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Sample records for ion-textured ofhc copper

  1. Secondary electron emission characteristics of molybdenum-masked, ion-textured OFHC copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, Arthur N.; Jensen, Kenneth A.; Roman, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    A method for producing a uniform, highly textured surface on oxygen-free, high conductivity (OFHC) copper by ion bombardment using sputtered molybdenum as a texture-inducing masking film was developed and used to provide samples for study. The purpose was to develop a basically OFHC copper surface having very low secondary electron emission characteristics. Surfaces having low secondary electron emission are a requirement for the electrodes of very high efficiency multistage depressed collectors (MDC's). Such MDC's are used in microwave amplifier traveling wave tubes for space communications and other applications. OFHC copper is the material most commonly used for MDC electrodes because it has high thermal conductivity, it is easy to machine, and its fabrication and brazing procedures are well established. However, its untreated surface displays relatively very high levels of secondary electron emissions. Textured OFHC copper samples were tested for true secondary electron emission and relative reflected primary electron yield at primary electron beam energy levels from 200 to 2000 eV and at direct (0 deg) to oblique (60 deg) beam impingement angles. The test results for three of the samples, each of which was processed in a slightly different way, are compared with each other and with test results for a machined OFHC copper sample. Although the textured samples are not represented here as having been processed optimally, their measured secondary electron emission characteristics are significantly lower than those of the untreated OFHC copper sample over the range of conditions studied. Importantly, the relative reflected primary electron yield of one of the textured samples is conspicuously lower than that of the others. Clearly, with further development, the molybdenum-masked ion-textured OFHC copper surface will be a promising material for high-efficiency MDC electrodes.

  2. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  3. Secondary electron emission characteristics of ion-textured copper and high-purity isotropic graphite surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, A. N.; Jensen, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    Experimentally determined values of true secondary electron emission and relative values of reflected primary electron yield for untreated and ion textured oxygen free high conductivity copper and untreated and ion textured high purity isotropic graphite surfaces are presented for a range of primary electron beam energies and beam impingement angles. This investigation was conducted to provide information that would improve the efficiency of multistage depressed collectors (MDC's) for microwave amplifier traveling wave tubes in space communications and aircraft applications. For high efficiency, MDC electrode surfaces must have low secondary electron emission characteristics. Although copper is a commonly used material for MDC electrodes, it exhibits relatively high levels of secondary electron emission if its surface is not treated for emission control. Recent studies demonstrated that high purity isotropic graphite is a promising material for MDC electrodes, particularly with ion textured surfaces. The materials were tested at primary electron beam energies of 200 to 2000 eV and at direct (0 deg) to near grazing (85 deg) beam impingement angles. True secondary electron emission and relative reflected primary electron yield characteristics of the ion textured surfaces were compared with each other and with those of untreated surfaces of the same materials. Both the untreated and ion textured graphite surfaces and the ion treated copper surface exhibited sharply reduced secondary electron emission characteristics relative to those of untreated copper. The ion treated graphite surface yielded the lowest emission levels.

  4. Metallurgical effects on the constitutive and fragmentation behavior of OFHC copper rings

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W.H.

    1987-07-07

    Preliminary results of recent constitutive and fragmentation studies on electromagnetically launched expanding ring specimens of fully annealed OFHC copper with grain sizes of 10, 30-50, 90-120, and 150-200 ..mu..m are reported. Grain size correlations with material behavior are developed and briefly discussed in reference to previous data, with particular attention to thermodynamic models of fragmentation.

  5. Thermal conductance measurements of pressed OFHC copper contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal conductance of oxygen-free high conductivity (OFHC) copper sample pairs with surface finishes ranging from 0.1 to 1.6-micrometers rms roughness was investigated over the range of 1.6 to 6.0-K under applied contact forces up to 670 N. The thermal conductance increases with increasing contact force; however, no correlation can be drawn with respect to surface finish.

  6. Electrical Conductivity, Thermal Stability, and Lattice Defect Evolution During Cyclic Channel Die Compression of OFHC Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh Kumar, S. S.; Raghu, T.

    2015-02-01

    Oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper samples are severe plastically deformed by cyclic channel die compression (CCDC) technique at room temperature up to an effective plastic strain of 7.2. Effect of straining on variation in electrical conductivity, evolution of deformation stored energy, and recrystallization onset temperatures are studied. Deformation-induced lattice defects are quantified using three different methodologies including x-ray diffraction profile analysis employing Williamson-Hall technique, stored energy based method, and electrical resistivity-based techniques. Compared to other severe plastic deformation techniques, electrical conductivity degrades marginally from 100.6% to 96.6% IACS after three cycles of CCDC. Decrease in recrystallization onset and peak temperatures is noticed, whereas stored energy increases and saturates at around 0.95-1.1J/g after three cycles of CCDC. Although drop in recrystallization activation energy is observed with the increasing strain, superior thermal stability is revealed, which is attributed to CCDC process mechanics. Low activation energy observed in CCDC-processed OFHC copper is corroborated to synergistic influence of grain boundary characteristics and lattice defects distribution. Estimated defects concentration indicated continuous increase in dislocation density and vacancy with strain. Deformation-induced vacancy concentration is found to be significantly higher than equilibrium vacancy concentration ascribed to hydrostatic stress states experienced during CCDC.

  7. Surface interactions, corrosion processes and lubricating performance of protic and aprotic ionic liquids with OFHC copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, Tulia; Sanes, José; Jiménez, Ana-Eva; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2013-05-01

    In order to select possible candidates for use as lubricants or as precursors of surface coatings, the corrosion and surface interactions of oxygen-free high conductivity (OFHC) copper with two new protic (PIL) and four aprotic (APIL) room-temperature ionic liquids have been studied. The PILs, with no heteroatoms in their composition, are the triprotic di[(2-hydroxyethyl)ammonium] succinate (MSu) and the diprotic di[bis-(2-hydroxyethyl)ammonium] adipate (DAd). The four APILs contain imidazolium cations with short or long alkyl chain substituents and reactive anions: 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium phosphonate ([EMIM]EtPO3H); 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium octylsulfate ([EMIM]C8H17SO4); 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([HMIM]BF4) and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([HMIM]PF6). Contact angles between the ionic liquids and OFHC copper surface were measured. Mass and roughness changes of OFHC copper after 168 h in contact with the ionic liquids have been determined. Copper surfaces were studied by XRD, SEM-EDX and XPS surface analysis. FTIR spectra of the liquid phases recovered after being in contact with the copper surface were compared with that of the neat ionic liquids. The lowest corrosion rate is observed for the diprotic ammonium adipate PIL (DAd), which gives low mass and surface roughness changes and forms adsorbed layers on copper, while the triprotic ammonium succinate salt (MSu) produces a severe corrosive attack by reaction with copper to form a blue crystalline solid, which has been characterized by FTIR and thermal analysis (TGA). All imidazolium APILs react with copper, with different results as a function of the anion. As expected, [EMIM]C8H17SO4 reacts with copper to form the corresponding copper sulphate salt. [EMIM]EtPO3H produces severe corrosion to form a phosphonate-copper soluble phase. [HMIM]BF4 gives rise to the highest roughness increase of the copper surface. [HMIM]PF6 shows the lowest mass and roughness changes of

  8. Validating material modelling for OFHC copper using dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) test at different velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, N.; Testa, G.; Ruggiero, A.; Iannitti, G.; Colliander, M. Hörnquist; Mortazavi, N.

    2017-01-01

    In the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, the material is subjected to very large strain, high strain rate and elevated temperature. Numerical simulation, validated comparing with measurements obtained on soft-recovered extruded fragments, can be used to probe material response under such extreme conditions and to assess constitutive models. In this work, the results of a parametric investigation on the simulation of DTE test of annealed OFHC copper - at impact velocity ranging from 350 up to 420 m/s - using the modified Rusinek-Klepaczko model, are presented. Simulation of microstructure evolution was performed using the visco-plastic self consistent model (VPSC), providing, as input, the velocity gradient history obtained with FEM at selected locations along the axis of the fragment trapped in the extrusion die. Finally, results are compared with EBSD analysis.

  9. Modelling and simulation of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) in OFHC copper at very high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, G.; Bonora, N.; Ruggiero, A.; Iannitti, G.; Persechino, I.; Hörnqvist, M.; Mortazavi, N.

