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Sample records for ion-enhanced field emission

  1. The quantum mechanics of ion-enhanced field emission and how it influences microscale gas breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yingjie; Go, David B.

    2014-09-14

    The presence of a positive gas ion can enhance cold electron field emission by deforming the potential barrier and increasing the tunneling probability of electrons—a process known as ion-enhanced field emission. In microscale gas discharges, ion-enhanced field emission produces additional emission from the cathode and effectively reduces the voltage required to breakdown a gaseous medium at the microscale (<10 μm). In this work, we enhance classic field emission theory by determining the impact of a gaseous ion on electron tunneling and compute the effect of ion-enhanced field emission on the breakdown voltage. We reveal that the current density for ion-enhanced field emission retains the same scaling as vacuum cold field emission and that this leads to deviations from traditional breakdown theory at microscale dimensions.

  2. Microscale gas breakdown: ion-enhanced field emission and the modified Paschen’s curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, D. B.; Venkattraman, A.

    2014-12-01

    Gas breakdown at microscale dimensions has been of great interest to the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and plasma communities for nearly 15 years as the first reports of deviations from traditional theory began to emerge. Since those first reports, a significant amount of work has investigated why gas breakdown deviates from the classic Paschen’s Law when the dimensions are in the range of 1-10 µm. Nearly universally, these deviations that form the so-called modified Paschen’s curve have been attributed to electron field emission, where electrons directly tunnel from the cathode into the gas due to the very high electric fields at microscale dimensions. Furthermore, because of ionization in the gas gap, field emission is enhanced by positive ions and thus is inherently coupled to the gas and discharge dynamics. Progress in understanding the mechanisms and physics of this process has in turn led to new ideas and devices that capitalize on the high surface-to-volume ratio in microscale dimensions and take advantage of cathode emission processes. This topical review summarizes and analyzes the numerous experimental, computational and analytical works on breakdown at microscale dimensions, discusses implications and new areas emerging in microscale devices that take advantage of field emission and presents perspectives looking ahead at new opportunities for field emission-driven microplasmas.

  3. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  4. Field emission electron source

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  5. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. Raghavan, S.; Duesberg, G. S.; Pratap, R.

    2014-09-08

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ∼10 nA μm{sup −1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  6. Fundamental properties of field emission-driven direct current microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbach, Paul; Go, David B.

    2012-11-01

    For half a century, it has been known that the onset of field emission in direct current microdischarges with gap sizes less than 10 μm can lead to breakdown at applied voltages far less than predicted by Paschen's law. It is still unclear how field emission affects other fundamental plasma properties at this scale. In this work, a one-dimensional fluid model is used to predict basic scaling laws for fundamental properties including ion density, electric field due to space charge, and current-voltage relations in the pre-breakdown regime. Computational results are compared with approximate analytic solutions. It is shown that field emission provides an abundance of cathode electrons, which in turn create large ion concentrations through ionizing collisions well before Paschen's criterion for breakdown is met. Breakdown due to ion-enhanced field emission occurs when the electric field due to space charge becomes comparable to the applied electric field. Simple scaling analysis of the 1D Poisson equation demonstrates that an ion density of n+ ≈ 0.1VAɛ0/qd2 is necessary to significantly distort the electric field. Defining breakdown in terms of this critical ion density leads analytically to a simple, effective secondary emission coefficient γ' of the same mathematical form initially suggested by Boyle and Kisliuk [Phys. Rev. 97, 255 (1955)].

  7. Properties of a field emission-driven Townsend discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbach, Paul; Go, David

    2012-10-01

    For half a century, it has been known that the onset of field emission in direct current (DC) microplasmas with gap sizes less than 10 μm can lead to breakdown at applied voltages far less than predicted by Paschen's law. It is still unclear how field emission affects other fundamental plasma properties at this scale. In this work, a one-dimensional fluid model is used to predict basic scaling laws for fundamental properties such as ion density, electric field due to space charge, and current voltage relations in the pre-breakdown regime. Computational results are compared with approximate analytic solutions. It is shown that ionizing collisions by field-emitted electrons produce significant ion densities well before Paschen's criteria for breakdown is met. When positive space charge densities become sufficiently large, the effect of ion-enhanced field emission leads to breakdown. Defining breakdown mathematically using a solvability condition leads to a full modified Paschen's curve, while defining it physically in terms of a critical ion density leads analytically to an effective secondary emission coefficient, γ', of the form initially suggested by Boyle and Kisliuk.footnotetextBoyle, W.S. and Kisliuk, P., Phys. Rev. 97, 255 (1955).

  8. Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P.; Patil, D. S.

    2011-10-15

    The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

  9. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N.; Balooch, Mehdi; McLean, II, William; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2002-01-01

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  10. The JPL Field Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hook, Simon J.; Kahle, Anne B.

    1995-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Field Emission Spectrometer (FES) was built by Designs and Prototypes based on a set of functional requirements supplied by JPL. The instrument has a spectral resolution of 6 wavenumbers (wn) and can acquire spectra from either the Mid Infrared (3-5 mu m) or the Thermal Infrared (8-12 pm) depending on whether the InSb or HgCdTe detector is installed respectively. The instrument consists of an optical head system unit and battery. The optical head which is tripod mounted includes the interferometer and detector dewar assembly. Wavelength calibration of the interferometer is achieved using a Helium-Neon laser diode. The dewar needs replenishing with liquid Nitrogen approximately every four hours. The system unit includes the controls for operation and the computer used for acquiring viewing and processing spectra. Radiometric calibration is achieved with an external temperature-controlled blackbody that mounts on the fore-optics of the instrument. The blackbody can be set at 5 C increments between 10 and 55 C. The instrument is compact and weighs about 33 kg. Both the wavelength calibration and radiometric calibration of the instrument have been evaluated. The wavelength calibration was checked by comparison of the position of water features in a spectrum of the sky with their position in the output from a high resolution atmospheric model. The results indicatethat the features in the sky spectrum are within 6-8 wn of their position ill the model spectrum. The radiometric calibration was checked by first calibrating the instrument using the external blackbody supplied with the instrument and then measuring the radiance from another external blackbody at a series of temperatures. The temperatures of these radiance spectra were then recovered by inventing Planck's law and the recovered temperatures compared lo the measured blackbody temperature. These results indicate that radiometric calibration is good to 0.5 C over the range of

  11. Field Emission and Nanostructure of Carbon Films

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, V.I.; Lowndes, D.H.; Baylor, L.R.

    1999-11-29

    The results of field emission measurements of various forms of carbon films are reported. It is shown that the films nanostructure is a crucial factor determining the field emission properties. In particular, smooth, pulsed-laser deposited amorphous carbon films with both high and low sp3 contents are poor field emitters. This is similar to the results obtained for smooth nanocrystalline, sp2-bonded carbon films. In contrast, carbon films prepared by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HE-CVD) exhibit very good field emission properties, including low emission turn-on fields, high emission site density, and excellent durability. HF-CVD carbon films were found to be predominantly sp2-bonded. However, surface morphology studies show that these films are thoroughly nanostructured, which is believed to be responsible for their promising field emission properties.

  12. Carbon nanotube emitters and field emission triode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhiqin; Zhang, Binglin; Yao, Ning; Zhang, Lan; Ma, Huizhong; Deng, Jicai

    2006-05-01

    Based on our study on field emission from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), we experimentally manufactured field emission display (FED) triode with a MWNTs cold cathode, and demonstrated an excellent performance of MWNTs as field emitters. The measured luminance of the phosphor screens was 1.8*10^(3) cd/m2 for green light. The emission is stable with a fluctuation of only 1.5% at an average current of 260 'mu'A.

  13. Silicon oxynitride: A field emission suppression coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Nimel D.

    We have studied coatings deposited using our inductively-coupled RF plasma ion implantation and desposition system to suppress field emission from large, 3-D electrode structures used in high voltage applications, like those used by Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in their DC-field photoelectron gun. Currently time and labor-intensive hand-polishing procedures are used to minimize field emission from these structures. Previous work had shown that the field emission from polished stainless steel (27 muA of field-emitted current at 15 MV/m) could be drastically reduced with simultaneous deposition of sputtered silicon dioxide during nitrogen implantation (167 pA of field-emitted current at 30 MV/m). We have determined that this unique implantation and deposition procedure produces high-purity silicon oxynitride films that can suppress field emission from stainless steel regardless of their initial surface polish. However, when this implantation procedure was applied to large, 3-D substrates, arcs occurred, damaging the coating and causing unreliable and unrepeatable field emission suppression. We have developed a novel reactive sputtering procedure to deposit high-purity silicon oxynitride coatings without nitrogen ion implantation. We can control the stoichometry and deposition rate of these coatings by adjusting the nitrogen pressure and incident RF-power. Using profilometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, elastic recoil detection analysis, and current-voltage measurements, we have determined that the elemental composition, chemical bonding, density, and electrical properties of the reactively-sputtered silicon oxynitride coatings are similar to those produced by nitrogen implantation during silicon dioxide deposition. Furthermore, high voltage tests determined that both coatings similarly suppress field emission from 6" diameter, polished

  14. Field Emission from Zinc Oxide Nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Asthanal, A; Yap, Y K; Shahbazian-Yassar, R

    2015-03-01

    We report here, the in-situ field emission (FE) property measurement on the individual ZnO nanobelts inside a high resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) using a special scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)-TEM system. The field emission properties were found to be size scale dependent. It was found that the threshold voltage decreases and the field enhancement factor increases with the decrease in the diameter of the tip of the nanobelt and increase in the sharpness of the tip. The field emission parameter was estimated following the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) theory. The ZnO nanobelt with the sharp agave like tip structure (d = 10 nm) showed the highest value of the field enhancement factor, β ≈ 4562, and a high field emission current of ~ 502 µA. PMID:26413652

  15. Emission Characteristics of Graphite Nanofiber Field Emitter for Field Emission Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushirozawa, Mizumoto; Hagiwara, Kei; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Yokoo, Kuniyoshi

    Graphite nanofiber (GNF) is a field emission material consisting of intricately tangled nano-sized carbon fibers and has similar field emission characteristics to CNT. An important issue in achieving practical use of FED (field emission display) using carbon nano-materials is how to attain emission uniformity. With the objective of uniformity, field emission characteristics of GNF emitter were examined using a scanning Faraday cup emission profiler. The current density of emitted electrons changed considerably over the emitting area at a low field, as high as two orders in intensity in a measuring emitter area of 1 mm2. However, uniformity was significantly improved due to current saturation at a high field. This paper discusses the current saturation in field emission of GNF from the space-charge effect of emitted electrons.

  16. Field Emission Measurements from Niobium Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    M. BastaniNejad, P.A. Adderley, J. Clark, S. Covert, J. Hansknecht, C. Hernandez-Garcia, R. Mammei, M. Poelker

    2011-03-01

    Increasing the operating voltage of a DC high voltage photogun serves to minimize space charge induced emittance growth and thereby preserve electron beam brightness, however, field emission from the photogun cathode electrode can pose significant problems: constant low level field emission degrades vacuum via electron stimulated desorption which in turn reduces photocathode yield through chemical poisoning and/or ion bombardment and high levels of field emission can damage the ceramic insulator. Niobium electrodes (single crystal, large grain and fine grain) were characterized using a DC high voltage field emission test stand at maximum voltage -225kV and electric field gradient > 10MV/m. Niobium electrodes appear to be superior to diamond-paste polished stainless steel electrodes.

  17. Field emission from Dirac and Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Li, X.; Ning, H.; Hu, Changjun; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Based on theoretical investigation on characteristics of the field emission current of Dirac/Weyl semimetals, the dependence of the field emission current on the applied bias is deduced and studied. This theoretical study demonstrates that the field emission current of a Dirac semimetal is much smaller than that of a conventional material when they have similar carrier parameters. This makes Dirac semimetal a better candidate for gate/base electrode material than gold and other conventional metals for an ultra-thin gate oxide metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor. The field emission current of a Dirac semimetal decreases with the effective electron mass, while it increases for a conventional material. This implies that such an effective mass dependence can be used as a simple criterion to probe a Dirac semimetal in practice.

  18. Scaling law for direct current field emission-driven microscale gas breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Venkattraman, A.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2012-12-15

    The effects of field emission on direct current breakdown in microscale gaps filled with an ambient neutral gas are studied numerically and analytically. Fundamental numerical experiments using the particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions method are used to systematically quantify microscale ionization and space-charge enhancement of field emission. The numerical experiments are then used to validate a scaling law for the modified Paschen curve that bridges field emission-driven breakdown with the macroscale Paschen law. Analytical expressions are derived for the increase in cathode electric field, total steady state current density, and the ion-enhancement coefficient including a new breakdown criterion. It also includes the effect of all key parameters such as pressure, operating gas, and field-enhancement factor providing a better predictive capability than existing microscale breakdown models. The field-enhancement factor is shown to be the most sensitive parameter with its increase leading to a significant drop in the threshold breakdown electric field and also to a gradual merging with the Paschen law. The proposed scaling law is also shown to agree well with two independent sets of experimental data for microscale breakdown in air. The ability to accurately describe not just the breakdown voltage but the entire pre-breakdown process for given operating conditions makes the proposed model a suitable candidate for the design and analysis of electrostatic microscale devices.

  19. Deducing dust emission mechanisms from field measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field observations are needed to both develop and test theories on dust emission for use in global modeling systems. The mechanism of dust emission (aerodynamic entrainment, saltation bombardment, aggregate disintegration) and the amount and particle-size distribution of emitted dust may vary under ...

  20. OIL AND GAS FIELD EMISSIONS SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an oil and gas field emissions survey. The production segment of the oil and gas industry has been identified as a source category that requires the development of more reliable emissions inventory methodologies. The overall purpose of the project was ...

  1. Field emission from hydrogen titanate nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Indrani; Chatterjee, Sriparna; Ayyub, Pushan

    2011-10-01

    Hydrothermally synthesized hydrogen titanate (H2Ti3O7) nanotube meshes and arrays exhibit excellent field emission characteristics. The turn-on field is as low as 1.4 V μm-1 for the mesh and 2.6 V μm-1 for the array, while the electric field corresponding to an emission current density of 10 μA cm-2 is 2 V μm-1 (mesh) and 3.8 V μm-1 (array). The H2Ti3O7 nanotube mesh has one of the lowest reported turn-on voltages and highest enhancement factors. The emission current also shows good long term stability. We attribute the efficient field emission to the presence of mid-gap states arising from the negative surface charge on the H2Ti3O7 nanotubes.

  2. Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating Field Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Harding, Alice K.; Miller, M. Coleman; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Parent, Damien

    2012-01-01

    The high-quality Fermi LAT observations of gamma-ray pulsars have opened a new window to understanding the generation mechanisms of high-energy emission from these systems, The high statistics allow for careful modeling of the light curve features as well as for phase resolved spectral modeling. We modeled the LAT light curves of the Vela and CTA I pulsars with simulated high-energy light curves generated from geometrical representations of the outer gap and slot gap emission models. within the vacuum retarded dipole and force-free fields. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method was used to explore the phase space of the magnetic inclination angle, viewing angle. maximum emission radius, and gap width. We also used the measured spectral cutoff energies to estimate the accelerating parallel electric field dependence on radius. under the assumptions that the high-energy emission is dominated by curvature radiation and the geometry (radius of emission and minimum radius of curvature of the magnetic field lines) is determined by the best fitting light curves for each model. We find that light curves from the vacuum field more closely match the observed light curves and multiwavelength constraints, and that the calculated parallel electric field can place additional constraints on the emission geometry

  3. Polypyrrole nanostructures and their field emission investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harpale, Kashmira; More, Mahendra A.; Koinkar, Pankaj M.; Patil, Sandip S.; Sonawane, Kishor M.

    2015-03-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) nanostructures have been synthesized on indium doped tin oxide (ITO) substrates by a facile electrochemical route employing cyclic voltammetry (CV) mode. The morphology of the PPy thin films was observed to be influenced by the monomer concentration. Furthermore, FTIR revealed formation of electrically conducting state of PPy. Field emission investigations of the PPy nanostructures were carried out at base pressure of 1×10-8mbar. The values of turn-on field, corresponding to emission current density of 1 μA/cm2 were observed to be 0.6, 1.0 and 1.2 V/μm for the PPy films characterized with rod-like, cauliflower and granular morphology, respectively. In case of PPy nanorods maximum current density of 1.2 mA/cm2 has been drawn at electric field of 1 V/μm. The low turn on field, extraction of very high emission current density at relatively lower applied field and good emission stability propose the PPy nanorods as a promising material for field emission based devices.

  4. Electron Field Emission Characteristics of Planar Field Emission Array with Diamondlike Carbon Electron Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chin-Maw; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Yokoyama, Meiso; Chuang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Hui; Wang, Wen-Chun; Lin, I-Nan

    1999-02-01

    The electron emission characteristics of planar field emission arrays (FEAs), containing undoped and boron-doped diamondlike carbon (DLC) films as emitters, were investigated. The planar DLC FEAs require only 13.3 V/µm to turn on the electron field emission, whereas the boron-doped planar DLC FEAs requires an even lower electric field (9.8 V/µm) to trigger the electron emission. The boron-doped DLC films also possess an electron emission property highly superior to that of the undoped DLC films and exhibit a stable electron emission current of 938 µA under a 20 V/µm bias voltage, which corresponds to a high emission current density of (Je)B-DLC=128 mA/cm2. These superior properties suggest that the boron-doped DLC FEAs are potentially useful as electron emitters in flat panel displays.

  5. Field emission and growth of fullerene nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rinzler, A.G.; Hafner, J.H.; Nilolaev, P.; Colbert, D.T.; Smalley, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    Efforts to control the growth of individual carbon nanotubes from nanotube seed crystals have led to a characterization of their field-induced electron emission behavior. The application of a bias voltage in the growth apparatus was motivated by the prolific formation of nanotubes in the carbon are growth method, in which the electric field appears to play a central role. The authors report here the ability to achieve various tube tip configurations by the controlled application of voltage, heat and chemicals to an individual nanotube, and that these states are well characterized by the emission currents they induce.

  6. Field scale measurements of NH3 emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neftel, Albrecht; Ammann, Christof; Kuhn, Uwe; Sintermann, Jörg; Lehuger, Simon; Gärtner, Andrea; Hirschberger, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    The uncertainty in the ammonia emissions after application of organic manure contributes to a large extent to the overall uncertainties of the nitrogen budget of managed grassland systems (Ammann et al., 2009). Due to the sticky nature of the ammonia molecule and the variability of the emission fluxes the experimental determination is still a major challenge and a wide spread range of emission factors can be found in the literature. We report on two field experiments performed in August 2009 at the NitroEurope site in Oensingen, Switzerland. The ammonia emission flux after liquid manure application was investigated simultaneously by various micrometeorological methods: (1) a mass balance approach measuring the horizontal advection flux with open-path FTIR sensors (Gärtner et al., 2008), (2) aerodynamic gradient methods, and (3) eddy covariance measurements based on a novel fast ammonia analyser. Due to the sequential application of the manure and the fast decrease of the ammonia volatilisation, detailed footprint calculations (Neftel et al., 2008) and corrections with a high temporal resolution were crucial for obtaining representative emission fluxes. The plausibility of flux measurements has been evaluated with back trajectories simulations (WindTrax, Flesch et al., 2009). The results of all applied flux measurement methods confirmed the low emission levels found earlier by Spirig et al. (2009). A comparison of the field observations with results of process oriented models showed considerable differences in the temporal course of the ammonia emission indicating the need for improvements of the models. References: Ammann, C., Spirig, C., Leifeld, J. and Neftel, A.: Assessment of the nitrogen and carbon budget of two managed temperate grassland fields, Agric. Ecosyst. Environ., 133, 150-162, 2009. Flesch, T.K., Harper, L.A., Desjardins, R.L., Gao, Z., and Crenna, B.: Multi-Source Emission Determination Using an Inverse-Dispersion Technique. Boundary-Layer Meteorol

  7. Factors affecting methane emission from rice fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neue, H. U.; Wassmann, R.; Lantin, R. S.; Alberto, Ma C. R.; Aduna, J. B.; Javellana, A. M.

    Emission of CH 4 from ricefields is the result of anoxic bacterial methane production. Global estimates of annual CH 4 emission from ricefields is 100 Tg. CH 4 emission data from limited sites are tentative. It is essential that uncertainty in individual sources is reduced in order to develop feasible and effective mitigation options which do not negate gains in rice production and productivity. Field studies at the International Rice Research Institute show that soil and added organic matter are the sources for initial methane production. Addition of rice straw enhances methane production. Roots and root exudates of wetland rice plants appear to be the major carbon sources at ripening stage. The production and transport of CH 4 to the atmosphere depend on properties of the rice plant. Under the same spacing and fertilization, the traditional variety Dular emitted more CH 4 per day than did the new plant type IR65597. Upon flooding for land preparation anaerobic conditions result in significant amount of methane being formed. Drying the field at midtillering significantly reduced total CH 4 emissions. Large amounts of entrapped CH 4 escape to the atmosphere when floodwater recedes upon drying at harvest. Cultural practices may account for 20% of the overall seasonal CH 4 emissions.

  8. Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

  9. On field emission from a semiconducting substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Richard; Van Zeghbroeck, Bart

    1999-10-01

    A theoretical examination of field emission from the conduction band of a semiconducting substrate is reported. The analysis includes a comparison with Fowler-Nordheim theory, and it is concluded that the formalism of the Fowler-Nordheim theory is incorrect when applied to carriers originating from a semiconducting substrate. The use of a Fowler-Nordheim analysis results in an error in the extraction of the barrier height that is dependent upon the applied electric field across the oxide, conduction band offset, and temperature. A lower limit of the error was calculated to be between 5% and 15%. An analytical expression is developed to describe the field emission of electrons from the conduction band of a semiconductor.

  10. Electrochemical sharpening of field emission tips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    A method for sharpening field emitter tips by electroetching/polishing. In gated field emitters, it is very important to initiate electron emission at the lowest possible voltage and thus the composition of the emitter and the gate, as well as the emitter-gate structure, are important factors. This method of sharpening the emitter tips uses the grid as a counter electrode in electroetching of the emitters, which can produce extremely sharp emitter tips as well as remove asperities and other imperfections in the emitters, each in relation to the specific grid hole in which it resides. This has the effect of making emission more uniform among the emitters as well as lowering the turn-on voltage.

  11. Formation of nanofilament field emission devices

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Contolini, Robert J.; Musket, Ronald G.; Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    A process for fabricating a nanofilament field emission device. The process enables the formation of high aspect ratio, electroplated nanofilament structure devices for field emission displays wherein a via is formed in a dielectric layer and is self-aligned to a via in the gate metal structure on top of the dielectric layer. The desired diameter of the via in the dielectric layer is on the order of 50-200 nm, with an aspect ratio of 5-10. In one embodiment, after forming the via in the dielectric layer, the gate metal is passivated, after which a plating enhancement layer is deposited in the bottom of the via, where necessary. The nanofilament is then electroplated in the via, followed by removal of the gate passification layer, etch back of the dielectric, and sharpening of the nanofilament. A hard mask layer may be deposited on top of the gate metal and removed following electroplating of the nanofilament.

  12. Integrated field emission array for ion desorption

    DOEpatents

    Resnick, Paul J; Hertz, Kristin L; Holland, Christopher; Chichester, David; Schwoebel, Paul

    2013-09-17

    An integrated field emission array for ion desorption includes an electrically conductive substrate; a dielectric layer lying over the electrically conductive substrate comprising a plurality of laterally separated cavities extending through the dielectric layer; a like plurality of conically-shaped emitter tips on posts, each emitter tip/post disposed concentrically within a laterally separated cavity and electrically contacting the substrate; and a gate electrode structure lying over the dielectric layer, including a like plurality of circular gate apertures, each gate aperture disposed concentrically above an emitter tip/post to provide a like plurality of annular gate electrodes and wherein the lower edge of each annular gate electrode proximate the like emitter tip/post is rounded. Also disclosed herein are methods for fabricating an integrated field emission array.

  13. Integrated field emission array for ion desorption

    DOEpatents

    Resnick, Paul J; Hertz, Kristin L.; Holland, Christopher; Chichester, David

    2016-08-23

    An integrated field emission array for ion desorption includes an electrically conductive substrate; a dielectric layer lying over the electrically conductive substrate comprising a plurality of laterally separated cavities extending through the dielectric layer; a like plurality of conically-shaped emitter tips on posts, each emitter tip/post disposed concentrically within a laterally separated cavity and electrically contacting the substrate; and a gate electrode structure lying over the dielectric layer, including a like plurality of circular gate apertures, each gate aperture disposed concentrically above an emitter tip/post to provide a like plurality of annular gate electrodes and wherein the lower edge of each annular gate electrode proximate the like emitter tip/post is rounded. Also disclosed herein are methods for fabricating an integrated field emission array.

  14. Quasistationary field of thermal emission and near-field radiometry.

    PubMed

    Reznik, A N; Vaks, V L; Yurasova, N V

    2004-11-01

    We provide a theory of radiometry measurements of the quasistationary (near) field of thermal emission from a heated conducting medium. It explains why the Rytov effect, which essentially is a drastic growth of the thermal field energy near the medium surface, cannot be detected experimentally. However, we discovered a measurable near-field effect: the effective depth of formation of the received emission proves to be less than the skin-layer depth, depending on the size of the receiving antenna and its height above the surface. For such measurements highly effective antennas of a small aperture size are necessary. We developed and investigated a variety of microwave antennas whose parameters were fairly suitable for near-field radiometry. The measurements conducted with these antennas yielded experimental evidence of the fact that the quasistationary thermal field really exists. Near-field radiometry opens further opportunities for investigating media. In particular, we demonstrate here a technique for retrieval of the subsurface temperature profile in water with the help of near-field measurements.

  15. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, Lawrence S.; Felter, Thomas E.; Talin, Alec; Ohlberg, Douglas; Fox, Ciaran; Han, Sung

    1999-01-01

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/.mu.m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 .mu.m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceeded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material.

  16. Processing of materials for uniform field emission

    DOEpatents

    Pam, L.S.; Felter, T.E.; Talin, A.; Ohlberg, D.; Fox, C.; Han, S.

    1999-01-12

    This method produces a field emitter material having a uniform electron emitting surface and a low turn-on voltage. Field emitter materials having uniform electron emitting surfaces as large as 1 square meter and turn-on voltages as low as 16V/{micro}m can be produced from films of electron emitting materials such as polycrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon by the method of the present invention. The process involves conditioning the surface of a field emitter material by applying an electric field to the surface, preferably by scanning the surface of the field emitter material with an electrode maintained at a fixed distance of at least 3 {micro}m above the surface of the field emitter material and at a voltage of at least 500V. In order to enhance the uniformity of electron emission the step of conditioning can be preceded by ion implanting carbon, nitrogen, argon, oxygen or hydrogen into the surface layers of the field emitter material. 2 figs.

  17. Electron Field Emission from Nanostructured Carbon Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanju

    2005-03-01

    Fabricating small structures has almost become fashionable and the rationale is that reducing one or more dimensions below some critical length changes the systems' physical properties drastically, where nanocrystalline diamond (n-D) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the class of advanced carbon materials serve model examples. Emission of electrons at room temperature - cold electron emitters - are of vital importance for a variety of vacuum microelectronic devices - electron microscopes, photo multipliers, X-ray generators, lamps, and flat panel displays and microwave cathodes. Electron emitters may lead to otherwise difficult to obtain advantages in performance and/or design. This is the driving force to investigate the carbon-related materials as cold cathodes. In this talk, the performance of various forms of carbon in thin film form including diamond, n-D, and vertically aligned CNTs as cold cathodes for their potential use in field emission displays (FEDs) in terms of I-V characteristics and corresponding spatial imaging will be presented. Physics based models such as, NEA, surface modification, geometric enhancement, and microstructure alteration due to particle bombardment, and doping, will be described to support the experimental observations of electron field enhancement (low turn-on voltage, high current and emission site density) and its reliability from the abovementioned carbon-related materials. Other vacuum device applications such as thermionic power generators will be mentioned briefly.

  18. Measuring methyl bromide emissions from fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.; Yates, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Methyl bromide is used extensively for pest control. Recent evidence suggests that methyl bromide may react with stratospheric ozone and, due to the Clean Air Act, is scheduled for phase-out within the next 5 to 10 years. As indicated in a recent report from The National Agricultural Pesticide Impact Assessment Program, there will be substantial economic impact on the agricultural community if the use of methyl bromide is restricted. There are several areas of uncertainty concerning the agricultural use of methyl bromide. Foremost is the quantification of mass emitted to the atmosphere from agricultural fields. To address this, two field experiments were conducted to directly measure methyl bromide emissions. In the first experiment, methyl bromide was injected at approximately 25 cm depth and the soil was covered with 1 mil high-density polyethylene plastic. The second experiment was similar except that methyl bromide was injected at approximately 68 cm depth and the soil was not covered. From these experiments, the emission rate into the atmosphere and the subsurface transport of methyl bromide was determined. Both experiments include a field-scale mass balance to verify the accuracy of the flux-measurement methods as well as to check data consistency. The volatilization rate and mass lost was determined from estimates of the degradation and from several atmospheric and chamber flux methods.

  19. Methyl bromide emissions from tarped fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cicerone, R.J.; Williams, J.; Wang, N.Y.

    1995-12-31

    Once in the stratosphere, bromine atoms can destroy ozone effectively. Because of this potential effect, certain organobromine compounds including methyl bromide (MeBr) are being controlled or eliminated by national and international regulations. It would be valuable to determine the fraction of MeBr used in soil fumigations that subsequently enters the atmosphere to better assess the need for, and value of, strong regulations. We have designed and conducted several experiments accompanying field fumigations with MeBr/chloropicrin mixtures. In each of three field-fumigation experiments new Irvine, CA in which the fumigated field was covered immediately with plastic tarping, we have deployed static flux chambers on top of the tarping and measured escape fluxes of MeBr. After tarp removal, the same chambers were replaced on the bare soil to continue the measurements. We have also measured soil bromide contents before and after the fumigation. One experiment yielded an escape fraction of 80 to 87% (with 19% remaining as bromide) while the other two experiments yielded escape fractions of 30 to 35% (with about 70% remaining as bromide). This paper will summarize stratospheric bromine chemistry, describe the field experiments and discuss factors that influence emissions, including soil pH, moisture and organic content and injection technique. We acknowledge TriCal, Inc. for many helpful discussions and for professional field applications of MeBr.

  20. Field measurement of diesel particulate matter emissions.

    PubMed

    Volkwein, Jon C; Mischler, Steven E; Davies, Brian; Ellis, Clive

    2008-03-01

    A primary means to reduce environmental levels of diesel particulate matter (DPM) exposure to miners is to reduce the amount of DPM emission from the engine. A quick and economic method to estimate engine particulate emission levels has been developed. The method relies on the measurement of pressure increase across a filter element that is briefly used to collect a DPM sample directly from the engine exhaust. The method has been refined with the inclusion of an annular aqueous denuder to the tube which permits dry filter samples to be obtained without addition of dilution air. Tailpipe filter samples may then be directly collected in hot and water-supersaturated exhaust gas flows from water bath-cooled coal mine engines without the need for dilution air. Measurement of a differential pressure (DP) increase with time has been related to the mass of elemental carbon (EC) on the filter. Results for laboratory and field measurements of the method showed agreement between DP increase and EC collected on the filter with R(2) values >0.86. The relative standard deviation from replicate samples of DP and EC was 0.16 and 0.11, respectively. The method may also have applications beyond mining, where qualitative evaluation of engine emissions is desirable to determine if engine or control technology maintenance may be required.

  1. Magnetic field emission gun with zirconiated emitter.

    PubMed

    Troyon, M

    1989-03-01

    A magnetic-field-superimposed field emission gun with low aberrations and equipped with a zirconiated tungsten emitter has been developed for applications where very stable high probe currents are required. It has been tested on a conventional electron microscope at 10 kV and on an electron beam testing system at 1 kV. Probe current i = 250 nA in a probe size d = 0.4 micron is obtained at 10 kV; at 1 kV the resolution is 0.1 micron with i = 5 nA, and 0.4 micron with i = 30 nA. For these probe currents, the spatial broadening effect due to electron-electron interactions in the beam is the preponderant factor limiting the probe size.

  2. Field Emission Microplasma Actuated Microchannel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholeti, Siva Sashank; Shivkumar, Gayathri; Alexeenko, Alina

    2015-11-01

    Flow actuation by dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) involve no moving parts and provide high power density for flow enhancement, heating and mixing applications in microthrusters, micropumps and microcombustors. Conventional micro-DBDs require voltages ~ kV for flow enhancement of a few m/s for 500 μm high channel. However for gaps <10 microns, field emission lowers the breakdown voltage following modified Paschen curve. We consider a micropump concept that takes advantage of the field emission from a micro-DBD with dielectric thickness of 3 μm and a peak voltage of -325 V at 10 MHz. At 760 Torr, for electrode thickness of 1 μm, Knudsen number with respect to the e-nitrogen collisions is 0.1. So, kinetic approach of particle-in-cell method with Monte Carlo collisions is applied in nitrogen at 300 K to resolve electron (ne) and ion (ni) number densities. Body force, fb = eE(ni-ne) , where, e is electron charge and E is electric field. The major source of heating from plasma is Joule heating, J.E, where J is current density. At 760 Torr, for fb,avg = 1 mN/cubic mm and J.E = 8 W/cubic mm, micro-DBD induced a flow with a velocity of 4.1 m/s for a 64 mW/m power input for a channel height of 500 μm. The PIC/MCC plasma simulations are coupled to a CFD solver for analysis of the resulting flow actuation in microchannels at various Reynolds numbers. This work was supported by NSF ECCS Grant No. 1202095.

  3. Field emission microplasma actuation for microchannel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sashank Tholeti, Siva; Shivkumar, Gayathri; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2016-06-01

    Microplasmas offer attractive flow control methodology for gas transport in microsystems where large viscous losses make conventional pumping methods highly inefficient. We study microscale flow actuation by dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) with field emission (FE) of electrons, which allows lowering the operational voltage from kV to a few hundred volts and below. A feasibility study of FE-DBD for flow actuation is performed using 2D particle-in-cell method with Monte Carlo collisions (PIC/MCC) at 10 MHz in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. The free diffusion dominated, high velocity field emission electrons create a large positive space charge and a body force on the order of 106 N m-3. The body force and Joule heat decrease with increase in dielectric thickness and electrode thickness. The body force also decreases at lower pressures. The plasma body force distribution along with the Joule heating is then used in the Navier-Stokes simulations to quantify the flow actuation in a microchannel. Theoretical analysis and simulations for plasma actuated planar Poiseuille flow show that the gain in flow rate is inversely proportional to Reynolds number. This theoretical analysis is in good agreement with the simulations for a microchannel with closely placed actuators under incompressible conditions. Flow rate of FE-DBD driven 2D microchannel is around 100 ml min-1 mm-1 for an input power of 64 μW mm-1. The gas temperature rises by 1500 K due to the Joule heating, indicating FE-DBD’s potential for microcombustion, micropropulsion and chemical sensing in addition to microscale pumping and mixing applications.

  4. Field thermal infrared emissivity dependence on soil moisture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissivity dependence on soil water content has been already reported and modeled under controlled conditions at the laboratory. This study completes and extends that previous work by providing emissivity measurements under field conditions without elimination of impurities, local heterogeneities or...

  5. Status review of field emission displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrayeb, Joseph; Daniels, Reginald

    2001-09-01

    Cathode ray tube (CRT) technology dominates the direct view display market. Mature CRT technology for many designs is still the preferred choice. CRT manufacturers have greatly improved the size and weight of the CRT displays. High performance CRTs continue to be in great demand, however, supply have to contend with the vanishing CRT vendor syndrome. Therefore, the vanishing CRT vendor syndrome fuels the search for an alternate display technology source. Within the past 10 years, field emission display (FED) technology had gained momentum and, at one time, was considered the most viable electronic display technology candidate [to replace the CRT]. The FED community had advocated and promised many advantages over active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCD), electro luminescent (EL) or Plasma displays. Some observers, including potential FED manufacturers and the Department of Defense, (especially the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA)), consider the FED entry as having leapfrog potential. Despite major investments by US manufacturers as well as Asian manufacturers, reliability and manufacturing difficulties greatly slowed down the advancement of the technology. The FED manufacturing difficulties have caused many would-be FED manufacturing participants to abandon FED research. This paper will examine the trends, which are leading this nascent technology to its downfall. FED technology was once considered to have the potential to leapfrog over AMLCD's dominance in the display industry. At present the FED has suffered severe setbacks and there are very few [FED] manufacturers still pursuing research in the area. These companies have yet to deliver a display beyond the prototype stage.

  6. Field emission characteristics from graphene on hexagonal boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Takatoshi; Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Ebisudani, Taishi; Okano, Ken; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2014-06-02

    An attempt has been made to utilize uniquely high electron mobility of graphene on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) to electron emitter. The field emission property of graphene/h-BN/Si structure has shown enhanced threshold voltage and emission current, both of which are key to develop novel vacuum nanoelectronics devices. The field emission property was discussed along with the electronic structure of graphene investigated by Fowler-Nordheim plot and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The result suggested that transferring graphene on h-BN modified its work function, which changed field emission mechanism. Our report opens up a possibility of graphene-based vacuum nanoelectronics devices with tuned work function.

  7. Field emission from crystalline copper sulphide nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Deng, S. Z.; Xu, N. S.; Wang, Suhua; Wen, Xiaogang; Yang, Shihe; Yang, Chunlei; Wang, Jiannong; Ge, Weikun

    2002-05-01

    Straight crystalline copper sulphide (Cu2S) nanowire arrays have been grown by using a simple gas-solid reaction at room temperature. These were demonstrated to exhibit semiconductor properties. Field emission was observed at a field of ˜6 MV/m, and its current-field characteristics deviate from Fowler-Nordheim theory, i.e., showing a nonlinear Fowler-Nordheim plot. The uniform emission from the whole arrays was observed using transparent anode technique, and their variation with applied field was recorded. The emission from individual nanowires was also studied using a field emission microscope, and was found to consist of a number of spatially resolved diffuse spots. Finally, stable emission current at different levels and over time was recorded. These findings indicate that semiconductor nanowires as cold cathode have a potential future, worthy of further comprehensive investigation. The technical importance of using semiconductor nanowires as cold cathode emitter is given.

  8. Field emission spectroscopy of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, K. A.; Trofimov, V. V.; Egorov, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental set up for the natural experiment and measurement model are presented to obtain the feld emission energy distribution spectrum out of silicon carbide in case of the macro-sample having a macroscopic shape of a tip. The prototype of feld emission 6H - SiC monolithic cathode is proposed for spectroscopy measurements, and characterised by current-voltage dependence at macroscale interelectrode distance.

  9. Experiments with Low Voltage Field Emission EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournelle, J.; Cathey, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    We report results from 5-7 keV Field Emission EPMA experiments on selected natural minerals and synthetic materials to illustrate some strengths -- and pitfalls --of low keV FE-EPMA. In a silicate mineral in pseudotachylite from South Mountain, AZ (Goodwin, 1999), the spatial resolution (equation of Merlet & Llovet, 2012, with an 80 nm diameter beam) at 7 keV for Si Ka is calculated to be 588 nm, 391 nm for Ca Ka and 641 nm for Fe La. This pseudotachylite contains abundant 5-10 um sieve-textured crystals full of inclusions with low BSE intensity. Previous 15 keV work suggested the sieve phase was amphibole. At 7 keV, it is possible to identify the compositions of the submicron inclusions as SiO2 and a K-rich alumino-silicate phase; the host composition is epidote. The enhanced resolution of FE-EPMA reveals problems with some microanalytical standards. Vicenzi and Rose (2008) showed submicron inclusions in the Smithsonian Kakanui hornblende standard. Our 7 keV experiments show the ~400 nm inclusions consist of a silicate phase (glass?), Fe-Ti oxide and possibly a gas bubble, concentrated along planes or grain boundaries. SEM imaging of an inclusion analyzed with a focused FE beam shows radiating trails of debris on the hornblende host, consistent with residue from a popped vapor bubble in the inclusion. How should FE-EPMA handle standards that may have inclusions? Use a focused beam avoiding inclusions? Sometimes, perhaps. However, we used a defocused beam to "average" the phases. The results show little or no deviation from the published wet chemical analysis. Operation at reduced keV may require use of non-traditional X-ray lines (e.g. Gopon et al, 2013 for Fe Ll vs Fe La). Experiments at 5 keV were also performed upon a synthetic material enriched in Nd (Nd-Mg-Zn). Fischer & Baun (1967) demonstrated problems with the Ma/Mb lines of REE; we find that use of the Nd Mz line is necessary in order to achieve reasonable results in this material (98 wt% total, Nd 36 wt

  10. Enhanced field emission of plasma treated multilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, Ruchita T.; More, Mahendra A.; Gelamo, Rogerio V.; Late, Dattatray J. E-mail: csrout@iitbbs.ac.in; Rout, Chandra Sekhar E-mail: csrout@iitbbs.ac.in

    2015-09-21

    Electron emission properties of multilayer graphene (MLG) prepared by a facile exfoliation technique have been studied. Effect of CO{sub 2} Ar, N{sub 2}, plasma treatment was studied using Raman spectroscopy and investigated for field emission based application. The CO{sub 2} plasma treated multilayer graphene shows an enhanced field emission behavior with a low turn on field of 0.18 V/μm and high emission current density of 1.89 mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 0.35 V/μm. Further the plasma treated MLG exhibits excellent current stability at a lower and higher emission current value.

  11. Field dependent emission rates in radiation damaged GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R. M.; Myers, S. M.; Wampler, W. R.; Lang, D. V.; Seager, C. H.; Campbell, J. M.

    2014-07-07

    We have measured the temperature and field dependence of emission rates from five traps in electron damaged GaAs. Four of the traps have previously been identified as radiation defects. One of the traps, seen in higher doped diodes, has not been previously identified. We have fit the data to a multiphonon emission theory that allows recombination in GaAs to be characterized over a broad range of temperature and electric field. These results demonstrate an efficient method to calculate field-dependent emission rates in GaAs.

  12. Recent progress in nanostructured next-generation field emission devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Gaurav; Lahiri, Indranil

    2014-08-01

    Field emission has been known to mankind for more than a century, and extensive research in this field for the last 40-50 years has led to development of exciting applications such as electron sources, miniature x-ray devices, display materials, etc. In the last decade, large-area field emitters were projected as an important material to revolutionize healthcare and medical devices, and space research. With the advent of nanotechnology and advancements related to carbon nanotubes, field emitters are demonstrating highly enhanced performance and novel applications. Next-generation emitters need ultra-high emission current density, high brightness, excellent stability and reproducible performance. Novel design considerations and application of new materials can lead to achievement of these capabilities. This article presents an overview of recent developments in this field and their effects on improved performance of field emitters. These advancements are demonstrated to hold great potential for application in next-generation field emission devices.

  13. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  14. PCDD AND PCDF EMISSIONS FROM SIMULATED SUGARCANE FIELD BURNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emissions from simulated sugarcane field burns were sampled and analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs and PCDFs). Sugarcane leaves from Hawaii and Florida were burned in a manner simulating the natural physical dimensions and biomass density fou...

  15. Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Nanotube Matrices With Low Emission Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Archana; Prasad, Abhishek; Moscatello, Jason; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Chong M.; Yap, Yoke K.

    2013-01-22

    PMMA-STO-CNT matrices were created by opened-tip vertically-aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with conformal coating of strontium titanate and Poly(methyl methacrylate). Emission threshold of 0.8 V/μm was demonstrated, about five-fold lower than that of the as-grown VAMWCNTs. Theoretical simulation and modeling suggest that PMMA-STO-CNT matrices have suppressed screening effects and Coulombs’ repulsion forces between electrons in adjacent CNTs, leading to low emission threshold, high emission density, and prolong emission stability. These findings are important for practical application of VA-MWCNTs in field emission devices.

  16. Positional control of plasmonic fields and electron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Word, R. C.; Fitzgerald, J. P. S.; Könenkamp, R.

    2014-09-15

    We report the positional control of plasmonic fields and electron emission in a continuous gap antenna structure of sub-micron size. We show experimentally that a nanoscale area of plasmon-enhanced electron emission can be motioned by changing the polarization of an exciting optical beam of 800 nm wavelength. Finite-difference calculations are presented to support the experiments and to show that the plasmon-enhanced electric field distribution of the antenna can be motioned precisely and predictively.

  17. Field electron emission from pencil-drawn cold cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiangtao; Yang, Bingjun; Liu, Xiahui; Yang, Juan; Yan, Xingbin

    2016-05-01

    Field electron emitters with flat, curved, and linear profiles are fabricated on flexible copy papers by direct pencil-drawing method. This one-step method is free of many restricted conditions such as high-temperature, high vacuum, organic solvents, and multistep. The cold cathodes display good field emission performance and achieve high emission current density of 78 mA/cm2 at an electric field of 3.73 V/μm. The approach proposed here would bring a rapid, low-cost, and eco-friendly route to fabricate but not limited to flexible field emitter devices.

  18. Connecting Photospheric Magnetic Fields and Transition Temperature Plasma Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Donald

    2016-05-01

    The connectivity of quiet sun magnetic fields is not well understood. One observational obstacle to probe this question has been the sparse spectral observations spanning the transition temperatures (3×104 K< T < 1×105K) between the chromosphere and corona. The Si IV lines observed by IRIS provide a rich dataset to address the structure of the cool quiet sun. We use over 900 deep exposures from IRIS to map the correlation between transition-temperature emission structures and magnetic field concentrations. Ultimately, our aim is to discern the topology and energetic equilibrium of the magnetic structures that span the quiet sun. We use both a potential field model and a snapshot of the Bifrost 3D MHD simulation to interpret our emission data. In a broad sense, we find there is a clear correlation between magnetic fields and strong Si IV emission. However, more pointed statistics suggest that the relationship is quite complex. We do not find evidence for cool loops longer than 3 Mm in length, but we see ubiquitous, smooth emission nearly everywhere in the quiet sun. Emission voids on scales larger than 8 Mm cannot be well explained by their proximity to magnetic fields. This evidence suggests that weak-field transition-temperature loops contribute significantly to quiet sun transition-temperature emission measure, and evolutionary effects likely play a role in structuring the magnetic atmosphere.

  19. Nanodiamond vacuum field emission device with gate modulated triode characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, S. H.; Kang, W. P.; Raina, S.; Huang, J. H.

    2013-05-01

    A three-electrode nanodiamond vacuum field emission (VFE) device with gate modulated triode characteristics is developed by integrating nanodiamond emitter with self-aligned silicon gate and anode, employing a mold transfer technique in conjunction with chemical vapor deposition of nanodiamond. Triode behavior showing emission current modulation with high current density at low operating voltages is achieved. A systematic analysis based on modified Fowler-Nordheim theory is used to analyze gate modulated VFE characteristics, confirming the triode field emission mechanism and operating principle. The realization of an efficient VFE microtriode has achieved the fundamental step for further development of vacuum integrated microelectronics.

  20. Field emission from CNT films deposited on porous Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepińska, Izabela; Wronka, Halina; Waszuk, Stanisław; Radomska, Joanna; Kozłowski, Mirosław; Czerwosz, ElŻbieta; Craciunoiu, Florea

    2015-09-01

    The carbon nanotubes films on various type of porous Si substrate were prepared. Three methods of porous Si preparation electrolysis, wet etching with silver nitrate and with potassium hydroxide were used. CNTs films were obtained by two step method containing PVD and CVD process. These yield of field emission depended on the type of film. I-U characteristics and F-N plots are discussed for these films. The short-term stability of emission measurements results are also presented. Depending on technological parameters of Si etching the topography of samples is different and it affects on the emission currents intensity and the electric threshold field.

  1. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo; Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao; Li, Jun

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and field emission properties of nanotubes and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lifeng

    2005-11-01

    In this study, we investigated several novel methods to synthesize carbon nanotubes and nanowires of various compositions with controlled properties, utilized electron microscopy and microanalysis techniques to study their growth mechanisms and effects of growth parameters on their internal structures and morphologies, and set up a field emission microscope and a field emission probe system to study field emission properties of single nanotube/nanowires and thin films of nanostructures. The introduction of H2 during catalyst activation and nanotube growth periods thermodynamically and kinetically facilitates the formation of high quality nanotubes. With the inclusion of H2, the nanotube diameter decreased from 300 nm to 15 nm and growth rate increased from 78 nm/s to 145 nm/s. The growth location and orientation of carbon nanotubes to substrates can be controlled by the position and density of catalysts, respectively. Focused Ion Beam (FIB) techniques were utilized to confine catalyst locations and to directly deposit patterned catalyst precursors. Nanotube internal structures including graphitization and number of graphite layers can be tailored using different hydrocarbon gases (CH4 or C2H2) as carbon sources or by varying catalyst elements (Fe, Ni, or Co). Besides effects of nanoscale radius and high aspect ratio, the internal structures of carbon nanotubes greatly affects their field mission properties including turn-on field, threshold field and enhancement factor. Carbon nanotubes from Fe or Co demonstrate better field emission properties than those from Ni. At high electric fields, nanotube emission deviates from the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) theory due to space charge and field emission-induced temperature effects. Also, an abnormal noise power spectral density (PSD) peak was observed at the space charge regime and PSD decreases with the increase of emission current due to Joule self-heating. In order to investigate field emission properties of nanostructures

  3. A knife-edge array field emission cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.

    1994-08-01

    many cathode applications require a new type of cathode that is able to produce short pulsed electron beams at high emission current. Gated field emitter arrays of micrometer size are recognized as candidates to meet this need and have become the research focus of vacuum microelectronics. Existing fabrication methods produce emitters that are limited either in frequency response or in current emission. One reason is that the structure of these emitters are not sufficiently optimized. In this study, the author investigated the factors that affect the performance of field emitters. An optimum emitter structure, the knife-edge field emitter array, was developed from the analysis. Large field enhancement factor, large effective emission area, and small emitter capacitance are the advantages of the structure. The author next explored various options of fabricating the knife-edge emitter structure. He proposed a unique thin film process procedure and developed the fabrication techniques to build the emitters on (110) silicon wafers. Data from the initial cathode tests showed very low onset voltages and Fowler-Nordheim type emission. Emission simulation based on the fabricated emitter structure indicated that the knife-edge emitter arrays have the potential to produce high performance in modulation frequency and current emission. Several fabrication issues that await further development are discussed and possible solutions are suggested.

  4. Spontaneous Radiation Emission from Short, High Field Strength Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2005-09-15

    Since the earliest papers on undulaters were published, it has been known how to calculate the spontaneous emission spectrum from ''short'' undulaters when the magnetic field strength parameter is small compared to unity, or in ''single'' frequency sinusoidal undulaters where the magnetic field strength parameter is comparable to or larger than unity, but where the magnetic field amplitude is constant throughout the undulater. Fewer general results have been obtained in the case where the insertion device is both short, i.e., the magnetic field strength parameter changes appreciably throughout the insertion device, and the magnetic field strength is high enough that ponderomotive effects, radiation retardation, and harmonic generation are important physical phenomena. In this paper a general method is presented for calculating the radiation spectrum for short, high-field insertion devices. It is used to calculate the emission from some insertion device designs of recent interest.

  5. Superior Field Emission Properties of Layered WS2-RGO Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Rout, Chandra Sekhar; Joshi, Padmashree D.; Kashid, Ranjit V.; Joag, Dilip S.; More, Mahendra A.; Simbeck, Adam J.; Washington, Morris; Nayak, Saroj K.; Late, Dattatray J.

    2013-01-01

    We report here the field emission studies of a layered WS2-RGO composite at the base pressure of ~1 × 10−8 mbar. The turn on field required to draw a field emission current density of 1 μA/cm2 is found to be 3.5, 2.3 and 2 V/μm for WS2, RGO and the WS2-RGO composite respectively. The enhanced field emission behavior observed for the WS2-RGO nanocomposite is attributed to a high field enhancement factor of 2978, which is associated with the surface protrusions of the single-to-few layer thick sheets of the nanocomposite. The highest current density of ~800 μA/cm2 is drawn at an applied field of 4.1 V/μm from a few layers of the WS2-RGO nanocomposite. Furthermore, first-principles density functional calculations suggest that the enhanced field emission may also be due to an overalp of the electronic structures of WS2 and RGO, where graphene-like states are dumped in the region of the WS2 fundamental gap. PMID:24257504

  6. Carbon nanotube based field emission X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan

    This dissertation describes the development of field emission (FE) x-ray sources with a carbon-nanotube (CNT) cathode. Field emission x-rays have advantages over conventional x-rays by replacing the thermionic cathode with a cold cathode so that electrons are emitted at room temperature and emission is voltage controllable. CNTs are found to be excellent electron emitters with low threshold fields and high current density which makes them ideal for generate field emission x-rays. Macroscopic CNT cold cathodes are prepared and the parameters to tune their field emission properties are studied: structure and morphology of CNT cathodes, temperature as well as electronic work function of CNT. Macroscopic CNT cathodes with optimized performance are chosen to build a high-resolution x-ray imaging system. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution up to nanoseconds and spatial resolution down to 10 micron. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging and micro-computed tomography are also demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for non-destructive testing and for non-invasive small-animal imaging for biomedical research.

  7. Edge field emission of large-area single layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshch, Victor I.; Bandurin, Denis A.; Orekhov, Anton S.; Purcell, Stephen T.; Obraztsov, Alexander N.

    2015-12-01

    Field electron emission from the edges of large-area (∼1 cm × 1 cm) graphene films deposited onto quartz wafers was studied. The graphene was previously grown by chemical vapour deposition on copper. An extreme enhancement of electrostatic field at the edge of the films with macroscopically large lateral dimensions and with single atom thickness was achieved. This resulted in the creation of a blade type electron emitter, providing stable field emission at low-voltage with linear current density up to 0.5 mA/cm. A strong hysteresis in current-voltage characteristics and a step-like increase of the emission current during voltage ramp up were observed. These effects were explained by the local mechanical peeling of the graphene edge from the quartz substrate by the ponderomotive force during the field emission process. Specific field emission phenomena exhibited in the experimental study are explained by a unique combination of structural, electronic and mechanical properties of graphene. Various potential applications ranging from linear electron beam sources to microelectromechanical systems are discussed.

  8. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube field emitters after high temperature thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Shin, Dong Hoon; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Hwang, Yeon Mo; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2014-07-15

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters have been fabricated by attaching a CNT film on a graphite rod using graphite adhesive material. The CNT field emitters showed much improved field emission properties due to increasing crystallinity and decreasing defects in CNTs after the high temperature thermal annealing at 900 °C in vacuum ambient. The CNT field emitters showed the low turn-on electric field of 1.15 V/μm, the low threshold electric field of 1.62 V/μm, and the high emission current of 5.9 mA which corresponds to a current density of 8.5 A/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the CNT field emitters indicated the enhanced field emission properties due to the multi-stage effect when the length of the graphite rod increases. The CNT field emitter showed good field emission stability after the high temperature thermal annealing. The CNT field emitter revealed a focused electron beam spot without any focusing electrodes and also showed good field emission repeatability.

  9. Neptune radio emission in dipole and multipole magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, C. B.; King, N. V.; Romig, J. H.; Warwick, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    We study Neptune's smooth radio emission in two ways: we simulate the observations and we then consider the radio effects of Neptune's magnetic multipoles. A procedure to deduce the characteristics of radio sources observed by the Planetary Radio Astronomy experiment minimizes limiting assumptions and maximizes use of the data, including quantitative measurement of circular polarization. Study of specific sources simulates time variation of intensity and apparent polarization of their integrated emission over an extended time period. The method is applied to Neptune smooth recurrent emission (SRE). Time series are modeled with both broad and beamed emission patterns, and at two frequencies which exhibit different time variation of polarization. These dipole-based results are overturned by consideration of more complex models of Neptune's magnetic field. Any smooth emission from the anticipated auroral radio source is weak and briefly observed. Dominant SRE originates complex fields at midlatitude. Possible SRE source locations overlap that of 'high-latitude' emission (HLE) between +(out) and -(in) quadrupoles. This is the first identification of multipolar magnetic structure with a major source of planetary radio emission.

  10. Diamond-Coated Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Field Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Stevan; Withers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Field-emission cathodes containing arrays of carbon nanotubes coated with diamond or diamondlike carbon (DLC) are undergoing development. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been shown to perform well as electron field emitters. The idea underlying the present development is that by coating carbon nanotubes with wideband- gap materials like diamond or DLC, one could reduce effective work functions, thereby reducing threshold electric-field levels for field emission of electrons and, hence, improving cathode performance. To demonstrate feasibility, experimental cathodes were fabricated by (1) covering metal bases with carbon nanotubes bound to the bases by an electrically conductive binder and (2) coating the nanotubes, variously, with diamond or DLC by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In tests, the threshold electric-field levels for emission of electrons were reduced by as much as 40 percent, relative to those of uncoated- nanotube cathodes. Coating with diamond or DLC could also make field emission-cathodes operate more stably by helping to prevent evaporation of carbon from nanotubes in the event of overheating of the cathodes. Cathodes of this type are expected to be useful principally as electron sources for cathode-ray tubes and flat-panel displays.

  11. Observation of Field-Emission Dependence on Stored Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jiahang; Antipov, Sergey P.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Doran, Darrell S.; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Liu, Wanming; Power, John; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jiaru; Wang, Dan; Wang, Faya; Whiteford, Charles E.; Wisniewski, Eric; Xiao, Liling

    2015-12-01

    Field emission from a solid metal surface has been continuously studied for a century over macroscopic to atomic scales. It is general knowledge that, other than the surface properties, the emitted current is governed solely by the applied electric field. A pin cathode has been used to study the dependence of field emission on stored energy in an L -band rf gun. The stored energy was changed by adjusting the axial position (distance between the cathode base and the gun back surface) of the cathode while the applied electric field on the cathode tip is kept constant. A very strong correlation of the field-emission current with the stored energy has been observed. While eliminating all possible interfering sources, an enhancement of the current by a factor of 5 was obtained as the stored energy was increased by a factor of 3. It implies that under certain circumstances a localized field emission may be significantly altered by the global parameters in a system.

  12. Observation of Field-Emission Dependence on Stored Energy.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jiahang; Antipov, Sergey P; Baryshev, Sergey V; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Doran, Darrell S; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Liu, Wanming; Power, John; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jiaru; Wang, Dan; Wang, Faya; Whiteford, Charles E; Wisniewski, Eric; Xiao, Liling

    2015-12-31

    Field emission from a solid metal surface has been continuously studied for a century over macroscopic to atomic scales. It is general knowledge that, other than the surface properties, the emitted current is governed solely by the applied electric field. A pin cathode has been used to study the dependence of field emission on stored energy in an L-band rf gun. The stored energy was changed by adjusting the axial position (distance between the cathode base and the gun back surface) of the cathode while the applied electric field on the cathode tip is kept constant. A very strong correlation of the field-emission current with the stored energy has been observed. While eliminating all possible interfering sources, an enhancement of the current by a factor of 5 was obtained as the stored energy was increased by a factor of 3. It implies that under certain circumstances a localized field emission may be significantly altered by the global parameters in a system. PMID:26764996

  13. Process system and method for fabricating submicron field emission cathodes

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Hayes, Jeffrey P.

    1998-01-01

    A process method and system for making field emission cathodes exists. The deposition source divergence is controlled to produce field emission cathodes with height-to-base aspect ratios that are uniform over large substrate surface areas while using very short source-to-substrate distances. The rate of hole closure is controlled from the cone source. The substrate surface is coated in well defined increments. The deposition source is apertured to coat pixel areas on the substrate. The entire substrate is coated using a manipulator to incrementally move the whole substrate surface past the deposition source. Either collimated sputtering or evaporative deposition sources can be used. The position of the aperture and its size and shape are used to control the field emission cathode size and shape.

