingering, breakup of outer fingers, and prompt splattering into multiple secondary droplets as We was increased. The critical Weber numbers that mark the boundaries between these impact regimes are identified. The specific impact behaviors, such as fingering and prompt splattering or splashing, share essential similarity with those also observed in droplet-surface impacts, whereas substantial variations in the transition boundaries may result from the disparity of the boundary conditions at impacts. To compare the outcomes of both types of collisions, a simple model based on energy conservation was carried out to predict the maximum diameter of an expanding liquid disk for a binary droplet collision. The results oppose the dominance of viscous drag, as proposed by previous studies, as the main deceleration force to effect a Rayleigh-Taylor instability and ensuing periphery fingers, which may further lead to the formations of satellite droplets.

  14. Studying Proton-Proton Collisions Using Pythia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi

    2004-10-01

    At Brookhaven National Lab, the RHIC experiments are currently investigating, on a subatomic level, what happens when heavy ions collide at high speeds. This is done in order to create such high temperatures and densities that quarks are no longer bound to one another. This state of matter is called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Evidence for the existence of the QGP may be the quenching of hadron jets, which occurs when the fast quarks or gluons lose so much energy in the hot, dense medium that they cannot survive. Then the jets of particles that these particles usually result in cannot be made. By studying the particle yield at high transverse momentum (Pt), one can probe what is happening to the jets created during collisions. Using Pythia, a standard model event generator based on the Lund String Model, we study jets of particles created when elementary protons collide. Then we know what should happen to jets at high transverse momentum transfer, when no QGP is present. Comparing the pt spectrum of jet partners generated by Pythia to RHIC results for proton-proton collisions shows that the two do in fact agree. This not only insures that the analysis of RHIC data is correct, but it also establishes a basis for comparison for Au-Au collisions. Comparing d+Au collision data to the Pythia Pt spectrum of jets with leading baryon and meson triggers, we found good agreement. Thus the jet production does not change drastically in nature in the presence of a cold nuclear medium.

  15. Simulation of Droplets Collisions Using Two-Phase Entropic Lattice Boltzmann Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazloomi Moqaddam, A.; Chikatamarla, S. S.; Karlin, I. V.

    2015-12-01

    The recently introduced entropic lattice Boltzmann model for multiphase flows (Mazloomi et al. in Phys Rev Lett 114:174502, 2015) is used to simulate binary droplet collisions. The entropy-based stabilization, together with a new polynomial equation of state, enhances performance of the model and allow us to simulate droplet collision for various Weber and Reynolds numbers and large liquid to vapor density ratio. Different types of droplet collision outcomes, namely coalescence, stretching separation and reflexive separation are recovered in a range of impact parameter for two equal sized droplets. The results demonstrated the essential role played by the surface tension, kinematic viscosity, impact parameter and relative velocity in the droplet collision dynamics leading to coalescence or separation collision outcomes. Comparison between numerical results and experiments in both coalescence and separation collisions demonstrate viability of the presented model.

  16. Simulating the universe(s) III: observables for the full bubble collision spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Wainwright, Carroll L.; Aguirre, Anthony; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2016-07-01

    This is the third paper in a series establishing a quantitative relation between inflationary scalar field potential landscapes and the relic perturbations left by the collision between bubbles produced during eternal inflation. We introduce a new method for computing cosmological observables from numerical relativity simulations of bubble collisions in one space and one time dimension. This method tiles comoving hypersurfaces with locally-perturbed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker coordinate patches. The method extends previous work, which was limited to the spacetime region just inside the future light cone of the collision, and allows us to explore the full bubble-collision spacetime. We validate our new methods against previous work, and present a full set of predictions for the comoving curvature perturbation and local negative spatial curvature produced by identical and non-identical bubble collisions, in single scalar field models of eternal inflation. In both collision types, there is a non-zero contribution to the spatial curvature and cosmic microwave background quadrupole. Some collisions between non-identical bubbles excite wall modes, giving extra structure to the predicted temperature anisotropies. We comment on the implications of our results for future observational searches. For non-identical bubble collisions, we also find that the surfaces of constant field can readjust in the presence of a collision to produce spatially infinite sections that become nearly homogeneous deep into the region affected by the collision. Contrary to previous assumptions, this is true even in the bubble into which the domain wall is accelerating.

  17. Alternate Pacing of Border-Collision Period-Doubling Bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaopeng; Schaeffer, David G

    2007-11-01

    Unlike classical bifurcations, border-collision bifurcations occur when, for example, a fixed point of a continuous, piecewise C1 map crosses a boundary in state space. Although classical bifurcations have been much studied, border-collision bifurcations are not well understood. This paper considers a particular class of border-collision bifurcations, i.e., border-collision period-doubling bifurcations. We apply a subharmonic perturbation to the bifurcation parameter, which is also known as alternate pacing, and we investigate the response under such pacing near the original bifurcation point. The resulting behavior is characterized quantitatively by a gain, which is the ratio of the response amplitude to the applied perturbation amplitude. The gain in a border-collision period-doubling bifurcation has a qualitatively different dependence on parameters from that of a classical period-doubling bifurcation. Perhaps surprisingly, the differences are more readily apparent if the gain is plotted vs. the perturbation amplitude (with the bifurcation parameter fixed) than if plotted vs. the bifurcation parameter (with the perturbation amplitude fixed). When this observation is exploited, the gain under alternate pacing provides a useful experimental tool to identify a border-collision period-doubling bifurcation.

  18. Recommended Screening Practices for Launch Collision Aviodance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaver, Brian A.; Hametz, Mark E.; Ollivierre, Jarmaine C.; Newman, Lauri K.; Hejduk, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this document is to assess the value of launch collision avoidance (COLA) practices and provide recommendations regarding its implementation for NASA robotic missions. The scope of this effort is limited to launch COLA screens against catalog objects that are either spacecraft or debris. No modifications to manned safety COLA practices are considered in this effort. An assessment of the value of launch COLA can be broken down into two fundamental questions: 1) Does collision during launch represent a significant risk to either the payload being launched or the space environment? 2) Can launch collision mitigation be performed in a manner that provides meaningful risk reduction at an acceptable level of operational impact? While it has been possible to piece together partial answers to these questions for some time, the first attempt to comprehensively address them is documented in reference (a), Launch COLA Operations: an Examination of Data Products, Procedures, and Thresholds, Revision A. This report is the product of an extensive study that addressed fundamental technical questions surrounding launch collision avoidance analysis and practice. The results provided in reference (a) will be cited throughout this document as these two questions are addressed. The premise of this assessment is that in order to conclude that launch COLA is a value-added activity, the answer to both of these questions must be affirmative. A "no" answer to either of these questions points toward the conclusion that launch COLA provides little or no risk mitigation benefit. The remainder of this assessment will focus on addressing these two questions.

  19. Collisions of Rydberg Atoms with Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAdam, Keith B.

    2000-10-01

    The long range of Coulomb interactions, together with the large size, long radiative lifetimes and high state densities of highly excited Rydberg atoms, results in inelastic collision cross sections of prodigious size -- often large enough to outweigh small number densities in astrophysica and cool laboratory plasmas -- and in other unusual features. This talk will provide: (a) a brief survey of the significant features of collisions between electron or positive ions and state-selected Rydberg atoms and of recent experiments( O. Makarov and K.B. MacAdam, Phys. Rev. A 60), 2131-8 (1999); and K.B. MacAdam, J.C. Day and D.M. Homan, Comm. At. Mol. Phys./Comm. Mod. Phys. 1(2), Part D, 57-73 (1999). to investigate them; (b) an introduction to some of the special techniques that have been developed(J.L. Horn, D.M. Homan, C.S. Hwang, W.L. Fuqua III and K.B. MacAdam, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 69), 4086-93 (1998). for preparation, manipulation and detection of Rydberg atoms; and (c) a glimpse at new directions in Rydberg atom collision research.

  20. Collision-induced constructive quantum interference

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xihua; Xie, Hankun

    2003-06-01

    We theoretically study the collision-induced constructive quantum interference in an open four-level system with the density-matrix approach based on the experimental observation of constructive quantum interference between two transition pathways 3P{sub 1/2}-5S (or 4D) and 3P{sub 3/2}-5S (or 4D) via equal-frequency hybrid excitation in the Na{sub 2}-Na system. The effects of the collision-induced coherent and incoherent decay rates and the ratio of the two transition dipole moments on the interference are analyzed. It is shown that through the incoherent process (collision), the coherence between a widely separated doublet and subsequent constructive quantum interference can be realized. The physical origin of the constructive interference can be seen clearly in the dressed-atom picture. The theoretical results can also be used to qualitatively explain the dependence of quantum interference on the experimental buffer gas pressure and sample temperature.

  1. Spinodal phase separation in relativistic nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, Joergen

    2010-09-15

    The spinodal amplification of density fluctuations is treated perturbatively within dissipative fluid dynamics for the purpose of elucidating the prospects for this mechanism to cause a phase separation to occur during a relativistic nuclear collision. The present study includes not only viscosity but also heat conduction (whose effect on the growth rates is of comparable magnitude but opposite), as well as a gradient term in the local pressure, and the corresponding dispersion relation for collective modes in bulk matter is derived from relativistic fluid dynamics. A suitable two-phase equation of state is obtained by interpolation between a hadronic gas and a quark-gluon plasma, while the transport coefficients are approximated by simple parametrizations that are suitable at any degree of net baryon density. We calculate the degree of spinodal amplification occurring along specific dynamical phase trajectories characteristic of nuclear collision at various energies. The results bring out the important fact that the prospects for spinodal phase separation to occur can be greatly enhanced by careful tuning of the collision energy to ensure that the thermodynamic conditions associated with the maximum compression lie inside the region of spinodal instability.

  2. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. IV. THE COLLISION KERNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-12-20

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, τ{sub p}. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with τ{sub p} corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, τ{sub p,} {sub h}, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, τ{sub p,} {sub l}, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at τ{sub p,} {sub l} = τ{sub p,} {sub h}, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For τ{sub p,} {sub h} in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with τ{sub p,} {sub l} and scales with τ{sub p,} {sub h} roughly as ∝ τ{sub p,h}{sup 1/2}. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  3. Collision zone magmatism aids continental crustal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savov, Ivan; Meliksetian, Khachatur; Ralf, Halama; Gevorg, Navasardian; Chuck, Connor; Massimo, D'Antonio; Samuele, Agostini; Osamu, Ishizuka; Sergei, Karapetian; Arkadi, Karakhanian

    2014-05-01

    .51282, respectively). These isotopic signatures are much more similar to those typical of intra-oceanic subduction zones than those typical of continental crust, likely due to the very young age of the rocks. In contrast, trace element abundances reveal many similarities to average CC, such as Nb-Ta and Ti troughs and Pb peaks. The range of d11B isotope ratios (-8.7 to +2.1 per mil) signifies magmas originating from moderately metasomatised (arc preconditioned) mantle sources. Our combined results reveal that the collision-related mantle melting is capable of generating large volumes of plutons and volcanic rocks that resemble (although not perfectly) the composition of the average CC. We will attempt to use the new combined datasets in order to quantify the importance of the collision zone magmatism for continental crustal growth. [1] Lee et al. (2007) EPSL 263, 370-387; [2] Niu et al. (2013) Earth-Science Reviews 127, 96-110; [3] Connor et al., (2012) J.Applied Volcanology, 1:3, 1-19.

  4. A first collision source method for ATTILA, an unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete ordinates code

    SciTech Connect

    Wareing, T.A.; Morel, J.E.; Parsons, D.K.

    1998-12-01

    A semi-analytic first collision source method is developed for the transport code, ATTILA, a three-dimensional, unstructured tetrahedral mesh, discrete-ordinates code. This first collision source method is intended to mitigate ray effects due to point sources. The method is third-order accurate, which is the same order of accuracy as the linear-discontinuous spatial differencing scheme used in ATTILA. Numerical results are provided to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the first collision source method.

  5. Measurement of D-meson production in Pb—Pb collisions at the LHC with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festanti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of D-meson production in heavy-ion collisions at LHC energy provides insights into the mechanisms of interaction of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium formed in these collisions. ALICE results on the D-meson nuclear modification factor and azimuthal anisotropy in Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV are presented.

  6. Impulsive model for reactive collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marron, M. T.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple classical mechanical model of the reactive scattering of a structureless atom A and a quasi-diatomic BC is developed which takes full advantage of energy, linear and angular momentum conservation relations but introduces a minimum of further assumptions. These are as follows: (1) the vibrational degree of freedom of the reactant (BC) and product (AB) molecules is suppressed, so the change in vibrational energy is simply a parameter; (2) straight-line trajectories are assumed outside of a reaction shell; (3) within this zone, momentum transfer occurs impulsively (essentially instantaneously) following mass transfer; (4) the impulse, which may be either positive or negative, is directed along the BC axis, which may, however, assume all orientations with respect to the incident relative velocity. The model yields differential and total cross sections and product rotational energy distributions for a given collision exoergicity Q, or for any known distribution over Q. Numerical results are presented for several prototype reactions whose dynamics have been well-studied.

  7. Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swihart, Donald E.; Skoog, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    This document represents two views of the Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). One viewgraph presentation reviews the development and system design of Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). Two types of ACAT exist: Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance (AGCAS) and Automatic Air Collision Avoidance (AACAS). The AGCAS Uses Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) for mapping functions, and uses Navigation data to place aircraft on map. It then scans DTED in front of and around aircraft and uses future aircraft trajectory (5g) to provide automatic flyup maneuver when required. The AACAS uses data link to determine position and closing rate. It contains several canned maneuvers to avoid collision. Automatic maneuvers can occur at last instant and both aircraft maneuver when using data link. The system can use sensor in place of data link. The second viewgraph presentation reviews the development of a flight test and an evaluation of the test. A review of the operation and comparison of the AGCAS and a pilot's performance are given. The same review is given for the AACAS is given.

  8. Plate rotation during continental collision and its relationship with the exhumation of UHP metamorphic terranes: Application to the Norwegian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrill, A. D.; van Hunen, J.; Cuthbert, S. J.; Brueckner, H. K.; Allen, M. B.

    2014-05-01

    variation and asynchronous onset of collision during the convergence of continents can significantly affect the burial and exhumation of subducted continental crust. Here we use 3-D numerical models for continental collision to discuss how deep burial and exhumation of high and ultrahigh pressure metamorphic (HP/UHP) rocks are enhanced by diachronous collision and the resulting rotation of the colliding plates. Rotation during collision locally favors eduction, the inversion of the subduction, and may explain the discontinuous distribution of ultra-high pressure (UHP) terranes along collision zones. For example, the terminal (Scandian) collision of Baltica and Laurentia, which formed the Scandinavian Caledonides, resulted in the exhumation of only one large HP/UHP terrane, the Western Gneiss Complex (WGC), near the southern end of the collision zone. Rotation of the subducting Baltica plate during collision may provide an explanation for this distribution. We explore this hypothesis by comparing orthogonal and diachronous collision models and conclude that a diachronous collision can transport continental material up to 60 km deeper, and heat material up to 300°C hotter, than an orthogonal collision. Our diachronous collision model predicts that subducted continental margin material returns to the surface only in the region where collision initiated. The diachronous collision model is consistent with petrological and geochonological observations from the WGC and makes predictions for the general evolution of the Scandinavian Caledonides. We propose the collision between Laurentia and Baltica started at the southern end of the collisional zone, and propagated northward. This asymmetric geometry resulted in the counter clockwise rotation of Baltica with respect to Laurentia, consistent with paleomagnetic data from other studies. Our model may have applications to other orogens with regional UHP terranes, such as the Dabie Shan and Papua New Guinea cases, where block

  9. Conjunctions and Collision Avoidance with Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E.

    2013-09-01

    Electrodynamic propulsion technology is currently in development by NASA, ESA, and JAXA for the purpose of affordable removal of large debris objects from LEO. At the same time, the Naval Research Laboratory is preparing a 3U CubeSat with a 1-km electrodynamic tether for a flight demonstration of electrodynamic propulsion. This type of propulsion does not require fuel. The electrodynamic thrust is the Lorentz force acting on the electric current in a long conductor (tether) in the geomagnetic field. Electrons are collected from the ambient plasma on one end and emitted back into the plasma from the other end. The electric current loop is closed through the ionosphere, as demonstrated in two previous flights. The vehicle is solar powered. To support safe navigation of electrodynamic tethers, proper conjunction analysis and collision avoidance strategies are needed. The typical lengths of electrodynamic tethers for near-term applications are measured in kilometers, and the conjunction geometry is very different from the geometry of conjunctions between compact objects. It is commonly thought that the collision cross-section in a conjunction between a tether and a compact object is represented by the product of the tether length and the size of the object. However, rigorous analysis shows that this is not the case, and that the above assumption leads to grossly overestimated collision probabilities. The paper will present the results of a detailed mathematical analysis of the conjunction geometry and collision probabilities in close approaches between electrodynamic tethers and compact objects, such as satellites, rocket bodies, and debris fragments. Electrodynamic spacecraft will not require fuel, and therefore, can thrust constantly. Their orbit transfers can take many days, but can result in major orbit changes, including large rotations of the orbital plane, both in the inclination and the node. During these orbit transfers, the electrodynamic spacecraft will

  10. Coulomb collisions in the Boltzmann equation for electrons in low-temperature gas discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the effects of electron-electron and electron-ion Coulomb collisions on the electron distribution function and transport coefficients obtained from the Boltzmann equation for simple dc gas discharge conditions. Expressions are provided for the full Coulomb collision terms acting on both the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the electron distribution function, which are then incorporated in the freeware Boltzmann equation solver BOLSIG+. Different Coulomb collision effects are demonstrated and discussed on the basis of BOLSIG+  results for argon gas. It is shown that the anisotropic part of the electron-electron collision term, neglected in previous work, can in certain cases have a large effect on the electron mobility and is essential when describing the transition towards the Coulomb-collision dominated regime characterized by Spitzer transport coefficients. Finally, a brief overview is presented of the discharge conditions for which different Coulomb collision effects occur in different gases.

  11. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  12. POLARIZED PROTON COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BAI, M.; AHRENS, L.; ALEKSEEV, I.G.; ALESSI, J.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider provides not only collisions of ions but also collisions of polarized protons. In a circular accelerator, the polarization of polarized proton beam can be partially or fully lost when a spin depolarizing resonance is encountered. To preserve the beam polarization during acceleration, two full Siberian snakes were employed in RHIC. In 2002, polarized proton beams were first accelerated to 100 GeV and collided in RHIC. Beams were brought into collisions with longitudinal polarization at the experiments STAR and PHENIX by using spin rotators. Optimizing polarization transmission efficiency and improving luminosity performance are significant challenges. Currently, the luminosity lifetime in RHIC is limited by the beam-beam effect. The current state of RHIC polarized proton program, including its dedicated physics run in 2005 and efforts to optimize luminosity production in beam-beam limited conditions are reported.

  13. Elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, K H; Adams, N; Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, S; Allgower, C; Amsbaugh, J; Anderson, M; Anderssen, E; Arnesen, H; Arnold, L; Averichev, G S; Baldwin, A; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Beddo, M; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Bennett, S; Bercovitz, J; Berger, J; Betts, W; Bichsel, H; Bieser, F; Bland, L C; Bloomer, M; Blyth, C O; Boehm, J; Bonner, B E; Bonnet, D; Bossingham, R; Botlo, M; Boucham, A; Bouillo, N; Bouvier, S; Bradley, K; Brady, F P; Braithwaite, E S; Braithwaite, W; Brandin, A; Brown, R L; Brugalette, G; Byrd, C; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carr, L; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Caylor, B; Cebra, D; Chatopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, W; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Chrin, J; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Consiglio, C; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Danilov, V I; Dayton, D; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Dialinas, M; Diaz, H; DeYoung, P A; Didenko, L; Dimassimo, D; Dioguardi, J; Dominik, W; Drancourt, C; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Eggert, T; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Etkin, A; Fachini, P; Feliciano, C; Ferenc, D; Ferguson, M I; Fessler, H; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Flores, I; Foley, K J; Fritz, D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gazdzicki, M; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Gojak, C; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Grau, M; Greiner, D; Greiner, L; Grigoriev, V; Grosnick, D; Gross, J; Guilloux, G; Gushin, E; Hall, J; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harper, G; Harris, J W; He, P; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hill, D; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Howe, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Hunt, W; Hunter, J; Igo, G J; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jacobson, S; Jared, R; Jensen, P; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kenney, V P; Khodinov, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koehler, G; Konstantinov, A S; Kormilitsyne, V; Kotchenda, L; Kotov, I; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Krupien, T; Kuczewski, P; Kuhn, C; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Leonhardt, W J; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, Z; Liaw, C J; Lin, J; Lindenbaum, S J; Lindenstruth, V; Lindstrom, P J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Lopiano, D; Love, W A; Lutz, J R; Lynn, D; Madansky, L; Maier, R; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Marks, K; Marstaller, R; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; Matyushevski, E A; McParland, C; McShane, T S; Meier, J; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Middlekamp, P; Mikhalin, N; Miller, B; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Minor, B; Mitchell, J; Mogavero, E; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; Morse, R; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Ngo, T; Nguyen, M; Nguyen, T; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Noggle, T; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nussbaum, T; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Ogilvie, C A; Olchanski, K; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Ososkov, G A; Ott, G; Padrazo, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Pentia, M; Perevotchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Pirogov, S; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Polk, I; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Puskar-Pasewicz, J; Rai, G; Rasson, J; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J; Renfordt, R E; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Riso, J; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Roehrich, D; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sanchez, R; Sandler, Z; Sandweiss, J; Sappenfield, P; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Scheblien, J; Scheetz, R; Schlueter, R; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schulz, M; Schüttauf, A; Sedlmeir, J; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, J; Seyboth, P; Seymour, R; Shakaliev, E I; Shestermanov, K E; Shi, Y; Shimanskii, S S; Shuman, D; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Smykov, L P; Snellings, R; Solberg, K; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Stone, N; Stone, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Symons, T J; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarchini, A; Tarzian, J; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Szanto De Toledo, A; Tonse, S; Trainor, T; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Vakula, I; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Visser, G; Voloshin, S A; Vu, C; Wang, F; Ward, H; Weerasundara, D; Weidenbach, R; Wells, R; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitfield, J P; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wilson, K; Wirth, J; Wisdom, J; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wolf, J; Wood, L; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, J; Zhang, W M; Zhu, J; Zimmerman, D; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-01-15

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

  14. Elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, K H; Adams, N; Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, S; Allgower, C; Amsbaugh, J; Anderson, M; Anderssen, E; Arnesen, H; Arnold, L; Averichev, G S; Baldwin, A; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Beddo, M; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Bennett, S; Bercovitz, J; Berger, J; Betts, W; Bichsel, H; Bieser, F; Bland, L C; Bloomer, M; Blyth, C O; Boehm, J; Bonner, B E; Bonnet, D; Bossingham, R; Botlo, M; Boucham, A; Bouillo, N; Bouvier, S; Bradley, K; Brady, F P; Braithwaite, E S; Braithwaite, W; Brandin, A; Brown, R L; Brugalette, G; Byrd, C; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carr, L; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Caylor, B; Cebra, D; Chatopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, W; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Chrin, J; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Consiglio, C; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Danilov, V I; Dayton, D; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Dialinas, M; Diaz, H; DeYoung, P A; Didenko, L; Dimassimo, D; Dioguardi, J; Dominik, W; Drancourt, C; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Eggert, T; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Etkin, A; Fachini, P; Feliciano, C; Ferenc, D; Ferguson, M I; Fessler, H; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Flores, I; Foley, K J; Fritz, D; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gazdzicki, M; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Gojak, C; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Grau, M; Greiner, D; Greiner, L; Grigoriev, V; Grosnick, D; Gross, J; Guilloux, G; Gushin, E; Hall, J; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harper, G; Harris, J W; He, P; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hill, D; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Howe, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Hunt, W; Hunter, J; Igo, G J; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jacobson, S; Jared, R; Jensen, P; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kenney, V P; Khodinov, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koehler, G; Konstantinov, A S; Kormilitsyne, V; Kotchenda, L; Kotov, I; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Krupien, T; Kuczewski, P; Kuhn, C; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Leonhardt, W J; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, Z; Liaw, C J; Lin, J; Lindenbaum, S J; Lindenstruth, V; Lindstrom, P J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Lopiano, D; Love, W A; Lutz, J R; Lynn, D; Madansky, L; Maier, R; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Marks, K; Marstaller, R; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; Matyushevski, E A; McParland, C; McShane, T S; Meier, J; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Middlekamp, P; Mikhalin, N; Miller, B; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Minor, B; Mitchell, J; Mogavero, E; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; Morse, R; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Ngo, T; Nguyen, M; Nguyen, T; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Noggle, T; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nussbaum, T; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Ogilvie, C A; Olchanski, K; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Ososkov, G A; Ott, G; Padrazo, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Pentia, M; Perevotchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Pirogov, S; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Polk, I; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Puskar-Pasewicz, J; Rai, G; Rasson, J; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J; Renfordt, R E; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Riso, J; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Roehrich, D; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sanchez, R; Sandler, Z; Sandweiss, J; Sappenfield, P; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Scheblien, J; Scheetz, R; Schlueter, R; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schulz, M; Schüttauf, A; Sedlmeir, J; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, J; Seyboth, P; Seymour, R; Shakaliev, E I; Shestermanov, K E; Shi, Y; Shimanskii, S S; Shuman, D; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Smykov, L P; Snellings, R; Solberg, K; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Stone, N; Stone, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Symons, T J; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarchini, A; Tarzian, J; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Szanto De Toledo, A; Tonse, S; Trainor, T; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Vakula, I; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Visser, G; Voloshin, S A; Vu, C; Wang, F; Ward, H; Weerasundara, D; Weidenbach, R; Wells, R; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitfield, J P; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wilson, K; Wirth, J; Wisdom, J; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wolf, J; Wood, L; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, J; Zhang, W M; Zhu, J; Zimmerman, D; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-01-15

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at square root(S)NN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented. PMID:11177841

  15. Pseudorapidity distribution of multiplicity in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ya-Fei; Jiang, Zhi-Jin; Wang, Zeng-Wei

    2008-04-01

    Using the Glauber model, we discuss the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in heavy-ion collisions. Based on the latter, after considering the effect of energy loss of the nucleons in multiple collisions, we derive the pseudorapidity distribution of the multiplicity as a function of the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Using this, we analyze the experimental measurements carried out by the BRAHMS Collaboration in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. The results are in good agreement with the experimental observations. Supported by Key Foundation of Shanghai (06JC14075)

  16. Oblique collision of dust acoustic solitons in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Boruah, A.; Sharma, S. K. Bailung, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2015-09-15

    The oblique collision between two equal amplitude dust acoustic solitons is observed in a strongly coupled dusty plasma. The solitons are subjected to oblique interaction at different colliding angles. We observe a resonance structure during oblique collision at a critical colliding angle which is described by the idea of three wave resonance interaction modeled by Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation. After collision, the solitons preserve their identity. The amplitude of the resultant wave formed during interaction is measured for different collision angles as well as for different colliding soliton amplitudes. At resonance, the maximum amplitude of the new soliton formed is nearly 3.7 times the initial soliton amplitude.