    2017-01-01

    At high strain rates, deformation processes are essentially adiabatic and if the plastic work is large enough dynamic recrystallization can occur. In this work, an examination on microstructure evolution of OFHC copper in Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, performed at 400 m/s, was carried out. EBSD investigations, along the center line of the fragment remaining in the extrusion die, showed a progressive elongation of the grains, and an accompanying development of a strong <001> + <111> dual fiber texture. Discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurred at larger strains, and it was showed that nucleation occurred during straining. A criterion for DRX to occur, based on the evolution of Zener-Hollomon parameter during the dynamic deformation process, is proposed. Finally, DTE test was simulated using the modified Rusinek-Klepaczko constitutive model incorporating a model for the prediction of DRX initiation.

  10. Validating Material Modelling of OFHC Copper Using Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) Test at Different Impact Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Nicola; Testa, Gabriel; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Hörnqvist, Magnus; Mortazavi, Nooshin

    2015-06-01

    In the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, the material is subjected to very large strain, high strain rate and elevated temperature. Numerical simulation, validated comparing with measurements obtained on soft-recovered extruded fragments, can be used to probe material response under such extreme conditions and to assess constitutive models. In this work, the results of a parametric investigation on the simulation of DTE test of annealed OFHC copper - at impact velocity ranging from 350 up to 420 m/s - using phenomenological and physically based models (Johnson-Cook, Zerilli-Armstrong and Rusinek-Klepaczko), are presented. Preliminary simulation of microstructure evolution was performed using crystal plasticity package CPFEM, providing, as input, the strain history obtained with FEM at selected locations along the extruded fragments. Results were compared with EBSD investigation.

  11. Modelling and Simulation of Dynamic Recrystallization (DRX) In OFHC Copper at Very High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Gabriel; Bonora, Nicola; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Hörnqvist, Magnus; Mortazavi, Nooshin

    2015-06-01

    At high strain rates, the deformation process is essentially adiabatic and if the plastic work is large enough, dynamic recrystallization can occur. In this work, an examination on microstructure evolution in Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test of OFHC copper, performed at 400 m/s, was carried out. EBSD investigations, along the center line of the fragment remaining in the extrusion die, showed a progressive elongation of the grains, and an accompanying development of a strong < 001 > + < 111 > dual fiber texture. Meta-dynamic discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurred at larger strains, and it was showed that nucleation occurred during straining. A criterion, based on the evolution of Zener-Hollomon parameter during the dynamic deformation process, was proposed. Finally, DTE test was simulated using the modified Rusinek-Klepaczko constitutive model incorporating restoring effects induced by recrystallization processes.

  12. Deformation and failure of OFHC copper under high strain rate shear compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Andrew; Testa, Gabriel; Bonora, Nicola; Iannitti, Gianluca; Persechino, Italo; Colliander, Magnus Hörnqvist

    2017-01-01

    Hat-shaped specimen geometries were developed to generate high strain, high-strain-rates deformation under prescribed conditions. These geometries offer also the possibility to investigate the occurrence of ductile rupture under low or negative stress triaxiality, where most failure models fail. In this work, three tophat geometries were designed, by means of extensive numerical simulation, to obtain desired stress triaxiality values within the shear region that develops across the ligament. Material failure was simulated using the Continuum Damage Model (CDM) formulation with a unilateral condition for damage accumulation and validated by comparing with quasi-static and high strain rate compression tests results on OFHC copper. Preliminary results seem to indicate that ductile tearing initiates at the specimen corner location where positive stress triaxiality occurs because of local rotation and eventually propagates along the ligament.

  13. Laser ablative fluxless soldering (LAFS): 60Sn-40Pb solder wettability tests on laser cleaned OFHC copper substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Peebles, H. C.; Keicher, D. M.; Hosking, F. M.; Hlava, P. F.; Creager, N. A.

    1991-01-01

    OFHC copper substrates, cleaned by laser ablation under argon and helium gas, were tested for solder wettability by 60Sn-40Pb using an area-of-spread method. The wettability of copper surfaces cleaned under both argon and helium gas was found to equal or exceed the wettability obtained on this surface in air using a standard RMA flux. The area of spread on copper substrates cleaned under helium was eight times larger than the area of spread of substrates cleaned under argon. The enhanced spreading observed on the substrates cleaned under helium gas was found to be due to surface roughness. 11 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Deformation and annealing behavior of heavily drawn oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waryoba, Daudi Rigenda

    Conductor wires used in pulsed high-field magnets require metallic materials with a beneficial combination of high mechanical strength to resist the Lorentz forces and high electrical conductivity to limit temperature excursions due to Joule heating. To achieve the required strength, most conductors are fabricated from microcomposite materials using the work hardening effect after heavy cold deformation such as wire drawing. Since the microstructure and texture of these microcomposites are complex, a detailed systematic study of these materials requires a separate study of the individual phases. This work presents a comprehensive study of the microstructure and microtexture evolution during deformation, and subsequent annealing of heavily deformed OFHC copper wires. Analytical tools used for investigation include optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), orientation-imaging microscopy (OIM) in SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile and microhardness testing. Some of the key features of the as-drawn wire are elongated grain size and shear bands. The intensity of the shear bands increased with strain. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and the microhardness of the heavily cold-drawn copper wires increased with strain, reached a saturation point and dropped at higher deformation strain. Deformation did not significantly alter the electrical conductivity of the wires. Deformed and recovered microstructures were characterized by a strong<111>+weak<100> duplex fiber texture. Nucleation of recrystallized grains occurred at shear bands and resulted in randomization of texture. On the other hand, recrystallization produced a strong<100>+weak<111>, which later changed to a <111> fiber texture during abnormal grain growth. A detailed analysis showed that recrystallization was a growth-controlled mechanism, and proceeds from the outer surface to the core. Interestingly, secondary recrystallization was

  15. Contact heat conductance at a diamond-OFHC copper interface with GaIn eutectic as a heat transfer medium

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.; Khounsary, A.

    1996-09-01

    The results of an experimental study of the contact heat conductance across a single diamond crystal interface with OFHC copper (Cu) are reported. Gallium-indium (GaIn) eutectic was used as an interstitial material. Contact conductance data are important in the design and the prediction of the performance of x-ray optics under high-heat-load conditions. Two sets of experiments were carried out. In one, the copper surface in contact with diamond was polished and then electroless plated with 1 {mu}m of nickel, while in the other, the copper contact surface was left as machined. The measured average interface heat conductances are 44.7{plus_minus}8 W/cm{sup 2}-K for nonplated copper and 23.0{plus_minus}8 W/cm{sup 2}-K for nickel-plated copper. For reference, the thermal contact conductances at a copper-copper interface (without diamond) were also measured, and the results are reported. A typical diamond monochromator, 0.2 mm thick, will absorb about 44 W under a standard undulator beam at the Advanced Photon Source. The measured conductance for nickel-plated copper suggests that the temperature drop across the interface of diamond and nickel-plated copper, with a 20 mm {sup 2}contact area, will be about 10{degree}C. Therefore temperature rises are rather modest, and the accuracy of the measured contact conductances presented here are sufficient for design purposes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Isolation of kinetic and spatial properties of uni-axial dynamic tensile loading of OFHC copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis-Koller, D.; Escobedo-Diaz, J. P.; Cerreta, E. K.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Hansen, B.; Lebensohn, R.; Mourad, H.; Patterson, B.; Tonks, D.

    2012-08-01

    Materials performance is recognized as being central to many emergent technologies. Future technologies will place increasing demands on materials performance with respect to extremes in stress, strain, temperature, and pressure. In this study, the dynamic ductile damage evolution of OFHC Cu is explored as a test bed to understand the role of spatial effects due to loading profile and defect density as well as the role of the kinetics of tensile pulse evolution. Well-characterized OFHC Cu samples of 30 μm, 60 μm, 100 μm, and 200 μm grain sizes were subjected to plate impact uniaxial strain loading in spall geometry to produce early stage (incipient damage. Using 2D metallographic techniques, soft recovered samples were studied to statistically link mesoscale processes to continuum level observations of free surface particle velocity measured with VISAR. Based on these findings, mechanisms for the void nucleation/growth and coalescence are proposed.

  17. Effect of neutron irradiation and post-irradiation annealing on microstructure and mechanical properties of OFHC-copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. N.; Edwards, D. J.; Toft, P.