  14. Electron Field Emission Properties of Textured Platinum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.

    2002-01-01

    During ground tests of electric microthrusters and space tests of electrodynamic tethers the electron emitters must successfully operate at environmental pressures possibly as high as 1x10(exp -4) Pa. High partial pressures of oxygen, nitrogen, and water vapor are expected in such environments. A textured platinum surface was used in this work for field emission cathode assessments because platinum does not form oxide films at low temperatures. Although a reproducible cathode conditioning process did not evolve from this work, some short term tests for periods of 1 to 4 hours showed no degradation of emission current at an electric field of 8 V/mm and background pressures of about 1x10(exp -6) Pa. Increases of background pressure by air flow to about 3x10(exp -4) Pa yield a hostile environment for the textured platinum field emission cathode.

  15. Electron field emission from boron nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encarnacion, Pedro Aron

    A systematic study of electron field emission from boron nitride thin films is presented, establishing nanostructured thin film cubic boron nitride (cBN) as a robust and chemically inert material with a low effective workfunction, able to sustain electron emission in a space plasma environment. RHEED data shows the films as polycrystalline, composed of partially oriented crystallites of cBN with predominantly (001) crystallographic texture relative to the Si substrate. FTIR data showed our films to be overwhelmingly cBN, with a volume fraction greater than 75%. AFM images show nanostructures relevant to field enhancement, with a mean feature height of 79 nm, mean RMS roughness of 19 nm, average grain size of 155 nm2 +/- 84 nm2, and a mean feature radius of ˜7 nm. The results are discussed in the light of current theoretical models for electron field emission, including particulars relevant to semiconductors and nanostructured surfaces. Electron emission thresholds were measured from under 1V/mum up to just under 20V/mum in vacuum. Voltage sweep measurements were made both in vacuo and in various gas environments relevant to space applications. Repeatability of emission results was demonstrated, albeit with indications of threshold shifts, possibly due to desorption of adsorbate impurities. Time dependence measurements at constant extraction field show stable field emission over periods of extended operation. An effective barrier height ow of approximately 9.3 meV for the as-grown cBN thin films is measured, based on the application of the generalised Fowler-Nordheim theory to the electron field emission measurements, and employing a model of the film surface as an ensemble of self-assembled protruberances in the shape of prolate half ellipsoids of revolution on a flat surface. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental determination of this important parameter for cBN films. It appears that the low value of o w measured for cBN is a direct consequence of the

  16. Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.

    1999-01-01

    A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display.

  17. Method of improving field emission characteristics of diamond thin films

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1999-05-11

    A method of preparing diamond thin films with improved field emission properties is disclosed. The method includes preparing a diamond thin film on a substrate, such as Mo, W, Si and Ni. An atmosphere of hydrogen (molecular or atomic) can be provided above the already deposited film to form absorbed hydrogen to reduce the work function and enhance field emission properties of the diamond film. In addition, hydrogen can be absorbed on intergranular surfaces to enhance electrical conductivity of the diamond film. The treated diamond film can be part of a microtip array in a flat panel display. 3 figs.

  18. Influence of field evaporation treatment on the field emission properties of carbon nanotubes array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xin; Zhang, Wen-Jing; Zhang, Gengmin

    2010-04-01

    Field evaporation was used in the post-fabrication treatment of a carbon nanotubes (CNTs) array and effectively modified the CNTs morphology in favor of the field emission under a moderate field. After the field evaporation treatment, the uniformity of the emission site distribution improved but the onset voltage rose. Using the Fowler-Nordheim theory, the actual onset field and the evaporation field around the CNT were calculated to be -4.6-5 and 9-12 V/nm, respectively. These values are close to those obtained from the individual CNT samples. The above results have provided an alternative to modify the configuration of an array sample and demonstrated the feasibility of tackling the problem of the disparity in the field emission capability of different CNTs in an array.

  19. Field emission characteristics of regular arrays of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, A A; Al-Heniti, S; Al-Hazmi, F S; Faidah, Adel S; Shalaan, E; Husain, M

    2014-06-01

    The developments of electronic devices based on micron-sized vacuum electron sources during the last decades have triggered intense research on highly efficient carbon based thin film electron emitters. The synthesis of massive arrays of carbon nanotubes that are oriented on patterned Fe catalyst deposited on quartz substrates is reported. The well-ordered nanotubes can be used as electron field emission arrays. Scaling up of the synthesis process should be entirely compatible with the existing semiconductor processes, and should allow the development of nanotubes devices integrated into future technology. The emission from carbon nanotubes array is explained by Fowler-Nordheim tunneling of electrons from tip-like structures in the nanometer range, which locally amplify the applied field by the field enhancement factor beta. We found that the low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) system can produce nanotubes capable of excellent emission currents at lower voltages. The carbon nanotubes array shows good field emission with turn on field E(alpha) = 1.30 V/microm at the current density of 3.50 mA/cm2 with enhancement factor beta = 1.22 x 10(2).

  20. Anomalous high-frequency oscillations in a field emission tube and their significance in pulsed field emission.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, M J; Christensen, D A; Mousa, M S; Baturin, A; Sheshin, E P

    2007-09-01

    Relaxation oscillations occur when a capacitor is inserted in series with a field emission tube, a DC high-voltage power supply, and a ballast resistor. The waveform of these oscillations is highly reproducible with a dominant frequency of 200 MHz and a decay time of 20 ns. The peak current as high as 320 mA has been observed although the tungsten emitter is only rated for 10 microA. We have shown that these oscillations are due to a displacement current, charging of the anode-tip capacitance, and are not of a field emission origin. We conclude that the effects of displacement current should be considered in measurements of field emission with microsecond pulses, where high-current densities can be observed. PMID:17485175

  1. Field Emission Characteristics Depending on Emitter Patterns of A Screen-Printed Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sang Jik; Lee, Sang Heon

    2006-01-01

    We have fabricated carbon nanotube field-emission displays (CNT-FEDs) panel with a 2 in. diagonal size using a screen printing method and in-situ vacuum sealing technology. The field emission properties of the CNT-FED panel with square-type CNT emitters were characterized and compared with those of the panel with line-type CNT emitters. As results, the square-type CNT emitters showed a much larger emission current and more stable current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Light emission started to occur at an electric field of 3.5 V/μm, for a corresponding to an anode-cathode voltage of 700 V. The vacuum level inside of the in-situ vacuum-sealed panel was 1.4× 10-5 Torr. The sealed panel showed similar I-V characteristics with the unsealed one and uniform light emission with very high brightness at a current density of 243 μA/cm2 obtained at an electric field of 10 V/μm.

  2. Optical and field emission properties of Zinc Oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui; Zhu, Yanwu; Ni, Zhenhua; Sun, Han; Poh, Cheekok; Lim, Sanhua; Sow, Chornghaur; Shen, Zexiang; Feng, Yuanping; Lin, Jianyi

    2005-10-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nano-pikes were produced by oxidative evaporation and condensation of Zn powders. The crystalline structure and optical properties of the ZnO nanostructures (ZnONs) greatly depend on the deposition position of the ZnONs. TEM and XRD indicated that the ZnONs close to the reactor center, ZnON-A, has better crystalline structure than the ZnONs away from the center, ZnON-B. ZnON-A showed the PL and Raman spectra characteristic of perfect ZnO crystals, whereas ZnON-B produced very strong green emission band at 500 nm in the photoluminescence (PL) spectrum and very strong Raman scattering peak at 560 cm(-1), both related to the oxygen deficiency due to insufficient oxidation of zinc vapor. ZnON-B exhibited better field emission properties with higher emission current density and lower turn-on field than ZnON-A.

  3. Electromagnetic plasma wave emissions from the auroral field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    The most important types of auroral radio emissions are reviewed, both from a historical perspective as well as considering the latest results. Particular emphasis is placed on four types of electromagnetic emissions which are directly associated with the plasma on the auroral field lines. These emissions are (1) auroral hiss, (2) saucers, (3) ELF noise bands, and (4) auroral kilometric radiation. Ray tracing and radio direction finding measurements indicate that both the auroral hiss and auroral kilometric radiation are generated along the auroral field lines relatively close to the earth, at radial distances from about 2.5 to 5 R sub e. For the auroral hiss the favored mechanism appears to be amplified Cerenkov radiation. For the auroral kilometric radiation several mechanisms have been proposed, usually involving the intermediate generation of electrostatic waves by the precipitating electrons.

  4. Field emission and photoluminescence of ZnO nanocombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Wu, H. Y.; Zheng, Z. Q.; Yang, Y. H.

    2013-11-01

    Three kinds of new comb-shape nanostructures of ZnO have been grown on single silicon substrates without catalyst-assisted thermal evaporation of Zn and active carbon powders. The morphology and structure of the prepared nanorods are determined on the basis of field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The growth mechanism of the ZnO nanocombs can be explained on the basis of the vapor-solid (VS) processes. In nanocombs 1 and nanocombs 2, the comb teeth grow along [0001] and the comb stem grows along [], while in nanocombs 3, nanoteeth grow along [] and stem grows along [0001]. The photoluminescence and field-emission properties of ZnO nanocombs 1-3 have been investigated. The turn-on electric field of ZnO nanocombs 1-3, which is defined as the field required to producing a current density of 10 μA/cm2, is 9, 7.7 and 7.1 V/μm, respectively. The field-emission performance relies not only on the tip’s radius of curvature and field enhancement factor, but also on the factor evaluating the degree of the screening effect.

  5. Work function measurements by the field emission retarding potential method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, L. W.; Strayer, R. W.; Mackie, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    Using the field emission retarding potential method true work functions have been measured for the following monocrystalline substrates: W(110), W(111), W(100), Nb(100), Ni(100), Cu(100), Ir(110) and Ir(111). The electron elastic and inelastic reflection coefficients from several of these surfaces have also been examined near zero primary beam energy.

  6. Sub-micronewton thrust measurements of indium field emission thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemer, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of three indium field emission thrusters (In-FETs) developed by the Austrian Research Center Seibersdorf (ARCS) have been measured up to 200 muN, 2 mA, and 20 W using a submicronewton resolution thrust stand.

  7. Field-emission cathodes of glass-insulated microwire

    SciTech Connect

    Donika, F.G.; Miglei, D.F.; Smyslov, V.V.

    1987-08-01

    A method is described for fabricating field-emission cathodes in glass insulation. Cathodes with nickel and germanium emitters have packing densities of 10/sup 2/-10/sup 4/ pieces/mm/sup 2/ and point radii of curvature of 0.1-1 ..mu..m.

  8. Aproaches for mitigation of greenhouse gas emission from agricultural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Itoh, M.

    2009-12-01

    Percentage of atmospheric methane emitted form rice paddy is estimated at 60Tg/yr (20 - 100Tg/yr) which is near 10% of total global methane emission of 535Tg/yr (410 - 660Tg) (IPCC(1995), and which is near 30% of anthropogenic CH4 emission. Thus, mitigation of CH4 emission is required to be speed up. CH4 in paddy soil is emanated by the activities of anaerobic bacteria which is called methane producer through reduction of CO2 or decomposition of acetic acid, and it is transported to atmosphere through soil or paddy water surface. It is effective to control methane emission from rice paddy that period is prolonged on intermittent irrigation drainage, composted rice straw is incorporated as fertilizer instead of flesh one, or other. However, empirical approach of these kinds of experiments had not been sufficient because such a kind of experiment required significant times and efforts. In this study, we conducted demonstrative experiments to verify the effects of water management method differences in order to reduce CH4 emission from rice paddy at 9 experimental sites in 8 prefectures. In this, we used new gas analyzer which can measure CH4, CO2 and N2O at once developed by National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences (NIAES), Japan. In this report, we show the preliminary results in first year of this study. Nakaboshi (mid-season-drainage) is one of cultivation methods in rice paddy that surface water in paddy field is once drained for about 10 days and the field is maintained like upland field to give adequate stress to rice plant for better harvest qualities and yields. Our targeted evaluation was dependencies of Nakaboshi periods lengths and Nakaboshi periods to CH4 emission reduction amounts for total cultivation periods within harvest yield maintained. The longer length of Nakaboshi period was prolonged, the lesser emission amounts of CH4 decreased even after when Nakaboshi period lasted, as a whole. In some soil types, for example in Kagoshima

  9. Cathodoluminescence studies of nanocrystalline silicon films for field emission displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biaggi Labiosa, Azlin M.

    The cathodoluminescence (CL) emission from p-type porous silicon (PSi) films excited with low energy electron beams compatible with field emission display (FED) technologies was investigated. First, a study was carried out to find the optimal PSi configuration that would yield the strongest CL emission. It was found that the highest, stable CL intensities were obtained from samples prepared from p-type wafers with resistivity between 1-2 Ocm. Afterwards, the effects on the morphological details and the chemical composition due to the electron irradiation of the PSi films were studied. During a continuous irradiation of 10 hours the CL intensity of the films reduced in less than 10%. In situ SIMS analyses before and after prolonged e-beam excitation showed minor compositional changes of the film and reduced sputtering of the silicon nanoparticles due to the electron irradiation. It was also found that the electron bombardment causes microscale morphological modifications of the films, but the nanoscale features appear to be unchanged. The structural changes are manifested by the increase in the density of the nanoparticles which explains the significant enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) that follows the electron irradiation. Second, after a thorough characterization of the PSi films under electron irradiation, tuning of the CL emission of PSi films was investigated. The PSi films used for this experiment were non-oxidized films unlike the ones used for the CL characterization that were oxidized films. The tuning was achieved by controlling the average size of the nanostructure thus showing that the origin of this CL emission is associated with the quantum confinement and the surface chemistry effects that are known to exist in the porous silicon system. However, the CL emission obtained from these samples was unstable which is attributed to the breaking of Si--H bonds due to the electron irradiation. Dangling bonds are then formed on the surface and this in

  10. Electron field emission in nanostructures: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Joseph Andrew

    The objective of this work was to study electron field emission from several nanostructures using a first-principles framework. The systems studied were carbon nanowires, graphene nanoribbons, and nanotubes of varying composition. These particular structures were chosen because they have recently been identified as showing novel physical phenomena, as well as having tremendous industrial applications. We examined the field emission under a variety of conditions, including laser illumination and the presence of adsorbates. The goal was to explore how these conditions affect the field emission performance. In addition to the calculations, this dissertation has presented computational developments by the author that allowed these demanding calculations to be performed. There are many possible choices for basis when performing an electronic structure calculation. Examples are plane waves, atomic orbitals, and real-space grids. The best choice of basis depends on the structure of the system being analyzed and the physical processes involved (e.g., laser illumination). For this reason, it was important to conduct rigorous tests of basis set performance, in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency. There are no existing benchmark calculations for field emission, but transport calculations for nanostructures are similar, and so provide a useful reference for evaluating the performance of various basis sets. Based on the results, for the purposes of studying a non-periodic nanostructure under field emission conditions, we decided to use a real-space grid basis which incorporates the Lagrange function approach. Once a basis was chosen, in this case a real-space grid, the issue of boundary conditions arose. The problem is that with a non-periodic system, field emitted electron density can experience non-physical reflections from the boundaries of the calculation volume, leading to inaccuracies. To prevent this issue, we used complex absorbing potentials (CAPs) to absorb

  11. Field emission properties of ZnO nanosheet arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, Kusha Kumar; Rout, Chandra Sekhar E-mail: dj.late@ncl.res.in E-mail: csrout@iitbbs.ac.in; Khare, Ruchita; More, Mahendra A.; Chakravarty, Disha; Late, Dattatray J. E-mail: dj.late@ncl.res.in E-mail: csrout@iitbbs.ac.in; Thapa, Ranjit E-mail: dj.late@ncl.res.in E-mail: csrout@iitbbs.ac.in

    2014-12-08

    Electron emission properties of electrodeposited ZnO nanosheet arrays grown on Indium tin oxide coated glass substrates have been studied. Influence of oxygen vacancies on electronic structures and field emission properties of ZnO nanosheets are investigated using density functional theory. The oxygen vacancies produce unshared d electrons which form an impurity energy state; this causes shifting of Fermi level towards the vacuum, and so the barrier energy for electron extraction reduces. The ZnO nanosheet arrays exhibit a low turn-on field of 2.4 V/μm at 0.1 μA/cm{sup 2} and current density of 50.1 μA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 6.4 V/μm with field enhancement factor, β = 5812 and good field emission current stability. The nanosheet arrays grown by a facile electrodeposition process have great potential as robust high performance vertical structure electron emitters for future flat panel displays and vacuum electronic device applications.

  12. Nanotube field electron emission: principles, development, and applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunhan; Sun, Yonghai; Yeow, J T W

    2015-06-19

    There is a growing trend to apply field emission (FE) electron sources in vacuum electronic devices due to their fast response, high efficiency and low energy consumption compared to thermionic emission ones. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been regarded as a promising class of electron field emitters since the 1990s and have promoted the development of FE technology greatly because of their high electrical and thermal conductivity, chemical stability, high aspect ratio and small size. Recent studies have shown that FE from CNTs has the potential to replace conventional thermionic emission in many areas and that it exhibits advanced features in practical applications. Consequently, FE from nanotubes and applications thereof have attracted much attention. This paper provides a comprehensive review of both recent advances in CNT field emitters and issues related to applications of CNT based FE. FE theories and principles are introduced, and the early development of field emitters is related. CNT emitter types and their FE performance are discussed. The current situation for applications based on nanotube FE is reviewed. Although challenges remain, the tremendous progress made in CNT FE over the past ten years indicates the field's development potential.

  13. Enhancement of field emission characteristics of carbon nanotubes on oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Ashish; Roy, Susanta Sinha; Ray, Sekhar Chandra; Hazra, Kiran Shankar; Hamilton, Jeremy; Dickinson, Calum; McLaughlin, James; Misra, Devi Shankar

    2011-08-01

    Vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on p-type silicon wafer using thermal chemical vapor deposition process and subsequently treated with oxygen plasma for oxidation. It was observed that the electron field emission (EFE) characteristics are enhanced. It showed that the turn-on electric field (E(TOE)) of CNTs decreased from 0.67 (untreated) to 0.26 V/microm (oxygen treated). Raman spectra showed that the numbers of defects are increased, which are generated by oxygen-treatment, and absorbed molecules on the CNTs are responsible for the enhancement of EFE. Scanning electron microscopy and Transmission electron microscopy images were used to identify the quality and physical changes of the nanotube morphology and surfaces; revealing the evidence of enhancement in the field emission properties after oxygen-plasma treatment.

  14. Electron field emission from undoped and doped DLC films

    SciTech Connect

    Chakhovskoi, A G; Evtukh, A A; Felter, T E; Klyui, N I; Kudzinovsky, S Y; Litovchenko, V G; Litvin, Y M

    1999-06-01

    Electron field emission and electrical conductivity of undoped and nitrogen doped DLC films have been investigated. The films were grown by the PE CVD method from CH{sub 4}:H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}:H{sub 2}:N{sub 2} gas mixtures, respectively. By varying nitrogen content in the gas mixture over the range 0 to 45%, corresponding concentrations of 0 to 8 % (atomic) could be achieved in the films. Three different gas pressures were used in the deposition chamber: 0.2, 0.6 and 0.8 Torr. Emission current measurements were performed at approximately 10{sup -6} Torr using the diode method with emitter-anode spacing set at 20 {micro}m. The current - voltage characteristics of the Si field electron emission arrays covered with DLC films show that threshold voltage (V{sub th}) varies in a complex manner with nitrogen content. As a function of nitrogen content, V{sub th} initially increases rapidly, then decreases and finally increases again for the highest concentration. Corresponding Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) plots follow F-N tunneling over a wide range. The F-N plots were used for determination of the work function, threshold voltage, field enhancement factor and effective emission area. For a qualitative explanation of experimental results, we treat the DLC film as a diamond-like (sp{sup 3} bonded) matrix with graphite-like inclusions.

  15. Discrete space charge affected field emission: Flat and hemisphere emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kevin L.; Shiffler, Donald A.; Tang, Wilkin; Rittersdorf, Ian M.; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Harris, John R.; Lau, Y. Y.; Petillo, John J.; Luginsland, John W.

    2015-05-21

    Models of space-charge affected thermal-field emission from protrusions, able to incorporate the effects of both surface roughness and elongated field emitter structures in beam optics codes, are desirable but difficult. The models proposed here treat the meso-scale diode region separate from the micro-scale regions characteristic of the emission sites. The consequences of discrete emission events are given for both one-dimensional (sheets of charge) and three dimensional (rings of charge) models: in the former, results converge to steady state conditions found by theory (e.g., Rokhlenko et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 107, 014904 (2010)]) but show oscillatory structure as they do. Surface roughness or geometric features are handled using a ring of charge model, from which the image charges are found and used to modify the apex field and emitted current. The roughness model is shown to have additional constraints related to the discrete nature of electron charge. The ability of a unit cell model to treat field emitter structures and incorporate surface roughness effects inside a beam optics code is assessed.

  16. Field emission from single-crystalline HfC nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jinshi; Tang, Jie; Zhang Han; Shinya, Norio; Nakajima, Kiyomi; Qin, Lu-Chang

    2012-03-12

    Single HfC nanowire field emitter/electrode structures have been fabricated using nano-assembling and electron beam induced deposition. Field ion microscopy has been applied to study the atomic arrangement of facets formed on a field evaporation-modified HfC nanowire tip. Field evaporation and crystal form studies suggest that the {l_brace}111{r_brace} and {l_brace}110{r_brace} crystal planes have lower work functions, while the {l_brace}100{r_brace}, {l_brace}210{r_brace}, and {l_brace}311{r_brace} planes have higher work functions. Field emission measurement permits us to obtain that the work function of the {l_brace}111{r_brace} crystal plane is about 3.4 eV.

  17. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION RATES AND DEVELOPMENT OF EMISSION FACTORS FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of field testing to develop more reliable green house gas (GHG) emission estimates for Wastewater treatment (WWT) lagoons. (NOTE: Estimates are available for the amount of methane (CH4) emitted from certain types of waste facilities, but there is not adeq...

  18. FIELD EVALUATION OF LOW-EMISSION COAL BURNER TECHNOLOGY ON UTILITY BOILERS VOLUME III. FIELD EVALUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of field tests conducted to determine the emission characteristics of a Babcock and Wilcox Circular burner and Dual Register burner (DRB). The field tests were performed at two utility boilers, generally comparable in design and size except for the burner...

  19. Research on Field Emission and Dark Current in ILC Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kexin; Li, Yongming; Palczewski, Ari; Geng, Rongli

    2013-09-01

    Field emission and dark current are issues of concern for SRF cavity performance and SRF linac operation. Complete understanding and reliable control of the issue are still needed, especially in full-scale multi-cell cavities. Our work aims at developing a generic procedure for finding an active field emitter in a multi-cell cavity and benchmarking the procedure through cavity vertical test. Our ultimate goal is to provide feedback to cavity preparation and cavity string assembly in order to reduce or eliminate filed emission in SRF cavities. Systematic analysis of behaviors of field emitted electrons is obtained by ACE3P developed by SLAC. Experimental benchmark of the procedure was carried out in a 9-cell cavity vertical test at JLab. The energy spectrum of Bremsstrahlung X-rays is measured using a NaI(Tl) detector. The end-point energy in the X-ray energy spectrum is taken as the highest kinetic electron energy to predict longitudinal position of the active field emitter. Angular location of the field emitter is determined by an array of silicon diodes around irises of the cavity. High-resolution optical inspection was conducted at the predicted field emitter location.

  20. Groundwater impact on methane emissions from flooded paddy fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, A.; Boano, F.; Revelli, R.; Ridolfi, L.

    2015-09-01

    High methane (CH4) fluxes emitted from paddy fields strongly contribute to the accumulation of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, compromising the eco-compatibility of one of the most important world foods. A strong link exists between infiltration rates of irrigation water and CH4 emissions. Since depth to the groundwater table affects infiltration rates, a relevant groundwater impact is expected on CH4 emissions from paddy fields. In this work, a theoretical approach is adopted to investigate the aquifer effect on CH4 dynamics in paddies. Infiltration rates are strongly affected by the development of different connection states between aquifer and irrigation ponded water. A strong reduction in infiltration rates results from a water table near to the soil surface, when the system is hydraulically connected. When the groundwater level increases, the infiltration rate reduction due to the switch from disconnected to connected state promotes a relevant increase of CH4 emissions. This is due to a strong reduction of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) percolation, which leads to higher DOC availability for microbial CH4 production and, consequently, higher CH4 emissions. Our simulations show that CH4 fluxes can be reduced by up to 24% when groundwater level is decreased and the aquifer is disconnected from ponding water. In paddies with shallow aquifers, lowering the water table with a drainage system could thus represent a promising CH4 mitigation option.

  1. Multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-layer resistive carbon film field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications. The multi-layered film of the present invention consists of at least two layers of a conductive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, where the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure can be a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film can be a plurality of carbon layers, where adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced.

  2. Multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1998-10-13

    A multi-layer resistive carbon film field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications is disclosed. The multi-layered film of the present invention consists of at least two layers of a conductive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, where the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure can be a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film can be a plurality of carbon layers, where adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. 8 figs.

  3. Field emission of electrons from cylindrical metallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Dixit, Amrit

    2008-10-01

    In this communication the authors have derived an almost exact expression for the tunneling probability of an electron through the surface potential barrier on account of a negative charge on a cylindrical metallic dust particle and have used it to obtain the field emission current density from the surface of the particle. Based on these results, a parametric analysis of the phenomenon and comparison to the results of JWKB approximation (similar to Fowler-Nordheim theory) has been presented. These results are also applicable to a number of applications based on electric field emission from a thin metallic wire surrounded by a coaxial cylindrical surface at a high electric potential with respect to the wire. The investigation is of relevance to dusty plasmas in space and laboratory and carbon nanotubes.

  4. AC Magnetic Field Frequency Dependence of Magnetoacoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.; DeNale, R.

    1992-01-01

    Our recent study has proved a strong correlation between the low-frequency AC applied magnetic field amplitude dependence of the asymmetry of the magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) burst and the strength of the domain wall-defect interaction in iron-base ferromagnets. For the present study the AC magnetic field frequency dependence of the asymmetry has been investigated in the range of 1 to 200 Hz. When represented by the third moment of the rectified acoustic emission pulses, the asymmetry becomes a bell-shaped function of frequency with its center located around 25 Hz. This experiment has been performed with low carbon, high yield stress steel specimens of three different levels of domain wall-defect interaction strength. The results show that the increase in the interaction strength causes a vertical down shift of the asymmetry in the entire frequency range investigated.

  5. Hydrocarbon emissions in the Bakken oil field in North Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke-Maday, I.; Petron, G.; Miller, B.; Frost, G. J.; Peischl, J.; Kort, E. A.; Smith, M. L.; Karion, A.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Montzka, S. A.; Sweeney, C.; Ryerson, T. B.; Tans, P. P.; Schnell, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Within the past five years, the production of oil and natural gas in the United States from tight formations has increased rapidly due to advances in technology, such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. With the expansion of oil and natural gas extraction operations comes the need to better quantify their emissions and potential impacts on climate forcing and air quality. The Bakken formation within the Williston Basin in North Dakota has emerged as a large contributor to the recent growth in oil production and accounts for over 10% of domestic production. Close to 30% of associated gas co-produced with the oil is flared. Very little independent information is currently available to assess the oil and gas industry emissions and their impacts on regional air quality. In May 2014, an airborne field campaign was conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Earth System Research Laboratory and the University of Michigan to investigate hydrocarbon emissions from operations in the oil field. Here, we present results from the analysis for methane, several non-methane hydrocarbons and combustion tracers in 72 discrete air samples collected by the aircraft on nine different flights. Samples were obtained in the boundary layer upwind and downwind of the operations and in the free troposphere. We will show results of a multiple species analysis and compare them with field campaign data from other U.S. oil and gas fields, measurements from NOAA's Global Monitoring Division long-term observing network, and available bottom-up information on emissions from oil and gas operations.

  6. Peculiarities of the Field Electron Emission from Dust Grains

    SciTech Connect

    Richterova, I.; Beranek, M.; Pavlu, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Safrankova, J.

    2008-09-07

    The goal of the paper is investigation of the electron field emission that limits the attainable grain charge and can prevent electrostatic fragmentation of loosely bounded aggregates of dust grains. We have found that the effective work function of the spherical amorphous carbon grains does not depend on the relative beam energy. Preliminary results on an influence of the ion treatment/cleaning using the simultaneous electron and ion bombardments are discussed.

  7. Very stable electron field emission from strontium titanate coated carbon nanotube matrices with low emission thresholds.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Archana; Prasad, Abhishek; Moscatello, Jason P; Engelhard, Mark; Wang, Chongmin; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2013-01-22

    Novel PMMA-STO-CNT matrices were created by opened-tip vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with conformal coatings of strontium titanate (STO) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Emission threshold of 0.8 V/μm was demonstrated, about 5-fold lower than that of the as-grown VA-MWCNTs. This was obtained after considering the related band structures under the perspective of work functions and tunneling width as a function of the STO thickness. We showed that there is an optimum thickness of STO coatings to effectively reduce the work function of CNTs and yet minimize the tunneling width for electron emissions. Furthermore, simulation and modeling suggest that PMMA-STO-CNT matrices have suppressed screening effects and Coulombs' repulsion forces between electrons in adjacent CNTs, leading to low emission threshold, high emission density, and prolonged emission stability. These findings are important for practical application of VA-MWCNTs in field emission devices, X-ray generation, and wave amplification.

  8. Semi-shunt field emission in electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2014-08-04

    We introduce a concept of semi-shunts representing needle shaped metallic protrusions shorter than the distance between a device electrodes. Due to the lightening rod type of field enhancement, they induce strong electron emission. We consider the corresponding signature effects in photovoltaic applications; they are: low open circuit voltages and exponentially strong random device leakiness. Comparing the proposed theory with our data for CdTe based solar cells, we conclude that stress can stimulate semi-shunts' growth making them shunting failure precursors. In the meantime, controllable semi-shunts can play a positive role mitigating the back field effects in photovoltaics.

  9. Synthesis and field emission properties of Cu dendritic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianwen; Yu, Ke; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2010-03-01

    Cu dendritic nanostructures were synthesized on ITO glass substructure by electrochemical deposition. SEM images showed that these Cu dendritic nanostuctures revealed a clear and well-defined dendritic fractal structure with a pronounced trunk and highly ordered branches distributed on both sides of the trunk. The diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model was used to explain the fractal growth of Cu dendritic nanostructures. Field emission properties of these Cu dendritic nanostructures were measured, which have possessed good performance with the turn-on field of 7.5 V/μm (defined as the electric field required to be detected at a current density of 0.1 mA/cm 2) and the field enhancement factor β of 1094.

  10. Electron field emission from nanostructured cubic boron nitride islands

    SciTech Connect

    Teii, Kungen; Matsumoto, Seiichiro; Robertson, John

    2008-01-07

    Nanocrystal-assembled cubic boron nitride (cBN) islands are formed by using low-energy ({approx}20 eV) ion irradiation in an inductively coupled fluorine-containing plasma. The temporal evolution of surface morphology and roughness reveals three-dimensional island growth for initial sp{sup 2}-bonded BN and subsequent cBN, accompanied by a high frequency of renucleation. The formation of cBN islands enhances the field emission and reduces the turn-on field down to around 9 V/{mu}m due to an increase in the island-related field. The results demonstrate the high potential of cBN for field emitters, comparable to other wide band gap semiconductors.

  11. Fabrication and field emission properties of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng

    Research on the area of the fabrication of carbon nanotubes is fundamental and critical to the entire subject of carbon nanotubes. This dissertation describes an experiment to fabricate carbon nanotubes by the method of Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) and the electron field emission properties of carbon nanotubes. A MPECVD system was built and used to fabricate the vertical aligned carbon nanotube film. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the as-grown carbon nanotube samples. By using a metal-containing diblock copolymer catalyst, carbon nanotubes with a diameter of 4 to 7 nm were synthesized. The effect of growth parameters was studied and these parameters were optimized. The growth of high density (˜ 109/cm2) and large coverage area (˜ 1 cm2) carbon nanotube film on glass substrate at low growth temperature was realized. Based on a series of experiments, the effects of oxygen atoms and Ti/N underlayer on the growth were studied. A series of experiments were evaluated to characterize the field emission properties of the various carbon nanotube cathodes. A simple technique of scratching the pattern surface by a cotton swab was found effective to activate more carbon nanotubes to emit. By using the techniques of photolithography and shadow mask, various carbon nanotube patterns were achieved in order to obtain high emission current density and a low threshold electric field. The lowest threshold electric field was found to be 2.3 V/um. The highest current density was found to be 2.2 mA/cm2 when the electric field was 4.7 V/um. Our work shows that it is feasible to provide greater control over the fabrication of carbon nanotubes so that more obstacles in the broad application of carbon nanotubes can be overcome.

  12. A thin film triode type carbon nanotube field emission cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanborn, Graham; Turano, Stephan; Collins, Peter; Ready, W. Jud

    2013-01-01

    The field electron emission of carbon nanotubes has been heavily studied over the past two decades for various applications, such as in display technologies, microwave amplifiers, and spacecraft propulsion. However, a commercializable lightweight and internally gated electron source has yet to be realized. This work presents the fabrication and testing of a novel internally gated carbon nanotube field electron emitter. Several specific methods are used to prevent electrical shorting of the gate layer, a common failure for internally gated devices. A unique design is explored where the etch pits extend into the silicon substrate and isotropic etching is used to create a lateral buffer zone between the gate and carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes are self-aligned to and within 10 microns from the gate, which creates large electric fields at low potential inputs. Initial tests confirm high field emission performance with an anode current density (based on total area of the device) of 293 μA cm-2 and a gate current density of 1.68 mA cm-2 at 250 V.

  13. Field emission properties of a graphene/polymer composite.

    PubMed

    Patole, Shashikant P; Lee, Jong Hak; Park, Jae Hong; Yu, Seong Man; Makotchenko, V G; Nazarov, A S; Fedorov, V E; Shin, Dong Wook; Alegaonkar, Prashant S; More, Mahendra A; Yoo, Ji-Beom

    2013-11-01

    Thin graphene/polymer sheet composites were fabricated using easily soluble expanded graphite (ESEG), and their field emission (FE) parameters were examined. Due to the high dispersability of ESEG, a stable graphene suspension was prepared by ultrasonication in toluene without the need for a surfactant. The suspension consisted of exfoliated graphene sheets with a thickness of 1 - 2 nm. Using a calendering process, the solution was further shear mixed with ethyl cellulose to obtain a well-dispersed graphene/polymer composite. The composite was screen printed onto a conducing substrate to fabricate the FE cathode layers. The FE measurements were taken in a diode configuration at an applied electrostatic field and inter-electrode distance of 1.7 to 6 V/microm and approximately 200 microm, respectively. The threshold turn-on-field was approximately 3.5 V/microm at a current density of approximately 10 microA/cm2 with a corresponding mean field enhancement factor of 1350 +/- 50. Emission occurred mainly from the edges and bends of the graphene layers. The luminescence uniformity of the composite cathode layers was examined using a phosphor-coated anode.

  14. Experimental investigations of hard photon emission from strong crystalline fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medenwaldt, R.; Møller, S. P.; Jensen, B. N.; Strakhovenko, V. M.; Uggerhøj, E.; Worm, T.; Elsener, K.; Sona, P.; Connell, S. H.; Sellschop, J. P. F.; Avakian, R. O.; Avetisian, A. E.; Taroian, S. P.

    1992-05-01

    For the first time very pronounced high-energy photon peaks have been measured in the radiation emission from 70, 150 and 240 GeV electrons incident at 0.1-1.0 mrad to the axis in diamond and Si crystals. The energy of the photons in the peaks is 0.7-0.8 times the particle energy with yields of 50 times the Bethe-Heitler one (in diamond). The peaks consist of single photons and are caused by the influence of strong crystalline fields on emission of coherent bremsstrahlung, emitted when the ultrarelativistic electrons cross the rows of atoms in a crystal plane. The effect should be envisaged as a source for nearly monoenergetic photons in the multihundred GeV-region.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of field emission from a planar nanodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Torfason, Kristinn; Valfells, Agust; Manolescu, Andrei

    2015-03-15

    High resolution molecular dynamics simulations with full Coulomb interactions of electrons are used to investigate field emission in planar nanodiodes. The effects of space-charge and emitter radius are examined and compared to previous results concerning transition from Fowler-Nordheim to Child-Langmuir current [Y. Y. Lau, Y. Liu, and R. K. Parker, Phys. Plasmas 1, 2082 (1994) and Y. Feng and J. P. Verboncoeur, Phys. Plasmas 13, 073105 (2006)]. The Fowler-Nordheim law is used to determine the current density injected into the system and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to find a favourable point of emission on the emitter surface. A simple fluid like model is also developed and its results are in qualitative agreement with the simulations.

  16. Experiments and simulations of ion-enhanced interfacial chemistry on aqueous NaCl aerosols

    PubMed

    Knipping; Lakin; Foster; Jungwirth; Tobias; Gerber; Dabdub; Finlayson-Pitts

    2000-04-14

    A combination of experimental, molecular dynamics, and kinetics modeling studies is applied to a system of concentrated aqueous sodium chloride particles suspended in air at room temperature with ozone, irradiated at 254 nanometers to generate hydroxyl radicals. Measurements of the observed gaseous molecular chlorine product are explainable only if reactions at the air-water interface are dominant. Molecular dynamics simulations show the availability of substantial amounts of chloride ions for reaction at the interface, and quantum chemical calculations predict that in the gas phase chloride ions will strongly attract hydroxl radicals. Model extrapolation to the marine boundary layer yields daytime chlorine atom concentrations that are in good agreement with estimates based on field measurements of the decay of selected organics over the Southern Ocean and the North Atlantic. Thus, ion-enhanced interactions with gases at aqueous interfaces may play a more generalized and important role in the chemistry of concentrated inorganic salt solutions than was previously recognized.

  17. Neutrino emissivity from electron-positron annihilation in hot matter in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Amsterdamski, P.; Haensel, P. )

    1990-10-15

    The neutrino emissivity due to electron-positron annihilation in a strong magnetic field is computed. A strong magnetic field can significantly increase the neutrino emissivity at {ital T}{similar to}10{sup 9} K.

  18. Field-emission properties of sulphur doped nanocrystalline diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranauskas, V.; Sampaio, M. A.; Peterlevitz, A. C.; Ceragioli, H. J.; Quispe, J. C. R.

    2007-03-01

    Nanostructured diamond doped with sulphur has been prepared using a hot-filament assisted chemical vapour deposition system fed with an ethyl alcohol, carbon disulfide, hydrogen, and argon mixture. The reduction of diamond grains to the nanoscale is relevant to create a network of defective grain boundaries which may be n-type doped to facilitate the transport and injection of electrons to the diamond grains located at the vacuum interface, enhancing the electron field-emission properties of the samples. The downsizing was produced by secondary nucleation and defects induced by sulphur and argon atoms in the chemical vapour deposition surface reactions. Sulphur also acts as an n-type dopant of diamond. Raman measurements show that the samples are nanodiamonds embedded in a matrix of graphite and disordered carbon grains and the morphology, revealed by field electron scanning microscopy, shows that the grains are in the range of 10 to 30 nm. The lowest threshold achieved for field emission was 13.20 V/μm.

  19. Field emission energy distributions from individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransen, M. J.; van Rooy, Th. L.; Kruit, P.

    1999-05-01

    We measured field emission energy distributions of electrons emitted from individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes mounted on tungsten tips. The shape of the energy distribution is strongly sample dependent. Some nanotube emitters exhibit an almost metallic behaviour, while others show sharply peaked energy distributions. The smallest half-width we measured was only 0.11 eV, without correction for the broadening of the energy analyzer. A common feature of both types of carbon nanotube energy spectra is that the position of the peaks in the spectrum depends linearly on the extraction voltage, unlike metallic emitters, where the position stays in the vicinity of the Fermi level. With a small modification to the field emission theory for metals we extract the distance between the highest filled energy level of the nanotube and the vacuum potential, the field on the emitter surface, the emitter radius and the emitting area, from the energy distribution and the Fowler-Nordheim plot. The last two parameters are in good agreement with transmission electron micrographs of such samples. The sharply-peaked energy distributions from other samples indicate that resonant states can exist at the top of the nanotube.

  20. Cesiated thin-film field-emission microcathode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macaulay, J. M.; Brodie, I.; Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.

    1992-08-01

    The effect of adsorbed cesium on the performance of thin-film field-emission microcathode arrays with molybdenum tips is discussed. A reduction in the voltage required to extract an average of 1 nA per tip from 50 to 15 V is reported. Cesiated arrays have exhibited stable performance when operated continuously for up to 650 h at array current densities up to 100 A/cm2, with minimal leakage current. Using the Fowler-Nordheim theory, analysis of current-voltage characteristics of a heavily cesiated emitter array gives values for the emitting area, work function, and geometrical factor.

  1. Work function measurements using a field emission retarding potential technique.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, M H M O; Dall'Agnol, F F; Pimentel, V L; Mammana, V P; Tatsch, P J; den Engelsen, D

    2016-03-01

    Herein we describe the measurement of the work function of a metal with advanced equipment based on the field emission retarding potential (FERP) method using a carbon nanotube (CNT) as cathode. The accuracy of the FERP method using a CNT emitter is described and a comparison between measurements of the work functions of aluminum, barium, calcium, gold, and platinum with published data will be presented. Our FERP equipment could be optimized with the aid of particle tracing simulations. These simulations led us to insert a magnetic collimator to improve the collection efficiency at the anode. PMID:27036828

  2. Polarization oscillations of near-field thermal emission.

    PubMed

    Machida, Manabu; Narimanov, Evgenii; Schotland, John C

    2016-06-01

    We consider the polarization of thermal emission in the near field of various materials, including dielectrics and metallic systems with resonant surface modes. We find that, at thermal equilibrium, the degree of polarization exhibits spatial oscillations with a period of approximately half the optical wavelength, independent of material composition. This result contrasts with that of Setala et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett.88, 123902 (2002)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.88.123902], who find monotonic decay of the degree of polarization for systems in local thermal equilibrium. PMID:27409433

  3. Emission of Methyl halides from Japanese rice paddy fields.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komori, D.; Sudo, S.; Akiyama, H.; Nishimura, S.; Yagi, K.; Hayashi, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Yamada, K.; Toyoda, S.; Koba, K.; Yoshida, N.

    2005-12-01

    Rice paddy field is one of emission source of methyl halide (MeX: X = Cl, Br, I) which are concerned about stratospheric ozone depletion and enhanced aerosol formation. Although significant amounts of MeX which are estimated to be emitted from rice paddies affect to regional and global atmospheric environment, understandings and recent estimations of production and consumption mechanisms of MeX have large uncertainty with depending on environmental conditions. In this study, new flux data sets of MeX emissions from Japanese rice paddy fields were reported. The fluxes of MeX were compared with environmental data sets which included meteorological parameters (ambient air temperature, ambient MeX concentrations, humidity, solar irradiance), soil parameters (soil temperature, pH, redox potential, soil water contents) to understand the emission mechanisms of MeX. Gas fluxes of C2H4 were also measured, which indicate rice plants growth and ageing. Observations of MeX flux were conducted with using automated closed chamber sampling system in Tsukuba, Japan, during a cultivation season of rice from May 2005 to September 2005. Rice plants were cultivated under intermittent irrigation. Soil gases were collected manually by using evacuated 1L stainless canisters once a week and every 4 hours in certain day during this period. Other environmental parameters were automatically obtained every 10 minutes. Seasonal variation of gas emissions of C2H4 were observed in maximum tillering phase and heading phase. In addition, clearly diurnal flux trends of C2H4 depending on solar irradiance were observed. These results suggested rice plant was remarkably growing in these phase. Similarly, large amounts of gas emissions of MeBr and MeI were observed in the same phase. Diurnal flux trends of MeBr and MeI were associated with solar irradiance. Results were generally consistent with previous reports (Redeker et al., 2000). On the other hand, MeCl flux was increased in later periods than

  4. Electron emission and fragmentation of molecules in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, K.; Prümper, G.; Hatamoto, T.; Okunishi, M.; Mathur, D.

    2007-06-01

    We have constructed an apparatus for high-resolution electron spectroscopy and electron-ion coincidence experiments on gas-phase molecules in intense laser fields. The apparatus comprises an electron time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer and an ion TOF spectrometer with a position detector, placed on either side of an effusive molecular beam. The ionizing radiation is either the fundamental (800 nm wavelength) of a Ti:sapphire laser or frequency doubled 400-nm light, with pulse durations of ~ 150 fs and the repetition rate of 1 kHz. We have investigated the electron emission and fragmentation of linear alcohol molecules, methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol, in laser fields with peak intensities up to ~ 1×10 14 W/cm2. Details of our apparatus are described along with an overview of some recent results.

  5. Preequilibrium neutron emission in heavy ion reaction: Mean field effect and multiple emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Sabyasachi; Nandy, Maitreyee; Mohanty, A. K.; Gambhir, Y. K.

    2016-09-01

    Effects of nuclear mean field and of multiple preequilibrium (PEQ) emission on double differential neutron multiplicity distribution from heavy ion reactions (12C+165Ho and 20Ne+165Ho ) at 10-30 MeV/u have been investigated in the framework of the semiclassical formalism for heavy ion reaction (henceforth termed "HION") developed earlier. HION follows the equilibration of a target+projectile composite system through the kinematics of two-body scattering. In the present work nuclear density distribution in the composite system is estimated in the relativistic mean field (RMF) approach. The nucleon-nucleon collision rates and subsequently the nucleon emission probability are calculated from this density distribution. A second approach based on a semiphenomenological formalism is also used for nuclear density distribution. Energy-angle distribution of neutron multiplicities calculated with this modified HION model coupled with multiple PEQ emission could reproduce the measured data of earlier workers in the projectile energy range of 10-30 MeV/u.

  6. Coherent infrared emission from myoglobin crystals: an electric field measurement.

    PubMed

    Groot, Marie-Louise; Vos, Marten H; Schlichting, Ilme; van Mourik, Frank; Joffre, Manuel; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Martin, Jean-Louis

    2002-02-01

    We introduce coherent infrared emission interferometry as a chi(2) vibrational spectroscopy technique and apply it to studying the initial dynamics upon photoactivation of myoglobin (Mb). By impulsive excitation (using 11-fs pulses) of a Mb crystal, vibrations that couple to the optical excitation are set in motion coherently. Because of the order in the crystal lattice the coherent oscillations of the different proteins in the crystal that are associated with charge motions give rise to a macroscopic burst of directional multi-teraHertz radiation. This radiation can be detected in a phase-sensitive way by heterodyning with a broad-band reference field. In this way both amplitude and phase of the different vibrations can be obtained. We detected radiation in the 1,000-1,500 cm(-1) frequency region, which contains modes sensitive to the structure of the heme macrocycle, as well as peripheral protein modes. Both in carbonmonoxy-Mb and aquomet-Mb we observed emission from six modes, which were assigned to heme vibrations. The phase factors of the modes contributing to the protein electric field show a remarkable consistency, taking on values that indicate that the dipoles are created "emitting" at t = 0, as one would expect for impulsively activated modes. The few deviations from this behavior in Mb-CO we propose are the result of these modes being sensitive to the photodissociation process and severely disrupted by it.

  7. Thermionic field emission in gold nitride Schottky nanodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyropoulos-Antonakakis, N.; Sarantopoulou, E.; Kollia, Z.; Samardžija, Z.; Kobe, S.; Cefalas, A. C.

    2012-11-01

    We report on the thermionic field emission and charge transport properties of gold nitride nanodomains grown by pulsed laser deposition with a molecular fluorine laser at 157 nm. The nanodomains are sandwiched between the metallic tip of a conductive atomic force microscope and a thin gold layer forming thus a metal-semiconductor-metal junction. Although the limited existing data in the literature indicate that gold nitride was synthesized previously with low efficiency, poor stability, and metallic character; in this work, it is shown that gold nitride nanodomains exhibit semiconducting behavior and the metal-semiconductor-metal contact can be modeled with the back-to-back Schottky barrier model. From the experimental I-V curves, the main charge carrier transport process is found to be thermionic field emission via electron tunneling. The rectifying, near symmetric and asymmetric current response of nanocontacts is related to the effective contact area of the gold nitride nanodomains with the metals. A lower limit for the majority charge carriers concentration at the boundaries of nanodomains is also established using the full depletion approximation, as nanodomains with thickness as low as 6 nm were found to be conductive. Current rectification and charge memory effects are also observed in "quite small" conductive nanodomains (6-10 nm) due to stored charges. Indeed, charges near the surface are identified as inversion domains in the phase shift mapping performed with electrostatic force microscopy and are attributed to charge trapping at the boundaries of the nanodomains.

  8. Density functional theory for field emission from carbon nano-structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhibing

    2015-12-01

    Electron field emission is understood as a quantum mechanical many-body problem in which an electronic quasi-particle of the emitter is converted into an electron in vacuum. Fundamental concepts of field emission, such as the field enhancement factor, work-function, edge barrier and emission current density, will be investigated, using carbon nanotubes and graphene as examples. A multi-scale algorithm basing on density functional theory is introduced. We will argue that such a first principle approach is necessary and appropriate for field emission of nano-structures, not only for a more accurate quantitative description, but, more importantly, for deeper insight into field emission.

  9. Flexible and Transparent Field Emission Devices based on Graphene-Nanowire Hybrid Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Muhammad; Heo, Kwang; Lee, Byung Yang; Seo, David H.; Seo, Sunae; Jian, Jikang; Hong, Seunghun

    2011-03-01

    Recent developments in wafer scale synthesis and transfer of graphene have made it possible to fabricate electrodes for versatile flexible devices. However, a flexible and transparent graphene-based field emission device has not been explored yet. Herein, we report the fabrication of flexible and transparent field emission devices based on graphene-nanowire hybrid structures. In this work, we successfully grew vertically-aligned Au nanowires on graphene surface using an electrochemical method and utilized it as a cathode. We also utilized a graphene electrode for an anode resulting in a transparent and flexible field emission device. Our field emission devices can be bent down to 22 mm radius of curvature without any significant change in its field emission currents. This flexible and transparent field emission device based on graphene-nanowire hybrid structures will utilized for various applications such as field emission displays, x-ray tubes, and pressure sensors.

  10. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission test sequence for field... Systems § 1065.935 Emission test sequence for field testing. (a) Time the start of field testing as.... Start the field test within 20 min of engine shutdown. (3) If the standard-setting part requires...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emission test sequence for field... Systems § 1065.935 Emission test sequence for field testing. (a) Time the start of field testing as.... Start the field test within 20 min of engine shutdown. (3) If the standard-setting part requires...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emission test sequence for field... Systems § 1065.935 Emission test sequence for field testing. (a) Time the start of field testing as.... Start the field test within 20 min of engine shutdown. (3) If the standard-setting part requires...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.935 - Emission test sequence for field testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission test sequence for field... Systems § 1065.935 Emission test sequence for field testing. (a) Time the start of field testing as.... Start the field test within 20 min of engine shutdown. (3) If the standard-setting part requires...

  14. Electric field induced Lyman-α emission of a hydrogen beam for electric field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chérigier-Kovacic, L. Doveil, F.; Ström, P.; Lejeune, A.

    2015-06-15

    Electric field induced Lyman-α emission is a new way of measuring weak electric fields in vacuum and in a plasma. It is based on the emission of Lyman-α radiation (121.6 nm) by a low-energy metastable H atom beam due to Stark-quenching of the 2s level induced by the field. In this paper, we describe the technique in detail. Test measurements have been performed in vacuum between two plates polarized at a controlled voltage. The intensity of emitted radiation, proportional to the square of the field modulus, has been recorded by a lock-in technique, which gives an excellent signal to noise ratio. These measurements provide an in situ calibration that can be used to obtain the absolute value of the electric field. A diagnostic of this type can help to address a long standing challenge in plasma physics, namely, the problem of measuring electric fields without disturbing the equilibrium of the system that is being studied.

  15. Field emission from optimized structure of carbon nanotube field emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, V.; Noguchi, T.; Kato, S.

    2016-04-01

    The authors report a detail study on the emission properties of field emitter array (FEA) of micro-circular emitters of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The FEAs were fabricated on patterned substrates prepared with an array of circular titanium (Ti) islands on titanium nitride coated tantalum substrates. CNTs were rooted into these Ti islands to prepare an array of circular emitters. The circular emitters were prepared in different diameters and pitches in order to optimize their structure for acquiring a high emission current. The pitch was varied from 0 to 600 μm, while a diameter of circular emitters was kept constant to be 50 μm in order to optimize a pitch. For diameter optimization, a diameter was changed from 50 to 200 μm while keeping a constant edge-to-edge distance of 150 μm between the circular emitters. The FEA with a diameter of 50 μm and a pitch of 120 μm was found to be the best to achieve an emission current of 47 mA corresponding to an effective current density of 30.5 A/cm2 at 7 V/μm. The excellent emission current was attributed to good quality of CNT rooting into the substrate and optimized FEA structure, which provided a high electric field on a whole circular emitter of 50 μm and the best combination of the strong edge effect and CNT coverage. The experimental results were confirmed with computer simulation.

  16. Vacuum field energy and spontaneous emission in anomalously dispersive cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Douglas H.; Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2011-05-15

    Anomalously dispersive cavities, particularly white-light cavities, may have larger bandwidth to finesse ratios than their normally dispersive counterparts. Partly for this reason, they have been proposed for use in laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO)-like gravity-wave detectors and in ring-laser gyroscopes. In this paper we analyze the quantum noise associated with anomalously dispersive cavity modes. The vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode is proportional to the cavity-averaged group velocity of that mode. For anomalously dispersive cavities with group index values between 1 and 0, this means that the total vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode must exceed ({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}/2. For white-light cavities in particular, the group index approaches zero and the vacuum field energy of a particular spatial mode may be significantly enhanced. We predict enhanced spontaneous emission rates into anomalously dispersive cavity modes and broadened laser linewidths when the linewidth of intracavity emitters is broader than the cavity linewidth.

  17. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizuno, Yosuke; Fishman, G. Jerry; Hartmann, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), supernova remnants, and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments. Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet, rather than by the scattering of particles back and forth across the shock as in Fermi acceleration. Shock acceleration' is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different spectral properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants. We will review recent PIC simulations of relativistic jets and try to make a connection with observations.

  18. Continuous field investigation assessing nitrogen and phosphorus emission from irrigated paddy field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Kanami; Aichi, Masaatsu; Zessner, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    In order to maintain good river environment, it is very important to understand and to control nutrient behavior such as Nitrogen and Phosphorus. Other than urban and industrial waste water, nutrient emission from agricultural activity is dominant pollution source into the river system. Rice is one of the staple products of Asia and paddy field occupies large areas in Asian countries. Rice is also widely cultivated in Japan. Paddy field occupies large areas in Japanese river basin areas. While paddy field can deteriorate river water quality by discharging fertilizer, it is also suggested that paddy field has water purification function. Regarding to nutrient emission from paddy field, existing monitored data are insufficient so as to discuss quantitatively seasonal change of material behavior including flooding season and dry season and to evaluate year round comprehensive impact from paddy field to the river system. These are not sufficient data for discussion of material flow and emission impact quantitatively as well as qualitatively. We have carried out field investigation in paddy fields in middle reach of the Tone River Basin. The aim of the survey is understanding of water and nutrient balance in paddy field. In order to understand emission impact from paddy field to river system, all input and output flow are measured to calculate nutrient balance in paddy field. Therefore we observed quantity of water flow into/from paddy field, water quality change of inflow and outflow during flooding season. We set focus on a monitoring paddy field IM, and monitored continuously water and nutrient behavior. By measuring water quality and flow rate of inflow, outflow, infiltrating water, ground water and depth of flooding water, we tried to quantitatively understand N and P cycle around paddy field including seasonal tendency, change accompanying with rainy events and occurred according to agricultural events like fertilization. At the beginning of flooding season, we

  19. Emission reduction by multipurpose buffer strips on arable fields.

    PubMed

    Sloots, K; van der Vlies, A W

    2007-01-01

    In the area managed by Hollandse Delta, agriculture is under great pressure and the social awareness of the agricultural sector is increasing steadily. In recent years, a stand-still has been observed in water quality, in terms of agrochemicals, and concentrations even exceed the standard. To improve the waterquality a multi-purpose Field Margin Regulation was drafted for the Hoeksche Waard island in 2005. The regulation prescribes a crop-free strip, 3.5 m wide, alongside wet drainage ditches. The strip must be sown with mixtures of grasses, flowers or herbs. No crop protection chemicals or fertilizer may be used on the strips. A total length of approximately 200 km of buffer strip has now been laid. Besides reducing emissions, the buffer strips also stimulate natural pest control methods and encourage local tourism. Finally, the strips should lead to an improvement in the farmers' image. The regulation has proved to be successful. The buffer strips boosted both local tourism and the image of the agricultural sector. Above all, the strips provided a natural shield for emission to surface water, which will lead to an improvement of the water quality and raise the farmers' awareness of water quality and the environment.

  20. Beam extraction experiment with field-emission arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, H.; Watanabe, A.; Shiho, M.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental project aimed to develop FEL drivers using a field-emission array is under way. The subject covers design and fabrication of novel micro-emitters, operation of FEAs, beam formation and emittance diagnostics. So far the generation of a focused beam has been demonstrated with an array of double-gated microemitters. Active control of FEAs has greatly improved the stability of the emission current. Large FEAs with an emitting area of up to 2 x 2 cm{sup 2} have been fabricated for the production of high-current beams. DC beams (1 - 5 keV < 100 {mu}A) extracted from Spindt cathodes were propagated over 1 m and projected on a fluorescent screen. Separate images of FEA tips were observed and emittance measurement has been carried out. The cathode is going to be replaced by a double-gated FEA to improve the beam quality. Pulsed extraction of high currents will also be tested, employing a non-gated FEA as the cathode of a 1 MV induction linac. Results of these experiments will be presented and perspectives concerning the FEA gun will be discussed.

  1. Local field emission spectroscopy of InSb micrograins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, N. D.; Glukhovskoy, E. G.; Mosiyash, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    Local electron density-of-state spectra and level parameters in indium antimonide (InSb) micrograins have been studied using a tunneling microscope in the field-electron emission regime. The activation energies (ψ) of electron levels and electron lifetimes (τ) on these levels have been determined based on the correspondence of current-voltage characteristics to the probabilities of emission. Several local electron levels in a near-surface region of intrinsic ( i-InSb) micrograins are identified with ψ ˜ 0.73, 1.33, 1.85, 2.15, and 5.1 eV and τ ˜ 5 × 10-8-3 × 10-7 s, respectively. A physical model is proposed, according to which "light" electrons are localized due to the Coulomb interaction and their dimensional quantization takes place in the near-surface zone as determined by the effective mass, energy, and concentration of electrons and the radius of curvature of the micrograin surface.

  2. A field emission microscope in an advanced students' laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greczylo, Tomasz; Mazur, Piotr; Debowska, Ewa

    2006-03-01

    This paper describes a university level experiment during which students can observe the surface structure and determine the work function of a clean single tungsten crystal and a crystal covered with barium. The authors used a commercial field emission microscope offered by Leybold Didactic and designed an experiment which can be easily reproduced and performed in a students' laboratory. The use of a digital camera and computer allowed simultaneous observation and imaging of the surface of the body-centred cubic structure of the single tungsten crystal. Some interesting results about the changes in tungsten work function with time and with barium coverage are presented and discussed. The data help to improve knowledge and skills in the calculation of measurement uncertainty.