  17. Protein folding dynamics: the diffusion-collision model and experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Karplus, M.; Weaver, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The diffusion-collision model of protein folding is assessed. A description is given of the qualitative aspects and quantitative results of the diffusion-collision model and their relation to available experimental data. We consider alternative mechanisms for folding and point out their relationship to the diffusion-collision model. We show that the diffusion-collision model is supported by a growing body of experimental and theoretical evidence, and we outline future directions for developing the model and its applications. PMID:8003983

  18. Collisions of Small Drops in a Turbulent Flow. Part II: Effects of Flow Accelerations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, M. B.; Khain, A. P.

    2004-08-01

    The effects of Lagrangian acceleration on collision efficiency and collision kernels of small cloud droplets in a turbulent flow are investigated using the results of the recent laboratory experiments by La Porta et al., conducted under high Reλ flow of pronounced intermittency. The effect of Lagrangian accelerations on drop collisions has been found to be significant, namely, for drop pairs, containing a drop collector exceeding 10 μm in radius, collision efficiency, and collision kernels increase by up to 25% and 40%, respectively, at dissipation rates of 200 cm2 s-3 typical of weak cumulus clouds. In well-developed deep cumulus clouds, the increase attains the factor of 2.5 and 5, respectively, at typical dissipation rates of 1000 cm2 s-3. The effect of Lagrangian accelerations is mainly caused by the increase in the collision efficiency that is highly sensitive even to weak variations of interdrop relative velocity. The increase in the swept volume is responsible only for a fraction of the overall increase in the collision kernel.The effect of intermittency of a turbulent flow manifests itself in two aspects: (i) an increase in variance of Lagrangian accelerations with an increase in Reλ, and (ii) the formation of a specific shape of the probability distribution function (PDF) characterized by a sharp maximum and elongated tail. The increase in variance of Lagrangian accelerations leads to an increase in the collision rate between droplets. The effect of the PDF shape on the collision rate is studied by comparing the magnitudes of collision efficiencies (and kernels) obtained in case of the non-Gaussian PDF with those obtained using the Gaussian PDF of the same acceleration variation. The utilization of the Gaussian PDF leads to a slight (about 10% 15%) overestimation of the values of the collision efficiency and collision kernel. Thus, the effect of intermittency on drop collisions related to high values of PDF flatness has been found to be insignificant

  19. ACAT Ground Collision Avoidance Flight Tests Over

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has concluded flight tests of an Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS) under the joint U.S. Air Force/NASA F-16D Automatic Collision Avoidance...

  20. Transport theory beyond binary collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Carrington, Margaret E.; Mrowczynski, Stanislaw

    2005-03-15

    Using the Schwinger-Keldysh technique, we derive the transport equations for a system of quantum scalar fields. We first discuss the general structure of the equations and then their collision terms. Taking into account up to three-loop diagrams in {phi}{sup 3} model and up to four-loop diagrams in {phi}{sup 4} model, we obtain transport equations which include the contributions of multiparticle collisions and particle production processes, in addition to mean-field effects and binary interactions.

  1. Collisions in Chiral Kinetic Theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yuan; Son, Dam T; Stephanov, Mikhail A

    2015-07-10

    Using a covariant formalism, we construct a chiral kinetic theory Lorentz invariant to order O(ℏ), which includes collisions. We find a new contribution to the particle number current due to the side jumps required by the conservation of angular momentum during collisions. We also find a conserved symmetric stress-energy tensor as well as the H function obeying Boltzmann's H theorem. We demonstrate their use by finding a general equilibrium solution and the values of the anomalous transport coefficients characterizing the chiral vortical effect.

  2. Dissipative heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmeier, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    This report is a compilation of lecture notes of a series of lectures held at Argonne National Laboratory in October and November 1984. The lectures are a discussion of dissipative phenomena as observed in collisions of atomic nuclei. The model is based on a system which has initially zero temperature and the initial energy is kinetic and binding energy. Collisions excite the nuclei, and outgoing fragments or the compound system deexcite before they are detected. Brownian motion is used to introduce the concept of dissipation. The master equation and the Fokker-Planck equation are derived. 73 refs., 59 figs. (WRF)

  3. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-12-31

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which is still dipole in form but contains an energy--dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results {bar p}p in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. The cluster size of emitted hadrons increases gradually with energy. Aside from high-energy collisions, the giant fullerene molecules were studied and precise algebraic eigenvalue expressions of the Hueckel problem for carbon-240 were obtained.

  4. DETECTION OF LOW-VELOCITY COLLISIONS IN SATURN'S F RING

    SciTech Connect

    Attree, N. O.; Murray, C. D.; Cooper, N. J.; Williams, G. A.

    2012-08-20

    Jets of material extending several hundred kilometers from Saturn's F ring are thought to be caused by collisions at speeds of several tens of ms{sup -1} between {approx}10 km diameter objects such as S/2004 S 6 and the core of the ring. The subsequent effects of Keplerian shear give rise to the multi-stranded nature of the F ring. Observations of the ring by the Imaging Science Subsystem experiment on the Cassini spacecraft have provided evidence that some smaller protrusions from the ring's core are the result of low-velocity collisions with nearby objects. We refer to these protrusions as 'mini-jets' and one such feature has been observed for {approx}7.5 hr as its length changed from {approx}75 km to {approx}250 km while it simultaneously appeared to collapse into the core. Orbit determinations suggest that such mini-jets consist of ring material displaced by a {approx}1 ms{sup -1} collision with a nearby moonlet, resulting in paths relative to the core that are due to a combination of Keplerian shear and epicyclic motion. Detections of mini-jets in the Cassini images suggest that it may now be possible to understand most small-scale F ring structure as the result of such collisions. A study of these mini-jets will therefore put constraints on the properties of the colliding population as well as improve our understanding of low-velocity collisions between icy objects.

  5. Progress with collision optics of the Fermilab tevatron collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Valishev, A.; Alexahin, Yu.; Annala, J.; Labedev, V.; Nagaslaev, V.; Sajaev, V.; Accelerator Systems Division; FNAL

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in the measurement and modeling of the machine parameters and lattice functions at the Tevatron allowed modifications of the collision optics to be performed in order to increase the collider luminosity. As the result, beta functions in the two collision points were decreased from 35cm to 29cm which resulted in {approx} 10% increase of the peak luminosity. In this report we describe the results of optics measurements and corrections. We also discuss planned improvements, including the new betatron tune working point and correction of the beta function chromaticity.

  6. Electron-electron collisions at TESLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Siegfried; Reyzl, Ingrid

    2001-07-01

    Electron-electron collisions at the future TESLA linear collider is a promising complement to e+e- collisions. A critical issue for the physics potential of this option is the achievable luminosity. For e+e- collisions, the pinch effect enhances the luminosity, while due to the repelling forces for e-e- collisions, the luminosity is significantly reduced and is more sensitive to beam separations. This report discusses the e-e- option for TESLA and the expected luminosity.

  7. Photon and dilepton production in high energy heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Sakaguchi, Takao

    2015-05-07

    The recent results on direct photons and dileptons in high energy heavy ion collisions, obtained particularly at RHIC and LHC are reviewed. The results are new not only in terms of the probes, but also in terms of the precision. We shall discuss the physics learned from the results.

  8. Low-energy H+ + H2 reactive collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozdanov, Tasko P.

    2014-04-01

    An overview of the results of theoretical treatments of the reactive H+ + H2 system in the interval of collision energies Ec = (1 - 500) meV is presented. The inelastic and reactive processes occur via scrambling of protons and formation of a long-lived collision complex, allowing for the application of various statistical theories. The first systematic theoretical treatment has been based on the "most dynamically biased" (MDB) statistical theory. Recently, the numerically exact (converged) time-independent quantum mechanical (TIQM) calculations have been compared with the statistical quantum mechanical (SQM) model. Our recent results have demonstrated, within the mean-potential statistical (MPS) model, the importance of a proper incorporation of the permutation symmetry of equivalent protons taking part in the collision. We present detailed comparisons of the calculated cross sections and thermal rate coefficients obtained by using our MPS model with MDB, SQM and TIQM results.

  9. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Collision posts. 238.211 Section 238.211... Equipment § 238.211 Collision posts. (a) Except as further specified in this paragraph, paragraphs (b... time on or after September 8, 2000, shall have either: (i) Two full-height collision posts, located...

  10. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Collision posts. 238.211 Section 238.211... Equipment § 238.211 Collision posts. (a) Except as further specified in this paragraph, paragraphs (b... time on or after September 8, 2000, shall have either: (i) Two full-height collision posts, located...

  11. 49 CFR 238.211 - Collision posts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... structural protection described in paragraph (a) of this section, either: (1) Two forward collision posts... structural protection described in paragraphs (a) and (b) of this section, two forward collision posts... body structure. (3) Prior to or during structural deformation, each collision post acting together...

  12. InChIKey collision resistance: an experimental testing.

    PubMed

    Pletnev, Igor; Erin, Andrey; McNaught, Alan; Blinov, Kirill; Tchekhovskoi, Dmitrii; Heller, Steve

    2012-01-01

    InChIKey is a 27-character compacted (hashed) version of InChI which is intended for Internet and database searching/indexing and is based on an SHA-256 hash of the InChI character string. The first block of InChIKey encodes molecular skeleton while the second block represents various kinds of isomerism (stereo, tautomeric, etc.). InChIKey is designed to be a nearly unique substitute for the parent InChI. However, a single InChIKey may occasionally map to two or more InChI strings (collision). The appearance of collision itself does not compromise the signature as collision-free hashing is impossible; the only viable approach is to set and keep a reasonable level of collision resistance which is sufficient for typical applications.We tested, in computational experiments, how well the real-life InChIKey collision resistance corresponds to the theoretical estimates expected by design. For this purpose, we analyzed the statistical characteristics of InChIKey for datasets of variable size in comparison to the theoretical statistical frequencies. For the relatively short second block, an exhaustive direct testing was performed. We computed and compared to theory the numbers of collisions for the stereoisomers of Spongistatin I (using the whole set of 67,108,864 isomers and its subsets). For the longer first block, we generated, using custom-made software, InChIKeys for more than 3 × 1010 chemical structures. The statistical behavior of this block was tested by comparison of experimental and theoretical frequencies for the various four-letter sequences which may appear in the first block body.From the results of our computational experiments we conclude that the observed characteristics of InChIKey collision resistance are in good agreement with theoretical expectations. PMID:23256896

  13. The growth of massive stars via stellar collisions in ensemble star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M. S.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2013-04-01

    Recent simulations and observations suggest that star clusters form via the assembling of smaller subclusters. Because of their short relaxation time, subclusters experience core collapse much earlier than virialized solo clusters, which have similar properties of the merger remnant of the assembling clusters. As a consequence, it seems that the assembling clusters result in efficient multiple collisions of stars in the cluster core. We performed a series of N-body simulations of ensemble and solitary clusters including stellar collisions and found that the efficiency of multiple collisions between stars is suppressed if subclusters assemble after they experience core collapse individually. In this case, subclusters form their own multiple collision stars which experienced a few collisions, but they fail to collide with each other after their host subclusters assemble. The multiple collision stars scatter each other and escape, and furthermore the central density of the remnant clusters had already been depleted for the stars to experience more collisions. On the other hand, if subclusters assemble before they experience core collapse, the multiple collisions of stars proceed efficiently in the remnant cluster, and the collision products are more massive than virialized solo clusters and comparable in mass to cold solo clusters.

  14. Diffractive Higgs boson photoproduction in ultraperipheral collisions at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Gay Ducati, M. B.; Silveira, G. G.

    2010-10-01

    A new production mechanism for the standard model Higgs boson in ultraperipheral collisions at the LHC, which allows central exclusive diffractive production by double pomeron exchange in photon-proton processes, is presented. The Higgs boson is centrally produced by gluon fusion with two large rapidity gaps emerging in the final state, being the main experimental signature for this process. As already studied for Pomeron-Pomeron and two-photon processes, the Higgs boson photoproduction is studied within this new mechanism in proton-proton (pp) and proton-nucleus (pA) collisions, where each system has a different dynamics to be taken into account. As a result, this mechanism predicts a production cross section for pp collisions of about 1.8 fb, which is similar to that obtained in Pomeron-Pomeron processes. Besides, in pPb collisions the cross sections have increased to about 0.6 pb, being comparable with the results of two-photon processes in pAu collisions. Therefore, as the rapidity gap survival probability is an open question in high-energy physics, an analysis for different values of this probability shows how competitive the mechanisms are in the LHC kinematical regime.

  15. Experiments on the dynamics of droplet collisions in a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, K. D.; Orme, M. E.

    Highly controlled experiments of binary droplet collisions in a vacuum environment are performed in order to study the collision dynamics devoid of aerodynamic effects that could otherwise obstruct the experimental observations by causing distortion or even disintegration of the coalesced mass. Pre-collision droplets are generated from capillary stream break-up at wavelengths much larger than those generated with the typical Rayleigh droplet formation in order to reduce the interactions among the collision products. Experimental results show that the range of droplet Weber number necessary to describe the boundaries between permanent coalescence and coalescence followed by separation is several orders of magnitude higher than has been reported in experiments conducted at standard atmospheric pressures with lower viscosity liquids (i.e. hydrocarbon fuels and water). Additionally, the time periods of both the oblate and prolate portions of the coalesced droplet oscillation have been measured and it is reported for the first time that the time period for the prolate portion of the oscillation grows exponentially with the Weber number. Finally, new pictorial results are presented for droplet collisions between non-spherical droplets.

  16. Plate rotation during continental collision and its relationship with the exhumation of UHP metamorphic terranes: application to the Norwegian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrill, Andrew; van Hunen, Jeroan; Cuthbert, Simon; Allen, Mark; Brueckner, Hannes

    2014-05-01

    Lateral variation and asynchronous onset of collision during the convergence of continents can significantly affect the burial and exhumation of subducting material. We use 3D numerical models for continental collision to discuss how deep burial and exhumation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks are enhanced by oblique convergence and resulting rotation of the colliding plates. Rotation during collision locally favours eduction, the inversion of the subduction process following ocean slab break-off, and may relate to the discontinuous distribution of ultra-high pressure (UHP) terranes along collision zones. For example the terminal (Scandian) collision of Baltica and Laurentia, which formed the Scandinavian Caledonides resulted in the exhumation of only one large high pressure/ultra-high pressure (HP/UHP) terrane, the Western Gneiss Complex (WGC), near the southern end of the collision zone. Rotation of the subducting Baltica plate during collision may provide a likely explanation for this distribution. We explore this hypothesis by comparing orthogonal and oblique collision models and conclude that an oblique collision can transport continental material up to 60km deeper, and heat material up to 300°C hotter, than an orthogonal collision. Our oblique collision model predicts that subducted continental margin material returns to the surface only in the region where collision initiated. The oblique collision model is consistent with petrological and geochonological observations from the Western Gneiss Complex and makes predictions for the general evolution of the Scandinavian Caledonides. We propose the collision between Laurentia and Baltica started at the southern end of the collisional zone, and propagated northward. This asymmetric geometry resulted in the counter clockwise rotation of Baltica and the northwards movement of Baltica's rotational pole with respect to Laurentia, consistent with paleomagnetic data from other studies. Our model has applications

  17. Probing GPDs in ultraperipheral collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, D.Yu.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Wagner, J.

    2015-04-10

    Ultraperipheral collisions in hadron colliders give new opportunities to investigate the hadron structure through exclusive photoproduction processes. We describe the possibility of measuring the Generalized Parton Distributions in the Timelike Compton Scattering process and in the production of heavy vector meson.

  18. Quarkonium production in hadronic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavai, R.; Schuler, G.A.; Sridhar, K.

    1995-07-01

    We summarize the theoretical description of charmonium and bottonium production in hadronic collisions and compare it to the available data from hadron-nucleon interactions. With the parameters of the theory established by these data, we obtain predictions for quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC energies.

  19. Duration of an Elastic Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-01-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding…

  20. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2009-01-01

    An initial Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the initial concept for an aircraft-based method of conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) in the TMA focusing on conflict detection algorithms and alerting display concepts. This paper gives an overview of the CD&R concept, simulation study, and test results.

  1. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Simulation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2010-01-01

    A Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate pilot reaction to conflict events in the TMA near the airport, different alert timings for various scenarios, alerting display concepts, and directive alerting concepts. This paper gives an overview of the conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) concept, simulation study, and test results

  2. Dynamical phase trajectories for relativistic nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Arsene, I. C.; Bravina, L. V.; Cassing, W.; Ivanov, Yu. B.; Russkikh, V. N.; Larionov, A.; Randrup, J.; Toneev, V. D.; Zeeb, G.; Zschiesche, D.

    2007-03-15

    Central collisions of gold nuclei are simulated by several existing models and the central net baryon density {rho} and the energy density {epsilon} are extracted at successive times for beam kinetic energies of 5-40 GeV/nucleon. The resulting trajectories in the ({rho},{epsilon}) phase plane are discussed from the perspective of experimentally exploring the expected first-order hadronization phase transition with the planned FAIR at GSI or in a low-energy campaign at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  3. Jets In Heavy Ion Collisions with CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salur, Sevil

    2016-08-01

    Jet physics in heavy ion collisions is a rich field which has been rapidly evolving since the first observations of medium interactions at RHIC through back-to-back hadron correlations and at LHC via reconstructed jets. In order to completely characterize the final state via jet-medium interactions and distinguish between competing energy loss mechanisms, complementary and robust jet observables are investigated. Latest developments of jet finding techniques and their applications to heavy ion environments are discussed with an emphasis given on experimental results from CMS experiment.

  4. Positronium quenching via collisions with triplet states of photomagnetic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, C.I.; Naidu, S.V.; Sharma, S.C.; Kowalski, J.M. )

    1991-04-01

    We have studied positronium quenching resulting from collisions with the triplet states of benzaldehyde, oxygen, benzophenone, and bromonaphthalene. Positronium pick-off decay rates are presented as functions of triplet populations via uv irradiation of benzaldehyde-ethane, benzaldehyde-helium, and oxgyen-ethane gaseous mixtures and of benzophenone and bromonaphthalene adsorbed porous silicas. Our results show that the cross sections for positronium quenching in collisions with excited triplet states are not as high as reported previously. The oxygen data suggest reactions between hot'' (nonthermal) positronium and oxygen molecules.

  5. Relaxation of diatomic molecules by isotropic collisions: application to depolarizing collisions of CS by He atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lique, F.; Spielfiedel, A.; Feautrier, N.

    2007-02-01

    An irreducible tensor formalism is applied to isotropic collisions of diatomic molecules with 1S atoms. Explicit expressions of the generalized spectroscopic relaxation cross sections are given, including pressure broadening cross sections as well as collisional transfer and destruction cross sections of the k-component of the target density matrix. For applications in the high temperature limit, formulae within the infinite order sudden approximation (IOS) are given for 1Σ electronic state molecules and 2S+1Σ electronic state molecules in the Hund's case (b) limit. Application to collisions of CS by He atoms shows that a good agreement is found between close coupling and IOS results at moderate energies and that multipolar depolarizing rates within a j-level are of the same order of magnitude whatever the considered multipole order k whereas multipolar transfer rates are lower by an order of magnitude. Propensity rules in relation to the CS-He potential energy surface are given.

  6. Coupled and decoupled regimes of continental collision: Numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccenda, M.; Minelli, G.; Gerya, T. V.

    2009-02-01

    Useful geodynamic distinction of continental collision zones can be based on the degree of rheological coupling of colliding plates. Coupled active collision zones (which can be either retreating or advancing) are characterized by a thick crustal wedge and compressive stresses (i.e. Himalaya and Western Alps), while decoupled end-members (which are always retreating) are defined by a thin crustal wedge and bi-modal distribution of stresses (i.e., compressional in the foreland and extensional in the inner part of the orogen, Northern Apennines). In order to understand physical controls defining these different geodynamic regimes we conducted a 2D numerical study based on finite-differences and marker-in-cell techniques. In our experiments we systematically varied several major parameters responsible for the degree of rheological coupling between plates during collision such as convergence rate, crustal rheology and effective velocity of upward propagation of aqueous fluids and melts in the mantle wedge. Low convergence rates and fluids/melts propagation velocities favor continuous coupling and convergence between the plates. Coupled collision zones are characterized by continuous accretion of the weak upper continental crust resulting in the development of a thick and broad crustal wedge, by hot temperature in the inner parts of the orogen due to radiogenic heating of the thickened crust, by compressive orogenic stresses and appearance of a double seismogenic (brittle) layer involving upper crust and sub-Moho mantle. In contrast high convergence rates and fluid/melt percolation velocities produce efficient weakening of the mantle wedge and of the subduction channel triggering complete decoupling of two plates, mantle wedging into the crustal wedge and retreating style of collision. The evolution of fully decoupled collision zones are characterized by the disruption of the accretionary wedge, formation of an extensional basin in the inner part of the orogen and

  7. The Screening Effect in Electromagnetic Production of Electron Positron Pairs in Relativistic Nucleus-Atom Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jianshi; Derrickson, J. H.; Parnell, T. A.; Strayer, M. R.