    2001-12-01

    Specimens of oxygen-free high conductivity (OFHC) copper were irradiated in the DR-3 reactor at Risø at 100 °C to doses in the range 0.01-0.3 dpa (NRT). Some of the specimens were tensile tested in the as-irradiated condition at 100 °C whereas others were given a post-irradiation annealing treatment at 300 °C for 50 h and subsequently tested at 100 °C. The microstructure of specimens was characterized in the as-irradiated as well as irradiated and annealed conditions both before and after tensile deformation. While the interstitial loop microstructure coarsens with irradiation dose, no significant changes were observed in the population of stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT). The post-irradiation annealing leads to only a partial recovery and the level of recovery depends on the irradiation dose level. However, the post-irradiation annealing eliminates the yield drop and reinstates enough uniform elongation to render the material useful again. These results are discussed in terms of the cascade-induced source hardening (CISH) model.

  18. Thermal conductance measurements of pressed OFHC copper contacts at liquid helium temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal conductance of oxygen-free high conductivity (COFHC) copper sample pairs with surface finishes ranging from 0.1 to 1.6-micrometers rms roughness was investigated over the range of 1.6 to 6.0-K under applied contact forces up to 670 N. The thermal conductance increases with increasing contact force; however, no correlation can be drawn with respect to surface finish.

  19. Cyclic fatigue analysis of rocket thrust chambers. Volume 1: OFHC copper chamber low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element elasto-plastic strain analysis was performed for the throat section of a regeneratively cooled rocket combustion chamber. The analysis employed the RETSCP finite element computer program. The analysis included thermal and pressure loads, and the effects of temperature dependent material properties, to determine the strain range corresponding to the chamber operating cycle. The analysis was performed for chamber configuration and operating conditions corresponding to a hydrogen-oxygen combustion chamber which was fatigue tested to failure. The computed strain range at typical chamber operating conditions was used in conjunction with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OHFC) copper isothermal fatigue test data to predict chamber low-cycle fatigue life.

  20. Elastic-plastic-creep analysis of brazed carbon-carbon/OFHC divertor tile concepts for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, E.; Reis, E.E.

    1995-12-31

    The 7.5 MW/m{sup 2} heat flux requirements for the TPX divertor necessitate the use of high conductivity carbon-carbon (C-C) tiles that are brazed to annealed copper (OFHC) coolant tubes. Significant residual stresses are developed in the C-C tiles during the braze process due to large differences in the thermal expansion coefficients between these materials. Analyses which account for only the elastic-plastic strains developed in the OFHC tube may not accurately characterize the behavior of the tube during brazing. The elevated temperature creep behavior of the copper coolant tubes intuitively should reduce the calculated residual stresses in the C-C tiles. Two divertor tile concepts, the monoblock and the archblock, were analyzed for residual stress using 2-D finite element analysis for elastic-plastic-creep behavior of the OFHC tube during an assumed braze cooldown cycle. The results show that the inclusion of elevated temperature creep effects decrease the calculated residual stresses by only about 10% when compared to those analyses in which only elastic-plastic behavior of the OFHC is accounted for. The primary reason that creep effects at higher temperatures are not more significant is due to the low yield stress and nearly flat-top stress-strain curve of annealed OFHC. Since high temperature creep plays less of a role in the residual stress levels than previously thought, future scoping studies can be done in an elastic-plastic analysis with confidence that the stresses will be within approximately 10% of an elastic-plastic-creep analysis.

  1. Mechanical and chemical effects of ion-texturing biomedical polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weigand, A. J.; Cenkus, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    To determine whether sputter etching may provide substantial polymer surface texturing with insignificant changes in chemical and mechanical properties, an 8 cm beam diameter, electron bombardment, argon ion source was used to sputter etch (ion-texture process) nine biomedical polymers. The materials included silicone rubber, 32% carbon impregnated polyolefin, polyoxymethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, ultrahigh molecular weight (UHMW) polyethylene, UHMW polyethylene with carbon fibers (10%), and several polyurethanes (bioelectric, segmented, and cross linked). Ion textured microtensile specimens of each material except UHMW polyethylene and UHMW polyethylene with 10% carbon fibers were used to determine the effect of ion texturing on tensile properties. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine surface morphology changes, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis was used to analyze the near surface chemical changes that result from ion texturing. Ion energies of 500 eV with beam current densities ranging from 0.08 to 0.19 mA/sq cm were used to ion texture the various materials. Standard microtensile specimens of seven polymers were exposed to a saline environment for 24 hours prior to and during the tensile testing. The surface chemical changes resulting from sputter etching are minimal in spite of the often significant changes in the surface morphology.

  2. Secondary electron emission characteristics of untreated and ion-textured titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, Arthur N.; Jensen, Kenneth A.; Blackford, Gary A.

    1989-01-01

    Experimentally determined values of true secondary electron emission and relative values of reflected primary electron yield are presented for untreated (simply machined) and ion-textured, high-purity titanium over ranges of primary electron beam energies and beam impingement angles. The purpose of the investigation was to explore the feasibility of using titanium as electrode material in the multistage depressed collectors (MDC's) used in microwave amplifier traveling wave tubes (TWT's) for space communications and aircraft applications. Because of its relatively low density and thermal expansion characteristics and relatively high strength, thermal emissivity, and melting temperature, titanium presents itself as a possible candidate for the MDC electrode application. A detailed description of the method of ion texturing the titanium is included. Although the ion-treated surface considered in this study is not presented as being optimum from the standpoint of secondary electron emission suppression, it nevertheless serves to demonstrate that the surface can be modified by this procedure to significantly reduce these emission characteristics relative to those of the untreated surface. Further studies can reasonably be expected to produce surfaces with even lower secondary emission characteristics. The titanium surface were tested at primary electron beam energies of 200 to 2000 eV and at direct (0 deg) to near-grazing (85 deg) beam impingement angles. True secondary electron emission and relative reflected primary electron yield characteristics of the surfaces were compared with each other and with textured titanium surface exhibited secondary electron emission characteristics sharply lower than those exhibited by untreated titanium or copper. Clearly, then, in consideration of the secondary electron emission suppression of ion-textured titanium along with its other favorable physical properties, it must be included as a potential candidate for use as MDC electrode

  3. The characterization of copper alloys for the application of fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, S.; Fukaya, K.; Eto, M.; Akiba, M.

    1995-12-31

    Three kinds of candidate copper alloys for divertor structural materials of fusion experimental reactors, that is, Oxygen Free High thermal conductivity Copper (OFHC), alumina disperse reinforced copper (DSC) and the composite of W and Cu (W/Cu), were prepared for strength and fatigue tests at temperatures ranging from R.T. to 500 C in a vacuum. High temperature strength of DSC and W/Cu with rapid fracture after peak loading at the temperatures is higher than that of OFHC by factor of 2, but fracture strains of DFC and W/Cu are smaller than that of OFHC. Fatigue life of DSC, which shows the same fatigue behavior of OFHC at room temperature, is longer than other materials at 400 C. Remarkable fatigue life reduction of OFHC found in this experiment is to be due to recrystallization of OFHC yielded above 400 C.

  4. High temperature, low-cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys in argon. Part 1: Preliminary results for 12 alloys at 1000 F (538 C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Short-term tensile evaluations at room temperature and 538 C and low-cycle fatigue evaluations at 538 C are presented for the following materials: Zirconium copper-annealed, Zirconium copper-1/4 hard, Zirconium copper-1/2 hard, Tellurium copper-1/2 hard, Chromium copper-SA and aged, OFHC copper-hard, OFHC copper-1/4 hard, OFHC copper-annealed, Silver-as drawn, Zr-Cr-Mg copper-SA, CW and aged, Electroformed copper-30-35 ksi, and Co-Be-Zr- copper-SA, aged. A total of 50 tensile tests and 76 low-cycle fatigue tests were performed using a strain rate of 0.2 percent per second.

  5. An Effective Secondary Electron Emission Suppression Treatment For Copper MDC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, Arthur N.; Long, Kenwyn J.; Jensen, Kenneth A.; Roman, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    Untreated oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper, commonly used for MDC electrodes, exhibits relatively high secondary electron emission characteristics. This paper describes a specialized ion-bombardment procedure for texturing copper surfaces which sharply reduces the emission properties relative to untreated copper. The resulting surface is a particle-free, robust, uniformly highly-textured all-metal structure. The use of this process requires no modifications to copper machining, brazing, or other MDC normal fabrication procedures. The flight TWT for a planned NASA deep space probe, the Cassini Mission, will incorporate copper MDC electrodes treated with the method described here.