  3. Nanodiamonds for field emission: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Maria Letizia; Orlanducci, Silvia; Rossi, Marco; Tamburri, Emanuela

    2015-03-12

    The aim of this review is to highlight the recent advances and the main remaining challenges related to the issue of electron field emission (FE) from nanodiamonds. The roadmap for FE vacuum microelectronic devices envisages that nanodiamonds could become very important in a short time. The intrinsic properties of the nanodiamond materials indeed meet many of the requirements of cutting-edge technologies and further benefits can be obtained by tailored improvements of processing methodologies. The current strategies used to modulate the morphological and structural features of diamond to produce highly performing emitting systems are reported and discussed. The focus is on the current understanding of the FE process from nanodiamond-based materials and on the major concepts used to improve their performance. A short survey of non-conventional microsized cold cathodes based on nanodiamonds is also reported.

  4. Thermionic field emission transport in carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Perello, David J; Lim, Seong Chu; Chae, Seung Jin; Lee, Innam; Kim, Moon J; Lee, Young Hee; Yun, Minhee

    2011-03-22

    With experimental and analytical analysis, we demonstrate a relationship between the metal contact work function and the electrical transport properties saturation current (Isat) and differential conductance (σsd=∂Isd/∂Vsd) in ambient exposed carbon nanotubes (CNT). A single chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown 6 mm long semiconducting single-walled CNT is electrically contacted with a statistically significant number of Hf, Cr, Ti, Pd, and Au electrodes, respectively. The observed exponentially increasing relationship of Isat and σsd with metal contact work function is explained by a theoretical model derived from thermionic field emission. Statistical analysis and spread of the data suggest that the conduction variability in same CNT devices results from differences in local surface potential of the metal contact. Based on the theoretical model and methodology, an improved CNT-based gas sensing device layout is suggested. A method to experimentally determine gas-induced work function changes in metals is also examined.

  5. Influence of the Electric Field on Secondary Electron Emission Yield

    SciTech Connect

    Beranek, M.; Richterova, I.; Nemecek, Z.; Pavlu, J.; Safrankova, J.

    2008-09-07

    We have applied a technique based on levitation of a single charged grain in the quadrupole. We have used 3-6 micrometer spherical grains from amorphous carbon. These grains were charged by an electron beam with the energy tunable up to 10 keV and the grain charge was continuously monitored. If the grain is charged by an constant energy, its surface potential is set to the value when incident electrons are slow down to the energy where the secondary emission yield is equal to unity. Our investigations reveal that this energy changes proportionally to the grain surface field. Moreover, we have observed a shift of charging characteristics after a long-time electron bombardment.

  6. Origin of enhanced field emission characteristics postplasma treatment of multiwalled carbon nanotube array

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyu; Lim, Seong Chu; Lee, Young Hee; Choi, Young Chul

    2008-08-11

    Field emission properties of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with plasma treatment have been investigated. Origin of the enhanced field emission current was interpreted in terms of surface morphology of MWCNTs, work function, field enhancement factor, and emission area. Contrary to the general belief, the change in the work function increased slightly with the plasma treatment time, whereas the field enhancement factor decreased. We found that the number of emittable MWCNTs played a dominant role in the current enhancement.

  7. Methyl bromide emissions from a covered field: II. Volatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment to investigate the environmental fate and transport of methyl bromide in agricultural fields is described. The methyl bromide volatilization rate was determined as a function of time for conditions where methyl bromide was applied at a rate of 843 kg in a 3.5-ha (i.e., 240 kg/ha) field covered with plastic at a depth of 25 cm. Three methods were used to estimate the methyl bromide volatilization rate, including: the aerodynamic, theoretical profile shape and integrated horizontal flux methods. The highest methyl bromide volatilization rates were at the beginning of the experiment. Within the first 24 h, approximately 36% of the applied methyl bromide mass was lost. Diurnally, the largest volatilization rates occurred during the day when temperatures were high and the atmosphere was unstable. Cooler temperatures, light winds, and neutral to stable atmospheric conditions were present at night, reducing the flux. The total emission calculated using these methods was found to be approximately 64% ({+-} 10%) of the applied mass. A mass balance was calculated using each flux estimation technique and several methods for analyzing the data. The average mass recovery using all the flux methods was 867 kg ({+-}83 kg), which was 102.8% ({+-}9.8%) of the applied (i.e., 843 kg). The range in the mass balance percent (i.e., percent of applied mass that is measured) is from 88 to 112%. The averaged mass balance percent for the aerodynamic method, which involved using the measured data directly, was approximately 100.8%. The total emission calculated using the aerodynamic method was found to be approximately 62% ({+-}11%) of the applied mass. 29 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Wang

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  9. A model study of the role of workfunction variations in cold field emission from microstructures with inclusion of field enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, H.; Joshi, R. P.; Neuber, A.; Dickens, J.

    2015-10-01

    An analytical study of field emission from microstructures is presented that includes position-dependent electric field enhancements, quantum corrections due to electron confinement and fluctuations of the workfunction. Our calculations, applied to a ridge microstructure, predict strong field enhancements. Though quantization lowers current densities as compared to the traditional Fowler-Nordheim process, strong field emission currents can nonetheless be expected for large emitter aspect ratios. Workfunction variations arising from changes in electric field penetration at the surface, or due to interface defects or localized screening, are shown to be important in enhancing the emission currents.

  10. Field investigation to assess nutrient emission from paddy field to surface water in river catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Kanami; Aichi, Masaatsu; Zessner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    In order to maintain good river environment, it is remarkably important to understand and to control nutrient behavior such as Nitrogen and Phosphorus. Our former research dealing with nutrient emission analysis in the Tone River basin area in Japan, in addition to urban and industrial waste water, nutrient emission from agricultural activity is dominant pollution source into the river system. Japanese style agriculture produces large amount of rice and paddy field occupies large areas in Japanese river basin areas. While paddy field can deteriorate river water quality by outflow of fertilizer, it is also suggested that paddy field has water purification function. As we carried out investigation in the Tone River Basin area, data were obtained which dissolved nitrogen concentration is lower in discharging water from paddy field than inflowing water into the field. Regarding to nutrient emission impact from paddy field, sufficient data are required to discuss quantitatively seasonal change of material behavior including flooding season and dry season, difference of climate condition, soil type, and rice species, to evaluate year round comprehensive impact from paddy field to the river system. In this research, field survey in paddy field and data collection relating rice production were carried out as a preliminary investigation to assess how Japanese style paddy field contributes year round on surface water quality. Study sites are three paddy fields located in upper reach of the Tone River basin area. The fields are flooded from June to September. In 2014, field investigations were carried out three times in flooding period and twice in dry period. To understand characteristics of each paddy field and seasonal tendency accompanying weather of agricultural event, short term investigations were conducted and we prepare for further long term investigation. Each study site has irrigation water inflow and outflow. Two sites have tile drainage system under the field and

  11. Stable field emission performance of SiC-nanowire-based cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Wan; Choi, Young-Jin; Choi, Kyoung Jin; Park, Jae-Gwan; Park, Jae-Hwan; Pimenov, Sergei M.; Frolov, Vadim D.; Abanshin, Nikolay P.; Gorfinkel, Boris I.; Rossukanyi, Nikolay M.; Rukovishnikov, Alexander I.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we report the fabrication and testing of diode-type low-voltage field emission display (FED) devices with SiC-nanowire-based cathodes. The SiC-nanowire FEDs (flat vacuum lamps) were characterized by low emission threshold fields (~2 V µm-1), high current density and stable long-term performance. The analysis of field emission data evidenced that the Schottky effect would have a considerable influence on the field emission from nanowire-based samples, leading to the true values of the field enhancement factor being significantly lower than those derived from Fowler-Nordheim plots.

  12. A Method for Studying the Electric Field Enhanced Emission of Carriers from Deep Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, In Duk; Choe, Byungdoo

    1986-11-01

    A spectroscopic method is proposed for studying the electric field enhanced emission of trapped carriers from deep levels. The resulting spectrum directly represents the effect of the electric field enhanced emission only, thus removing the intrinsic difficulty in treating the electric field enhanced emission from deep levels of large concentration. This method involves two steps of measurements of the ionized trap densities; in the first step the electric field pulse is applied to induce an enhanced emission, and in the second without the electric field pulse. Experimental results by this method have been given for the DX center in LPE Al068Ga0.32As:Sn.

  13. Recent Progress in Silicon-Based MEMS Field Emission Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenard, Roger X.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tajmar, Martin

    2005-02-01

    The Indium Field Emission Thruster (In-FET) is a highly characterized and space-proven device based on space-qualified liquid metal ion sources. There is also extensive experience with liquid metal ion sources for high-brightness semiconductor fabrications and inspection Like gridded ion engines, In-FETs efficiently accelerate ions through a series of high voltage electrodes. Instead of a plasma discharge to generate ions, which generates a mixture of singly and doubly charged ions as well as neutrals, indium metal is melted (157°C) and fed to the tip of a capillary tube where very high local electric fields perform more-efficient field emission ionization, providing nearly 100% singly charged species. In-FETs do not have the associated losses or lifetime concerns of a magnetically confined discharge and hollow cathode in ion thrusters. For In-FETs, propellant efficiencies ˜100% stipulate single-emitter currents ⩽10μA, perhaps as low as 5μA of current. This low emitter current results in ⩽0.5 W/emitter. Consequently, if the In-FET is to be used for future Human and Robotic missions under President Bush's Exploration plan, a mechanism to generate very high power levels is necessary. Efficient high-power operation requires many emitter/extractor pairs. Conventional fabrication techniques allow 1-10 emitters in a single module, with pain-staking precision required. Properly designed and fabricated In-FETs possess electric-to-jet efficiency >90% and a specific mass <0.25 kg/kWe. MEMS techniques allow reliable batch processing with ˜160,000 emitters in a 10×10-cm array. Developing a 1.5kW 10×10-cm module is a necessary stepping-stone for >500 kWe systems where groups of 9 or 16 modules, with a single PPU/feed system, form the building blocks for even higher-power exploration systems. In 2003, SNL and ARCS produced a MEMS-based In-FET 5×5 emitter module with individually addressable emitter/extractor pairs on a 15×15mm wafer. The first MEMS thruster

  14. Field emission of carbon nanotube array with normal-gate cold cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jian-Feng; Mu, Xiao-Wen; Qiao, Xian-Wu; Chen, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Jun-Hong

    2010-05-01

    A hexagon pitch carbon nanotube (CNT) array vertical to the normal gate of cold cathode field emission displayer (FED) is simulated by solving the Laplace equation. The calculated results show that the normal gate causes the electric field around the CNT tops to be concentrated and the emission electron beam becomes a column. The field enhancement factor and the emission current intensity step up greatly compared with those of the diode structure. Emission current density increases rapidly with the decrease of normal-gate aperture. The gate voltage exerts a critical influence on the emission current.

  15. Ultrafast thermionic emission from metal irradiated using a femtosecond laser and an electric field in combination

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tingfeng; Guo, Jin; Shao, Junfeng; Wang, Dinan; Chen, Anmin E-mail: mxjin@jlu.edu.cn; Jin, Mingxing E-mail: mxjin@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-03-15

    Ultrafast thermionic emission from gold film irradiated with a femtosecond laser pulse in the presence of an additional electric field is analyzed using a two-temperature equation combined with a modified Richardson equation. The calculated results show that the duration of the emission is below 1 ps. Supplying an additional electric field is found to change the emission from the metal surface. Given the same laser fluence, this additional field reduces the work function of the metal, and thus improves the efficiency of thermionic emission. These results help to understand the mechanism and suggest ways to improve emissions in the context of ultrafast thermalized electron systems.

  16. Highly efficient electron field emission from graphene oxide sheets supported by nickel nanotip arrays.

    PubMed

    Ye, Dexian; Moussa, Sherif; Ferguson, Josephus D; Baski, Alison A; El-Shall, M Samy

    2012-03-14

    Electron field emission is a quantum tunneling phenomenon whereby electrons are emitted from a solid surface due to a strong electric field. Graphene and its derivatives are expected to be efficient field emitters due to their unique geometry and electrical properties. So far, electron field emission has only been achieved from the edges of graphene and graphene oxide sheets. We have supported graphene oxide sheets on nickel nanotip arrays to produce a high density of sharp protrusions within the sheets and then applied electric fields perpendicular to the sheets. Highly efficient and stable field emission with low turn-on fields was observed for these graphene oxide sheets, because the protrusions appear to locally enhance the electric field and dramatically increase field emission. Our simple and robust approach provides prospects for the development of practical electron sources and advanced devices based on graphene and graphene oxide field emitters. PMID:22288579

  17. Field Emission Electron Microprobe Analysis of Halogens in Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacker, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Field emission electron microprobe is capable of higher resolution and lower voltage than other microprobes, making it an ideal instrument for analysis of small accessory minerals in thin section such as apatite. In this study, the field emission electron microprobe was evaluated for analysis of fluorine and chlorine in apatite. Analysis was conducted on (001), (100) and an intermediate section of natural apatite crystals, using the JEOL JXA-8530F Hyperprobe, located at Fayetteville State University in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Conditions were beam current of 10 nanoamps, accelerating voltages from 5-20 kV, and spot sizes from 1-10 micrometers. Very short counting times were used, some as little as 2 seconds. Analytical strategies exploited the fact that excitation energies for fluorine Kα are much lower than for chlorine. Earlier studies (e.g. Stormer et al. 1993; Fialin and Chopin, 2006) documented the complex behavior of beam-driven migration, subsurface accumulation and desorption during fluorine analysis. The cumulative effect is increase and then fall of count rates with time and repeated analysis. The details of earlier studies were reproduced: (1) Apatite analysis by electron microprobe has two additional unknown variables, which are the crystallographic orientation of the unknown and of the standard. (2) The most reliable measure of fluorine cps is derived from a regression to zero time, accounting for crystal orientation; (3) Changing the analytical conditions (accelerating voltage, spot size, duration of analysis) changes only the time scale over which migration and desorption take place. New results from the JEOL Hyperprobe show that, for all crystal orientations, initial fluorine cps increase from 5 and 7 kV to 10 kV, but decrease systematically with further increases in kV, interpreted as loss of fluorine without concomitant excitation of X-rays. To date, fluorine analysis is routinely conducted at 15 and 20 kV. In contrast, chlorine initial

  18. Fabrication of carbon nanotube emitters on the graphite rod and their high field emission performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Hoon Shin, Dong; Nam Yun, Ki; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Jin Lee, Cheol

    2014-01-27

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters with small emission area were fabricated on graphite rods using CNT films. By introducing the edge polishing process, the field emission performance of the CNT emitter was much improved, which showed a very high emission current of 6.34 mA (1.6 A/cm{sup 2}) under an applied electric field of 5.3 V/μm. It also indicates good long-term emission stability, which reveals no degradation in the emission current for 20 h. The emission patterns demonstrate uniform and well-focused electron beam spots. The enhanced field emission performance is mainly attributed to the suppressed edge emission after the edge polishing process.

  19. Field emission chemical sensor for receptor/binder, such as antigen/antibody

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, John A.

    1986-01-01

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  20. Improved Field Emission Algorithms for Modeling Field Emission Devices Using a Conformal Finite-Difference Time-Domain Particle-in-Cell Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, M. C.; Loverich, J.; Stoltz, P. H.; Nieter, C.

    2013-10-01

    This work introduces a conformal finite difference time domain (CFDTD) particle-in-cell (PIC) method with an improved field emission algorithm to accurately and efficiently study field emission devices. The CFDTD method is based on the Dey-Mittra algorithm or cut-cell algorithm, as implemented in the Vorpal code. For the field emission algorithm, we employ the elliptic function v(y) found by Forbes and a new fitting function t(y)2 for the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) equation. With these improved correction factors, field emission of electrons from a cathode surface is much closer to the prediction of the exact FN formula derived by Murphy and Good. This work was supported in part by both the U.S. Department of Defense under Grant No. FA9451-07-C-0025 and the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-SC0004436.

  1. Leakage and field emission in side-gate graphene field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bartolomeo, A.; Giubileo, F.; Iemmo, L.; Romeo, F.; Russo, S.; Unal, S.; Passacantando, M.; Grossi, V.; Cucolo, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    We fabricate planar graphene field-effect transistors with self-aligned side-gate at 100 nm from the 500 nm wide graphene conductive channel, using a single lithographic step. We demonstrate side-gating below 1 V with conductance modulation of 35% and transconductance up to 0.5 mS/mm at 10 mV drain bias. We measure the planar leakage along the SiO2/vacuum gate dielectric over a wide voltage range, reporting rapidly growing current above 15 V. We unveil the microscopic mechanisms driving the leakage, as Frenkel-Poole transport through SiO2 up to the activation of Fowler-Nordheim tunneling in vacuum, which becomes dominant at higher voltages. We report a field-emission current density as high as 1 μA/μm between graphene flakes. These findings are important for the miniaturization of atomically thin devices.

  2. Low-macroscopic field emission properties of wide bandgap copper aluminium oxide nanoparticles for low-power panel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan Banerjee, Arghya; Joo, Sang W.

    2011-09-01

    Field emission properties of CuAlO2 nanoparticles are reported for the first time, with a low turn-on field of approximately 2 V µm - 1 and field enhancement factor around 230. The field emission process follows the standard Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling of cold electron emission. The emission mechanism is found to be a combination of low electron affinity, internal nanostructure and large field enhancement at the low-dimensional emitter tips of the nanoparticles. The field emission properties are comparable to the conventional carbon-based field emitters, and thus can become alternative candidate for field emission devices for low-power panel applications.

  3. Low-macroscopic field emission properties of wide bandgap copper aluminium oxide nanoparticles for low-power panel applications.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arghya Narayan; Joo, Sang W

    2011-09-01

    Field emission properties of CuAlO(2) nanoparticles are reported for the first time, with a low turn-on field of approximately 2 V µm(-1) and field enhancement factor around 230. The field emission process follows the standard Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling of cold electron emission. The emission mechanism is found to be a combination of low electron affinity, internal nanostructure and large field enhancement at the low-dimensional emitter tips of the nanoparticles. The field emission properties are comparable to the conventional carbon-based field emitters, and thus can become alternative candidate for field emission devices for low-power panel applications. PMID:21841217

  4. Field Thermal Infrared Emissivity Dependence on Soil Moisture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate estimate of land surface temperature, a key parameter in surface energy balance models, requires knowledge of the surface emissivity. Emissivity dependence on soil water content has been already reported and modeled under controlled conditions at the laboratory. This study completes and ext...

  5. Stable electron field emission from carbon nanotubes emitter transferred on graphene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ning; Chen, Jing; Qu, Ke; Khan, Qasim; Lei, Wei; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2015-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arrays grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method was transferred onto the substrate covered with graphene layer obtained by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology. The graphene buffer layer provides good electrical and thermal contact to the CNTs. The field emission characteristics of this hybrid structure were investigated in this study. Compared with the CNTs arrays directly grown on the silicon substrate, the hybrid emitter shows better field emission performance, such as high emission current and long-term emission stability. The presence of this graphene layer was shown to improve the field emission behavior of CNTs. This work provides an effective way to realize stable field emission from CNTs emitter and similar hybrid structures.

  6. In-FEEP ion beam neutralization with thermionic and field emission cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrese, C.; Polk, J.; Mueller, J.; Owens, A.; Tajmar, M.; Fink, R.; Spindt, C.

    2002-01-01

    Charge neutralization of an In-FEEP thruster was demonstrated with three different electron sources by zeroing the floating potential of the thruster and neutralizer system. The three cathodes used in the investigation include a mixed metal thermionic cathode, a carbon nanotube field emission cathode, and a Spindt-type Mo field emission array cathode.

  7. Photoelectric charging of dust particles: Effect of spontaneous and light induced field emission of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Dixit, A.

    2009-09-07

    The authors have analyzed the charging of dust particles in a plasma, taking into account the electron/ion currents to the particles, electron/ion generation and recombination, electric field emission, photoelectric emission and photoelectric field emission of electrons under the influence of light irradiation; the irradiance has been assumed to be at a level, which lets the particles retain the negative sign of the charge. Numerical results and discussion conclude the papers.

  8. Universal field-emission model for carbon nanotubes on a metal tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, D. Y.; Zhang, G. Y.; Liu, S.; Sakurai, T.; Wang, E. G.

    2002-01-01

    Electron-field-emission properties have been investigated systematically for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fabricated on a metal tip. With a vacuum gap of 0.7 mm, the threshold field is as low as 0.7 V/μm and the current density approaches 10 mA/cm2 at an electronic field of 1.0 V/μm. The emission current is quite stable with very low fluctuation. The emission behavior is in excellent agreement with Fowler-Nordheim theory and no current saturation is found even with an emission current reaching 1 A/cm2. A universal relationship 1/β=d2/d+1/β0 between the field amplification factor β and the vacuum gap d is developed within a two-region field-emission model. This relationship provides the basis for a microscopic understanding of CNT emitters and is applicable to other systems as well.

  9. Extremely stable field emission from AlZnO nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, X. Y.; Li, L. M.; Yu, H. C.; Chen, Y. J.; Wang, Y. G.; Wang, T. H.

    2006-07-01

    Extremely stable electric field emission from well-aligned AlZnO nanowire arrays is realized. The emission current density is up to 6.5mA/cm2, and no current saturation is observed. The turn-on field is 2.9V/μm as d (distance between the nanowire emitters and anode) is 0.64mm. After aging for two days, the emission current is extremely stable with the fluctuations of ±0.4%. The high stability arises from the high crystal quality with few surface states of the nanowires and the in situ fabrication of cathodes. The field emission behaviors are in excellent agreement with Fowler-Nordheim theory, and the relationship between the field enhancement factor β and d follows a universal equation. Our results imply that AlZnO nanowire arrays are promising candidates for field emission displays.

  10. Metallic nanowire-graphene hybrid nanostructures for highly flexible field emission devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Muhammad; Heo, Kwang; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Joohyung; Seo, David H.; Seo, Sunae; Jian, Jikang; Hong, Seunghun

    2011-09-01

    We report a simple but efficient method to prepare metallic nanowire-graphene (MN-G) hybrid nanostructures at a low temperature and show its application to the fabrication of flexible field emission devices. In this method, a graphene layer was transferred onto an anodic alumina oxide template, and vertically aligned Au nanowires were grown on the graphene surface via electrodeposition method. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated the fabrication of flexible field emission devices, where the MN-G hybrid nanostructures and another graphene layer on PDMS substrates were utilized as a cathode and an anode for highly flexible devices, respectively. Our field emission device exhibited stable and high field emission currents even when bent down to the radius of curvature of 25 mm. This MN-G hybrid nanostructure should prove tremendous flexibility for various applications such as bio-chemical sensors, field emission devices, pressure sensors and battery electrodes.

  11. Carbon-Coated Porous Aluminum Oxides Used as Spacer Overlayers to Reduce Secondary Electron Emission for Field Emission Display Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tung-Yuan; Pan, Fu-Ming; Chen, Cheng-Li; Chen, Te-Ming; Chen, Tsung-Han; Kuo, Chih-Che; Lin, Ting-Li

    2013-07-01

    Porous surface structures can mitigate the charging effect of vacuum spacers of field-emission flat panel display due to the abundance of secondary electrons (SEs) emitted from the spacers during field emission display (FED) operation. In this study, we fabricated porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) overlayers on glass substrates to examine the effect of carbon deposition on the reduction of SE emissions. This paper reports that uniform AAO overlayers can be simultaneously prepared on both sides of a glass plate 2 ×10 cm2 in size. The SE emission of the AAO overlayer was examined by using an Auger electron microscope. When a small amount of carbon is evaporation-deposited on the as-prepared AAO overlayer, the SE emission efficiency is significantly decreased and the reduction in the SE emission is ascribed to the low SE yield of the carbon deposit and the suppression of SE escape from the narrowed pore channels. However, a heavy deposition of carbon results in a smaller surface roughness of the AAO overlayer, thereby increasing SE emission. The carbon-coated AAO overlayer demonstrates favorable electrical and mechanical properties, making it suitable for use in FED vacuum spacers.

  12. Methane emissions from global rice fields: Magnitude, spatiotemporal patterns, and environmental controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bowen; Tian, Hanqin; Ren, Wei; Tao, Bo; Lu, Chaoqun; Yang, Jia; Banger, Kamaljit; Pan, Shufen

    2016-09-01

    Given the importance of the potential positive feedback between methane (CH4) emissions and climate change, it is critical to accurately estimate the magnitude and spatiotemporal patterns of CH4 emissions from global rice fields and better understand the underlying determinants governing the emissions. Here we used a coupled biogeochemical model in combination with satellite-derived contemporary inundation area to quantify the magnitude and spatiotemporal variation of CH4 emissions from global rice fields and attribute the environmental controls of CH4 emissions during 1901-2010. Our study estimated that CH4 emissions from global rice fields varied from 18.3 ± 0.1 Tg CH4/yr (Avg. ±1 SD) under intermittent irrigation to 38.8 ± 1.0 Tg CH4/yr under continuous flooding in the 2000s, indicating that the magnitude of CH4 emissions from global rice fields is largely dependent on different water schemes. Over the past 110 years, our simulated results showed that global CH4 emissions from rice cultivation increased by 85%. The expansion of rice fields was the dominant factor for the increasing trends of CH4 emissions, followed by elevated CO2 concentration, and nitrogen fertilizer use. On the contrary, climate variability had reduced the cumulative CH4 emissions for most of the years over the study period. Our results imply that CH4 emissions from global rice fields could be reduced through optimizing irrigation practices. Therefore, the future magnitude of CH4 emissions from rice fields will be determined by the human demand for rice production as well as the implementation of optimized water management practices.

  13. Generalized Fowler-Nordheim Theory of Field Emission of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shi-Dong; Chen, Lu

    2008-07-01

    Based on the low-energy band structure of carbon nanotubes (CNs), we develop a generalized Fowler-Nordheim theory of the CN field emission, in which the behavior of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics depends on the electric field and the diameter of the CNs. This formalism reveals the key differences of field emission between conventional bulk metallic emitters and low-dimensional emitters and gives a clear physical understanding of the non-Fowler-Nordheim feature of the I-V characteristics of the CN field emission.

  14. Generalized Fowler-Nordheim theory of field emission of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shi-Dong; Chen, Lu

    2008-07-11

    Based on the low-energy band structure of carbon nanotubes (CNs), we develop a generalized Fowler-Nordheim theory of the CN field emission, in which the behavior of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics depends on the electric field and the diameter of the CNs. This formalism reveals the key differences of field emission between conventional bulk metallic emitters and low-dimensional emitters and gives a clear physical understanding of the non-Fowler-Nordheim feature of the I-V characteristics of the CN field emission. PMID:18764229

  15. Observation of valence band electron emission from n-type silicon field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Meng; Kim, Han; Akinwande, Akintunde I.

    1999-08-01

    Electron emission from the valence band of n-type Si field emitter arrays is reported. High electrostatic field at the surface of Si was achieved by reducing the radius of the emitter tip. Using oxidation sharpening, 1 μm aperture polycrystalline Si gate, n-type Si field emitter arrays with small tip radius (˜10 nm) were fabricated. Three distinct emission regions were observed: conduction band emission at low gate voltages, saturated current emission from the conduction band at intermediate voltages, and valence band plus conduction band emission at high gate voltages. Emission currents at low and high voltages obey the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The ratio of the slopes of the corresponding Fowler-Nordheim fits for these two regions is 1.495 which is in close agreement with the theoretical value of 1.445.

  16. Densification effects of the carbon nanotube pillar array on field-emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kuang-Yu; Chou, Chia-Hsin; Liao, Chan-Yu; Li, Yu-Ren; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a simple densification method for carbon nanotube (CNT) pillars is proposed to achieve high-performance field emission characteristics and stable emission. Through capillary force during solution evaporation, the CNT density in each pillar can be increased by about six times without causing damage to the crystallinity of CNTs. The densified CNT pillars exhibit lower series resistance, sharper pillars, better contacts, higher thermal conductivity, and better mechanical stiffness than as-grown ones. Therefore, the threshold field of the field emitter with such CNT pillars of 50 µm height can be reduced to 1.98 V/µm, as compared with 2.2 V/µm for the undensified ones. Moreover, the fluctuation of field-emission current decreases from 15.5 to 9.4% after the stress tests at a field of 2 V/µm for 1800 s. These findings imply that the densified CNT pillars are promising for the field-emission applications.

  17. Greenhouse gas emissions from dairy manure management: a review of field-based studies.

    PubMed

    Owen, Justine J; Silver, Whendee L

    2015-02-01

    Livestock manure management accounts for almost 10% of greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture globally, and contributes an equal proportion to the US methane emission inventory. Current emissions inventories use emissions factors determined from small-scale laboratory experiments that have not been compared to field-scale measurements. We compiled published data on field-scale measurements of greenhouse gas emissions from working and research dairies and compared these to rates predicted by the IPCC Tier 2 modeling approach. Anaerobic lagoons were the largest source of methane (368 ± 193 kg CH4 hd(-1) yr(-1)), more than three times that from enteric fermentation (~120 kg CH4 hd(-1) yr(-1)). Corrals and solid manure piles were large sources of nitrous oxide (1.5 ± 0.8 and 1.1 ± 0.7 kg N2O hd(-1) yr(-1), respectively). Nitrous oxide emissions from anaerobic lagoons (0.9 ± 0.5 kg N2O hd(-1) yr(-1)) and barns (10 ± 6 kg N2O hd(-1) yr(-1)) were unexpectedly large. Modeled methane emissions underestimated field measurement means for most manure management practices. Modeled nitrous oxide emissions underestimated field measurement means for anaerobic lagoons and manure piles, but overestimated emissions from slurry storage. Revised emissions factors nearly doubled slurry CH4 emissions for Europe and increased N2O emissions from solid piles and lagoons in the United States by an order of magnitude. Our results suggest that current greenhouse gas emission factors generally underestimate emissions from dairy manure and highlight liquid manure systems as promising target areas for greenhouse gas mitigation.

  18. Field emission of carbon quantum dots synthesized from a single organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiahui; Yang, Bingjun; Yang, Juan; Yu, Shengxue; Chen, Jiangtao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a facile synthesis of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) and its field emission performance are reported. The CQDs are prepared from a single N, N-dimethylformamide acting as carbon and nitrogen-doping sources simultaneously. The CQDs are investigated by photoluminescence, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The CQDs have an average size of 3 nm and are doped with N atoms. CQD dispersion shows strong fluorescence under UV illumination. For the first time, the field emission behavior of CQDs coated on Si substrate is studied. As a candidate of cold cathode, the CQDs display good field emission performance. The CQD emitter reaches the current density of 1.1 mA cm(-2) at 7.0 V μm(-1) and exhibits good long-term emission stability, suggesting promising application in field emission devices. PMID:27671204

  19. Field emission of carbon quantum dots synthesized from a single organic solvent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiahui; Yang, Bingjun; Yang, Juan; Yu, Shengxue; Chen, Jiangtao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a facile synthesis of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) and its field emission performance are reported. The CQDs are prepared from a single N, N-dimethylformamide acting as carbon and nitrogen-doping sources simultaneously. The CQDs are investigated by photoluminescence, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The CQDs have an average size of 3 nm and are doped with N atoms. CQD dispersion shows strong fluorescence under UV illumination. For the first time, the field emission behavior of CQDs coated on Si substrate is studied. As a candidate of cold cathode, the CQDs display good field emission performance. The CQD emitter reaches the current density of 1.1 mA cm(-2) at 7.0 V μm(-1) and exhibits good long-term emission stability, suggesting promising application in field emission devices.

  20. Field emission of carbon quantum dots synthesized from a single organic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiahui; Yang, Bingjun; Yang, Juan; Yu, Shengxue; Chen, Jiangtao

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a facile synthesis of carbon quantum dots (CQDs) and its field emission performance are reported. The CQDs are prepared from a single N, N-dimethylformamide acting as carbon and nitrogen-doping sources simultaneously. The CQDs are investigated by photoluminescence, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The CQDs have an average size of 3 nm and are doped with N atoms. CQD dispersion shows strong fluorescence under UV illumination. For the first time, the field emission behavior of CQDs coated on Si substrate is studied. As a candidate of cold cathode, the CQDs display good field emission performance. The CQD emitter reaches the current density of 1.1 mA cm-2 at 7.0 V μm-1 and exhibits good long-term emission stability, suggesting promising application in field emission devices.

  1. Growth of Aligned Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and the Effect of Adsorbates on the Field Emission Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, W. I.; Teo, K. B. K.; Lansley, S. B.; Chhowalla, M.; Amaratunga, G. A. J.; Semet, V.; Binh, Vu Thien; Pirio, G.; Legagneux, P.

    2003-10-01

    In attempt to decipher the field emission characteristics of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), we have developed a fabrication method based on plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) to provide utmost control of the nanotube structure such as their alignment, individual position, diameter, length and morphology. We investigated the field emission properties of these nanotubes to elucidate the effect of adsorbates on the nanotubes. Our results show that although the adsorbates cause an apparent lowering of the required turn on voltage/field of the nanotubes, the adsorbates undesirably cause a saturation of the current, large temporal fluctuations in the current, and also a deviation of the emission characteristics from Fowler-Nordheim like emission. The adsorbates are easily removed by extracting an emission current of 1 uA per nanotube or using a high applied electric field (˜25V/um).

  2. Emissions of Nonmethane Organic Compounds at an Illinois (USA) Landfill: Preliminary Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bogner, J.; Spokas, K.; Niemann, M.; Niemann, L.; Baker, J.

    1997-08-01

    Current US regulatory models for estimating emissions of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills require field validation to determine if the models are realistic. A project was initiated to begin to develop a field method for direct measurement of landfill NMOC emissions and, concurrently, develop improved sampling and analysis methods for individual NMOCs in landfill gas matrices. Two contrasting field sites at the Greene Valley Landfill, DuPage County, Illinois, USA, were established.

  3. Method of synthesizing small-diameter carbon nanotubes with electron field emission properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jie (Inventor); Du, Chunsheng (Inventor); Qian, Cheng (Inventor); Gao, Bo (Inventor); Qiu, Qi (Inventor); Zhou, Otto Z. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube material having an outer diameter less than 10 nm and a number of walls less than ten are disclosed. Also disclosed are an electron field emission device including a substrate, an optionally layer of adhesion-promoting layer, and a layer of electron field emission material. The electron field emission material includes a carbon nanotube having a number of concentric graphene shells per tube of from two to ten, an outer diameter from 2 to 8 nm, and a nanotube length greater than 0.1 microns. One method to fabricate carbon nanotubes includes the steps of (a) producing a catalyst containing Fe and Mo supported on MgO powder, (b) using a mixture of hydrogen and carbon containing gas as precursors, and (c) heating the catalyst to a temperature above 950.degree. C. to produce a carbon nanotube. Another method of fabricating an electron field emission cathode includes the steps of (a) synthesizing electron field emission materials containing carbon nanotubes with a number of concentric graphene shells per tube from two to ten, an outer diameter of from 2 to 8 nm, and a length greater than 0.1 microns, (b) dispersing the electron field emission material in a suitable solvent, (c) depositing the electron field emission materials onto a substrate, and (d) annealing the substrate.

  4. [Emission Inventory of Crop Residues Field Burning and Its Temporal and Spatial Distribution in Sichuan Province].

    PubMed

    He, Min; Wang, Xing-rui; Han, Li; Feng, Xiao-qiong; Mao, Xue

    2015-04-01

    Based on the collected activity data, the 2012 emission inventory of crop residues field burning in Sichuan province was developed through the emission factor approach. Besides, the temporal and spatial distribution of pollutant emissions was also analysed in this paper. The results showed that the total emissions of SO2, NO(x), NH3, CH4, NMVOC, CO, PM2.5, EC and OC from crop residues field burning in Sichuan province in the year of 2012 were 1 210, 12 185, 2 827, 20 659, 40 463, 292 671, 39 277, 1 984 and 10 215 t, respectively; The rice straw, wheat straw, corn straw and oil rape straw were four major contributors to pollutant emissions, with a total contribution about 88% - 94%; Crop residues field burning emissions were affected by agricultural harvesting. Temporally, the emissions were concentrated in July and August with a small peak in May; Spatially, the Chengdu plain, the Northern area and the Eastern area of Sichuan province were the highest emission areas, while the Western area had relatively low emissions; The key uncertain sources included emission factors and parameters used for estimating crop burning amounts.

  5. Microbial mechanisms to reduce the uncertainties in the CH4 emissions from global rice fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaljit, K.; Tian, H.; Ren, W.; Yang, J.

    2013-12-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, methane (CH4) uptake or emission represents the net balance between activities of different microbial organisms including anaerobic Methanogens that produce CH4 and Methanotrophs which oxidize CH4 in the aerobic environments. In this way, anaerobic soil environments such as rice fields are major source of terrestrial CH4 emissions. However, large uncertainties in the CH4 emission estimates have been reported from rice fields. The bottom-up and top-down methods showed a wide range of CH4 emissions estimations ranging from 25 to 300 Tg yr-1 from rice fields. The major reason for uncertainties in the CH4 emissions includes the water management that alters the balance of Methanogens and Methanotrophs in the rice fields. Two kinds of water management practices are followed including continuous flooding (CF) which refers to the continuous submergence as well as alternate wetting and drying (AWD) in which the rice fields are drained for several days during the growing season. The AWD provides aeration stress on Methanogens resulting in lower CH4 emissions than CF water management followed in the rice fields. A single aeration during growing season may significantly reduce the CH4 emission from the rice fields. Currently, most of the models structures assume that Methanogens become active once the soil moisture content is raised to saturation. However, several laboratory scale studies have indicated that following aeration the Methanogens don't become fully functional immediately even if the soil moisture content is raised to saturation. In this study, we integrated the aeration stress mechanisms on the Methanogens in the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM). The improved version of DLEM was used to conduct uncertainty analysis on global CH4 emission estimation following CF and AWD water management in the rice fields. Results of this study have shown that inclusion of the aeration stress mechanism on Methanogens in the modeling framework has

  6. Synthesis and excellent field emission properties of three-dimensional branched GaN nanowire homostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enling; Sun, Lihe; Cui, Zhen; Ma, Deming; Shi, Wei; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-10-01

    Three-dimensional branched GaN nanowire homostructures have been synthesized on the Si substrate via a two-step approach by chemical vapor deposition. Structural characterization reveals that the single crystal GaN nanowire trunks have hexagonal wurtzite characteristics and grow along the [0001] direction, while the homoepitaxial single crystal branches grow in a radial direction from the six-sided surfaces of the trunks. The field emission measurements demonstrate that the branched GaN nanowire homostructures have excellent field emission properties, with low turn-on field at 2.35 V/μm, a high field enhancement factor of 2938, and long emission current stability. This indicates that the present branched GaN nanowire homostructures will become valuable for practical field emission applications.

  7. Field emission from carbon nanotubes produced using microwave plasma assisted CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.; Yoon, S.F.; Ahn, J.; Gan, B.; Rusli; Yu, M.B.; Cheah, L.K.; Shi, X.

    2000-01-30

    Electron field emission from carbon nanotubes prepared using microwave plasma assisted CVD has been investigated. The nanotubes, ranging from 50 to 120 nm in diameter and a few tens of microns in length, were formed under methane and hydrogen plasma at 720 C with the aid of iron-oxide particles. The morphology and growth direction of the nanotubes are found to be strongly influenced by the flow ratio of methane to hydrogen. However, the electron field emission from these massive nanotubes show similar characteristics, i.e., high emission current at low electric fields.

  8. Growth temperature effect on field emission properties of printable carbon nanotubes cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lili; Sun, Zhuo; Chen, Ting; Que, Wenxiu

    2006-05-01

    The carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in the temperature range of 500-750 °C. The dependence of field emission properties of screen-printed cathode on the CNTs growth temperatures was studied. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and Raman spectra showed that with the temperature increasing from 500 °C to 750 °C, the average diameter of most CNTs decreased, and the crystallinity of the nanotubes increases as shown by the narrower and more intense G peak in the Raman spectra. It is found that the higher growth temperature, the better field emission properties of the screen-printed nanotubes cathodes, i.e. lower turn-on emission field, higher emission current and more uniform emission.

  9. Characterization of field emission from carbon nanofibers on a metal tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Y.; Tone, D.; Nagatsu, S.; Endo, T.; Kita, S.; Okuyama, F.

    2009-08-01

    Field electron emission from carbon nanofibers (CNFs) grown on a tungsten tip has been characterized by measuring emission current-voltage (I-V) curves and observing emission patterns on a phosphor screen. CNFs were vertically grown on the tip by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Field emission from the CNFs over 100 μA was strongly dependent on emitter-anode distance, and the dominant field electrons were emitted within an angular spread of Δθ ˜25°, indicating the electron emission took place mainly from the emitter's apex area. By analyzing the I-V curves with the aid of the Fowler-Nordheim theory, the maximum current density was estimated to be about J =2×109 A/m2.

  10. Field emission behavior of cuboid zinc oxide nanorods on zinc-filled porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ke; Zhang, Yongsheng; Xu, Rongli; Jiang, Desheng; Luo, Laiqiang; Li, Qiong; Zhu, Ziqiang; Lu, Wei

    2005-01-01

    Single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods with cuboid morphology have been prepared on the zinc-filled porous silicon substrate using a vapor phase transport method. Field-emission measurements showed that the turn-on field and threshold field of the cuboid ZnO nanorods film were about 3.2 and 8.2 V/μm respectively. From the emitter surface, a homogeneous emission image was observed with emission site density (ESD) of ˜10 4 cm -2. The better emission uniformity and the high ESD may be attributed to a large number of ZnO nanocrystallites as emitter on the surface of the nanorod end contributing to emission.

  11. High performance bulk metallic glass/carbon nanotube composite cathodes for electron field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Hojati-Talemi, Pejman; Gibson, Mark A.; East, Daniel; Simon, George P.

    2011-11-07

    We report the preparation of new nanocomposites based on a combination of bulk metallic glass and carbon nanotubes for electron field emission applications. The use of bulk metallic glass as the matrix ensures high electrical and thermal conductivity, high thermal stability, and ease of processing, whilst the well dispersed carbon nanotubes act as highly efficient electron emitters. These advantages, alongside excellent electron emission properties, make these composites one of the best reported options for electron emission applications to date.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of near-field terahertz emission from semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corzo-Garcia, S. C.; Hernandez-Serrano, A. I.; Castro-Camus, E.; Mitrofanov, O.

    2016-07-01

    We simulated the carrier dynamics in InGaAs after ultrafast photoexcitation. By using a finite-difference time-domain approach we were able to analyze the near terahertz field emission caused by the motion of such carriers. We found that both the current parallel and normal to the interface take a relevant role in the terahertz emission. We also found that the ballistic motion of the carriers after photoexcitation dominates the emission rather than diffusion.

  13. Modelled and field measurements of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions from a Canadian deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, J. D.; Wang, D.; Den Hartog, G.; Neumann, H. H.; Dann, T. F.; Puckett, K. J.

    rates by at least two-fold compared to emissions derived from field measurements. The isoprene emission algorithm proposed by Guenther et al. (1993), applied at the leaf level, provides relatively good agreement compared to measurements. Field measurements indicate that isoprene emissions change with leaf ontogeny and differ amongst tree species. Emission rates defined as function of foliage development stage and plant species need to be introduced in the hydrocarbon emission algorithms. Extensive model evaluation and more hydrocarbon emission measurement;: from different plant species are required to fully assess the appropriateness of this emission calculation approach for Canadian forests.

  14. Emissions of N2O and NO from fertilized fields: Summary of available measurement data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwman, A. F.; Boumans, L. J. M.; Batjes, N. H.

    2002-12-01

    Information from 846 N2O emission measurements in agricultural fields and 99 measurements for NO emissions was summarized to assess the influence of various factors regulating emissions from mineral soils. The data indicate that there is a strong increase of both N2O and NO emissions accompanying N application rates, and soils with high organic-C content show higher emissions than less fertile soils. A fine soil texture, restricted drainage, and neutral to slightly acidic conditions favor N2O emission, while (though not significant) a good soil drainage, coarse texture, and neutral soil reaction favor NO emission. Fertilizer type and crop type are important factors for N2O but not for NO, while the fertilizer application mode has a significant influence on NO only. Regarding the measurements, longer measurement periods yield more of the fertilization effect on N2O and NO emissions, and intensive measurements (≥1 per day) yield lower emissions than less intensive measurements (2-3 per week). The available data can be used to develop simple models based on the major regulating factors which describe the spatial variability of emissions of N2O and NO with less uncertainty than emission factor approaches based on country N inputs, as currently used in national emission inventories.

  15. Improved field emission property of graphene paper by plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jianlong; Zeng Baoqing; Wu Zhe; Zhu Jinfeng; Liu Xingchong

    2010-07-19

    Lateral orientation and aggregation of the graphene sheets limited field enhancement of graphene paper (GP). To improve the field enhancement of GP, argon plasma treatment was induced to destroy the aggregation and cause formation of surface protrusions. After Ar plasma treatment, turn-on field and threshold field of GP were reduced from 2.3 V/mum to 1.6 V/mum and 4.4 V/mum to 3.0 V/mum, respectively. The enhancement was attributed to the protrusions. Scanning electron microscopy and hydrophobicity had been used to prove the morphology change after plasma treatment.

  16. Effect of Biochar on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Nitrogen Cycling in Laboratory and Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, Nikolas; Harter, Johannes; Kaldamukova, Radina; Ruser, Reiner; Graeff-Hönninger, Simone; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    The extensive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizers in agriculture is a major source of anthropogenic N2O emissions contributing 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Soil biochar amendment has been suggested as a means to reduce both CO2 and non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions. The reduction of N2O emissions by biochar has been demonstrated repeatedly in field and laboratory experiments. However, the mechanisms of the reduction remain unclear. Further it is not known how biochar field-weathering affects GHG emissions and how agro-chemicals, such as the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP), that is often simultaneously applied together with commercial N-fertilizers, impact nitrogen transformation and N2O emissions from biochar amended soils. In order investigate the duration of the biochar effect on soil N2O emissions and its susceptibility to DMPP application we performed a microcosm and field study with a high-temperature (400 ° C) beech wood derived biochar (60 t ha-1 and 5 % (w/w) biochar in the field and microcosms, respectively). While the field site contained the biochar already for three years, soil and biochar were freshly mixed for the laboratory microcosm experiments. In both studies we quantified GHG emissions and soil nitrogen speciation (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium). While the field study was carried out over the whole vegetation period of the sunflower Helianthus annuus L., soil microcosm experiments were performed for up to 9 days at 28° C. In both experiments a N-fertilizer containing DMPP was applied either before planting of the sunflowers or at the beginning of soil microcosms incubation. Laboratory microcosm experiments were performed at 60% water filled pore space reflecting average field conditions. Our results show that biochar effectively reduced soil N2O emissions by up to 60 % in the field and in the soil microcosm experiments. No significant differences in N2O emission mitigation potential between field-aged and fresh

  17. Field Electron Emission from Caterpillar-Like Clavae Nano-Structure Carbon Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Jun; Zhu, Yu-Zhuan; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Shi; Liu, Xin-Xin; Li, Huai-Hui; Mei, Cui-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Fei

    2010-08-01

    Nano-carbon films with large density of caterpillar-like clavae are synthesized by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition using a mixture of methane and hydrogen gases on Mo film substrates. The films are characterized by Raman spectra, optical microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Field electron emission measurements of nano-carbon films are also carried out to show the turn-on field as low as 1.5 V/μm and the high current density of 2.2 mA/cm2 at electric field of 5.7 V/μm, the uniformly distributed emission site density from a broad well-proportioned emission area of about 4.0 cm2 is also obtained. The field-emission current density J versus macroscopic electric field E does not follow the original Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) relation since they are not well represented in the F-N plot by a straight line. A modified F-N relation is applied successfully to explain all the field-emission data observed for E < 6.0 V/μm.

  18. ABRUPT LONGITUDINAL MAGNETIC FIELD CHANGES AND ULTRAVIOLET EMISSIONS ACCOMPANYING SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, B. M.; Petrie, G. J. D.; Sudol, J. J.

    2012-11-20

    We have used Transition Region and Coronal Explorer 1600 A images and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) magnetograms to compare ultraviolet (UV) emissions from the chromosphere to longitudinal magnetic field changes in the photosphere during four X-class solar flares. An abrupt, significant, and persistent change in the magnetic field occurred across more than 10 pixels in the GONG magnetograms for each flare. These magnetic changes lagged the GOES flare start times in all cases, showing that they were consequences and not causes of the flares. Ultraviolet emissions were spatially coincident with the field changes. The UV emissions tended to lag the GOES start times for the flares and led the changes in the magnetic field in all pixels except one. The UV emissions led the photospheric field changes by 4 minutes on average with the longest lead being 9 minutes; however, the UV emissions continued for tens of minutes, and more than an hour in some cases, after the field changes were complete. The observations are consistent with the picture in which an Alfven wave from the field reconnection site in the corona propagates field changes outward in all directions near the onset of the impulsive phase, including downward through the chromosphere and into the photosphere, causing the photospheric field changes, whereas the chromosphere emits in the UV in the form of flare kernels, ribbons, and sequential chromospheric brightenings during all phases of the flare.

  19. Systematic Field Study of NO(x) Emission Control Methods for Utility Boilers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartok, William; And Others

    A utility boiler field test program was conducted. The objectives were to determine new or improved NO (x) emission factors by fossil fuel type and boiler design, and to assess the scope of applicability of combustion modification techniques for controlling NO (x) emissions from such installations. A statistically designed test program was…

  20. “Comprehensive emission measurements from prescribed burning in Florida: field and laboratory, aerial and ground”

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simultaneous aerial- and ground-based emission sampling was conducted during prescribed burns at Eglin Air Force Base in November 2012 on a short grass/shrub field and a pine forest. Cumulative emission samples for volatile organic comounds, elemental carbon, organic carbon, ch...

  1. Comprehensive emission measurements from prescribed burning in Florida: field and laboratory, aerial and ground

    EPA Science Inventory

    Simultaneous aerial- and ground-based emission sampling was conducted during prescribed burns at Eglin Air Force Base in November 2012 on a short grass/shrub field and a pine forest. Cumulative emission samples for volatile organic compounds, elemental carbon, organic carbon, c...

  2. U.S. EPA'S FIELD TEST PROGRAMS TO UPDATE DATA ON LANDFILL GAS EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses a field test program in which the EPA is currently engaged to improve data on landfill gas (LFG) emissions. LFG emissions data in use at this time are based on determinations made in the late 1980s and early 1990s; changes in landfill operations, such as using...

  3. Planar nanosized field emission cathodes on the basis of graphene/semi-insulating silicon carbide fabricated by focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jityaev, L.; Ageev, O. A.; Svetlichnyi, A. M.; Kolomiytsev, A. S.; Spiridonov, O. B.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the field emission properties of planar graphene structures with nanosized interelectrode distance. The graphene was obtained by thermal decomposition of silicon carbide in vacuum. Planar field emission structures on the basis of graphene on semiinsulating SiC were fabricated by using focused ion beam. We have performed current-voltage measurement on graphene/SiC field emission cathodes. The planar field emission structures showed a threshold voltage less than 1 V.

  4. Controlled growth and field emission properties of zinc oxide nanopyramid arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Qi, Junjie; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Xiaomei; Liao, Qingliang; Huang, Yunhua

    2007-09-01

    Single-crystalline, pyramidal zinc oxide nanorods have been synthesized in a large quantity on p-Si substrate via catalyst-free thermal chemical vapor deposition at low temperature. SEM investigations showed that the nanorods were vertically aligned on the substrate, with diameters ranging from 60 to 80 nm and lengths about 1.5 μm. A self-catalysis VLS growth mechanism was proposed for the formation of the ZnO nanorods. The field emission properties of the ZnO nanopyramid arrays were investigated. A turn-on field about 3.8 V/μm was obtained at a current density of 10 μA/cm 2, and the field emission data was analyzed by applying the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The stability of emission current density under a high voltage was also tested, indicating that the ZnO nanostructures are promising for an application such as field emission sources.

  5. Field Emission Study of Carbon Nanotubes: High Current Density from Nanotube Bundle Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronikowski, Micheal J.; Manohara, Harish M.; Siegel, Peter H.; Hunt, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the field emission behavior of lithographically patterned bundles of multiwalled carbon nanotubes arranged in a variety of array geometries. Such arrays of nanotube bundles are found to perform significantly better in field emission than arrays of isolated nanotubes or dense, continuous mats of nanotubes, with the field emission performance depending on the bundle diameter and inter-bundle spacing. Arrays of 2-micrometers diameter nanotube bundles spaced 5 micrometers apart (edge-to-edge spacing) produced the largest emission densities, routinely giving 1.5 to 1.8 A/cm(sup 2) at approximately 4 V/micrometer electric field, and greater than 6 A/cm(sup 2) at 20 V/micrometers.

  6. Field emission characteristics of nano-diamond cathode surface by graphitization pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yan-mei; Yang, Yan-ning; Liu, Qiao-ping; Li, Wei-xia

    2016-03-01

    Cathode samples of nano-diamond by graphitization pretreatment with different temperatures were fabricated by electrophoresis, then the structures and morphologies of the cathode samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the field emission tests were conducted. The effects of graphitization pretreatment on the field emission characteristics of nano-diamond cathode surface on titanium substrate are studied. The results indicate that the surface morphologies of nano-diamond cathode samples after graphitization pretreatment change a lot, and the field emission characteristics in low-voltage area are improved obviously. However, in high-voltage area, the curve distortion happens, and it doesn't conform the mechanism of field emission characteristics.

  7. [Effects of winter cover crop on methane and nitrous oxide emission from paddy field].

    PubMed

    Tang, Hai-ming; Tang, Wen-guang; Shuai, Xi-qiang; Yang, Guang-li; Tang, Hai-tao; Xiao, Xiao-Ping

    2010-12-01

    Static chamber-GC technique was employed to study the effects of different treatment winter cover crops, including no-tillage and directly sowing ryegrass (T1), no-tillage and directly sowing Chinese milk vetch (T2), tillage and transplanting rape (T3), no-tillage and directly sowing rape (T4), and fallowing (CK), on the CH4 and N2O emission from double cropping rice paddy field. During the growth period of test winter cover crops, the CH4 and N2O emission in treatments T1-T4 was significantly higher than that in CK (P < 0.01). Treatments T1 and T3 not only had the largest CH4 emission (0.60 and 0.88 g x m(-2)), but also had the largest N2O emission (0.20 and 0.23 g x m(-2), respectively). After the winter cover crops returned to field, the CH4 emission from early and late rice fields in treatments T1, T2, T3, and T4 was larger than that in CK. In early rice field, treatments T1 and T2 had the largest CH4 emission (21.70 and 20.75 g x m(-2)); while in late rice field, treatments T3 and T4 had the largest one (58.90 and 54.51 g x m(-2) respectively). Treatments T1-T4 also had larger N2O emission from early and late rice fields than the CK did. The N2O emission from early rice field in treatments T1, T2, T3, and T4 was increased by 53.7%, 12.2%, 46.3%, and 29.3%, and that from late rice field in corresponding treatments was increased by 28.6%, 3.8%, 34.3%, and 27.6%, respectively, compared with CK.

  8. LZIFU: IDL emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Ting

    2016-07-01

    LZIFU (LaZy-IFU) is an emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. Written in IDL, the pipeline turns IFS data to 2D emission line flux and kinematic maps for further analysis. LZIFU has been applied and tested extensively to various IFS data, including the SAMI Galaxy Survey, the Wide-Field Spectrograph (WiFeS), the CALIFA survey, the S7 survey and the MUSE instrument on the VLT.

  9. PISCES field chemical emissions monitoring project: Site 102 emissions report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report is one of a series sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute in the area of trace substance emissions from fossil-fuel power plants. This report presents the results of a sampling and analytical study to characterize trace substances emissions at Site 102. Site 102 is a cyclone boiler burning a sub-bituminous coal. Site 102 employs an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. The objective of this report is to transmit the detailed data to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assist the Agency in evaluating utility trace chemical emissions as well as the associated health risk impacts--as mandated in Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. This report does not attempt to compare the results with other sites. An assessment of data from all plants that have been tested is presented in the Electric Utility Trace Substances Synthesis Report (EPRI TR-104614).

  10. Laboratory and field investigations of particulate and carbon monoxide emissions from traditional and improved cookstoves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Christoph A.; Bond, Tami C.; Conway, Stuart; Osorto Pinel, Anibal Benjamin; MacCarty, Nordica; Still, Dean

    We implemented a program in which emission characterization is enabled through collaborations between academic, US and international non-governmental entities that focus on evaluation, dissemination, and in-use testing, of improved cookstoves. This effort resulted in a study of field and laboratory emissions from traditional and improved biofuel cookstoves. We found that field measured particulate emissions of actual cooking average three times those measured during simulated cooking in the laboratory. Emission factors are highly dependent on the care and skill of the operator and the resulting combustion; these do not appear to be accurately reproduced in laboratory settings. The single scattering albedo (SSA) of the emissions was very low in both lab and field measurements, averaging about 0.3 for lab tests and around 0.5 for field tests, indicating that the primary particles are climate warming. Over the course of three summers in Honduras, we measured field emissions from traditional cookstoves, relatively new improved cookstoves, and "broken-in" improved cookstoves. We found that well-designed improved cookstoves can significantly reduce PM and CO emission factors below traditional cookstoves. For improved stoves, the presence of a chimney generally resulted in lower emission factors but left the SSA unaffected. Traditional cookstoves had an average PM emission factor of 8.2 g kg -1 - significantly larger than previous studies. Particulate emission factors for improved cookstoves without and with chimneys averaged about 6.6 g kg -1 and 4.5 g kg -1, respectively. The elemental carbon (EC) fraction of PM varied significantly between individual tests, but averaged about 25% for each of the categories.

  11. Attosecond electron emission probes of ultrafast nanolocalized fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, Matthias

    2011-05-01

    Ongoing experimental and theoretical work on the temporal and spatial characterization of nanolocalized plasmonic fields will be presented. Because of their broad spectral bandwidth, plasmons in metal nanoparticles undergo ultrafast dynamics with timescales as short as a few hundred attoseconds. So far, the spatiotemporal dynamics of optical fields localized on the nanoscale has been hidden from direct access in the real space and time domain. Our ultimate goal is to characterize the nanoplasmonic fields not only on a nanometer spatial scale but also on ~100 attosecond temporal scale. Information about the nanoplasmonic fields, which are excited by few-cycle laser pulses with stable electric field waveform, can be obtained by the measurement of photoemitted electrons. We will present recent results on the large acceleration of recollision electrons in nanolocalized fields near dielectric nanoparticles following the excitation by 5-fs near-infrared laser pulses with controlled electric field waveforms. This work has been carried out in collaboration with Th. Fennel (University of Rostock), E. Ruehl (FU Berlin), and M.I. Stockman (GSU Atlanta). We acknowledge support by the DFG via Emmy-Noether program and SPP1391.

  12. Field emission characteristics of electrochemically synthesized nickel nanowires with oxygen plasma post-treatment.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jinsoo; Lee, Sun Jeong; Park, Dong Hyuk; Kim, Young Soo; Lee, Yeonhee; Lee, Cheol Jin; Lee, Seong-Rae

    2006-07-28

    The field emissive, electrical, magnetic, and structural characteristics of nickel (Ni) nanowires synthesized using the electrochemical deposition method with an alumina nanoporous template are reported. The synthesis and formation of Ni nanowires were confirmed by XRD, SEM, and HR-TEM experiments. Ferromagnetic hysteresis curves and the metallic temperature dependence of the current-voltage characteristics were observed for the Ni nanowire systems. The nanotip emitters of the field emission cells of the Ni nanowires after O(2) plasma treatment were easily patterned using the solution drop casting (SDC) method, in which the Ni nanowires were homogeneously dispersed in organic solvents, and then dropped and dried on an n-type doped Si substrate as the cathode. For the O(2) plasma treated Ni nanowires, we observed that the inhomogeneous oxidized layer on their surface was reduced, that the current density of the field emission cell increased from approximately 3.0 x 10(-9) to approximately 1.0 x 10(-3) A cm(-2) due to field emission, and that the lowest threshold electric field was approximately 4 V microm(-1). The field enhancement factor was estimated as approximately 1300 for the O(2) plasma treated Ni nanowires. The evolution of the field emission obtained from the phosphor screen was observed at different applied electric fields. PMID:19661596

  13. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  14. Self-consistent density functional calculation of field emission currents from metals

    PubMed

    Gohda; Nakamura; Watanabe; Watanabe

    2000-08-21

    We have developed a fully self-consistent method which is suitable to examine field emission currents, on the basis of the density functional theory. In our method, the nearby counterelectrode is not necessary. By using this method, we have investigated field emission currents from a biased metallic surface represented by the jellium model. We have found that the energy barrier between the jellium and vacuum becomes lower than the Fermi energy under strong electric fields (e.g., 10 V/nm for r(s) = 4 bohr). In this situation, the slope of the Fowler-Nordheim plot becomes flatter than that under a weaker field.