    1999-01-01

    We study the screening effects of the atomic electrons in the electromagnetic production of electron-positron pairs in relativistic nucleus-atom collisions for fixed target experiments. Our results are contrasted with those obtained in bare collisions, with particular attention given to its dependence on the beam energy and the target atom.

  8. Surviving the crash: Assessing the aftermath of cosmic bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Tysanner, Martin; Johnson, Matthew C.

    2009-06-15

    This paper is the third in a series investigating the possibility that if we reside in an inflationary 'bubble universe', we might observe the effects of collisions with other such bubbles. Here, we study the interior structure of a bubble collision spacetime, focusing on the issue of where observers can reside. Numerical simulations indicate that if the interbubble domain wall accelerates away, infinite spacelike surfaces of homogeneity develop to the future of the collision; this strongly suggests that observers can have collisions to their past, and previous results then imply that this is very likely. However, for observers at nearly all locations, the restoration of homogeneity relegates any observable effects to a vanishingly small region on the sky. We find that bubble collisions may also play an important role in defining measures in inflation: a potentially infinite relative volume factor arises between two bubble types depending on the sign of the acceleration of the domain wall between them; this may in turn correlate with observables such as the scale or type of inflation.

  9. Electric fields and chiral magnetic effect in Cu + Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2015-03-01

    The non-central Cu + Au collisions can create strong out-of-plane magnetic fields and in-plane electric fields. By using the HIJING model, we study the general properties of the electromagnetic fields in Cu + Au collisions at 200 GeV and their impacts on the charge-dependent two-particle correlator γq1q2 = < cos ⁡ (ϕ1 +ϕ2 - 2ψRP) > (see main text for definition) which was used for the detection of the chiral magnetic effect (CME). Compared with Au + Au collisions, we find that the in-plane electric fields in Cu + Au collisions can strongly suppress the two-particle correlator or even reverse its sign if the lifetime of the electric fields is long. Combining with the expectation that if γq1q2 is induced by elliptic-flow driven effects we would not see such strong suppression or reversion, our results suggest to use Cu + Au collisions to test CME and understand the mechanisms that underlie γq1q2.

  10. Collective effects in light-heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, Björn; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-11-01

    We present results for the azimuthal anisotropy of charged hadron distributions in A+A, p+A, d+A, and 3He+A collisions within the IP-Glasma+MUSIC model. Obtained anisotropies are due to the fluid dynamic response of the system to the fluctuating initial geometry of the interaction region. While the elliptic and triangular anisotropies in peripheral Pb+Pb collisions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV are well described by the model, the same quantities in √{ s} = 5.02 TeV p+Pb collisions underestimate the experimental data. This disagreement can be due to neglected initial state correlations or the lack of a detailed description of the fluctuating spatial structure of the proton, or both. We further present predictions for azimuthal anisotropies in p+Au, d+Au, and 3He+Au collisions at √{ s} = 200 GeV. For d+Au and 3He+Au collisions we expect the detailed substructure of the nucleon to become less important.

  11. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    Plenary. Electron collisions - past, present and future / J. W. McConkey. Collisions of slow highly charged ions with surfaces / J. Burgdörfer ... [et al.]. Atomic collisions studied with "reaction-microscopes" / R. Moshammer ... [et al.]. Rydberg atoms: a microscale laboratory for studying electron-molecule tnteractions / F. B. Dunning -- Collisions involvintg photons. Quantum control of photochemical reaction dynamics and molecular functions / M. Yamaki ... [et al.]. Manipulating and viewing Rydberg wavepackets / R. R. Jones. Angle-resolved photoelectrons as a probe of strong-field interactions / M. Vrakking. Ultracold Rydberg atoms in a structured environment / I. C. H. Liu and J. M. Rost. Synchrotron-radiation-based recoil ion momentum spectroscopy of laser cooled and trapped cesium atoms / L. H. Coutinho. Reconstruction of attosecond pulse trains / Y. Mairesse ... [et al.]. Selective excitation of metastable atomic states by Femto- and attosecond laser pulses / A. D. Kondorskiy. Accurate calculations of triple differential cross sections for double photoionization of the hygrogen molecule / W. Vanroose ... [et al.]. Double and triple photoionization of Li and Be / J. Colgan, M. S. Pindzola and F. Robicheaux. Few/many body dynamics in strong laser fields / J. Zanghellini and T. Brabec. Rescattering-induced effects in electron-atom scattering in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field / A. V. Flegel ... [et al.]. Multidimensional photoelectron spectroscopy / P. Lablanquie ... [et al.]. Few photon and strongly driven transitions in the XUV and beyond / P. Lambropoulos, L. A. A. Nikolopoulos and S. I. Themelis. Ionization dynamics of atomic clusters in intense laser pulses / U. Saalmann and J. M. Rost. On the second order autocorrelation of an XUV attosecond pulse train / E. P. Benis ... [et al.]. Evidence for rescattering in molecular dissociation / I. D. Williams ... [et al.]. Photoionizing ions using synchrotron radiation / R. Phaneuf. Photo double

  12. Collision-induced dissociation of fluoropyridinide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shuji; Lineberger, W. Carl; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2007-10-01

    Collision-induced dissociation of ortho-fluoro, meta-fluoro, and 2,6-difluoropyridinide anions are studied using the selected ion flow tube technique. Structures and energetics of the reactants, transition states, and products are calculated at the MP4(SDQ)/6-31 + G(d) level of theory based on the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) and/or MP2/6-31 + G(d) optimized geometries. The monofluoropyridinide anions (C5NH3F-) dissociate almost exclusively via loss of an HF molecule, i.e., C5NH2- + HF at low collision energies, in addition to loss of F- at higher energies. 2,6-Difluoropyridinide anions (C5NH2F2-) dissociate via successive loss of HF molecules to form C5NHF- then C5N- depending on the collision energy. The CID results strongly suggest formation of ring-intact pyridynide structures (C5NH2-, C5NHF-) with a bent triple bond embedded in the azine ring systems. Calculated reaction energy diagrams are totally consistent with the experimental observations. Didehydropyridynides C5NH2- and C5NHF- have substantial barriers to decomposition. Tetradehydropyridynide C5N- is a highly strained ring system and metastable with a predicted barrier of about 5 kcal mol-1 (20 kJ mol-1) toward ring-opening to a linear NCCCCC- structure. The observed C5N- species is most likely the linear anion under experimental conditions; however, the ring-intact C5N- pyridynide is a highly energetic species releasing about 80 kcal mol-1 (340 kJ mol-1) of energy upon the ring-opening.

  13. Pediatric pelvic fractures in side impact collisions.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Kristy B; Mari-Gowda, Shresta; Kallan, Michael J; Durbin, Dennis R; Winston, Flaura K

    2002-11-01

    Little is known about the mechanism of pelvic injury in the pediatric population, an age range over which the pelvis undergoes tremendous structural change. We hypothesize that these structural changes influence pelvic fracture injury mechanisms. A probability sample of children under age 16 years in crashes were enrolled in an on-going crash surveillance system which links insurance claims data to telephone survey and crash investigation data. 15,725 children in side impact collisions were studied. Risk of pelvic fracture in side impact collisions was estimated and factors associated with these injuries were identified. Eight cases were examined using in-depth investigation to identify the injury mechanisms. Of our study sample, 0.10% of children suffered a pelvic fracture. The typical child with a pelvic fracture was a 12-15 year old female front row occupant of a passenger car involved in a struck side collision with intrusion. Analyses of the in-depth crash investigations determined that the developmental age of the child was the most important parameter associated with the type of pelvic fracture. Children 8-11 years experienced isolated pubic rami fractures, whereas children 12-15 years experienced multiple fractures of the pelvic ring. This distinct injury pattern is directly related to the ossification during puberty of the cartilage connecting the three bones of the pelvis. A secondary influence on the injury pattern was the geometrical and stiffness incompatibilities between impact partners that resulted in vehicle deformation and rotation of the vehicle seat. In the effort to improve the side impact protection of vehicles, attention should be paid to improved structural chassis design that minimizes the dynamic deformation of the seat. PMID:17096230

  14. Depolarizing collisions with hydrogen: Neutral and singly ionized alkaline earths

    SciTech Connect

    Manso Sainz, Rafael; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Bueno, Javier Trujillo; Aguado, Alfredo

    2014-06-20

    Depolarizing collisions are elastic or quasielastic collisions that equalize the populations and destroy the coherence between the magnetic sublevels of atomic levels. In astrophysical plasmas, the main depolarizing collider is neutral hydrogen. We consider depolarizing rates on the lowest levels of neutral and singly ionized alkali earths Mg I, Sr I, Ba I, Mg II, Ca II, and Ba II, due to collisions with H°. We compute ab initio potential curves of the atom-H° system and solve the quantum mechanical dynamics. From the scattering amplitudes, we calculate the depolarizing rates for Maxwellian distributions of colliders at temperatures T ≤ 10,000 K. A comparative analysis of our results and previous calculations in the literature is completed. We discuss the effect of these rates on the formation of scattering polarization patterns of resonant lines of alkali earths in the solar atmosphere, and their effect on Hanle effect diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  15. A neuro-collision avoidance strategy for robot manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onema, Joel P.; Maclaunchlan, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    The area of collision avoidance and path planning in robotics has received much attention in the research community. Our study centers on a combination of an artificial neural network paradigm with a motion planning strategy that insures safe motion of the Articulated Two-Link Arm with Scissor Hand System relative to an object. Whenever an obstacle is encountered, the arm attempts to slide along the obstacle surface, thereby avoiding collision by means of the local tangent strategy and its artificial neural network implementation. This combination compensates the inverse kinematics of a robot manipulator. Simulation results indicate that a neuro-collision avoidance strategy can be achieved by means of a learning local tangent method.

  16. Communications: When diffraction rules the stereodynamics of rotationally inelastic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemeshko, Mikhail; Jambrina, Pablo G.; de Miranda, Marcelo P.; Friedrich, Bretislav

    2010-04-01

    Following upon our recent work on vector correlations in the Ar-NO collisions [Lemeshko and Friedrich, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 12, 1038 (2010)], we compare model results with close-coupling calculations for a range of channels and collision energies for the He-NO system. The striking agreement between the model and exact polarization moments indicates that the stereodynamics of rotationally inelastic atom-molecule collisions at thermal energies is governed by diffraction of matter waves from a two-dimensional repulsive core of the atom-molecule potential. Furthermore, the model polarization moments characterizing the He-NO, He-O2, He-OH, and He-CaH stereodynamics are found to coalesce into a single, distinctive pattern, which can serve as a "fingerprint" to identify diffraction-driven stereodynamics in future work.

  17. Potential energy curves and collision integrals of air components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Stallcop, James R.; Levin, Eugene; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Collision integrals are fundamental quantities required to determine the transport properties of the environment surrounding aerospace vehicles in the upper atmosphere. These collision integrals can be determined as a function of temperature from the potential energy curves describing the atomic and molecular collisions. Ab initio calculations provide a practical method of computing the required interaction potentials. In this work we will discuss recent advances with an emphasis on the accuracy that is obtainable. Results for interactions, e.g. N+N, N+O, O+O, and H+N2 will be reviewed and their application to the determination of transport properties, such as diffusion and viscosity coefficients, will be examined.

  18. Two models with rescattering for high energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bøggild, H.; Hansen, Ole; Humanic, T. J.

    2006-12-01

    The effects of hadronic rescattering in high energy relativistic Au+Au collisions are studied using two very different models to describe the early stages of the collision. One model is based on a hadronic thermal picture and the other on a superposition of parton-parton collisions. Operationally, the output hadrons from each of these models are used as input to a hadronic rescattering calculation. The results of the rescattering calculations from each model are then compared with rapidity and transverse momentum distributions from the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider BRAHMS experiment. In spite of the different points of view of the two models of the initial stage, after rescattering, the observed differences between the models are mostly “washed out” and both models give observables that agree roughly with each other and with experimental data.

  19. Theia's Collision With The Early Earth - Dry Or Wet Moon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, R.; Loibnegger, B.; Burger, C.; Maindl, T. I.; Schäfer, C.

    2016-04-01

    Our study exist of three separated parts concerning the formation of the Moon due to a catastrophic collision of a Mars-sized body - often referred to as Theia - with the early Earth. The first one deals with planet-formation in the early Solar System, the second one with the dynamical evolution of the planets Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn and an additional planet (Theia) between Earth and Mars, and the third one with the proposed giant collision itself and its outcome concerning masses and water contents of the resulting bodies (or fragments), computed via Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations.

  20. Rotational quenching of CS in ultracold 3He collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Rajwant; Dhilip Kumar, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum mechanical scattering calculations of rotational quenching of CS (v = 0) collision with 3He are performed at ultracold temperatures and results are compared with isotopic 4He collision. Rotational quenching cross sections and rate coefficients have been calculated in the ultracold region for rotational levels up to j = 10 using the He-CS potential energy surface computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory. The quenching cross sections are found to be two orders of magnitude larger for the 3He than the 4He isotope under ultracold conditions. Wigner threshold law is found to be valid below 10-3 K temperature.

  1. Dilepton production in nucleon-nucleon collisions revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Radhey; Mosel, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    We present a fully relativistic and gauge invariant framework for calculating the cross sections of dilepton production in nucleon-nucleon ($NN$) collisions which is based on the meson-exchange approximation for the $NN$ scattering amplitudes. Prediction of our model are compared with those of other covariant models that have been used earlier to describe this reaction. Our results are also compared with those of the semiclassical models of this reaction which are employed in the transport model calculations of the dilepton production in nucleus-nucleus collisions. It is found that cross sections obtained within the semiclassical and quantum mechanical models differ noticeably from each other.

  2. Large-scale model-based assessment of deer-vehicle collision risk.

    PubMed

    Hothorn, Torsten; Brandl, Roland; Müller, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Ungulates, in particular the Central European roe deer Capreolus capreolus and the North American white-tailed deer Odocoileus virginianus, are economically and ecologically important. The two species are risk factors for deer-vehicle collisions and as browsers of palatable trees have implications for forest regeneration. However, no large-scale management systems for ungulates have been implemented, mainly because of the high efforts and costs associated with attempts to estimate population sizes of free-living ungulates living in a complex landscape. Attempts to directly estimate population sizes of deer are problematic owing to poor data quality and lack of spatial representation on larger scales. We used data on >74,000 deer-vehicle collisions observed in 2006 and 2009 in Bavaria, Germany, to model the local risk of deer-vehicle collisions and to investigate the relationship between deer-vehicle collisions and both environmental conditions and browsing intensities. An innovative modelling approach for the number of deer-vehicle collisions, which allows nonlinear environment-deer relationships and assessment of spatial heterogeneity, was the basis for estimating the local risk of collisions for specific road types on the scale of Bavarian municipalities. Based on this risk model, we propose a new "deer-vehicle collision index" for deer management. We show that the risk of deer-vehicle collisions is positively correlated to browsing intensity and to harvest numbers. Overall, our results demonstrate that the number of deer-vehicle collisions can be predicted with high precision on the scale of municipalities. In the densely populated and intensively used landscapes of Central Europe and North America, a model-based risk assessment for deer-vehicle collisions provides a cost-efficient instrument for deer management on the landscape scale. The measures derived from our model provide valuable information for planning road protection and defining hunting quota. Open

  3. Injuries from motor-vehicle collisions with moose--Maine, 2000-2004.

    PubMed

    2006-12-01

    Moose are among the largest mammals in North America. Standing up to 7.5 feet at the shoulder and weighing up to 1,600 lbs, they are the largest members of the deer family. Maine's moose population (approximately 29,000) is the biggest in the United States outside of Alaska. During a collision with a motor vehicle, a moose usually is struck in the legs, causing its body to roll onto the hood of the vehicle, often collapsing the windshield and roof. As a result, motor-vehicle collisions involving moose are capable of causing substantial injury to vehicle occupants. To assess motor-vehicle collisions with moose in Maine and evaluate risk factors for injuries from these types of collisions, the Maine Department of Health and Human Services studied collision reports from 2000--2004. The results of that study indicated that collision rates varied by county but had clear patterns by season and time of day. Variables associated with risk for injury were posted speed limit, type of vehicle, and sex and age of the driver. Measures to reduce collisions with moose should focus on improving driver education programs and developing better engineering controls (e.g., removing roadside vegetation to improve visibility for drivers). In addition, herd management (i.e., decreasing moose population size through hunting) is currently being used in areas of Maine with high numbers of collisions, although studies are needed to assess its effectiveness.

  4. New Message Differences for Collision Attacks on MD4 and MD5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yu; Wang, Lei; Kunihiro, Noboru; Ohta, Kazuo

    In 2005, collision resistance of several hash functions was broken by Wang et al. The strategy of determining message differences is the most important part of collision attacks against hash functions. So far, many researchers have tried to analyze Wang et al.'s method and proposed improved collision attacks. Although several researches proposed improved attacks, all improved results so far were based on the same message differences proposed by Wang et al. In this paper, we propose new message differences for collision attacks on MD4 and MD5. Our message differences of MD4 can generate a collision with complexity of less than two MD4 computations, which is faster than the original Wang et al.'s attack, and moreover, than the all previous attacks. This is the first result that improves the complexity of collision attack by using different message differences from Wang et al.'s. Regarding MD5, so far, no other message difference from Wang et al.'s is known. Therefore, study for constructing method of other message differences on MD5 should be interesting. Our message differences of MD5 generates a collision with complexity of 242 MD5 computations, which is slower than the latest best attack. However, since our attack needs only 1 bit difference, it has some advantages in terms of message freedom of collision messages.

  5. Airborne Collision Detection and Avoidance for Small UAS Sense and Avoid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahawneh, Laith Rasmi

    collision risk using the uncorrelated encounter model (UEM) developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory. We evaluate the proposed approach using Monte Carlo simulations and compare the performance with linearly extrapolated collision detection logic. For the path planning and collision avoidance part, we present multiple reactive path planning algorithms. We first propose a collision avoidance algorithm based on a simulated chain that responds to a virtual force field produced by encountering intruders. The key feature of the proposed approach is to model the future motion of both the intruder and the ownship using a chain of waypoints that are equally spaced in time. This timing information is used to continuously re-plan paths that minimize the probability of collision. Second, we present an innovative collision avoidance logic using an ownship centered coordinate system. The technique builds a graph in the local-level frame and uses the Dijkstra's algorithm to find the least cost path. An advantage of this approach is that collision avoidance is inherently a local phenomenon and can be more naturally represented in the local coordinates than the global coordinates. Finally, we propose a two step path planner for ground-based SAA systems. In the first step, an initial suboptimal path is generated using A* search. In the second step, using the A* solution as an initial condition, a chain of unit masses connected by springs and dampers evolves in a simulated force field. The chain is described by a set of ordinary differential equations that is driven by virtual forces to find the steady-state equilibrium. The simulation results show that the proposed approach produces collision-free plans while minimizing the path length. To move towards a deployable system, we apply collision detection and avoidance techniques to a variety of simulation and sensor modalities including camera, radar and ADS-B along with suitable tracking schemes. Keywords: unmanned aircraft system, small UAS

  6. Characteristics of officer-involved vehicle collisions in California

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Scott E.; Rojek, Jeff; Alpert, Geoff; Tiesman, Hope; James, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the situational and individual officer characteristics of officer-involved vehicle collisions that result in fatality, injury, and non-injury outcomes. Design/methodology/approach Data on 35,840 vehicle collisions involving law enforcement officers in California occurring between January 2000 and December 2009 are examined. A descriptive analysis of collision characteristics is presented. Findings There were 39 officers killed by collisions over this study period and 7,684 officers who received some type injury. Incidents involving officers on motorcycles represented 39 percent of officer fatalities and 39 percent of severe injuries. In the case of fatalities, 33 percent of officers were reported as wearing seatbelts, 38 percent were not wearing a seatbelt, and seatbelt use was not stated in 29 percent of car fatalities. Research limitations/implications The findings only represent one state and the analysis is based on an estimated 86 percent of collisions that occurred during the study period due to missing data. Nonetheless, the results are based on a robust sample and address key limitations in the existing literature. Practical implications During the study period in California the estimated financial impact of collisions reached into the hundreds of millions of dollars when considering related fatality, injury, and vehicle damage costs combined. These impacts highlight the need for the law enforcement community to give greater attention to this issue. Originality/value At the time of this writing there was no published independent research that compares the situational and officer characteristics across fatality, injury, and non-injury outcomes in these events. The findings reported here will help inform emerging interest in this issue within the law enforcement, academic, and policy-making communities. PMID:26877704

  7. HUBBLE REVEALS STELLAR FIREWORKS ACCOMPANYING GALAXY COLLISION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Hubble Space Telescope image provides a detailed look at a brilliant 'fireworks show' at the center of a collision between two galaxies. Hubble has uncovered over 1,000 bright, young star clusters bursting to life as a result of the head-on wreck. [Left] A ground-based telescopic view of the Antennae galaxies (known formally as NGC 4038/4039) - so named because a pair of long tails of luminous matter, formed by the gravitational tidal forces of their encounter, resembles an insect's antennae. The galaxies are located 63 million light-years away in the southern constellation Corvus. [Right] The respective cores of the twin galaxies are the orange blobs, left and right of image center, crisscrossed by filaments of dark dust. A wide band of chaotic dust, called the overlap region, stretches between the cores of the two galaxies. The sweeping spiral- like patterns, traced by bright blue star clusters, shows the result of a firestorm of star birth activity which was triggered by the collision. This natural-color image is a composite of four separately filtered images taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2), on January 20, 1996. Resolution is 15 light-years per pixel (picture element). Credit: Brad Whitmore (STScI), and NASA

  8. COLLIDE-2: Collisions Into Dust Experiment-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.

    2002-01-01

    The Collisions Into Dust Experimental (COLLIDE-2) was the second flight of the COLLIDE payload. The payload performs six low-velocity impact experiments to study the collisions that are prevalent in planetary ring systems and in the early stages of planet formation. Each impact experiment is into a target of granular material, and the impacts occur at speeds between 1 and 100 cm/s in microgravity and in a vacuum. The experiments are recorded on digital videotape which is later analyzed. During the period of performance a plan was developed to address some of the technical issues that prevented the first flight of COLLIDE from being a complete success, and also to maximize the scientific return based on the science results from the first flight. The experiment was modified following a series of reviews of the design plan, and underwent extensive testing. The data from the experiment show that the primary goal of identifying transition regimes for low-velocity impacts based on cratering versus accretion was achieved. Following a brief period of storage, the experiment flew regimes for low-velocity impacts based on cratering versus accretion was achieved. as a Hitchhiker payload on the MACH-1 Hitchhiker bridge on STS-108 in December 2001. These data have been analyzed and submitted for publication. That manuscript is attached to this report. The experiment was retrieved in January 2002, and all six impact experiments functioned nominally. Preliminary results were reported at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.

  9. Physics of Nuclear Collisions at High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwa, Rudolph C.

    2012-05-01

    A wide range of problems has been investigated in the research program during the period of this grant. Although the major effort has been in the subject of heavy-ion collisions, we have also studied problems in biological and other physical systems. The method of analysis used in reducing complex data in multiparticle production to simple descriptions can also be applied to the study of complex systems of very different nature. Phase transition is an important phenomenon in many areas of physics, and for heavy-ion collisions we study the fluctuations of multiplicities at the critical point. Human brain activities as revealed in EEG also involve fluctuations in time series, and we have found that our experience enables us to find the appropriate quantification of the fluctuations in ways that can differentiate stroke and normal subjects. The main topic that characterizes the research at Oregon in heavy-ion collisions is the recombination model for the treatment of the hadronization process. We have avoided the hydrodynamical model partly because there is already a large community engaged in it, but more significantly we have found the assumption of rapid thermalization unconvincing. Recent results in studying LHC physics lead us to provide more evidence that shower partons are very important even at low p_T, but are ignored by hydro. It is not easy to work in an environment where the conventional wisdom regards our approach as being incorrect because it does not adhere to the standard paradigm. But that is just what a vibrant research community needs: unconventional approach may find evidences that can challenge the orthodoxy. An example is the usual belief that elliptic flow in fluid dynamics gives rise to azimuthal anisotropy. We claim that it is only sufficient but not necessary. With more data from LHC and more independent thinkers working on the subject what is sufficient as a theory may turn out to be incorrect in reality. Another area of investigation that

  10. Electron collisions in gas switches

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G.