  6. Behavior of CuP and OFHC Cu anodes under electrodeposition conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, G.S.; Schrott, A.G.; Horkans, J.; Andricacos, P.C.; Isaacs, H.S.

    1992-08-01

    Films formed on CuP (with 0.05 wt % P) and OFHC Cu anodes in electroplating solutions were studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, electrochemical methods, and a newly developed gravimetric technique. The black film formed on CuP in Cl-containing solutions was found to resemble a porous sponge composed of CuCl but laden/with concentrated CuSO{sub 4} solution. The difference between the buoyancy-corrected measured mass change and the charge-equivalent mass change was found to have two components: a reversible part that comes and goes as the current is turned on and off, and an irreversible part that remains on the surface and increase in mass with time. The irreversible part results from the anodic film, which increases linearly with charge density but independent of current density. The reversible part of the mass change arises from the weight of the diffusion layer. In contrast to CuP, OFHC Cu releases much more Cu{sup +1} during anodic polarization and forms a poorly-adherent anodic film that is considerably heavier than the black film for a given charge density.

  7. Behavior of CuP and OFHC Cu anodes under electrodeposition conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, G.S.; Schrott, A.G.; Horkans, J.; Andricacos, P.C. . Thomas J. Watson Research Center); Isaacs, H.S. )

    1992-01-01

    Films formed on CuP (with 0.05 wt % P) and OFHC Cu anodes in electroplating solutions were studied by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, electrochemical methods, and a newly developed gravimetric technique. The black film formed on CuP in Cl-containing solutions was found to resemble a porous sponge composed of CuCl but laden/with concentrated CuSO{sub 4} solution. The difference between the buoyancy-corrected measured mass change and the charge-equivalent mass change was found to have two components: a reversible part that comes and goes as the current is turned on and off, and an irreversible part that remains on the surface and increase in mass with time. The irreversible part results from the anodic film, which increases linearly with charge density but independent of current density. The reversible part of the mass change arises from the weight of the diffusion layer. In contrast to CuP, OFHC Cu releases much more Cu{sup +1} during anodic polarization and forms a poorly-adherent anodic film that is considerably heavier than the black film for a given charge density.

  8. Copper

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper ; CASRN 7440 - 50 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  9. Grain size effects on the high strain rate deformation of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Michael Earle

    The high strain rate (>104/s) mechanical properties of OFHC copper were studied by the Taylor impact test for a series of copper grain sizes from 31 to 152 mum. The results are analyzed by both analytical and finite element. There is a significant increase in the dynamic strength of OFHC copper for strain rates greater than approximately 104/s. This strength increase is also dependent upon the grain size of the OFHC copper prior to testing and follows a classical Hall-Petch relationship. In addition to the analytical and finite element models, a universal dynamic stress-strain curve was developed and constructed for each grain size of the OFHC copper. The characterization parameters determined from the universal dynamic stress-strain curve are also grain size dependent. Many of these parameters also follow the classical Hall-Petch trend. Post-impact microstructures of the copper can be generalized into five distinct regions. Beginning at the specimen impact face, those regions are: (i) a nanocrystalline, or sub-micron grain size layer; (ii) a dynamically recrystallized region; (iii) a region of high density (111)[112¯] twinning; (iv) a section dominated by dislocation plastic flow, or slip and (v) the specimen portion where the deformation is completely elastic. The five regions can be related to the mechanical properties derived from the individual models and the universal dynamic stress-strain curve with consideration of the initial microstructure of the copper. The results of this dissertation suggest that there is a direct linkage between the dynamic mechanical state of stress during the impact tests and both the initial and final metallurgical microstructures of the copper.

  10. Swept Mechanism of Micro-Milling Tool Geometry Effect on Machined Oxygen Free High Conductivity Copper (OFHC) Surface Roughness

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhenyu; Liu, Zhanqiang; Li, Yuchao; Qiao, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Cutting tool geometry should be very much considered in micro-cutting because it has a significant effect on the topography and accuracy of the machined surface, particularly considering the uncut chip thickness is comparable to the cutting edge radius. The objective of this paper was to clarify the influence of the mechanism of the cutting tool geometry on the surface topography in the micro-milling process. Four different cutting tools including two two-fluted end milling tools with different helix angles of 15° and 30° cutting tools, as well as two three-fluted end milling tools with different helix angles of 15° and 30° were investigated by combining theoretical modeling analysis with experimental research. The tool geometry was mathematically modeled through coordinate translation and transformation to make all three cutting edges at the cutting tool tip into the same coordinate system. Swept mechanisms, minimum uncut chip thickness, and cutting tool run-out were considered on modeling surface roughness parameters (the height of surface roughness Rz and average surface roughness Ra) based on the established mathematical model. A set of cutting experiments was carried out using four different shaped cutting tools. It was found that the sweeping volume of the cutting tool increases with the decrease of both the cutting tool helix angle and the flute number. Great coarse machined surface roughness and more non-uniform surface topography are generated when the sweeping volume increases. The outcome of this research should bring about new methodologies for micro-end milling tool design and manufacturing. The machined surface roughness can be improved by appropriately selecting the tool geometrical parameters. PMID:28772479

  11. Swept Mechanism of Micro-Milling Tool Geometry Effect on Machined Oxygen Free High Conductivity Copper (OFHC) Surface Roughness.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenyu; Liu, Zhanqiang; Li, Yuchao; Qiao, Yang

    2017-01-28

    Cutting tool geometry should be very much considered in micro-cutting because it has a significant effect on the topography and accuracy of the machined surface, particularly considering the uncut chip thickness is comparable to the cutting edge radius. The objective of this paper was to clarify the influence of the mechanism of the cutting tool geometry on the surface topography in the micro-milling process. Four different cutting tools including two two-fluted end milling tools with different helix angles of 15° and 30° cutting tools, as well as two three-fluted end milling tools with different helix angles of 15° and 30° were investigated by combining theoretical modeling analysis with experimental research. The tool geometry was mathematically modeled through coordinate translation and transformation to make all three cutting edges at the cutting tool tip into the same coordinate system. Swept mechanisms, minimum uncut chip thickness, and cutting tool run-out were considered on modeling surface roughness parameters (the height of surface roughness Rz and average surface roughness Ra) based on the established mathematical model. A set of cutting experiments was carried out using four different shaped cutting tools. It was found that the sweeping volume of the cutting tool increases with the decrease of both the cutting tool helix angle and the flute number. Great coarse machined surface roughness and more non-uniform surface topography are generated when the sweeping volume increases. The outcome of this research should bring about new methodologies for micro-end milling tool design and manufacturing. The machined surface roughness can be improved by appropriately selecting the tool geometrical parameters.

  12. Experimental Evaluation of the Taylor-Type Polycrystal Model for the Finite Deformation of an FCC Metal (OFHC Copper)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    McClintock , Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cambridge, MA 02139 1 R. M. McMeeking, University of California...at Santa Barbara , Department of Material Science, Santa Barbara , CA 93111 1 Prof. Alan Miller, Stanford Univerrsity, Department of Materials Science

  13. Experimental Investigation on Thermoresistance between AlN, Bi-2223 and OFHC in High Tc- Direct Cooling Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. L.; Rao, R. S.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    In the development of high temperature superconducting (HTS) direct cooling technology, the high electric insulation high heat conducting AlN has become one of the important components. The thermal contact resistance between AlN, Bi-2223 and OFHC is investigated by experiment with a G-M cryocooler as the source of cooling. The heat conductivity of AlN is measured between 29 and 160 K temperatures. When the temperature on the interface layer side of Bi-2223 is 55 K, under the action of the contact pressure of 0.5469 MPa, the thermal contact resistance between AlN and Bi-2223 is 38.86 times to the thermal conduction resistance of a 10 mm thick AlN pad. Baced on micro-nanocryogenics, it is proposed that the thermal contact resistance is one of the crucial techniques to be attacked in HTS direct cooling technology.

  14. Reverse Taylor Tests on Ultrafine Grained Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, A.; Meyers, M. A.; Martin, M.; Thadhani, N. N.; Gregori, F.; Asaro, R. J.

    2006-07-28

    Reverse Taylor impact tests have been carried out on ultrafine grained copper processed by Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP). Tests were conducted on an as-received OFHC Cu rod and specimens that had undergone sequential ECAP passes (2 and 8). The average grain size ranged from 30 {mu}m for the initial sample to less than 0.5 {mu}m for the 8-pass samples. The dynamic deformation states of the samples, captured by high speed digital photography were compared with computer simulations run in AUTODYN-2D using the Johnson-Cook constitutive equation with constants obtained from stress-strain data and by fitting to an experimentally measured free surface velocity trace. The constitutive response of copper of varying grain sizes was obtained through quasistatic and dynamic mechanical tests and incorporation into constitutive models.