  15. X-ray Tube Using a Graphene Flower Cloth Field Emission Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, Yusuke; Muramatsu, Kazuo; Tsuboi, Shougo; Jyouzuka, Atsuo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Onizuka, Yoshihiro; Mimura, Hidenori

    2013-10-01

    We have successfully fabricated a filament-less X-ray tube using a graphene flower cloth (GFC) field emission cathode. The GFC has numerous nanoprotrusions formed by self-standing graphene structures. The field emission current and the field enhancement factor β were 500 µA and 5600, respectively. The stability of voltage defined as a variance coefficient (σ/mean) of voltage was calculated to be 0.04% while maintaining the X-ray tube current of 300 µA. We applied our X-ray tube with the GFC field emitter to the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of stainless steel.

  16. Field emission from zinc oxide nanorod bundles grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling Li; Gong, Shang Dong; Wu, Li Hong; Li, Xin Jian

    2013-04-01

    A large-area zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod bundle array was grown on a silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) substrate by a chemical vapor deposition method, and its field-emission properties was studied. The structural characterization disclosed that the bundles were composed of hexagonal ZnO nanorods growing along c-axis and taking roots into the silicon pillars of Si-NPA. The average diameter and length of the ZnO nanorods were ∼145 nm and ∼10 μm, respectively. The field-emission measurements showed that the turn-on field of ZnO/Si-NPA was 4.6 V/μm with an emission current density (ECD) of 1 μA/cm2, and an ECD of 420 μA/cm2 was achieved at an applied field of 8.89 V/μm. The field enhancement factor was calculated to be ∼1700 based on the Fowler-Nordheim theory. According to the obtained charge coupled device (CCD) image, the density and brightness of the emission dots increased with the applied field, and the high emission dot density was attributed to the formation of a large number of ZnO nanorod emitting tips. Our results indicated that ZnO/Si-NPA might be a promising electron emission source.

  17. Enhanced Field Emission From The Gold- Polyaniline (Au-PANI) Nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Sandip S.; More, Mahendra A.; Koiry, Shankar P.; Aswal, D. K.

    2010-12-01

    The gold-polyaniline nanocomposite was synthesized by electrochemical route in two steps. In the first step polyaniline film was deposited by cyclic voltammetry on the ITO coated glass substrate, and then synthesis of gold-polyaniline nanocomposite via chronoamperometry. The synthesized gold-polyaniline nanocomposite film was characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Ultra-violet spectroscopy (UV-vis) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR). The SEM analysis shows well adherent gold nanoparticles on the surface of polyaniline nanofibers. The XRD and UV-Vis spectra indicate formation of gold nanoparticles. From the field emission studies, the value of the turn on field, corresponding to 1 nA emission current, is found to be 0.65 V/{mu}m and emission current density of 1 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} has been drawn at an applied field of 1.1 V/{mu}m. These values are observed to be superior than the reported ones. The field emission current stability investigated at 1 {mu}A over duration of more than four hours is found to be good. The observed field emission characteristics suggest the gold polyaniline nanocomposite as promising material for field emission based applications.

  18. Field emission and material transfer in microswitches electrical contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, M.; Rowe, S. W.; Poulain, C.; Mariolle, D.; Chiesi, L.; Houzé, F.; Delamare, J.

    2010-12-01

    Material transfer from one electrical contact part to the other has already been reported in microswitches operating under hot switching conditions. By using an atomic force microscope with a conductive cantilever, we highlighted that electrons are emitted from the cathode when electrode separation becomes less than a few tens of nanometers. This electronic emission proves to follow Fowler-Nordheim theory and leads to the damage of the opposite contact member (anode) by impact heating. Anode material evaporates under this extreme heating and deposits on the opposite contact member (cathode), leading to a material transfer from anode to cathode.

  19. Energy spectra of field emission electrons from a W<310> tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, H.; Arai, N.; Nagaoka, K.; Uchiyama, S.; Yamashita, T.; Itoh, H.; Oshima, C.

    1996-06-01

    Total energy distributions of field emission electrons from a single crystal <310>-oriented tungsten tip have been measured at temperatures of 80 and 300 K and in the emission current region from 10 -8 to 10 -6 A. We have used a high resolution field emission spectrometer computer-controlled by a low-noise power supply developed in this experiment. The main part of the observed distributions agree with the theoretical ones calculated on the basis of the Fowler-Nordheim theory, while discrepancies have been observed in two regions.

  20. Magnetic-Field-Induced Rotation of Polarized Light Emission from Monolayer WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Robert; Arora, Ashish; Plechinger, Gerd; Nagler, Philipp; Granados del Águila, Andrés; Ballottin, Mariana V.; Christianen, Peter C. M.; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Steffen; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias; Bratschitsch, Rudolf

    2016-08-01

    We control the linear polarization of emission from the coherently emitting K+ and K- valleys (valley coherence) in monolayer WS2 with an out-of-plane magnetic field of up to 25 T. The magnetic-field-induced valley Zeeman splitting causes a rotation of the emission polarization with respect to the excitation by up to 35° and reduces the polarization degree by up to 16%. We explain both of these phenomena with a model based on two noninteracting coherent two-level systems. We deduce that the coherent light emission from the valleys decays with a time constant of τc=260 fs .

  1. Field-Emission from Chemically Functionalized Diamond Surfaces: Does Electron Affinity Picture Work?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Miyazaki, Takehide; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Okushi, Hideyo; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2014-03-01

    By means of the time-dependent density functional electron dynamics, we have revisited the field-emission efficiency of chemically functionalized diamond (100) surfaces. In order to achieve high efficiency and high (chemical) stability, proper chemical species are needed to terminate diamond surfaces. Hydrogen (H) termination is well known to achieve the negative electron affinity (NEA) of diamond surface which indeed enhances field emission performance than that of clean surface with positive electron affinity (PEA). Yet, the durability of H-terminated diamond surface was concerned for long-time operation of the field-emission. Meantime, oxidation, or hydroxyl (OH) termination was considered to achieve chemical stability of the surface but presence of oxygen (O) atom should reduce the emission efficiency. Recently, H- OH-co-terminated surface is reported as NEA and was expected to achieve both emission efficiency and chemical stability. However, our simulation showed that emission efficiency of the H- OH- co-terminated surface is much lower than clean surface with PEA, thus we note that the electron affinity cannot be a unique measure to determine the emission efficiency. In this talk, we introduce necessity of new concept to understand the emission efficiency which needs to know detailed potential profile from bulk to vacuum through surface, which is strongly dependent on the surface chemical functionalization. This work was supported by ALCA project conducted by Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  2. Beam Dynamics Simulations of Optically-Enhanced Field Emission from Structured Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, A.; Grote, D.; Mihalcea, D.; Piot, P.; Vay, J.-L.

    2014-01-01

    Structured cathodes - cathodes with a segmented emission surface - are finding an increasing number of applications and can be combined with a variety of emission mechanisms, including photoemission and field emission. These cathodes have been used to enhance the quantum efficiency of metallic cathodes when operated as plasmonic cathodes, have produced high-current electron bunches though field emission from multiple tips, and can be used to form beams with transverse segmentations necessary for improving the performance of accelerator-based light sources. In this report we present recent progress towards the development of finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell simulations using the emission process in structured cathodes based on the WARP framework. The simulations give further insight on the localized source of the emitted electrons which could be used for additional high-fidelity start-to-end simulations of electron accelerators that employ this type of electron source.

  3. Net summertime emission of ammonia from corn and triticale fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Undine; Smith, Jeremy; Brümmer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Recent advancements in laser spectrometry offer new opportunities to investigate ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of environmentally relevant trace gases. In this study, we used a quantum cascade laser (QCL) absorption spectrometer to continuously measure high-frequency concentrations of ammonia and the net exchange between an agricultural site and the atmosphere based on the eddy-covariance approach. The footprint was split into two main sectors, one planted with corn (Zea mays) and the other one with triticale. Ammonia concentrations were highly variable between 2 and almost 100 ppb with an average value of 8.1 ppb during the observation period from April to September 2015. While both deposition and emission of ammonia was observed, the total campaign exchange resulted in a loss of 3.3 kg NH3-N ha-1. Highest average emission fluxes of 65 ng N m-2 s-1 were recorded after fertilization at the beginning of the campaign in April and May. Afterwards the exchange of ammonia with the atmosphere decreased considerably, but the site remained on average a consistent source with sporadic lower peaks and an average flux of 13 ng N m-2 s-1. While management in the form of fertilization was the main driver for ammonia concentration and exchange at the site, biophysical controls from temperature, wind regime, and surface wetness are also presented.

  4. Net summertime emission of ammonia from corn and triticale fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Undine; Smith, Jeremy; Brümmer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Recent advancements in laser spectrometry offer new opportunities to investigate ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of environmentally relevant trace gases. In this study, we used a quantum cascade laser (QCL) absorption spectrometer to continuously measure high-frequency concentrations of ammonia and the net exchange between an agricultural site and the atmosphere based on the eddy-covariance approach. The footprint was split into two main sectors, one planted with corn (Zea mays) and the other one with triticale. Ammonia concentrations were highly variable between 2 and almost 100 ppb with an average value of 8.1 ppb during the observation period from April to September 2015. While both deposition and emission of ammonia was observed, the total campaign exchange resulted in a loss of 3.3 kg NH3-N ha‑1. Highest average emission fluxes of 65 ng N m‑2 s‑1 were recorded after fertilization at the beginning of the campaign in April and May. Afterwards the exchange of ammonia with the atmosphere decreased considerably, but the site remained on average a consistent source with sporadic lower peaks and an average flux of 13 ng N m‑2 s‑1. While management in the form of fertilization was the main driver for ammonia concentration and exchange at the site, biophysical controls from temperature, wind regime, and surface wetness are also presented.

  5. The electric field effect and electromagnetic wave emission in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, T.

    2013-04-01

    We formulate a theory for the electric field effect in intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). The coupled dynamical equations for the phase differences are derived in the presence of both a bias current and an applied electric field on the basis of the capacitively-coupled IJJ model. It is shown that the current-voltage characteristics of the IJJs sensitively depend on the applied electric field. The dipole emission originating from the electric field effect is also predicted.

  6. Optical field emission from resonant gold nanorods driven by femtosecond mid-infrared pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kusa, F.; Echternkamp, K. E.; Herink, G.; Ropers, C.; Ashihara, S.

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate strong-field photoelectron emission from gold nanorods driven by femtosecond mid-infrared optical pulses. The maximum photoelectron yield is reached at the localized surface plasmon resonance, indicating that the photoemission is governed by the resonantly-enhanced optical near-field. The wavelength- and field-dependent photoemission yield allows for a noninvasive determination of local field enhancements, and we obtain intensity enhancement factors close to 1300, in good agreement with finite-difference time domain computations.

  7. Flexible field emission of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes/reduced graphene hybrid films.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duck Hyun; Lee, Jin Ah; Lee, Won Jong; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2011-01-01

    The outstanding flexible field emission properties of carbon hybrid films made of vertically aligned N-doped carbon nanotubes grown on mechanically compliant reduced graphene films are demonstrated. The bottom-reduced graphene film substrate enables the conformal coating of the hybrid film on flexible device geometry and ensures robust mechanical and electrical contact even in a highly deformed state. The field emission properties are precisely examined in terms of the control of the bending radius, the N-doping level, and the length or wall-number of the carbon nanotubes and analyzed with electric field simulations. This high-performance flexible carbon field emitter is potentially useful for diverse, flexible field emission devices.

  8. Marigold-like nanocrystals: controllable synthesis, field emission, and photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Changqing; Yu, Ke; Yin, Haihong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Shouchuan; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Ziqiang

    2014-06-01

    Cubic marigold-like Cu2S nanostructures were synthesized from a facile hydrothermal process without using any additives or surfactants. After thermal annealed at different condition, monoclinic Cu2S and tetragonal Cu1.81S nanostructures were obtained for the first time, maintaining the marigold-like morphology undestroyed. Field emission (FE) properties of these three types of nanostructures were investigated for the first time. The results indicated that the tetragonal Cu1.81S nanostructures had excellent field emission performance with turn-on field of and threshold field of . Moreover, their photocatalytic properties of the three nanostructures were also investigated by photodegradating methylene blue (MB). The results showed that the tetragonal Cu1.81S nanostructures may be a competitive material in both field emission and photocatalytic applications.

  9. Emission characteristics in solution-processed asymmetric white alternating current field-induced polymer electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yonghua; Xia, Yingdong; Smith, Gregory M.; Gu, Yu; Yang, Chuluo; Carroll, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the emission characteristics of a blue fluorophor poly(9, 9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) combined with a red emitting dye: Bis(2-methyl-dibenzo[f,h]quinoxaline)(acetylacetonate)iridium (III) [Ir(MDQ)2(acac)], are examined in two different asymmetric white alternating current field-induced polymer electroluminescent (FIPEL) device structures. The first is a top-contact device in which the triplet transfer is observed resulting in the concentration-dependence of the emission similar to the standard organic light-emitting diode (OLED) structure. The second is a bottom-contact device which, however, exhibits concentration-independence of emission. Specifically, both dye emission and polymer emission are found for the concentrations as high as 10% by weight of the dye in the emitter. We attribute this to the significant different carrier injection characteristics of the two FIPEL devices. Our results suggest a simple and easy way to realize high-quality white emission.

  10. Physical properties of thin-film field emission cathodes with molybdenum cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Brodie, I.; Humphrey, L.; Westerberg, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Field emission cathodes fabricated using thin-film techniques and electron beam microlithography are described, together with effects obtained by varying the fabrication parameters. The emission originates from the tip of molybdenum cones that are about 1.5 micron tall with a tip radius around 500 A. Such cathodes have been produced in closely packed arrays containing 100 and 5000 cones as well as singly. Maximum currents in the range 50-150 microamp per cone can be drawn. Life tests with the 100-cone arrays drawing 2 mA total emission (or 3 A per sq cm) have proceeded in excess of 7000 hr with about a 10% drop in emission current. Studies are presented of the emission characteristics and current fluctuation phenomena. It is tentatively concluded that the emission arises from only one or a few atomic sites on the cone tips.

  11. Enhanced Field-Emission Performance from Carbon Nanotube Emitters on Nickel Foam Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Meng; Xu, Peng; Han, Lijing; Yi, Lan; Wang, Xu; Li, Zhenhua; Shang, Xuefu; Wang, Xiumin; Wu, Huizhen; Zhao, Pei; Song, Yenan; Wang, Miao

    2016-04-01

    We present a three-dimensionally configured cathode with enhanced field-emission performance formed by combining carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters with a nickel foam (NiF) substrate via a conventional screen-printing technique. The CNT/NiF cathode has low turn-on electric field of 0.53 V μm-1 (with current density of 10 μA cm-2) and threshold electric field of 0.87 V μm-1 (with current density of 0.1 mA cm-2), and a very high field enhancement factor of 1.4 × 104. The porous structure of the NiF substrate can greatly improve the field-emission properties due to its large specific surface area that can accommodate more CNTs and increase the emitter density, as well as its high electrical and thermal conductivities that facilitate current transition and heat dissipation in the cathode. Most importantly, the local electric field was also enhanced by the multistage effect resulting from the rough metal surface, which furthermore leads to a high field enhancement factor. We believe that this improved field-emission performance makes such cathodes promising candidates for use in various field-emission applications.

  12. Measurements of N2O emissions from different vegetable fields on the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Tiantian; Xie, Liyong; Guo, Liping; Yan, Hongliang; Lin, Miao; Zhang, He; Lin, Jia; Lin, Erda

    2013-06-01

    Few studies have measured the N2O emission fluxes from vegetable fields. In order to identify the characteristics and the influencing factors of N2O emissions from different vegetable fields, we measured N2O emissions for a full year from four typical fields, including an open-ground vegetable field that has produced vegetables for over 20 years (OV20), a recently developed open-ground vegetable field that was converted from a maize field three years earlier (OV3), a recently developed greenhouse vegetable field that was converted from a maize field 3 years earlier (GV3) and a typical local maize field (Maize). Four different fertilization treatments were set additionally in the recently developed open-ground vegetable field. These were: no fertilizer or manure (OV3_CK), manure only (OV3_M) and the combination of manure with different rates of chemical fertilizer application (OV3_MF1 and OV3_MF3). The results showed that N2O emission fluxes fluctuated between 0.3 ± 0.1 and 912.4 ± 80.0 mg N2O-N m-2 h-1 with the highest emission peak occurring after fertilization followed by irrigation. Nitrogen application explained 64.6-84.5% of the N2O emission in the vegetable fields. The magnitude of the emission peaks depended on the nitrogen application rate and the duration of the emission peaks was mainly associated with soil temperature when appropriate irrigation was given after fertilization. The N2O emission peaks occurred later and lasted for a longer period when the soil temperature was <24 °C in May. However, emission peaks occurred earlier and lasted for a shorter period when the soil temperature was around 25-33 °C from June to August. The annual N2O emissions from the fertilized vegetable fields were 1.68-2.38 times higher than that from the maize field, which had an emission value of 2.88 ± 0.10 kg N ha-1 a-1. The N2O emission factor (EF) of manure nitrogen was 0.07% over the whole year, but was 0.11% and 0.02% in the spring cucumber season and the autumn

  13. High-current-density field emission display fabricated from single-walled carbon nanotube electron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; Shang, X. F.; Ma, Y. P.; Zhou, J. J.; Gu, Z. Q.; Li, Z. H.; Xu, Y. B.; Wang, M.

    2008-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes can be used as electron sources in the process of field emission, and have great potential for practical application of the field emission display (FED) panels with large screen size. We fabricated a FED using the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the cathode by the screen-printing process. Test showed that the SWNTs emitters exhibit excellent macroscopic emission properties. It has low turn-on voltage (2.7 V/μ m) and high brightness, with a high current density of good uniformity and stability. It was observed that the field emission qualitatively follows the conventional Fowler Nordheim (F N) theory, and aging treatment played an important role in improving the image uniformity and stability. Compared to other complicated processes, the simple fabrication using screen-printing process seems to be advantageous for practical application.

  14. Dark-to-arc transition in field emission dominated atmospheric microdischarges

    SciTech Connect

    Tholeti, Siva Sashank; Semnani, Abbas; Peroulis, Dimitrios; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2015-08-15

    We study the voltage-current characteristics of gas discharges driven by field emission of electrons at the microscale. Particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collision calculations are first verified by comparison with breakdown voltage measurements and then used to investigate atmospheric discharges in nitrogen at gaps from 1 to 10 μm. The results indicate the absence of the classical glow discharge regime because field electron emission replaces secondary electron emission as the discharge sustaining mechanism. Additionally, the onset of arcing is significantly delayed due to rarefied effects in electron transport. While field emission reduces the breakdown voltage, the power required to sustain an arc of the same density in microgaps is as much as 30% higher than at macroscale.

  15. Electric field-induced emission enhancement and modulation in individual CdSe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Vietmeyer, Felix; Tchelidze, Tamar; Tsou, Veronica; Janko, Boldizsar; Kuno, Masaru

    2012-10-23

    CdSe nanowires show reversible emission intensity enhancements when subjected to electric field strengths ranging from 5 to 22 MV/m. Under alternating positive and negative biases, emission intensity modulation depths of 14 ± 7% are observed. Individual wires are studied by placing them in parallel plate capacitor-like structures and monitoring their emission intensities via single nanostructure microscopy. Observed emission sensitivities are rationalized by the field-induced modulation of carrier detrapping rates from NW defect sites responsible for nonradiative relaxation processes. The exclusion of these states from subsequent photophysics leads to observed photoluminescence quantum yield enhancements. We quantitatively explain the phenomenon by developing a kinetic model to account for field-induced variations of carrier detrapping rates. The observed phenomenon allows direct visualization of trap state behavior in individual CdSe nanowires and represents a first step toward developing new optical techniques that can probe defects in low-dimensional materials.

  16. High brightness field emission from printed carbon nanotubes in an S-band microwave gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qilong; Li, Xiangkun; Di, Yusong; Yu, Cairu; Zhang, Xiaobing; Li, Ming; Lei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were applied as cold cathode and placed into an S-band microwave gun operating at 2856 MHz with the pulse duration of 2.8 μs. High brightness field emission was demonstrated and the current density achieves the value more than 4.2 A/cm2. The emittance of field emission beam is calculated to be nearly 21 μm based on the beam profile of emission electrons monitored via yttrium aluminum garnet screen. The infrared image of printed CNTs confirms that the emitters in the center contributed more electrons and the heat generated during the large current density field emission. The results in the paper imply that randomly distributed printed CNTs have the potential to be applied as the high brightness electron sources for free electron lasers.

  17. Stationary digital breast tomosynthesis with distributed field emission x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, F.; Calderon, X.; Gidcumb, E.; Lu, J.; Qian, X.; Spronk, D.; Tucker, A.; Yang, G.; Zhou, O.

    2011-03-01

    Tomosynthesis requires projection images from different viewing angles. Using a distributed x-ray source this can be achieved without mechanical motion of the source with the potential for faster image acquisition speed. A distributed xray tube has been designed and manufactured specifically for breast tomosynthesis. The x-ray tube consists of 31 field emission x-ray sources with an angular range of 30°. The total dose is up to 100mAs with an energy range between 27 and 45 kVp. We discuss the source geometry and results from the characterization of the first prototype. The x-ray tube uses field emission cathodes based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) as electron source. Prior to the manufacturing of the sealed x-ray tube extensive testing on the field emission cathodes has been performed to verify the requirements for commercial tomosynthesis systems in terms of emission current, focal spot size and tube lifetime.

  18. Nucleon-nucleon scattering in a strong external magnetic field and the neutrino emissivity

    SciTech Connect

    Bavarsad, E.; Mohammadi, R.; Haghighat, M.

    2010-11-15

    The nucleon-nucleon scattering in a large magnetic background is considered to find its potential to change the neutrino emissivity of the neutron stars. For this purpose, we consider the one-pion-exchange approximation to find the nucleon-nucleon (NN) cross section in a background field as large as 10{sup 15}-10{sup 18} G. We show that the NN cross section in neutron stars with temperatures in the range 0.1-5 MeV can be changed up to the 1 order of magnitude with respect to the one in the absence of the magnetic field. In the limit of the soft neutrino emission, the neutrino emissivity can be written in terms of the NN-scattering amplitude; therefore, the large magnetic fields can dramatically change the neutrino emissivity of the neutron stars as well.

  19. Evidence of satellite valley position in GaN by photoexcited field emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Pavlidis, D.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Evtukh, A.; Litovchenko, V.; Semenenko, N.

    2008-06-01

    GaN field emitter rods with nanometer diameter were fabricated by photoelectrochemical etching on a n+-GaN substrate. Their electron field emission properties were investigated under ultraviolet (UV) illumination. The Fowler-Nordheim plots of the emission current show different slopes for nonilluminated and UV illuminated devices. A model based on the electron emission from valleys having different specific electron affinities is proposed to explain the experimental results. In the absence of illumination, the GaN rods are almost fully depleted and emission takes place only from the lower valley. Upon UV illumination and presence of a high electric field at the emitter tip, the upper valley of the conduction band appears to be occupied by electrons generated at the valence band. The energy difference between the lower and upper valleys was determined to be 1.15eV and is in good agreement with formerly published theoretical and measured values.

  20. Influence of cluster-assembly parameters on the field emission properties of nanostructured carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducati, C.; Barborini, E.; Piseri, P.; Milani, P.; Robertson, J.

    2002-11-01

    Supersonic cluster beam deposition has been used to produce films with different nanostructures by controlling the deposition parameters such as the film thickness, substrate temperature and cluster mass distribution. The field emission properties of cluster-assembled carbon films have been characterized and correlated to the evolution of the film nanostructure. Threshold fields ranging between 4 and 10 V/mum and saturation current densities as high as 0.7 mA have been measured for samples heated during deposition. A series of voltage ramps, i.e., a conditioning process, was found to initiate more stable and reproducible emission. It was found that the presence of graphitic particles (onions, nanotube embryos) in the films substantially enhances the field emission performance. Films patterned on a micrometer scale have been conditioned spot by spot by a ball-tip anode, showing that a relatively high emission site density can be achieved from the cluster-assembled material.

  1. Effect of synthesis parameters on morphology of polyaniline (PANI) and field emission investigation of PANI nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bankar, Prashant K.; More, Mahendra A.; Patil, Sandip S.

    2015-06-24

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanostructures have been synthesized by simple chemical oxidation route at different monomer concentration along with variation in synthesis temperature. The effect of variation of synthesis parameters has been revealed using different characterization techniques. The structural and morphological characterization of the synthesized PANI nanostructures was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), whereas Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been used to reveal the chemical properties. With the variation in the synthesis temperature and monomer concentration, various morphologies characterized by formation of PANI nanoparticles, nanofibres, nanotubes and nanospheres, are revealed from the SEM analysis. The FTIR analysis reveals the formation of conducting state of PANI under prevailing experimental conditions. The field emission investigation of the conducting PANI nanotubes was performed in all metal UHV system at base pressure of 1x10{sup −8} mbar. The turn on field required to draw emission of 1 nA current was observed to be ∼ 2.2 V/μm and threshold field (corresponding to emission current density of 1 µA/cm2) was found to be 3.2 V/μm. The emission current was observed to be stable for more than three hours at a preset value 1 µA. The simple synthesis route and good field emission characteristics indicate potential of PANI nanofibres as a promising emitter for field emission based micro/nano devices.

  2. Cosmic Rays, Magnetic Fields and Diffuse Emissions: Combining Observations from Radio to Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Peter

    With the advent of WMAP, Planck, and Fermi-LAT telescopes the diffuse emission from the Milky Way has received renewed attention. Observations of the different components of the diffuse emission reveal information on Cosmic Rays (CRs), magnetic fields (B-fields) and the interstellar medium. CRs interact with the interstellar medium and the B-fields in the Milky Way, producing diffuse emission from radio to gamma rays. The fundamental problem is that CRs, B-fields, and the interstellar medium are not precisely known. In fact, despite intensive studies, the B-field intensity and topology, and CR spectra and distribution throughout the Galaxy are still uncertain. As a consequence unequivocally disentangling and describing the diffuse components simultaneously using a single wavelength domain is impossible. Our approach to disentangling and describing the diffuse emission components is to simultaneously consider the diffuse emission in multiple frequency domains. We propose to exploit the entire database of the present radio surveys, microwave observations (WMAP and Planck), X-ray observations (INTEGRAL) and gamma-ray observations (COMPTEL and Fermi-LAT) in order to analyze their diffuse emission in a combined multi-wavelength approach. We will jointly infer information on the spectra and distribution of CRs in the Galaxy, and on Galactic B-fields, with unprecedented accuracy. Finally we will be able to describe the baseline Galactic diffuse emissions and characterize Milky Way structures and their emission mechanisms, which have attracted the attention of the scientific community recently. This project is innovative and essential for maximizing the scientific return from the presently available data in a multidisciplinary view and uses novel approaches. The results will benefit NASA-related science generally and the return from the named missions specifically.

  3. Field Emission in CEBAF's SRF Cavities and Implications for Future Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Jay Benesch

    2006-02-15

    Field emission is one of the key issues in superconducting RF for particle accelerators. When present, it limits operating gradient directly or via induced heat load at 2K. In order to minimize particulate contamination of and thus field emission in the CEBAF SRF cavities during assembly, a cold ceramic RF window was placed very close to the accelerating cavity proper. As an unintended consequence of this, the window is charged by field-emitted electrons, making it possible to monitor and model field emission in the CEBAF cavities since in-tunnel operation began. From January 30, 1995, through February 10, 2003, there were 64 instances of spontaneous onset or change in cavity field emission with a drop in usable gradient averaging 1.4 ({sigma} 0.8) MV/m at each event. Fractional loss averaged 0.18 ({sigma} 0.12) of pre-event gradient. This event count corresponds to 2.4 events per century per cavity, or 8 per year in CEBAF. It is hypothesized that changes in field emission are due to adsorbed gas accumulation. The possible implications of this and other observations for the International Linear Collider (ILC) and other future accelerators will be discussed.

  4. Field emission driven direct current argon discharges and electrical breakdown mechanism across micron scale gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejčik, Štefan; Radjenović, Branislav; Klas, Matej; Radmilović-Radjenović, Marija

    2015-11-01

    In this paper results of the experimental and theoretical studies of the field emission driven direct current argon microdischarges for the gaps between 1 μm and 100 μm are presented and discussed. The breakdown voltage curves and Volt-Ampere characteristics proved to be a fertile basis providing better understanding of the breakdown phenomena in microgaps. Based on the measured breakdown voltage curves, the effective yields have been estimated confirming that the secondary electron emission due to high electric field generated in microgaps depends primarily on the electric field leading directly to the violation of the Paschen's law. Experimental data are supported by the theoretical predictions that suggest departure from the scaling law and a flattening of the Paschen curves at higher pressures confirming that Townsend phenomenology breaks down when field emission becomes the key mechanism leading to the breakdown. Field emission of electrons from the cathode, the space charge effects in the breakdown and distinction between the Fowler-Nordheim field emission and the space charge limited current density are also analyzed. Images and Volt-Ampere characteristics recorded at the electrode gap size of 20 μm indicate the existence of a discharge region similar to arc at the pressure of around 200 Torr has been observed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  5. Use of LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy and field ion microscopy in microstructural studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Buckley, D. H.; Pepper, S. V.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    The studies reported were conducted to gain a fundamental understanding of adhesion and dynamic friction on an atomic or microscopic level. Fundamental aspects of low energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger emission spectroscopy (AES), and field ion microscopy (FIM) are discussed. Typical results of studies conducted are considered, giving attention to LEED-AES experiments, pin and disk experiments, and field ion microscope investigations.

  6. Methane emissions from rice fields: Effect of plant height among several rice cultivars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, A.; Willis, C. R.; Sass, R. L.; Fisher, F. M.

    The effect of rice cultivar and plant height on methane (CH4) emission from rice fields was studied from data of 8-year field experiments. Field experiments were conducted from 1989 to 1996 at the Texas A & M University Agricultural Research and Extension Center near Beaumont, Texas. Eleven rice cultivars and three soil types were involved. The results of this study showed the following: 1) Rice cultivar choice slightly influenced the day-to-day seasonal pattern of methane emission, but it had a significant effect on the seasonal total methane emission. The average seasonal methane emission is 22.8gCH4m-2 for high-emitting cultivars (Mars and Della), ranging from 8.0 to 41.0gCH4m-2 and 17.7gCH4m-2 for low-emitting cultivars (Lemont, Labelle, Lebonnet, Dawn, Katy, IR 36, Cypress, and Jasmine), ranging from 1.7 to 28.4gCH4m-2. 2) Seasonal methane emission has a positive linear correlation with postheading rice plant height. The correlation coefficient r2 is 0.736 (n=24, and p<0.05). In this paper we suggest that plant height may be a good criteria in choosing cultivars for mitigation of methane emission. More importantly, it provides a potential method for estimating methane emission from regional or global rice paddies as plant height can be evaluated by remotely sensed imagery.

  7. Field emission performance of multiwalled carbon nanotubes for a low-power spacecraft neutraliser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, K. L.; Kent, B. J.; Song, W.; Castelli, C.

    2009-05-01

    Field electron emission from aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes has been assessed to determine if the performance, defined by power consumption, lifetime and emission current, is suitable for use in spacecraft charge neutralisation for field emission electric propulsion (FEEP). Carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) were mounted on a dual in line chip with a macroscopic (nickel mesh) extractor electrode mounted ˜1 mm above the tubes. The nanotubes' field emission characteristics (emission currents, electron losses and operating voltage) were measured at ˜10 -4 Pa. An endurance test of one sample, running at a software-controlled constant emission current lasted >1400 h, approaching the longest known FEEP thruster lifetime. The emission corresponds to a current density of ˜10 mA/cm 2 at a voltage of 150 V. These results, implementing mature extractor-electrode geometry, indicate that carbon nanotubes have considerable potential for development as robust, low-power, long-lived electron emitters for use in space.

  8. [Effects of controlled release fertilizers on N2O emission from paddy field].

    PubMed

    Li, Fangmin; Fan, Xiaolin; Liu, Fang; Wang, Qiang

    2004-11-01

    With close chamber method, this paper studied the effects of controlled release fertilizer (CRF), non-coated compound fertilizer (Com) and conventional urea (CK) on N2O emission from paddy field. The results showed that within 10 days after transplanting, the ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the surface water of the plot treated with CRF were significantly different from those treated with Com. The partial coefficient between N2O emission rates and corresponding nitrate concentrations in the water was significantly high (r = 0.6834). Compared with Com, CRF was able to reduce N2O emission from the paddy field. Within 100 days after basal application, the N2O emission rate of treatment CRF was only 13.45%-21.26% of Corn and 71.17%-112.47% of CK. The N2O emission of Com was mainly concentrated in 1-25 d after basal fertilization and mid-aeration period, but that of CRF was remarkably lower during same period, while the peak of N2O emission of CK was postponed and reduced. It was concluded that both one-time fertilization of CRF and several-time fertilizations of conventional urea were able to reduce N2O emission from the paddy field. PMID:15707336

  9. [China's rice field greenhouse gas emission under climate change based on DNDC model simulation].

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhan; Niu, Yi-long; Sun, Lai-xiang; Li, Chang-sheng; Liu, Chun-jiang; Fan, Dong-li

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to a large body of literature assessing the impact of agriculture greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on climate change, there is a lack of research examining the impact of climate change on agricultural GHG emissions. This study employed the DNDC v9.5, a state-of-art biogeochemical model, to simulate greenhouse gas emissions in China' s rice-growing fields during 1971-2010. The results showed that owing to temperature rising (on average 0.49 °C higher in the second 20 years than in the first 20 year) and precipitation increase (11 mm more in the second 20 years than in the first 20 years) during the rice growing season, CH4 and N2O emissions in paddy field increased by 0.25 kg C . hm-2 and 0.25 kg N . hm-2, respectively. The rising temperature accelerated CH4 emission and N2O emission increased with precipitation. These results indicated that climate change exerted impact on the mechanism of GHG emissions in paddy field.

  10. [Effects of controlled release fertilizers on N2O emission from paddy field].

    PubMed

    Li, Fangmin; Fan, Xiaolin; Liu, Fang; Wang, Qiang

    2004-11-01

    With close chamber method, this paper studied the effects of controlled release fertilizer (CRF), non-coated compound fertilizer (Com) and conventional urea (CK) on N2O emission from paddy field. The results showed that within 10 days after transplanting, the ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the surface water of the plot treated with CRF were significantly different from those treated with Com. The partial coefficient between N2O emission rates and corresponding nitrate concentrations in the water was significantly high (r = 0.6834). Compared with Com, CRF was able to reduce N2O emission from the paddy field. Within 100 days after basal application, the N2O emission rate of treatment CRF was only 13.45%-21.26% of Corn and 71.17%-112.47% of CK. The N2O emission of Com was mainly concentrated in 1-25 d after basal fertilization and mid-aeration period, but that of CRF was remarkably lower during same period, while the peak of N2O emission of CK was postponed and reduced. It was concluded that both one-time fertilization of CRF and several-time fertilizations of conventional urea were able to reduce N2O emission from the paddy field.

  11. The screening effects of carbon nanotube arrays and its field emission optimum density

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Dan Liu, Lie

    2013-12-15

    In order to investigate the field emission optimum density of carbon nanotube (CNT) array, the screening effects of CNT array have been studied. It has been shown that the electric field in the vicinity of an individual nanotube of array can be notable distorted due to the screening action of the surrounding neighbors. The optimum normalized spacing s/l(as referred to the length) for the maximum emission current is inversely proportional to aspect ratio l/r and electric field strength for CNT arrays with a fixed dimension.

  12. Secondary nanotube growth on aligned carbon nanofibre arrays for superior field emission.

    PubMed

    Watts, Paul C P; Lyth, Stephen M; Henley, Simon J; Silva, S Ravi P

    2008-04-01

    We report substantial improvement of the field emission properties from aligned carbon nanotubes grown on aligned carbon nanofibres by a two-stage plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. The threshold field decreased from 15.0 to 3.6 V/microm after the secondary growth. The field enhancement factor increased from 240 to 1480. This technique allows for superior emission of electrons for carbon nanotube/nanofibre arrays grown directly on highly doped silicon for direct integration in large area displays. PMID:18572626

  13. A novel field measurement method for determining fine particle and gas emissions from residential wood combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissari, Jarkko; Hytönen, Kati; Lyyränen, Jussi; Jokiniemi, Jorma

    Emission data from residential wood combustion are usually obtained on test stands in the laboratory but these measurements do not correspond to the operational conditions in the field because of the technological boundary conditions (e.g. testing protocol, environmental and draught conditions). The field measurements take into account the habitual practice of the operators and provide the more reliable results needed for emission inventories. In this study, a workable and compact method for measuring emissions from residential wood combustion in winter conditions was developed. The emissions for fine particle, gaseous and PAH compounds as well as particle composition in real operational conditions were measured from seven different appliances. The measurement technique worked well and was evidently suitable for winter conditions. It was easy and fast to use, and no construction scaffold was needed. The dilution of the sample with the combination of a porous tube diluter and an ejector diluter was well suited to field measurement. The results indicate that the emissions of total volatile organic carbon (TVOC) (17 g kg -1 (of dry wood burned)), carbon monoxide (CO) (120 g kg -1) and fine particle mass (PM 1) (2.7 g kg -1) from the sauna stove were higher than in the other measured appliances. In the masonry heaters, baking oven and stove, the emissions were 2.9-9 g kg -1 TVOC, 28-68 g kg -1 CO and 0.6-1.6 g kg -1 PM 1. The emission of 12 PAHs (PAH 12) from the sauna stove was 164 mg kg -1 and consisted mainly of PAHs with four benzene rings in their structure. PAH 12 emission from other appliances was, on average, 21 mg kg -1 and was dominated by 2-ring PAHs. These results indicate that despite the non-optimal operational practices in the field, the emissions did not differ markedly from the laboratory measurements.

  14. Work function measurements by the field emission retarding potential method.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, R. W.; Mackie, W.; Swanson, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the theoretical foundation of the field electron retarding potential method, and review of its experimental application to the measurement of single crystal face work functions. The results obtained from several substrates are discussed. An interesting and useful fallout from the experimental approach described is the ability to accurately measure the elastic and inelastic reflection coefficient for impinging electrons to near zero-volt energy.

  15. Radio Emission from particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulrey, Katharine

    2015-04-01

    Geomagnetic radiation from air showers is an attractive technique for detecting ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Macroscopic and microscopic models have been developed which qualitatively agreed with field observations. A controlled laboratory experiment at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) was designed to test these models. The experiment measures the radio frequency emission from cascades of secondary particles in a dense dielectric medium in the presence of a magnetic field. The cascades were induced by a ~ 4.5 GeV electron beam in a polyethylene target placed in magnetic fields up to +/-1000 G. The radio emission beam pattern was sampled in horizontal and vertical polarizations by multiple antennas with a total frequency band of 30-3000 MHz. The emission was found to be in good agreement with model predictions, including a Cerenkov-like beam pattern and linear scaling with magnetic field. Katharine Mulrey for the T-510 Collaboration.

  16. Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1999-08-10

    A novel field emitter device is disclosed for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials. 8 figs.

  17. Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    A novel field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials.

  18. Growth and field emission of tungsten oxide nanotip arrays on ITO glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai; Pan, Qingtao; Yang, Feng; Ni, Shibi; He, Deyan

    2007-09-01

    High-density and uniformly aligned tungsten oxide nanotip arrays have been deposited by a conventional thermal evaporation on ITO glass substrates without any catalysts or additives. The temperature of substrate was 450-500 °C. It was shown that the tungsten oxide nanotips are single-crystal grown along [0 1 0] direction. For commercial applications, field emission of the tungsten oxide nanotip arrays was characterized in a poor vacuum at room temperature. The field emission behaviors are in agreement with Fowler-Nordheim theory. The turn-on field is 2.8 V μm -1 as d is 0.3 mm. The excellent field emission performances indicated that the tungsten oxide nanotip arrays grown by the present approach are a good candidate for application in vacuum microelectronic devices.

  19. Low energy cluster beam deposited BN films as the cascade for field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, L.; Ge, J.; Wang, G.

    2005-07-01

    The atomic deposited BN films with the thickness of nanometers (ABN) were prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering method and the nanostructured BN films (CBN) were prepared by Low Energy Cluster Beam Deposition. UV-Vis Absorption measurement proves the band gap of 4.27 eV and field emission of the BN films were carried out. F-N plots of all the samples give a good fitting and demonstrate the F-N tunneling of the emission process. The emission of ABN begins at the electric field of 14.6 V/μ m while that of CBN starts at 5.10 V/μ m. Emission current density of 1 mA/cm2 for ABN needs the field of 20 V/μ m while that of CBN needs only 12.1 V/μ m. The cluster-deposited BN on n-type Silicon substrate proves a good performance in terms of the lower gauge voltage, more emission sites and higher electron intensity and seems a promising substitute for the cascade of field emission.

  20. Emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, and other trace gases from rice fields in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A. K.; Rasmussen, R. A.; Shearer, M. J.; Chen, Zong-Liang; Yao, Heng; Yang, Jun

    1998-10-01

    We measured the emissions of methane, nitrous oxide, and other environmentally important trace gases from rice fields in China. The experiments were conducted near Beijing, representing temperate latitude rice agriculture, and at Guangzhou, representing tropical and subtropical agriculture. These studies complement our intensive research at Tu Zu in China (subtropical) and the work near Bogor, Indonesia, representing tropical rice agriculture. The experiments described here span 5 years between 1992 and 1996. The seasonally averaged methane emissions from Beijing were about 9 (5-16) mg m-2 h-1. Emissions from the first crop of the year at Guangzhou were about 5 (2-8) mg m-2 h-1 and about 30 (18-54) mg m-2 h-1 from the second crop. Measurements of nitrous oxide fluxes from the same rice fields show that emissions are confined to events that consist of high fluxes decaying to zero within a few days. Some of the events appear to be triggered by fertilizer applications. It is apparent that rice fields using nitrogen-based fertilizers are a source of N2O, but a robust estimate of whole season average emission rate is still not possible. The composite of all the N2O fluxes we observed gives a geometric mean of about 70 μg m-2 h-1. These rates are high enough to suggest that the rice fields could be a globally important source of N2O. As the agricultural practices change from use of organic fertilizers to nitrogen-based fertilizers, the role of N2O emissions from rice fields may become more important in its global budget. We also observed that chloroform and carbon monoxide were emitted from all fields studied. The flux of CO is not large enough to be important on the global scale, but the emissions of chloroform may be.

  1. Shock-associated low-energy ion enhancements observed by Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, R. B.; Pesses, M. E.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1981-09-01

    Observations of shock-associated ion enhancements at energies of not less than 30 keV are presented from data gathered by Voyagers 1 and 2. Observations include examples of energetic storm particle events associated with flare-produced shocks and examples of corotating particle events (CPE) associated with forward and reverse shocks that bound corotating interaction regions in the outer heliosphere. Most of the CPE have recurrent double-peaked intensity enhancements showing little or no velocity dispersion at peak intensities, time durations of several days, and soft energy spectra extending up to 5 MeV/nucleon. The lowest energy ion enhancements are confined mainly downstream of the corotating interaction regions with the magnitude and duration of the upstream enhancements increasing with increasing ion energy. The observations are consistent with the dynamical and kinematical effects expected when low energy ions are accelerated at quasi-perpendicular shocks.

  2. Water-processed carbon nanotube/graphene hybrids with enhanced field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Meng; Xu, Peng; Song, Yenan; Wang, Xu; Li, Zhenhua; Shang, Xuefu; Wu, Huizhen; Zhao, Pei; Wang, Miao

    2015-09-01

    Integrating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene into hybrid structures provides a novel approach to three dimensional (3D) materials with advantageous properties. Here we present a water-processing method to create integrated CNT/graphene hybrids and test their field emission properties. With an optimized mass ratio of CNTs to graphene, the hybrid shows a significantly enhanced field emission performance, such as turn-on electric field of 0.79 V/μm, threshold electric field of 1.05 V/μm, maximum current density of 0.1 mA/cm2, and field enhancement factor of ˜1.3 × 104. The optimized mass ratio for field emission emphasizes the importance of both CNTs and graphene in the hybrid. We also hypothesize a possible mechanism for this enhanced field emission performance from the CNT/graphene hybrid. During the solution treatment, graphene oxide behaves as surfactant sheets for CNTs to form a well dispersed solution, which leads to a better organized 3D structure with more conducting channels for electron transport.

  3. Vertically-Aligned Single-Crystal Nanocone Arrays: Controlled Fabrication and Enhanced Field Emission.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jing Lai; Lei, Dang Yuan; Chen, Fei; Lau, Shu Ping; Milne, William I; Toimil-Molares, M E; Trautmann, Christina; Liu, Jie

    2016-01-13

    Metal nanostructures with conical shape, vertical alignment, large ratio of cone height and curvature radius at the apex, controlled cone angle, and single-crystal structure are ideal candidates for enhancing field electron-emission efficiency with additional merits, such as good mechanical and thermal stability. However, fabrication of such nanostructures possessing all these features is challenging. Here, we report on the controlled fabrication of large scale, vertically aligned, and mechanically self-supported single-crystal Cu nanocones with controlled cone angle and enhanced field emission. The Cu nanocones were fabricated by ion-track templates in combination with electrochemical deposition. Their cone angle is controlled in the range from 0.3° to 6.2° by asymmetrically selective etching of the ion tracks and the minimum tip curvature diameter reaches down to 6 nm. The field emission measurements show that the turn-on electric field of the Cu nanocone field emitters can be as low as 1.9 V/μm at current density of 10 μA/cm(2) (a record low value for Cu nanostructures, to the best of our knowledge). The maximum field enhancement factor we measured was as large as 6068, indicating that the Cu nanocones are promising candidates for field emission applications.

  4. Water-processed carbon nanotube/graphene hybrids with enhanced field emission properties

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Meng; Xu, Peng; Wang, Xu; Wu, Huizhen; Wang, Miao E-mail: miaowang@css.zju.edu.cn; Song, Yenan; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Pei E-mail: miaowang@css.zju.edu.cn; Shang, Xuefu

    2015-09-15

    Integrating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene into hybrid structures provides a novel approach to three dimensional (3D) materials with advantageous properties. Here we present a water-processing method to create integrated CNT/graphene hybrids and test their field emission properties. With an optimized mass ratio of CNTs to graphene, the hybrid shows a significantly enhanced field emission performance, such as turn-on electric field of 0.79 V/μm, threshold electric field of 1.05 V/μm, maximum current density of 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, and field enhancement factor of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 4}. The optimized mass ratio for field emission emphasizes the importance of both CNTs and graphene in the hybrid. We also hypothesize a possible mechanism for this enhanced field emission performance from the CNT/graphene hybrid. During the solution treatment, graphene oxide behaves as surfactant sheets for CNTs to form a well dispersed solution, which leads to a better organized 3D structure with more conducting channels for electron transport.

  5. Emission line eclipse mapping of velocity fields in dwarf nova accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, M.; Mineshige, S.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a new method, emission-line eclipse mapping, to map the velocity fields in an accretion disc. We apply the usual eclipse mapping technique to the light curves at each of 12-24 wavelengths across the line center to map the region with same line-of-sight velocity, from which we are able to plot the rotational velocity as a function of radius on the assumption of axisymmetric disc. We calculate time changes of the emission line profiles, assuming Keplerian rotation fields (vvarphi propto r-1/2) and the emissivity distribution of j propto r-3/2, and reconstruct emissivity profiles. The results show typically a `two-eye' pattern for high line-of-sight velocities and we can recover the relation, vvarphi propto d-1/2, where d is the separation of two lq eyes.'

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet field emission lamp consisting of neodymium ion doped lutetium fluoride thin film as phosphor.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Masahiro; Tsuji, Takayuki; Yusop, Mohd Zamri; Tanemura, Masaki; Ono, Shingo; Nagami, Tomohito; Fukuda, Kentaro; Suyama, Toshihisa; Yokota, Yuui; Yanagida, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2014-01-01

    A vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) field emission lamp was developed by using a neodymium ion doped lutetium fluoride (Nd(3+) : LuF3) thin film as solid-state phosphor and carbon nanofiber field electron emitters. The thin film was synthesized by pulsed laser deposition and incorporated into the lamp. The cathodoluminescence spectra of the lamp showed multiple emission peaks at 180, 225, and 255 nm. These emission spectra were in good agreement with the spectra reported for the Nd(3+) : LuF3 crystal. Moreover, application of an acceleration voltage effectively increased the emission intensity. These results contribute to the performance enhancement of the lamp operating in the VUV region.

  7. Methane emissions estimate from airborne measurements over a western United States natural gas field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; PéTron, Gabrielle; Frost, Gregory; Michael Hardesty, R.; Kofler, Jonathan; Miller, Ben R.; Newberger, Tim; Wolter, Sonja; Banta, Robert; Brewer, Alan; Dlugokencky, Ed; Lang, Patricia; Montzka, Stephen A.; Schnell, Russell; Tans, Pieter; Trainer, Michael; Zamora, Robert; Conley, Stephen

    2013-08-01

    (CH4) emissions from natural gas production are not well quantified and have the potential to offset the climate benefits of natural gas over other fossil fuels. We use atmospheric measurements in a mass balance approach to estimate CH4 emissions of 55 ± 15 × 103 kg h-1 from a natural gas and oil production field in Uintah County, Utah, on 1 day: 3 February 2012. This emission rate corresponds to 6.2%-11.7% (1σ) of average hourly natural gas production in Uintah County in the month of February. This study demonstrates the mass balance technique as a valuable tool for estimating emissions from oil and gas production regions and illustrates the need for further atmospheric measurements to determine the representativeness of our single-day estimate and to better assess inventories of CH4 emissions.

  8. Enhancement of Laser Induced Breakdown Emission in the Presence of External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Virendra N.; Zhang, Hansheng; Yueh, Fang Y.; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2001-04-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a useful method for determining the elemental composition in solid, liquid and gaseous samples. Elemental analysis of sample is accomplished by measuring the emission of the elemental atom or ions present in the plasma from any kind of samples. The ability to form and study the plasma on unprepared sample makes LIBS a very attractive analytical technique. Various techniques have been used for enhancing the analytical characteristics of the plasma sources used for elemental analysis. Many complicated magnetic field geometries have been used earlier with various types of plasma sources to enhance the plasma emission. In this paper characterization of laser induced plasma emission from Manganese (Mn) in liquid solution is presented. The plasma was formed in between the poles of two magnets with 1200 Gauss pole strength separated by 5 mm. The effect of magnetic field on various emission properties was studied. An one and half times enhancement in the intensity of Mn emission line at 403.076, 403.307 and 403.449 nm was observed for the laser intensity below 1.5x10e12 W/cm2. The intensity of Mn line decreases at higher laser intensity in the presence of magnetic field. This decrease in the emission at higher laser intensity seems to be due to turbulence as a result of laser induced shock as well as generation of instability in the plasma in the presence of magnetic field. The calibration curve for Mn was obtained in an optimized condition in the absence and presence of magnetic field. The limit of detection for Mn in liquid was found to be 0.63 PPM in the presence of magnetic field, which is less in comparison to the absence of magnetic field ( 0.87 PPM). * Visiting Scientist from Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452 013 (INDIA)

  9. Measurement and Analysis of Field Emission Electrons in the LCLS Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Jongewaard, E.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Schmerge, J.F.; Vlieks, A.; /SLAC

    2007-11-02

    The field emission was measured during the high-power testing of the LCLS photocathode RF gun. A careful study and analysis of the field emission electrons, or dark current is important in assessing the gun's internal surface quality in actual operation, especially those surfaces with high fields. The first indication of a good RF gun design and fabrication is short processing time to the required fields and low electron emission at high fields. The charge per 2 microsecond long RF pulse (the dark charge) was measured as a function of the peak cathode field for the 1.6 cell, 2.856GHz LCLS RF gun. Faraday cup data was taken for cathode peak RF fields up to 120MV/m producing a maximum of 0.6nC/RF pulse for a diamond-turned polycrystalline copper cathode installed in the gun. Digitized images of the dark charge were taken using a 100 micron thick YAG crystal for a range of solenoid fields to determine the location and angular distribution of the field emitters. The FN plots and emitter image analysis will be described in this paper.

  10. Vertically aligned carbon nanopillars with size and spacing control for a transparent field emission display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Chang Hwa; Lee, Jung A; Lee, Seung S

    2013-01-18

    A top-down fabrication method is presented for vertically aligned carbon nanopillars (CNPs) using photolithography and pyrolysis. The modified backside exposure method of photolithography fabricates vertically aligned polymer (SU-8) nanopillars. The pyrolysis process, which transforms the polymer to amorphous carbon, reliably produces vertically aligned CNPs with widths ranging from 100 to 400 nm. The CNPs can be used as a transparent field emission cathode for a transparent display and light emission is observed.

  11. Spectroscopic investigations of a field emission generated radiative zone: Mass spectroscopic measurements. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mitterauer, J.

    1981-10-01

    In view of the application of liquid metal field ion sources as electric thrustors for space propulsion, the basic physical features of the field ionization mechanism were analyzed experimentally. An ultrahigh vacuum test chamber and a liquid metal ion source were built. Diagnostic methods, e.g., basic measurements of the emission characteristics, probe measurements of the ion current distribution, mass spectroscopic measurements of the particles emitted from the ion source, and spectroscopic measurements of the visible radiation accompanying field ionization, were developed. Experimental data which can be transferred to prototype field ion thrusters are presented, but experimental facilities limit conclusions regarding theoretical aspects of field ionization.

  12. Seasonal Production and Emission of Methane from Rice Fields, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, M. Aslam K.; Rasmussen,Reinhold A.

    2002-12-03

    B 139 - Methane (CH4) is a greenhouse gas regarded second only to carbon dioxide in its ability to cause global warming. Methane is important because of its relatively fast increase, and also because it is, per molecule, some 60 times more effective than carbon dioxide in causing global warming. The largest present anthropogenic sources of methane are rice fields, cattle and biomass burning. The global emissions from these sources are still not well known. In the middle 1980s there were few available data on methane emissions from rice fields leading to estimates of a global source between 100-280 Tg/yr. Extensive worldwide research during the last decade has shown that the global emissions from rice fields are more likely to be in the range of 30-80Tg/yr. While this work has led to a substantial reduction in the estimated emissions, the uncertainty is still quite large, and seriously affects our ability to include methane in integrated assessments for future climate change and environmental management.China dominated estimates of methane emissions from rice fields because it was, and is, the largest producer of rice, and major increases in rice production had taken place in the country over the last several decades. This report summarizes the work in Sichuan Province, China, in each of the following areas: the design of the experiment; the main results on methane emissions from rice fields, delineating the factors controlling emissions; production of methane in the soil; a survey of water management practices in sample of counties in Sichuan province; and results of ambient measurements including data from the background continental site. B139

  13. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube yarn for micro-resolution X-ray tube cathode.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Won; Mo, Chan Bin; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Seongwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has excellent electrical and thermal conductivity and high aspect ratio for X-ray tube cathode. However, CNT field emission cathode has been shown unstable field emission and short life time due to field evaporation by high current density and detachment by electrostatic force. An alternative approach in this direction is the introduction of CNT yarn, which is a one dimensional assembly of individual carbon nanotubes bonded by the Van der Waals force. Because CNT yarn is composed with many CNTs, CNT yarns are expected to increase current density and life time for X-ray tube applications. In this research, CNT yarn was fabricated by spinning of a super-aligned CNT forest and was characterized for application to an X-ray tube cathode. CNT yarn showed a high field emission current density and a long lifetime of over 450 hours. Applying the CNT yarn field emitter to the X-ray tube cathode, it was possible to obtain micro-scale resolution images. The relationship between the field emission properties and the microstructure evolution was investigated and the unraveling effect of the CNT yarn was discussed. PMID:24245260

  14. Effect of Purity and Substrate on Field Emission Properties of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) have been synthesized by chemical vapour decomposition (CVD) of acetylene over Rare Earth (RE) based AB2(DyNi2) alloy hydride catalyst. The as-grown carbon nanotubes were purified by acid and heat treatments and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis and Raman Spectroscopy. Fully carbon based field emitters have been fabricated by spin coating a solutions of both as-grown and purified MWNT and dichloro ethane (DCE) over carbon paper with and without graphitized layer. The use of graphitized carbon paper as substrate opens several new possibilities for carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters, as the presence of the graphitic layer provides strong adhesion between the nanotubes and carbon paper and reduces contact resistance. The field emission characteristics have been studied using an indigenously fabricated set up and the results are discussed. CNT field emitter prepared by spin coating of the purified MWNT–DCE solution over graphitized carbon paper shows excellent emission properties with a fairly stable emission current over a period of 4 h. Analysis of the field emission characteristics based on the Fowler–Nordheim (FN) theory reveals current saturation effects at high applied fields for all the samples. PMID:21798103

  15. Effect of Purity and Substrate on Field Emission Properties of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rakhi, Rb; Sethupathi, K; Ramaprabhu, S

    2007-06-21

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) have been synthesized by chemical vapour decomposition (CVD) of acetylene over Rare Earth (RE) based AB2(DyNi2) alloy hydride catalyst. The as-grown carbon nanotubes were purified by acid and heat treatments and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis and Raman Spectroscopy. Fully carbon based field emitters have been fabricated by spin coating a solutions of both as-grown and purified MWNT and dichloro ethane (DCE) over carbon paper with and without graphitized layer. The use of graphitized carbon paper as substrate opens several new possibilities for carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters, as the presence of the graphitic layer provides strong adhesion between the nanotubes and carbon paper and reduces contact resistance. The field emission characteristics have been studied using an indigenously fabricated set up and the results are discussed. CNT field emitter prepared by spin coating of the purified MWNT-DCE solution over graphitized carbon paper shows excellent emission properties with a fairly stable emission current over a period of 4 h. Analysis of the field emission characteristics based on the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) theory reveals current saturation effects at high applied fields for all the samples.

  16. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube yarn for micro-resolution X-ray tube cathode.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Won; Mo, Chan Bin; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Seongwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has excellent electrical and thermal conductivity and high aspect ratio for X-ray tube cathode. However, CNT field emission cathode has been shown unstable field emission and short life time due to field evaporation by high current density and detachment by electrostatic force. An alternative approach in this direction is the introduction of CNT yarn, which is a one dimensional assembly of individual carbon nanotubes bonded by the Van der Waals force. Because CNT yarn is composed with many CNTs, CNT yarns are expected to increase current density and life time for X-ray tube applications. In this research, CNT yarn was fabricated by spinning of a super-aligned CNT forest and was characterized for application to an X-ray tube cathode. CNT yarn showed a high field emission current density and a long lifetime of over 450 hours. Applying the CNT yarn field emitter to the X-ray tube cathode, it was possible to obtain micro-scale resolution images. The relationship between the field emission properties and the microstructure evolution was investigated and the unraveling effect of the CNT yarn was discussed.