    1989-01-01

    Many technologies rely on the conduction/insulation properties of gaseous matter for their successful operation. Many others (e.g., pulsed power technologies) rely on the rapid change (switching or modulation) of the properties of gaseous matter from an insulator to a conductor and vice versa. Studies of electron collision processes in gases aided the development of pulsed power gas switches, and in this paper we shall briefly illustrate the kind of knowledge on electron collision processes which is needed to optimize the performance of such switching devices. To this end, we shall refer to three types of gas switches: spark gap closing, self-sustained diffuse discharge closing, and externally-sustained diffuse discharge opening. 24 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  12. QCD studies in ep collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.

    1997-06-01

    These lectures describe QCD physics studies over the period 1992--1996 from data taken with collisions of 27 GeV electrons and positrons with 820 GeV protons at the HERA collider at DESY by the two general-purpose detectors H1 and ZEUS. The focus of these lectures is on structure functions and jet production in deep inelastic scattering, photoproduction, and diffraction. The topics covered start with a general introduction to HERA and ep scattering. Structure functions are discussed. This includes the parton model, scaling violation, and the extraction of F{sub 2}, which is used to determine the gluon momentum distribution. Both low and high Q{sup 2} regimes are discussed. The low Q{sup 2} transition from perturbative QCD to soft hadronic physics is examined. Jet production in deep inelastic scattering to measure {alpha}{sub s}, and in photoproduction to study resolved and direct photoproduction, is also presented. This is followed by a discussion of diffraction that begins with a general introduction to diffraction in hadronic collisions and its relation to ep collisions, and moves on to deep inelastic scattering, where the structure of diffractive exchange is studied, and in photoproduction, where dijet production provides insights into the structure of the Pomeron. 95 refs., 39 figs.

  13. Astroblaster--A Fascinating Game of Multi-Ball Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kires, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Multi-ball collisions inside the Astroblaster toy are explained from the conservation of momentum point of view. The important role of the coefficient of restitution is demonstrated in ideal and real cases. Real experimental results with the simple toy can be compared with a computer model represented by an interactive Java applet. (Contains 1…

  14. Simple Expalanation of a Well-Known Collision Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, F.; Schmalzle, P.

    1981-01-01

    Explains that the result of collision experiments with a linear arrangement of several identical elastic balls cannot be predicted solely from the conservation laws and energy and momentum. Indicates that the system of balls must be capable of dispersion-free energy propagation. (Author/JN)

  15. Applied Academic & Workplace Skills for Collision Repair & Refinish Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation, Herndon, VA.

    This task list of workplace skills for collision repair and refinish technicians resulted from grant from the U.S. Department of Education to the National Automotive Technician Education Foundation (NATEF) of the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence. The skills list is integrated with academic skills. This document lists the…

  16. Tilting Uranus without a Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogoszinski, Zeeve; Hamilton, Douglas P.

    2016-10-01

    The most accepted hypothesis for the origin of Uranus' 98° obliquity is a giant collision during the late stages of planetary accretion. This model requires a single Earth mass object striking Uranus at high latitudes; such events occur with a probability of about 10%. Alternatively, Uranus' obliquity may have arisen from a sequence of smaller impactors which lead to a uniform distribution of obliquities. Here we explore a third model for tilting Uranus using secular spin-orbit resonance theory. We investigate early Solar System configurations in which a secular resonance between Uranus' axial precession frequency and another planet's orbital node precession frequency might occur.Thommes et al. (1999) hypothesized that Uranus and Neptune initially formed between Jupiter and Saturn, and were then kicked outward. In our scenario, Neptune leaves first while Uranus remains behind. As an exterior Neptune slowly migrates outward, it picks up both Uranus and Saturn in spin-orbit resonances (Ward and Hamilton 2004; Hamilton and Ward 2004). Only a distant Neptune has a nodal frequency slow enough to resonate with Uranus' axial precession.This scenario, with diverging orbits, results in resonance capture. As Neptune migrates outward its nodal precession slows. While in resonance, Uranus and Saturn each tilt a bit further, slowing their axial precession rates to continually match Neptune's nodal precession rate. Tilting Uranus to high obliquities takes a few 100 Myrs. This timescale may be too long to hold Uranus captive between Jupiter and Saturn, and we are investigating how to reduce it. We also find that resonance capture is rare if Uranus' initial obliquity is greater than about 10°, as the probability of capture decreases as the planet's initial obliquity increases. We will refine this estimate by quantifying capture statistics, and running accretion simulations to test the likelihood of a low early obliquity. Our preliminary findings show that most assumptions about

  17. Modeling and Simulation of an UAS Collision Avoidance Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliveros, Edgardo V.; Murray, A. Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a Modeling and Simulation of an Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Collision Avoidance System, capable of representing different types of scenarios for UAS collision avoidance. Commercial and military piloted aircraft currently utilize various systems for collision avoidance such as Traffic Alert and Collision A voidance System (TCAS), Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B), Radar and ElectroOptical and Infrared Sensors (EO-IR). The integration of information from these systems is done by the pilot in the aircraft to determine the best course of action. In order to operate optimally in the National Airspace System (NAS) UAS have to work in a similar or equivalent manner to a piloted aircraft by applying the principle of "detect-see and avoid" (DSA) to other air traffic. Hence, we have taken these existing sensor technologies into consideration in order to meet the challenge of researching the modeling and simulation of an approximated DSA system. A Schematic Model for a UAS Collision Avoidance System (CAS) has been developed ina closed loop block diagram for that purpose. We have found that the most suitable software to carry out this task is the Satellite Tool Kit (STK) from Analytical Graphics Inc. (AGI). We have used the Aircraft Mission Modeler (AMM) for modeling and simulation of a scenario where a UAS is placed on a possible collision path with an initial intruder and then with a second intruder, but is able to avoid them by executing a right tum maneuver and then climbing. Radars have also been modeled with specific characteristics for the UAS and both intruders. The software provides analytical, graphical user interfaces and data controlling tools which allow the operator to simulate different conditions. Extensive simulations have been carried out which returned excellent results.

  18. Topological regularizations of the triple collision singularity in the 3-vortex problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, Yasuaki

    2008-02-01

    The triple collision singularity in the 3-vortex problem is studied in this paper. Under the necessary condition k_1^{-1}+k_2^{-1}+k_3^{-1}=0 for vorticities to have the triple collision, the main results are summarized as follows: (i) For k1 = k2, the triple collision singularity is topologically regularizable. (ii) For 0 < |k1 - k2| < epsilon with a sufficiently small epsilon, the triple collision singularity is not topologically regularizable. First of all, in order to prove these statements, all singularities in the 3-vortex problem are classified. Then, we introduce a dynamical system by blowing up the triple collision singularity with an appropriate time scaling. Roughly speaking, it corresponds to pasting an invariant manifold at the triple collision singularity on the original phase space. This technique is well known as McGehee's collision manifold (1974 Inventions Math. 27 191-227) in the N-body problem of celestial mechanics. Finally, by adopting the viewpoint of Easton (1971 J. Diff. Eqns 10 92-9), topological regularizations of the triple collision singularity are studied in detail.

  19. Characterizing the collision of potassium atoms with a siloxane coated glass surface using spectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgus, Tyler Christophe

    2001-07-01

    We have developed a series of three experiments to characterize the collisions between potassium atoms and a siloxane coated non-stick surface on a glass substrate. The first experiment looks at the aggregate effect of multiple collisions of the potassium atoms with the surface. The atoms are observed spectroscopically. The spectroscopic information allows for the calculation of the flux, average velocity, and density of the potassium atoms. These quantities are also calculated with a computer model. The parameters of the model are the probability that a potassium atom will stick to the surface during a collision, and the probabilities that the collision is specular or diffuse. The second experiment uses the photo-desorption effect to create a spatially peaked non-equilibrium density distribution. The rate of decay of this distribution is fit with a computer model whose free parameter is proportional to the probability that an atom will stick to the siloxane coated wall during a collision. The third experiment is designed to observe the results of a single collision with a siloxane coated surface. Again, the potassium atoms are observed spectroscopically, the Doppler effect providing velocity resolution. The intensity of the fluorescence is related to the velocity-density distribution. The density is then theoretically modeled using the same simple kernel, accounting for contributions to the density from the potassium source, specular collisions, and diffuse collisions.

  20. Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu to UU collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloczynski, John; Huang, Xu-Guang; Zhang, Xilin; Liao, Jinfeng

    2015-07-01

    We study the charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in relativistic heavy ion collisions, as motivated by the search for the Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) and the investigation of related background contributions. In particular we aim to understand how these correlations induced by various proposed effects evolve from collisions with AuAu system to that with UU system. To do that, we quantify the generation of magnetic field in UU collisions at RHIC energy and its azimuthal correlation with the matter geometry using event-by-event simulations. Taking the experimental data for charge-dependent azimuthal correlations from AuAu collisions and extrapolating to UU with reasonable assumptions, we examine the resulting correlations to be expected in UU collisions and compare them with recent STAR measurements. Based on such analysis we discuss the viability for explaining the data with a combination of the CME-like and flow-induced contributions.

  1. Initial-state fluctuations in collisions between light and heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Kevin; Singer, Jordan; Heinz, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    In high-energy collisions involving small nuclei (p +p or x +Au collisions where x =p , d , or 3He) the fluctuating size, shape, and internal gluonic structure of the nucleon is shown to have a strong effect on the initial size and shape of the fireball of new matter created in the collision. A systematic study of the eccentricity coefficients describing this initial fireball state for several semirealistic models of nucleon substructure and for several practically relevant collision systems involving small nuclei is presented. The key importance of multiplicity fluctuations in such systems is pointed out. Our results show large differences from expectations based on conventional Glauber model simulations of the initial state created in such collisions.

  2. Produced Hadron Spectra in p + p Collisions at √s=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagel, K.

    2007-10-01

    The rapidity dependence of particle production in high energy p + p collisions can provide important information of parton distribution functions and the transport of baryon number. In addition, p + p collisions provide an elementary reference for heavy ion collisions. Identified charged hadron spectra resulting from p + p collisions at RHIC have been measured over a wide range of rapidity with BRAHMS for √s=200 GeV. We will present the spectra of positive and negative π and p. The spectra are analyzed to extract rapidity densities over the rapidity range from 0 to near 4 which we compare to rapidity distributions of the same species of produced hadrons in Au + Au collisions at the same energy. The proton rapidity densities are used to determine nuclear stopping while the pion yields constrain the total entropy production.

  3. Metastability of isoformyl ions in collisions with helium and hydrogen. [in interstellar molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.

    1984-01-01

    The stability of HOC(+) ions under conditions in interstellar molecular clouds is considered. In particular, the possibility that collisions with helium or hydrogen will induce isomerization to the stable HCO(+) form is examined theoretically. Portions of the electronic potential energy surfaces for interaction with He and H atoms are obtained from standard quantum mechanical calculations. Collisions with He atoms are found to be totally ineffective for inducing isomerization. Collisions with H atoms are found to be ineffective at low interstellar temperatures owing to a small (about 500 K) barrier in the entrance channel; at higher temperatures where this barrier can be overcome, however, collisions with hydrogen atoms do result in conversion to the stable HCO(+) form. Although detailed calculations are not presented, it is argued that low-energy collisions with H2 molecules are also ineffective in destroying the metastable ion.

  4. Constraining relativistic models through heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, D. P.; Providencia, C.; Chiapparini, M.; Bracco, M. E.; Delfino, A.; Malheiro, M.

    2007-12-15

    Relativistic models can be successfully applied to the description of compact star properties in nuclear astrophysics as well as to nuclear matter and finite nuclei properties, these studies taking place at low and moderate temperatures. Nevertheless, all results are model dependent, and so far it is unclear whether some of them should be discarded. Moreover, in the regime of hot hadronic matter, very few calculations exist using these relativistic models, in particular when applied to particle yields in heavy ion collisions. A very important investigation is the simulation of a supernova explosion that is based on the construction of an adequate equation of state that needs to be valid within very large ranges of temperatures (0 to 100 MeV at least) and densities (very low to ten times the nuclear saturation density at least). In the present work, we comment on the known constraints that can help the selection of adequate models in this wide regime and investigate the main differences that arise when the particle production during a Au+Au collision at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is calculated with different relativistic models. We conclude that most of the models investigated in the present work give a very good overall description of the data and make predictions for not yet measured particle ratios.

  5. Positronium collisions with rare-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrikant, Ilya; Gribakin, Gleb; Swann, Andrew; Wilde, Robyn

    2016-05-01

    We calculate elastic scattering of positronium (Ps) by the Xe atom using the recently developed pseudopotential method† and review general features of Ps scattering from heavier rare-gas atoms: Ar, Kr and Xe. The total scattering cross section is dominated by two contributions: elastic scattering and Ps ionization (break-up). To calculate the Ps ionization cross sections we use the binary-encounter method for Ps collisions with an atomic target. Our results for the ionization cross section agree well with previous calculations carried out in the impulse approximation. Our total Ps-Xe cross section, when plotted as a function of the projectile velocity, exhibits similarity with the electron-Xe cross section for the collision velocities higher than 0.8 a.u., and agrees very well with the measurements at Ps velocities above 0.5 a.u. † Fabrikant I I and Gribakin G F 2014 Phys. Rev. A 90 052717 Supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  6. COLLISIONS BETWEEN GRAVITY-DOMINATED BODIES. I. OUTCOME REGIMES AND SCALING LAWS

    SciTech Connect

    Leinhardt, Zoee M.; Stewart, Sarah T. E-mail: sstewart@eps.harvard.edu

    2012-01-20

    Collisions are the core agent of planet formation. In this work, we derive an analytic description of the dynamical outcome for any collision between gravity-dominated bodies. We conduct high-resolution simulations of collisions between planetesimals; the results are used to isolate the effects of different impact parameters on collision outcome. During growth from planetesimals to planets, collision outcomes span multiple regimes: cratering, merging, disruption, super-catastrophic disruption, and hit-and-run events. We derive equations (scaling laws) to demarcate the transition between collision regimes and to describe the size and velocity distributions of the post-collision bodies. The scaling laws are used to calculate maps of collision outcomes as a function of mass ratio, impact angle, and impact velocity, and we discuss the implications of the probability of each collision regime during planet formation. Collision outcomes are described in terms of the impact conditions and the catastrophic disruption criteria, Q*{sub RD}-the specific energy required to disperse half the total colliding mass. All planet formation and collisional evolution studies have assumed that catastrophic disruption follows pure energy scaling; however, we find that catastrophic disruption follows nearly pure momentum scaling. As a result, Q*{sub RD} is strongly dependent on the impact velocity and projectile-to-target mass ratio in addition to the total mass and impact angle. To account for the impact angle, we derive the interacting mass fraction of the projectile; the outcome of a collision is dependent on the kinetic energy of the interacting mass rather than the kinetic energy of the total mass. We also introduce a new material parameter, c*, that defines the catastrophic disruption criteria between equal-mass bodies in units of the specific gravitational binding energy. For a diverse range of planetesimal compositions and internal structures, c* has a value of 5 {+-} 2; whereas

  7. Collisions between Gravity-dominated Bodies. I. Outcome Regimes and Scaling Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinhardt, Zoë M.; Stewart, Sarah T.

    2012-01-01

    Collisions are the core agent of planet formation. In this work, we derive an analytic description of the dynamical outcome for any collision between gravity-dominated bodies. We conduct high-resolution simulations of collisions between planetesimals; the results are used to isolate the effects of different impact parameters on collision outcome. During growth from planetesimals to planets, collision outcomes span multiple regimes: cratering, merging, disruption, super-catastrophic disruption, and hit-and-run events. We derive equations (scaling laws) to demarcate the transition between collision regimes and to describe the size and velocity distributions of the post-collision bodies. The scaling laws are used to calculate maps of collision outcomes as a function of mass ratio, impact angle, and impact velocity, and we discuss the implications of the probability of each collision regime during planet formation. Collision outcomes are described in terms of the impact conditions and the catastrophic disruption criteria, Q*RD—the specific energy required to disperse half the total colliding mass. All planet formation and collisional evolution studies have assumed that catastrophic disruption follows pure energy scaling; however, we find that catastrophic disruption follows nearly pure momentum scaling. As a result, Q*RD is strongly dependent on the impact velocity and projectile-to-target mass ratio in addition to the total mass and impact angle. To account for the impact angle, we derive the interacting mass fraction of the projectile; the outcome of a collision is dependent on the kinetic energy of the interacting mass rather than the kinetic energy of the total mass. We also introduce a new material parameter, c*, that defines the catastrophic disruption criteria between equal-mass bodies in units of the specific gravitational binding energy. For a diverse range of planetesimal compositions and internal structures, c* has a value of 5 ± 2; whereas for

  8. A Collective Collision Operator for DSMC

    SciTech Connect

    GALLIS,MICHAIL A.; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.

    2000-06-21

    A new scheme to simulate elastic collisions in particle simulation codes is presented. The new scheme aims at simulating the collisions in the highly collisional regime, in which particle simulation techniques typically become computationally expensive.The new scheme is based on the concept of a grid-based collision field. According to this scheme, the particles perform a single collision with the background grid during a time step. The properties of the background field are calculated from the moments of the distribution function accumulated on the grid. The collision operator is based on the Langevin equation. Based on comparisons with other methods, it is found that the Langevin method overestimates the collision frequency for dilute gases.

  9. Analyzing Collisions in Terms of Newton's Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, John L.

    2003-02-01

    Although the principle of momentum conservation is a consequence of Newton's second and third laws of motion, as recognized by Newton himself, this principle is typically applied in analyzing collisions as if it is a separate concept of its own. This year I sought to integrate my treatment of collisions with my coverage of Newton's laws by asking students to calculate the effect on the motion of two particles due to the forces they exerted for a specified time interval on each other. For example, "A 50-kg crate slides across the ice at 3 m/s and collides with a 25-kg crate at rest. During the collision process the 50-kg crate exerts a 500 N time-averaged force on the 25 kg for 0.1 s. What are the accelerations of the crates during the collision, and what are their velocities after the collision? What are the momenta of the crates before and after collision?"

  10. Multiplicity dependence of the average transverse momentum in pp, p-Pb, and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. A.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergognon, A. A. E.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, F.; Böttger, S.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Braidot, E.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dang, R.; Danu, A.; Das, K.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, S.; Dash, A.; De, S.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Deloff, A.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; D Erasmo, G.; de Rooij, R.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Elia, D.; Elwood, B. G.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erdal, H. A.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Fenton-Olsen, B.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floratos, E.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goerlich, L.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, S.; Grigoryan, A.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hippolyte, B.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jachołkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jha, D. M.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Ketzer, B.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, T.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, D. J.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kompaniets, M.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kurepin, A.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, V.; Kushpil, S.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; La Pointe, S. L.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lea, R.; Lechman, M.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, G. R.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; Leoncino, M.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazumder, R.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S. K.; Oh, S.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Planinic, M.; Płoskoń, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Rauch, W.; Rauf, A. W.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rivetti, A.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Santoro, R.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, C.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Scott, P. A.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Rohni, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, T.; Sinha, B. C.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, M.; Song, J.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymański, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tarazona Martinez, A.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Ter Minasyan, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Trubnikov, V.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, V.; Wagner, J.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaccolo, V.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, D.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.; Zyzak, M.

    2013-12-01

    The average transverse momentum versus the charged-particle multiplicity Nch was measured in p-Pb collisions at a collision energy per nucleon-nucleon pair √{sNN}=5.02 TeV and in pp collisions at collision energies of √{s}=0.9,2.76, and 7 TeV in the kinematic range 0.15results in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN}=2.76 TeV at similar charged-particle multiplicities. In pp and p-Pb collisions, a strong increase of with Nch is observed, which is much stronger than that measured in Pb-Pb collisions. For pp collisions, this could be attributed, within a model of hadronizing strings, to multiple-parton interactions and to a final-state color reconnection mechanism. The data in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions cannot be described by an incoherent superposition of nucleon-nucleon collisions and pose a challenge to most of the event generators.

  11. Results from MAC

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, G.B.

    1983-05-01

    The MAC detector has been exposed at PEP to 40 pb/sup -1/ luminosity of e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions. The detector is described and recent results of a continuing analysis of hadronic cross section, lepton pair charge asymmetry, Bhabha process, two photon final state and radiative ..mu.. pairs are given. New results on flavor tagging of hadronic events with an inclusive ..mu.., and some searches for new particles are presented.

  12. Flight Tests Validate Collision-Avoidance System

    NASA Video Gallery

    Flights tests of a smartphone-assisted automatic ground collision avoidance system at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center consistently commanded evasive maneuvers when it sensed that the unmanned ...

  13. Telerobotics with whole arm collision avoidance

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K.; Strenn, S.

    1993-09-01

    The complexity of teleorbotic operations in a cluttered environment is exacerbated by the need to present collision information to the operator in an understandable fashion. In addition to preventing movements which will cause collisions, a system providing some form of virtual force reflection (VFR) is desirable. With this goal in mind, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has installed a kinematically master/slave system and developed a whole arm collision avoidance system which interacts directly with the telerobotic controller. LLNL has also provided a structure to allow for automated upgrades of workcell models and provide collision avoidance even in a dynamically changing workcell.

  14. Integrated Collision Avoidance System for Air Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Collision with ground/water/terrain and midair obstacles is one of the common causes of severe aircraft accidents. The various data from the coremicro AHRS/INS/GPS Integration Unit, terrain data base, and object detection sensors are processed to produce collision warning audio/visual messages and collision detection and avoidance of terrain and obstacles through generation of guidance commands in a closed-loop system. The vision sensors provide more information for the Integrated System, such as, terrain recognition and ranging of terrain and obstacles, which plays an important role to the improvement of the Integrated Collision Avoidance System.

  15. Ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions: Direction of spectator flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshin, Sergei A.; Niida, Takafumi

    2016-08-01

    In high-energy heavy-ion collisions, the directed flow of particles is conventionally measured with respect to that of the projectile spectators, which is defined as positive x direction, but it is not known if the spectators deflect in the outward or inward directions—outward or toward the center line of the collision. In this Communication we discuss how the measurements of the directed flow at midrapidity, especially in asymmetric collision such as Cu +Au , can be used to answer this question. We show that the existing data strongly favor the case that the spectators, in the ultrarelativistic collisions, on average deflect outward.

  16. NUCLEAR AND HEAVY ION PHYSICS: Charged-particle pseudorapidity distributions in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zeng-Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Jin

    2009-04-01

    Using the Glauber model, we present the formulas for calculating the numbers of participants, spectators and binary nucleon-nucleon collisions. Based on this work, we get the pseudorapidity distributions of charged particles as the function of the impact parameter in nucleus-nucleus collisions. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental observations made by the BRAHMS Collaboration in Au + Au collisions at GeV in different centrality bins over the whole pseudorapidity range.