  15. Metallurgical examination of recovered copper jet particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.; Walters, W.P.

    1995-11-30

    A shaped charge (81 mm, 42{degrees}, OFHC copper cone) was fired into a ``soft` recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 gm, of which 184 gm was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g. dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work we present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet we find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  16. Attenuation of shock waves in copper and stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.B.

    1986-06-01

    By using shock pins, data were gathered on the trajectories of shock waves in stainless steel (SS-304L) and oxygen-free-high-conductivity copper (OFHC-Cu). Shock pressures were generated in these materials by impacting the appropriate target with thin (approx.1.5 mm) flying plates. The flying plates in these experiments were accelerated to high velocities (approx.4 km/s) by high explosives. Six experiments were conducted, three using SS-304L as the target material and three experiments using OFHC-Cu as the target material. Peak shock pressures generated in the steel experiments were approximately 109, 130, and 147 GPa and in the copper experiments, the peak shock pressures were approximately 111, 132, and 143 GPa. In each experiment, an attenuation of the shock wave by a following release wave was clearly observed. An extensive effort using two characteristic codes (described in this work) to theoretically calculate the attenuation of the shock waves was made. The efficacy of several different constitutive equations to successfully model the experiments was studied by comparing the calculated shock trajectories to the experimental data. Based on such comparisons, the conclusion can be drawn that OFHC-Cu enters a melt phase at about 130 GPa on the principal Hugoniot. There was no sign of phase changes in the stainless-steel experiments. In order to match the observed attenuation of the shock waves in the SS-304L experiments, it was necessary to include strength effects in the calculations. It was found that the values for the parameters in the strength equations were dependent on the equation of state used in the modeling of the experiments. 66 refs., 194 figs., 77 tabs.

  17. Low-cycle-fatigue behavior of copper materials and their use in synchrotron beamline components

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Nian, T.; Ryding, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-09-01

    The third generation synchrotron facilities such as the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Project (APS) generate x-ray beams with very high heat loads and heat flux levels. The front-end and beamline components are required to sustain total heat loads of 5 to 15 kW and heat flux levels exceeding 400 W/mm{sup 2}. Grazing geometry and enhanced heat transfer techniques are used in the design of such components to reduce heat flux levels below the 30 W/mm{sup 2} level, which is sustainable by the special copper materials routinely used in the component design. Although the resulting maximum surface temperatures can be sustained, the structural stresses and the fatigue issues remain viable concerns for the copper, particularly under brazing or bonding of the parts. Brazing and bonding are almost always utilized in the design of the components, and the drastically lowered yield stress of the annealed copper subjected to bonding temperatures above 400{degree}C is a real concern. Such materials with reduced post-bonding stress levels easily reach yield point under thermal stresses during ordinary use on the beamline. The resulting plastic deformation in each load cycle may cause low-cycle-fatigue problems. The two common copper materials are OFHC and Glidcop. This paper critically reviews the available literature for low-cycle-fatigue properties, of OFHC at the elevated temperatures typically found in synchrotron operations.

  18. Damage Characterization in Copper Deformed under Hydrostatic Stress - Experimental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Flater, P. J.; House, J. W.; Nixon, M. E.

    2006-07-28

    The results of an experimental investigation designed to determine the effect of damage created by hydrostatic tensile loading on the properties of copper are reported. Three metallurgical conditions of half-hard OFHC copper were investigated; as worked; annealed 2hr at 400 deg. C ({approx}40 micron grain diameter); and annealed 2hr at 800 deg. C ({approx}80 micron grain diameter). Mechanical property characterization included uniaxial compression tests. High rate plasticity and damage was introduced by Taylor and rod-on-rod impact tests. The damage from the high rate experiments was characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Quasi-static compression specimens machined from recovered high rate samples were tested to determine the influence of damage on the mechanical response of the material. The compression test results will be discussed in relationship to the starting microstructure and the extent of damaged introduced into the material.

  19. Low-cycle fatigue analysis of a cooled copper combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element elastoplastic strain analysis was performed for the throat section of regeneratively cooled rocket engine combustion chamber. The analysis included thermal and pressure loads, and the effects of temperature dependent material properties, to determine the strain range corresponding to the engine operating cycle. The strain range was used in conjunction with OFHC copper isothermal fatigue test data to predict engine low-cycle fatigue life. The analysis was performed for chamber configuration and operating conditions corresponding to a hydrogen-oxygen chamber which was fatigue tested to failure at the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  20. Fatigue behavior of copper and selected copper alloys for high heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leedy, K.D.; Stubbins, J.F.; Singh, B.N.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-04-01

    The room temperature fatigue behavior of standard and subsize specimens was examined for five copper alloys: OFHC Cu, two CuNiBe alloys, a CuCrZr alloy, and a Cu-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} alloy. Fatigue tests were run in strain control to failure. In addition to establishing failure lives, the stress amplitudes were monitored as a function of numbers of accrued cycles. The results indicate that the alloys with high initial yield strengths provide the best fatigue response over the range of failure lives examined in the present study: N{sub f} = 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 6}. In fact, the fatigue performance of the best alloys is dominated by the elastic portion of the strain range, as would be expected from the correlation of performance with yield properties. The alumina strengthened alloy and the two CuNiBe alloys show the best overall performance of the group examined here.

  1. Qualification of electron-beam welded joints between copper and stainless steel for cryogenic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusch, C.; Borsch, M.; Heidt, C.; Magginetti, N.; Sas, J.; Weiss, K.-P.; Grohmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Joints between copper and stainless steel are commonly applied in cryogenic systems. A relatively new and increasingly important method to combine these materials is electron-beam (EB) welding. Typically, welds in cryogenic applications need to withstand a temperature range from 300K down to 4K, and pressures of several MPa. However, few data are available for classifying EB welds between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel. A broad test program was conducted in order to qualify this kind of weld. The experiments started with the measurement of the hardness in the weld area. To verify the leak-tightness of the joints, integral helium leak tests at operating pressures of 16 MPa were carried out at room- and at liquid nitrogen temperature. The tests were followed by destructive tensile tests at room temperature, at liquid nitrogen and at liquid helium temperatures, yielding information on the yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of the welds at these temperatures. Moreover, nondestructive tensile tests up to the yield strength, i.e. the range in which the weld can be stressed during operation, were performed. Also, the behavior of the weld upon temperature fluctuations between room- and liquid nitrogen temperature was tested. The results of the qualification indicate that EB welded joints between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel are reliable and present an interesting alternative to other technologies such as vacuum brazing or friction welding.

  2. Effects on LDEF exposed copper film and bulk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Gregory, John C.; Christl, Ligia C.; Raikar, Ganesh N.

    1992-01-01

    Two forms of copper were exposed to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Mission 1 environment: a copper film initially 74.2 plus or minus 1.1 nm thick sputter coated on a fused silical flat and a bulk piece of oxygen free, high conductivity (OFHC) copper. The optical density of the copper film changed from 1.33 to 0.70 where exposed and the film thickness increased to 106.7 plus or minus 0.5 nm where exposed. The exposed area appears purple by reflection and green by transmission for the thin film and maroon color for the bulk copper piece. The exposed areas increased in thickness, but only increase in the thickness of thin film samples could be readily measured. The increase in film thickness is consistent with the density changes occurring during conversion of copper to an oxide. However, we have not been able to confirm appreciable conversion to an oxide by x ray diffraction studies. We have not yet subjected the sample to e-beams or more abusive conditions out of concern that the film might be modified.

  3. Effects on LDEF exposed copper film and bulk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Gregory, John C.; Christl, Ligia C.; Raikar, Ganesh N.

    1992-01-01

    Two forms of copper were exposed to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Mission 1 environment: a copper film initially 74.2 plus or minus 1.1 nm thick sputter coated on a fused silical flat and a bulk piece of oxygen free, high conductivity (OFHC) copper. The optical density of the copper film changed from 1.33 to 0.70 where exposed and the film thickness increased to 106.7 plus or minus 0.5 nm where exposed. The exposed area appears purple by reflection and green by transmission for the thin film and maroon color for the bulk copper piece. The exposed areas increased in thickness, but only increase in the thickness of thin film samples could be readily measured. The increase in film thickness is consistent with the density changes occurring during conversion of copper to an oxide. However, we have not been able to confirm appreciable conversion to an oxide by x ray diffraction studies. We have not yet subjected the sample to e-beams or more abusive conditions out of concern that the film might be modified.