  17. Fabrication of field emission display prototype utilizing printed carbon nanotubes/nanofibers emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, P. S.; Chen, T.; Chen, Y. W.; Zhang, Z. J.; Feng, T.; Wang, L. L.; Lin, L. F.; Sun, Z.; Zheng, Z. H.

    2008-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes/nanofibers (CNTs) used as emitters, diode-type field emission display (FED) prototypes of dot matrix and character images were fabricated by low-cost techniques and equipments, respectively. The technical development in the design and fabrication of the cathode, the anode, and the panel, is described. CNTs were produced by a simple, low-cost and easily-controllable thermal chemical vapor deposition. The cathode was prepared by the screen-printing method. The field emission characteristics were enhanced by a heat post-treatment in H2 gas atmosphere. The panel structure was packaged by a vacuum fluorescent display-like process and vacuum-sealed through an exhaust glass tube. The fully-sealed CNTs FED (c-FED) showed good emission properties. The brightness of 600 cd/m2 was achieved from the yellow phosphor at a relatively low applied electric field. The developed technology has a potential practical application in c-FED.

  18. Initiation of vacuum breakdown and failure mechanism of the carbon nanotube during thermal field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Cai; Lie, Liu; Jin-Chuan, Ju; Xue-Long, Zhao; Hong-Yu, Zhou; Xiao, Wang

    2016-04-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT)-based materials can be used as vacuum device cathodes. Owing to the excellent field emission properties of CNT, it has great potentials in the applications of an explosive field emission cathode. The falling off of CNT from the substrate, which frequently appears in experiments, restricts its application. In addition, the onset time of vacuum breakdown limits the performance of the high-power explosive-emission-cathode-based diode. In this paper, the characteristics of the CNT, electric field strength, contact resistance and the kind of substrate material are varied to study the parameter effects on the onset time of vacuum breakdown and failure mechanism of the CNT by using the finite element method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11305263 and 61401484).

  19. Electrochemical Etching and Characterization of Sharp Field Emission Points for Electron Impact Ionization.

    PubMed

    Van Well, Tyler L; Redshaw, Matthew; Gamage, Nadeesha D; Kandegedara, R M Eranjan B

    2016-01-01

    A new variation of the drop-off method for fabricating field emission points by electrochemically etching tungsten rods in a NaOH solution is described. The results of studies in which the etching current and the molarity of the NaOH solution used in the etching process were varied are presented. The investigation of the geometry of the tips, by imaging them with a scanning electron microscope, and by operating them in field emission mode is also described. The field emission tips produced are intended to be used as an electron beam source for ion production via electron impact ionization of background gas or vapor in Penning trap mass spectrometry applications. PMID:27500824

  20. Influence of charge deposition in a field-emission display panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lei; Zhang, Xiaobing; Lou, Chaogang; Zhu, ZuoYa

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission displays (FEDs) have been studied intensively in recent years as a candidate for flat-display panels in the future. In a FED, electrons emit from field emitters. Some electrons may impinge on the insulator surface between cathode and gate electrodes and cause charging of that surface because the yield of secondary electron emission is usually not equal to one. The charging of the insulator walls between cathode and gate electrodes is one of the important factors influencing the performance of a FED. In this paper, a simulation program is used to calculate this charge deposition, electric field distribution and electron trajectories. From the change of the electric field upon charge deposition in the triode region, it is shown that the insulator surface is negatively charged at a low gate voltage, e.g. 20 V. However, positive charge is deposited when the gate voltage is high, e.g. 100 V. The simulations also show that the emission current will increase even further after coating the dielectric with a thin film of a material with a high-secondary emission coefficient such as MgO. If a cone-shaped dielectric aperture is used in a triode, the emission current will decrease after charge deposition. However, the focus performance of the electron beam is improving in this case.

  1. Field Emission at Grain Boundaries: Modeling the Conductivity in Highly Doped Polycrystalline Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Nicolas; Hüpkes, Jürgen; Rau, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    In this contribution, we elaborate a conductivity model for highly doped polycrystalline semiconductors. The prominent feature of the model is the description of grain-boundary scattering by field emission, i.e., quantum-mechanical tunneling of electrons through potential barriers at grain boundaries. For this purpose, we adapt a theory of Stratton [Theory of field emission from semiconductors, Phys. Rev. 125, 67 (1962)] to double Schottky barriers at grain boundaries. We provide strong evidence that field emission rather than the predominantly applied thermionic emission is the dominant transport path across grain boundaries in semiconductors with carrier concentrations exceeding approximately 1019 cm-3 . We obtain a comprehensive conductivity model for highly doped polycrystalline semiconductors by combining field emission with two intragrain scattering mechanisms, that are ionized-impurity and electron-phonon scattering. The model is applied to a wide range of literature data in order to show its applicability and explanatory power. The literature data comprise, in particular, transparent conductive oxides with a special emphasis on aluminum-doped ZnO.

  2. Optical and field emission properties of layer-structure GaN nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Zhen; Li, Enling; Shi, Wei; Ma, Deming

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • The layer-structure GaN nanowires with hexagonal-shaped cross-sections are produced via a process based on the CVD method. • The diameter of the layer-structure GaN nanowire gradually decreases from ∼500 nm to ∼200 nm along the wire axis. • The layer-structure GaN nanowire film possesses good field emission property. - Abstract: A layer-structure gallium nitride (GaN) nanowires, grown on Pt-coated n-type Si (1 1 1) substrate, have been synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The results show: (1) SEM indicates that the geometry structure is layer-structure. HRTEM indicates that GaN nanowire’s preferential growth direction is along [0 0 1] direction. (2) The room temperature PL emission spectrum of the layer-structure GaN nanowires has a peak at 375 nm, which proves that GaN nanowires have potential application in light-emitting nano-devices. (3) Field-emission measurements show that the layer-structure GaN nanowires film has a low turn-on field of 4.39 V/μm (at room temperature), which is sufficient for electron emission devices, field emission displays and vacuum nano-electronic devices. The growth mechanism for GaN nanowires has also been discussed briefly.

  3. Experimental and theoretical study on field emission properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Zhou, Wei-Man; Liu, Wei-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Li

    2015-05-01

    Field emission properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated experimentally and theoretically. CNTs are in situ decorated with ZnO NPs during the growth process by chemical vapor deposition using a carbon source from the iron phthalocyanine pyrolysis. The experimental field emission test shows that the ZnO NP decoration significantly improves the emission current from 50 μA to 275 μA at 550 V and the reduced threshold voltage from 450 V to 350 V. The field emission mechanism of ZnO NPs on CNTs is theoretically studied by the density functional theory (DFT) combined with the Penn-Plummer method. The ZnO NPs reconstruct the ZnO-CNT structure and pull down the surface barrier of the entire emitter system to 0.49 eV so as to reduce the threshold electric field. The simulation results suggest that the presence of ZnO NPs would increase the LDOS near the Fermi level and increase the emission current. The calculation results are consistent with the experiment results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91123018, 61172040, and 61172041) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM7277).

  4. Field studies of isoprene emissions from vegetation in the Northwest Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Susan M.; Boissard, C.; Hagenlocher, B.; Hewitt, C. Nicholas

    1998-10-01

    During the Biogenic Emissions in the Mediterranean Area (BEMA) project field campaigns (1993-1997), 40 native Mediterranean plant species were screened for emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes using a branch enclosure sampling method with subsequent gas chromatographic-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and GC-mass selective detector (MS) analysis. Thirteen species emitted more than 0.5 μg (C) g-1 dw h-1 isoprene at 30°C and 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), of which nine species emitted more than 20 μg (C) g-1 dw h-1. Emissions of isoprene were strongly correlated with temperature and PAR, and were reasonably well predicted by existing algorithms. There was little intraspecies and day to day variation in base emission rates. In general, median base emission rates were higher in summer compared to autumn for most species. Significant difference in aggregated habitat base emission rates was found between dunes, garrigue, woodland, and riverside sample sites. Although considerable unexplained variability in base emission rates remains to be explored, first estimates of base emission rates for Mediterranean shrublands are presented here.

  5. Interpretation of the field enhancement factor for electron emission from carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. C.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2009-07-01

    The local electric fields in the vicinity of the tips of metallic nanotubes are calculated. The variation in the field enhancement factor as a function of internanotube separation, anode-substrate separation, and height and radius of the nanotube is reported. Calculations show that the field induced electron emission current, based on the Fowler-Nordheim theory, is reduced when the intertube separation is less than twice the height of the nanotube. The location of the anode plane is shown to be important when the anode-substrate separation is less than three times the height of the nanotube. The results also predict that the macroscopic threshold field for electron emission should decrease as the anode-substrate separation D decreases. For separations greater than three times the height of the nanotube, the threshold field becomes constant and independent of anode-cathode geometry. Conversely, the manner in which applied electric field is defined is crucial if the results are be understood better. Experimental field emission measurements made on an isolated carbon nanotube confirms the need for a new interpretation of the electric field around stand alone point emitters.

  6. Field electron and ion emission from charged surfaces: a strategic historical review of theoretical concepts.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Richard G

    2003-01-01

    The field-electron (FE) and field-ion techniques directly observe and measure atomic-level surface processes that occur in very high electric fields. In theoretical terms, the high fields put large additional terms into Hamiltonians and free energies, and significantly modify many aspects of the surface physics and chemistry, as compared with the field-free situation. This paper presents a strategic review of the fundamental science of some of these high-field surface effects and processes, as developed in the context of the field electron and ion emission techniques. It outlines the main theoretical concepts developed, notes some twists of scientific history, and suggests useful contributions made to mainstream science. Topics covered are basic aspects of FE emission, surface field ionisation, localised field adsorption, charged surfaces theory, field-ion image contrast theory and associated imaging-gas kinetics, field evaporation, and aspects of the thermodynamics of charged surfaces. Despite many years of effort, important aspects of the theory remain incomplete. Some theoretical challenges are noted.

  7. Apparatus comprising a tunable nanomechanical near-field grating and method for controlling far-field emission

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Dustin Wade; Bogart, Gregory Robert

    2007-02-06

    A tunable nanomechanical near-field grating is disclosed which is capable of varying the intensity of a diffraction mode of an optical output signal. The tunable nanomechanical near-field grating includes two sub-gratings each having line-elements with width and thickness less than the operating wavelength of light with which the grating interacts. Lateral apertures in the two sub-gratings are formed from the space between one line-element of the first sub-grating and at least one line-element of the second sub-grating. One of the sub-gratings is capable of motion such that at least one of aperture width and aperture depth changes, causing a perturbation to the near-field intensity distribution of the tunable nanomechanical near-field grating and a corresponding change to the far-field emission of thereof.

  8. Light source with carbon nanotubes field emission cathode and rare-earth doped nanocrystalline phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psuja, P.; Strek, W.

    2007-09-01

    In this work we report a new carbon nanotubes field emission (CNT-FED) light source with nanocrystalline phosphors. The nanocrystalline powders of cerium doped yttrium aluminum garnet were obtained by modified Pechini method. The phosphor has been electrophoretically deposited on ITO-glass substrates. The cathode composed of carbon nanotubes was fabricated in the same manner. A light source was assembled and tested. Low-voltage cathodoluminescent spectra and I-V characteristics of fabricated cathodes were measured. A possibility of application of Ce doped nanocrystalline YAG phosphor in the field emission displays (FEDs) was discussed.

  9. Terahertz emission from collapsing field domains during switching of a gallium arsenide bipolar transistor.

    PubMed

    Vainshtein, Sergey; Kostamovaara, Juha; Yuferev, Valentin; Knap, Wojciech; Fatimy, Abdel; Diakonova, Nina

    2007-10-26

    Broadband pulsed THz emission with peak power in the sub-mW range has been observed experimentally during avalanche switching in a gallium arsenide bipolar junction transistor at room temperature, while significantly higher total generated power is predicted in simulations. The emission is attributed to very fast oscillations in the conductivity current across the switching channels, which appear as a result of temporal evolution of the field domains generated in highly dense electron-hole plasma. This plasma is formed in turn by powerful impact ionization in multiple field domains of ultrahigh amplitude.

  10. Seeking optimal performance of multiwall carbon nanotubes in field emission: Tight-binding approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shi-Dong; Deng, Shao Zhi; Xu, Ning Sheng

    2006-10-01

    The field emission performance of different components of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNs) is systematically studied by quantum tunneling theory with the tight-binding approach. We find that the current-voltage characteristic in field emission of MWCNs still approximately follows the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The key characteristics of all MWCNs are almost independent of the component and the layer number of MWCNs that have more three layers. The interlayer coupling of MWCNs can induce a semiconductor-metal phase transition, which leads to most MWCNs being actually metallic, and the chiral and quantum size effects disappear.

  11. Field emission in actuation pads of radio frequency microelectromechanical systems ohmic switches: A potential contamination mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsoureli, M.; Reig, B.; Papandreou, E.; Poulain, C.; Souchon, F.; Deborgies, F.; Papaioannou, G.

    2016-01-01

    The field emission current generated across the actuation pads in ohmic MEMS switches during ON state is shown to constitute an additional source of degradation. Switches with Au/Au and Au/Ru contacts have been subjected to 24 h continuous stress. In both cases the switch ohmic contact resistance and field emission current across actuation pads were monitored simultaneously. The experimental results revealed a negligible degradation in Au/Au contact devices while the Au/Ru contact devices show a fast degradation. The experimental results from Au/Au and Ru/Au contact switches have been compared taking into account the plasma generation in the actuation pads.

  12. Field emission characteristics of a graphite nanoneedle cathode and its application to scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Neo, Yoichiro; Mimura, Hidenori; Matsumoto, Takahiro

    2006-02-13

    A high-brightness electron beam of more than 10{sup 11} A sr{sup -1} m{sup -2} was achieved from a graphite nanoneedle cathode, which was fabricated by simple hydrogen plasma etching of a graphite rod. A field emission was obtained at a high residual pressure of 10{sup -6} Torr. The performance of this cold cathode was demonstrated by the fabrication of a scanning electron microscope, which was operated at a high residual pressure of 10{sup -5}-10{sup -6} Torr. The brightness of this cathode offers a convenient field electron emission source that does not require a massive ultrahigh vacuum system.

  13. Probing Emissions of Military Cargo Aircraft: Description of a Joint Field Measurement Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Corporan, E.; DeWitt, M.; Spicer, C.; Holdren, M.; Cowen, K.; Harris, B.; Shores, R.; Hashmonay, R.; Kaganan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Direct emissions of NOx, volatile organic compounds, and particulate matter (PM) by aircraft contribute to the pollutant levels found in the atmosphere. Aircraft emissions can be injected at the ground level or directly at the high altitude in flight. Conversion of the precursor gases into secondary PM is one of the pathways for the increased atmospheric PM. Atmospheric PM interacts with solar radiation altering atmospheric radiation balance and potentially contributing to global and regional climate changes. Also, direct emissions of air toxics, ozone precursors and PM from aircraft in and around civilian airports and military air bases can worsen local air quality in non-attainment and/or maintenance areas. These emissions need to be quantified. However, the current EPA methods for particle emission measurements from such sources, modified Method 5 and Conditional Test Method 039, are gravimetric-based, and it is anticipated that these methods will not be suitable for current and future generations of aircraft turbine engines, whose particle mass emissions are low. To evaluate measurement approaches for military aircraft emissions, two complementary projects were initiated in 2005. A joint field campaign between these two programs was executed during the first week of October 2005 at the Kentucky Air National Guard (KYANG) base in Louisville, KY. This campaign represented the first in a series of field studies for each program funded by the DoD Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) and provided the basis for cross-comparison of the sampling approaches and measurement techniques employed by the respective program teams. This paper describes the overall programmatic of the multi-year SERDP aircraft emissions research and presents a summary of the results from the joint field campaign.

  14. Mitigating nitrous oxide emissions from tea field soil using bioaugmentation with a Trichoderma viride biofertilizer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengjun; Fu, Xiaoqing; Ma, Shuanglong; Bai, Zhihui; Xiao, Runlin; Li, Yong; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Land-use conversion from woodlands to tea fields in subtropical areas of central China leads to increased nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, partly due to increased nitrogen fertilizer use. A field investigation of N2O using a static closed chamber-gas chromatography revealed that the average N2O fluxes in tea fields with 225 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) fertilizer application were 9.4 ± 6.2 times higher than those of woodlands. Accordingly, it is urgent to develop practices for mitigating N2O emissions from tea fields. By liquid-state fermentation of sweet potato starch wastewater and solid-state fermentation of paddy straw with application of Trichoderma viride, we provided the tea plantation with biofertilizer containing 2.4 t C ha(-1) and 58.7 kg N ha(-1). Compared to use of synthetic N fertilizer, use of biofertilizer at 225 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) significantly reduced N2O emissions by 33.3%-71.8% and increased the tea yield by 16.2%-62.2%. Therefore, the process of bioconversion/bioaugmentation tested in this study was found to be a cost-effective and feasible approach to reducing N2O emissions and can be considered the best management practice for tea fields. PMID:24955418

  15. Characterisation of carbon nanotube pastes for field emission using their sheet resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floweri, Octia; Kim, Jihan; Seo, Yongho; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Naesung

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) pastes for field emitters were fabricated by varying the milling speed, CNT amount and glass frit (GF) powder size. The CNTs remained agglomerated at lower milling speeds while they were damaged and shortened at higher speeds. Increasing the amount of CNTs improved the field emission properties, but excessive CNTs led to increased removal of the CNT paste with surface activation because of lower cohesion strength. Small GF particles were incorporated to provide a flat surface to the CNT paste, which improved its field emission uniformity and lifespan. The dispersion, density and milling damage characteristics of CNTs in the pastes were assessed by their sheet resistances under the assumption of equal printed thicknesses. Tape activation reduced the thickness of the CNT pastes by different amounts that depended on the cohesion strength of the paste. This reduction caused the sheet resistance to increase. For all cases in this study, the field emission properties of the CNT pastes were closely related to their sheet resistances, suggesting that sheet resistance could be used as a figure-of-merit for the evaluation of CNT pastes for field emission applications.

  16. Mitigating Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Tea Field Soil Using Bioaugmentation with a Trichoderma viride Biofertilizer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengjun; Fu, Xiaoqing; Ma, Shuanglong; Xiao, Runlin; Li, Yong; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Land-use conversion from woodlands to tea fields in subtropical areas of central China leads to increased nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, partly due to increased nitrogen fertilizer use. A field investigation of N2O using a static closed chamber-gas chromatography revealed that the average N2O fluxes in tea fields with 225 kg N ha−1 yr−1 fertilizer application were 9.4 ± 6.2 times higher than those of woodlands. Accordingly, it is urgent to develop practices for mitigating N2O emissions from tea fields. By liquid-state fermentation of sweet potato starch wastewater and solid-state fermentation of paddy straw with application of Trichoderma viride, we provided the tea plantation with biofertilizer containing 2.4 t C ha−1 and 58.7 kg N ha−1. Compared to use of synthetic N fertilizer, use of biofertilizer at 225 kg N ha−1 yr−1 significantly reduced N2O emissions by 33.3%–71.8% and increased the tea yield by 16.2%–62.2%. Therefore, the process of bioconversion/bioaugmentation tested in this study was found to be a cost-effective and feasible approach to reducing N2O emissions and can be considered the best management practice for tea fields. PMID:24955418

  17. Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation and Emission from Relativistic Jets and Supernova Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hartmann, D. H.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C.; Mizunno, Y.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    We performed numerical simulations of particle acceleration, magnetic field generation, and emission from shocks in order to understand the observed emission from relativistic jets and supernova remnants. The investigation involves the study of collisionless shocks, where the Weibel instability is responsible for particle acceleration as well as magnetic field generation. A 3-D relativistic particle-in-cell (RPIC) code has been used to investigate the shock processes in electron-positron plasmas. The evolution of theWeibe1 instability and its associated magnetic field generation and particle acceleration are studied with two different jet velocities (0 = 2,5 - slow, fast) corresponding to either outflows in supernova remnants or relativistic jets, such as those found in AGNs and microquasars. Slow jets have intrinsically different structures in both the generated magnetic fields and the accelerated particle spectrum. In particular, the jet head has a very weak magnetic field and the ambient electrons are strongly accelerated and dragged by the jet particles. The simulation results exhibit jitter radiation from inhomogeneous magnetic fields, generated by the Weibel instability, which has different spectral properties than standard synchrotron emission in a homogeneous magnetic field.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and field emission properties of rare-earth hexaboride nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Han

    Rare-earth hexaborides are a family of compounds which have low work function, high melting point, and high mechanical strength. These properties are highly suitable for electron field emission applications. To explore this possibility, we developed a chemical vapor deposition method and produced three different types of 1D nano-structures, which include single crystalline nanowires of LaB6, CeB6, and GdB6; polycrystalline nanowires of YB12, LaB12, MgO, and Mg3N 2; core-shell nanocables of MgB2-in-MgO and LaB6-in-CNT. TEM, SEM, EELS and EDX techniques were applied to characterize structural and chemical information about the synthesized nano-structures. Vapor-solid growth, catalyst-assisted vapor-liquid-solid growth and CNT-assisted template growth are proposed to be accounted for the formation mechanisms of these 1D nano-structures and the theoretical predictions match the experimental observations quantitatively. To fabricate a single nanowire field emitter, direct contact, electron beam lithography and focused ion beam welding techniques were used to attach a single LaB6 nanowire to the tip of a tungsten wire. Cold field emission properties were measured from such made single nanowire emitters. Work function values of 2.6 eV and 1.5 eV were obtained from a LaB 6 nanowire emitter and GdB6 nanowire emitter respectively. An Emission Current density as high as 5x105 A/cm 2 was obtained from a single LaB6 nanowire emitter, under an extraction voltage of 800 V. Emission current stability was also studied for the nanowire emitter and the results indicate surface-contamination induced emission current fluctuations. A home-designed TEM in-situ field emission measurement holder was fabricated for a JEOL 2010F HRTEM. Field electron emission was performed on a single LaB6 nanowire field electron emitter simultaneously with high resolution TEM imaging. Image contrast changes were observed at under-focus imaging conditions when a series of negative biases were applied to the

  19. Modeling and computation of mean field equilibria in producers' game with emission permits trading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuhua; Wang, Xinyu; Shanain, Aleksandr

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a mean field game to model the production behaviors of a very large number of producers, whose carbon emissions are regulated by government. Especially, an emission permits trading scheme is considered in our model, in which each enterprise can trade its own permits flexibly. By means of the mean field equilibrium, we obtain a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation coupled with a Kolmogorov equation, which are satisfied by the adjoint state and the density of producers (agents), respectively. Then, we propose a so-called fitted finite volume method to solve the HJB equation and the Kolmogorov equation. The efficiency and the usefulness of this method are illustrated by the numerical experiments. Under different conditions, the equilibrium states as well as the effects of the emission permits price are examined, which demonstrates that the emission permits trading scheme influences the producers' behaviors, that is, more populations would like to choose a lower rather than a higher emission level when the emission permits are expensive.

  20. The oxidized porous silicon vacuum microtriode: A revolutionary new type of field emission array

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.D.; Demroff, H.P.; Elliott, T.S.; Faber, J.S.; Lee, B.; Mazumdar, T.; McIntyre, P.M.; Trost, H.J.; Pang, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Yue began studying porous silicon-based vacuum microelectronic devices i n1990. Results from a device he dubbed the Oxidized Porous Silicon Field Emission Diode (OPSFED) showed that porous silicon (PS) offered an attractive alternative to standard field emission devices. Emission sites are reduced to near-atomic dimensions and site density is increased by six orders of magnitude. Yue, and later Madduri extracted electrons into the vacuum in a diode configuration, but no attempt to build a triode device had ever been successful. Using a novel metallization technique developed by Dr. R.C. Jaklevic et al. for use in STM imaging, the authors have successfully fabricated the first working PS-based vacuum microtriodes. Results are extremely encouraging. Collector currents up to 700 {micro}A were extracted across {approximately}3mm of vacuum with a pulsed DC gate bias of less than 20V. Simultaneous measurement of the gate current showed current densities to 700A/cm{sup 2}. Modulation of the emission to 5MH: was observed. Fowler-Nordheim plots show a slight curvature, as would be expected from extremely sharp emission tips, although it is stressed that the electroemissive mechanism is as yet unknown. Fowler-Nordheim plots for OPSFED`s made from the same material show an opposite curvature as predicted for emission from a large number of sites. Density of emitters approach a true two-dimensional limit, and many applications exist if the technology can be matured.

  1. On the problems of stability and durability of field-emission current sources for electrovacuum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Alexander N.; Aban'shin, Nikolay P.; Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, Georgy G.; Avetisyan, Yuri A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of the practical implementation of the concept of field-emission current source with high average current density of 0.1-0.3 A-cm-2 are shown. The durability of cathode samples at a level of 6000 hours is achieved under conditions of technical vacuum. A phenomenological model is suggested that describes the tunneling of both equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrons in a vacuum from the zone of concentration of electrostatic field. Conditions are discussed as the resulting increase in the emission current due to the connection mechanism of the photoelectric effect is thermodynamically favorable, that is not accompanied by an undesirable increase in the temperature of the local emission zone. It is shown that to ensure stability and durability of the cathode is also important to limit the concentration of equilibrium carriers using composite structures «DLC film on Mo substrate." This helps to reduce the criticality of the CVC. A possible alternative is to use a restrictive resistance in the cathode. However, this increases the heat losses and thus decreases assembly efficiency. The results of experimental studies of the structure showing the saturation of photoemission current component with an increase in operating voltage. This fact suggests the existence of an effective mechanism for control of emission at constant operating voltage. This is fundamentally important for the stabilization of field emission cathode, providing a reliability and durability. The single-photon processes and the small thickness DLC films (15-20 nm) provide high-speed process of control.

  2. Emissions of 1,3-Dichloropropene and Chloropicrin after Soil Fumigation under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yates, Scott R; Ashworth, Daniel J; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Qiaoping; Knuteson, James; van Wessenbeeck, Ian J

    2015-06-10

    Soil fumigation is an important agronomic practice in the production of many high-value vegetable and fruit crops, but the use of chemical fumigants can lead to excessive atmospheric emissions. A large-scale (2.9 ha) field experiment was conducted to obtain volatilization and cumulative emission rates for two commonly used soil fumigants under typical agronomic practices: 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) and chloropicrin. The aerodynamic method and the indirect back-calculation method using ISCST3 and CALPUFF dispersion models were used to estimate flux loss from the treated field. Over the course of the experiment, the daily peak volatilization rates ranged from 12 to 30 μg m(-2) s(-1) for 1,3-D and from 0.7 to 2.6 μg m(-2) s(-1) for chloropicrin. Depending on the method used for quantification, total emissions of 1,3-D and chloropicrin, respectively, ranged from 16 to 35% and from 0.3 to 1.3% of the applied fumigant. A soil incubation study showed that the low volatilization rates measured for chloropicrin were due to particularly high soil degradation rates observed at this field site. Understanding and quantifying fumigant emissions from agricultural soil will help in developing best management practices to reduce emission losses, reducing adverse impacts to human and ecosystem health, and providing inputs for conducting risk assessments.

  3. Green house gas emissions from open field burning of agricultural residues in India.

    PubMed

    Murali, S; Shrivastava, Rajnish; Saxena, Mohini

    2010-10-01

    In India, about 435.98 MMT of agro-residues are produced every year, out of which 313.62 MMT are surplus. These residues are either partially utilized or un-utilised due to various constraints. To pave the way for subsequent season for agriculture activity, the excess crop residues are burnt openly in the fields, unmindful of their ill effects on the environment. The present study has been undertaken to evaluate the severity of air pollution through emission of green house gases (GHGs) due to open field burning of agro-residues in India. Open field burning of surplus agro-residues in India results in the emission of GHG. Emissions of CH4 and N2O in 1997-98 and 2006-07 have been 3.73 and 4.06 MMT CO2 equivalent, which is an increase of 8.88% over a decade. About three-fourths of GHG emissions from agro-residues burning were CH4 and the remaining one-fourth were N2O. Burning of wheat and paddy straws alone contributes to about 42% of GHGs. These GHG emissions can be avoided once the agro-residues are employed for sustainable, cost-effective and environment- friendly options like power generation.

  4. Enhanced field emission from ZnO nanowires grown on a silicon nanoporous pillar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hai Jun; Chan, Yu Fei; Su, Lei; Li, De Yao; Sun, Xiao Ming

    2010-12-01

    A large scale heterostructure array of ZnO nanowires/silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) was prepared by a self-catalytic thermal evaporation and vapor-phase transport method, and an ultrahigh field emission current density of 1.55 mA cm-2 was obtained under an operating electric field of 4.0 V μm-1, with a low turn-on field of 1.65 V μm-1. The enhancement factor calculated according to the Fowler-Nordheim theory was ˜3141. The excellent field emission performance was attributed to the unique structure of ZnO/Si-NPA, especially the formation of ZnO nanowires on regular Si pillar array. Our work indicated that ZnO/Si-NPA might be an ideal candidate cathode of potential applications in flat panel displays and high brightness electron sources.

  5. Multiscale model of heat dissipation mechanisms during field emission from carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahay, M.; Zhu, W.; Fairchild, S.; Murray, P. T.; Back, T. C.; Gruen, G. J.

    2016-01-01

    A multiscale model of field emission (FE) from carbon nanotube fibers (CNFs) is developed, which takes into account Joule heating within the fiber and radiative cooling and the Nottingham effect at the tip of the individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the array located at the fiber tip. The model predicts the fraction of CNTs being destroyed as a function of the applied external electric field and reproduces many experimental features observed in some recently investigated CNFs, such as order of magnitude of the emission current (mA range), low turn on electric field (fraction of V/μm), deviation from pure Fowler-Nordheim behavior at large applied electric field, hysteresis of the FE characteristics, and a spatial variation of the temperature along the CNF axis with a maximum close to its tip of a few hundred °C.

  6. SURFACE FILMS TO SUPPRESS FIELD EMISSION IN HIGH-POWER MICROWAVE COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay l

    2014-02-07

    Results are reported on attempts to reduce the RF breakdown probability on copper accelerator structures by applying thin surface films that could suppress field emission of electrons. Techniques for application and testing of copper samples with films of metals with work functions higher than copper are described, principally for application of platinum films, since platinum has the second highest work function of any metal. Techniques for application of insulating films are also described, since these can suppress field emission and damage on account of dielectric shielding of fields at the copper surface, and on account of the greater hardness of insulating films, as compared with copper. In particular, application of zirconium oxide films on high-field portions of a 11.424 GHz SLAC cavity structure for breakdown tests are described.

  7. Investigation of an electron string ion source with field emission cathode.

    PubMed

    Becker, R; Currell, F J; Donets, E D; Donets, E E; Kester, O; Quint, W; Ptitsin, V E

    2008-02-01

    The string mode of operation for an electron beam ion source uses axially oscillating electrons in order to reduce power consumption, also simplifying the construction by omitting the collector with cooling requirements and has been called electron string ion source (ESIS). We have started a project (supported by INTAS and GSI) to use Schottky field emitting cathode tips for generating the electron string. The emission from these specially conditioned tips is higher by orders of magnitude than the focused Brillouin current density at magnetic fields of some Tesla and electron energies of some keV. This may avoid the observed instabilities in the transition from axially oscillating electrons to the string state of the electron plasma, opening a much wider field of possible operating parameters for an ESIS. Besides the presentation of the basic features, we emphasize in this paper a method to avoid damaging of the field emission tip by backstreaming ions.

  8. Enhanced field emission of vertically aligned core-shelled carbon nanotubes with molybdenum oxide encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Chua, Daniel H. C.; Sow, C. H.; Wee, Andrew T. S.

    2009-06-01

    The field emission characteristics of the core-shelled nanostructures obtained by directly coating molybdenum oxide onto vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) was investigated. A metal-organic chemical vapor deposition technique was used with Mo(CO){sub 6} as the precursor and films deposited at process temperatures of 200, 400, and 700 deg. C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction were used to study and understand the material properties of the deposited coatings. Enhanced field emission performance was observed for molybdenum oxide coated MWNT samples at 400 deg. C with a turn-on field of 1.33 V mum{sup -1} and a field enhancement factor beta estimated to be approx7000. The enhanced performance may be due to both the shape of the coated emitters and a decrease in the effective barrier height.

  9. Finite field of view effects on inversion of limb thermal emission observations. [balloon sounding of stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Guo, J.; Conrath, B. J.; Kunde, V. G.; Maguire, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that the technique of thermal emission spectroscopy provides an effective means for remote sounding of stratospheric temperature structure and constituent distributions. One procedure for measuring the stratospheric infrared spectrum involves the conduction of observations along ray paths tangent to the stratospheric limb. Thermal emission limb tangent observations have certain advantages compared to other types of observations. The techniques for determining temperature and trace gas distributions from limb thermal emission radiances are based on the assumption that the bulk of opacity lies near the tangent point. Ideally, the field of view (FOV) of the observing instrument should be very small. The effect of a finite FOV is to reduce the spatial resolution of the retrieved temperature and constituent profiles. The present investigation is concerned with the effects of the FOV on the inversion of infrared thermal emission measurements for balloon platforms. Attention is given to a convenient method for determining the weighting functions.

  10. Observation of enhanced field emission properties of Au/TiO2 nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Girish P.; Bagal, Vivekanand S.; Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; Late, Dattatray J.; More, Mahendra A.; Chavan, Padmakar G.

    2016-05-01

    Simple and low-cost method of thermal annealing was used to decorate Gold (Au) nanoparticles on aligned TiO2 nanotubes. The aligned TiO2 nanotubes were decorated by Au nanoparticles with an average diameter of 9, 18 and 28 nm (aligned TiO2 nanotubes referred as specimen A and TiO2 nanotubes decorated by Au nanoparticles with average diameter of 9, 18 and 28 nm are referred as specimen B, C and D, respectively). The detailed characterization such as structural, morphological and elemental analysis of TiO2 and Au/TiO2 nanocomposite have been carried out using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, the meticulous comparative field emission characteristics of the aligned TiO2 nanotubes and Au/TiO2 nanocomposite have been performed. The turn-on field defined for the current density of 10 μA/cm2 has been found to be 3.9, 2.8, 3.2 and 3.7 V/μm for specimen A, B, C and D, respectively. The observed low turn-on field of specimen B has been found to be superior than the other semiconducting nanocomposites reported in the literature. The emission current stability over a period of 3 h is found to be better for all the specimens. To the best of our knowledge, a systematic field emission study of Au/TiO2 nanocomposite has not been explored. The observed superior field emission study of Au/TiO2 nanocomposite indicates their possible use in micro/nanoelectronic devices.

  11. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Schellart, P; Trinh, T N G; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; Ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-04-24

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields.

  12. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Schellart, P; Trinh, T N G; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; Ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-04-24

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields. PMID:25955053

  13. Scalarized photon analysis of spontaneous emission in the uniform magnetic field free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soln, Josip

    1990-04-01

    The recently developed concept of scalarized photons (formally photons of any polarization) is used to analyze the spontaneous emission in the uniform magnetic field free-electron laser in the microwave spectral region. With the electron beam energy of up to 10 MeV and the uniform magnetic field of up to 4 Tesla, the radiation (occurring with the fundamental and higher harmonic frequencies) can easily cover a 10- to 10,000 GHz spectral region.

  14. Magnetic-Field-Induced Rotation of Polarized Light Emission from Monolayer WS_{2}.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robert; Arora, Ashish; Plechinger, Gerd; Nagler, Philipp; Granados Del Águila, Andrés; Ballottin, Mariana V; Christianen, Peter C M; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Steffen; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias; Bratschitsch, Rudolf

    2016-08-12

    We control the linear polarization of emission from the coherently emitting K^{+} and K^{-} valleys (valley coherence) in monolayer WS_{2} with an out-of-plane magnetic field of up to 25 T. The magnetic-field-induced valley Zeeman splitting causes a rotation of the emission polarization with respect to the excitation by up to 35° and reduces the polarization degree by up to 16%. We explain both of these phenomena with a model based on two noninteracting coherent two-level systems. We deduce that the coherent light emission from the valleys decays with a time constant of τ_{c}=260  fs. PMID:27563997

  15. Tip-geometry enhanced cooling of field emission from the n-type semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M. S. Choi, J. Y.; Mayer, A.; Miskovsky, N. M.; Cutler, P. H.

    2014-02-24

    The cooling effect of field emission from an n-type semiconductor was theoretically investigated in quest for a solid state cooler. The vacuum potential was exactly expressed in terms of the semiconductor cathode geometry. This leaded to the more accurate configuration-dependent calculations of the energy exchange and the cooling power. It has been shown that a sharper tip of semiconductor can yield either a larger field emission current density or a larger energy exchange, according to the applied bias. For an atomic size tip, the n-Si cathode yielded the cooling power density Γ = 2.0, 75, and 713 W/cm{sup 2} at temperature T = 300, 600, and 900 K, respectively. This implies that an optimized configuration of an n-Si cathode produces a significant electron emission cooling, especially at high temperatures.

  16. Electron field emission from TiO2 nanotube arrays synthesized by hydrothermal reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyauchi, Masahiro; Tokudome, Hiromasa; Toda, Yoshitake; Kamiya, Toshio; Hosono, Hideo

    2006-07-01

    Conductive TiO2 nanotube arrays were grown on metal Ti substrates by hydrothermal reaction and subsequent postannealing in vacuum. The nanotubes were vertically grown and adhered well to the substrates. The crystal structure of the postannealed TiO2 nanotubes was identified to be oxygen-defective anatase. The nanotube arrays exhibited efficient electron field emission even at room temperature with rather low turn-on fields ˜280V per electrode distance of 100μm. The emission current density exceeded 0.15mA /cm2 at an extraction voltage of 800V. The emission current was reproducible and stable in the lower voltage (<800V) region.

  17. GAMMA-RAY BURST PROMPT EMISSION: JITTER RADIATION IN STOCHASTIC MAGNETIC FIELD REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Jirong; Wang Jiancheng

    2011-04-10

    We revisit the radiation mechanism of relativistic electrons in the stochastic magnetic field and apply it to the high-energy emissions of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We confirm that jitter radiation is a possible explanation for GRB prompt emission in the condition of a large electron deflection angle. In the turbulent scenario, the radiative spectral property of GRB prompt emission is decided by the kinetic energy spectrum of turbulence. The intensity of the random and small-scale magnetic field is determined by the viscous scale of the turbulent eddy. The microphysical parameters {epsilon}{sub e} and {epsilon}{sub B} can be obtained. The acceleration and cooling timescales are estimated as well. Due to particle acceleration in magnetized filamentary turbulence, the maximum energy released from the relativistic electrons can reach a value of about 10{sup 14} eV. The GeV GRBs are possible sources of high-energy cosmic-ray.

  18. Temporal patterns of methane emissions from wetland rice fields treated by different modes of N application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, R.; Neue, H. U.; Lantin, R. S.; Aduna, J. B.; Alberto, M. C. R.; Andales, M. J.; Tan, M. J.; van der Gon, H. A. C. Denier; Hoffmann, H.; Papen, H.; Rennenberg, H.; Seiler, W.

    1994-08-01

    Methane emission rates from wetland rice fields were determined in Los Baños (Philippines) using an automatic system that allows continuous measurements over time. Methane emission was monitored in an irrigated Aquandic Epiaqualf planted to rice cultivar IR72. Urea fertilizer was applied using four modes: (1) broadcast 10 days after transplanting, (2) broadcast at transplanting, (3) broadcast and incorporated at final harrowing, and (4) deep placement as sulfur-coated granules. The treatments were laid out in a randomized complete block design with four replicates. Measurements were done in the 1991 wet season, 1992 dry season (four treatments), and the 1992 wet season (only treatment 3). Methane emission rates from the experimental plots showed pronounced seasonal and diel variations. The diel pattern of methane emission rates followed a consistent pattern, with highest rates observed in the early afternoon and lowest rates in the early morning. Methane emission rate was generally highest at the ripening stage. The average methane emission rate during the 1992 dry season (190 mg CH4 m-2 d-1) exceeded the average flux rates of the 1992 wet season (79 mg CH4 m-2 d-1) by a factor of 2.4. The total methane emitted from these flooded rice fields amounted to 19 g CH4 m-2 in the dry season with rice yields of 5.2-6.3 t ha-1 and 7 g CH4 m-2 in the wet season with rice yields of 2.4-3.3 t ha-1 regardless of the mode of N application. Significant amounts corresponding to 20% of the methane released under waterlogged conditions were released when the soil was drained after harvest. Emission rates increased sharply when the floodwater receded and macropores started to drain. Emission of methane stopped only when the soil became fully aerated.

  19. Gap size dependent transition from direct tunneling to field emission in single molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dong; Zhang, Yi; Pyatkov, Feliks; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Mayer, Dirk

    2011-04-28

    I/V characteristics recorded in mechanically controllable break junctions revealed that field emission transport is enhanced in single molecule junctions as the gap size between two nanoelectrodes is reduced. This observation indicates that Fowler-Nordheim tunneling occurs not only for intermolecular but also for intramolecular electron transport driven by a reduced energy barrier at short tunneling distances.

  20. Nanowire-density-dependent field emission of n-type 3C-SiC nanoarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin; Gao, Fengmei; Chen, Shanliang; Yang, Weiyou; Li, Chengming

    2015-09-21

    The density of the nanowires is one of the key issues for their field emission (FE) properties of the nanoarrays, since it plays an important role on the electron emission sites and field screening effect. Here, we reported the nanowire-density-dependent FE properties of the n-type 3C-SiC nanoarrays. The highly oriented and large-scale SiC nanoarrays were grown on the 6H-SiC wafer via pyrolysis of polyureasilazane by adjusting the thicknesses of Au films used as the catalysts. The densities of the nanoarrays were tunable to be ∼2.9 × 10{sup 7}, ∼4.0 × 10{sup 7}, and ∼5.7 × 10{sup 7} nanowires/cm{sup 2} by controlling the Au film thicknesses of 50, 70, and 90 nm, respectively. The measured FE characteristics disclosed that the turn-on fields of the samples could be tailored to be of ∼1.79, 1.57, and 1.95 V/μm with the increase of the densities, suggesting that a suitable nanowire density could favor the enhanced electron emission from the SiC nanoarrays with improved emission sites and limited field screening effects.

  1. Liquid jet target x-ray tube with field emission cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heid, Oliver; Polikhov, Stepan; Karpinskiy, Gennadiy; Geisler, Andreas; Bondarenko, Taras; Botyachkova, Alexandra; Frolov, Sergey; Ivanov, Vladislav

    2015-08-01

    We introduce first results of our research in a promising approach for micro focal x-ray generation. The approach combines the use of liquid metal jet target as anode and carbon based nanostructures as field emission cathode. Results of metal jet break-up CFD simulation and cold cathode performance tests are described. The planned experimental program is discussed herein as well.

  2. Field emission behaviour of manganese oxide nanorods synthesized by hydrothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankar, P. K.; Gavhane, D. S.; Kolhe, P. S.; Warule, S. S.; More, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    A facile, low temperature and single step hydrothermal method has been used to fabricate well defined manganese oxide (MnO2) nanorods over Si substrate. The structural and morphological studies reveal the formation of crystalline MnO2 nanostructures. The diameter of the MnO2 nanorods is estimated to be ~100 nm, with length in several micrometers. Field-emission properties of the as-synthesized MnO2 nanorods are investigated. The turn on field required to draw emission of 0.1 µA/cm2 current was observed to be ~ 3.2 V/μm and threshold field (corresponding to emission current density of 1 µA/cm2) was found to be 5.1 V/μm. The emission current was observed to be stable for more than three hours at a preset value 1 µA. These results are helpful for the design, fabrication and optimization of integrated field emitters using 1D nanostructure as cold cathode material.

  3. Electromagnetic vacuum of complex media: Dipole emission versus light propagation, vacuum energy, and local field factors

    SciTech Connect

    Donaire, M.

    2011-02-15

    We offer a unified approach to several phenomena related to the electromagnetic vacuum of a complex medium made of point electric dipoles. To this aim, we apply the linear response theory to the computation of the polarization field propagator and study the spectrum of vacuum fluctuations. The physical distinction among the local density of states which enter the spectra of light propagation, total dipole emission, coherent emission, total vacuum energy, and Schwinger-bulk energy is made clear. Analytical expressions for the spectrum of dipole emission and for the vacuum energy are derived. Their respective relations with the spectrum of external light and with the Schwinger-bulk energy are found. The light spectrum and the Schwinger-bulk energy are determined by the Dyson propagator. The emission spectrum and the total vacuum energy are determined by the polarization propagator. An exact relationship of proportionality between both propagators is found in terms of local field factors. A study of the nature of stimulated emission from a single dipole is carried out. Regarding coherent emission, it contains two components. A direct one which is transferred radiatively and directly from the emitter into the medium and whose spectrum is that of external light. And an indirect one which is radiated by induced dipoles. The induction is mediated by one (and only one) local field factor. Regarding the vacuum energy, we find that in addition to the Schwinger-bulk energy the vacuum energy of an effective medium contains local field contributions proportional to the resonant frequency and to the spectral line width.

  4. Synthesis, characterization, growth mechanism, photoluminescence and field emission properties of novel dandelion-like gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Ghulam; Cao, Chuanbao; Khan, Waheed S.; Hussain, Sajad; Usman, Zahid; Safdar, Muhammad; Shah, Sajjad Hussain; Khattak, Noor Abass Din

    2011-09-01

    Dandelion-like gallium nitride (GaN) microstructures were successfully synthesized via Ni catalyst assisted chemical vapor deposition method at 1200 °C under NH3 atmosphere by pre-treating precursors with aqueous ammonia. The as-synthesized product was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that as-synthesized dandelion-like GaN was pure and has hexagonal wurtzite structure. SEM results showed that the size of the dandelion-like GaN structure was in the range of 30-60 μm. Dandelion-like GaN microstructures exhibited reasonable field emission properties with the turn-on field of 9.65 V μm-1 (0.01 mA cm-2) and threshold field of 11.35 V μm-1 (1 mA cm-2) which is sufficient for applications of electron emission devices, field emission displays and vacuum micro electronic devices. Optical properties were studied at room temperature by using fluorescence spectrophotometer. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements of dandelion-like GaN showed a strong near-band-edge emission at 370.2 nm (3.35 eV) with blue band emission at 450.4 nm (2.75 eV) and 465.2 nm (2.66 eV) but with out yellow band emission. The room-temperature photoluminescence properties showed that it has also potential application in light-emitting devices. The tentative growth mechanism for the growth of dandelion-like GaN was also described.

  5. A field-validated model for landfill methane emissions inclusive of seasonal methane oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, J. E.; Spokas, K.; Chanton, J.

    2010-12-01

    In addition to natural wetlands, atmospheric methane (CH4) has multiple anthropogenic sources with high uncertainties, including rice production, ruminant animals, natural gas leakages, biomass burning, and landfills. For an improved IPCC Tier III methodology for landfill CH4 emissions in California, we have developed a new science-based, field-validated inventory model which decouples emissions from a historical reliance on a theoretical first order kinetic model for CH4 generation potential. The model (CALMIM, CAlifornia Landfill Methane Inventory Model) is a freely-available JAVA tool which estimates net CH4 emissions to the atmosphere for any landfill cover soil over a typical annual cycle, including (1) the effect of engineered gas extraction; (2) the physical effects of daily, intermediate, and final cover materials to retard emissions; and (3) seasonal soil moisture and temperature effects on both gaseous transport and methanotrophic CH4 oxidation. Linking site-specific data with existing globally-validated USDA models for annual climate and soil microclimate (Global TempSim; Global RainSim; Solarcalc; STM2), this model relies on 1-D diffusion as the major driver for emissions. Importantly, unlike current inventory methods based on modeled generation, the driving force for emissions (e.g., the CH4 concentration gradient) can be directly compared to field data. Methane oxidation is scaled to maximum rates over the full range of moisture and temperature conditions based on extensive supporting laboratory studies using California landfill cover soils. Field validation included meteorological data, soil moisture/temperature measurements, and seasonal (wet/dry) CH4 emissions & oxidation measurements for daily, intermediate, and final cover soils over two annual cycles at a northern (Monterey County) and southern California (Los Angeles County) landfill. The model accurately predicted soil temperature and moisture trends for individual cover materials with

  6. Field enhancement factor and field emission from a hemi-ellipsoidal metallic needle.

    PubMed

    Pogorelov, Evgeny G; Zhbanov, Alexander I; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2009-03-01

    We present an exact solution for the electrostatic field between a metallic hemi-ellipsoidal needle on a plate (as a cathode) and a flat anode. The basic idea is to replace the cathode by a linearly charged thread in a uniform electric field and to use a set of "image" charges to reproduce the anode. We calculate the field enhancement factor on the needle surface and ponderomotive force acting on the needle. Using the Fowler-Nordheim theory we obtain an exact analytical formula for the total current. PMID:19232831

  7. Direct current scanning field emission microscope integrated with existing scanning electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Reece, Charles E.; Sundelin, Ronald M.

    2002-09-01

    Electron field emission (FE) from broad-area metal surfaces is known to occur at much lower electric field than predicted by Fowler-Nordheim law. Although micron or submicron particles are often observed at such enhanced field emission (EFE) sites, the strength and number of emitting sites and the causes of EFE strongly depend on surface preparation and handling, and the physical mechanism of EFE remains unknown. To systematically investigate the sources of this emission, a dc scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) has been built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive spectrometer for emitter characterization. In the SFEM chamber of ultrahigh vacuum (approx10-9 Torr), a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern (2.5 mum step resolution) under a high voltage anode microtip for field emission detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum by a hermetic retractable linear transporter to the SEM chamber for individual emitter site characterization. Artificial marks on the sample surface serve as references to convert x, y coordinates of emitters in the SFEM chamber to corresponding positions in the SEM chamber with a common accuracy of plus-or-minus100-200 mum in x and y. Samples designed to self-align in sample holders are used in each chamber, allowing them to retain position registration after non-in situ processing to track interesting features. No components are installed inside the SEM except the sample holder, which does not affect the routine operation of the SEM. The apparatus is a system of low cost and maintenance and significant operational flexibility. Field emission sources from planar niobium--the material used in high-field rf superconducting cavities for particle accelerator--have been studied after different surface preparations, and significantly reduced field emitter density has been achieved by refining the preparation process based on scan

  8. Photoluminescence and field emission of 1D ZnO nanorods fabricated by thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Jin, X.; Ouyang, Z. B.; Xu, P.

    2012-07-01

    Four kinds of new one-dimensional nanostructures, celery-shaped nanorods, needle-shaped nanorods, twist fold-shaped nanorods, and awl-shaped nanorods of ZnO, have been grown on single silicon substrates by an Au catalyst assisted thermal evaporation of ZnO and active carbon powders. The morphology and structure of the prepared nanorods are determined on the basis of field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The photoluminescence spectra (PL) analysis noted that UV emission band is the band-to-band emission peak and the emission bands in the visible range are attributed to the oxygen vacancies, Zn interstitials, or impurities. The field-emission properties of four kinds of ZnO nanorods have been invested and the awl-shaped nanorods of ZnO have preferable characteristics due to the smallest emitter radius on the nanoscale in the tip in comparison with other nanorods. The growth mechanism of the ZnO nanorods can be explained on the basis of the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) processes.

  9. High Resolution CNT-FED and Improvement in Field-Emission Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurachi, Hiroyuki; Uemura, Sashiro; Yotani, Junko; Nagasako, Takeshi; Yamada, Hiromu; Ezaki, Tomotaka; Maesoba, Tsuyoshi; Nakao, Takehiro; Ito, Masaaki; Sakurai, Akira; Shimoda, Hideo; Saito, Yahachi; Shinohara, Hisanori

    A recent study of carbon nanotube (CNT)-field emission display (FED) was described, and luminance uniformity of the experimental panel and the results of the life test of the CNT emitters were revealed. Furthermore, a high-resolution CNT-FED was investigated for graphic-displays. The sub-pixel size was 0.2 mm × 0.6 mm. The configuration of the display was a metal-backed color-phosphor screen, tall-spacer of 0.5-1.0 mm height for individual phosphor line, a metal gate-substrate with tall spacer and chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown-CNT on a metal-electrode. In order to improve field-emission characteristics of the CNT cathode, we developed two kinds of new CNT emitters by thermal-CVD. One is an emitter with thin CNTs which were grown on an alumina layer. The emission was extremely increased at lower voltage, compared to our conventional CNT emitter. Another is an emitter with secondary thin CNTs grown on thick CNTs. The emission showed an improvement in emission distribution uniformity.

  10. Novel thin film field emission electron source laboratory directed research and development final report

    SciTech Connect

    Walko, R.J.; Fleming, J.G.; Hubbs, J.W.

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate proof of concept of a thin film field emission electron source based on electron tunneling between discrete metal islands on an insulating substrate. An electron source of this type should be more easily fabricated permitting the use of a wider range of materials, and be less prone to damage and erratic behavior than the patterned field emitter arrays currently under development for flat panel displays and other vacuum microelectronic applications. This report describes the results of the studies of electron and light emission from such structures, and the subsequent discovery of a source of light emission from conductive paths across thin insulating gaps of the semiconductor-insulator-semiconductor (SIS) and metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures. The substrates consisted of silicon nitride and silicon dioxide on silicon wafers, Kapton{reg_sign}, quartz, and cut slabs of silica aerogels. The conductive film samples were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and sputtering, while the MIS and SIS samples were prepared by CVD followed by cleaving, grinding, mechanical indentation, erosion by a sputter Auger beam, electrical arcing and chemical etching. Electron emission measurements were conducted in high and ultra high vacuum systems at SNL, NM as well as at SNL, CA. Optical emission measurements were made in air under an optical microscope as well as in the above vacuum environments. Sample morphology was investigated using both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  11. Effects of magnetic field on the low temperature emission of nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mc Murtrie, Roger; Rogers, Lachlan J.; Manson, Neil B.

    2010-02-01

    Under optical illumination in the blue or green, negatively charged nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond emit in the red. The intensity of this emission varies slightly depending on spin state occupation. Optical transitions occur predominantly without change of spin projection. However, excited ms = ± 1 states can decay non-radiatively to the ground ms = 0 state via intermediary singlet states. With continuous excitation, this effect transfers most of the population to the ms = 0 state resulting in decay becoming almost entirely radiative so that optical emission is stronger than when all spin states are occupied equally. However, under optical illumination the ms = 0 polarization is reduced when an applied magnetic field induces avoided crossings between energy levels. The spin states are mixed and some population is diverted into the ms = ± 1 states with consequent reduction in optical emission. The change of emission can be calculated from a rate equation model involving the spin states of the ground and excited levels plus one singlet level [5]. The spin states of the excited levels are also affected by strain and in this work we calculate the variation in optical emission with changing magnetic field for various fixed values of strain.

  12. Microwave plasma CVD-grown graphene-CNT hybrids for enhanced electron field emission applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Vishakha; Shukla, A. K.; Vankar, V. D.

    2014-12-01

    The growth and electron emission characteristics were investigated from a hybrid structure of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and multilayer layer graphene (MLG) deposited on silicon substrate coated with iron catalyst and an interlayer of aluminium. The hybrid structures were synthesized in a two-step process by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique. The formation of MWCNTs takes place by absorption and precipitation of carbon radicals into the catalyst particles. Thereafter, ample carbon forms MLG on tip of the MWCNTs resulting in a MLG-MWCNTs hybrid nanostructure. MLG was observed to grow branching out of the tips and sidewalls of the MWCNTs and is expected to attach by Van der Walls bonds. Transmission electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy confirmed the crystalline nature of the hybrid structures. Electron emission studies were carried out using a diode-type field emission setup. The enhancement factor was found to be ~3,500 for bare MWCNTs, ~4,070 to ~5,000 for hybrid structures and ~6,500 for N-doped MLG-MWCNTs hybrid structures. Modification in the defects structure and enhancement of emission sites are suggested to be responsible for the increase of the field emission characteristics.

  13. Field Emission Properties of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown on Silicon Nanoporous Pillar Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei-fen; Li, Long-yu; Xiao, Shun-hua; Yang, Xiao-hui; Jia, Min; Li, Xin-jian

    2007-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown on a silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) by thermal chemical vapor deposition. Surface morphologies and microstructure of the resultant were studied by a field emission scanning electron microscope, Raman spectrum, transmission electron microscope, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The composition of samples was determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that a great deal of CNTs, with diameter in the range of 20-70 nm, incorporated with Si-NPA and a large scale nest array of CNTs/Si-NPA (NACNT/Si-NPA) was formed. EDS analysis showed that the composition of carbon nanotubes was carbon. Field emission measurements showed that a current density of 5 mA/cm2 was obtained at an electric field of 4.26 V/μm, with a turn-on field of 1.3 V/μm. The enhancement factor calculated according to the Fowler-Nordheim theory was ~11,000. This excellent field emission performance is attributed to the unique structure and morphology of NACNT/Si-NPA, especially the formation of a nest-shaped carbon nanotube array. A schematic drawing that illustrates the experimental configuration is given. These results indicate that NACNT/Si-NPA might be an ideal candidate cathode for potential applications in flat panel displays.

  14. Two-process model of electron field emission from nanocarbons: Temperature effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Igor S.; Pikhitsa, Peter V.; Choi, Mansoo

    2004-09-01

    The two-process model on electron field emission from nanocarbons that we recently suggested [I. S. Altman, P. V. Pikhitsa, and M. Choi, Appl. Phys. Lett. 84, 1126 (2004)] has solved the existing experimental puzzles such as an occurrence of the sharp knee in the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) plot. Our model implies two successive processes: (1) Tunneling from the metallic region into the semiconducting region under the external macroscopic electric field and (2) tunneling from the semiconducting region into vacuum under the Coulomb field of an additional electron appearing in the first process. However, this model in its original form was inapplicable at finite temperatures. We develop the model (remaining within the framework of the two-process approach, which allows the knee occurrence in the FN plot) in order to describe temperature effects in field emission from nanocarbons. Fitting of the recent experimental data on the temperature behavior of field emission from carbon nanotubes allowed us to extract parameters corresponding to the first process in our model.

  15. Field emission properties and growth mechanism of In2O3 nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Four kinds of nanostructures, nanoneedles, nanohooks, nanorods, and nanotowers of In2O3, have been grown by the vapor transport process with Au catalysts or without any catalysts. The morphology and structure of the prepared nanostructures are determined on the basis of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The growth direction of the In2O3 nanoneedles is along the [001], and those of the other three nanostructures are along the [100]. The growth mechanism of the nanoneedles is the vapor-liquid–solid (VLS), and those of the other three nanostructures are the vapor-solid (VS) processes. The field emission properties of four kinds of In2O3 nanostructures have been investigated. Among them, the nanoneedles have the best field emission properties with the lowest turn-on field of 4.9 V/μm and the threshold field of 12 V/μm due to possessing the smallest emitter tip radius and the weakest screening effect. PMID:24612921

  16. Low threshold field emission from high-quality cubic boron nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teii, Kungen; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2012-05-01

    Field emission performance of materials with mixed sp2/sp3 phases often depends upon the phase composition at the surface. In this study, the emission performance of high-quality cubic boron nitride (cBN) films is studied in terms of phase purity. Thick cBN films consisting of micron-sized grains are prepared from boron trifluoride gas by chemical vapor deposition in a plasma jet and an inductively coupled plasma. Both the bulk and surface phase purities as well as crystallinities of cBN evaluated by visible and ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy, glancing-angle x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are the highest when the film is deposited in a plasma jet under an optimized condition. The emission turn-on field decreases with increasing the phase purity, down to around 5 V/μm for the highest cBN purity, due to the larger field enhancement, while it is higher than 14 V/μm without cBN (sp2-bonded hexagonal BN only). The results indicate that the total field enhancement for the high phase purity film is governed by the internal field amplification related to the surface coverage of more conductive cBN, rather than the external one related to the surface topology or roughness.