  17. Dynamics of droplet collision and flame-front motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Long

    Three physical phenomena were experimentally and computationally investigated in this research, namely the dynamics of head-on droplet-droplet collision, head-on droplet-film collision, and laminar premixed flames, with emphasis on the transition between bouncing and merging of the liquid surfaces for the droplet collision studies, and on the susceptibility to exhibit hydrodynamic instability for the flame dynamics. All three problems share the common feature of having an active deformable interface separating two flow regions of disparate densities, and as such can be computationally described using the adopted immersed boundary technique. Experimentally, the droplets (˜300 mum diameter) were generated using the ink jet printing technique, and imaged using stroboscopy for the droplet-droplet collision events and high-speed cine-photography for the droplet-film collision events. For the study of droplet-droplet collision, the instant of merging was experimentally determined and then used as an input in the computational simulation of the entire collision event. The simulation identified the differences between collision and merging at small and large Weber numbers, and satisfactorily described the dynamics of the inter-droplet gap including the role of the van der Waals force in effecting surface rupture. For the study of droplet-film collision, extensive experimental mapping showed that the collision dynamics is primarily affected by the droplet Weber number (We) and the film thickness scaled by the droplet radius (H), that while droplet absorption by the film is facilitated with increasing droplet Weber number, the boundary of transition is punctuated by an absorption peninsula, in the We-H space, within which absorption is further facilitated for smaller Weber numbers. Results from computation simulation revealed the essential dependence of the collision dynamics on the restraining nature of the solid surface, the energy exchange between the droplet and the

  18. Studying Phase Transitions in Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Mishustin, I.N.

    2000-12-31

    Three main topics are discussed concerning the theoretical description and observable signatures of possible phase transitions in nuclear collisions. The first one is related to the multifragmentation of equilibrated sources and its connection to a liquid-gas phase transition in finite systems. The second one deals with the Coulomb excitation of ultrarelativistic heavy ions resulting in their deep disintegration. The third topic is devoted to the description of a first-order phase transition in rapidly expanding matter. The resulting picture is that a strong collective flow of matter will lead to the fragmentation of a metastable phase into droplets. If the transition from quark-gluon plasma to hadron gas is of the first order, it will manifest itself by strong nonstatistical fluctuations in observable hadron distributions.

  19. Collision-induced gas phase dissociation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The Landau-Zener theory of reactive cross sections was applied to diatomic molecules dissociating from a ladder of vibrational states. The result predicts a dissociation rate that is quite well duplicated by an Arrhenius function having a preexponential temperature dependence of about T(sub -1/2), at least for inert collision partners. This relation fits experimental data reasonably well. The theory is then used to calculate the effect of vibrational nonequilibrium on dissociation rate. For Morse oscillators, the results are about the same as given by Hammerling, Kivel, and Teare in their analytic approximation for harmonic oscillators, though at very high temperature a correction for the partition function limit is included. The empirical correction for vibration nonequilibrium proposed by Park, which is a convenient algorithm for CFD calculations, is modified to prevent a drastic underestimation of dissociation rates that occurs with this method when vibrational temperature is much smaller than the kinetic temperature of the gas.

  20. Analysis and Consequences of the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Liou, Jer-Chi

    2010-01-01

    The collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251, on 10 February 2009, was the first known unintentional hypervelocity collision in space of intact satellites. Iridium 33 was an active commercial telecommunications satellite, while Cosmos 2251 was a derelict communication satellite of the Strela-2M class. The collision occurred at a relative velocity of 11.6 km/s at an altitude of approximately 790 km over the Great Siberian Plain and near the northern apex of Cosmos 2251 s orbit. This paper describes the physical and orbital characteristics of the relevant spacecraft classes and reports upon our analysis of the resulting debris clouds size, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and relative velocity/directionality distributions. We compare these distributions to those predicted by the NASA breakup model and notable recent fragmentation events; in particular, we compare the area-to-mass ratio distribution for each spacecraft to that exhibited by the FY-1C debris cloud for the purpose of assessing the relative contribution of modern aerospace materials to debris clouds resulting from energetic collisions. In addition, we examine the long-term consequences of this event for the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. Finally, we discuss "lessons learned", which may be incorporated into NASA s environmental models.

  1. Midair collisions - The accidents, the systems, and the Realpolitik

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    Two midair collisions occurring in 1978 are described, and the air traffic control system and procedures in use at the time, human factors implications and political consequences of the accidents are examined. The first collision occurred in Memphis and involved a Falcon jet and a Cessna 150 in a situation in which the controllers handling each aircraft were not aware of the presence of the other aircraft until it was too late. The second occurred in San Diego four months later, when a Boeing 727 on a visual approach struck a Cessna 172 from the rear. Following the San Diego collision there arose a great deal of investigative activity, resulting in suggestions for tighter control on visual flight rules aircraft and the expansion of positive control airspace. These issues then led to a political battle involving general aviation, the FAA and the Congress. It is argued, however, that the collisions were in fact system-induced errors resulting from an air traffic control system which emphasizes airspace allocation and politics rather than the various human factors problems facing pilots and controllers.

  2. Discrete Velocity Models for Mixtures Without Nonphysical Collision Invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhoff, Niclas; Vinerean, Mirela

    2016-09-01

    An important aspect of constructing discrete velocity models (DVMs) for the Boltzmann equation is to obtain the right number of collision invariants. It is a well-known fact that DVMs can also have extra collision invariants, so called spurious collision invariants, in plus to the physical ones. A DVM with only physical collision invariants, and so without spurious ones, is called normal. For binary mixtures also the concept of supernormal DVMs was introduced, meaning that in addition to the DVM being normal, the restriction of the DVM to any single species also is normal. Here we introduce generalizations of this concept to DVMs for multicomponent mixtures. We also present some general algorithms for constructing such models and give some concrete examples of such constructions. One of our main results is that for any given number of species, and any given rational mass ratios we can construct a supernormal DVM. The DVMs are constructed in such a way that for half-space problems, as the Milne and Kramers problems, but also nonlinear ones, we obtain similar structures as for the classical discrete Boltzmann equation for one species, and therefore we can apply obtained results for the classical Boltzmann equation.

  3. Discrete Velocity Models for Mixtures Without Nonphysical Collision Invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhoff, Niclas; Vinerean, Mirela

    2016-10-01

    An important aspect of constructing discrete velocity models (DVMs) for the Boltzmann equation is to obtain the right number of collision invariants. It is a well-known fact that DVMs can also have extra collision invariants, so called spurious collision invariants, in plus to the physical ones. A DVM with only physical collision invariants, and so without spurious ones, is called normal. For binary mixtures also the concept of supernormal DVMs was introduced, meaning that in addition to the DVM being normal, the restriction of the DVM to any single species also is normal. Here we introduce generalizations of this concept to DVMs for multicomponent mixtures. We also present some general algorithms for constructing such models and give some concrete examples of such constructions. One of our main results is that for any given number of species, and any given rational mass ratios we can construct a supernormal DVM. The DVMs are constructed in such a way that for half-space problems, as the Milne and Kramers problems, but also nonlinear ones, we obtain similar structures as for the classical discrete Boltzmann equation for one species, and therefore we can apply obtained results for the classical Boltzmann equation.

  4. Airborne Collision Detection and Avoidance for Small UAS Sense and Avoid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahawneh, Laith Rasmi

    collision risk using the uncorrelated encounter model (UEM) developed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory. We evaluate the proposed approach using Monte Carlo simulations and compare the performance with linearly extrapolated collision detection logic. For the path planning and collision avoidance part, we present multiple reactive path planning algorithms. We first propose a collision avoidance algorithm based on a simulated chain that responds to a virtual force field produced by encountering intruders. The key feature of the proposed approach is to model the future motion of both the intruder and the ownship using a chain of waypoints that are equally spaced in time. This timing information is used to continuously re-plan paths that minimize the probability of collision. Second, we present an innovative collision avoidance logic using an ownship centered coordinate system. The technique builds a graph in the local-level frame and uses the Dijkstra's algorithm to find the least cost path. An advantage of this approach is that collision avoidance is inherently a local phenomenon and can be more naturally represented in the local coordinates than the global coordinates. Finally, we propose a two step path planner for ground-based SAA systems. In the first step, an initial suboptimal path is generated using A* search. In the second step, using the A* solution as an initial condition, a chain of unit masses connected by springs and dampers evolves in a simulated force field. The chain is described by a set of ordinary differential equations that is driven by virtual forces to find the steady-state equilibrium. The simulation results show that the proposed approach produces collision-free plans while minimizing the path length. To move towards a deployable system, we apply collision detection and avoidance techniques to a variety of simulation and sensor modalities including camera, radar and ADS-B along with suitable tracking schemes. Keywords: unmanned aircraft system, small UAS

  5. Collisions of F(+) with Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hottoka, Matti; Roos, Bjorn; Delos, J. B.; Srivastava, R.; Sharma, R. B.

    1987-06-01

    Measurements of inelastic collisions of F(+) with Ne have been made. Transitions between 3P and 1D terms of F(+) are seen, with the inelastically scattered ions sharply focused in the forward direction. Potential energy curves of (FNe)/+/ have been calculated. The 3Sigma and 3Pi curves correlating to F(+)/(3P) are repulsive, while the 1Sigma correlating to F(+)(1D) is attractive. Several curve crossings are identified, where transitions occur through spin-orbit coupling. Scattering angles and differential cross sections have been calculated, and they show the presence of a 'glory' (or halo) effect, which account for the forward scattering of ions.

  6. Investigation of the Direct Charge Transfer in Low Energy D2+ + H Collisions using Merged-Beams Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, S. L.; Guillen, C. I.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Havener, C. C.

    2011-10-01

    The hydrogen - hydrogen (deuterium) molecular ion is the most fundamental ion-molecule two-electron system. Charge transfer (CT) for H2+ on H, which is one of the possible reaction paths for the (H-H2)+ system, is of special interest because of its contribution to H2 formation in the early universe, its exoergicity, and rich collision dynamics. Due to technical difficulty in making an atomic H target, the direct experimental investigations of CT for H2+ on H are sparse and generally limited to higher collision energies. The measurements of the absolute cross section of different CT paths for H2+ on H over a large range of collision energy are needed to benchmark theoretical calculations, especially the ones at low energies. The rate coefficient of CT at low energy is not known but may be comparable to other reaction rate coefficients in cold plasmas with H, H+, H2+, and H3+ as constituents. For instance, CT for H2+ on H and the following H3+ formation reaction H2+ + H2 → H + H3+ are clearly rate interdependent although it was always assumed that every ionization of H2 will lead to the formation of H3+. CT proceeds through dynamically coupled electronic, vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom. One can depict three paths, electronic CT, CT with nuclear substitution, and CT with dissociation. Electronic CT and CT with nuclear substitution in the H2+ on H collisions are not distinguishable by any quantum theory. Here we use the isotopic system (D2+ - H) to measure without ambiguity the electronic CT cross section by observing the H+ products. Using the ion-atom merged-beam apparatus at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the absolute direct CT cross sections for D2+ + H from keV/u to meV/u collision energies have been measured. The molecular ions are extracted from an Electron-Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source with a vibrational state distribution which is most likely determined by Frank-Condon transitions between ground state D2 and D2+. A ground-state H beam

  7. Collision Broadening Of Line Spectrum In Sonoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chaohui; An Yu

    2008-06-24

    The direct measurement of temperature inside a sonoluminescing bubble as it is at its flashing phase is almost impossible due to the smallness of the bubble and the short duration of the flashing. One may estimate the temperature through fitting the continuum spectrum of sonoluminescence by the black body radiation formula, or fitting the shape of atomic or molecular line spectrum (the different temperature, density and pressure result in the different shape of the line spectrum due to the effect of collision broadening). However, the temperature changes in a huge range at short duration as the bubble flashes, therefore, the observed spectra are some kind of average one, so are those fitted results. To evaluate the instantaneous temperature more accurately, we simulate the processes of the bubble motion and the thermodynamics inside the bubble, in which atomic or molecular line spectra with the collision broadening effect and the continuum spectra contributed from the processes of electron-atom bremsstrahlung, electron-ion bremsstrahlung and recombination radiation and radiative attachment of electrons to atoms and molecules are taken into account in calculating the light emission. If both the calculated continuum spectra and the shape of line spectra can well represent the experimental data, we may deduce that the calculation of the temperature, density and pressure is reliable and we indirectly evaluate those quantities inside the bubble. In the present calculation, the line spectra of OH radical at about 310 nm mixing the electron transition with the vibration and rotational bands are considered. The calculation qualitatively consists with the observation, and we expect that with the more precise bubble dynamics model instead of the uniform model employed in the present calculation we may improve the quantitative result.

  8. An overheight vehicle bridge collision monitoring system using piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, G.; Olmi, C.; Gu, H.

    2007-04-01

    With increasing traffic volume follows an increase in the number of overheight truck collisions with highway bridges. The detection of collision impact and evaluation of the impact level is a critical issue in the maintenance of a concrete bridge. In this paper, an overheight collision detection and evaluation system is developed for concrete bridge girders using piezoelectric transducers. An electric circuit is designed to detect the impact and to activate a digital camera to take photos of the offending truck. Impact tests and a health monitoring test were conducted on a model concrete bridge girder by using three piezoelectric transducers embedded before casting. From the experimental data of the impact test, it can be seen that there is a linear relation between the output of sensor energy and the impact energy. The health monitoring results show that the proposed damage index indicates the level of damage inside the model concrete bridge girder. The proposed overheight truck-bridge collision detection and evaluation system has the potential to be applied to the safety monitoring of highway bridges.

  9. Large Collisions on Icy and Rocky Bodies with Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, E.; Stewart, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Here, we investigate the outcome of collisions between icy-rocky planetary embryos with strength. In the inner solar system, impacts between embryos are hypothesized to generate crustal dichotomies on global scales, e.g., the Borealis Basin on Mars. In the Kuiper Belt, such global scale collisions differ from the inner solar system in important ways. First, bodies are less massive and their mutual collision velocities are smaller in amplitude compared to the inner solar system. As a result, the amount of direct shock heating is small and very localized. Strength is an important factor because shear heating is a process that can deposit energy more deeply into the final body. With a small gravitational potential, the post impact shape of the body may exhibit features related to residual strength. The variety of possible post-impact structures depends on the pre-impact thermal state and level of differentiation of the silicate-ice mixture and impact conditions. Here, we focus on collisions scenarios proposed for the origin of the Pluto system using the CTH shock physics code. We report on the magnitude of thermal processing and residual strength for varying assumptions about initial conditions.

  10. A Computational Study of Systemic Hydration in Vocal Fold Collision

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Pinaki; Siegmund, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical stresses develop within vocal fold (VF) soft tissues, due to phonation-associated vibration and collision. These stresses in turn affect the hydration of VF tissue and thus influence voice health. In this paper, high-fidelty numerical computations are described taking into account fully three-dimensional geometry, realistic tissue and air properties, and high-amplitude vibration and collision. A segregated solver approach is employed, using sophisticated commercial solvers for both the VF tissue and glottal airflow domains. The tissue viscoelastic properties were derived from a biphasic formulation. Two cases were considered, whereby the tissue viscoelastic properties corresponded to two different volume fractions of the fluid phase of the VF tissue. For each case, hydrostatic stresses occurring as a result of vibration and collision were investigated. Assuming the VF tissue to be poroelastic, interstitial fluid movement within VF tissue was estimated from the hydrostatic stress gradient. Computed measures of overall VF dynamics (peak air-flow velocity, magnitude of VF deformation, frequency of vibration and contact pressure) were well within the range of experimentally observed values. The VF motion leading to mechanical stresses within the VFs and their effect on the interstitial fluid flux is detailed. It is found that average deformation and vibration of VFs tends to increase the state of hydration of the VF tissue whereas VF collision works to reduce hydration. PMID:23531170

  11. System engineering analysis of derelict collision prevention options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, Darren S.; Di Pentino, Frank; Kaczmarek, Adam; Dingman, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    Sensitivities to the future growth of orbital debris and the resulting hazard to operational satellites due to collisional breakups of large derelict objects are being studied extensively. However, little work has been done to quantify the technical and operational tradeoffs between options for minimizing future derelict fragmentations that act as the primary source for future debris hazard growth. The two general categories of debris mitigation examined for prevention of collisions involving large derelict objects (rocket bodies and payloads) are active debris removal (ADR) and just-in-time collision avoidance (JCA). Timing, cost, and effectiveness are compared for ADR and JCA solutions highlighting the required enhancements in uncooperative element set accuracy, rapid ballistic launch, despin/grappling systems, removal technologies, and remote impulsive devices. The primary metrics are (1) the number of derelict objects moved/removed per the number of catastrophic collisions prevented and (2) cost per collision event prevented. A response strategy that contains five different activities, including selective JCA and ADR, is proposed as the best approach going forward.

  12. Observation of sequential Υ suppression in PbPb collisions.

    PubMed

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Pierro, G A; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J

    2012-11-30

    The suppression of the individual Υ(nS) states in PbPb collisions with respect to their yields in pp data has been measured. The PbPb and pp data sets used in the analysis correspond to integrated luminosities of 150 μb(-1) and 230 nb(-1), respectively, collected in 2011 by the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a center-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 2.76 TeV. The Υ(nS) yields are measured from the dimuon invariant mass spectra. The suppression of the Υ(nS) yields in PbPb relative to the yields in pp, scaled by the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions, R(AA), is measured as a function of the collision centrality. Integrated over centrality, the R(AA) values are 0.56±0.08(stat)±0.07(syst), 0.12±0.04(stat)±0.02(syst), and lower than 0.10 (at 95% confidence level), for the Υ(1S), Υ(2S), and Υ(3S) states, respectively. The results demonstrate the sequential suppression of the Υ(nS) states in PbPb collisions at LHC energies.

  13. Electrochemistry of a single attoliter emulsion droplet in collisions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Kwon; Kim, Jiyeon; Bard, Allen J

    2015-02-18

    We report here the electrochemistry of emulsion droplets by observing single emulsion droplet collisions with selective electrochemical reduction on an ultramicroelectrode (UME). With appropriately applied potentials at an UME, we can observe the electrochemical effects of single collision signals from the complete electrolysis of single emulsion droplets, or selective electrolysis of redox species in single emulsion droplets. This was observed with nitrobenzene (NB), 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ), and ionic liquid. The NB, TCNQ, and ionic liquid act as emulsion material, redox specie, and emulsifier (and electrolyte), respectively. NB emulsions and NB (TCNQ) emulsions were made by ultrasonic processing. During the amperometric current-time (i-t) curve measurement with NB/water emulsion at -0.65 V, reduction of NB emulsion droplets was measured. In the case of less negative potentials, e.g., at -0.45 V with a NB (TCNQ) emulsion, selective reduction of TCNQ in NB droplet was measured. Spike-like responses from electrolysis of NB or TCNQ in each experiment were observed. From these single-particle collision results of NB and NB (TCNQ) emulsions, the collision frequency, size distribution, i-t decay behavior of emulsion droplets, and possible mechanisms are discussed.

  14. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-05-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen.

  15. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251-245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  16. Evolution of collision numbers for a chaotic gas dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vidgop, Alexander Jonathan; Fouxon, Itzhak

    2011-11-01

    We put forward a conjecture of recurrence for a gas of hard spheres that collide elastically in a finite volume. The dynamics consists of a sequence of instantaneous binary collisions. We study how the numbers of collisions of different pairs of particles grow as functions of time. We observe that these numbers can be represented as a time integral of a function on the phase space. Assuming the results of the ergodic theory apply, we describe the evolution of the numbers by an effective Langevin dynamics. We use the facts that hold for these dynamics with probability one, in order to establish properties of a single trajectory of the system. We find that for any triplet of particles there will be an infinite sequence of moments of time, when the numbers of collisions of all three different pairs of the triplet will be equal. Moreover, any value of difference of collision numbers of pairs in the triplet will repeat indefinitely. On the other hand, for larger numbers of pairs there is but a finite number of repetitions. Thus the ergodic theory produces a limitation on the dynamics.

  17. Collisions of molecules with clusters: A quasiclassical study

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinek, J.; Guevenc, Z.B.

    1993-08-01

    Presented are results of a quasiclassical simulation study of processes induced by a collision of a D{sub 2} molecule with a Ni{sub 13} cluster. Focus was on the reactive channel, i.e., dissociative adsorption of the molecule. Dependence on factors such as the collision energy, initial (quantized) rovibrational state of the molecule, and structure and temperature of cluster were analyzed. Direct and indirect (involving formation of transient complexes -- resonances) reaction pathways were considered and characterized quantitatively. We have illustrated how multidimensional potential energy surfaces describing cluster-molecule interactions can be analyzed in terms of a reduced set of relevant degrees of freedom and the topologies of these surfaces correlated with dynamical phenomena extracted from the calculations. The complex problem of ``tuning`` the cluster-molecule interaction potential using experimental data has also been addressed, and a specific example of such ``tuning`` has been given. It underscores the crucial role of the intimate interplay between theory and experiment, especially in the field of clusters where, because of the large number of degrees of freedom involved, first principle calculations are (and will remain) of limited feasibility. More generally, the analysis and the discussion presented show that the phenomena and problems relevant for cluster-molecule collisions -- a new research area by all accounts have much in common with those encountered in nucleus-nucleus, atom-atom, atom-molecule, and molecule-molecule collisions -- research fields with a considerable history.

  18. Analyzing Benzene and Cyclohexane Emulsion Droplet Collisions on Ultramicroelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Deng, Haiqiang; Dick, Jeffrey E; Bard, Allen J

    2015-11-01

    We report the collisions of single emulsion oil droplets with extremely low dielectric constants (e.g., benzene, ε of 2.27, or cyclohexane, ε of 2.02) as studied via emulsion droplet reactor (EDR) on an ultramicroelectrode (UME). By applying appropriate potentials to the UME, we observed the electrochemical effects of single-collision signals from the bulk electrolysis of single emulsion droplets. Different hydrophobic redox species (ferrocene, decamethyl-ferrocene, or metalloporphyrin) were trapped in a mixed benzene (or cyclohexane) oil-in-water emulsion using an ionic liquid as the supporting electrolyte and emulsifier. The emulsions were prepared using ultrasonic processing. Spike-like responses were observed in each i-t response due to the complete electrolysis of all of the above-mentioned redox species within the droplet. On the basis of these single-particle collision results, the collision frequency, size distribution, i-t decay behavior of the emulsion droplets, and possible mechanisms are analyzed and discussed. This work demonstrated that bulk electrolysis can be achieved in a few seconds in these attoliter reactors, suggesting many applications, such as analysis and electrosynthesis in low dielectric constant solvents, which have a much broader potential window.

  19. Collision between chemically driven self-propelled drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabunaka, Shunsuke; Yoshinaga, Natsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    We consider analytically and numerically head-on collision between two self-propelled drops. Each drop is driven by chemical reactions that produce or consume the concentration isotropically. The isotropic distribution of the concentration field is destabilized by motion of the drop which is itself made by Marangoni flow from concentration-dependent surface tension. This symmetry-breaking self-propulsion is distinct from other self-propulsion mechanisms due to the intrinsic polarity such as squirmers and self-phoretic motion; there is a bifurcation point below which the drop is stationary and above which it moves spontaneously. When two drops moving along the same axis with opposite direction, the interactions arise both from hydrodynamics and concentration overlap. We found that two drops exhibit either elastic collision or fusion depending on the distance from the bifurcation point controlled, for instance, by viscosity. The elastic collision results from the balance between dissipation and energy injection by chemical reactions. We derive the reduced equations for the collision between two drops and analyze the contributions from the two interactions. The concentration-mediated interaction is found to dominate the hydrodynamic interaction.

  20. Linking magmatism with collision in an accretionary orogen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan; Chung, Sun-Lin; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Wen-Jiao; Guo, Qian-Qian

    2016-01-01

    A compilation of U-Pb age, geochemical and isotopic data for granitoid plutons in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), enables evaluation of the interaction between magmatism and orogenesis in the context of Paleo-Asian oceanic closure and continental amalgamation. These constraints, in conjunction with other geological evidence, indicate that following consumption of the ocean, collision-related calc-alkaline granitoid and mafic magmatism occurred from 255 ± 2 Ma to 251 ± 2 Ma along the Solonker-Xar Moron suture zone. The linear or belt distribution of end-Permian magmatism is interpreted to have taken place in a setting of final orogenic contraction and weak crustal thickening, probably as a result of slab break-off. Crustal anatexis slightly post-dated the early phase of collision, producing adakite-like granitoids with some S-type granites during the Early-Middle Triassic (ca. 251–245 Ma). Between 235 and 220 Ma, the local tectonic regime switched from compression to extension, most likely caused by regional lithospheric extension and orogenic collapse. Collision-related magmatism from the southern CAOB is thus a prime example of the minor, yet tell-tale linking of magmatism with orogenic contraction and collision in an archipelago-type accretionary orogen. PMID:27167207

  1. A conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann equation with anisotropic scattering and the grazing collisions limit

    SciTech Connect

    Gamba, Irene M.; Haack, Jeffrey R.