  4. Effects on LDEF exposed copper film and bulk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Gregory, John C.; Christl, Ligia C.; Raikar, Ganesh N.

    1991-01-01

    Two forms of copper were exposed to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Mission 1 environment: a copper film, initially 74.2 plus or minus 1.1 nm thick sputter coated on a fused silica flat and a bulk piece of oxygen-free, high conductivity (OFHC) copper. The optical density of the copper film changed from 1.33 to 0.70 where exposed, and the film thickness increased to 106.7 plus or minus 0.5 nm where exposed. The exposed area appears purple by reflection and green by transmission for the thin film and maroon color for the bulk copper piece. The exposed areas increased in thickness, but only increase in the thickness of the thin film sample could be readily measured. The increase in film thickness is consistent with the density changes occurring during conversion of copper to an oxide. However, we have not been able to confirm appreciable conversion to an oxide by x-ray diffraction studies. We have not yet subjected the sample to e-beams or more abusive investigations out of concern that the film might be modified.

  5. The interaction of atomic oxygen with copper: An XPS, AES, XRD, optical transmission, and stylus profilometry study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raikar, Ganesh N.; Gregory, John C.; Christl, Ligia C.; Peters, Palmer N.

    1993-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) experiment A-0114 was designed to study the reaction of material surfaces with low earth orbits (LEO) atmospheric oxygen. The experiment contained 128 one-inch circular samples; metals, polymers, carbons, and semiconductors. Half of these samples were exposed on the front of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and remaining on the rear. Among metal samples, copper has shown some interesting new results. There were two forms of copper samples: a thin film sputter-coated on fused silica and a solid piece of OFHC copper. They were characterized by x-ray and Auger electron spectroscopies, x-ray diffraction, and high resolution profilometry. Cu 2p core level spectra were used to demonstrate the presence of Cu2O and CuO and to determine the oxidation states.

  6. Evidence of melt in {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} recovered copper jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Nikkel, D.J. Jr.; Kershaw, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    A shaped charge (81 mm, 42{degrees}, OFHC copper cone) was fired into a {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} recovery bunker to allow metallurgical examination of recovered jet particles and the slug. The initial weight of the copper liner was 245 gm, of which 184 gm was recovered. The number of jet particles recovered was 37 (approximately 63% of the particles formed by the charge). Extensive metallurgical analyses were performed on the recovered slug and jet particles. The microstructural features associated with voids, e.g. dendritic grain growth, clearly indicate that the regions in the vicinity of the centerline of the slug and jet particles were melted. In this work we present calculations of jet temperature as a function of constitutive behavior. In order to predict melt in the center region of the jet we find it necessary to scale flow stress with a pressure dependent shear modulus.

  7. The Influence of Zirconium on the Low-Cycle Fatigue Response of Ultrafine-Grained Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, P.; Canadinc, D.; Maier, H. J.; Hellmig, R. J.; Zuberova, Z.; Estrin, J.

    2007-09-01

    This article reports on the influence of zirconium (Zr) addition (0.17 wt pct) on the cyclic stability of ultrafine-grained (UFG) oxygen-free high-conductivity (OFHC) copper (Cu) of originally high (99.995 wt pct) purity processed via equal-channel angular extrusion (ECAE). Systematic low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests accompanied by microstructural investigation revealed that a Zr addition substantially affects the cyclic stability of UFG Cu, such that longer fatigue lives, notable cyclic hardening, and higher stress ranges were attained in the LCF regime. This significant improvement of the fatigue properties of OFHC Cu by the addition of Zr is attributed to the Cu-Zr precipitates and impurities, effectively limiting the mobility of the grain boundaries and additional work hardening imposed by the precipitates. In addition, the strain-amplitude and strain-rate dependencies of the cyclic stability of Zr-added UFG Cu were investigated in detail, where the UFG Cu-Zr alloy exhibits an expressively lesser dependency as compared with the pure UFG Cu. The current results offer new insight into the improvement of the cyclic stability of UFG Cu and other UFG materials, and provides a venue for their utility in a broader range of applications demanding enhanced cyclic deformation response and stability.

  8. Steady Deflagration of PBX-9501 Within a Copper Cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Pemberton, Steven J.; Herrera, Dennis H.; Herrera, Tommy J.; Arellano, Jesus C.; Sandoval, Thomas D.

    2012-06-26

    A copper cylinder cook-off experiment has been designed to cause steady deflagration in PBX-9501 explosive material. The design is documented and preliminary copper expansion results are presented for steady deflagration with a reaction speed of 1092 +/- 24 m/s. The expansion of reaction products from the detonation of an explosive is something that is well understood, and reasonably simulated using documented equations of state (EOS) for many explosives of interest. These EOS were historically measured using a 'standard' copper cylinder test design; this design comprised an annealed, oxygen-free high conductivity (OFHC) copper tube filled with explosive material and detonated from one end. Expansion of the copper wall was measured as a function of time using either a streak camera (for classic testing), or more recently using laser velocimetry techniques. Expansion data were then used to derive the EOS in various preferred forms - which are not discussed here for the sake of brevity. [Catanach, et. al., 1999] When an explosive deflagrates rather than detonating, simulation becomes more difficult. Reaction products are released on a slower time scale, and the reactions are much more affected by the geometry and local temperature within the reaction environment. It is assumed that the standard, documented EOS will no longer apply. In an effort to establish a first order approximation of deflagration product behavior, a cook-off test has been designed to cause steady deflagration in PBX-9501 explosive material, and to record the copper expansion profile as a function of time during this test. The purpose of the current paper is to document the initial test design and report some preliminary results. A proposal for modification of the design is also presented.

  9. Optical properties of ion beam textured metals. [using copper, silicon, aluminum, titanium and stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.; Weigand, A. J.; Mirtich, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Copper, silicon, aluminum, titanium and 316 stainless steel were textured by 1000 eV xenon ions from an 8 cm diameter electron bombardment ion source. Simultaneously sputter-deposited tantalum was used to facilitate the development of the surface microstructure. Scanning electron microscopy of the ion textured surfaces revealed two types of microstructure. Copper, silicon, and aluminum developed a cone structure with an average peak-to-peak distance ranging from 1 micron for silicon to 6 microns for aluminum. Titanium and 316 stainless steel developed a serpentine ridge structure. The average peak-to-peak distance for both of these materials was 0.5 micron. Spectral reflectance was measured using an integrating sphere and a holraum reflectometer. Total reflectance for air mass 0 and 2, solar absorptance and total emittance normalized for a 425 K black body were calculated from the reflectance measurements.

  10. Mechanical behavior and strength in spalled copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachhani, Shraddha J.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Potocki, Mark L.; Martinez, Daniel T.; Lovato, Manuel L.; Gray, George T.; Cerreta, Ellen K.

    2017-01-01

    The bulk compressive and tensile response of samples machined from the different regions of dynamically damaged OFHC copper is examined in combination with post-mortem analysis of the recovered sample. This was done using optical microscopy and electron back-scatter diffraction to understand the strength and mechanical behavior of a material deformed under dynamic loading conditions. Stored plastic work in the shocked samples produced significant hardening in all the samples. It was also observed that the samples containing a dynamically induced damage field were slightly harder and showed enhanced yield strength over material simply subjected to shock and release that showed no dynamic damage. This was attributed to the excess work hardening around voids induced during incipient spall. By comparing the responses of two specimens with differing amounts of dynamic damage, it was concluded that there appears to be a limit to the amount of dynamic damage, after which the enhanced yield strength in the material with dynamic damage will cease to exist.

  11. Copper hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-10-01

    The world production of copper is steadily increasing. Although humans are widely exposed to copper-containing items on the skin and mucosa, allergic reactions to copper are only infrequently reported. To review the chemistry, biology and accessible data to clarify the implications of copper hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common. As a metal, it possesses many of the same qualities as nickel, which is a known strong sensitizer. Cumulative data on subjects with presumed related symptoms and/or suspected exposure showed that a weighted average of 3.8% had a positive patch test reaction to copper. We conclude that copper is a very weak sensitizer as compared with other metal compounds. However, in a few and selected cases, copper can result in clinically relevant allergic reactions.