  17. The ENSO signal in atmospheric composition fields: emission-driven versus dynamically induced changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inness, A.; Benedetti, A.; Flemming, J.; Huijnen, V.; Kaiser, J. W.; Parrington, M.; Remy, S.

    2015-08-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) not only affects meteorological fields but also has a large impact on atmospheric composition. Atmospheric composition fields from the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) reanalysis are used to identify the ENSO signal in tropospheric ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide and smoke aerosols, concentrating on the months October to December. During El Niño years, all of these fields have increased concentrations over maritime South East Asia in October. The MACC Composition Integrated Forecasting System (C-IFS) model is used to quantify the relative magnitude of dynamically induced and emission-driven changes in the atmospheric composition fields. While changes in tropospheric ozone are a combination of dynamically induced and emission-driven changes, the changes in carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and smoke aerosols are almost entirely emission-driven in the MACC model. The ozone changes continue into December, i.e. after the end of the Indonesian fire season while changes in the other fields are confined to the fire season.

  18. Modulation of Field Electron Emission from Carbon Nanotubes by Double layer Charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhidov, Anvar

    2005-03-01

    Field emission from carbon nanotubes is well known phenomenon. In this work we present a novel method of modulating the current densities and threshold voltages. We studied field emission characteristics of HIPCO Single Walled Nanotube (SWNT) paper charged in NaCl electrolyte. The charge injection was by double layer electro chemical doping and it showed significant change in the threshold electric fields and the current densities. This was attributed mostly to a change in the work function and partially due to the change in the field enhancement factor beta. The turn on field (for 1microA of emission current) was seen to change from 1.04 V/micron to 0.82 V/micron for the negatively charged paper (Na ions) and similarly on the positively charged (Cl ions) it increased from 1.01 V/micron to 2.1 V/micron. Calculated values of the work function were compared with values from Kelvin Probe measurements. The work function values showed a significant decrease in the negatively charged samples and a sharp increase in the positively charged samples as compared to the uncharged ones. Experiments were repeated by varying the charging time from 2000 sec to 3 hrs with the current being kept constant.

  19. Cathode fall model and current-voltage characteristics of field emission driven direct current microplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2013-11-15

    The post-breakdown characteristics of field emission driven microplasma are studied theoretically and numerically. A cathode fall model assuming a linearly varying electric field is used to obtain equations governing the operation of steady state field emission driven microplasmas. The results obtained from the model by solving these equations are compared with particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collisions simulation results for parameters including the plasma potential, cathode fall thickness, ion number density in the cathode fall, and current density vs voltage curves. The model shows good overall agreement with the simulations but results in slightly overpredicted values for the plasma potential and the cathode fall thickness attributed to the assumed electric field profile. The current density vs voltage curves obtained show an arc region characterized by negative slope as well as an abnormal glow discharge characterized by a positive slope in gaps as small as 10 μm operating at atmospheric pressure. The model also retrieves the traditional macroscale current vs voltage theory in the absence of field emission.

  20. Operating modes of field emission assisted microplasmas in the microwave regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alamatsaz, Arghavan; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2016-09-01

    The operating modes of microwave microplasma devices integrated with field emitting cathodes are studied using one-dimensional particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulations. The PIC-MCC simulations predict operation in two modes—an α-mode characterized by a positive differential resistance with negligible influence of boundary processes and a γ-mode with significant field-induced electron emission. PIC-MCC results are presented for two representative 0.5 GHz argon microplasmas operating in the α and γ modes. The field emission-induced transition to γ-mode modifies the electron number density profiles in the sheath apart from leading to a higher contribution of conduction current in the sheath. The interpretation of electrical characteristics using time history of voltage and current demonstrates that the microplasma device impedance decreases as a result of the thinner sheath. It is also shown that the presence of field emitting cathodes leads to lower power requirements (about 64% of the case presented without field emission) to achieve a given plasma density.

  1. Field emission properties and growth mechanism of In2O3 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Zheng, Zhaoqiang; Wu, Huanyu; Zhu, Lianfeng

    2014-03-01

    Four kinds of nanostructures, nanoneedles, nanohooks, nanorods, and nanotowers of In2O3, have been grown by the vapor transport process with Au catalysts or without any catalysts. The morphology and structure of the prepared nanostructures are determined on the basis of field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The growth direction of the In2O3 nanoneedles is along the [001], and those of the other three nanostructures are along the [100]. The growth mechanism of the nanoneedles is the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), and those of the other three nanostructures are the vapor-solid (VS) processes. The field emission properties of four kinds of In2O3 nanostructures have been investigated. Among them, the nanoneedles have the best field emission properties with the lowest turn-on field of 4.9 V/μm and the threshold field of 12 V/μm due to possessing the smallest emitter tip radius and the weakest screening effect.

  2. Field emission properties of porous diamond-like films produced by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammana, V. P.; Santos, T. E. A.; Mammana, A. P.; Baranauskas, V.; Ceragioli, Helder J.; Peterlevitz, A. C.

    2002-10-01

    The field emission properties of "porous diamond-like" carbon structures have been characterized. A hot filament chemical vapor deposition system fed with ethyl alcohol vapor diluted in helium was used to deposit the samples. Morphological analysis by field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed that they had a highly porous structure, which was attributed to the modification of the kinetics of the carbon deposition process due to the presence of helium as a buffer gas. Micro-Raman spectroscopy showed two peaks in the graphene and microcrystalline graphite frequencies and a new peak at 1620 cm-1. Low threshold fields (Et) and hysteresis in the current versus voltage characteristic have been observed, and a model to explain the hysteresis is proposed.

  3. Enhanced field emission properties of screen-printed doubled-walled carbon nanotubes by polydimethylsiloxane elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hui; Feng, Tao; Zhang, Zhejuan; Wang, Kai; Qian, Min; Chen, Yiwei; Sun, Zhuo

    2010-09-01

    Field emission (FE) properties of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) treated by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer with different heating temperature have been systematically studied. The current density of treated DWCNT films decreases with the increase of heating temperature. The screen-printed DWCNTs treated by PDMS elastomer with drying temperature 150 °C for 20 min have the best FE performance with a marvelous field enhancement factor ( β = 20194). The optimized FE performance is attributed to the morphological change of DWCNT films after PDMS elastomer treatment and the change of separation energy for the CNT-substrate interface. It is proved that the PDMS treatment is a facile and effective method for field emission display (FED) application, especially for low-temperature FED preparation.

  4. Vertical graphene nanosheets synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition and the field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin; Qin, Shengchun; Bai, Shuai; Yue, Hongwei; Li, Yali; Chen, Qiang; Li, Junshuai; He, Deyan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we explored synthesis of vertical graphene nanosheets (VGNs) by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Through optimizing the experimental condition, growth of well aligned VGNs with uniform morphologies on nickel-coated stainless steel (SS) was realized for the first time by thermal CVD. In the meantime, influence of growth parameters on the VGN morphology was understood based on the balancing between the concentration and kinetic energy of carbon-containing radicals. Structural characterizations demonstrate that the achieved VGNs are normally composed of several graphene layers and less corrugated compared to the ones synthesized by other approaches, e.g. plasma enhanced (PE) CVD. The field emission measurement indicates that the VGNs exhibit relatively stable field emission and a field enhancement factor of about 1470, which is comparable to the values of VGNs prepared by PECVD can be achieved.

  5. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng, Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5×10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy∕min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result. PMID:21691440

  6. Simulations of Field-Emission Electron Beams from CNT Cathodes in RF Photoinjectors

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalcea, Daniel; Faillace, Luigi; Panuganti, Harsha; Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T.; Piot, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Average field emission currents of up to 700 mA were produced by Carbon Nano Tube (CNT) cathodes in a 1.3 GHz RF gun at Fermilab High Brightness Electron Source Lab. (HBESL). The CNT cathodes were manufactured at Xintek and tested under DC conditions at RadiaBeam. The electron beam intensity as well as the other beam properties are directly related to the time-dependent electric field at the cathode and the geometry of the RF gun. This report focuses on simulations of the electron beam generated through field-emission and the results are compared with experimental measurements. These simulations were performed with the time-dependent Particle In Cell (PIC) code WARP.

  7. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-05-23

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5x10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

  8. Field emission device driven by self-powered contact-electrification: Simulation and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiangyu; Jiang, Tao; Sun, Zhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei

    2015-09-01

    A self-powered field emission device (FED) driven by a single-electrode tribo-electric nanogenerator (TENG) is demonstrated. The mechanical motion works as both a power supply to drive the FED and a control unit to regulate the amount of emitted electrons. By using the Fowler-Nordheim equation and Kirchhoff laws, a theoretical model of this self-powered FED is proposed, and accordingly the real-time output characteristics of the device are systematically investigated. It is found that the motion distance of the TENG controls switch-on of the FED and determines the charge amount for emission, while the motion velocity regulates the amplitude of emission current. The minimum contact area for the TENG to generate field emission is about 9 cm2, which can be improved by optimizing FED structure and the tribo-materials of TENG. The demonstrated concept of this self-powered FED as well as the proposed physical analysis can serve as guidance for further applications of FED in such fields of self-powered electronics and soft electronics.

  9. Field emission device driven by self-powered contact-electrification: Simulation and experimental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiangyu E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn; Jiang, Tao; Sun, Zhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn

    2015-09-14

    A self-powered field emission device (FED) driven by a single-electrode tribo-electric nanogenerator (TENG) is demonstrated. The mechanical motion works as both a power supply to drive the FED and a control unit to regulate the amount of emitted electrons. By using the Fowler-Nordheim equation and Kirchhoff laws, a theoretical model of this self-powered FED is proposed, and accordingly the real-time output characteristics of the device are systematically investigated. It is found that the motion distance of the TENG controls switch-on of the FED and determines the charge amount for emission, while the motion velocity regulates the amplitude of emission current. The minimum contact area for the TENG to generate field emission is about 9 cm{sup 2}, which can be improved by optimizing FED structure and the tribo-materials of TENG. The demonstrated concept of this self-powered FED as well as the proposed physical analysis can serve as guidance for further applications of FED in such fields of self-powered electronics and soft electronics.

  10. A continuous emissions monitor for metals: Field demonstration of a prototype probe

    SciTech Connect

    Flower, W.; Peng, L.; Woods, C.

    1995-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories conducted field tests of a prototype continuous emissions monitor for metals at Clemson University, August 5-11, 1994, in cooperation with the joule-melter vitrification project at Clemson and Savannah River. The monitor is based on Laser Spark Spectroscopy, an established laboratory diagnostic technique that has been adapted for monitoring metal emissions from thermal waste treatment facilities. In the field tests described in this report, emissions were measured from a joule melter that was processing a surrogate waste-water treatment sludge from Oak Ridge. Data from this test provides the first insight into how emissions change (in real time) as operating parameters such as waste feed rate are changed. We detected all metals that were present above the estimated minimum detectability limits (in the parts-per-billion range for Clean Air Act metals), in addition to glass-making species such as calcium, boron, and silicon. This report summarizes the Clemson field tests, including design of the prototype probe, preparations leading up to the tests, the tests themselves, and analysis of results.

  11. Field-emission stability of hydrothermally synthesized aluminum-doped zinc oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsang-Yen; Wang, Jyh-Liang; Yang, Po-Yu; Hwang, Chuan-Chou; Shye, Der-Chi

    2012-07-01

    The Al-doped ZnO (AZO) nanostructures field-emission arrays (FEAs) were hydrothermally synthesized on AZO/glass substrate. The samples with Al-dosage of 3 at.% show the morphology as nanowires vertically grown on the substrates and a structure of c-axis elongated single-crystalline wurtzite. The good field-emission (i.e., the large anode current and low fluctuation of 15.9%) can be found by AZO nanostructure FEAs with well-designed Al-dosage (i.e., 3 at.%) because of the vertical nanowires with the less structural defects and superior crystallinity. Moreover, the Full width at half maximum (FWHM) of near band-edge emission (NBE) decreased as the increase of annealing temperature, representing the compensated structural defects during oxygen ambient annealing. After the oxygen annealing at 500 degrees C, the hydrothermal AZO nanostructure FEAs revealed the excellent electrical characteristics (i.e., the larger anode current and uniform distribution of induced fluorescence) and enhanced field-emission stability (i.e., the lowest current fluctuation of 5.97%).

  12. Field Emission of Wet Transferred Suspended Graphene Fabricated on Interdigitated Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji; Wang, Qilong; Tao, Zhi; Qi, Zhiyang; Zhai, Yusheng; Wu, Shengqi; Zhang, Xiaobing; Lei, Wei

    2016-02-10

    Suspended graphene (SG) membranes could enable strain-engineering of ballistic Dirac fermion transport and eliminate the extrinsic bulk disorder by annealing. When freely suspended without contact to any substrates, graphene could be considered as the ultimate two-dimensional (2D) morphology, leading to special field characteristics with the 2D geometrical effect and effectively utilized as an outstanding structure to explore the fundamental electronic or optoelectronic mechanism. In this paper, we report field emission characterization on an individual suspended few-layer graphene. A controllable wet transfer method is used to obtain the continuous and suspended graphene membrane on interdigitated gold electrodes. This suspended structure displays an overall field emission from the entirely surface, except for the variation in the emitting positions, acquiring a better enhancement than the exfoliated graphene on the conventional flat substrate. We also observe the transition process from space charge flow at low bias to the Fowler-Nordheim theory at high current emission regime. It could enable theoretical and experimental investigation of the typical electron emission properties of the 2D regime. Numerical simulations are also carried out to study the electrical properties of the suspended structure. Further improvement on the fabrication would realize low disorder, high quality, and large-scale suspended graphene devices. PMID:26795930

  13. Effect of cubic phase evolution on field emission properties of boron nitride island films

    SciTech Connect

    Teii, Kungen; Yamao, Ryota; Matsumoto, Seiichiro

    2009-12-01

    Field emission performance of boron nitride (BN) island films is studied in terms of cubic phase evolution in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Fine-grained island films with large surface roughness can be grown for initial sp{sup 2}-bonded BN and subsequent cubic BN (cBN) phases by using low-energy (approx20 eV) ion bombardment. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the electron affinity is as low as 0.3 eV for both sp{sup 2}-bonded BN and cBN phases. The evolution of cBN islands reduces the turn-on field down to around 9 V/mum and increases the current density up to 10{sup -4} A/cm{sup 2}. The emission is facilitated by the larger field enhancement due to the larger roughness and the higher conduction of cBN islands. The potential barrier height is estimated to be about 3.4 eV for emission from the Fermi level, while it is only about 0.3 eV for 'conduction band emission'.

  14. Field Emission of Wet Transferred Suspended Graphene Fabricated on Interdigitated Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ji; Wang, Qilong; Tao, Zhi; Qi, Zhiyang; Zhai, Yusheng; Wu, Shengqi; Zhang, Xiaobing; Lei, Wei

    2016-02-10

    Suspended graphene (SG) membranes could enable strain-engineering of ballistic Dirac fermion transport and eliminate the extrinsic bulk disorder by annealing. When freely suspended without contact to any substrates, graphene could be considered as the ultimate two-dimensional (2D) morphology, leading to special field characteristics with the 2D geometrical effect and effectively utilized as an outstanding structure to explore the fundamental electronic or optoelectronic mechanism. In this paper, we report field emission characterization on an individual suspended few-layer graphene. A controllable wet transfer method is used to obtain the continuous and suspended graphene membrane on interdigitated gold electrodes. This suspended structure displays an overall field emission from the entirely surface, except for the variation in the emitting positions, acquiring a better enhancement than the exfoliated graphene on the conventional flat substrate. We also observe the transition process from space charge flow at low bias to the Fowler-Nordheim theory at high current emission regime. It could enable theoretical and experimental investigation of the typical electron emission properties of the 2D regime. Numerical simulations are also carried out to study the electrical properties of the suspended structure. Further improvement on the fabrication would realize low disorder, high quality, and large-scale suspended graphene devices.

  15. A study on characteristics of Methane emission from a periodically irrigated paddy field in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakikuromaru, N.; Iwata, T.; Yagi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is generated by organic matter decomposition in the anaerobic soil. Paddy field is one of the most important eco-system in monsoon Asia. It is said that about 10% of CH4sources is paddy fields (IPCC AR4, 2007). In this study, methane emission from a single-rice crop field was estimated by long-term micrometeorological measurements. Methane emission was calculated by the aerodynamic gradient technique from January 2011 to August 2014. Intermittent water management was carried out during cultivation period at the observational site, HCH, located in Okayama, Japan. 3-days flood and 4-days drained condition were regularly repeated from late-June to early October. Seasonal variations of CH4flux for irrigation term from 2011 to 2013 were shown in Fig.1. Remarkably large fluxes were shown at early stage of irrigation term in 2011.It seemed to be caused by the relatively longer flooded condition that the first flooded period was 20 days. Flux in 2012 was smaller than in other year through the entire irrigation period. Rapid rise in flux for early August and gradual decrease between late August and September were shown in 2013. Fluxes under drained condition showed larger emission than under flooded condition. Cumulative CH4 emissions during cultivated period from 2011 to 2013 were estimated 15.7, 8.6, and 12.9 gC/m2, respectively.

  16. Chemical ionization mass spectrometry using carbon nanotube field emission electron sources.

    PubMed

    Radauscher, Erich J; Keil, Adam D; Wells, Mitch; Amsden, Jason J; Piascik, Jeffrey R; Parker, Charles B; Stoner, Brian R; Glass, Jeffrey T

    2015-11-01

    A novel chemical ionization (CI) source has been developed based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron source. The CNT-based electron source was evaluated and compared with a standard filament thermionic electron source in a commercial explosives trace detection desktop mass spectrometer. This work demonstrates the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. Both positive and negative modes were investigated. Spectra were collected for a standard mass spectrometer calibration compound, perfluorotributylamine (PFTBA), as well as trace explosives including trinitrotoluene (TNT), Research Department explosive (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The electrical characteristics, lifetime at operating pressure, and power requirements of the CNT-based electron source are reported. The CNT field emission electron sources demonstrated an average lifetime of 320 h when operated in constant emission mode under elevated CI pressures. The ability of the CNT field emission source to cycle on and off can provide enhanced lifetime and reduced power consumption without sacrificing performance and detection capabilities. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26133527

  17. Enhanced Field Emission from Vertically Oriented Graphene by Thin Solid Film Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagge-Hansen, Michael

    Recent progress and a coordinated national research program have brought considerable effort to bear on the synthesis and application of carbon nanostructures for field emission. At the College of William and Mary, we have developed field emission arrays of vertically oriented graphene (carbon nanosheets, CNS) that have demonstrated promising cathode performance, delivering emission current densities up to 2 mA/mm2 and cathode lifetime >800 hours. The work function (φ) of CNS and other carbonaceous cathode materials has been reported to be φ˜4.5-5.1 eV. The application of low work function thin films can achieve several orders of magnitude enhancement of field emission. Initially, the intrinsic CNS field emission was studied. The mean height of the CNS was observed to decrease as a function of operating time at a rate of ˜0.05 nm/h (I 1˜40 muA/mm2). The erosion mechanism was studied using a unique UHV diode design which allowed line-of-site assessment from the field emission region in the diode to the ion source of a mass spectrometer. The erosion of CNS was found to occur by impingement of hyperthermal H and O neutrals and ions generated at the surface oxide complex of the Cu anode by electron stimulated desorption. Techniques for minimizing this erosion are presented. The Mo2C (φ˜3.7 eV) beading on CNS at previously reported carbide formation temperatures of ˜800°C was circumvented by physical vapor deposition of Mo and vacuum annealing at ˜300°C which resulted in a conformal Mo2C coating and stable field emission of 1˜50 muA/mm2. For a given applied field, the emission current was >102 greater than uncoated CNS. ThO2 thin film coatings were presumed to be even more promising because of a reported work function of φ ˜2.6 eV. The fundamental behavior of the initial oxidation of polycrystalline Th was studied in UHV (p<1x10-11 Torr), followed by studies of thin film coatings on Ir and thermionic emission characteristics. Although a work function of 3

  18. Comparison of low-voltage field emission from TaC and tungsten fiber arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, J.K.; Lee, K.J.; Hill, D.N.

    1988-01-01

    Field emitter array (FEA) devices were constructed using thin-film fabrication techniques based on in situ eutectic composites containing either TaC or NbC fibers in a NiCr alloy matrix. The emission characteristics of the TaC devices were measured and compared to those of W--ZrO/sub 2/ FEA's. Both devices produced the linear Fowler--Nordheim plots common to all field emission devices; however, the array current density of the TaC FEA's was more than two orders of magnitude lower than that of the W--ZrO/sub 2/ FEA's. This was primarily due to the lower fiber density and lower field enhancement of the carbide fiber devices. If it were possible to produce cathode geometries comparable to those of the W--ZrO/sub 2/ FEA's, a theoretical analysis indicates that emission performance of the TaC devices would be superior because of the lower work function of TaC. However, post-emission observations indicated that the carbide fiber emitters failed more readily than the tungsten emitters under comparable operating conditions.

  19. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Electron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich J.; Keil, Adam D.; Wells, Mitch; Amsden, Jason J.; Piascik, Jeffrey R.; Parker, Charles B.; Stoner, Brian R.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2015-11-01

    A novel chemical ionization (CI) source has been developed based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission electron source. The CNT-based electron source was evaluated and compared with a standard filament thermionic electron source in a commercial explosives trace detection desktop mass spectrometer. This work demonstrates the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. Both positive and negative modes were investigated. Spectra were collected for a standard mass spectrometer calibration compound, perfluorotributylamine (PFTBA), as well as trace explosives including trinitrotoluene (TNT), Research Department explosive (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The electrical characteristics, lifetime at operating pressure, and power requirements of the CNT-based electron source are reported. The CNT field emission electron sources demonstrated an average lifetime of 320 h when operated in constant emission mode under elevated CI pressures. The ability of the CNT field emission source to cycle on and off can provide enhanced lifetime and reduced power consumption without sacrificing performance and detection capabilities.

  20. Model of the Jovian magnetic field topology constrained by the Io auroral emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, S. L. G.; Bonfond, B.; Zarka, P.; Grodent, D.

    2011-05-01

    The determination of the internal magnetic field of Jupiter has been the object of many studies and publications. These models have been computed from the Pioneer, Voyager, and Ulysses measurements. Some models also use the position of the Io footprints as a constraint: the magnetic field lines mapping to the footprints must have their origins along Io's orbit. The use of this latter constraint to determine the internal magnetic field models greatly improved the modeling of the auroral emissions, in particular the radio ones, which strongly depends on the magnetic field geometry. This constraint is, however, not sufficient for allowing a completely accurate modeling. The fact that the footprint field line should map to a longitude close to Io's was not used, so that the azimuthal component of the magnetic field could not be precisely constrained. Moreover, a recent study showed the presence of a magnetic anomaly in the northern hemisphere, which has never been included in any spherical harmonic decomposition of the internal magnetic field. We compute a decomposition of the Jovian internal magnetic field into spherical harmonics, which allows for a more accurate mapping of the magnetic field lines crossing Io, Europa, and Ganymede orbits to the satellite footprints observed in UV. This model, named VIPAL, is mostly constrained by the Io footprint positions, including the longitudinal constraint, and normalized by the Voyager and Pioneer magnetic field measurements. We show that the surface magnetic fields predicted by our model are more consistent with the observed frequencies of the Jovian radio emissions than those predicted by previous models.

  1. Model of the Jovian magnetic field topology constrained by the Io auroral emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, S.; Bonfond, B.; Grodent, D.; Zarka, P.

    2011-10-01

    The determination of the internal magnetic field of Jupiter has been the object of many studies and publications. These models have been computed from the Pioneer, Voyager, and Ulysses measurements. Some models also use the position of the Io footprints as a constraint: the magnetic field lines mapping to the footprints must have their origins along Io's orbit. The use of this latter constraint to determine the internal magnetic field models greatly improved the modeling of the auroral emissions, in particular the radio ones, which strongly depends on the magnetic field geometry. This constraint is, however, not sufficient for allowing a completely accurate modeling. The fact that the footprint field line should map to a longitude close to Io's was not used, so that the azimuthal component of the magnetic field could not be precisely constrained. Moreover, a recent study showed the presence of a magnetic anomaly in the northern hemisphere, which has never been included in any spherical harmonic decomposition of the internal magnetic field. We compute a decomposition of the Jovian internal magnetic field into spherical harmonics, which allows for a more accurate mapping of the magnetic field lines crossing Io, Europa, and Ganymede orbits to the satellite footprints observed in UV. This model, named VIPAL, is mostly constrained by the Io footprint positions, including the longitudinal constraint, and normalized by the Voyager and Pioneer magnetic field measurements. We show that the surface magnetic fields predicted by our model are more consistent with the observed frequencies of the Jovian radio emissions than those predicted by previous models.

  2. Fluid modeling of operating modes in a field emission driven alternating current (FEDAC) microdischarge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Alamatsaz, Arghavan; Shivaprasad, Therazhundur Ramesh

    2014-10-01

    The recent interest in electrostatic microscale devices has lead to a great emphasis on electrical breakdown of gases in microgaps. The breakdown process has been shown to be significantly different from its counterpart in macrogaps with field emission of electrons from the cathode playing a major role. This work aims to build on prior work dealing with pre-breakdown and post-breakdown operating modes in direct current field emission driven (FED) microdischarges. Specifically, charged particle dynamics in microscale gaps that are driven by time-varying fields are studied using an in-house two-fluid code with appropriate cathode boundary conditions including field emission. The model includes continuity and energy equations for both electrons and ions to account for the significant non-equilibrium and is augmented by the Poisson's equation for electrostatic potential. The frequency dependence of breakdown behavior as well as pre-breakdown and post-breakdown current-voltage characteristics is determined for a wide range of frequencies from low radio frequency (RF) to microwave and contrasted with existing results for direct current FED microdischarges. The results are also used to explain trends recently observed in an evanescent-mode cavity resonator operating in the microwave regime.

  3. Highly enhanced and temporally stable field emission from MWCNTs grown on aluminum coated silicon substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sreekanth, M.; Ghosh, S. Patra, R.; Srivastava, P.

    2015-06-15

    In this work, a detailed field emission study of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) grown on Si and Al coated Si substrates is reported. Morphological and microstructural studies of the films show higher entanglement of CNTs in the case of CNT/Si film as compared to CNT/Al/Si film. Raman studies show that the defect mediated peak (D) is substantially suppressed as compared to graphitic peak (G) resulting in significant reduction in I{sub D}/I{sub G} value in CNT/Al/Si film. Field emission (FE) current density of CNT/Al/Si film (∼25 mA/cm{sup 2}) is significantly higher as compared to that of CNT/Si film (∼1.6 mA/cm{sup 2}). A substantial improvement in temporal stability is also observed in CNT/Al/Si film. This enhancement in field emission current is attributed to strong adhesion between substrate and CNTs, low work function, high local field enhancement factor at the CNT tips and less entanglement of CNTs grown on Al/Si. The temporally stable CNT/Al/Si cold cathode can be a potential candidate to replace conventional electron sources in prototype devices.

  4. Case studies of quasi-periodic VLF emissions and related ULF fluctuations of the magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayosh, M.; Santolik, O.; Nemec, F.; Parrot, M.

    2014-12-01

    Quasi-periodic (QP) VLF emissions are observed in the inner magnetosphere mostly on the day-side. These waves exhibit a periodic time modulation of the wave intensity that is possibly a result of the whistler-mode wave growth being periodically modulated by compressional ULF magnetic field pulsations. We have analyzed 50 QP events measured by the DEMETER satellite at altitudes of about 700 km to verify their generation mechanism. The analyzed events have a modulation period between 15 s and 80 s, and they were observed during quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kp<3). Magnetometers of the CARISMA system were used for monitoring the ULF magnetic field pulsations in a wide spatial range. We have found that ULF magnetic field pulsations in the Pc3 - Pc5 range are well correlated with the occurrence of the QP emissions with modulation periods between about 40 and 80 s. At the same time, increased fluxes of high-energy electrons (E > 30 keV) were observed by DEMETER and by the NOAA-17 satellite. We analyze possible links between these electrons, QP emissions, and ULF magnetic field pulsations.

  5. Uncertainty of oil field GHG emissions resulting from information gaps: a Monte Carlo approach.

    PubMed

    Vafi, Kourosh; Brandt, Adam R

    2014-09-01

    Regulations on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from liquid fuel production generally work with incomplete data about oil production operations. We study the effect of incomplete information on estimates of GHG emissions from oil production operations. Data from California oil fields are used to generate probability distributions for eight oil field parameters previously found to affect GHG emissions. We use Monte Carlo (MC) analysis on three example oil fields to assess the change in uncertainty associated with learning of information. Single factor uncertainties are most sensitive to ignorance about water-oil ratio (WOR) and steam-oil ratio (SOR), resulting in distributions with coefficients of variation (CV) of 0.1-0.9 and 0.5, respectively. Using a combinatorial uncertainty analysis, we find that only a small number of variables need to be learned to greatly improve on the accuracy of MC mean. At most, three pieces of data are required to reduce bias in MC mean to less than 5% (absolute). However, the parameters of key importance in reducing uncertainty depend on oil field characteristics and on the metric of uncertainty applied. Bias in MC mean can remain after multiple pieces of information are learned, if key pieces of information are left unknown.

  6. Emission Factors of Nitrous Oxide by Organic Manure Fertilizers in Japanese Upland Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.

    2011-12-01

    Preliminary data of field experiments which were conducted to estimate emission factors of nitrous oxide by organic manure fertilizers in 10 Japan-wide experiment sites, 2010 was reported. We compared nitrous oxide emission from urea as chemical fertilizers and cow manure as organic applications, in 1o Japanese prefectures of Yamagata, Fukushima, Ibaraki, Aichi, Shiga, Tokushima, Nagasaki, Kumamoto and Kagoshima. Same amounts of nitrogen were applied in organic and inorganic fertilizers in each field. In each site, 3 replication plots were organized in randomized block design with zero-nitrogen application plots. N2O gas fluxes were measured every one week or more during cultivation seasons. We also measured several soil physical and chemical parameters of inorganic nitrogen species, soil moisture contents or WFPS (Water Filled Pore Space), soil temperatures, bulk densities etc. Gas fluxes ware measured by automated Shimadzu GC-2014 ECD gas chromatograph. Soil moistures were measured by Camplel's Hydrosense in each site. Vegetation of conducting fields were cabbage in 7 fields, wheat in 1, pear orchard and onion in 1. Microorganisms' abundance was also considered to clarify N2O emission processes by the PCR-DGGE method.

  7. Efficient field emission from coiled carbon nano/microfiber on copper substrate by dc-PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Jha, A.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2010-10-01

    Crystalline coiled carbon nano/micro fibers in thin film form have been synthesized via direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on copper substrates with acetylene as a carbon precursor at 10 mbar pressure and 750 °C substrate temperature. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD pattern as well as selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern showed that the samples were crystalline in nature. SEM and HRTEM studies showed that as synthesized coiled carbon fibers are having average diameter ˜100 nm and are several micrometers in length. The as-prepared samples showed moderately good electron field emission properties with a turn-on field as low as 1.96 V/μm for an inter-electrode distance 220 μm. The variation of field emission properties with inter-electrode distance has been studied in detail. The field emission properties of the coiled carbon fibrous thin films are compared with that of crystalline multiwalled carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures.

  8. Effect of sequential surface irrigations on field-scale emissions of 1,3-dichloropropene.

    PubMed

    Yates, S R; Knuteson, J; Ernst, F F; Zheng, W; Wang, Q

    2008-12-01

    A field experiment was conducted to measure subsurface movement and volatilization of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) after shank injection to an agricultural soil. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of sprinkler irrigation on the emissions of 1,3-D to the atmosphere and is based on recent research that has shown that saturating the soil pore space reduces gas-phase diffusion and leads to reduced volatilization rates. Aerodynamic, integrated horizontal flux, and theoretical profile shape methods were used to estimate fumigant volatilization rates and total emission losses. These methods provide estimates of the volatilization rate based on measurements of wind speed, temperature, and 1,3-D concentration in the atmosphere. The volatilization rate was measured continuously for 16 days, and the daily peak volatilization rates for the three methods ranged from 18 to 60 microg m(-2) s(-1). The total 13-D mass entering the atmosphere was approximately 44-68 kg ha(-1), or 10-15% of the applied active ingredient This represents approximately 30-50% reduction in the total emission losses compared to conventional fumigant applications in field and field-plot studies. Significant reduction in volatilization of 1,3-D was observed when five surface irrigations were applied to the field, one immediately after fumigation followed by daily irrigations. PMID:19192793

  9. Investigating of the Field Emission Performance on Nano-Apex Carbon Fiber and Tungsten Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousa, Marwan S.; Alnawasreh, Shadi; Madanat, Mazen A.; Al-Rabadi, Anas N.

    2015-10-01

    Field electron emission measurements have been performed on carbon-based and tungsten microemitters. Several samples of both types of emitters with different apex radii have been obtained employing electrolytic etching techniques using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with different molarities depending on the material used. A suitable, home-built, field electron microscope (FEM) with 10 mm tip to screen separation distance was used to electrically characterize the electron emitters. Measurements were carried out under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions with base pressure of 10-9 mbar. The current-voltage characteristics (I-V) presented as Fowler-Nordheim (FN) type plots, and field electron emission images have been recorded. In this work, initial comparison of the field electron emission performance of these micro and nanoemitters has been carried out, with the aim of obtaining a reliable, stable and long life powerful electron source. We compare the apex radii measured from the micrographs obtained from the SEM images to those extracted from the FN-type _I-V_plots for carbon fibers and tungsten tips.

  10. Field Emission Characteristics of the Structure of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Bundles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao-Hung; Sie, Cong-Lin; Chen, Ching-An; Chang, Hsuan-Chen; Shih, Yi-Ting; Chang, Hsin-Yueh; Su, Wei-Jhih; Lee, Kuei-Yi

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we performed thermal chemical vapor deposition for growing vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) bundles for a field emitter and applied photolithography for defining the arrangement pattern to simultaneously compare square and hexagonal arrangements by using two ratios of the interbundle distance to the bundle height (R) of field emitters. The hexagon arrangement with R = 2 had the lowest turn-on electric field (E to) and highest enhancement factor, whereas the square arrangement with R = 3 had the most stable field emission (FE) characteristic. The number density can reveal the correlation to the lowest E to and highest enhancement factor more effectively than can the R or L. The fluorescent images of the synthesized VACNT bundles manifested the uniformity of FE currents. The results of our study indicate the feasibility of applying the VACNT field emitter arrangement to achieve optimal FE performance. PMID:26183388

  11. Field emission properties of hybrid few-layer graphene-carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei Qi, Jun; Zhang, Fu; Xia Zhang, Li; Cao, Jian; Cai Feng, Ji

    2014-04-01

    Few-layer graphene (FLG) and carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrid is prepared by in situ growth of FLG on the walls of CNTs, using PECVD, without catalyst. The amount and size of FLG can be controlled by total gas pressure and growth time. The field emission (FE) characteristics of CNTs coated with different-density FLG were studied, and an FE phenomenon schematic and electrostatic field equipotential model of these FLG-CNTs were proposed. These results show that the geometrical morphology of FLG plays an important role in the FE property of hybrid FLG-CNTs. The medium-density FLG on the CNTs exhibits excellent FE properties, with a low turn-on electric field and threshold field, as well as large field enhancement factor, which are much better than those of the as-grown CNTs. The excellent FE properties of the FLG-CNT hybrids make them promising candidates for high-performance FE emitters.

  12. Modulation of field emission properties of znO nanorods during arc discharge.

    PubMed

    Fang, F; Kennedy, J; Carder, D A; Futter, J; Murmu, P; Markwitz, A

    2010-12-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods have been synthesized via the arc discharge method. Different oxygen partial pressures were applied in the arc discharge chamber to modulate the field emission properties of the as-synthesized ZnO nanorods. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was carried out to analyze the morphology of the ZnO nanorods. The ion beam analysis technique of proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) was performed to probe the impurities in ZnO nanorods. SEM images clearly revealed the formation of randomly oriented ZnO nanorods with diameters between 10-50 nm. It was found that the morphology and the electrical properties of the ZnO nanorods were dependent on the oxygen partial pressure during arc discharge. In addition enhanced UV-sensitive photoconductivity was found for ZnO nanorods synthesized at high oxygen partial pressure during arc discharge. The field emission properties of the nanorods were studied. The turn-on field, which is defined at a current density of 10 microA cm(-2), was about 3 V microm(-1) for ZnO nanorods synthesized at 99% oxygen partial pressure during arc discharge. The turn-on field for ZnO nanorods increased with the decrease of oxygen partial pressure during arc discharge. The simplicity of the synthesis route coupled with the modulation of field emission properties due to the arc discharge method make the ZnO nanorods a promising candidate for a low cost and compact cold cathode material. PMID:21121322

  13. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multi-resolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE PAGES

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2015-04-29

    Atmospheric inversions are frequently used to estimate fluxes of atmospheric greenhouse gases (e.g., biospheric CO2 flux fields) at Earth's surface. These inversions typically assume that flux departures from a prior model are spatially smoothly varying, which are then modeled using a multi-variate Gaussian. When the field being estimated is spatially rough, multi-variate Gaussian models are difficult to construct and a wavelet-based field model may be more suitable. Unfortunately, such models are very high dimensional and are most conveniently used when the estimation method can simultaneously perform data-driven model simplification (removal of model parameters that cannot be reliably estimated) and fitting.more » Such sparse reconstruction methods are typically not used in atmospheric inversions. In this work, we devise a sparse reconstruction method, and illustrate it in an idealized atmospheric inversion problem for the estimation of fossil fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the USA. Our new method is based on stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), a method used to reconstruct compressively sensed images. Our adaptations bestow three properties to the sparse reconstruction procedure which are useful in atmospheric inversions. We have modified StOMP to incorporate prior information on the emission field being estimated and to enforce non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, though based on wavelets, our method allows for the estimation of fields in non-rectangular geometries, e.g., emission fields inside geographical and political boundaries. Our idealized inversions use a recently developed multi-resolution (i.e., wavelet-based) random field model developed for ffCO2 emissions and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also

  14. Field emission property of ZnO nanowires prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Htay, Myo Than; Hashimoto, Yoshio

    2015-08-01

    The field emission property of cold cathode emitters utilizing the ZnO nanowires with various conditions prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technique was discussed. It is found that the emission current was enhanced in the emitters having higher aspect ratio as well as smaller sheet resistance. Applying of post-annealing process, utilization of additional Mo back electrode in the cathode, and coating of Mo on the ZnO nanowires resulted in the improvement of the emission current and lowering the threshold voltage. A threshold voltage of about 5.5 V/μm to obtain 1.0 μA/cm2 was achieved in the sample prepared at the growth temperatures varying continuously from 250 °C to 300 °C.

  15. Simultaneous field measurements of biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Iris Cofman; Levine, Joel S.

    1987-01-01

    Seasonal and diurnal emissions of NO and N2O from agricultural sites in Jamestown, Virginia and Boulder, Colorado are estimated in terms of soil temperature; percent moisture; and exchangeable nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium concentrations. The techniques and procedures used to analyze the soil parameters are described. The spatial and temporal variability of the NO and N2O emissions is studied. A correlation between NO fluxes in the Virginia sample and nitrate concentration, temperature, and percent moisture is detected, and NO fluxes for the Colorado site correspond with temperature and moisture. It is observed that the N2O emissions are only present when percent moisture approaches or exceeds the field capacity of the soil. The data suggest that NO is produced primarily by nitrification in aerobic soils, and N2O is formed by denitrification in anaerobic soils.

  16. Reducing CH4 emission from rice paddy fields by altering water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, S.; Itoh, M.

    2010-12-01

    Percentage of atmospheric methane emitted form rice paddy is estimated at 60Tg/yr (20 - 100Tg/yr) which is near 10% of total global methane emission of 535Tg/yr (410 - 660Tg) (IPCC(1995), and which is near 30% of anthropogenic CH4 emission. Thus, mitigation of CH4 emission is urgently required. CH4 in paddy soil is emanated by the activities of anaerobic bacteria which is called methane producer through reduction of CO2 or decomposition of acetic acid, and it is transported to atmosphere through soil or paddy water surface. It is effective to control methane emission from rice paddy that period is extended on intermittent drainage, composted rice straw is incorporated as fertilizer instead of flesh one, or other. However, empirical approach of these kinds of experiments had not been sufficient because such a kind of experiment required significant times and efforts. In this study, we conducted demonstrative experiments to verify the effects of water management method differences in order to reduce CH4 emission from rice paddy at 9 experimental sites in 8 prefectures. In this, we used new gas analyzer which can measure CH4, CO2 and N2O at once developed by National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences (NIAES), Japan. In this report, we show the results in two years of this study. 'Nakaboshi' (mid-season-drainage) is one of cultivation methods in rice paddy that surface water in paddy field is once drained for about 10 days and the field is maintained like upland field to give adequate stress to rice plant for better harvest qualities and yields. Our targeted evaluation was dependencies of Nakaboshi periods lengths and Nakaboshi periods to CH4 emission reduction amounts for total cultivation periods within harvest yield maintained. The longer length of Nakaboshi period was extended, the lesser CH4 emitted even after when Nakaboshi period lasted, as a whole. In some cases, for example in Kagoshima, exceptional phenomena of that significant high emission were

  17. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes/Si nanowires core-sheath structure arrays and their field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, M.; Li, M. K.; Zhang, Z. J.; Li, H. L.

    2003-09-01

    A new composite structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)/Si nanowires (SiNWs) arrays have been synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) within the pores of microporous alumina template. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microcopy (TEM) reveal that the obtained well-aligned composite structure has a core-sheath structure and the deposited material in the carbon sheath is polycrystalline silicon. Field emission from these CNTs-sheathed SiNWs exhibits significant enhancement compared to the pure SiNWs in turn-on field, total emission current and stability. The field emission characteristics of the composite structure are analyzed based on Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron field emission increased with decreasing diameter of such structure. The well-aligned core-sheath structure provides an important means to fabricate emitter devices with chemically inert surface as well as with superior performance of field emission properties.

  18. sparse-msrf:A package for sparse modeling and estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emission fields

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-06

    The software is used to fit models of emission fields (e.g., fossil-fuel CO2 emissions) to sparse measurements of gaseous concentrations. Its primary aim is to provide an implementation and a demonstration for the algorithms and models developed in J. Ray, V. Yadav, A. M. Michalak, B. van Bloemen Waanders and S. A. McKenna, "A multiresolution spatial parameterization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions", accepted, Geoscientific Model Development, 2014. The software can be used to estimate emissions of non-reactive gases such as fossil-fuel CO2, methane etc. The software uses a proxy of the emission field being estimated (e.g., for fossil-fuel CO2, a population density map is a good proxy) to construct a wavelet model for the emission field. It then uses a shrinkage regression algorithm called Stagewise Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (StOMP) to fit the wavelet model to concentration measurements, using an atmospheric transport model to relate emission and concentration fields. Algorithmic novelties described in the paper above (1) ensure that the estimated emission fields are non-negative, (2) allow the use of guesses for emission fields to accelerate the estimation processes and (3) ensure that under/overestimates in the guesses do not skew the estimation.

  19. sparse-msrf:A package for sparse modeling and estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emission fields

    2014-10-06

    The software is used to fit models of emission fields (e.g., fossil-fuel CO2 emissions) to sparse measurements of gaseous concentrations. Its primary aim is to provide an implementation and a demonstration for the algorithms and models developed in J. Ray, V. Yadav, A. M. Michalak, B. van Bloemen Waanders and S. A. McKenna, "A multiresolution spatial parameterization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions", accepted, Geoscientific Model Development, 2014. The softwaremore » can be used to estimate emissions of non-reactive gases such as fossil-fuel CO2, methane etc. The software uses a proxy of the emission field being estimated (e.g., for fossil-fuel CO2, a population density map is a good proxy) to construct a wavelet model for the emission field. It then uses a shrinkage regression algorithm called Stagewise Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (StOMP) to fit the wavelet model to concentration measurements, using an atmospheric transport model to relate emission and concentration fields. Algorithmic novelties described in the paper above (1) ensure that the estimated emission fields are non-negative, (2) allow the use of guesses for emission fields to accelerate the estimation processes and (3) ensure that under/overestimates in the guesses do not skew the estimation.« less

  20. HIGH-CURRENT COLD CATHODE FIELD EMISSION ARRAY FOR ELECTRON LENS APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2012-12-28

    During Phase I, the following goals were achieved: (1) design and fabrication of a novel, nano-dimensional CNT field emitter assembly for high current density application, with high durability; (2) fabrication of a ceramic based micro channel plate (MCP) and characterization of its secondary electron emission; and (3) characterizing the CNT/MCP cathode for high field emission and durability. As a result of these achievements, a relatively high current density of ~ 1.2 A/cm2 from a CNT cathode and single channel MCP were measured. The emission current was also extremely stable with a peak-to-peak variation of only 1.8%. The emission current could be further enhanced to meet requirements for electron lens applications by increasing the number of MCP channels. A calculation for maximum possible current density with a 1200 channel/cm2 MCP, placed over a cathode with 1200 uniformly functioning CNTs, would be ~1.46 kA/cm2, neglecting space charge limitations. Clearly this level of emission is far greater than what is needed for the electron lens application, but it does offer a highly comforting margin to account for sub-standard emitters and/or to allow the lesser challenge of building a cathode with fewer channels/cm2. A satisfactory goal for the electron lens application would be a controllable emission of 2-4 mA per channel in an ensemble of 800-1200 uniformly-functioning channels/cm2, and a cathode with overall area of about 1 cm2.

  1. Synthesis and field emission properties of different ZnO nanostructure arrays

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this article, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures of different shapes were fabricated on silicon substrate. Well-aligned and long ZnO nanowire (NW) arrays, as well as leaf-like ZnO nanostructures (which consist of modulated and single-phase structures), were fabricated by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method without the assistance of a catalyst. On the other hand, needle-like ZnO NW arrays were first fabricated with the CVD process followed by chemical etching of the NW arrays. The use of chemical etching provides a low-cost and convenient method of obtaining the needle-like arrays. In addition, the field emission properties of the different ZnO NW arrays were also investigated where some differences in the turn-on field and the field-enhancement factors were observed for the ZnO nanostructures of different lengths and shapes. It was experimentally observed that the leaf-like ZnO nanostructure is most suitable for field emission due to its lowest turn-on and threshold field as well as its high field-enhancement factor among the different synthesized nanostructures. PMID:22444723

  2. Field measurement of greenhouse gas emission rates and development of emission factors for wastewater treatment. Final report, September 1994-March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, B.; LaCosse, J.

    1997-09-01

    The report gives results of field testing to develop more reliable greenhouse gas (GHG) emission estimates for Wastewater treatment (WWT) lagoons. Field tests of emissions were conducted for WWT lagoons that use anaerobic processes to treat large volumes of wastewater with large biological oxygen demand (BOD) loadings. Air emissions and wastewater were measured at anaerobic lagoons at three meat processing plants and two publicly owned treatment works. The overall emission rates of CH4, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, ammonia (NH3), and chlorofluorocarbons were measured from each source using an open-path monitoring approach. The emitted compounds were identified and quantified by Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Emission factors were developed for CH4 and NH3 as a function of the plant production rate, wastewater parameters (e.g., influent BOD and chemical oxygen demand (COD) loadings), and WWT system performance (e.g., BOD and COD removal rates).

  3. Non-dipolar magnetic field models and patterns of radio emission: Uranus and Neptune compared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    The magnetic field geometries of Uranus and Neptune are superficially similar, and are similarly unlike those of other planets: the field strengths are similar, and they contain extraordinarily large non-dipolar components. As a corollary, the best dipolar field models of each of the two planets comprises a dipole that is considerably offset from the planetary center and tilted away from the rotational axis. However, in other respects the best field models of the two planets are quite different. Uranus has a quadrupole model in which all the terms are well determined and in which none of the higher order terms is determined. To represent the magnetometer data acquired during Voyager's Neptune encounter requires a model of order 8 (instead of Uranus' order 2), yet many of the coefficients are poorly determined. A second model, an octupole model comprising the terms up to order three of the order 8 model, has been suggested by the magnetometer team as being useful; its use, however, is limited only to the region outside of about 2R(exp N), whereas planetary radio emissions have their sources well inside this surface. Computer code has been written that permits an analysis of the detailed motion of low energy charged particles moving in general planetary magnetic fields. At Uranus, this code reveals the existence of an isolated region of the inner magnetosphere above the day side in which particles may be trapped, separate from the more general magnetospheric trapping. An examination of the so-call ordinary mode uranian radio emissions leads us to believe that these emissions are in fact extraordinary mode emissions coming from particles trapped in this isolated region. A similar attempt to discover trapping regions at Neptune has proved, unfortunately, to be impossible. This arises from three factors: (1) the computation needed to track particles in an eighth order field is more than an order of magnitude greater than that needed to perform a similar calculation in a

  4. Emission-Line Eclipse Mapping of Velocity Fields in a Dwarf-Nova Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Makoto; Mineshige, Shin

    2002-06-01

    We propose a new method, emission-line eclipse mapping, to map the velocity fields of an accretion disk in position space. Quiescent dwarf novae usually exhibit double-peaked emission-line profiles because of disk rotation. Since a part of a disk having a different line-of-sight velocity is successively obscured by a companion in eclipsing systems, they show time-varying line profiles. We calculated the time changes of the emission-line profiles, assuming Keplerian rotation fields (vφ ~ r-1/2 with r being the distance from the disk center) and an emissivity distribution of j ~ r-3/2. We, then, applied the usual eclipse mapping technique to the light curves at each of 12-24 wavelengths across the line center to map the region with the same line-of-sight velocity. The reconstructed images typically exhibit a `two-eye' pattern for high line-of-sight velocities, and we can recover the relation, vφ ~ d-1/2, on the assumption of an axisymmetric disk, where d is the separation between the two `eyes'. We will be able to probe the Keplerian rotation law, the most fundamental assumption adopted in many disk models, by high-speed spectroscopic observations with 8-m class telescopes.

  5. Effect of graphitic order on field emission stability of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayastha, Vijaya Kumar; Ulmen, Benjamin; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2007-01-01

    We observed current density (J) dependent degradation in field emission current from multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These degradations are recoverable and can be explained by emission current-induced dislocations along the MWCNTs. MWCNTs grown by thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) can emit stable current continuously for at least 1200 min with upper current density limits of ~0.5 mA cm-2. In contrast, this upper limit is<40 µA cm-2 for nanotubes grown by plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD), although higher J is possible with relatively shorter stability duration. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate higher graphitic order of the thermal CVD grown MWCNTs as compared to PECVD grown MWCNTs. Our study suggests that graphitic order affects their upper performance limits of long-term emission stability, although the effects from adsorbates cannot be completely ignored. These results indicate that field emission cannot be considered as an ideal quantum tunnelling process. The effect of electron transport along CNTs before electron tunnelling must be considered.

  6. Effect of graphitic order on field emission stability of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kayastha, Vijaya Kumar; Ulmen, Benjamin; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2007-01-24

    We observed current density (J) dependent degradation in field emission current from multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These degradations are recoverable and can be explained by emission current-induced dislocations along the MWCNTs. MWCNTs grown by thermal chemical vapour deposition (CVD) can emit stable current continuously for at least 1200 min with upper current density limits of approximately 0.5 mA cm(-2). In contrast, this upper limit is<40 microA cm(-2) for nanotubes grown by plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD), although higher J is possible with relatively shorter stability duration. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate higher graphitic order of the thermal CVD grown MWCNTs as compared to PECVD grown MWCNTs. Our study suggests that graphitic order affects their upper performance limits of long-term emission stability, although the effects from adsorbates cannot be completely ignored. These results indicate that field emission cannot be considered as an ideal quantum tunnelling process. The effect of electron transport along CNTs before electron tunnelling must be considered. PMID:19636115

  7. Characterisation of soil emissions of nitric oxide at field and laboratory scale using high resolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laville, P.; Flura, D.; Gabrielle, B.; Loubet, B.; Fanucci, O.; Rolland, M.-N.; Cellier, P.

    Agricultural soils may account for 10% of anthropogenic emissions of NO, a precursor of tropospheric ozone with potential impacts on air quality and global warming. However, the estimation of this biogenic source strength and its relationships to crop management is still challenging because of the spatial and temporal variability of the NO fluxes. Here, we present a combination of new laboratory- and field-scale methods to characterise NO emissions and single out the effects of environmental drivers. First, NO fluxes were continuously monitored over the growing season of a maize-cropped field located near Paris (France), using 6 automatic chambers. Mineral fertilizer nitrogen was applied from May to October 2005. An additional field experiment was carried out in October to test the effects of N fertilizer form on the NO emissions. The automatic chambers were designed to measure simultaneously the NO and N 2O gases. Laboratory measurements were carried out in parallel using soil cores sampled at same site to test the response of NO fluxes to varying soil N-NH 4 and water contents, and temperatures. The effects of soil core thickness were also analysed. The highest NO fluxes occurred during the first 5 weeks following fertilizer application. The cumulative loss of NO-N over the growing season was estimated at 1.5 kg N ha -1, i.e. 1.1% of the N fertilizer dose (140 kg N ha -1). All rainfall events induced NO peak fluxes, whose magnitude decreased over time in relation to the decline of soil inorganic N. In October, NO emissions were enhanced with ammonium forms of fertilizer N. Conversely, the application of nitrate-based fertilizers did not significantly increase NO emissions compared to an unfertilized control. The results of the subsequent laboratory experiments were in accordance with the field observations in magnitude and time variations. NO emissions were maximum with a water soil content of 15% (w w -1), and with a NH 4-N content of 180 mg NH 4-N kg soil -1

  8. Field test of available methods to measure remotely SOx and NOx emissions from ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzani Lööv, J. M.; Alfoldy, B.; Gast, L. F. L.; Hjorth, J.; Lagler, F.; Mellqvist, J.; Beecken, J.; Berg, N.; Duyzer, J.; Westrate, H.; Swart, D. P. J.; Berkhout, A. J. C.; Jalkanen, J.-P.; Prata, A. J.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Borowiak, A.

    2014-08-01

    Methods for the determination of ship fuel sulphur content and NOx emission factors based on remote measurements have been compared in the harbour of Rotterdam and compared to direct stack emission measurements on the ferry Stena Hollandica. The methods were selected based on a review of the available literature on ship emission measurements. They were either optical (LIDAR, Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS), UV camera), combined with model-based estimates of fuel consumption, or based on the so called "sniffer" principle, where SO2 or NOx emission factors are determined from simultaneous measurement of the increase of CO2 and SO2 or NOx concentrations in the plume of the ship compared to the background. The measurements were performed from stations at land, from a boat and from a helicopter. Mobile measurement platforms were found to have important advantages compared to the land-based ones because they allow optimizing the sampling conditions and sampling from ships on the open sea. Although optical methods can provide reliable results it was found that at the state of the art level, the "sniffer" approach is the most convenient technique for determining both SO2 and NOx emission factors remotely. The average random error on the determination of SO2 emission factors comparing two identical instrumental set-ups was 6%. However, it was found that apparently minor differences in the instrumental characteristics, such as response time, could cause significant differences between the emission factors determined. Direct stack measurements showed that about 14% of the fuel sulphur content was not emitted as SO2. This was supported by the remote measurements and is in agreement with the results of other field studies.

  9. Field test of available methods to measure remotely SO2 and NOx emissions from ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzani Lööv, J. M.; Alfoldy, B.; Beecken, J.; Berg, N.; Berkhout, A. J. C.; Duyzer, J.; Gast, L. F. L.; Hjorth, J.; Jalkanen, J.-P.; Lagler, F.; Mellqvist, J.; Prata, F.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Westrate, H.; Swart, D. P. J.; Borowiak, A.

    2013-11-01

    Methods for the determination of ship fuel sulphur content and NOx emission factors from remote measurements have been compared in the harbour of Rotterdam and compared to direct stack emission measurements on the ferry Stena Hollandica. The methods were selected based on a review of the available literature on ship emission measurements. They were either optical (LIDAR, DOAS, UV camera), combined with model based estimates of fuel consumption, or based on the so called "sniffer" principle, where SO2 or NOx emission factors are determined from simultaneous measurement of the increase of CO2 and SO2 or NOx concentrations in the plume of the ship compared to the background. The measurements were performed from stations at land, from a boat, and from a helicopter. Mobile measurement platforms were found to have important advantages compared to the landbased ones because they allow to optimize the sampling conditions and to sample from ships on the open sea. Although optical methods can provide reliable results, it was found that at the state of the art, the "sniffer" approach is the most convenient technique for determining both SO2 and NOx emission factors remotely. The average random error on the determination of SO2 emission factors comparing two identical instrumental set-ups was 6%. However, it was found that apparently minor differences in the instrumental characteristics, such as response time, could cause significant differences between the emission factors determined. Direct stack measurements showed that about 14% of the fuel sulphur content was not emitted as SO2. This was supported by the remote measurements and is in agreement with the results of other field studies.

  10. A morphological filter for removing 'Cirrus-like' emission from far-infrared extragalactic IRAS fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleton, P. N.; Siqueira, P. R.; Basart, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of diffuse extended IR emission from the Galaxy in the form of the so called 'Galactic Cirrus' emission has hampered the exploration of the extragalactic sky at long IR wavelengths. We describe the development of a filter based on mathematical morphology which appears to be a promising approach to the problem of cirrus removal. The method of Greyscale Morphology was applied to a 100 micron IRAS image of the M81 group of galaxies. This is an extragalactic field which suffers from serious contamination from foreground Galactic 'cirrus'. Using a technique called 'sieving', it was found that the cirrus emission has a characteristic behavior which can be quantified in terms of an average spatial structure spectrum or growth function. This function was then used to attempt to remove 'cirrus' from the entire image. The result was a significant reduction of cirrus emission by an intensity factor of 15 compared with the original input image. The method appears to preserve extended emission in the spatially extended IR disks of M81 and M82 as well as distinguishing fainter galaxies within bright regions of galactic cirrus. The techniques may also be applicable to IR databases obtained with the Cosmic Background Explorer.

  11. Carbon nanotube based microfocus field emission x-ray source for microcomputed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zejian; Yang Guang; Lee, Yueh Z.; Bordelon, David; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2006-09-04

    Microcomputed tomography is now widely used for in vivo small animal imaging for cancer studies. Achieving high imaging quality of live objects requires the x-ray source to have both high spatial and temporal resolutions. Preliminary studies have shown that carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source has significant intrinsic advantages over the conventional thermionic x-ray tube including better temporal resolution and programmability. Here we report the design and characterization of a CNT based field emission x-ray source that also affords a high spatial resolution. The device uses modified asymmetric Einzel lenses for electron focusing and an elliptical shaped CNT cathode patterned by photolithography. Stable and small isotropic x-ray focal spot sizes were obtained.

  12. Necessary Conditions for Two-Lobe Patterns in Field Emission Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neo, Yoichiro; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Tomita, Makoto; Sasaki, Masahiro; Mimura, Hidenori

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the mechanism by which small organic molecules adsorbed on a field emission tip form cloverleaf patterns. This phenomenon was discovered by Müller in 1950. Many theories have been subsequently proposed for the formation of these patterns. However, their formation mechanism is not well understood. In a previous study, we obtained images of emission sites by field ion microscopy that contained the same shapes as cloverleaf patterns. In the present study, we experimentally determine the necessary conditions for obtaining cloverleaf patterns. Experiments using simple gas and liquid molecules with σ- or π-bonds clearly revealed that there are two main conditions for obtaining cloverleaf patterns: molecules must contain π-bonds and their adsorption state must be modulated by the electron current.