    2014-08-01

    We present the formulation of a conservative spectral method for the Boltzmann collision operator with anisotropic scattering cross-sections. The method is an extension of the conservative spectral method of Gamba and Tharkabhushanam [17,18], which uses the weak form of the collision operator to represent the collisional term as a weighted convolution in Fourier space. The method is tested by computing the collision operator with a suitably cut-off angular cross section and comparing the results with the solution of the Landau equation. We analytically study the convergence rate of the Fourier transformed Boltzmann collision operator in the grazing collisions limit to the Fourier transformed Landau collision operator under the assumption of some regularity and decay conditions of the solution to the Boltzmann equation. Our results show that the angular singularity which corresponds to the Rutherford scattering cross section is the critical singularity for which a grazing collision limit exists for the Boltzmann operator. Additionally, we numerically study the differences between homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation with the Rutherford scattering cross section and an artificial cross section, which give convergence to solutions of the Landau equation at different asymptotic rates. We numerically show the rate of the approximation as well as the consequences for the rate of entropy decay for homogeneous solutions of the Boltzmann equation and Landau equation.

  2. Low-Velocity Aggregate Collisions Simulating Planetary Ring Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, A.; Colwell, J. E.; Bradley, E. T.; Vamos, C.

    2012-12-01

    Proto-planetary and planetary ring system evolution is driven by collisions between small particles and aggregates that may be composed of dust, water ice, or a combination of materials. In these collisional systems, impacts between objects can occur at very low velocities, much less than 1 m/s. Low-velocity impacts can have competing effects: at the lowest velocities, collisions may play a critical role in growth into larger aggregates; at slightly higher velocities, collisions can cause break-up and release of material. In the Saturnian ring system, for instance, particles are excited to such "higher" velocities (10's of cm/s) in regions where density waves enhance particle concentrations. These conditions are present in the A ring, and it has been hypothesized that collisions have an additional effect of modifying the spectral properties of the ring particles, which are composed of a mix of ice and dust (Nicholson et al., 2008). This modification may occur when collisions cause ejection of material with different spectral characteristics, or by breaking particles apart to reveal more pristine interiors. We have designed and built an apparatus to simulate low-velocity collisions between aggregates in a laboratory vacuum environment. In our experiment, two aggregates are launched towards each other; the resulting impact velocities are controlled by the initial spring launch velocity, the masses of the aggregates, and timing of the collisions. Initially, we use lunar regolith simulant to create the aggregates; the simulant can be packed to different densities to control the mass and porosity of the impactors. We also create aggregates that are mixtures of materials, including icy components. A high-speed digital video camera is used to record the impacts to observe the behavior of both impactors and the resulting ejecta material. We observe over a range of velocities to identify the conditions under which aggregates shed only some material from the surface, or

  3. 46 CFR 179.310 - Collision bulkheads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Collision bulkheads. 179.310 Section 179.310 Shipping... recess or step, up to the bulkhead deck; (c) The after collision bulkhead on a double-ended ferry of more... step, at least up to the bulkhead deck....

  4. Variation of transverse momentum in hadronic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Amand, J.; Uritam, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a detailed parameterization of the transverse momentum in hadronic collisions on multiplicity and on beam momentum. Hadronic collisions are considered at energies below the ultra-high energy domain, on the basis of an uncertainty relation and a naive eikonal model with an impact-parameter-dependent multiplicity.

  5. Mechanical Energy Changes in Perfectly Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Suppose a block of mass "m"[subscript 1] traveling at speed "v"[subscript 1] makes a one-dimensional perfectly inelastic collision with another block of mass "m"[subscript 2]. What else does one need to know to calculate the fraction of the mechanical energy that is dissipated in the collision? (Contains 1 figure.)

  6. Oblique and Head-On Elastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Chiu-king

    2008-01-01

    When a moving ball collides elastically with an identical, initially stationary ball, the incident ball will either come to rest (head-on collision; see Fig. 1) or will acquire a velocity that is perpendicular to that acquired by the target ball (oblique collision; see Fig. 2). These two possible outcomes are related in an interesting way, which…

  7. Long-Range Collisions in Magnetized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D.

    2015-12-01

    Astrophysical (and earthbound) plasmas in strong magnetic fields exhibit collisional effects that are not described by classical collision theory nor by the standard collision operators, such as the Landau or Balescu-Lenard operators. These theories implicitly neglect "long-range" collisions, i.e. collisions with impact parameters large compared to the cyclotron radius. This presentation will review several important physical effects such collisions have on various phenomena, including cross-magnetic field diffusion, heat conduction, and collisional slowing parallel to the magnetic field. Long-range collisions are analyzed as guiding-centers moving in one-dimension along the magnetic field, with parallel energy and momentum transferred to particles on separate field lines through the screened Coulomb interaction. This causes cross-field heat transport that is independent of magnetic field strength B (as opposed to the classical 1/B2 scaling), and enhances the rate of collisional slowing parallel to B. The Coulomb interaction between guiding centers on different field lines also produces random ExB drifts that enhance cross-magnetic field diffusion compared to the classical theory. The theory of long-range guiding center collisions must also include the novel effect of "collisional caging": plasma noise causes two colliding guiding centers to diffuse in relative parallel velocity, reversing their motion along B and colliding several times before becoming uncorrelated. This further enhances cross-field diffusion from long-range collisions by a factor of three, and enhances parallel slowing by a factor of approximately 1.5.

  8. Charge exchange in H^+ + He^+ collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Leon, Nicolais; Sabin, John R.; Deumens, Erik; Ohrn, Yngve

    2008-05-01

    Charge exchange in H^+ + He^+ collision are investigated theoretically at projectile energies below the ionization threshold at about 100 keV/amu. The electron nuclear dynamics (END) method is used to analyze the collision processes. Total charge exchange cross sections were calculated and compared with other theoretical and experimental data.

  9. Approaches to Evaluating Probability of Collision Uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, Matthew D.; Johnson, Lauren C.

    2016-01-01

    While the two-dimensional probability of collision (Pc) calculation has served as the main input to conjunction analysis risk assessment for over a decade, it has done this mostly as a point estimate, with relatively little effort made to produce confidence intervals on the Pc value based on the uncertainties in the inputs. The present effort seeks to try to carry these uncertainties through the calculation in order to generate a probability density of Pc results rather than a single average value. Methods for assessing uncertainty in the primary and secondary objects' physical sizes and state estimate covariances, as well as a resampling approach to reveal the natural variability in the calculation, are presented; and an initial proposal for operationally-useful display and interpretation of these data for a particular conjunction is given.

  10. Adiabatic theory for anisotropic cold molecule collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, Mariusz; Shagam, Yuval; Narevicius, Edvardas; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-08-21

    We developed an adiabatic theory for cold anisotropic collisions between slow atoms and cold molecules. It enables us to investigate the importance of the couplings between the projection states of the rotational motion of the atom about the molecular axis of the diatom. We tested our theory using the recent results from the Penning ionization reaction experiment {sup 4}He(1s2s {sup 3}S) + HD(1s{sup 2}) → {sup 4}He(1s{sup 2}) + HD{sup +}(1s) + e{sup −} [Lavert-Ofir et al., Nat. Chem. 6, 332 (2014)] and demonstrated that the couplings have strong effect on positions of shape resonances. The theory we derived provides cross sections which are in a very good agreement with the experimental findings.

  11. Collision prediction models using multivariate Poisson-lognormal regression.

    PubMed

    El-Basyouny, Karim; Sayed, Tarek

    2009-07-01

    This paper advocates the use of multivariate Poisson-lognormal (MVPLN) regression to develop models for collision count data. The MVPLN approach presents an opportunity to incorporate the correlations across collision severity levels and their influence on safety analyses. The paper introduces a new multivariate hazardous location identification technique, which generalizes the univariate posterior probability of excess that has been commonly proposed and applied in the literature. In addition, the paper presents an alternative approach for quantifying the effect of the multivariate structure on the precision of expected collision frequency. The MVPLN approach is compared with the independent (separate) univariate Poisson-lognormal (PLN) models with respect to model inference, goodness-of-fit, identification of hot spots and precision of expected collision frequency. The MVPLN is modeled using the WinBUGS platform which facilitates computation of posterior distributions as well as providing a goodness-of-fit measure for model comparisons. The results indicate that the estimates of the extra Poisson variation parameters were considerably smaller under MVPLN leading to higher precision. The improvement in precision is due mainly to the fact that MVPLN accounts for the correlation between the latent variables representing property damage only (PDO) and injuries plus fatalities (I+F). This correlation was estimated at 0.758, which is highly significant, suggesting that higher PDO rates are associated with higher I+F rates, as the collision likelihood for both types is likely to rise due to similar deficiencies in roadway design and/or other unobserved factors. In terms of goodness-of-fit, the MVPLN model provided a superior fit than the independent univariate models. The multivariate hazardous location identification results demonstrated that some hazardous locations could be overlooked if the analysis was restricted to the univariate models. PMID:19540972

  12. Crab Waist Collision at DAFNE

    SciTech Connect

    Milardi, C.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, G.; Murtas, F.; Pellegrino, L.; /Frascati /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN /INFN, Cosenza /INFN, Rome /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Rome U. /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Rome3 /SLAC

    2011-11-30

    DAFNE is an accelerator complex consisting of a double ring lepton collider working at the c.m. energy of the {Phi}-resonance (1.02 GeV) and an injection system. In its original configuration the collider consisted of two independent rings, each {approx}97 m long, sharing two 10 m long interaction regions (IR1 and IR2) where the KLOE and FINUDA or DEAR detectors were respectively installed. A full energy injection system, including an S-band linac, 180 m long transfer lines and an accumulator/damping ring, provides fast and high efficiency electron positron injection also in topping-up mode during collisions. Recently the DAFNE collider has been upgraded in order to implement a new collision scheme based on large Piwinski angle and cancellation of the synchro-betatron resonances by means of electromagnetic sextupoles (Crab-Waist compensation). The novel approach has proved to be effective in improving beam-beam interaction and collider luminosity.

  13. Energy coupling in catastrophic collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holsapple, K. A.; Choe, K. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of events leading to the catastrophic collisions and disruption of solar system bodies is fraught with the same difficulties as are other theories of impact events; since one simply cannot perform experiments in the regime of interest. In the catastrophic collisions of asteroids that regime involves bodies of a few tons to hundred of kilometers in diameter, and velocities of several kilometers pre second. For hundred kilometer bodies, gravitational stresses dominate material fracture strengths, but those gravitational stresses are essentially absent for laboratory experiments. Only numerical simulations using hydrocodes can in principle analyze the true problems, but they have their own major uncertainties about the correctness of the physical models and properties. The question of the measure of the impactor and its energy coupling is investigated using numerical code calculations. The material model was that of a generic silicate rock, including high pressure melt and vapor phases, and includes material nonlinearity and dissipation via a Mie-Gruniesen model. A series of calculations with various size ratios and impact velocities are reported.

  14. A clinically feasible method for the detection of potential collision in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Wei; Lin Haibo; Plastaras, John P.; Wang Huanshu; Bui, Viet; Vapiwala, Neha; McDonough, James; Tochner, Zelig; Both, Stefan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Potential collision between the patient/couch and the gantry could delay the start of the treatment and reduce clinical efficiency. The ability to accurately detect possible collisions during the treatment planning phase is desired. Such collision detection should account for the specific proton gantry design, the treatment beam configuration, couch orientation, and the patient specific geometry. In this paper the authors developed an approach to detect possible patient-machine collisions using patient treatment plan data. Methods: The geometry of the machine and the patient was reconstructed relative to the isocenter of the proton treatment room. The surface contour of the gantry was first captured from the proton computer aided design and reconstructed to account for specific gantry rotation, snout position, collimator rotation, and range compensator dimensions based on the patient treatment plan data. The patient body and couch contours were captured from the patient's CT DICOM structure file. They were reconstructed relative to the isocenter taking into account treatment couch rotation. For potential collision that occurs at body portions where no CT images exist, scout images are used to construct the body contour. A software program was developed using a ray casting algorithm that was applied to detect collisions by determining if any of the patient and couch contour points fall into the spatial polygons formed by the proton gantry surfaces. Results: Twenty-four patient plans with or without potential collisions were retrospectively identified and analyzed using the collision detection software. In addition, five collision cases were artificially generated using an anthropomorphic phantom. The program successfully detected the collisions in all cases. The calculation time for each case was within 20 s. The software program was implemented in the authors' clinic to detect patient-gantry or gantry-couch collisions in the treatment planning phase

  15. From many body wee partons dynamics to perfect fluid: a standard model for heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Venugopalan, R.

    2010-07-22

    We discuss a standard model of heavy ion collisions that has emerged both from experimental results of the RHIC program and associated theoretical developments. We comment briefly on the impact of early results of the LHC program on this picture. We consider how this standard model of heavy ion collisions could be solidified or falsified in future experiments at RHIC, the LHC and a future Electro-Ion Collider.

  16. An optimal control strategy for collision avoidance of mobile robots in non-stationary environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyriakopoulos, K. J.; Saridis, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal control formulation of the problem of collision avoidance of mobile robots in environments containing moving obstacles is presented. Collision avoidance is guaranteed if the minimum distance between the robot and the objects is nonzero. A nominal trajectory is assumed to be known from off-line planning. The main idea is to change the velocity along the nominal trajectory so that collisions are avoided. Furthermore, time consistency with the nominal plan is desirable. A numerical solution of the optimization problem is obtained. Simulation results verify the value of the proposed strategy.

  17. Probing the microscopic corrugation of liquid surfaces with gas-liquid collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Mackenzie E.; Nathanson, Gilbert M.; Hanning-Lee, Mark A.; Minton, Timothy K.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the directions and velocities of Ne, Ar, and Xe atoms scattering from perfluorinated ether and hydrocarbon liquids to probe the relationship between the microscopic roughness of liquid surfaces and gas-liquid collision dynamics. Impulsive energy transfer is governed by the angle of deflection: head-on encounters deposit more energy than grazing collisions. Many atoms scatter in the forward direction, particularly at glancing incidence. These results imply that the incoming atoms recoil locally from protruding C-H and C-F groups in hard spherelike collisions.

  18. Evaluation of human behavior in collision avoidance: a study inside immersive virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Michel; Chagnon, Miguel; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2009-04-01

    During our daily displacements, we should consider the individuals advancing toward us in order to avoid a possible collision with our congeneric. We developed an experimental design in a virtual immersion room, which allows us to evaluate human capacities for avoiding collisions with other people. In addition, the design allows participants to interact naturally inside this immersive virtual reality setup when a pedestrian is moving toward them, creating a possible risk of collision. Results suggest that the performance is associated with visual and motor capacities and could be adjusted by cognitive social perception. PMID:19250010

  19. Potential Energy Curves and Collisions Integrals of Air Components. 2; Interactions Involving Ionized Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Collision integrals are fundamental quantities required to determine the transport properties of the environment surrounding aerospace vehicles in the upper atmosphere. These collision integrals can be determined as a function of temperature from the potential energy curves describing the atomic and molecular collisions. Ab initio calculations provide a practical method of computing the required interaction potentials. In this work we will discuss recent advances in scattering calculations with an emphasis on the accuracy that is obtainable. Results for interactions of the atoms and ionized atoms of nitrogen and oxygen will be reviewed and their application to the determination of transport properties, such as diffusion and viscosity coefficients, will be examined.

  20. a Three Pulse Optical Echo Study of Depolarising Collisions in Caesium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, William Thomason

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The work described in this thesis is an experimental study, using three excitation pulse photon echoes, of collisional relaxation of caesium atoms perturbed by noble gases. The theoretical aspects of this thesis include the development of a density matrix theory to describe the formation of echoes formed from a sequence of three excitation pulses when applied to a multi-level system. The manner in which the resultant echoes store information about optical coherences, Zeeman coherences and state populations is discussed. The theory of collisional relaxation of three excitation pulse echoes by depolarising collisions and velocity changing collisions is introduced. Measurements of collision cross sections for depolarising collisions and velocity changing collisions for atoms in a single state are possible by the three excitation pulse echo techniques. The experimental work of this thesis involves the measurement of collisional relaxation of three pulse echoes formed on the caesium 6S_{1 over2} rightarrow 7P_ {3over2} (455 nm) and 6S _{1over2} rightarrow 7P_{1over2} (459 nm) transitions, perturbed by low pressure (below 1 torr) helium, argon and xenon gas. One series of experiments measured the collision cross section for optical coherence destroying collisions, and the results obtained are in good agreement with previous two pulse echo measurements. The remaining experimental work determined values of collision cross sections due to depolarising collisions for ground state caesium atoms perturbed by noble gas. This marks the first measurement of this parameter for 6S_{1 over2} ground state caesium atoms.

  1. Destruction of Luzon forearc basin from subduction to Taiwan arc-continent collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirtzel, Justin; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Reed, Donald; Chen, Liwen; Liu, Char-Shine; Lundberg, Neil

    2009-12-01

    Along offshore to the east of southern Taiwan, different stages of subduction and collision occur simultaneously along strike of the convergent boundary. As a result, the evolution of the Luzon arc and its forearc basin can be studied from the younger subduction zone to the south to the collision zone to the north. Examining more than 8000 km of seismic lines, we analyzed the seismic stratigraphy of strata in a forearc basin and its successive basins in the collision zone, to study the processes related to arc collapse and forearc basin closure. The study area presents three evolutional stages: intra-oceanic subduction, initial arc-continent collision, and arc-continent collision. We divided 9 seismic sequences in the forearc basin and found older, sub-parallel basin-fill sequences (4-9) and younger, divergent sequences (1-3). Isochron maps of the sequences were used to interpret different deformation modes and their areal extends. On the arc side of the basin of the subduction and initial collision zones, we found relatively undisturbed strata, showing little arc deformation. On the trench side, the growth strata in sequences 1 through 3 are the result of recent tectonic wedging along the rear of the accretionary prism. Tectonic wedging and back-thrusts incorporate the forearc strata into the rear of the accretionary prism until they close the forearc basin at a region with a 2200 m basement relief. This relief is not caused by active deformation, as young flat forearc strata lap onto it and mark the transition from initial collision to collision where many growth strata to the north suggest abrupt increase in active arc basement deformation. The (1) deforming basement, (2) back-thrusts, and (3) other sedimentary processes affect the architecture of the successive basins in the collision zone until the arc is juxtaposed to the rear of the fold and thrust belt on land.

  2. Numerical thermalization in particle-in-cell simulations with Monte-Carlo collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, P. Y.; Lin, T. Y.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-15

    Numerical thermalization in collisional one-dimensional (1D) electrostatic (ES) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations was investigated. Two collision models, the pitch-angle scattering of electrons by the stationary ion background and large-angle collisions between the electrons and the neutral background, were included in the PIC simulation using Monte-Carlo methods. The numerical results show that the thermalization times in both models were considerably reduced by the additional Monte-Carlo collisions as demonstrated by comparisons with Turner's previous simulation results based on a head-on collision model [M. M. Turner, Phys. Plasmas 13, 033506 (2006)]. However, the breakdown of Dawson's scaling law in the collisional 1D ES PIC simulation is more complicated than that was observed by Turner, and the revised scaling law of the numerical thermalization time with numerical parameters are derived on the basis of the simulation results obtained in this study.

  3. Numerical thermalization in particle-in-cell simulations with Monte-Carlo collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, P. Y.; Lin, T. Y.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chen, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Numerical thermalization in collisional one-dimensional (1D) electrostatic (ES) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations was investigated. Two collision models, the pitch-angle scattering of electrons by the stationary ion background and large-angle collisions between the electrons and the neutral background, were included in the PIC simulation using Monte-Carlo methods. The numerical results show that the thermalization times in both models were considerably reduced by the additional Monte-Carlo collisions as demonstrated by comparisons with Turner's previous simulation results based on a head-on collision model [M. M. Turner, Phys. Plasmas 13, 033506 (2006)]. However, the breakdown of Dawson's scaling law in the collisional 1D ES PIC simulation is more complicated than that was observed by Turner, and the revised scaling law of the numerical thermalization time with numerical parameters are derived on the basis of the simulation results obtained in this study.

  4. Collision frequency of artificial satellites - The creation of a debris belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J.; Cour-Palais, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    The probability of satellite collisions increases with the number of satellites. In the present paper, possible time scales for the growth of a debris belt from collision fragments are determined, and possible consequences of continued unrestrained launch activities are examined. Use is made of techniques formerly developed for studying the evolution (growth) of the asteroid belt. A model describing the flux from the known earth-orbiting satellites is developed, and the results from this model are extrapolated in time to predict the collision frequency between satellites. Hypervelocity impact phenomena are then examined to predict the debris flux resulting from collisions. The results are applied to design requirements for three types of future space missions.

  5. COLLISIONS OF POROUS CLUSTERS: A GRANULAR-MECHANICS STUDY OF COMPACTION AND FRAGMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ringl, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Bertoldi, Dalia S.

    2012-06-20

    The collision of granular clusters can result in a number of complex outcomes from sticking to partial or full destruction of the clusters. These outcomes will contribute to the size distribution of dust aggregates, changing their optical properties and their capability to contribute to solid-state astrochemistry. We study the collision of two clusters of equal size, formed by approximately 7000 sub-{mu}m grains each, with a mass and velocity range that is difficult to sample in experiments. We obtain the outcome of the collision: compaction, fragmentation, and size distribution of ejecta, and type of outcome, as a function of velocity and impact parameter. We compare our results to other models and simulations, at both atomistic and continuum scales, and find some agreement together with some discrepancies. We also study collision-induced compaction as a function of cluster size, up to sizes of N = 250, 000, and find that for large clusters considerably higher compactions result at higher velocities.

  6. Change of Collision Efficiency with Distance in Bacterial Transport Experiements

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hailiang; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Johnson, William P.; Monkman, Crystal; Fuller, Mark E.

    2006-05-01

    Previous bacterial transport studies have shown decreased bacterial adhesion with transport distance, largely based on laboratory core experiments. An inferred effect of microbial population variability is invoked to interpret experimental data, but there lacks direct measurement at field-scale, especially in correlation of transport distance with change of bacterial surface properties. This study was undertaken to determine change of collision efficiency with transport distance, taking advantage of the bacterial transport experiment in Oyster, VA in the summer of 2001. Upon injection of an adhesion deficient strain, Comamonas sp. DA001 into a up-gradient well, bacterial samples were taken from multi-level samplers along the flow path, and were injected into cores of 40 cm in length and 7.5 cm in diameter packed with homogenized sediment from the same site, South Oyster focus area (SOFA). Bacterial suspension samples were also measured for bacterial electrophoretic mobility distribution. Using filtration theory, collision efficiency, the probability of bacterial attachment to the grain surfaces upon collision and a quantitative measure of bacterial adhesion, was determined using CXTFIT model fitted attachment rate, measured grain size (10th percentile), porosity, flow velocity, and collector efficiency. Collision efficiency was also determined based on the fraction of retention in the cores. Contrary to previous results and interpretation of field-scale breakthrough curves, our experimentally determined collision efficiency increases with transport distance in the core experiments, which correlates with increasingly negative surface charge of the injected bacteria. Therefore we conclude that the apparent decrease in adhesion with transport distance in the field is strongly controlled by field-scale heterogeneity in physical and chemical aquifer properties and not by microbial population heterogeneity.