  12. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats.

  13. Graphite fiber textile preform/copper matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilatovs, G. J.; Lee, Bruce; Bass, Lowell

    1995-01-01

    Graphite fiber reinforced/copper matrix composites have sufficiently high thermal conduction to make them candidate materials for critical heat transmitting and rejection components. The term textile composites arises because the preform is braided from fiber tows, conferring three-dimensional reinforcement and near net shape. The principal issues investigated in the past two years have centered on developing methods to characterize the preform and fabricated composite and on braidability. It is necessary to have an analytic structural description for both processing and final property modeling. The structure of the true 3-D braids used is complex and has required considerable effort to model. A structural mapping has been developed as a foundation for analytic models for thermal conduction and mechanical properties. The conductivity has contributions both from the copper and the reinforcement. The latter is accomplished by graphitization of the fibers, the higher the amount of graphitization the greater the conduction. This is accompanied by an increase in the fiber modulus, which is desirable from a stiffness point of view but decreases the braidability; the highest conductivity fibers are simply too brittle to be braided. Considerable effort has been expended on determining the optimal braidability--conductivity region. While a number of preforms have been fabricated, one other complication intervenes; graphite and copper are immiscible, resulting in a poor mechanical bond and difficulties in infiltration by molten copper. The approach taken is to utilize a proprietary fiber coating process developed by TRA, of Salt Lake City, Utah, which forms an itermediary bond. A number of preforms have been fabricated from a variety of fiber types and two sets of these have been infiltrated with OFHC copper, one with the TRA coating and one without. Mechanical tests have been performed using a small-scale specimen method and show the coated specimens to have superior

  14. Graphite fiber textile preform/copper matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gilatovs, G.J.; Lee, B.; Bass, L.

    1995-08-01

    Graphite fiber reinforced/copper matrix composites have sufficiently high thermal conduction to make them candidate materials for critical heat transmitting and rejection components. The term textile composites arises because the preform is braided from fiber tows, conferring three-dimensional reinforcement and near net shape. The principal issues investigated in the past two years have centered on developing methods to characterize the preform and fabricated composite and on braidability. It is necessary to have an analytic structural description for both processing and final property modeling. The structure of the true 3-D braids used is complex and has required considerable effort to model. A structural mapping has been developed as a foundation for analytic models for thermal conduction and mechanical properties. The conductivity has contributions both from the copper and the reinforcement. The latter is accomplished by graphitization of the fibers, the higher the amount of graphitization the greater the conduction. This is accompanied by an increase in the fiber modulus, which is desirable from a stiffness point of view but decreases the braidability; the highest conductivity fibers are simply too brittle to be braided. While a number of preforms have been fabricated, one other complication intervenes; graphite and copper are immiscible, resulting in a poor mechanical bond and difficulties in infiltration by molten copper. The approach taken is to utilize a proprietary fiber coating process developed by TRA, of Salt Lake City, Utah, which forms an itermediary bond. A number of preforms have been fabricated from a variety of fiber types and two sets of these have been infiltrated with OFHC copper, one with the TRA coating and one without. Mechanical tests have been performed using a small-scale specimen method and show the coated specimens to have superior mechanical properties.

  15. Graphite fiber textile preform/copper matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilatovs, G. J.; Lee, Bruce; Bass, Lowell

    1995-01-01

    Graphite fiber reinforced/copper matrix composites have sufficiently high thermal conduction to make them candidate materials for critical heat transmitting and rejection components. The term textile composites arises because the preform is braided from fiber tows, conferring three-dimensional reinforcement and near net shape. The principal issues investigated in the past two years have centered on developing methods to characterize the preform and fabricated composite and on braidability. It is necessary to have an analytic structural description for both processing and final property modeling. The structure of the true 3-D braids used is complex and has required considerable effort to model. A structural mapping has been developed as a foundation for analytic models for thermal conduction and mechanical properties. The conductivity has contributions both from the copper and the reinforcement. The latter is accomplished by graphitization of the fibers, the higher the amount of graphitization the greater the conduction. This is accompanied by an increase in the fiber modulus, which is desirable from a stiffness point of view but decreases the braidability; the highest conductivity fibers are simply too brittle to be braided. Considerable effort has been expended on determining the optimal braidability--conductivity region. While a number of preforms have been fabricated, one other complication intervenes; graphite and copper are immiscible, resulting in a poor mechanical bond and difficulties in infiltration by molten copper. The approach taken is to utilize a proprietary fiber coating process developed by TRA, of Salt Lake City, Utah, which forms an itermediary bond. A number of preforms have been fabricated from a variety of fiber types and two sets of these have been infiltrated with OFHC copper, one with the TRA coating and one without. Mechanical tests have been performed using a small-scale specimen method and show the coated specimens to have superior

  16. HIGH-STRAIN RATE RESPONSE OF ULTRA-FINE GRAINED COPPER: EXPERIMENTS AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Anuj; Kad, Bimal; Martin, Morgana; Thadhani, Naresh; Kenik, Edward A; Myers, Marc A.

    2008-07-01

    The high-strain rate response of ultra-fine grained (UFG) copper processed by Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) was characterized by reverse Taylor impact and Hopkinson-bar experiments. Two types of copper samples are tested using Hopkinson bar: (a) cylindrical samples to investigate the response at high strain-rates,(b) hat shaped samples to compare the shear band characteristics in UFG copper with the ones that have been studied in coarse grained samples. This can be attributed to the high strain-rate sensitivity of the fine grained FCC metals. Upon impact, the samples were found to undergo heat induced static recrystallization at a calculated temperature of 360K, indicating that the UFG copper is thermally unstable. Reverse Taylor tests were conducted on as-received OFHC Cu rod and ECAP specimens with sequential ECAP passes (2 and 8). The dynamic deformations of the samples are modeled using AUTODYN-2D and a modified Johnson-Cook constitutive equation was found to capture the dynamic response. Similar to the compression test results, the impacted front of the samples were found to recrystallize extensively and preferentially.

  17. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  18. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  19. Copper Metallochaperones

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Nigel J.; Winge, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    The current state of knowledge on how copper metallochaperones support the maturation of cuproproteins is reviewed. Copper is needed within mitochondria to supply the CuA and intramembrane CuB sites of cytochrome oxidase, within the trans-Golgi network to supply secreted cuproproteins and within the cytosol to supply superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). Subpopulations of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase also localize to mitochondria, the secretory system, the nucleus and, in plants, the chloroplast, which also requires copper for plastocyanin. Prokaryotic cuproproteins are found in the cell membrane and in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria. Cu(I) and Cu(II) form tight complexes with organic molecules and drive redox chemistry, which unrestrained would be destructive. Copper metallochaperones assist copper in reaching vital destinations without inflicting damage or becoming trapped in adventitious binding sites. Copper ions are specifically released from copper metallochaperones upon contact with their cognate cuproproteins and metal transfer is thought to proceed by ligand substitution. PMID:20205585

  20. Performance of a Cryogenic 21 Meter-Path Copper Herriott Cell Vacuum Coupled to a Bruker 125HR System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, Arlan W.; Sung, Keeyoon; Crawford, Timothy J.; Yu, Shanshan; Brown, Linda R.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    2013-06-01

    Accurate modeling of planetary atmospheres requires a detailed knowledge of the temperature and pressure dependence of spectroscopic line parameters of atmospheric molecules. With this requirement in mind, a new Herriott cell having a 21 meter folded absorption path was designed and fabricated with Oxygen-Free High Conductivity (OFHC) copper body and gold coated OFHC copper mirrors to operate for the first time with a broad-band Fourier transform spectrometer. The cell, enclosed in an isolated vacuum box, is cooled by a CTI Cryogenics, Inc. model 1050 closed-cycle helium refrigerator which also cryopumps the vacuum box. The temperature of the cell is monitored by a silicon temperature sensor and regulated by a Lakeshore model 331 temperature controller. The new cell system was integrated to the JPL Bruker model 125HR interferometer with transfer optics which are fully evacuated to 12 mTorr (the pressure inside the interferometer). The optics were through-put matched for entrance apertures smaller than 2 mm. The system has successfully operated for several months at gas sample temperatures between 75 and 250 K with extremely good stability to obtain spectra of methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen bands between 0.76 and 3 μm. We present the characterization and performance of the Herriott cell system and preliminary analyses of newly recorded spectra. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, NASA Langley Research Center, and The College of William and Mary under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  1. Modeling and evaluation of HE driven shock effects in copper with the MTS model

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.J.; Lassila, D.F.