  13. Theoretical modeling of the plasma-assisted catalytic growth and field emission properties of graphene sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Neha

    2015-12-15

    A theoretical modeling for the catalyst-assisted growth of graphene sheet in the presence of plasma has been investigated. It is observed that the plasma parameters can strongly affect the growth and field emission properties of graphene sheet. The model developed accounts for the charging rate of the graphene sheet; number density of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms; various elementary processes on the surface of the catalyst nanoparticle; surface diffusion and accretion of ions; and formation of carbon-clusters and large graphene islands. In our investigation, it is found that the thickness of the graphene sheet decreases with the plasma parameters, number density of hydrogen ions and RF power, and consequently, the field emission of electrons from the graphene sheet surface increases. The time evolution of the height of graphene sheet with ion density and sticking coefficient of carbon species has also been examined. Some of our theoretical results are in compliance with the experimental observations.

  14. Effect of plasma parameters on growth and field emission properties of spherical carbon nanotube tip

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Tewari, Aarti

    2011-06-15

    The effect of plasma parameters (e.g., electron density and temperature, ion density and temperature, neutral atom density and temperature) on the growth (without a catalyst), structure, and field emission properties of a spherical carbon nanotube (CNT) tip has been theoretically investigated. A theoretical model of charge neutrality, including the kinetics of electrons, positively charged ions, and neutral atoms and the energy balance of the various species in plasma, has been developed. Numerical calculations of the radius of the spherical CNT tip for different CNT number densities and plasma parameters have been carried out for the typical glow discharge plasma parameters. It is found that upon an increase in the CNT number density and plasma parameters, the radius of the spherical CNT tip decreases, and consequently the field emission factor for the spherical CNT tip increases.

  15. Blue-emitting AlN:Eu{sup 2+} nitride phosphor for field emission displays

    SciTech Connect

    Hirosaki, N.; Xie, R.-J.; Inoue, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Dierre, B.; Tamura, K.

    2007-08-06

    An Eu{sup 2+}-activated AlN phosphor was synthesized by firing the powder mixture of AlN, {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} at 2050 deg. C for 4 h under 1.0 MPa N{sub 2}. This nitride phosphor emits a strong blue color with the chromaticity coordinates of x=0.139 and y=0.106 at an accelerating voltage of 3 kV. The cathodoluminescence properties of AlN:Eu{sup 2+} was evaluated by utilizing it in the Spindt-type field emission display panel. It shows that the nitride phosphor exhibits higher brightness, higher color purity, lower saturation, and longer lifetime than the currently used Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce{sup 3+}, indicative of the suitability of the AlN:Eu{sup 2+} blue phosphor in field emission displays.

  16. Electron field emission from phase pure nanotube films grown in a methane/hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küttel, Olivier M.; Groening, Oliver; Emmenegger, Christoph; Schlapbach, Louis

    1998-10-01

    Phase pure nanotube films were grown on silicon substrates by a microwave plasma under conditions which normally are used for the growth of chemical vapor deposited diamond films. However, instead of using any pretreatment leading to diamond nucleation we deposited metal clusters on the silicon substrate. The resulting films contain only nanotubes and also onion-like structures. However, no other carbon allotropes like graphite or amorphous clustered material could be found. The nanotubes adhere very well to the substrates and do not need any further purification step. Electron field emission was observed at fields above 1.5 V/μm and we observed an emission site density up to 104/cm2 at 3 V/μm. Alternatively, we have grown nanotube films by the hot filament technique, which allows to uniformly cover a two inch wafer.

  17. EMISSION PATTERNS AND LIGHT CURVES OF GAMMA RAYS IN THE PULSAR MAGNETOSPHERE WITH A CURRENT-INDUCED MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Zhang, L.

    2011-12-20

    We study the emission patterns and light curves of gamma rays in the pulsar magnetosphere with a current-induced magnetic field perturbation. Based on the solution of a static dipole with the magnetic field induced by some currents (perturbation field), we derive the solutions of a static as well as a retarded dipole with the perturbation field in the Cartesian coordinates. The static (retarded) magnetic field can be expressed as the sum of the pure static (retarded) dipolar magnetic field and the static (retarded) perturbation field. We use the solution of the retarded magnetic field to investigate the influence of the perturbation field on the emission patterns and light curves, and apply the perturbed solutions to calculate the gamma-ray light curves for the case of the Vela pulsar. We find that the perturbation field induced by the currents will change the emission patterns and then the light curves of gamma rays, especially for a larger perturbation field. Our results indicate that the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) electrons (positrons) can decrease the rotation effect on the magnetosphere and makes emission pattern appear to be smoother relative to that of the pure retarded dipole, but the perturbation field created by the outward-flowing (inward-flowing) positrons (electrons) can make the emission pattern less smooth.

  18. A sparse reconstruction method for the estimation of multiresolution emission fields via atmospheric inversion

    DOE PAGES

    Ray, J.; Lee, J.; Yadav, V.; Lefantzi, S.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a sparse reconstruction scheme that can also be used to ensure non-negativity when fitting wavelet-based random field models to limited observations in non-rectangular geometries. The method is relevant when multiresolution fields are estimated using linear inverse problems. Examples include the estimation of emission fields for many anthropogenic pollutants using atmospheric inversion or hydraulic conductivity in aquifers from flow measurements. The scheme is based on three new developments. Firstly, we extend an existing sparse reconstruction method, Stagewise Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (StOMP), to incorporate prior information on the target field. Secondly, we develop an iterative method that uses StOMP tomore » impose non-negativity on the estimated field. Finally, we devise a method, based on compressive sensing, to limit the estimated field within an irregularly shaped domain. We demonstrate the method on the estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions in the lower 48 states of the US. The application uses a recently developed multiresolution random field model and synthetic observations of ffCO2 concentrations from a limited set of measurement sites. We find that our method for limiting the estimated field within an irregularly shaped region is about a factor of 10 faster than conventional approaches. It also reduces the overall computational cost by a factor of two. Further, the sparse reconstruction scheme imposes non-negativity without introducing strong nonlinearities, such as those introduced by employing log-transformed fields, and thus reaps the benefits of simplicity and computational speed that are characteristic of linear inverse problems.« less

  19. Evaluation of a Fourier transform infrared continuous emission monitor field test at a TSCA incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Z.; Demirgian, J.C.; Reedy, G.

    1994-06-01

    A Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer was field tested as a continuous emission monitor (CEM) at the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator at K-25 in Oak Ridge, Tenn., from August 23 to September 3, 1993. This paper reports results obtained from this field test. The FTIR spectrometer and the long-path cell used for the field test were specially designed and constructed, so that optical alignment of the system can be easily performed in the field. The system was tested in the laboratory and then in the field for instrument stability and signal-to-noise ratio. Time interval required for taking a new background spectrum was determined. It appears that the system performs well both in the laboratory and in the field. The field test followed a standard operation procedure (SOP), developed for the test, based on a proposed EPA protocol for applying FTIR in emission testing. Sixteen compounds were selected as target analytes. Ethylene was used as a calibration transfer standard to ensure that spectral performance of the FTIR spectrometer in the field is consistent with that in the laboratory. Spike tests were regularly conducted with a known concentration of a mixture of six compounds and also with SF{sub 6} to check the accuracy of the monitoring system. Data sampling, processing, and reporting were automated to collect data every 10 min, and data were collected throughout the test as long as liquid nitrogen was available in the detector. The instrumentation and software performed flawlessly. Although the field test was a success, further improvement is necessary. Suggestions for revising the SOP and the proposed EPA protocol are discussed.

  20. Dynamic radiography using a carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.; Zhang, J.; Lee, Y.Z.; Gao, B.; Dike, S.; Lin, W.; Lu, J.P.; Zhou, O.

    2004-10-01

    We report a dynamic radiography system with a carbon nanotube based field-emission microfocus x-ray source. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution as short as nanoseconds. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging are demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for noninvasive imaging in biomedical research and industrial inspection.

  1. Handheld deep ultraviolet emission device based on aluminum nitride quantum wells and graphene nanoneedle field emitters.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Iwayama, Sho; Saito, Takao; Kawakami, Yasuyuki; Kubo, Fumio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2012-10-22

    We report the successful fabrication of a compact deep ultraviolet emission device via a marriage of AlGaN quantum wells and graphene nanoneedle field electron emitters. The device demonstrated a 20-mW deep ultraviolet output power and an approximately 4% power efficiency. The performance of this device may lead toward the realization of an environmentally friendly, convenient and practical deep ultraviolet light source.

  2. Simulation of radio emission from air showers in atmospheric electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Buitink, S.; Huege, T.; Falcke, H; Kuijpers, J.

    2010-02-25

    We study the effect of atmospheric electric fields on the radio pulse emitted by cos- mic ray air showers. Under fair weather conditions the dominant part of the radio emission is driven by the geomagnetic field. When the shower charges are accelerated and deflected in an electric field additional radiation is emitted. We simulate this effect with the Monte Carlo code REAS2, using CORSIKA-simulated showers as input. In both codes a routine has been implemented that treats the effect of the electric field on the shower particles. We find that the radio pulse is significantly altered in background fields of the order of ~100 V/cm and higher. Practically, this means that air showers passing through thunderstorms emit radio pulses that are not a reliable measure for the shower energy. Under other weather circumstances significant electric field effects are expected to occur rarely, but nimbostratus clouds can harbor fields that are large enough. In general, the contribution of the electric field to the radio pulse has polarization properties that are different from the geomagnetic pulse. In order to filter out radio pulses that have been affected by electric field effects, radio air shower experiments should keep weatherinformation and perform full polarization measurements of the radio signal.

  3. Combined effect of nitrogen doping and nanosteps on microcrystalline diamond films for improvement of field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengui, U. A.; Campos, R. A.; Alves, K. A.; Antunes, E. F.; Hamanaka, M. H. M. O.; Corat, E. J.; Baldan, M. R.

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen-doped microcrystalline diamond (N-MCD) films were grown on Si substrates using a hot filament reactor with methanol solution of urea as N source. Electrostatic self-assembly seeding of nanocrystalline diamond were used to obtain continuous and uniform films. Simultaneous changes in grains morphology and work function of diamond by nitrogen doping decreased the threshold field and the angular coefficient of Fowler-Nordhein plots. The field emission properties of our N-MCD films are comparable to carbon nanotube films.

  4. Screening in nanowires and nanocontacts: field emission, adhesion force, and contact resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2009-01-01

    The explanations of several nanoscale phenomena such as the field enhancement factor in field emission, the large decay length of the adhesion force between a metallic tip and a surface, and the contact resistance in a nanowire break junction have been elusive. Here we develop an analytical theory of Thomas-Fermi screening in nanoscale structures. We demonstrate that nanoscale dimensions give rise to an effective screening length that depends on geometry and physical boundary conditions. The above phenomena are shown to be manifestations of the effective screening length.

  5. Wide-band-tunable photomixers using resonant laser-assisted field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagmann, Mark J.

    2003-07-01

    Simulations and experiments show a resonant interaction of tunneling electrons with a radiation field, and photomixing (optical heterodyning) in laser-assisted field emission can cause current oscillations from dc to 100 THz with this effect. Recent simulations by others are shown to be consistent with Fowler-Nordheim theory when the radiation is at low frequencies, and also confirm the existence of the resonance. The relationship of these simulations to photomixing is demonstrated, and estimates are given for the power of signals that could be obtained by this means.

  6. Mathematical model and software complex for computer simulation of field emission electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Nikiforov, Konstantin

    2015-03-10

    The software complex developed in MATLAB allows modelling of function of diode and triode structures based on field emission electron sources with complex sub-micron geometry, their volt-ampere characteristics, calculating distribution of electric field for educational and research needs. The goal of this paper is describing the physical-mathematical model, calculation methods and algorithms the software complex is based on, demonstrating the principles of its function and showing results of its work. For getting to know the complex, a demo version with graphical user interface is presented.

  7. Determination of satellite valley position in GaN emitter from photoexcited field emission investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenenko, M.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Argon plasma etched GaN field-emitter rods with nanometer-scale diameter were fabricated on GaN grown on an n+-GaN substrate. Their electron field emission properties were investigated both without and under illumination by using light sources with various wavelengths. The Fowler-Nordheim current-voltage characteristics of the cathodes show a change in slope for illuminated cathodes. The electron affinity difference ΔE between the different valleys in the conduction band has been ascertained and is in the range from 1.18 up to 1.21 eV.

  8. Evidence for adsorbate-enhanced field emission from carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, P. T.; Back, T. C.; Cahay, M. M.; Fairchild, S. B.; Maruyama, B.; Lockwood, N. P.; Pasquali, M.

    2013-07-01

    We used residual gas analysis (RGA) to identify the species desorbed during field emission (FE) from a carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber. The RGA data show a sharp threshold for H2 desorption at an external field strength that coincides with a breakpoint in the FE data. A comprehensive model for the gradual transition of FE from adsorbate-enhanced CNTs at low bias to FE from CNTs with reduced H2 adsorbate coverage at high bias is developed which accounts for the gradual desorption of the H2 adsorbates, alignment of the CNTs at the fiber tip, and importance of self-heating effects with applied bias.

  9. Highly Efficient Field Emission from Carbon Nanotube-Nanohorn Hybrids Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuge, Ryota; Miyawaki, Jin; Ichihashi, Toshinari; Kuroshima, Sadanori; Yoshitake, Tsutomu; Ohkawa, Tetsuya; Aoki, Yasushi; Iijima, Sumio; Yudasaka, Masako

    2011-03-01

    It is reported that the carbon nanotube (CNT) is one of the best cold cathode emitters for field emission display (FED) and field emission lamp (FEL) due to their large aspect ratio, high mechanical strength, and high electrical conductivity. For the manufacture of highly efficient field emission (FE) devices, we synthesized single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) on catalyst-supported single-wall carbon nanohorn (SWNH). We incorporated Fe acetate into SWNHs, heat-treated them, and obtained Fe oxide nano-particles attached to the tips of SWNHs (Fe@NHox). Using Fe@NHox as the catalyst, SWNTs were grown by ethanol-CVD technique (NTNH). In the obtained NTNH, the SWNTs diameters were 1--1.7 nm and the bundle diameters became almost uniform, i . e . , less than 10 nm, since the SWNTs were separated by SWNH aggregates. We also confirmed that a large-area FE device with NTNH cathodes made by screen printing was highly and homogeneously bright, suggesting the success of the hybrid strategy.

  10. Effect of the local morphology in the field emission properties of conducting polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Assis, T. A.; Benito, R. M.; Losada, J. C.; Andrade, R. F. S.; Miranda, J. G. V.; de Souza, Nara C.; de Castilho, C. M. C.; Mota, F. de B.; Borondo, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we present systematic theoretical evidence of a relationship between the point local roughness exponent (PLRE) (which quantifies the heterogeneity of an irregular surface) and the cold field emission properties (indicated by the local current density and the macroscopic current density) of real polyaniline (PANI) surfaces, considered nowadays as very good candidates in the design of field emission devices. The latter are obtained from atomic force microscopy data. The electric field and potential are calculated in a region bounded by the rough PANI surface and a distant plane, both boundaries held at distinct potential values. We numerically solve Laplace’s equation subject to appropriate Dirichlet’s condition. Our results show that local roughness reveals the presence of specific sharp emitting spots with a smooth geometry, which are the main ones responsible (but not the only) for the emission efficiency of such surfaces for larger deposition times. Moreover, we have found, with a proper choice of a scale interval encompassing the experimentally measurable average grain length, a highly structured dependence of local current density on PLRE, considering different ticks of PANI surfaces.

  11. Use of low-temperature field emission scanning electron microscopy to examine mites.

    PubMed

    Wergin, W P; Ochoa, R; Erbe, E F; Craemer, C; Raina, A K

    2000-01-01

    Partly because mites are microscopic in size and fragile in nature, acarologists estimate that less than five percent of extant species have been taxonomically described. Recently, data from conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been used to facilitate the descriptions and complement the information that has been historically obtained with the light microscope. However, the conventional preparation techniques associated with SEM frequently prevent or compromise the results. This study evaluated the use of low-temperature field emission SEM to image mites and their hosts. Results indicated that a modified cryofixation procedure, which was associated with this technique, retained the mites at their living/feeding sites in natural behavioral positions. Furthermore, the turgor of the specimens, even eggs and soft-bodied species, was also maintained. The structure and orientation of delicate structures such as setae, which would be subjected to mechanical damage during conventional chemical fixation, dehydration, and drying, were also preserved after cryofixation. Field emission SEM, which provided useful magnification beyond that attainable with a conventional SEM, also enabled resolution of ultrastructural features, such as tenent hairs on the empodium and pores on the dorsal surface that had not previously been observed. These advantages indicate that the low-temperature field emission SEM can provide important structural data that can be used to study the anatomy, morphology, and bioecology of mites.

  12. Active vacuum brazing of CNT films to metal substrates for superior electron field emission performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longtin, Rémi; Sanchez-Valencia, Juan Ramon; Shorubalko, Ivan; Furrer, Roman; Hack, Erwin; Elsener, Hansrudolf; Gröning, Oliver; Greenwood, Paul; Rupesinghe, Nalin; Teo, Kenneth; Leinenbach, Christian; Gröning, Pierangelo

    2015-02-01

    The joining of macroscopic films of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to titanium substrates is demonstrated by active vacuum brazing at 820 °C with a Ag-Cu-Ti alloy and at 880 °C with a Cu-Sn-Ti-Zr alloy. The brazing methodology was elaborated in order to enable the production of highly electrically and thermally conductive CNT/metal substrate contacts. The interfacial electrical resistances of the joints were measured to be as low as 0.35 Ω. The improved interfacial transport properties in the brazed films lead to superior electron field-emission properties when compared to the as-grown films. An emission current of 150 μA was drawn from the brazed nanotubes at an applied electric field of 0.6 V μm-1. The improvement in electron field-emission is mainly attributed to the reduction of the contact resistance between the nanotubes and the substrate. The joints have high re-melting temperatures up to the solidus temperatures of the alloys; far greater than what is achievable with standard solders, thus expanding the application potential of CNT films to high-current and high-power applications where substantial frictional or resistive heating is expected.

  13. Development of a cryogenic radiation detector for mapping radio frequency superconducting cavity field emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Danny Dotson; John Mammosser

    2005-05-01

    Field emissions in a super conducting helium cooled RF cavity and the production of radiation (mostly X-Rays) have been measured externally on cryomodules at Jefferson Lab since 1991. External measurements are limited to radiation energies above 100 keV due to shielding of the stainless steel cryogenic body. To measure the onset of and to map field emissions from a superconducting cavity requires the detecting instrument be inside the shield and within the liquid Helium. Two possible measurement systems are undergoing testing at JLab. A CsI detector array set on photodiodes and an X-Ray film camera with a fixed aperture. Several devices were tested in the cell with liquid Helium without success. The lone survivor, a CsI array, worked but saturated at high power levels due to backscatter. The array was encased in a lead shield with a slit opening set to measure the radiation emitted directly from the cell eliminating a large portion of the backscatter. This is a work in progress and te sting should be complete before the PAC 05. The second system being tested is passive. It is a shielded box with an aperture to expose radiation diagnostic film located inside to direct radiation from the cell. Developing a technique for mapping field emissions in cryogenic cells will assist scientists and engineers in pinpointing any surface imperfections for examination.

  14. Synthesis of bismuth tungstate (Bi2WO6) nanoflakes and their field emission investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolhe, P. S.; Bankar, P. K.; Gavhane, D. S.; Sonawane, K. M.; Maiti, N.; More, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The nanoflakes of Bismuth Tungstate (Bi2WO6) were successfully synthesized by a one-step facile hydrothermal route without using any templates or surfactants and field emission investigations of the Bi2WO6 nanoflakes emitter are reported. Structural and morphological analysis of as-synthesized Bi2WO6 nanoflakes has been carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Moreover, the field emission characteristics of the Bi2WO6 nanoflakes are found to be superior to the other semiconductor emitters. The synthesized Bi2WO6 nanoflakes emitter delivers current density of ~222.35 μA/cm2 at an applied electric field of ~7.2 V/μm. The emission current stability investigated at pre-set value of ~2 μA is observed to be fairly good. These observed results demonstrate potential candidate of the Bi2WO6 cathode as an electron source for practical applications in vacuum microelectronic device.

  15. Synthesis and field emission of β-SiC nanowires on silicon nanoporous pillar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Li, Zijiong; Kang, Liping; Li, Xinjian

    2012-10-01

    Nonaligned β-SiC nanowires (nw-SiC) were grown on silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA) by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method with nickel as the catalyst. The curly hair like SiC nanowires and the silicon pillar array formed a nanometer-micron hierarchy structure. The field-emission measurements to nw-SiC/Si-NPA showed that a lower turn-on field of 2.9 V μm-1 was obtained, and the enhancement factor of nw-SiC/Si-NPA according to the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) theory reached 5200. The excellent field-emission performance was attributed to the nanometer-micron hierarchy structure of nw-SiC/Si-NPA, including the high aspect ratio of the SiC nanowires and the regular surface undulation of Si-NPA which increased the emission sites density and might have reduced the electrostatic shielding among the emitters.

  16. Surface-Wave Plasma Deposition of a-C:H Films for Field Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Toru; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Takada, Noriharu; Toyoda, Hirotaka; Sugai, Hideo; Guang, W. X.; Hirao, Takashi; Toyoda, Naoki

    2000-10-01

    Recently crystalline diamond or diamondlike carbon (DLC) thin films prepared by the plasma enhanced CVD techniques have been widely studied as a new material of electron emitter for the next generation large-area field emission display. Among them, DLC films grown at low temperature are more attractive from an aspect of industrial manufacturing. In this study, we have carried out the deposition of hydrogenated amorphous carbon(a-C:H) films using a high density, low pressure surface-wave plasma (SWP). The SWP was produced in a 40cm-diameter vacuum chamber by introducing 2.45 GHz microwave through a quartz window via slot antennas. The a-C:H films were deposited on a silicon substrate immersed in He/CH4 plasma, under discharge conditions of 700 W microwave power and 200 mTorr total pressure. Excellent field emission characteristics were obtained: the threshold electric field defined at an emission current density of 1 μA/cm^2 was obtained to be 4 V/μm. Other film characteristics measured with the XPS and FT-IR are also presented. This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Science Research from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture in Japan.

  17. Electron spectrometer in adjustable triode configuration for photo-induced field emission measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, B.; Mingels, S.; Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Mueller, G.; Dams, F.; Prommesberger, C.; Schreiner, R.

    2012-01-15

    We have constructed a new ultrahigh vacuum apparatus with a triode configuration for the systematic investigation of photo-induced field emission (PFE) from metallic or semiconducting cathodes. These are exposed to electric fields up to 400 MV/m and laser irradiation by means of hole or mesh gates. Cathodes and gates are in situ exchangeable and adjustable with high precision to ensure a homogeneous extraction of electrons which are partially transmitted to the fixed electron spectrometer. Its hemispherical sector analyzer provides an energy resolution limit of 8 meV. The commissioning of the measurement system has been performed with a tungsten needle. Its temperature showed up in the high-energy tail of the electron spectrum, while its work function was derived from the spectral low-energy part combined with the integral current-voltage curve. First PFE measurements on B-doped Si-tip arrays yielded a small field emission current increase under green laser illumination. A shift and splitting of the energy spectra was observed which revealed different emission regimes as well as the photosensitivity of the cathode due to carrier excitation into the conduction band. For the full exploitation of the PFE system, a tunable laser over a wide eV-range is required.

  18. Field Emission Characteristics of Carbon Nanotubes and Their Applications in Sensors and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2003-03-01

    FIELD EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF CARBON NANOTUBES AND THEIR APPLICATIONS IN SENSORS AND DEVICES A. Vaseashta, C. Shaffer, M. Collins, A. Mwuara Dept of Physics, Marshall University, Huntington, WV V. Pokropivny Institute for Materials Sciences of NASU, Kiev, Ukraine. D. Dimova-Malinovska Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria. The dimensionality of a system has profound influence on its physical behavior. With advances in technology over the past few decades, it has become possible to fabricate and study reduced-dimensional systems, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Carbon nanotubes are especially promising candidate for cold cathode field emitter because of their electrical properties, high aspect ratio, and small radius of curvature at the tips. Electron emission from the carbon nanotubes was investigated. Based upon the field emission investigation of carbon nanotubes, several prototype devices have been suggested that operate with low swing voltages with sufficient high current densities. Characteristics that allow improved current stability and long lifetime operation for electrical and opto-electronics devices are presented. The aim of this brief overview is to illustrate the useful characteristics of carbon nanotubes and its possible application.

  19. Evaluating the Field Emission Characteristics of Aluminum for DC High Voltage Photo-Electron Guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taus, Rhys; Poelker, Matthew; Forman, Eric; Mamun, Abdullah

    2014-03-01

    High current photoguns require high power laser light, but only a small portion of the laser light illuminating the photocathode produces electron beam. Most of the laser light (~ 65%) simply serves to heat the photocathode, which leads to evaporation of the chemicals required to create the negative electron affinity condition necessary for photoemission. Photocathode cooling techniques have been employed to address this problem, but active cooling of the photocathode is complicated because the cooling apparatus must float at high voltage. This work evaluates the field emission characteristics of cathode electrodes manufactured from materials with high thermal conductivity: aluminum and copper. These electrodes could serve as effective heat sinks, to passively cool the photocathode that resides within such a structure. However, literature suggests ``soft'' materials like aluminum and copper are ill suited for photogun applications, due to excessive field emission when biased at high voltage. This work provides an evaluation of aluminum and copper electrodes inside a high voltage field emission test stand, before and after coating with titanium nitride (TiN), a coating that enhances surface hardness. National Science Foundation Award Number: 1062320 and the Department of Defence ASSURE program.

  20. Structural tuning of nanogaps using electromigration induced by field emission current with bipolar biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Yagi, Mamiko; Ito, Mitsuki; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi

    2015-07-07

    We report a new method for fabrication of Ni nanogaps based on electromigration induced by a field emission current. This method is called “activation” and is demonstrated here using a current source with alternately reversing polarities. The activation procedure with alternating current bias, in which the current source polarity alternates between positive and negative bias conditions, is performed with planar Ni nanogaps defined on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates at room temperature. During negative biasing, a Fowler-Nordheim field emission current flows from the source (cathode) to the drain (anode) electrode. The Ni atoms at the tip of the drain electrode are thus activated and then migrate across the gap from the drain to the source electrode. In contrast, in the positive bias case, the field emission current moves the activated atoms from the source to the drain electrode. These two procedures are repeated until the tunnel resistance of the nanogaps is successively reduced from 100 TΩ to 48 kΩ. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy studies showed that the gap separation narrowed from approximately 95 nm to less than 10 nm because of the Ni atoms that accumulated at the tips of both the source and drain electrodes. These results show that the alternately biased activation process, which is a newly proposed atom transfer technique, can successfully control the tunnel resistance of the Ni nanogaps and is a suitable method for formation of ultrasmall nanogap structures.

  1. Neutrino emissivity from e sup minus e+ annihilation in a strong magnetic field: Hot, nondegenerate plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminker, A.D.; Gnedin, O.Y.; Yakovlev, D.G. ); Amsterdamski, P.; Haensel, P. )

    1992-11-15

    The neutrino emissivity from {ital e}{sup {minus}}{ital e+} pair annihilation is calculated for a hot, nondegenerate plasma, {ital T}{much gt}{ital T}{sub {ital F}} ({ital T}{sub {ital F}} is the electron degeneracy temperature), in a magnetic field {bold B} of arbitrary strength. The results are fitted by an analytic expression. A not-very-strong magnetic field, {ital b}={ital B}/{ital B}{sub {ital c}}{much lt}1 ({ital B}{sub {ital c}}=4.41{times}10{sup 13} G), enhances the emissivity of a nonrelativistic plasma, {ital t}={ital T}/{ital T}{sub {ital c}}{approx lt}{ital b} ({ital T}{sub {ital c}}=6{times}10{sup 9} K), and does not affect the emissivity at higher {ital T}. Stronger fields, {ital b}{much gt}1, influence the pair annihilation if {ital t}{approx lt} {radical}{ital b} . At {ital t}{approx gt}{ital b}{sup 1/4} they suppress the process, and at {ital t}{much lt}{ital b}{sup 1/4} they enhance it. As a rule the pair annihilation dominates over other neutrino production mechanisms in a hot plasma of neutron-star envelopes.

  2. Aeolian dust emissions in Southern Africa: field measurements of dynamics and drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggs, Giles; Thomas, David; Washington, Richard; King, James; Eckardt, Frank; Bryant, Robert; Nield, Joanna; Dansie, Andrew; Baddock, Matthew; Haustein, Karsten; Engelstaedter, Sebastian; von Holdt, Johannah; Hipondoka, Martin; Seely, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Airborne dust derived from the world's deserts is a critical component of Earth System behaviour, affecting atmospheric, oceanic, biological, and terrestrial processes as well as human health and activities. However, very few data have been collected on the factors that control dust emission from major source areas, or on the characteristics of the dust that is emitted. Such a paucity of data limits the ability of climate models to properly account for the radiative and dynamical impacts triggered by atmospheric dust. This paper presents field data from the DO4 Models (Dust Observations for Models) project that aims to understand the drivers of variability in dust emission processes from major source areas in southern Africa. Data are presented from three field campaigns undertaken between 2011 and 2015. We analysed remote sensing data to identify the key geomorphological units in southern Africa which are responsible for emission of atmospheric dust. These are the Makgadikgadi pans complex in northern Botswana, the ephemeral river valleys of western Namibia, and Etosha Pan in northern Namibia. Etosha Pan is widely recognised as perhaps the most significant source of atmospheric dust in the southern hemisphere. We deployed an array of field equipment within each source region to measure the variability in and dynamics of aeolian erosivity, as well as dust concentration and flux characteristics. This equipment included up to 11 meteorological stations measuring wind shear stress and other standard climatic parameters, Cimel sun photometers, a LiDAR, sediment transport detectors, high-frequency dust concentration monitors, and dust flux samplers. Further data were gathered at each site on the dynamics of surface characteristics and erodibility parameters that impact upon erosion thresholds. These data were augmented by use of a Pi-Swerl portable wind tunnel. Our data represent the first collected at source for these key dust emission areas and highlight the

  3. Field emission display device structure based on double-gate driving principle for achieving high brightness using a variety of field emission nanoemitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Dai, Y. Y.; Luo, J.; Li, Z. L.; Deng, S. Z.; She, J. C.; Xu, N. S.

    2007-06-01

    In order to apply various cold cathode nanoemitters in a field emission display (FED) and to achieve high brightness, a FED device structure with double gates and corresponding driving method have been proposed. Individual pixel addressing can be achieved by applying proper sequence of positive or negative voltage to the lower gate and upper gate, respectively. The feasibility of the device has been demonstrated by using carbon nanotube and tungsten oxide nanowire cold emitters. Display of moving images has been demonstrated and high luminance up to 2500cd/m2 was obtained. The reported device structure is versatile for nanoemitters regardless of substrate or preparation temperature. The results are of significance to the development of FED using nanoemitters.

  4. Green-house gas emissions from rice fields under different water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Elio Agnelli, Alessandro; Ferrara, Rossana Monica; Adviento-Borbe, Maria Arlene; Linquist, Bruce; Gavina, Giacomo; Ravaglia, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    During 2012 season, two rice fields have been selected in Italy (Cantaglia farm, Bologna province) and subjected to different water management: one under continuous flooding (WET) and the other under alternate wetting and drying (AWD). In AWD, re-flushing occurred in order to maintain water field capacity over 60 %. Two rice varieties (one commonly cultivated in Italy and one variety from the S.I.S. germoplasm collection) have been considered under WET treatment (Gladio and Zhen Long 13 - abbreviated as ZL13), while only Gladio under AWD. Green house gases (GHGs) sampling have been performed weekly or bi-weekly throughout the growing season. Soluble organic carbon (C), soluble nitrogen (N) and nitrates have been collected through piezometers. Soil sampling have been performed at the beginning and at the end of the growing season and total organic C (TOC), total N (TN), C/N ratio of soil organic matter (SOM), bulk density and water holding capacity were measured. At the end of the growing season rice above- and below-ground biomass have been sampled and C and N content of stem, grain and roots were measured. Methane (CH4) emissions showed a clear trend, following water availability in soils. An initial peak after the first flooding was observed in all soils, while after the second flooding CH4 was emitted only in the WET treatment. Further flooding events in AWD soil did not determine CH4 emissions during the vegetative season. Overall, in 2012 growing season a 98 % reduction of CH4 emissions in AWD soil was observed. In the WET treatment, no significant variations were observed between the two varieties, although on average ZL13 showed lower rates of CH4 emissions. Two peaks of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions were observed: the first after the initial flooding in all soils; the second one, much greater, 14 days after the fertilization only in AWD soils. These two peaks accounted for 92 % of total N2O emissions in 2012 rice season. Overall, in 2012 growing season N2O

  5. Field-scale operation of methane biofiltration systems to mitigate point source methane emissions.

    PubMed

    Hettiarachchi, Vijayamala C; Hettiaratchi, Patrick J; Mehrotra, Anil K; Kumar, Sunil

    2011-06-01

    Methane biofiltration (MBF) is a novel low-cost technique for reducing low volume point source emissions of methane (CH₄). MBF uses a granular medium, such as soil or compost, to support the growth of methanotrophic bacteria responsible for converting CH₄ to carbon dioxide (CO₂) and water (H₂O). A field research program was undertaken to evaluate the potential to treat low volume point source engineered CH₄ emissions using an MBF at a natural gas monitoring station. A new comprehensive three-dimensional numerical model was developed incorporating advection-diffusive flow of gas, biological reactions and heat and moisture flow. The one-dimensional version of this model was used as a guiding tool for designing and operating the MBF. The long-term monitoring results of the field MBF are also presented. The field MBF operated with no control of precipitation, evaporation, and temperature, provided more than 80% of CH₄ oxidation throughout spring, summer, and fall seasons. The numerical model was able to predict the CH₄ oxidation behavior of the field MBF with high accuracy. The numerical model simulations are presented for estimating CH₄ oxidation efficiencies under various operating conditions, including different filter bed depths and CH₄ flux rates. The field observations as well as numerical model simulations indicated that the long-term performance of MBFs is strongly dependent on environmental factors, such as ambient temperature and precipitation. PMID:21414700

  6. Impact of some field factors on inhalation exposure levels to bitumen emissions during road paving operations.

    PubMed

    Deygout, François; Auburtin, Guy

    2015-03-01

    Variability in occupational exposure levels to bitumen emissions has been observed during road paving operations. This is due to recurrent field factors impacting the level of exposure experienced by workers during paving. The present study was undertaken in order to quantify the impact of such factors. Pre-identified variables currently encountered in the field were monitored and recorded during paving surveys, and were conducted randomly covering current applications performed by road crews. Multivariate variance analysis and regressions were then used on computerized field data. The statistical investigations were limited due to the relatively small size of the study (36 data). Nevertheless, the particular use of the step-wise regression tool enabled the quantification of the impact of several predictors despite the existing collinearity between variables. The two bitumen organic fractions (particulates and volatiles) are associated with different field factors. The process conditions (machinery used and delivery temperature) have a significant impact on the production of airborne particulates and explain up to 44% of variability. This confirms the outcomes described by previous studies. The influence of the production factors is limited though, and should be complemented by studying factors involving the worker such as work style and the mix of tasks. The residual volatile compounds, being part of the bituminous binder and released during paving operations, control the volatile emissions; 73% of the encountered field variability is explained by the composition of the bitumen batch.

  7. Enhanced field emission from lanthanum hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Correlation with physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S.; Sheremet, E.; Jha, Menaka; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Ganguli, A. K.; Schmidt, H.; Schulze, S.; Hietschold, M.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2014-10-01

    Detailed results from field emission studies of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) coated multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films, pristine LaB6 films, and pristine MWCNT films are reported. The films have been synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. An impressive increase in field enhancement factor and temporal stability as well as a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field are observed in LaB6-coated MWCNTs compared to pristine MWCNT and pristine LaB6 films. Surface morphology of the films has been examined by scanning electron microscopy. Introduction of LaB6 nanoparticles on the outer walls of CNTs LaB6-coated MWCNTs films is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of LaB6 was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results and further validated by the Raman spectra. Raman spectroscopy also shows 67% increase in defect concentration in MWCNTs upon coating with LaB6 and an upshift in the 2D band that could be attributed to p-type doping. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal a reduction in the work function of LaB6-coated MWCNT with respect to its pristine counterpart. The enhanced field emission properties in LaB6-coated MWCNT films are correlated with a change in microstructure and work function.

  8. Enhanced field emission from lanthanum hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes: Correlation with physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S.; Sheremet, E.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Jha, Menaka; Ganguli, A. K.; Schmidt, H.; Schulze, S.; Hietschold, M.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2014-10-28

    Detailed results from field emission studies of lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) coated multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films, pristine LaB{sub 6} films, and pristine MWCNT films are reported. The films have been synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. An impressive increase in field enhancement factor and temporal stability as well as a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field are observed in LaB{sub 6}-coated MWCNTs compared to pristine MWCNT and pristine LaB{sub 6} films. Surface morphology of the films has been examined by scanning electron microscopy. Introduction of LaB{sub 6} nanoparticles on the outer walls of CNTs LaB{sub 6}-coated MWCNTs films is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of LaB{sub 6} was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results and further validated by the Raman spectra. Raman spectroscopy also shows 67% increase in defect concentration in MWCNTs upon coating with LaB{sub 6} and an upshift in the 2D band that could be attributed to p-type doping. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal a reduction in the work function of LaB{sub 6}-coated MWCNT with respect to its pristine counterpart. The enhanced field emission properties in LaB{sub 6}-coated MWCNT films are correlated with a change in microstructure and work function.

  9. Secondary electron emission from a dielectric film subjected to an electric field. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quoc-Nguyen, N.

    1977-01-01

    An electric field in the range of 0.3,3.3 kV/mm is created normal to a thin film FEP teflon sample which accumulates potential of up to 8.8, 13.7 or 18.3 kV when exposed to an electron beam having energy of 10.0, 15.0 or 20.0 kV, respectively. It is found that the secondary electron emission from the charged sample varies with field. The threshold voltage, at which the secondary electron emission coefficient sigma is unity, drops down from a low field value of 13.73 kV to a high field value of 13.11 kV for a 15.0 kV beam. A computational technique was developed that generates equipotential lines or contours and field vectors above a plane where potential is known. The utilization of conformal transformations allows the extension of the technique to configurations which map into a plane.

  10. Modeling the effects of anode secondary electron emission on transmitted current in crossed-field diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Venkatesh; Vanderberg, Bo

    1996-11-01

    Recent experimental measurements of transmitted current in a crossed-field switch by Vanderberg and Eninger ( B. H. Vanderberg and J. E. Eninger, ``Space-charge limited current cut-off in crossed fields,'' presented at IEEE ICOPS'95, Madison, Wi. ) have shown that the measured values of transmitted current are significantly smaller than the theoretically predicted limit. The experiments also showed larger decrease in transmitted current for higher magnetic fields, implying an effect due to the higher angle of incidence of incident electrons (i.e., at values of B closer to B_H). Studies by Verboncoeur and Birdsall ( J. P. Verboncoeur and C. K. Birdsall. ``Rapid current transition in a crossed-field diode,'' Phys. Plasmas 3) 3, March 1996. have shown that even small amount ( < 1%) of over injection in a crossed-field diode near cut-off led to substantial decrease in transmitted current. In our current work, we show that the same effect can be triggered by the presence of secondary electron emission from the anode. This study models the dependence of emission upon incident electron angle and energy. Since the yield of secondary electrons increases with incident angle, this model follows the experimental results as B approaches B_Hull accurately. This work was supported in part by ONR under grant FD-N00014-90-J-1198

  11. Enhanced field electron emission properties of hierarchically structured MWCNT-based cold cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Loïck-Alexandre; Le Borgne, Vincent; Al Moussalami, Samir; El Khakani, My Ali

    2014-02-01

    Hierarchically structured MWCNT (h-MWCNT)-based cold cathodes were successfully achieved by means of a relatively simple and highly effective approach consisting of the appropriate combination of KOH-based pyramidal texturing of Si (100) substrates and PECVD growth of vertically aligned MWCNTs. By controlling the aspect ratio (AR) of the Si pyramids, we were able to tune the field electron emission (FEE) properties of the h-MWCNT cathodes. Indeed, when the AR is increased from 0 (flat Si) to 0.6, not only the emitted current density was found to increase exponentially, but more importantly its associated threshold field (TF) was reduced from 3.52 V/μm to reach a value as low as 1.95 V/μm. The analysis of the J- E emission curves in the light of the conventional Fowler-Nordheim model revealed the existence of two distinct low-field (LF) and high-field (HF) FEE regimes. In both regimes, the hierarchical structuring was found to increase significantly the associated β LF and β HF field enhancement factors of the h-MWCNT cathodes (by a factor of 1.7 and 2.2, respectively). Pyramidal texturing of the cathodes is believed to favor vacuum space charge effects, which could be invoked to account for the significant enhancement of the FEE, particularly in the HF regime where a β HF as high as 6,980 was obtained for the highest AR value of 0.6.

  12. Controlling quantum-dot light absorption and emission by a surface-plasmon field.

    PubMed

    Huang, Danhong; Easter, Michelle; Gumbs, Godfrey; Maradudin, A A; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Cardimona, D A; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-11-01

    The possibility for controlling both the probe-field optical gain and absorption, as well as photon conversion by a surface-plasmon-polariton near field is explored for a quantum dot located above a metal surface. In contrast to the linear response in the weak-coupling regime, the calculated spectra show an induced optical gain and a triply-split spontaneous emission peak resulting from the interference between the surface-plasmon field and the probe or self-emitted light field in such a strongly-coupled nonlinear system. Our result on the control of the mediated photon-photon interaction, very similar to the 'gate' control in an optical transistor, may be experimentally observable and applied to ultra-fast intrachip/interchip optical interconnects, improvement in the performance of fiber-optic communication networks, and developments of optical digital computers and quantum communications.

  13. 3-D RPIC Simulations of Relativistic Jets: Particle Acceleration, Magnetic Field Generation, and Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Hededal, C. B.; Fishman, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent PIC simulations using injected relativistic electron-ion (electro-positron) jets into ambient plasmas show that acceleration occurs in relativistic shocks. The Weibel instability created in shocks is responsible for particle acceleration, and generation and amplification of highly inhomogeneous, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection in relativistic jets. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than the synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understand the complex time evolution and spectral structure in relativistic jets and gamma-ray bursts. We will present recent PIC simulations which show particle acceleration and magnetic field generation. We will also calculate associated self-consistent emission from relativistic shocks.

  14. Testing the near field/far field model performance for prediction of particulate matter emissions in a paint factory.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, A J; Jensen, A C Ø; Levin, M; Kling, K I; Maso, M Dal; Nielsen, S H; Jensen, K A; Koponen, I K

    2015-01-01

    A Near Field/Far Field (NF/FF) model is a well-accepted tool for precautionary exposure assessment but its capability to estimate particulate matter (PM) concentrations is not well studied. The main concern is related to emission source characterization which is not as well defined for PM emitters compared to e.g. for solvents. One way to characterize PM emission source strength is by using the material dustiness index which is scaled to correspond to industrial use by using modifying factors, such as handling energy factors. In this study we investigate how well the NF/FF model predicts PM concentration levels in a paint factory. PM concentration levels were measured during big bag and small bag powder pouring. Rotating drum dustiness indices were determined for the specific powders used and applied in the NF/FF model to predict mass concentrations. Modeled process specific concentration levels were adjusted to be similar to the measured concentration levels by adjusting the handling energy factor. The handling energy factors were found to vary considerably depending on the material and process even-though they have the same values as modifying factors in the exposure models. This suggests that the PM source characteristics and process-specific handling energies should be studied in more detail to improve the model-based exposure assessment. PMID:25407261

  15. Testing the near field/far field model performance for prediction of particulate matter emissions in a paint factory.

    PubMed

    Koivisto, A J; Jensen, A C Ø; Levin, M; Kling, K I; Maso, M Dal; Nielsen, S H; Jensen, K A; Koponen, I K

    2015-01-01

    A Near Field/Far Field (NF/FF) model is a well-accepted tool for precautionary exposure assessment but its capability to estimate particulate matter (PM) concentrations is not well studied. The main concern is related to emission source characterization which is not as well defined for PM emitters compared to e.g. for solvents. One way to characterize PM emission source strength is by using the material dustiness index which is scaled to correspond to industrial use by using modifying factors, such as handling energy factors. In this study we investigate how well the NF/FF model predicts PM concentration levels in a paint factory. PM concentration levels were measured during big bag and small bag powder pouring. Rotating drum dustiness indices were determined for the specific powders used and applied in the NF/FF model to predict mass concentrations. Modeled process specific concentration levels were adjusted to be similar to the measured concentration levels by adjusting the handling energy factor. The handling energy factors were found to vary considerably depending on the material and process even-though they have the same values as modifying factors in the exposure models. This suggests that the PM source characteristics and process-specific handling energies should be studied in more detail to improve the model-based exposure assessment.

  16. Seasonal patterns of terpene content and emission from seven Mediterranean woody species in field conditions.

    PubMed

    Llusià, J; Peñuelas, J

    2000-01-01

    The seasonal pattern of terpene content and emission by seven Mediterranean woody species was studied under field conditions. Emission rates were normalized at 30°C and 1000 μmol·m·s PFD (photosynthetic photon flux density). Bupleurum fruticosum, Pinus halepensis, and Cistus albidus stored large amounts of terpenes (0.01-1.77% [dry matter]) with maximum values in autumn and minimum values in spring. They emitted large amounts of terpenes (2-40 μg·g DM·h), but with no clear seasonal trend except for Cistus albidus, which had maximum values in spring and minimum values in autumn. The nonstoring species Arbutus unedo, Erica arborea, Quercus coccifera and Quercus ilex also emitted large amounts of terpenes (0-40 μg·g DM·h) and also tended to present maximum emission rates in spring, although this trend was significant only for A. unedo. At the seasonal scale, emission rates did not follow changes in photosynthetic rates; instead, they mostly followed changes in temperature. From autumn to spring, the least volatile monoterpenes such as limonene were emitted at highest rates, whereas the most volatile monoterpenes such as α-pinene and β-pinene were the most emitted in summer. The monoterpene emission rates represented a greater percentage of the photosynthetic carbon fixation in summer (from 0.51% in Arbutus unedo to 5.64% in Quercus coccifera) than in the rest of the seasons. All these seasonality trends must be considered when inventorying and modeling annual emission rates in Mediterranean ecosystems. PMID:10636836

  17. Development of tomographic imaging systems using carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian

    2005-11-01

    Conventional thermionic x-ray sources use hot filament cathodes to generate electrons for x-ray production. The thermionic technology has several inherent limitations such as high operating temperature, slow response time, and difficulty for miniaturization. On the other hand, field emission provides an alternative to generate electrons without all these limitations. The concept of field emission x-ray source has been proposed and tested in the early 1970s. Unfortunately all of the early field emission x-ray systems failed due primarily to the limitations on the electron field emitters. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have recently emerged as a promising class of electron emissive materials and field emission x-ray source based on CNTs are expected to have significantly improved properties. We have recently developed a CNT-based field emission micro-focus x-ray source. It shows stable tube current under high operating voltage, extraordinary dynamic imaging capability, and excellent potential for miniaturization. All of these new features make it very attractive for various potential industrial and medical applications. In order to demonstrate its applications, two sets of x-ray imaging systems using this field emission x-ray source were constructed in our lab. One is a micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging system using a single field emission x-ray source for dynamic radiographic and tomographic imaging applications. It shows great potential for the future development of dynamic micro-CT scanner. The other one is a multi-beam field emission x-ray source with multiple addressable focal spots which can provide scanning x-ray beams without mechanical movement. It can lead to fast data acquisition rates for future tomographic imaging systems with a simplified experimental set-up.

  18. The galactic dynamo, the helical force free field and the emissions of AGN

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.; Li, Hui

    1997-05-01

    We present a theory relating the central galactic black hole (BH) formation to the galactic dynamo through an accretion disk. The associated AGN emissions and the collimated radio sources are then a result of the dynamo process. A unified theory of quasar and BL-Lac formation (hereafter AGN) starts with the collapse of damped Lyman-alpha clouds, presumably proto-galaxies, which then evolve to a central disk and black hole, (BH). An alpha - omega dynamo forms in this accretion disk where the augmentation of the poloidal field from the toroidal field depends upon star disk collisions. The winding number of the inner most orbit of the disk is so large, tilde 10 to the 11th power that the total gain of the dynamo is semi-infinite, and the original seed field of no consequence. The total magnetic flux produced is tilde 10000 times that of the galaxy, sufficient to explain the much larger flux of clusters. The semi-infinite gain of the dynamo implies that the field saturates at the dynamic stress so that most of the free energy of formation of the BH is carried off as magnetic energy in the form of a magnetic helix. The dissipation of this magnetic energy leads to the unique emission spectrum of AGN as well as the equally startling collimated radio and optical sources.

  19. Morphology dependent field emission of acid-spun carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairchild, S. B.; Boeckl, J.; Back, T. C.; Ferguson, J. B.; Koerner, H.; Murray, P. T.; Maruyama, B.; Lange, M. A.; Cahay, M. M.; Behabtu, N.; Young, C. C.; Pasquali, M.; Lockwood, N. P.; Averett, K. L.; Gruen, G.; Tsentalovich, D. E.

    2015-03-01

    Acid spun carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers were investigated for their field emission properties and performance was determined to be dependent on fiber morphology. The fibers were fabricated by wet-spinning of pre-made CNTs. Fiber morphology was controlled by a fabrication method and processing conditions, as well as purity, size, and type of the CNT starting material. The internal fiber structure consisted of CNT fibrils held together by van der Waals forces. Alignment and packing density of the CNTs affects the fiber’s electrical and thermal conductivity. Fibers with similar diameters and differing morphology were compared, and those composed of the most densely packed and well aligned CNTs were the best field emitters as exhibited by a lower turn-on voltage and a larger field enhancement factor. Fibers with higher electrical and thermal conductivity demonstrated higher maximum current before failure and longer lifetimes. A stable emission current at 3 mA was obtained for 10 h at a field strength of <1 V μm-1. This stable high current operation makes these CNT fibers excellent candidates for use as low voltage electron sources for vacuum electronic devices.

  20. Morphology dependent field emission of acid-spun carbon nanotube fibers.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, S B; Boeckl, J; Back, T C; Ferguson, J B; Koerner, H; Murray, P T; Maruyama, B; Lange, M A; Cahay, M M; Behabtu, N; Young, C C; Pasquali, M; Lockwood, N P; Averett, K L; Gruen, G; Tsentalovich, D E

    2015-03-13

    Acid spun carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers were investigated for their field emission properties and performance was determined to be dependent on fiber morphology. The fibers were fabricated by wet-spinning of pre-made CNTs. Fiber morphology was controlled by a fabrication method and processing conditions, as well as purity, size, and type of the CNT starting material. The internal fiber structure consisted of CNT fibrils held together by van der Waals forces. Alignment and packing density of the CNTs affects the fiber's electrical and thermal conductivity. Fibers with similar diameters and differing morphology were compared, and those composed of the most densely packed and well aligned CNTs were the best field emitters as exhibited by a lower turn-on voltage and a larger field enhancement factor. Fibers with higher electrical and thermal conductivity demonstrated higher maximum current before failure and longer lifetimes. A stable emission current at 3 mA was obtained for 10 h at a field strength of <1 V μm(-1). This stable high current operation makes these CNT fibers excellent candidates for use as low voltage electron sources for vacuum electronic devices. PMID:25694166

  1. Aqueous Phase Synthesis and Enhanced Field Emission Properties of ZnO-Sulfide Heterojunction Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guojing; Li, Zhengcao; Li, Mingyang; Chen, Chienhua; Lv, Shasha; Liao, Jiecui

    2016-07-01

    ZnO-CdS, ZnO-ZnS, and ZnO-Ag2S core-shell heterojunction structures were fabricated using low-temperature, facile and simple aqueous solution approaches. The polycrystalline sulfide shells effectively enhance the field emission (FE) properties of ZnO nanowires arrays (NWAs). This results from the formation of the staggered gap heterointerface (ZnO-sulfide) which could lead to an energy well at the interfaces. Hence, electrons can be collected when an electric field is applied. It is observed that ZnO-ZnS NWAs have the lowest turn-on field (3.0 Vμm-1), compared with ZnO-CdS NWAs (6.3 Vμm-1) and ZnO-Ag2S NWAs (5.0 Vμm-1). This may be associated with the pyramid-like ZnS shell which increases the number of emission nanotips. Moreover, the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) plot displays a nonlinear relationship in the low and high electric field regions caused by the double well potential effect of the heterojunction structures.

  2. Synthesis of carbon nanofibres from waste chicken fat for field electron emission applications

    SciTech Connect

    Suriani, A.B.; Dalila, A.R.; Mohamed, A.; Isa, I.M.; Kamari, A.; Hashim, N.; Soga, T.; Tanemura, M.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Waste chicken fat is used as a starting material to produce CNFs via TCVD method. • High heating rate applied resulted in aggregation of catalyst particles. • Aggregated catalyst produced sea urchin-like CNFs with amorphous nature. • The as-grown CNFs presented a potential for field electron emission applications. - Abstract: Carbon nanofibres (CNFs) with sea urchin-like morphology were synthesised from waste chicken fat precursor via catalytic thermal chemical vapour deposition method at 750 °C. The CNFs showed amorphous structures under high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction examination. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that the core of the sea urchin-like CNFs was composed of Fe{sub 3}C formed within the first 20 min of synthesis time. The growth of amorphous CNFs from agglomerated Fe{sub 3}C particles was favourable due to the high heating rate applied during the synthesis. Field electron emission examination of the CNFs indicated turn-on and threshold field values of 5.4 and 6.6 V μm{sup −1} at current density of 1 and 10 μA cm{sup −2}, respectively. This study demonstrates that waste chicken fat, a low-cost and readily available resource, can be used as an inexpensive carbon source for the production of CNFs with a potential application in field electron emitters.

  3. Field emission effects of nitrogenated carbon nanotubes on chlorination and oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, S. C.; Palnitkar, U.; Pao, C. W.; Tsai, H. M.; Pong, W. F.; Lin, I-N.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Ganguly, Abhijit; Chen, L. C.; Chen, K. H.

    2008-09-15

    With reference to our recent reports [Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 192107 (2007); Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 202102 (2007)] about the electronic structure of chlorine treated and oxygen-plasma treated nitrogenated carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs), here we studied the electron field emission effects on chlorination (N-CNT:Cl) and oxidation (N-CNT:O) of N-CNT. A high current density (J) of 15.0 mA/cm{sup 2} has been achieved on chlorination, whereas low J of 0.0052 mA/cm{sup 2} is observed on oxidation compared to J=1.3 mA/cm{sup 2} for untreated N-CNT at an applied electric field E{sub A} of {approx}1.9 V/{mu}m. The turn-on electric field (E{sub TO}) was {approx}0.875. The 1.25 V/{mu}m was achieved for N-CNT:Cl and N-CNT:O, respectively, with respect to E{sub TO}=1.0 V/{mu}m for untreated one. These findings are due to the formation of different bonds with carbon and nitrogen in the N-CNT during the process of chlorine (oxygen)-plasma treatment by the charge transfer, or else that changes the density of free charge carriers and hence enhances (reduces) the field emission properties of N-CNTs:Cl (N-CNTs:O)

  4. Effect of Secondary Electron Emission on Electron Cross-Field Current in E×B Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Yevgeny Raitses, Igor D. Kaganovich, Alexander Khrabrov, Dmytro Sydorenko, Nathaniel J. Fisch and Andrei Smolyakov

    2011-02-10

    This paper reviews and discusses recent experimental, theoretical, and numerical studies of plasma-wall interaction in a weakly collisional magnetized plasma bounded with channel walls made from different materials. A lowpressure ExB plasma discharge of the Hall thruster was used to characterize the electron current across the magnetic field and its dependence on the applied voltage and electron-induced secondary electron emission (SEE) from the channel wall. The presence of a depleted, anisotropic electron energy distribution function with beams of secondary electrons was predicted to explain the enhancement of the electron cross-field current observed in experiments. Without the SEE, the electron crossfield transport can be reduced from anomalously high to nearly classical collisional level. The suppression of SEE was achieved using an engineered carbon velvet material for the channel walls. Both theoretically and experimentally, it is shown that the electron emission from the walls can limit the maximum achievable electric field in the magnetized plasma. With nonemitting walls, the maximum electric field in the thruster can approach a fundamental limit for a quasineutral plasma.

  5. Aqueous Phase Synthesis and Enhanced Field Emission Properties of ZnO-Sulfide Heterojunction Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guojing; Li, Zhengcao; Li, Mingyang; Chen, Chienhua; Lv, Shasha; Liao, Jiecui

    2016-01-01

    ZnO-CdS, ZnO-ZnS, and ZnO-Ag2S core-shell heterojunction structures were fabricated using low-temperature, facile and simple aqueous solution approaches. The polycrystalline sulfide shells effectively enhance the field emission (FE) properties of ZnO nanowires arrays (NWAs). This results from the formation of the staggered gap heterointerface (ZnO-sulfide) which could lead to an energy well at the interfaces. Hence, electrons can be collected when an electric field is applied. It is observed that ZnO-ZnS NWAs have the lowest turn-on field (3.0 Vμm−1), compared with ZnO-CdS NWAs (6.3 Vμm−1) and ZnO-Ag2S NWAs (5.0 Vμm−1). This may be associated with the pyramid-like ZnS shell which increases the number of emission nanotips. Moreover, the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) plot displays a nonlinear relationship in the low and high electric field regions caused by the double well potential effect of the heterojunction structures. PMID:27387653

  6. Field emission spectroscopy evidence for dual-barrier electron tunnelling in nanographite

    SciTech Connect

    Bandurin, D. A.; Kleshch, V. I.; Mingels, S.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, G.; Obraztsov, A. N.

    2015-06-08

    Nanocarbon films with upstanding flake-like graphite crystallites of nanometre thickness were fabricated by carbon condensation from a methane–hydrogen gas mixture activated by a direct-current discharge. The nanographite (NG) crystallites are composed of a few graphene layers. The adjacent atomic layers are connected partially at the edges of the crystallites to form strongly curved graphene structures. The extraordinary field emission (FE) properties were revealed for the NG films with an average current density of a few mA/cm{sup 2}, reproducibly obtained at a macroscopic applied field of about 1 V/μm. The integral FE current–voltage curves and electron spectra (FEES) of NG cathodes with multiple emitters were measured in a triode configuration. Most remarkably, above a threshold field, two peaks were revealed in FEES with different field-dependent shifts to lower energies. This behaviour evidences electron emission through a dual potential barrier, corresponding to carbon–carbon heterostructure formed as a result of the graphene bending.

  7. LZIFU: an emission-line fitting toolkit for integral field spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Ting; Medling, Anne M.; Groves, Brent; Rich, Jeffrey A.; Rupke, David S. N.; Hampton, Elise; Kewley, Lisa J.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Croom, Scott M.; Richards, Samuel; Schaefer, Adam L.; Sharp, Rob; Sweet, Sarah M.

    2016-09-01

    We present lzifu (LaZy-IFU), an idl toolkit for fitting multiple emission lines simultaneously in integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. lzifu is useful for the investigation of the dynamical, physical and chemical properties of gas in galaxies. lzifu has already been applied to many world-class IFS instruments and large IFS surveys, including the Wide Field Spectrograph, the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE), the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey, the Sydney-Australian-astronomical-observatory Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) Galaxy Survey. Here we describe in detail the structure of the toolkit, and how the line fluxes and flux uncertainties are determined, including the possibility of having multiple distinct kinematic components. We quantify the performance of lzifu, demonstrating its accuracy and robustness. We also show examples of applying lzifu to CALIFA and SAMI data to construct emission line and kinematic maps, and investigate complex, skewed line profiles presented in IFS data. The code is made available to the astronomy community through github. lzifu will be further developed over time to other IFS instruments, and to provide even more accurate line and uncertainty estimates.