  7. Planetesimal Formation - Collisions of Decimeter Ice and Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, Johannes; Teiser, Jens; Wurm, Gerhard

    2015-11-01

    The early stages (from µm to mm) as well as the late stages (from km to planet size) of planet formation are quite well understood. The intermediate stage of planetesimal formation is not understood in detail, yet. Several processes, such as bouncing or radial drift, can potentially stall growth beyond the millimeter or centimeter size range.The collision dynamics of decimeter bodies are important in planetesimal formation models. They are interesting for coagulation models, as radial drift towards the central star becomes severe at sizes of decimeter to meter. But they are also crucial for gravitational instability models, because concentration mechanisms are believed to be strongest for decimeter bodies.We performed various collision experiments with decimeter as well as centimeter bodies, made up of both silicate dust and water ice. We investigated threshold conditions, such as the threshold to fragmentation, which are especially interesting for the coagulation models.Though mutual collisions might lead to bouncing or even fragmentation already at velocities that are much lower than relative velocities expected in PPDs, growth beyond decimeter sizes is still possible. Decimeter bodies start to decouple from to the surrounding gas, which results in relative velocities to smaller bodies of several m/s. In such collisions of bodies of different sizes, the bigger body can gain mass. This can be by direct mass transfer from the smaller body. Here, the accretion efficiency is a crucial parameter. Mass can also be transferred through gas-driven re-accretion of fragments of the smaller body, which are produced in the collision. The velocity and size distribution of the ejected fragments are significant for re-accretion.

  8. LOW-VELOCITY COLLISIONS OF CENTIMETER-SIZED DUST AGGREGATES

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, E.; Guettler, C.; Blum, J.; Meisner, T.; Teiser, J.; Wurm, G.

    2011-07-20

    Collisions between centimeter- and decimeter-sized dusty bodies are important in understanding the mechanisms leading to the formation of planetesimals. We performed laboratory experiments to study the collisional behavior of dust aggregates in this size range at velocities below and around the fragmentation threshold. We developed two independent experimental setups with the same goal: to study the effects of bouncing, fragmentation, and mass transfer in free particle-particle collisions. The first setup is an evacuated drop tower with a free-fall height of 1.5 m, providing us with 0.56 s of microgravity time, so that we observed collisions with velocities between 8 mm s{sup -1} and 2 m s{sup -1}. The second setup is designed to study the effect of partial fragmentation (when only one of the two aggregates is destroyed) and mass transfer in more detail. It allows for the measurement of the accretion efficiency because the samples are safely recovered after the encounter. At very low velocities, we found that bouncing was as expected, while the fragmentation velocity of 20 cm s{sup -1} was significantly lower than expected. We present the critical energy for disruptive collisions Q*, which were at least two orders of magnitude lower than previous experiments in the literature. In the wide range between bouncing and disruptive collisions, only one of the samples fragmented in the encounter, while the other gained mass. The accretion efficiency on the order of a few percentage points of the particle's mass depends on the impact velocity and the sample porosity. Our results will have consequences for dust evolution models in protoplanetary disks as well as for the strength of large, porous planetesimal bodies.

  9. Influence of driver nationality on the risk of causing vehicle collisions in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Lardelli, C; Luna, D; Jimenez, M; Bueno, C; Garcia, M; Galvez, V

    2002-01-01

    Study objective: To estimate the association between driver nationality and the risk of causing a collision between vehicles in motion. Design: Retrospective, matched by collision, case-control study. Setting: Collisions that occurred in Spain during the period from 1990 to 1999 were studied. Participants: Responsible (case) and non-responsible (control) drivers identified in the databases of the Dirección General de Tráfico (General Traffic Directorate) who were involved in a collisions between two or more four wheeled vehicles in motion, in which only one of the drivers had committed a traffic violation. Main results: Crude odds ratios (ORs) for the effect of driver nationality on the risk of causing a collision were significantly higher for foreign drivers than for Spanish drivers, and ranged from a minimum of 1.19 (95% CI 1.09 to 1.29) for Portuguese drivers to a maximum of 2.06 (1.88 to 2.27) for British drivers. Corresponding adjusted ORs were slightly lower, but were still significantly higher than 1 for all nationalities except Italian, Belgian, and American (USA). Adjusted ORs were usually higher for collisions that occurred in urban areas than on open roads. Conclusions: Authorities responsible for traffic safety, and drivers in general, should consider foreign drivers in Spain at particularly high risk for causing collisions, especially in urban areas. PMID:11964439

  10. Role of collisions in erosion of regolith during a lunar landing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Kyle J; Anand, Anshu; Metzger, Philip T; Hrenya, Christine M

    2013-02-01

    The supersonic gas plume of a landing rocket entrains lunar regolith, which is the layer of loose solids covering the lunar surface. This ejection is problematic due to scouring and dust impregnation of surrounding hardware, reduction in visibility for the crew, and spoofing of the landing sensors. To date, model predictions of erosion and ejection dynamics have been based largely on single-trajectory models in which the role of interparticle collisions is ignored. In the present work, the parameters affecting the erosion rate of monodisperse solids are investigated using the discrete element method (DEM). The drag and lift forces exerted by the rocket exhaust are incorporated via one-way coupling. The results demonstrate that interparticle collisions are frequent in the region immediately above the regolith surface; as many as 20% of particles are engaged in a collision at a given time. These collisions play an important role both in the erosion dynamics and in the final trajectories of particles. In addition, a direct assessment of the influence of collisions on the erosion rate is accomplished via a comparison between a "collisionless" DEM model and the original DEM model. This comparison shows that the erosion dynamics change drastically when collisions are considered and that the erosion rate is dependent on the collision parameters (coefficient of restitution and coefficient of friction). Physical explanations for these trends are provided.

  11. Collision effects of wind-power generators and other obstacles on birds.

    PubMed

    Drewitt, Allan L; Langston, Rowena H W

    2008-01-01

    There is extensive literature on avian mortality due to collision with man-made structures, including wind turbines, communication masts, tall buildings and windows, power lines, and fences. Many studies describe the consequences of bird-strike rather than address the causes, and there is little data based on long-term, standardized, and systematic assessments. Despite these limitations, it is apparent that bird-strike is a significant cause of mortality. It is therefore important to understand the effects of this mortality on bird populations. The factors which determine avian collision risk are described, including location, structural attributes, such as height and the use of lighting, weather conditions, and bird morphology and behavior. The results of incidental and more systematic observations of bird-strike due to a range of structures are presented and the implications of collision mortality for bird populations, particularly those of scarce and threatened species susceptible to collisions, are discussed. Existing measures for reducing collision mortality are described, both generally and specifically for each type of structure. It is concluded that, in some circumstances, collision mortality can adversely affect bird populations, and that greater effort is needed to derive accurate estimates of mortality levels locally, regionally, and nationally to better assess impacts on avian populations. Priority areas for future work are suggested, including further development of remote technology to monitor collisions, research into the causes of bird-strike, and the design of new, effective mitigation measures.

  12. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  13. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    DOE PAGES

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we alsomore » show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.« less

  14. Analysis of the necessity and the effectiveness of countermeasures to prevent a chain reaction of collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, Peter

    At present, the collision risk with space debris, which is increasingly endangering all spaceflight activities, is probably predominated by fragments from explosions of payloads and rocket upper stages in Earth orbits. In the future, interactive collisions between objects in Earth orbit could become the main source for the generation of fragments. The risk of a catastrophic collision, i.e. with the total destruction of the target object, is presently in the order of some per cent per year, and it will rise squared to the number of larger objects in Earth orbit. The larger fragments generated by such a collision could produce new catastrophic collisions and this could successively lead to the formation of an artificial debris belt in the way of a chain reaction. As a steady increase of the population will always lead to a chain reaction of collisions, the necessity of effective countermeasures is evident. Hence, in this paper the results of a new analysis of the possible evolution of the population in Earth orbit including fragment generation by collisions using an advanced version of the simulation program CHAIN will be presented. Of special interest in this concern is the analysis of the effectiveness of the different kinds of possible countermeasures.

  15. Asymmetry in the Collision Judgments of People With Homonymous Field Defects and Left Hemispatial Neglect

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Kevin E.; Woods, Russell L.; Goldstein, Robert B.; Peli, Eli; Luo, Gang; Bowers, Alex R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Although the impact of homonymous visual field defects (HFDs) on mobility has been investigated previously, the emphasis has been on obstacle detection. Relatively little is known about HFD patients' ability to judge collisions once an obstacle is detected. We investigated this using a walking simulator. Methods. Patients with HFDs (n = 29) and subjects with normal vision (NV; n = 21) were seated in front of a large screen on which a visual simulation of walking was displayed. They made collision judgments for a human figure that appeared for 1 second at lateral offsets from the virtual walking path. A perceived-collision threshold was calculated for right and left sides. Results. Symmetrical collision thresholds (same on left and right sides) were measured for participants with NV (n = 21), and right (n = 9) and left (n = 7) HFD without hemispatial neglect. Participants with left neglect (n = 10) showed significant asymmetry with thresholds smaller (compared to the NV group and other HFD groups) on the blind (P < 0.001) and larger on the seeing (P = 0.05) sides. Despite the asymmetry, the overall width of the zone of perceived collision risk was not different, suggesting a relatively uniform rightward deviation in judgments of the left neglect group. Conclusions. Left neglect was associated with rightward asymmetry in collision judgments, which may cause collisions on the left side even when an obstacle is detected. These behaviors may represent the spatial misperceptions in body midline described previously in patients with left neglect. PMID:26120818

  16. Collision effects of wind-power generators and other obstacles on birds.

    PubMed

    Drewitt, Allan L; Langston, Rowena H W

    2008-01-01

    There is extensive literature on avian mortality due to collision with man-made structures, including wind turbines, communication masts, tall buildings and windows, power lines, and fences. Many studies describe the consequences of bird-strike rather than address the causes, and there is little data based on long-term, standardized, and systematic assessments. Despite these limitations, it is apparent that bird-strike is a significant cause of mortality. It is therefore important to understand the effects of this mortality on bird populations. The factors which determine avian collision risk are described, including location, structural attributes, such as height and the use of lighting, weather conditions, and bird morphology and behavior. The results of incidental and more systematic observations of bird-strike due to a range of structures are presented and the implications of collision mortality for bird populations, particularly those of scarce and threatened species susceptible to collisions, are discussed. Existing measures for reducing collision mortality are described, both generally and specifically for each type of structure. It is concluded that, in some circumstances, collision mortality can adversely affect bird populations, and that greater effort is needed to derive accurate estimates of mortality levels locally, regionally, and nationally to better assess impacts on avian populations. Priority areas for future work are suggested, including further development of remote technology to monitor collisions, research into the causes of bird-strike, and the design of new, effective mitigation measures. PMID:18566097

  17. Studies of relativistic heavy ion collisions at the AGS (Experiment 814)

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    During the past year, the Pittsburgh group has continued to work with the E814 collaboration in carrying out AGS Experiment 814. We present here a brief history of the experiment, followed by a detailed report of the analysis work being pursued at the University of Pittsburgh. As originally proposed, Experiment 814 is a study of both extreme peripheral collisions and the transition from peripheral to central collisions in relativistic heavy ion-nucleus interactions. We are studying relativistic heavy ion interactions with nuclei in two types of collisions: (a) extreme peripheral collisions of large impact parameter, and (b) central collisions with high transverse energy in the final state. The experiment emphasizes the measurement of overall event characteristics, in particular energy flow measurements and a precise measurement of the particle charge, momentum, and energy in the forward direction. This permits measurements of cross sections and rapidity densities as a function of the transverse energy for leading baryons emitted into regions of larger rapidity. Combining the energy flow measurements as a function of rapidity with the spectra of leading baryons provides information on the impact parameter dependence of the nuclear stopping of the projectile in relativistic heavy ion collisions. In 1988, the scope of Experiment 814 was enlarged to include a search for strange matter in central collisions, the first results of which have been published, and analysis on a longer run taken in 1990 is still under way.

  18. Role of collisions in erosion of regolith during a lunar landing.

    PubMed

    Berger, Kyle J; Anand, Anshu; Metzger, Philip T; Hrenya, Christine M

    2013-02-01

    The supersonic gas plume of a landing rocket entrains lunar regolith, which is the layer of loose solids covering the lunar surface. This ejection is problematic due to scouring and dust impregnation of surrounding hardware, reduction in visibility for the crew, and spoofing of the landing sensors. To date, model predictions of erosion and ejection dynamics have been based largely on single-trajectory models in which the role of interparticle collisions is ignored. In the present work, the parameters affecting the erosion rate of monodisperse solids are investigated using the discrete element method (DEM). The drag and lift forces exerted by the rocket exhaust are incorporated via one-way coupling. The results demonstrate that interparticle collisions are frequent in the region immediately above the regolith surface; as many as 20% of particles are engaged in a collision at a given time. These collisions play an important role both in the erosion dynamics and in the final trajectories of particles. In addition, a direct assessment of the influence of collisions on the erosion rate is accomplished via a comparison between a "collisionless" DEM model and the original DEM model. This comparison shows that the erosion dynamics change drastically when collisions are considered and that the erosion rate is dependent on the collision parameters (coefficient of restitution and coefficient of friction). Physical explanations for these trends are provided. PMID:23496503

  19. Excitation Mechanisms in Moderate-Energy Na+-He and K+-He Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Shigetomo; Hattori, Takehito; Shimakura, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Excitation mechanisms in Na+-He and K+-He collisions were studied at laboratory collision energies of 1000 ≤ Elab ≤ 1500 eV by differential scattering spectroscopy. Extensive measurements were performed at Elab = 1500 eV. Double differential cross sections σ(Θ)k were measured over a wide range of center-of-mass scattering angles, 7.3 ≤ Θ ≤ 173°, by detecting all the scattered particles (Na+, Na, K+, K, He+, and He), where the subscript k denotes the number of exit channels in the reactions. At the collision energy of Elab = 1500 eV, one- and two-electron excitations were observed appreciably for the Na+-He collisions, while only one-electron excitations were observed in the K+-He collisions. The analyses of the experimental results for these collision systems indicate that the electronic transitions in the Na+-He and K+-He collisions take place at the internuclear distances of R < RC = 0.63 × 10-10 m [potential height V(R) > 49 eV] and R < RC = 0.80 × 10-10 m [V(R) > 36 eV], respectively. For these asymmetric systems, at Elab= 1500 eV, the electronic transition probabilities around the threshold angles are so small that the integral excitation cross sections have small values of Sex < 1.2 × 10-21 m2.

  20. Latest Electroweak Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The latest results in electroweak physics from proton anti-proton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron recorded by the CDF detector are presented. The results provide constraints on parton distribution functions, the mass of the Higgs boson and beyond the Standard Model physics.

  1. Activating main belt comets by collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maindl, T. I.; Haghighipour, N.; Schäfer, C.; Speith, R.

    2016-02-01

    Since their identification as a new class of bodies by Hsieh and Jewitt in 2006 active asteroids (or Main Belt Comets, MBCs) have attracted a great deal of interest. Given that sublimation of volatile material (presumably water-ice) drives MBC activity, these bodies are probable candidates for delivering a significant amount of Earth's water. Dynamical studies suggest in-situ formation of MBCs as the remnants of the break-up of large icy asteroids. Also, collisions between MBCs and small objects might have exposed sub-surface water-ice triggering the cometary activity of these bodies. In order to advance the effort of understanding the nature of MBC activation, we have investigated these collision processes by simulating the impacts in detail using a smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) approach that includes material strength and fracture models. Our simulations cover a range of impact velocities (between 0.5 km/s and 5.3 km/s) and angles, allowing m-sized impactors to erode enough of an MBC's surface to expose volatiles and trigger its activation. We also varied the material strength of the active asteroid's surface to study its influence on crater depths and shapes. As expected, depending on the impact energy, impact angle, and MBC's material strength we observe different crater depths. Across all scenarios however, our results show that the crater depths do not exceed a few meters. This implies that if the activity of MBCs is due to sublimating water-ice, ice has to exist in no deeper than a few meters from the surface.

  2. New diffraction results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Terashi, Koji; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-05-01

    We present new results from studies on diffractive dijet production and exclusive production of dijet and diphoton obtained by the CDF Collaboration in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron.

  3. Electron Collisions in a Magneto-Optical Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dech, Jeffery Michael

    Measurements of the multiple ionization cross section ratios of Cesium were performed with ion time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopy with a magneto-optical trap (MOT) apparatus, updating the previous measurement which dates back almost a century. Results are presented for collisions at energies of 50 eV to 120 eV. With a MOT, experiments can be performed with trapped, cold atomic targets which allow for unparalleled accuracy and experiments with signicant excited state target fractions above those achievable in most atomic beam experiments. A basic overview of optical cooling trapping, electron collision and atomic phenomena are presented. Experimental studies of electrons with Argon and Cesium targets were performed, measuring the multiple ionization ratios with ion TOF spectroscopy. The experimental apparatus and analysis methods are described in detail. Results are compared with previous measurements of multiple ionization ratios for both targets. Agreement within experimental error is found with the results of Tate and Smith across the energy range.

  4. Bose-Einstein correlations in pp and PbPb collisions with ALICE at the LHC

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    We report on the results of identical pion femtoscopy at the LHC. The Bose-Einstein correlation analysis was performed on the large-statistics ALICE p+p at sqrt{s}= 0.9 TeV and 7 TeV datasets collected during 2010 LHC running and the first Pb+Pb dataset at sqrt{s_NN}= 2.76 TeV. Detailed pion femtoscopy studies in heavy-ion collisions have shown that emission region sizes ("HBT radii") decrease with increasing pair momentum, which is understood as a manifestation of the collective behavior of matter. 3D radii were also found to universally scale with event multiplicity. In p+p collisions at 7 TeV one measures multiplicities which are comparable with those registered in peripheral AuAu and CuCu collisions at RHIC, so direct comparisons and tests of scaling laws are now possible. We show the results of double-differential 3D pion HBT analysis, as a function of multiplicity and pair momentum. The results for two collision energies are compared to results obtained in the heavy-ion collisions at similar multiplicity and p+p collisions at lower energy. We identify the relevant scaling variables for the femtoscopic radii and discuss the similarities and differences to results from heavy-ions. The observed trends give insight into the soft particle production mechanism in p+p collisions and suggest that a self-interacting collective system may be created in sufficiently high multiplicity events. First results for the central Pb+Pb collisions are also shown. A significant increase of the reaction zone volume and lifetime in comparison to RHIC is observed. Signatures of collective hydrodynamics-like behavior of the system are also apparent, and are compared to model predictions.

  5. A method of inferring collision ratio based on maneuverability of own ship under critical collision conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Youngjun; Rhee, Key-Pyo; Ahn, Kyoungsoo

    2013-06-01

    In constructing a collision avoidance system, it is important to determine the time for starting collision avoidance maneuver. Many researchers have attempted to formulate various indices by applying a range of techniques. Among these indices, collision risk obtained by combining Distance to the Closest Point of Approach (DCPA) and Time to the Closest Point of Approach (TCPA) information with fuzzy theory is mostly used. However, the collision risk has a limit, in that membership functions of DCPA and TCPA are empirically determined. In addition, the collision risk is not able to consider several critical collision conditions where the target ship fails to take appropriate actions. It is therefore necessary to design a new concept based on logical approaches. In this paper, a collision ratio is proposed, which is the expected ratio of unavoidable paths to total paths under suitably characterized operation conditions. Total paths are determined by considering categories such as action space and methodology of avoidance. The International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (1972) and collision avoidance rules (2001) are considered to solve the slower ship's dilemma. Different methods which are based on a constant speed model and simulated speed model are used to calculate the relative positions between own ship and target ship. In the simulated speed model, fuzzy control is applied to determination of command rudder angle. At various encounter situations, the time histories of the collision ratio based on the simulated speed model are compared with those based on the constant speed model.

  6. Efficient ALL vs. ALL collision risk analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, D.; Paskowitz, M.; Agueda, A.; Garcia, G.; Molina, M.

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, the space debris has gained a lot of attention due to the increasing amount of uncontrolled man-made objects orbiting the Earth. This population poses a significant and constantly growing thread to operational satellites. In order to face this thread in an independent manner, ESA has launched an initiative for the development of a European SSA System where GMV is participating via several activities. Apart from those activities financed by ESA, GMV has developed closeap, a tool for efficient conjunction assessment and collision probability prediction. ESÁs NAPEOS has been selected as computational engine and numerical propagator to be used in the tool, which can be considered as an add-on to the standard NAPEOS package. closeap makes use of the same orbit computation, conjunction assessment and collision risk algorithms implemented in CRASS, but at the same time both systems are completely independent. Moreover, the implementation in closeap has been validated against CRASS with excellent results. This paper describes the performance improvements implemented in closeap at algorithm level to ensure that the most time demanding scenarios (e.g., all catalogued objects are analysed against each other - all vs. all scenarios -) can be analysed in a reasonable amount of time with commercial-off-the-shelf hardware. However, the amount of space debris increases steadily due to the human activities. Thus, the number of objects involved in a full collision assessment is expected to increase notably and, consequently, the computational cost, which scales as the square of the number of objects, will increase as well. Additionally, orbit propagation algorithms that are computationally expensive might be needed to predict more accurately the trajectories of the space debris. In order to cope with such computational needs, the next natural step in the development of collision assessment tools is the use of parallelization techniques. In this paper we investigate

  7. Collision and Break-off : Numerical models and surface observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottrill, Andrew; van Hunen, Jeroen; Allen, Mark

    2013-04-01

    results in this area indicate the stress experienced by the overriding lithosphere changes through the collision and slab break-off process. This change is stress affects the topography, but also offers another observable for understanding collision zones. We relate our numerical model to Arabia-Eurasia collision which is thought to have begun around 35 Ma (Allen and Armstrong, 2008; Vincent et al., 2007). The post collision basin predicted by our numerical model can be associated with the Miocene carbonate deposits of the Qom formation (Morley et al., 2009). These Miocene carbonate deposits are found at approximately 200-300km from the suture zone and are stratigraphically "sandwiched" between terrestrial clastic sedimentary formations. The position of these deposits shows that they are intimately related with the collision process, and that this area of the overriding plate has dipped below sea level for about 10 Myrs during the Early Miocene. Another geographic area that offers possibility for observation of topography change produced during continental collision is the Italian Apennines. Here, slab detachment is proposed to have started around 30 Ma and a tear propagated north to south along Italy (Wortel, 2000). Van der Meulen et al., (1998) observed a period of basin formation followed by uplift using the sedimentary record. Migrating depocentres were interpreted as evidence of a slab tear propagating north to south. These depocentres are located on the overriding plate with the maximum observed depression around 100 km from the suture (Ascione et al., 2012). These observed depocentres could be analogous to the depressions observed in our numerical models. Allen, M. B. and Armstrong, H. A.: Arabia-Eurasia collision and the forcing of mid-Cenozoic global cooling, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 265(1-2), 52-58, doi:10.1016/j.palaeo.2008.04.021, 2008. Andrews, E. R. and Billen, M. I.: Rheologic controls on the dynamics of slab detachment

  8. Photon scattering in muon collisions.

    SciTech Connect

    Klasen, M.

    1997-12-18

    The authors estimate the benefit of muon colliders for photon physics. They calculate the rate at which photons are emitted from muon beams in different production mechanisms. Bremsstrahlung is reduced, beamstrahlung disappears, and laser backscattering suffers from a bad conversion of the incoming to the outgoing photon beam in addition to requiring very short wavelengths. As a consequence, the cross sections for jet photoproduction in {mu}p and {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collisions are reduced by factors of 2.2 and 5 compared to ep and e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} machines. However, the cross sections remain sizable and measurable giving access to the photon and proton parton densities down to x values of 10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup {minus}4}.

  9. A rapid method of estimating the collision frequencies between the earth and the earth-crossing bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Shin-Yi; Kessler, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The present study examines a very fast method of calculating the collision frequency between two low-eccentricity orbiting bodies for evaluating the evolution of earth-orbiting objects such as space debris. The results are very accurate and the required computer time is negligible. The method is now applied without modification to calculate the collision frequencies for moderately and highly eccentric orbits.

  10. Collisions in the Kuiper belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael

    2007-07-01

    For most of the 15 year history of observations of Kuiper belt objects, it has been speculated that impacts must have played a major role in shaping the physical and chemical characteristics of these objects, yet little direct evidence of the effects of such impacts has been seen. The past 18 months, however, have seen an explosion of major new discoveries giving some of the first insights into the influence of this critical process. From a diversity of observations we have been led to the hypotheses that: {1} satellite-forming impacts must have been common in the Kuiper belt; {2} such impacts led to significant chemical modification; and {3} the outcomes of these impacts are sufficiently predictable that we can now find and study these impact-derived systems by the chemical and physical attributes of both the satellites and the primaries. If our picture is correct, we now have in hand for the first time a set of incredibly powerful tools to study the frequency and outcome of collisions in the outer solar system. Here we propose three linked projects that would answer questions critical to the multiple prongs of our hypothesis. In these projects we will study the chemical effects of collisions through spectrophotometric observations of collisionally formed satellites and through the search for additional satellites around primaries with potential impact signatures, and we will study the physical effects of impacts through the examination of tidal evolution in proposed impact systems. The intensive HST program that we propose here will allow us to fully test our new hypotheses and will provide the ability to obtain the first extensive insights into outer solar system impact processes.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, J; Paul E. Johns, P

    2007-05-23

    Wild pig (Sus scrofa) collisions with vehicles are known to occur in the United States, but only minimal information describing these accidents has been reported. In an effort to better characterize these accidents, data were collected from 179 wild pig-vehicle collisions from a location in west central South Carolina. Data included accident parameters pertaining to the animals involved, time, location, and human impacts. The age structure of the animals involved was significantly older than that found in the population. Most collisions involved single animals; however, up to seven animals were involved in individual accidents. As the number of animals per collision increased, the age and body mass of the individuals involved decreased. The percentage of males was significantly higher in the single-animal accidents. Annual attrition due to vehicle collisions averaged 0.8 percent of the population. Wild pig-vehicle collisions occurred year-round and throughout the 24-hour daily time period. Most accidents were at night. The presence of lateral barriers was significantly more frequent at the collision locations. Human injuries were infrequent but potentially serious. The mean vehicle damage estimate was $1,173.

  12. Testing hydrodynamic descriptions of p+p collisions at √{s}=7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habich, M.; Miller, G. A.; Romatschke, P.; Xiang, W.

    2016-07-01

    In high-energy collisions of heavy ions, experimental findings of collective flow are customarily associated with the presence of a thermalized medium expanding according to the laws of hydrodynamics. Recently, the ATLAS, CMS, and ALICE experiments found signals of the same type and magnitude in ultrarelativistic proton-proton collisions. In this study, the state-of-the-art hydrodynamic model SONIC is used to simulate the systems created in p+p collisions. By varying the size of the second-order transport coefficients, the range of applicability of hydrodynamics itself to the systems created in p+p collisions is quantified. It is found that hydrodynamics can give quantitatively reliable results for the particle spectra and the elliptic momentum anisotropy coefficient v_2. Using a simple geometric model of the proton based on the elastic form factor leads to results of similar type and magnitude to those found in experiment when allowing for a small bulk viscosity coefficient.

  13. A description of the pseudorapidity distributions in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, H. L.; Deng, H. P.

    2015-09-01

    The charged particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions are classified into two parts: One is from the hot and dense matter created in collisions. The other is from leading particles. The hot and dense matter is assumed to expand and generate particles according to BJP hydrodynamics, a theory put forward by A. Bialas, R.A. Janik and R. Peschanski. The leading particles are argued to possess a Gaussian rapidity distribution with the normalization constant equaling the number of participants. A comparison is made between the theoretical results and the experimental measurements performed by BRAHMS and PHOBOS Collaborations at BNL-RHIC in Au-Au and Cu-Cu collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV and by ALICE Collaboration at CERN-LHC in Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV. The theoretical results are well consistent with experimental data.

  14. A collision avoidance system for workpiece protection

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, D.J.; Weber, T.M.; Novak, J.L.; Maslakowski, J.E.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes an application of Sandia`s non-contact capacitive sensing technology for collision avoidance during the manufacturing of rocket engine thrust chambers. The collision avoidance system consists of an octagon shaped collar with a capacitive proximity sensor mounted on each face. The sensors produced electric fields which extend several inches from the face of the collar and detect potential collisions between the robot and the workpiece. A signal conditioning system processes the sensor output and provides varying voltage signals to the robot controller for stopping the robot.

  15. Vorticity in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-06-01

    We study the event-by-event generation of flow vorticity in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Au +Au collisions and CERN Large Hadron Collider Pb +Pb collisions by using the hijing model. Different definitions of the vorticity field and velocity field are considered. A variety of properties of the vorticity are explored, including the impact parameter dependence, the collision energy dependence, the spatial distribution, the event-by-event fluctuation of the magnitude and azimuthal direction, and the time evolution. In addition, the spatial distribution of the flow helicity is also studied.

  16. Collision rates and the determination of atmospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielfiedel, A.; Feautrier, N.; Guitou, M.; Belyaev, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    Non-LTE modelisation of stellar atmospheres requires an accurate knowledge of collisional rate coefficients (mainly with H atoms) that compete with radiative rates to populate the atomic levels. In the framework of the SAM-GAIA project, we carry out, with colleagues from Uppsala, St. Petersburg and Nice, an interdisciplinary work combining quantum chemistry, collision physics and astrophysical modeling. Present studies concern collisional excitation of Mg and O by H-atoms. In the particular case of Mg, 15 electronic states of the MgH molecule as well as the associated couplings that mix the states during the collision were calculated. The resulting cross sections and rate coefficients point out the sensitivity of the results with the quantum chemistry data. Our detailed calculations show that the usual approximate formulae (Drawin, Kaulakys) lead to errors by factors up to 10^6. Consequences on atmospheric parameters are analyzed.

  17. Study On Electron Collisions With Zn-like W Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Mihailescu, A.; Pais, V.; Totolici, M. C.; Stancalie, V.

    2008-04-07

    The present work gives new refined results for electron impact excitation rates and collision strengths for transitions of type [Ar]3d{sup 10}4snl->[Ar]3d{sup 10}4sn';l', n, n' = 4,5, and {delta}J = 0,l in Zn-like W ion. We have examined the position and widths of the resonant states of type ls{sup 2}2s2p{sup 6}3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}3d{sup 10}4s{sup 2}nl. Autoionizing states can radically alter the low temperature behavior of collision rates, and are a major contributor to opacity. Preliminary results for Auger rates are presented. Hartree-Fock calculations have been carried out followed by a configuration interaction (CI) in intermediate coupling using the suite of Cowan's codes.

  18. Atomic collisions with 33-TeV lead ions

    SciTech Connect

    Vane, C.R.; Datz, S.; Krause, H.F.

    1996-10-01

    Recent availability of relativistic and ultrarelativistic beams of heavy ions has permitted the first controlled studies of atomic collisions at energies sufficient to measure effects of several new basic phenomena. These include measurements substantiating recently predicted finite nuclear size effects resulting in a reduction in the total electronic energy loss of heavy ions in matter, and measurements of Coulomb collisions in which electrons are excited from the Dirac negative energy continuum. Measurements of total energy loss, free electron-positron pair production, and electron capture from pair production have been recently performed using 33-TeV Pb{sup 82+} ions from the CERN SPS accelerator in Geneva. Results of these studies are presented, along with comparisons with relevant theory.

  19. Development of 3 DOF manipulator using ER fluid clutches for reduction of collision force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boku, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Taro

    2009-02-01

    .With robots and users more commonly sharing space such as in the fields of medicine and home automation, the possibility of a physical collision has increased, even though many robots use actuators with high-ratio gear trains to minimize the effects of impact. We developed a 3-DOF manipulator having a smart flexible joint using an ER fluid and a sensor-equipped pneumatic cushion. Results of position control and collision experiments using the manipulator demonstrated its effectiveness.

  20. Compact Collision Kernels for Hard Sphere and Coulomb Cross Sections; Fokker-Planck Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yongbin; Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2008-12-31

    A compact collision kernel is derived for both hard sphere and Coulomb cross sections. The difference between hard sphere interaction and Coulomb interaction is characterized by a parameter {eta}. With this compact collision kernel, the calculation of Fokker-Planck coefficients can be done for both the Coulomb and hard sphere interactions. The results for arbitrary order Fokker-Planck coefficients are greatly simplified. An alternate form for the Coulomb logarithm is derived with concern to the temperature relaxation in a binary plasma.

  1. Direct Experimental Evidence of Nonequilibrium Energy Sharing in Dissipative Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, G.; Maurenzig, P. R.; Olmi, A.; Bini, M.; Calamai, S.; Meucci, F.; Pasquali, G.; Poggi, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Gobbi, A.; Hildenbrand, K. D.

    1997-02-01

    Primary and secondary masses of heavy reaction products have been deduced from kinematics and energy-time-of-flight measurements, respectively, for the direct and reverse collisions of 100Mo with 120Sn at 14.1A MeV. Direct experimental evidence of the correlation of energy sharing with net mass transfer and model-independent results on the evolution of the average excitation from equal-energy to equal-temperature partition are presented.

  2. Charge transfer in energetic Li^2+ - H collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancev, I.

    2008-07-01

    The total cross sections for charge transfer in Li^2+ - H collisions have been calculated, using the four-body first Born approximation with correct boundary conditions (CB1-4B) and four-body continuum distorted wave method (CDW-4B) in the energy range 10 - 5000 keV/amu. Present results call for additional experimental data at higher impact energies than presently available.

  3. Collision-induced shifts of Rydberg levels of strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafi, M.; Bhatia, K. S.; Makdisi, Y. Y.; Philips, G.

    2003-05-01

    Measurements of spectral line shifts induced by collisions with rare gas perturbers are reported. High Rydberg states were prepared by multiphoton excitation using an excimer pumped tunable dye laser. A thermionic detector inside a heat pipe was used to collect the ionization products resulting from excited states. Analysis of the data for the shifts of the absorption transition to 5snd 1D 2 states in strontium is presented.

  4. Pion interferometry in {sup 28}Si + Pb central collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Nu; E814 Collaboration: BNL-GSI-McGill Univ.-Univ. of Pittsburg-SUNY Stony Brook-Univ. of Sao Paulo-Wayne State Univ.-Yale Univ.

    1994-08-01

    Two-pion correlation functions have been studied using the E814 apparatus in 14.6 A{center_dot}GeV/c {sup 28}Si + Pb central collisions. Results of the correlation functions for pions from the RQMD event generator are compared to the data and show that a source with RMS radius of 8.3 fm is compartable with the experimental data.

  5. Collision Rate and Symmetry Factor in Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jian; Wang, Qun

    2013-03-01

    The elastic and inelastic collision rates in a gluon gas are calculated. The symmetry factor and the phase space integral are discussed in detail. With a symmetry factor and well constrained phase space, the same result can be obtained as that of the full phase space without the factor. Such an equivalence is illustrated by analytic and numerical calculations for gg → gg and gg → ggg processes.

  6. Dynamic aperture studies during collisions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W., Ritson, D.

    1997-06-01

    The dynamic aperture during collisions in the LHC is mainly determined by the beam-beam interactions and by multipole errors of the high gradient quadrupoles in the interaction regions. The computer code JJIP has been modified to accommodate the LHC lattice configuration and parameters and is employed in this study. Simulations over a range of machine parameters are carried out, and results of preliminary investigation are presented.

  7. Effects of turbulence on the collision rate of cloud droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Orlando

    This dissertation concerns effects of air turbulence on the collision rate of atmospheric cloud droplets. This research was motivated by the speculation that air turbulence could enhance the collision rate thereby help transform cloud droplets to rain droplets in a short time as observed in nature. The air turbulence within clouds is assumed to be homogeneous and isotropic, and its small-scale motion (1 mm to 10 cm scales) is computationally generated by direct numerical integration of the full Navier-Stokes equations. Typical droplet and turbulence parameters of convective warm clouds are used to determine the Stokes numbers (St) and the nondimensional terminal velocities (Sv) which characterize droplet relative inertia and gravitational settling, respectively. A novel and efficient methodology for conducting direct numerical simulations (DNS) of hydrodynamically-interacting droplets in the context of cloud microphysics has been developed. This numerical approach solves the turbulent flow by the pseudo-spectral method with a large-scale forcing, and utilizes an improved superposition method to embed analytically the local, small-scale (10 mum to 1 mm) disturbance flows induced by the droplets. This hybrid representation of background turbulent air motion and the induced disturbance flows is then used to study the combined effects of hydrodynamic interactions and airflow turbulence on the motion and collisions of cloud droplets. Hybrid DNS results show that turbulence can increase the geometric collision kernel relative to the gravitational geometric kernel by as much as 42% due to enhanced radial relative motion and preferential concentration of droplets. The exact level of enhancements depends on the Taylor-microscale Reynolds number, turbulent dissipation rate, and droplet pair size ratio. One important finding is that turbulence has a relatively dominant effect on the collision process between droplets close in size as the gravitational collision mechanism

  8. Two-pion femtoscopy in p -Pb collisions at √{sN N}=5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; de, S.; de Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; de Falco, A.; de Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; de Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; di Bari, D.; di Mauro, A.; di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kadyshevskiy, V.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lokesh, K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martashvili, I.; Martin, N. A.; Martin Blanco, J.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; McDonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montano Zetina, L.; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Moreira de Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pereira da Costa, H.; Pereira de Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Rodriguez Manso, A.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seeder, K. S.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tarantola Peloni, A.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Maarel, J.; van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.; Alice Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    We report the results of the femtoscopic analysis of pairs of identical pions measured in p -Pb collisions at √{sN N}=5.02 TeV. Femtoscopic radii are determined as a function of event multiplicity and pair momentum in three spatial dimensions. As in the p p collision system, the analysis is complicated by the presence of sizable background correlation structures in addition to the femtoscopic signal. The radii increase with event multiplicity and decrease with pair transverse momentum. When taken at comparable multiplicity, the radii measured in p -Pb collisions, at high multiplicity and low pair transverse momentum, are 10%-20% higher than those observed in p p collisions but below those observed in A -A collisions. The results are compared to hydrodynamic predictions at large event multiplicity as well as discussed in the context of calculations based on gluon saturation.

  9. Leading-order anisotropic hydrodynamics for central collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nopoush, Mohammad; Strickland, Michael; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Bazow, Dennis; Heinz, Ulrich; Martinez, Mauricio

    2015-10-01

    We use leading-order anisotropic hydrodynamics to study an azimuthally symmetric boost-invariant quark-gluon plasma. We impose a realistic lattice-based equation of state and perform self-consistent anisotropic freeze-out to hadronic degrees of freedom. We then compare our results for the full spatiotemporal evolution of the quark-gluon plasma and its subsequent freeze-out to results obtained using 1+1D Israel-Stewart second-order viscous hydrodynamics. We find that for small shear viscosities, 4 π η /s ˜1 , the two methods agree well for nucleus-nucleus collisions; however, for large-shear-viscosity-to-entropy-density ratios or proton-nucleus collisions we find important corrections to the Israel-Stewart results for the final particle spectra and the total number of charged particles. Finally, we demonstrate that the total number of charged particles produced is a monotonically increasing function of 4 π η /s in Israel-Stewart viscous hydrodynamics, whereas in anisotropic hydrodynamics it has a maximum at 4 π η /s ˜10 . For all 4 π η /s >0 , we find that for Pb-Pb collisions Israel-Stewart viscous hydrodynamics predicts more dissipative particle production than anisotropic hydrodynamics.

  10. Two-dimensional model of resonant electron collisions with diatomic molecules and molecular cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vana, Martin; Hvizdos, David; Houfek, Karel; Curik, Roman; Greene, Chris H.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2016-05-01

    A simple model for resonant collisions of electrons with diatomic molecules with one electronic and one nuclear degree of freedom (2D model) which was solved numerically exactly within the time-independent approach was used to probe the local complex potential approximation and nonlocal approximation to nuclear dynamics of these collisions. This model was reformulated in the time-dependent picture and extended to model also electron collisions with molecular cations, especially with H2+.This model enables an assessment of approximate methods, such as the boomerang model or the frame transformation theory. We will present both time-dependent and time-independent results and show how we can use the model to extract deeper insight into the dynamics of the resonant collisions.

  11. Quarkonium production in high energyproton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions

    SciTech Connect

    del Valle, Z C; Corcella, G; Fleuret, F; Ferreiro, E G; Kartvelishvili, V; Kopeliovich, B; Lansberg, J P; Lourenco, C; Martinez, G; Papadimitriou, V; Satz, H; Scomparin, E; Ullrich, T; Teryaev, O; Vogt, R; Wang, J X

    2011-03-14

    We present a brief overview of the most relevant current issues related to quarkonium production in high energy proton-proton and proton-nucleus collisions along with some perspectives. After reviewing recent experimental and theoretical results on quarkonium production in pp and pA collisions, we discuss the emerging field of polarization studies. Afterwards, we report on issues related to heavy-quark production, both in pp and pA collisions, complemented by AA collisions. To put the work in broader perpectives, we emphasize the need for new observables to investigate the quarkonium production mechanisms and reiterate the qualities that make quarkonia a unique tool for many investigations in particle and nuclear physics.

  12. A fast conservative spectral solver for the nonlinear Boltzmann collision operator

    SciTech Connect

    Gamba, Irene M.; Haack, Jeffrey R.; Hu, Jingwei

    2014-12-09

    We present a conservative spectral method for the fully nonlinear Boltzmann collision operator based on the weighted convolution structure in Fourier space developed by Gamba and Tharkabhushnanam. This method can simulate a broad class of collisions, including both elastic and inelastic collisions as well as angularly dependent cross sections in which grazing collisions play a major role. The extension presented in this paper consists of factorizing the convolution weight on quadrature points by exploiting the symmetric nature of the particle interaction law, which reduces the computational cost and memory requirements of the method to O(M{sup 2}N{sup 4}logN) from the O(N{sup 6}) complexity of the original spectral method, where N is the number of velocity grid points in each velocity dimension and M is the number of quadrature points in the factorization, which can be taken to be much smaller than N. We present preliminary numerical results.

  13. Initial state fluctuations and final state correlations in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzum, Matthew; Petersen, Hannah

    2014-06-01

    We review the phenomenology and theory of bulk observables in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, focusing on recent developments involving event-by-event fluctuations in the initial stages of a heavy-ion collision, and how they manifest in observed correlations. We first define the relevant observables and show how each measurement is related to underlying theoretical quantities. Then we review the prevailing picture of the various stages of a collision, including the state-of-the-art modeling of the initial stages of a collision and subsequent hydrodynamic evolution, as well as hadronic scattering and freeze-out in the later stages. We then discuss the recent results that have shaped our current understanding and identify the challenges that remain. Finally, we point out open issues and the potential for progress in the field.

  14. The effect of electron collisions on rotational excitation of cometary water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xie, Xingfa; Mumma, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The e-H2O collisional rate for exciting rotational transitions in cometary water is evaluated for conditions found in Comet Halley. The e-H2O collisional rate exceeds that for excitation by neutral-neutral collisions at distances exceeding 3000 km from the cometary nucleus, in the case of the O sub 00 yields 1 sub 11 transition. The estimates are based on theoretical and experimental studies of e-H2O collisions, on ion and electron parameters acquired in-situ by instruments on the Giotto and Vega spacecraft, and on results obtained from models of the cometary ionosphere. The contribution of electron collisions may explain the need for large water-water cross-sections in models which neglect the effect of electrons. The importance of electron collisions is enhanced for populations of water molecules in regions where their rotational lines are optically thick.

  15. Propagation and oblique collision of ion-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized dusty electronegative plasma

    SciTech Connect

    El-Labany, S. K.; Behery, E. E.; El-Shamy, E. F.

    2013-12-15

    The propagation and oblique collision of ion-acoustic (IA) solitary waves in a magnetized dusty electronegative plasma consisting of cold mobile positive ions, Boltzmann negative ions, Boltzmann electrons, and stationary positive/negative dust particles are studied. The extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method is employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries equations and the corresponding expressions for the phase shifts after collision between two IA solitary waves. It turns out that the angle of collision, the temperature and density of negative ions, and the dust density of opposite polarity have reasonable effects on the phase shift. Clearly, the numerical results demonstrated that the IA solitary waves are delayed after the oblique collision. The current finding of this work is applicable in many plasma environments having negative ion species, such as D- and F-regions of the Earth's ionosphere and some laboratory plasma experiments.

  16. What we have (not)learned from the ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Paic, Guy

    2009-04-20

    The field of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is today a flourishing activity both on the experimental and on the theoretical side. Although the theoretical justifications to study these collisions was given already more than three decades ago and the experimental studies have a history of more than 25 years we are still very much in the dark as to the details of the processes and of the characteristics of the matter created in collisions. Increasing the energy of collisions has brought new insights but has also resulted with new challenges. In the present paper I will try from a personal perspective to report on the answers we have collected and on the problems we are faced with. The account is partial, taking into account that it is impossible to render justice to every aspect of the field.

  17. Charge-dependent azimuthal correlations of secondary particles in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okorokov, V.; Parfenov, P.

    2016-02-01

    The P/CP symmetry breaking in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) could be realized via transitions between local fluctuations of gauge fields. Azimuthal correlations which characterize the asymmetry of the emitted charged particles with respect to the reaction plane in non-central nucleus-nucleus collisions are the promising tools for experimental study of local P/CP violation in the strong interactions. The preliminary estimations of correlators within the model of chiral magnetic effect are presented for types of nuclei and collision energies corresponded to RHIC and the LHC beams for two various nuclear densities, namely, for approach of the hard sphere and for the two-component Fermi model. Besides of the correlator estimations for the symmetric collisions, the preliminary results for magnetic field in asymmetric Cu + Au collisions are also shown.

  18. Collisions of Free-floating Planets with Evolved Stars in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam; Rappaport, Saul; Fregeau, John

    2001-12-01

    We estimate the rate of collisions between stars and free-floating planets (FFPs) in globular clusters, in particular, the collision of FFPs with red giant branch (RGB) stars. Recent dynamical simulations imply that the density of such objects could exceed ~106 pc-3 near the cores of rich globular clusters. We show that in these clusters ~5%-10% of all RGB stars near the core would suffer a collision with an FFP and that such a collision can spin up the RGB star's envelope by an order of magnitude. In turn, the higher rotation rates may lead to enhanced mass-loss rates on the RGB, which could result in bluer horizontal branch (HB) stars. Hence, it is plausible that the presence of a large population of FFPs in a globular cluster can influence the distribution of stars on the HB of that cluster to a detectable degree.

  19. What we have (not)learned from the ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paic, Guy

    2009-04-01

    The field of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions is today a flourishing activity both on the experimental and on the theoretical side. Although the theoretical justifications to study these collisions was given already more than three decades ago and the experimental studies have a history of more than 25 years we are still very much in the dark as to the details of the processes and of the characteristics of the matter created in collisions. Increasing the energy of collisions has brought new insights but has also resulted with new challenges. In the present paper I will try from a personal perspective to report on the answers we have collected and on the problems we are faced with. The account is partial, taking into account that it is impossible to render justice to every aspect of the field.

  20. ELLIPTIC FLOW, INITIAL ECCENTRICITY AND ELLIPTIC FLOW FLUCTUATIONS IN HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NOUICER,R.; ALVER, B.; BACK, B.B.; BAKER, M.D.; BALLINTIJN, M.; BARTON, D.S.; ET AL.

    2007-02-19

    We present measurements of elliptic flow and event-by-event fluctuations established by the PHOBOS experiment. Elliptic flow scaled by participant eccentricity is found to be similar for both systems when collisions with the same number of participants or the same particle area density are compared. The agreement of elliptic flow between Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions provides evidence that the matter is created in the initial stage of relativistic heavy ion collisions with transverse granularity similar to that of the participant nucleons. The event-by-event fluctuation results reveal that the initial collision geometry is translated into the final state azimuthal particle distribution, leading to an event-by-event proportionality between the observed elliptic flow and initial eccentricity.