  8. Multi-parameter Correlation of Jovian Radio Emissions with Solar Wind and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Golla, T.; Reiner, M. J.; Farrell, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    Variability of the numerous varieties of Jovian radio emission has been associated with aspects of solar wind (SW) and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) parameters outside the magnetosphere. Here we demonstrate multiple-parameter correlations that relate each of several Jovian emissions, including bKOM and quasi-periodic bursts, to the SW and IMF impacting the Jovian magnetosphere. The data used are from the Ulysses spacecraft with radio data from the Unified Radio and Plasma wave (URAP) instrument, which provides high-quality remote radio observations of the Jovian emissions. The URAP observations are correlated with SW and IMF data from the relevant instruments on Ulysses, propagated to the nose of the Jovian magnetosphere with a sophisticated code. Because the aphelion of the Ulysses orbit was at the Jovian distance from the Sun, Ulysses spent ample time near Jupiter in 1991-1992 and 2003-2004, which are the intervals analyzed. Our results can be inverted such that radio observations by a Jovian orbiter, such as Cassini or Juno, are able to identify SW/IMF changes based on the behavior of the radio emissions.

  9. Field Measurements of Gasoline Direct Injection Emission Factors: Spatial and Seasonal Variability.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Naomi; Wang, Jonathan M; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Ramos, Manuel; Hilker, Nathan; Healy, Robert M; Sabaliauskas, Kelly; Wallace, James S; Evans, Greg J

    2016-02-16

    Four field campaigns were conducted between February 2014 and January 2015 to measure emissions from light-duty gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles (2013 Ford Focus) in an urban near-road environment in Toronto, Canada. Measurements of CO2, CO, NOx, black carbon (BC), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene-xylenes (BTEX), and size-resolved particle number (PN) were recorded 15 m from the roadway and converted to fuel-based emission factors (EFs). Other than for NOx and CO, the GDI engine had elevated emissions compared to the Toronto fleet, with BC EFs in the 73rd percentile, BTEX EFs in the 80-90th percentile, and PN EFs in the 75th percentile during wintertime measurements. Additionally, for three campaigns, a second platform for measuring PN and CO2 was placed 1.5-3 m from the roadway to quantify changes in PN with distance from point of emission. GDI vehicle PN EFs were found to increase by up to 240% with increasing distance from the roadway, predominantly due to an increasing fraction of sub-40 nm particles. PN and BC EFs from the same engine technology were also measured in the laboratory. BC EFs agreed within 20% between the laboratory and real-world measurements; however, laboratory PN EFs were an order of magnitude lower due to exhaust conditioning. PMID:26794244

  10. Field Measurements of Gasoline Direct Injection Emission Factors: Spatial and Seasonal Variability.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Naomi; Wang, Jonathan M; Jeong, Cheol-Heon; Ramos, Manuel; Hilker, Nathan; Healy, Robert M; Sabaliauskas, Kelly; Wallace, James S; Evans, Greg J

    2016-02-16

    Four field campaigns were conducted between February 2014 and January 2015 to measure emissions from light-duty gasoline direct injection (GDI) vehicles (2013 Ford Focus) in an urban near-road environment in Toronto, Canada. Measurements of CO2, CO, NOx, black carbon (BC), benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene-xylenes (BTEX), and size-resolved particle number (PN) were recorded 15 m from the roadway and converted to fuel-based emission factors (EFs). Other than for NOx and CO, the GDI engine had elevated emissions compared to the Toronto fleet, with BC EFs in the 73rd percentile, BTEX EFs in the 80-90th percentile, and PN EFs in the 75th percentile during wintertime measurements. Additionally, for three campaigns, a second platform for measuring PN and CO2 was placed 1.5-3 m from the roadway to quantify changes in PN with distance from point of emission. GDI vehicle PN EFs were found to increase by up to 240% with increasing distance from the roadway, predominantly due to an increasing fraction of sub-40 nm particles. PN and BC EFs from the same engine technology were also measured in the laboratory. BC EFs agreed within 20% between the laboratory and real-world measurements; however, laboratory PN EFs were an order of magnitude lower due to exhaust conditioning.

  11. Comparing field investigations with laboratory models to predict landfill leachate emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Fellner, Johann; Brunner, Paul H.

    2009-06-15

    Investigations into laboratory reactors and landfills are used for simulating and predicting emissions from municipal solid waste landfills. We examined water flow and solute transport through the same waste body for different volumetric scales (laboratory experiment: 0.08 m{sup 3}, landfill: 80,000 m{sup 3}), and assessed the differences in water flow and leachate emissions of chloride, total organic carbon and Kjeldahl nitrogen. The results indicate that, due to preferential pathways, the flow of water in field-scale landfills is less uniform than in laboratory reactors. Based on tracer experiments, it can be discerned that in laboratory-scale experiments around 40% of pore water participates in advective solute transport, whereas this fraction amounts to less than 0.2% in the investigated full-scale landfill. Consequences of the difference in water flow and moisture distribution are: (1) leachate emissions from full-scale landfills decrease faster than predicted by laboratory experiments, and (2) the stock of materials remaining in the landfill body, and thus the long-term emission potential, is likely to be underestimated by laboratory landfill simulations.

  12. Self-Magnetic Field Effects on Electron Emission as the Critical Current is Approached

    SciTech Connect

    Ottinger, P. F.; Cooperstein, G.; Schumer, J. W.; Swanekamp, S. B.

    2001-09-28

    The self-magnetic field associated with the current in a planar diode is shown to reduce electron emission below the Child-Langmuir current density. As the magnetic field increases, the diode current is limited to the critical current. Here, a ID analysis is carried out to calculate the suppressed current density in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. The problem is shown to be similar to that of the limiting current (i.e., Hull current) calculated in a crossed field gap, in which a constant transverse magnetic field is applied across the gap to insulate the electron flow. In the case considered here, the magnetic field is produced by the diode current itself and this self-magnetic field decreases with distance along the gap. It is shown that the emitted current density is only modestly reduced from the Child-Langmuir current density. The 1-D analysis remains valid until critical current is approached, at which point orbit crossing occurs and a 2-D kinetic analysis is required. The minimum diode length required to reach critical current is also derived.

  13. Tomographic imaging system for measuring impurity line emission in a field-reversed configuration.

    PubMed

    Roche, T; Bolte, N; Garate, E; Heidbrink, W W; McWilliams, R; Wessel, F

    2012-10-01

    A 16 chord optical tomography system has been developed and implemented in the flux coil generated-field reversed configuration (FRC). The chords are arranged in two fans of eight, which cover ~35% of the vessel area at the midplane. Each illuminate separate photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) which are fitted with narrow band-pass filters. In this case, filters are centered at 434.8 nm to measure emission from singly ionized argon. PMT crosstalk is negligible. Background noise due to electron radiation and H(γ) line radiation is <10% of argon emission. The spatial resolution of the reconstruction is 1.5 cm. Argon is introduced using a puff valve and tube designed to impart the gas into the system as the FRC is forming. Reconstruction of experimental data results in time-dependent, 2D emissivity profiles of the impurity ions. Analysis of these data show radial, cross-field diffusion to be in the range of 10-10(3) m(2)∕s during FRC equilibrium.

  14. Tomographic imaging system for measuring impurity line emission in a field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, T.; Heidbrink, W. W.; McWilliams, R.; Bolte, N.; Garate, E.; Wessel, F.

    2012-10-15

    A 16 chord optical tomography system has been developed and implemented in the flux coil generated-field reversed configuration (FRC). The chords are arranged in two fans of eight, which cover {approx}35% of the vessel area at the midplane. Each illuminate separate photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) which are fitted with narrow band-pass filters. In this case, filters are centered at 434.8 nm to measure emission from singly ionized argon. PMT crosstalk is negligible. Background noise due to electron radiation and H{sub {gamma}} line radiation is <10% of argon emission. The spatial resolution of the reconstruction is 1.5 cm. Argon is introduced using a puff valve and tube designed to impart the gas into the system as the FRC is forming. Reconstruction of experimental data results in time-dependent, 2D emissivity profiles of the impurity ions. Analysis of these data show radial, cross-field diffusion to be in the range of 10-10{sup 3} m{sup 2}/s during FRC equilibrium.

  15. Tomographic imaging system for measuring impurity line emission in a field-reversed configurationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, T.; Bolte, N.; Garate, E.; Heidbrink, W. W.; McWilliams, R.; Wessel, F.

    2012-10-01

    A 16 chord optical tomography system has been developed and implemented in the flux coil generated-field reversed configuration (FRC). The chords are arranged in two fans of eight, which cover ˜35% of the vessel area at the midplane. Each illuminate separate photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) which are fitted with narrow band-pass filters. In this case, filters are centered at 434.8 nm to measure emission from singly ionized argon. PMT crosstalk is negligible. Background noise due to electron radiation and Hγ line radiation is <10% of argon emission. The spatial resolution of the reconstruction is 1.5 cm. Argon is introduced using a puff valve and tube designed to impart the gas into the system as the FRC is forming. Reconstruction of experimental data results in time-dependent, 2D emissivity profiles of the impurity ions. Analysis of these data show radial, cross-field diffusion to be in the range of 10-103 m2/s during FRC equilibrium.

  16. Nitrous oxide emissions from Chinese maize-wheat rotation systems: A 3-year field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yanjiang; Ding, Weixin; Luo, Jiafa

    2013-02-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes were measured over a 3-year period (2004-2007) in a long-term experimental field. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the interannual variation of N2O emissions from a maize-wheat rotation, under different fertilizer regimes and to determine the key controlling factors. The study involved four treatments: compost (OM), half compost N plus half inorganic fertilizer-N (HOM), inorganic fertilizer-N (NPK), and control (CK) where no N application. The mean annual N2O emission over a 3-year period was 0.30 ± 0.11 kg N2O-N ha-1 in the CK treatment, but increased to 1.61 ± 0.10 kg N2O-N ha-1 in the HOM treatment, 2.13 ± 0.15 kg N2O-N ha-1 in the OM treatment, and 2.76 ± 0.19 kg N2O-N ha-1 in the NPK treatment. Differences were significant among treatments. The N2O emission factors of the applied OM, NPK and HOM were 0.61 ± 0.02, 0.82 ± 0.10 and 0.44 ± 0.04%, respectively, at a rate of 300 kg N ha-1 year-1, indicating that the combined application of compost with inorganic fertilizer significantly reduced N2O emission. Over a maize-wheat rotation year, more than 65% of the annual N2O emission occurred during the maize growing season. There was a large interannual variation in N2O emission in all treatments, albeit not significant either during the maize growing season or at an inter-year scale. This interannual variation was mainly attributable to differences in soil moisture after basal fertilizer application, and irrigation and/or heavy rainfall events immediately following basal fertilization could induce more N2O production than pre-irrigation before plowing. The HOM treatment had higher N fertilizer use efficiency and lowest yield-scaled N2O emissions compared with the OM and NPK treatments. We therefore argue that the combined application of half compost N plus half fertilizer-N will mitigate N2O emissions from soils in the North China plain.

  17. An array of Eiffel-tower-shape AlN nanotips and its field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongbing; Cong, Hongtao; Chen, Zhigang; Cheng, Huiming

    2005-06-01

    An array of Eiffel-tower-shape AlN nanotips has been synthesized and assembled vertically with Si substrate by a chemical vapor deposition method at 700 °C. The single-crystalline AlN nanotips along [001] direction, including sharp tips with 10-100 nm in diameter and submicron-sized bases, are distributed uniformly with density of 106-107tips/cm2. Field emission (FE) measurements show that its turn on field is 4.7 V/μm, which is comparable to that of carbon nanotubes, and the fluctuation of FE current is as small as 0.74% for 4 h. It is revealed this nanostructure is available to optimize the FE properties and make the array a promising field emitter.

  18. MoS2 nanoflowers and their field-emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. B.; Bando, Y.; Golberg, D.

    2003-03-01

    Elegant three-dimensional MoS2 nanoflowers were uniformly formed via heating a MoO2 thin film in a vapor sulfur atmosphere. Tens to hundreds of petals were self-assembled within a single nanoflower. Each petal, 100-300 nm wide and only several nanometers thick, exhibited a hexagonal structure. The number of petal layers gradually decreased towards the edges, resulting in uniquely thin edges, typically less than 3 nm. The MoS2 nanoflowers appeared to be excellent field emitters displaying a current density of 0.01 and 10 mA/cm2 at macroscopic fields of 4.5-5.5 and 7.6-8.6 V/μm, respectively; the electron field emission was consistent with the Fowler-Nordheim theory.

  19. Stable Electron Field Emission from CeO2 Nanowires by Hydrothermal Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xing-Qiu; Feng, Ping; Wang, Chong; Wang, Tai-Hong

    2007-08-01

    CeO2 nanowires are successful synthesized by hydrothermal method and their field emission (FE) properties are investigated. The turn-on electric field is 5.8 V/μm at an emitter-anode spacing of 700 μm. The FE current is stable and the current fluctuations are less than 3% over 5 h. All the plotted Fowler-Nordheim curves yield straight lines, which are in agreement with the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The relationship between the field enhancement factor β and the emitter-anode spacing d follows a universal equation. Our results imply that the CeO2 nanowires are promising materials for fabricating FE cathodes.

  20. Morphology-dependent field emission properties and wetting behavior of ZnO nanowire arrays

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication of three kinds of ZnO nanowire arrays with different structural parameters over Au-coated silicon (100) by facile thermal evaporation of ZnS precursor is reported, and the growth mechanism are proposed based on structural analysis. Field emission (FE) properties and wetting behavior were revealed to be strongly morphology dependent. The nanowire arrays in small diameter and high aspect ratio exhibited the best FE performance showing a low turn-on field (4.1 V/μm) and a high field-enhancement factor (1745.8). The result also confirmed that keeping large air within the films was an effective way to obtain super water-repellent properties. This study indicates that the preparation of ZnO nanowire arrays in an optimum structural model is crucial to FE efficiency and wetting behavior. PMID:21711609

  1. Enhanced field emission properties from CNT arrays synthesized on Inconel superalloy.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, S; Ge, L; Tiwary, C S; Hart, A C; Ozden, S; Kalaga, K; Lei, S; Sridhar, S V; Sinha, R K; Harsh, H; Kordas, K; Ajayan, P M; Vajtai, R

    2014-02-12

    One of the most promising materials for fabricating cold cathodes for next generation high-performance flat panel devices is carbon nanotubes (CNTs). For this purpose, CNTs grown on metallic substrates are used to minimize contact resistance. In this report, we compare properties and field emission performance of CNTs grown via water assisted chemical vapor deposition using Inconel vs silicon (Si) substrates. Carbon nanotube forests grown on Inconel substrates are superior to the ones grown on silicon; low turn-on fields (∼1.5 V/μm), high current operation (∼100 mA/cm(2)) and very high local field amplification factors (up to ∼7300) were demonstrated, and these parameters are most beneficial for use in vacuum microelectronic applications. PMID:24417432

  2. Field Emission and Consequences as Observed and Simulated for CEBAF Upgrade Cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Marhauser, Frank; Johnson, Rolland; Rodriguez, Rodolfo; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Hutton, Andrew; Kharashvili, George; Reece, Charles; Rimmer, Robert

    2013-09-01

    High gamma and neutron radiation levels were monitored at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) after installation of new cavity cryomodules and initial test runs in the frame of the ongoing 12 GeV upgrade program. The dose rates scaled exponentially with cavity accelerating fields, but were independent of the presence of an electron beam in the accelerator. Hence, field emission (FE) is the source of origin. This has led to concerns regarding the high field operation (100 MV per cryomodule) in the future 12 GeV era. Utilizing supercomputing, novel FE studies have been performed with electrons tracked through a complete cryomodule. It provides a principal understanding of experimental observations as well as ways to mitigate FE as best as practicable by identification of problematic cavities.

  3. Application of ZnO nanopillars and nanoflowers to field-emission luminescent tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Ye; Tailiang, Guo; Yadong, Jiang

    2012-04-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanopillars on a ZnO seed layer and ZnO nanoflowers were synthesized by electrochemical deposition on linear wires. The morphologies and crystal orientation of the ZnO nanostructures were investigated by a scanning electron microscopy and an X-ray diffraction pattern, respectively. Detailed study on the field-emission properties of ZnO nanostructures indicates that nanopillars with a high aspect ratio show good performance with a low turn-on field of 0.16 V/μm and a high field enhancement factor of 2.86 × 104. A luminescent tube with ZnO nanopillars on a linear wire cathode and a transparent anode could reach a luminance of about 1.5 × 104 cd/m2 under an applied voltage of 4 kV.

  4. Constraints on the local interstellar magnetic field from non-thermal emission of SN1006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchino, F.; Orlando, S.; Miceli, M.; Petruk, O.

    2011-07-01

    Context. The synchrotron radio morphology of bilateral supernova remnants depends on the mechanisms of particle acceleration and on the viewing geometry. However, unlike X-ray and γ-ray morphologies, the radio emission does not depend on the cut-off region of the parent electron population, making it a simpler and more straightforward tool to investigate the physics of cosmic ray production in supernova remnants (SNRs). Aims: We will use the radio morphology to derive tight constraints on the direction of the local magnetic field and its gradient, and on the obliquity dependence of the electron injection efficiency. Methods: We perform a set of 3D MHD simulations describing the expansion of a spherical SNR through a magnetized medium with a non-uniform magnetic field. From the simulations, we derive non-thermal radio maps and compare them with observations of the SN1006 remnant. Results: We find that the radio morphology of SN1006 at 1 GHz is best-fitted by a model with quasi-parallel injection efficiency, a magnetic field aspect angle of 38° ± 4° with the line of sight, and a gradient of the field strength toward the galactic plane, higher then the expected variations of the large scale field of the Galaxy. Conclusions: We conclude that the radio limbs of SN1006 are polar caps that do not lie in the plane of sky. The study of the synchrotron radio emission of SNRs is of crucial importance to derive information on the galactic magnetic field in the vicinity of the remnants, and to gather more hints on the actual injection efficiency scenario.

  5. [Quantifying direct N2O emissions from paddy fields during rice growing season in China: model establishment].

    PubMed

    Zou, Jian-Wen; Qin, Yan-Mei; Liu, Shu-Wei

    2009-02-15

    Various water management regimes, such as continuous flooding (F), flooding-midseason drainage-reflooding (F-D-F), and flooding-midseason drainage-reflooding-moist intermittent irrigation but without water logging (F-D-F-M), are currently practiced in paddy rice production in China. These water regimes have incurred a sensitive change in direct N2O emission from rice paddy fields. In order to establish statistical models quantifying the country-specific emission factor and background emission of N2O in paddy fields during the rice growing season, we compiled and statistically analyzed field data on 71 N2O measurements from 17 field studies that were published in peer-reviewed Chinese and English journals. For each field study, we documented the seasonal N2O emission, the type and amount of organic amendment and fertilizer nitrogen application, the water management regime, the drainage duration, the field location and cropping season. Seasonal total N2O was, on average, equivalent to 0.02% of the nitrogen applied in the continuous flooding rice paddies. Under the water regime of F-D-F or the F-D-F-M, seasonal N2O emissions increased with N fertilizer applied in rice paddies. Applying an Ordinary Least Square (OLS) linear regression model resulted in an emission factor of 0.42% for N2O, and in unpronounced background N2 O emission under the water regime of F-D-F. Under the F-D-F-M water regime, N2O emission factor and N2O-N background emission were estimated to be 0.73% and 0.79 kg x hm(-2) during the paddy rice growing season, respectively. After considering three different water regimes in rice paddies in China, the emission factor of N for N2O and N2O-N background emission averaged 0.54% and 0.43 kg x hm(-2). The results of this study suggest that paddy rice relative to upland crop production could have contributed to mitigating N2O emissions from agriculture in China. The emission factor of N for N2O and its background emissions can be directly adopted to develop

  6. Far field emission profile of pure wurtzite InP nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgarini, Gabriele Reimer, Michael E.; Zwiller, Val; Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J.; Lapointe, Jean

    2014-11-10

    We report on the far field emission profile of pure wurtzite InP nanowires in comparison to InP nanowires with predominantly zincblende crystal structure. The emission profile is measured on individual nanowires using Fourier microscopy. The most intense photoluminescence of wurtzite nanowires is collected at small angles with respect to the nanowire growth axis. In contrast, zincblende nanowires present a minimum of the collected light intensity in the direction of the nanowire growth. Results are explained by the orientation of electric dipoles responsible for the photoluminescence, which is different from wurtzite to zincblende. Wurtzite nanowires have dipoles oriented perpendicular to the nanowire growth direction, whereas zincblende nanowires have dipoles oriented along the nanowire axis. This interpretation is confirmed by both numerical simulations and polarization dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy. Knowledge of the dipole orientation in nanostructures is crucial for developing a wide range of photonic devices such as light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, and solar cells.

  7. Hydrothermal alteration of sediments associated with surface emissions from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Valette-Silver, J.N.; Esquer P., I.; Elders, W.A.; Collier, P.C.; Hoagland, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the mineralogical changes associated with these hydrothermal vents was initiated with the aim of developing possible exploration tools for geothermal resources. The Cerro Prieto reservoir has already been explored by extensive deep drilling so that relationships between surface manifestations and deeper hydrothermal processes could be established directly. Approximately 120 samples of surface sediments were collected both inside and outside of the vents. The mineralogy of the altered sediments studied appears to be controlled by the type of emission. A comparison between the changes in mineralogy due to low temperature hydrothermal activity in the reservoir, seen in samples from boreholes, and mineralogical changes in the surface emission samples shows similar general trends below 180 C: increase of quartz, feldspar and illite, with subsequent disappearance of kaolinite, montmorillonite, calcite and dolomite. These mineral assemblages seem to be characteristic products of the discharge from high intensity geothermal fields.

  8. Light emission from an ambipolar semiconducting polymer field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swensen, James S.; Soci, Cesare; Heeger, Alan J.

    2006-02-01

    Ambipolar light-emitting field-effect transistors are fabricated with two different metals for the top-contact source and drain electrodes; a low-work-function metal defining the channel for the source electrode and a high-work-function metal defining the channel for the drain electrode. A thin film of polypropylene-co-1-butene on SiN x is used as the gate dielectric on an n ++-Si wafer, which functioned as the substrate and the gate electrode. Transport data show ambipolar behavior. Recombination of electrons and holes results in a narrow zone of light emission within the channel. The location of the emission zone is controlled by the gate bias.

  9. Light emission from an ambipolar semiconducting polymer field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swensen, James S.; Soci, Cesare; Heeger, Alan J.

    2005-12-01

    Ambipolar light-emitting field-effect transistors are fabricated with two different metals for the top-contact source and drain electrodes; a low-work-function metal defining the channel for the source electrode and a high-work-function metal defining the channel for the drain electrode. A thin film of polypropylene-co-1-butene on SiNx is used as the gate dielectric on an n++-Si wafer, which functioned as the substrate and the gate electrode. Transport data show ambipolar behavior. Recombination of electrons and holes results in a narrow zone of light emission within the channel. The location of the emission zone is controlled by the gate bias.

  10. Ultrathin single-crystal ZnO nanobelts: Ag-catalyzed growth and field emission property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, G. Z.; Fang, X. S.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, D. D.; Huang, X.; Guo, J.; Liao, L.; Zheng, Z.; Xu, H. R.; Yu, T.; Shen, Z. X.; Huan, C. H. A.; Sum, T. C.; Zhang, H.; Wu, T.

    2010-06-01

    We report the growth of ultrathin single-crystal ZnO nanobelts by using a Ag-catalyzed vapor transport method. Extensive transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements reveal that the thickness of the ultrathin ZnO nanobelts is ~ 2 nm. Scanning electron microscopy and post-growth annealing studies suggest a '1D branching and 2D filling' growth process. Our results demonstrate the critical role of catalyst in the deterministic synthesis of nanomaterials with the desired morphology. In addition, these ultrafine nanobelts exhibit stable field emission with unprecedented high emission current density of 40.17 mA cm - 2. These bottom-up building blocks of ultrathin ZnO nanobelts may facilitate the construction of advanced electronic and photonic nanodevices.

  11. Nitrous oxide emission from highland winter wheat field after long-term fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X. R.; Hao, M. D.; Xue, X. H.; Shi, P.; Horton, R.; Wang, A.; Zang, Y. F.

    2010-10-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas. N2O emissions from soils vary with fertilization and cropping practices. The response of N2O emission to fertilization of agricultural soils plays an important role in global N2O emission. The objective of this study was to assess the seasonal pattern of N2O fluxes and the annual N2O emissions from a rain-fed winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) field in the Loess Plateau of China. A static flux chamber method was used to measure soil N2O fluxes from 2006 to 2008. The study included 5 treatments with 3 replications in a randomized complete block design. Prior to initiating N2O measurements the treatments had received the same fertilization for 22 years. The fertilizer treatments were unfertilized control (CK), manure (M), nitrogen (N), nitrogen + phosphorus (NP), and nitrogen + phosphorus + manure (NPM). Soil N2O fluxes in the highland winter wheat field were highly variable temporally and thus were fertilization dependent. The highest fluxes occurred in the warmer and wetter seasons. Relative to CK, m slightly increased N2O flux while N, NP and NPM treatments significantly increased N2O fluxes. The fertilizer induced increase in N2O flux occurred mainly in the first 30 days after fertilization. The increases were smaller in the relatively warm and dry year than in the cold and wet year. Combining phosphorous and/or manure with mineral N fertilizer partly offset the nitrogen fertilizer induced increase in N2O flux. N2O fluxes at the seedling stage were mainly controlled by nitrogen fertilization, while fluxes at other plant growth stages were influenced by plant and environmental conditions. The cumulative N2O emissions were always higher in the fertilized treatments than in the non-fertilized treatment (CK). Mineral and manure nitrogen fertilizer enhanced N2O emissions in wetter years compared to dryer years. Phosphorous fertilizer offset 0.50 and 1.26 kg N2O-N ha-1 increases, while manure + phosphorous offset 0

  12. Nitrous oxide emission from highland winter wheat field after long-term fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X. R.; Hao, M. D.; Xue, X. H.; Shi, P.; Wang, A.; Zang, Y. F.; Horton, R.

    2010-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas. N2O emissions from soils vary with fertilization and cropping practices. The response of N2O emission to fertilization of agricultural soils plays an important role in global N2O emission. The objective of this study was to assess the seasonal pattern of N2O fluxes and the annual N2O emissions from a rain-fed winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) field in the Loess Plateau of China. A static flux chamber method was used to measure soil N2O fluxes from 2006 to 2008. The study included 5 treatments with 3 replications in a randomized complete block design. Prior to initiating N2O measurements the treatments had received the same fertilization for 22 years. The fertilizer treatments were unfertilized control (CK), manure (M), nitrogen (N), nitrogen + phosphorus (NP), and nitrogen + phosphorus + manure (NPM). Soil N2O fluxes in the highland winter wheat field were highly variable temporally and thus were fertilization dependent. The highest fluxes occurred in the warmer and wetter seasons. Relative to CK, M slightly increased N2O flux while N, NP and NPM treatments significantly increased N2O fluxes. The fertilizer induced increase in N2O flux occurred mainly in the first 30 days after fertilization. The increases were smaller in the relatively warm and dry year than in the cold and wet year. Combining phosphorous and/or manure with mineral N fertilizer partly offset the nitrogen fertilizer induced increase in N2O flux. N2O fluxes at the seedling stage were mainly controlled by nitrogen fertilization, while fluxes at other plant growth stages were influenced by plant and environmental conditions. The cumulative N2O emissions were always higher in the fertilized treatments than in the non-fertilized treatment (CK). Mineral and manure nitrogen fertilizer enhanced N2O emissions in wetter years compared to dryer years. Phosphorous fertilizer offset 0.78 and 1.98 kg N2O ha-1 increases, while manure + phosphorous offset 0

  13. Effect of plastic tarps over raised-beds and potassium thiosulfate in furrows on chloropicrin emissions from drip fumigated fields.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ruijun; Gao, Suduan; McDonald, Jason A; Ajwa, Husein; Shem-Tov, Shachar; Sullivan, David A

    2008-06-01

    Plastic tarps are commonly used in raised bed strawberry production to minimize emissions of preplant soil fumigants and are left in place throughout the growing season as part of the standard cultural practices. Soil amendments with chemicals such as thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)) can reduce fumigant emissions. A field study was conducted near Santa Maria, CA to determine the effects of low density polyethylene (LDPE) and virtually impermeable film (VIF) over raised-beds and applying potassium thiosulfate (KTS) in furrows on reducing chloropicrin (CP) emissions from a strawberry field. Four fields (or treatments) were tested with 224 kg ha(-1) CP drip-applied threecm under the soil surface. The CP flux from bed tops and furrows and gas-phase concentrations under the tarps were monitored for five d. The CP emission flux and concentration under tarp were highest immediately following application. Diurnal temperature change affected CP concentration and emission fluxes (higher values during the day and lower at night). Slightly higher CP cumulative emission occurred using LDPE tarp (19%) compared to VIF (17%). Normalized flux (CP emission flux from the beds divided by CP concentration under the tarp) being estimated from field measurement was slightly higher for LDPE than VIF indicating different tarp permeability in the field. Because of extremely low emissions from the furrows (<0.2% of total emission loss), KTS application to furrow treatments did not show further emission reductions than non-KTS treatments. This indicates that emission reduction should focus on the tarp above raised-beds when fumigant was drip-applied near bed-surface.

  14. Methyl bromide emissions from a covered field: I. Experimental conditions and degradation in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, S.R.; Gan, J.; Ernst, F.F.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment is described to investigate the environmental fate and transport of methyl bromide in agricultural systems. The experiment was designed to determine the dynamics of methyl bromide movement through soil, degradation, and total emissions to the atmosphere. This is of particular interest because it will allow an assessment of the environmental impacts (i.e., stratospheric ozone depletion) resulting from the agricultural use of methyl bromide. Methyl bromide was applied at a rate of 843 kg in a 3.5-ha (i.e., 240 kg/ha) field at a depth of 0.25 m and covered with a sheet of 1-mil polyethylene plastic. The maximum methyl bromide concentration in the atmosphere occurred at night between 0200 and 0600 h. During the first 3 d of the experiment, the maximum daily concentrations at 0.2 m above the soil surface were 30, 5, and 1 mg/(m{sup 3} of air), respectively. The trend of reduced emissions with time continued until the plastic was removed, when a momentary increase in the methyl bromide emissions occurred. The maximum soil gas concentration 24 h after injection was 30 g/m{sup 3} located at a 0.25-m depth. When the plastic was removed from the field (at 5.6 d), the maximum soil gas concentration was approximately 2 g/m{sup 3} at a 0.5-m depth. A mass-difference method for estimating the total methyl bromide emissions from the soil, based on degradation of methyl bromide to Br{sup -}, indicates that approximately 39% or 325 kg ({+-} 164 kg) of the applied methyl bromide was converted to Br{sup -} and, therefore, 61% or 518 kg ({+-} 164 kg) was lost via volatilization. 16 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Quantifying fire-wide carbon emissions in interior Alaska using field measurements and Landsat imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, B. M.; Veraverbeke, S.; Azzari, G.; Czimczik, C. I.; Holden, S. R.; Mouteva, G. O.; Sedano, F.; Treseder, K. K.; Randerson, J. T.

    2014-08-01

    Carbon emissions from boreal forest fires are projected to increase with continued warming and constitute a potentially significant positive feedback to climate change. The highest consistent combustion levels are reported in interior Alaska and can be highly variable depending on the consumption of soil organic matter. Here we present an approach for quantifying emissions within a fire perimeter using remote sensing of fire severity. Combustion from belowground and aboveground pools was quantified at 22 sites (17 black spruce and five white spruce-aspen) within the 2010 Gilles Creek burn in interior Alaska, constrained by data from eight unburned sites. We applied allometric equations and estimates of consumption to calculate carbon losses from aboveground vegetation. The position of adventitious spruce roots within the soil column, together with estimated prefire bulk density and carbon concentrations, was used to quantify belowground combustion. The differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) exhibited a clear but nonlinear relationship with combustion that differed by forest type. We used a multiple regression model based on transformed dNBR and deciduous fraction to scale carbon emissions to the fire perimeter, and a Monte Carlo framework to assess uncertainty. Because of low-severity and unburned patches, mean combustion across the fire perimeter (1.98 ± 0.34 kg C m-2) was considerably less than within a defined core burn area (2.67 ± 0.40 kg C m-2) and the mean at field sites (2.88 ± 0.23 kg C m-2). These areas constitute a significant fraction of burn perimeters in Alaska but are generally not accounted for in regional-scale estimates. Although total combustion in black spruce was slightly lower than in white spruce-aspen forests, black spruce covered most of the fire perimeter (62%) and contributed the majority (67 ± 16%) of total emissions. Increases in spring albedo were found to be a viable alternative to dNBR for modeling emissions.

  16. Extreme ultraviolet emission and confinement of tin plasmas in the presence of a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava E-mail: aroy@barc.gov.in; Murtaza Hassan, Syed; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2014-05-15

    We investigated the role of a guiding magnetic field on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and ion emission from a laser produced Sn plasma for various laser pulse duration and intensity. For producing plasmas, planar slabs of pure Sn were irradiated with 1064 nm, Nd:YAG laser pulses with varying pulse duration (5–15 ns) and intensity. A magnetic trap was fabricated with the use of two neodymium permanent magnets which provided a magnetic field strength ∼0.5 T along the plume expansion direction. Our results indicate that the EUV conversion efficiency do not depend significantly on applied axial magnetic field. Faraday Cup ion analysis of Sn plasma show that the ion flux reduces by a factor of ∼5 with the application of an axial magnetic field. It was found that the plasma plume expand in the lateral direction with peak velocity measured to be ∼1.2 cm/μs and reduced to ∼0.75 cm/μs with the application of an axial magnetic field. The plume expansion features recorded using fast photography in the presence and absence of 0.5 T axial magnetic field are simulated using particle-in-cell code. Our simulation results qualitatively predict the plasma behavior.

  17. Electron field emission enhancement of vertically aligned ultrananocrystalline diamond-coated ZnO core-shell heterostructured nanorods.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Afsal, Manekkathodi; Lou, Shiu-Cheng; Chen, Huang-Chin; Chen, Chulung; Lee, Chi-Young; Chen, Lih-Juann; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Lin, I-Nan

    2014-01-15

    Enhanced electron field emission (EFE) behavior of a core-shell heterostructure, where ZnO nanorods (ZNRs) form the core and ultrananocrystalline diamond needles (UNCDNs) form the shell, is reported. EFE properties of ZNR-UNCDN core-shell heterostructures show a high emission current density of 5.5 mA cm(-2) at an applied field of 4.25 V μm(-1) , and a low turn-on field of 2.08 V μm(-1) compared to the 1.67 mA cm(-2) emission current density (at an applied field of 28.7 V μm(-1) ) and 16.6 V μm(-1) turn-on field for bare ZNRs. Such an enhancement in the field emission originates from the unique materials combination, resulting in good electron transport from ZNRs to UNCDNs and efficient field emission of electrons from the UNCDNs. The potential application of these materials is demonstrated by the plasma illumination measurements that lowering the threshold voltage by 160 V confirms the role of ZNR-UNCDN core-shell heterostructures in the enhancement of electron emission.

  18. Ion-enhanced oxidation of aluminum as a fundamental surface process during target poisoning in reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Kuschel, Thomas; Keudell, Achim von

    2010-05-15

    Plasma deposition of aluminum oxide by reactive magnetron sputtering (RMS) using an aluminum target and argon and oxygen as working gases is an important technological process. The undesired oxidation of the target itself, however, causes the so-called target poisoning, which leads to strong hysteresis effects during RMS operation. The oxidation occurs by chemisorption of oxygen atoms and molecules with a simultaneous ion bombardment being present. This heterogenous surface reaction is studied in a quantified particle beam experiment employing beams of oxygen molecules and argon ions impinging onto an aluminum-coated quartz microbalance. The oxidation and/or sputtering rates are measured with this microbalance and the resulting oxide layers are analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The sticking coefficient of oxygen molecules is determined to 0.015 in the zero coverage limit. The sputtering yields of pure aluminum by argon ions are determined to 0.4, 0.62, and 0.8 at 200, 300, and 400 eV. The variation in the effective sticking coefficient and sputtering yield during the combined impact of argon ions and oxygen molecules is modeled with a set of rate equations. A good agreement is achieved if one postulates an ion-induced surface activation process, which facilitates oxygen chemisorption. This process may be identified with knock-on implantation of surface-bonded oxygen, with an electric-field-driven in-diffusion of oxygen or with an ion-enhanced surface activation process. Based on these fundamental processes, a robust set of balance equations is proposed to describe target poisoning effects in RMS.

  19. Effect of deep injection on field-scale emissions of 1,3-dichloropropene and chloropicrin from bare soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fumigating soil is important for the production of many high-value vegetable, fruit, and tree crops, but fumigants are toxic and highly volatile which can lead to significant atmospheric emissions. A field experiment was conducted to measure emissions and subsurface diffusion of a mixture of 1,3-di...

  20. Exploring a suitable nitrogen fertilizer rate to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and ensure rice yields in paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yiming; Wang, Xiaopeng; Yang, Jingping; Zhao, Xing; Ye, Xinyi

    2016-09-15

    The application rate of nitrogen fertilizer was believed to dramatically influence greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from paddy fields. Thus, providing a suitable nitrogen fertilization rate to ensure rice yields, reducing GHG emissions and exploring emission behavior are important issues for field management. In this paper, a two year experiment with six rates (0, 75, 150, 225, 300, 375kgN/ha) of nitrogen fertilizer application was designed to examine GHG emissions by measuring carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) flux and their cumulative global warming potential (GWP) from paddy fields in Hangzhou, Zhejiang in 2013 and 2014. The results indicated that the GWP and rice yields increased with an increasing application rate of nitrogen fertilizer. Emission peaks of CH4 mainly appeared at the vegetative phase, and emission peaks of CO2, and N2O mainly appeared at reproductive phase of rice growth. The CO2 flux was significantly correlated with soil temperature, while the CH4 flux was influenced by logging water remaining period and N2O flux was significantly associated with nitrogen application rates. This study showed that 225kgN/ha was a suitable nitrogen fertilizer rate to minimize GHG emissions with low yield-scaled emissions of 3.69 (in 2013) and 2.23 (in 2014) kg CO2-eq/kg rice yield as well as to ensure rice yields remained at a relatively high level of 8.89t/ha in paddy fields. PMID:27179680

  1. Synthesis and field emission studies of tower-like GaN nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tower-like GaN nanowires were successfully fabricated on Au-coated Si substrates by chemical vapor deposition. The tower-like nanowire consisted of a nanowire at the center and microcrystal layers stacked one by one around the nanowire. The tower-like nanowires grew along the [0001] direction, and the exposed surfaces of the microcrystal layers are 101¯1 and 101¯1¯ facets. The growth mechanism of the tower-like GaN nanowires was proposed. The field emission property of tower-like GaN nanowires was tested. Due to the sharp tips, nearly vertical alignment and rough surfaces caused by the microcrystal layers, the tower-like GaN nanowires show excellent performance in field emission with a turn-on field of 2.44 V/μm which is lower than those of other GaN one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials. PACS 81.15.Gh; 68.37.Lp; 68.37.Vj PMID:25404876

  2. Transverse energy distribution analysis in a field emission element with an insulator funnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Liu; Xiaobing, Zhang; Wei, Lei; Hongping, Zhao; Baoping, Wang

    2005-06-01

    In a field emission display panel, an insulator funnel, which is called Hop funnel, has been used to separate the cathode and the anode. Secondary electrons generated on top of the insulating surface due to the primary electron bombardment are drawn to the exit hole of the funnel by the electric field. Therefore, the energy distribution of these secondary electrons influences the quality of the FED. In this paper, an experimental instrument has been built to study the energy distribution of the secondary electrons on the anode screen in a field emission display element. Simultaneously, the relevant simulation with different primary conditions has been made. The both numerical simulation and experimental results are compared, and it is found that: (1) The experimental results can be well described by the numerical simulations; (2) the distance between the emitting center and the funnel hole has a dramatic influence to the number of electrons that can leave the hop funnel; (3) the distance between the anode and the funnel does not have a strong influence on the energy distribution; (4) the transverse energy distribution of hop electrons is very low.

  3. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia; Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Ebert, Ute; Enriquez, Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Hoerandel, Joerg; Nelles, Anna; Schellart, Pim; Rachen, Joerg; Rutjes, Casper; ter Veen, Sander; Rossetto, Laura; Thoudam, Satyendra

    2016-04-01

    Energetic cosmic rays impinging on the atmosphere create a particle avalanche called an extensive air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower electric currents are induced that generate coherent radio wave emission that has been detected with LOFAR, a large and dense array of simple radio antennas primarily developed for radio-astronomy observations. Our measurements are performed in the 30-80 MHz frequency band. For fair weather conditions the observations are in excellent agreement with model calculations. However, for air showers measured under thunderstorm conditions we observe large differences in the intensity and polarization patterns from the predictions of fair weather models. We will show that the linear as well as the circular polarization of the radio waves carry clear information on the magnitude and orientation of the electric fields at different heights in the thunderstorm clouds. We will show that from the measured data at LOFAR the thunderstorm electric fields can be reconstructed. We thus have established the measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers induced by cosmic rays as a new tool to probe the atmospheric electric fields present in thunderclouds in a non-intrusive way. In part this presentation is based on the work: P. Schellart et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 165001 (2015).

  4. Anisotropic electric-field-enhanced electron emission from deep-level defects in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsarova, Tatsiana; Wosinski, Tadeusz; Makosa, Andrzej; Tkaczyk, Zbigniew

    2009-10-01

    Strongly anisotropic electric-field enhancements of the thermal emission rates of electrons from the EL3 and EL5 deep-level defects in n-type GaAs crystal have been revealed with the double-correlation deep-level transient spectroscopy. The results, analysed by taking into account both the Poole-Frenkel and phonon-assisted tunnel effects, evidence a strong coupling of the defects to the lattice vibronic modes. The defect potential anisotropy of EL3 is consistent with the defect identification as an off-centre substitutional oxygen on the arsenic site. The revealed surprising break-down of the emission-rate enhancement, for the electric field applied along the lang1 0 0rang crystallographic direction, is interpreted as resulting from a possible reorientation of the EL3 defect, owing to a jump of the oxygen ion into a neighbouring lattice site, driven by a strong electric field. On the other hand, a close pair divacancy complex is suggested to be responsible for the EL5 defect.

  5. EXPLORING MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE IN STAR-FORMING CORES WITH POLARIZATION OF THERMAL DUST EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Akimasa; Machida, Masahiro N.; Tomisaka, Kohji

    2012-12-10

    The configuration and evolution of the magnetic field in star-forming cores are investigated in order to directly compare simulations and observations. We prepare four different initial clouds having different magnetic field strengths and rotation rates, in which magnetic field lines are aligned/misaligned with the rotation axis. First, we calculate the evolution of such clouds from the prestellar stage until long after protostar formation. Then, we calculate the polarization of thermal dust emission expected from the simulation data. We create polarization maps with arbitrary viewing angles and compare them with observations. Using this procedure, we confirmed that the polarization distribution projected on the celestial plane strongly depends on the viewing angle of the cloud. Thus, by comparing the observations with the polarization map predicted by the simulations, we can roughly determine the angle between the direction of the global magnetic field and the line of sight. The configuration of the polarization vectors also depends on the viewing angle. We find that an hourglass configuration of magnetic field lines is not always realized in a collapsing cloud when the global magnetic field is misaligned with the cloud rotation axis. Depending on the viewing angle, an S-shaped configuration of the magnetic field (or the polarization vectors) appears early in the protostellar accretion phase. This indicates that not only the magnetic field but also the cloud rotation affects the dynamical evolution of such a cloud. In addition, by comparing the simulated polarization with actual observations, we can estimate properties of the host cloud such as the evolutionary stage, magnetic field strength, and rotation rate.

  6. In-field greenhouse gas emissions from cookstoves in rural Mexican households

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael; Edwards, Rufus; Alatorre Frenk, Claudio; Masera, Omar

    The majority of estimates of the greenhouse gas emissions associated with changes from traditional to improved cookstoves in developing countries come from water-boiling tests (WBTs) conducted in simulated kitchens. Little is known about the bias in these estimates relative to typical stove use by residents in rural communities. To assess this bias, the reductions in emissions as a result of installation of an improved wood-burning "Patsari" stove were quantified in both simulated kitchens and field conditions in eight homes with open fire stoves and 13 homes with Patsari stoves in Purépecha communities of Michoacán, Mexico. The results demonstrate that nominal combustion efficiencies (NCEs) of open fire cookstoves were significantly lower ( p<0.001) in rural homes during daily cooking activities (89.7±2.0%) compared to WBTs in simulated kitchens (94.2±0.5%), which results in almost a doubling of the products on incomplete combustion (PICs) emitted. Since emissions from the rural residential sector are important in the modeling of atmospheric trace greenhouse gas concentrations in areas that rely on solid fuel use for primary energy provision, if these open fires reflect conditions in other areas of the world, substantial underestimation of emissions from open fires may be present in current emission databases. Conversely, NCEs for the improved Patsari stoves were significantly higher ( p<0.01) in rural homes during daily cooking activities (92.3±1.3%) compared to during WBTs in simulated kitchens (87.2±4.3%), as WBTs do not reflect cooking activities in rural homes. Thus the Patsari emits 25% less PICs per kg fuelwood used than the open fire, and carbon emission reductions of Patsari and similar improved stoves are also likely underestimated. Finally, in addition to a reduction in overall particulate emissions for rural homes during daily activities, the ratio of organic carbon (OC) to elemental carbon (EC) within the aerosol fraction decreased between the

  7. Mechanical Modulation of Phonon-Assisted Field Emission in a Silicon Nanomembrane Detector for Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jonghoo; Blick, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission in a free-standing silicon nanomembrane detector for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins. The impacts of ion bombardment on the silicon nanomembrane have been explored in both mechanical and electrical points of view. Locally elevated lattice temperature in the silicon nanomembrane, resulting from the transduction of ion kinetic energy into thermal energy through the ion bombardment, induces not only phonon-assisted field emission but also a mechanical vibration in the silicon nanomembrane. The coupling of these mechanical and electrical phenomenon leads to mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission. The thermal energy relaxation through mechanical vibration in addition to the lateral heat conduction and field emission in the silicon nanomembrane offers effective cooling of the nanomembrane, thereby allowing high resolution mass analysis. PMID:26861329

  8. Mechanical Modulation of Phonon-Assisted Field Emission in a Silicon Nanomembrane Detector for Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Jonghoo; Blick, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission in a free-standing silicon nanomembrane detector for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins. The impacts of ion bombardment on the silicon nanomembrane have been explored in both mechanical and electrical points of view. Locally elevated lattice temperature in the silicon nanomembrane, resulting from the transduction of ion kinetic energy into thermal energy through the ion bombardment, induces not only phonon-assisted field emission but also a mechanical vibration in the silicon nanomembrane. The coupling of these mechanical and electrical phenomenon leads to mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission. The thermal energy relaxation through mechanical vibration in addition to the lateral heat conduction and field emission in the silicon nanomembrane offers effective cooling of the nanomembrane, thereby allowing high resolution mass analysis. PMID:26861329

  9. Flux measurements and sampling strategies: Applications to methane emissions from rice fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A. K.; Rasmussen, R. A.; Shearer, M. J.

    1998-10-01

    The emissions of methane from rice fields and other sources are often measured by placing chambers on the surface and taking sequential samples. Although static chambers pose several problems that affect the accuracy of the data, there are a few parameters that, if carefully chosen, can improve the reliability of the data and reduce the uncertainties. These parameters are the length of time the chamber is kept on the rice plants, the number of samples that are drawn to estimate the flux, the basal area and height of the chamber, the frequency of measurements during the growing season, and the number of plots sampled. In this paper we analyze a large data set to determine how these parameters can be chosen to improve data quality. The results show that, for individual flux measurements, extending the time the chambers are left on the plots improves precision more effectively than taking more sequential samples for each flux measurement. The exposure time cannot be extended too far, however, as it leads to a saturation effect so that the rate of accumulation in the chamber slows down. This can compromise the accuracy of the measurement. There is an optimum exposure time that balances these two effects. Many individual measurements are needed to characterize the emissions from the larger area of the fields and the seasonal patterns. For methane emissions from rice fields, the amplitude of the systematic seasonal cycle is usually large compared to the variability on shorter timescales. Consequently, reducing the sampling frequency increases the uncertainty of the seasonal flux very slowly. The spatial variability is large and random on the small scales of the basal area of the chambers. Reducing the number of plots sampled, therefore, has a major effect on the uncertainty of the seasonal average flux.

  10. Enhanced field electron emission properties of hierarchically structured MWCNT-based cold cathodes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchically structured MWCNT (h-MWCNT)-based cold cathodes were successfully achieved by means of a relatively simple and highly effective approach consisting of the appropriate combination of KOH-based pyramidal texturing of Si (100) substrates and PECVD growth of vertically aligned MWCNTs. By controlling the aspect ratio (AR) of the Si pyramids, we were able to tune the field electron emission (FEE) properties of the h-MWCNT cathodes. Indeed, when the AR is increased from 0 (flat Si) to 0.6, not only the emitted current density was found to increase exponentially, but more importantly its associated threshold field (TF) was reduced from 3.52 V/μm to reach a value as low as 1.95 V/μm. The analysis of the J-E emission curves in the light of the conventional Fowler-Nordheim model revealed the existence of two distinct low-field (LF) and high-field (HF) FEE regimes. In both regimes, the hierarchical structuring was found to increase significantly the associated βLF and βHF field enhancement factors of the h-MWCNT cathodes (by a factor of 1.7 and 2.2, respectively). Pyramidal texturing of the cathodes is believed to favor vacuum space charge effects, which could be invoked to account for the significant enhancement of the FEE, particularly in the HF regime where a βHF as high as 6,980 was obtained for the highest AR value of 0.6. PMID:24484649

  11. Ion and electron emission from silver nanoparticles in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Doeppner, T.; Fennel, Th.; Radcliffe, P.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.

    2006-03-15

    By a comparative analysis of the emission of highly charged ions and energetic electrons the interaction dynamics of intense femtosecond laser fields (10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}) with nanometer-sized silver clusters is investigated. Using dual laser pulses with variable optical delay the time-dependent cluster response is resolved. A dramatic increase both in the atomic charge state of the ions and the maximum electron kinetic energy is observed for a certain delay of the pulses. Corresponding Vlasov calculations on a metal cluster model system indicate that enhanced cluster ionization as well as the generation of fast electrons coincide with resonant plasmon excitation.

  12. Transition from direct tunneling to field emission in carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Po-Wen; Roth, Siegmar

    2008-01-01

    Transport measurements through metal-semiconductor carbon nanotube intramolecular junctions were carried out at high gate voltages in which regime the influence of Schottky barrier to charge transport is weak. The I-Vds curves exhibit an inflection point in the form of ln(I /Vds2)-1/Vds, showing a transition of transport mechanism from direct tunneling to field emission. The findings are interpreted in terms of quantum tunneling through a rectanglelike barrier at the junction, with a barrier width of ˜4nm, in good agreement with that observed on pentagon-heptagon defects at nanotube junctions via scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

  13. Triode carbon nanotube field emission display using barrier rib structure and manufacturing method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Han, In-taek; Kim, Jong-min

    2003-01-01

    A triode carbon nanotube field emission display (FED) using a barrier rib structure and a manufacturing method thereof are provided. In a triode carbon nanotube FED employing barrier ribs, barrier ribs are formed on cathode lines by a screen printing method, a mesh structure is mounted on the barrier ribs, and a spacer is inserted between the barrier ribs through slots of the mesh structure, thereby stably fixing the mesh structure and the spacer within a FED panel due to support by the barrier ribs.

  14. Methyl bromide emission from fields partially covered with a high-density polyethylene and a virtually impermeable film

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Yates, S.R.

    1998-09-01

    Recent field studies in the interior valley of southern California have indicated that 56--73% of methyl bromide (MeBr) used in soil fumigation is lost to atmospheric emission when the fields are covered completely with a high-density polyethylene (HDPE) film. The emission can be reduced to less than 5% when a virtually impermeable film or Hytibar is used to cover the fields. This study was conducted to determine MeBr emission from bedded field plots where only the beds were covered with a HDPE or a virtually impermeable plastic film. The results provide an assessment on MeBr emission from field beds partially covered with the HDPE film and the suitability of using a virtually impermeable film for emission reduction. Methyl bromide gas was applied to replicated field beds covered with either a HDPE or the Hytibar film. The films were removed 6 days after MeBr application. Replicated soil cores were taken from different locations of the field beds, 20 days after MeBr application, for the determination of soil bromide ion concentrations. The total amount of MeBr degraded from each plot was calculated from the measured bromide ion concentrations, and the potential emission was determined as the difference between the amount of applied and that of degraded. Results indicated that the potential emission from this bedded system was about 95% for the HDPE treatment and 90% for the Hytibar-covered plots. Regardless of the small improvement with the virtually impermeable film, the experiment clearly indicates that partially covering the field with either a HDPE or a virtually impermeable film would result in unacceptably high emission losses.

  15. Study of electrons photoemitted from field-emission tips. Progress report, July 1, 1982-June 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Reifenberger, R.

    1982-01-01

    Photo-induced field emission is a technique which studies electrons that have been photoemitted from a field emission tip. This experimental method promises to combine the proven utility of both field emission and photoemission for investigating the electronic states near a metal surface. The primary objective of the reseach decribed in this proposal is to measure photo-induced field emitted electrons as a function of both their final state energy and the applied electric field. An Argon-ion laser in conjunction with a tuneable cw dye laser will be used to photo-excite the electrons. A differential energy analyzer will allow energy resolved measurements of the photo-field emitted electrons. Other experiments, directly related to the unique effects associated with the illumination of metallic tips by laser light, are also proposed. Experiments that exploit the large tempeature rise of a field emission tip when illuminated by a focussed laser beam are proposed to study thermally activated surface diffusion of alkali adatoms on a field emission tip. These experiments may eventually provide information about thermally-induced or laser-induced chemical reactions on small metallic surfaces.

  16. Curvature aided efficient axial field emission from carbon nanofiber-reduced graphene oxide superstructures on tungsten wire substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Arunava; Roy, Rajarshi; Sen, Dipayan; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K.

    2016-03-01

    Field emission characteristics found in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and RGO based composite systems have always been an area of research interest mainly due to presence of prolific quasi aligned edges working as emitter sites. However, the specific role and extent of edge curvature geometry in RGO systems in regards to the enhancement of field emission has not discussed thoroughly prior to this work. In this work we demonstrate enhanced axial field emission due to top assembly of thin RGO layer over a quasi-vertically aligned carbon nanofiber thin film supported on a tungsten wire substrate. Furthermore, simulation analysis for our RGO based hybrid system using finite element modeling showed that two-stage local field amplification in RGO is responsible for the overall improvement of field emission characteristics. In support of our findings, a tentative explanation has been proposed based on the additional emission from RGO edges in between the CNF network resulting to the enhancement of axial field emission in the nanocomposite superstructure.

  17. Magnetic field surrounding the starburst nucleus of the galaxy M82 from polarized dust emission

    PubMed

    Greaves; Holland; Jenness; Hawarden

    2000-04-13

    Magnetic fields may play an important role in the star-formation process, especially in the central regions of 'starburst' galaxies where star formation is vigorous. But the field directions are very difficult to determine in the dense molecular gas out of which the stars form, so it has hitherto been impossible to test this hypothesis. Dust grains in interstellar clouds tend to be magnetically aligned, and it is possible to determine the alignment direction based on the polarization of optical light due to preferential extinction along the long axes of the aligned grains. This technique works, however, only for diffuse gas, not for the dense molecular gas. Here we report observations of polarized thermal emission from the aligned dust grains in the central region of M82, which directly traces the magnetic field structure (as projected onto the plane of the sky). Organized field lines are seen around the brightest star-forming regions, while in the dusty halo the field lines form a giant magnetic bubble possibly blown out by the galaxy's 'superwind'.

  18. Diamond Field Emission Source using Transfer Mold Technique Prepared by Diamond Powder Seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Sachiaki; Matsuba, Yohei; Takahashi, Kohro

    Diamond thin films fabricated by MPCVD (microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition) are available for use as a field emitter material, because of its high mechanical quality, thermal conductivity, chemical stability, environmental tolerance, and NEA (negative electron affinity). Diode and triode emitter arrays using P-doped polycrystalline diamond were manufactured on a SiO2/Si(100) substrate with reverse pyramids formed by the transfer mold technique. As the diamond nucleation process, spin-coat seeding with pure diamond powder dispersed in isoamyl acetate has been introduced in place of the bias method. SEM (scanning electron microscopy) images and Raman spectroscopy indicate that the crystal quality of the diamond thin film fabricated by spin-coat seeding is superior to that fabricated by the bias method. The diamond crystal completely grew on top of the diode emitter by the US (ultrasonic) treatment in a diamond powder solution before spin-coat seeding. The tip radius was smaller than 50 nm. The beginning voltage of the emission of the diode emitter is 3 V after the DC glow discharge treatment in H2, which is lower than that of an emitter array fabricated by the bias method, 40 V. On the other hand, the emission of the diamond triode emitter starts at a gate voltage of only 0.5 V, and the emission current of 50∼60 mA is obtained at a gate voltage of 2 V.

  19. Growth and field emission of carbon nanotubes on electroplated Ni catalyst coated on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaemyung; No, Kwangsoo; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2001-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are grown on Ni catalyst coated on soda-lime glass substrates using chemical vapor deposition of C2H2 gas at 550 °C. Ni film is coated on the surface of Ag film using the electroplating method. Ni was etched by ammonia (NH3) gas in order to form nanometer sized catalytic particles before carbon nanotube growth. Pd film is applied as a gas activator to decrease the growth temperature of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes grown on Ni catalyst particles showed a multiwalled structure with defective graphite sheets at the wall. The turn-on voltage was about 2.8 V/μm with an emission current density of 10 μA/cm2, and the threshold voltage was about 4.0 V/μm with an emission current density of 10 mA/cm2. The Fowler-Nordheim plot showed a good linear fit, indicating that the emission current of carbon nanotubes follows Fowler-Nordheim behavior. The calculated field enhancement factor was 2850.

  20. Loss mechanisms and back surface field effect in photon enhanced thermionic emission converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segev, Gideon; Rosenwaks, Yossi; Kribus, Abraham

    2013-07-01

    Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) solar converters are based on emission of energetic electrons from a semiconductor cathode that is illuminated and heated with solar radiation. By using a semiconductor cathode, photo generated electrons enable high electron emission at temperatures much lower than the common range for thermionic emitters. Simple models show that PETE conversion can theoretically reach high efficiency, for example, above 40% at concentration of 1000 suns. In this work, we present a detailed one-dimensional model of PETE conversion, accounting for recombination mechanisms, surface effects, and spatial distribution of potential and carrier concentration. As in the previous PETE models, negative space charge effects, photon recycling, and temperature gradients are not considered. The conversion efficiency was calculated for Si and GaAs based cathodes under a wide range of operating conditions. The calculated efficiencies are lower than predictions of previous zero-dimensional models. We analyze the loss mechanisms and show that electron recombination at the cathode contact is a significant loss. An electron-blocking junction at the cathode back contact is therefore essential for achieving high efficiency. The predicted efficiencies for Si and GaAs cathodes with homo-junction back surface field layers are both around 31%, but with more favorable assumptions on the contact structure, it may be near 40%. The analysis leads to important conclusions regarding the selection of cathode material and back surface junction configuration.