    1997-03-17

    Many experimental studies have investigated the effect of shock pressure on the post-shock mechanical properties of OFHC copper. These studies have shown that significant hardening occurs during shock loading due to dislocation processes and twinning. It has been demonstrated that when an appropriate initial value of the Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) is specified, the post-shock flow stress of OFE copper is well described by relationships derived independently for unshocked materials. In this study we consider the evolution of the MTS during HE driven shock loading processes and the effect on the subsequent flow stress of the copper. An increased post shock flow stress results in a higher material temperature due to an increase in the plastic work. An increase in temperature leads to thermal softening which reduces the flow stress. These coupled effects will determine if there is melting in a shaped charge jet or a necking instability in an EFP Ww. `Me critical factor is the evolution path followed combined with the `current` temperature, plastic strain, and strain rate. Preliminary studies indicate that in simulations of HE driven shock with very high resolution zoning, the MTS saturates because of the rate dependence in the evolution law. On going studies are addressing this and other issues with the goal of developing a version of the MT`S model that treats HE driven, shock loading, temperature, strain, and rate effects apriori.

  2. Analysis of a beryllium—copper diffusion joint after HHF test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiniatouline, R. N.; Mazul, I. V.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Zalavutdinov, R. Kh; Rybakov, S. Yu; Savenko, V. I.

    1996-10-01

    The development of beryllium—copper joints which can withstand relevant ITER divertor conditions is one of the important tasks at the present time. One of the main problems associated with these joints is the intermetallic layers. The strength and life of these joints significantly depend on the width and contents of the intermetallic layers. The objective of this work is to study the diffusion joint of TGP-56 beryllium to OFHC copper after thermal response and thermocyclic tests with a beryllium—copper mock-up. The HHF test was performed on the e-beam facility (EBTS, SNLA). The following methods were used for analysis: roentgenographic analysis, X-ray spectrum analysis and fracture analysis. During the investigation the following studies were undertaken: the analysis of the diffusion boundary layer, which was obtained at the cross-section of one of the tiles, the analysis of the debonded surfaces of several beryllium tiles and corresponding copper parts and the analysis of the upper surface of one of the tiles after HHF tests. The joint roentgenographic and element analyses revealed the following phases in the diffusion zone: Cu 2Be(˜170 μm), CuBe (˜30 μm), CuBe 2 (˜1 μm) and a solid solution of copper in beryllium. The phases Cu 2Be, CuBe and the solid solution of copper in beryllium were detected by the quantitative microanalysis and the phases CuBe, CuBe 2 and CuBe, by the roentgenographic analysis. The fracture (origin) is located in the central part of the tiles. This crack was caused by residual stresses and thermal fatigue testing. This analysis provides important data on the joint quality and may be used for all types of joints used for ITER applications.

  3. The evolution of damage in tritium exposed copper

    SciTech Connect

    Goods, S.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Severe microstructural damage has been observed in polycrystalline OFHC copper specimens thermally exposed to high pressure tritium gas at temperatures {le}200 {degree}C, but not at 300 {degree}C. No such damage occurs in single crystal specimens exposed under identical conditions, regardless of temperature. In the polycrystals, the damage takes the form of very flat, crack-like intergranular cavities. It is found that the cavitation evolves slowly with time. For short exposure times, cavities as small as 0.1 {mu}m are observed. In specimens subjected to the longest aging times, the cavities grow and link until entire grain boundary facets fail. The driving force for the growth of these cavities is attributed to the internal gas pressure of helium-3 generated by the decay of tritium. The growth kinetics of cavity microstructure are described by a coupled grain boundary, surface self-diffusion process. The tritium exposure profoundly affects the mechanical properties of the polycrystalline material, inducing a severe loss in ductility. In concert with the observed ductility loss is a change in fracture morphology from transgranular ductile rupture to intergranular fracture. Examination of the resulting grain boundary facets reveals a dimple structure. The spacing of these dimples can be correlated with the spacing of the exposure-induced grain boundary cavities.

  4. Oxidation of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    The gateway to affordable and reliable space transportation in the near future remains long-lived rocket-based propulsion systems; and because of their high conductivities, copper alloys remain the best materials for lining rocket engines and dissipating their enormous thermal loads. However, Cu and its alloys are prone to oxidative degradation -- especially via the ratcheting phenomenon of blanching, which occurs in situations where the local ambient can oscillate between oxidation and reduction, as it does in a H2/02- fuelled rocket engine. Accordingly, resistance to blanching degradation is one of the key requirements for the next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV) liner materials. Candidate copper alloys have been studied with a view to comparing their oxidation behavior, and hence resistance to blanching, in ambients corresponding to conditions expected in rocket engine service. These candidate materials include GRCop-84 and GRCop-42 (Cu - Cr-8 - Nb-4 and Cu - Cr-4 - Nb-2 respectively); NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Y), and GlidCop (Cu-O.l5%Al2O3 ODS alloy); they represent different approaches to improving the mechanical properties of Cu without incurring a large drop in thermal conductivity. Pure Cu (OFHC-Cu) was included in the study to provide a baseline for comparison. The samples were exposed for 10 hours in the TGA to oxygen partial pressures ranging from 322 ppm to 1.0 atmosphere and at temperatures of up to 700 C, and examined by SEM-EDS and other techniques of metallography. This paper will summarize the results obtained.

  5. Oxidation of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    The gateway to affordable and reliable space transportation in the near future remains long-lived rocket-based propulsion systems; and because of their high conductivities, copper alloys remain the best materials for lining rocket engines and dissipating their enormous thermal loads. However, Cu and its alloys are prone to oxidative degradation -- especially via the ratcheting phenomenon of blanching, which occurs in situations where the local ambient can oscillate between oxidation and reduction, as it does in a H2/02- fuelled rocket engine. Accordingly, resistance to blanching degradation is one of the key requirements for the next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV) liner materials. Candidate copper alloys have been studied with a view to comparing their oxidation behavior, and hence resistance to blanching, in ambients corresponding to conditions expected in rocket engine service. These candidate materials include GRCop-84 and GRCop-42 (Cu - Cr-8 - Nb-4 and Cu - Cr-4 - Nb-2 respectively); NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Y), and GlidCop (Cu-O.l5%Al2O3 ODS alloy); they represent different approaches to improving the mechanical properties of Cu without incurring a large drop in thermal conductivity. Pure Cu (OFHC-Cu) was included in the study to provide a baseline for comparison. The samples were exposed for 10 hours in the TGA to oxygen partial pressures ranging from 322 ppm to 1.0 atmosphere and at temperatures of up to 700 C, and examined by SEM-EDS and other techniques of metallography. This paper will summarize the results obtained.

  6. Interaction of atomic oxygen with thin film and bulk copper: An XPS, AES, XRD, and profilometer study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raikar, Genesh N.; Gregory, John C.; Christl, Ligia C.; Peters, Palmer N.

    1992-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) experiment A-0114 was designed primarily to study degradation of material surfaces due to low earth orbital (LEO) atmospheric oxygen. The experiment contained 128 one inch circular samples: metals, polymers, carbons, and semiconductors. Among metal samples, copper has shown some interesting new results. Two types of copper samples, a film sputter coated on fused silica and a bulk piece of OFHC copper, were characterized employing a variety of techniques such as X-ray and Auger electron spectroscopies, X-ray diffraction, and high resolution profilometry. Cu 2p core level spectra were used to characterize the presence of Cu2O and CuO in addition to Cu Auger LMM lines. These results are supported by our recent X-ray diffraction studies which clearly establish the presence of Cu oxides which we were unable to prove in our earlier work. Profilometry showed an increase in thickness of the film sample where exposed to 106.7 +/- 0.5 nm from an initial thickness of 74.2 +/- 1.1 nm. Further studies with SEM and ellipsometry are underway.

  7. Copper cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper cyanide ; CASRN 544 - 92 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  8. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  9. Copper peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, L.

    1988-01-01

    A number of oxidizing agents, including chlorine, bromine, ozone and other peroxides, were allowed to act on copper solutions with the intention of forming copper peroxide. The only successful agent appears to be hydrogen peroxide. It must be used in a neutral 50 to 30 percent solution at a temperature near zero. Other methods described in the literature apparently do not work. The excess of hydrogen must be quickly sucked out of the brown precipitate, which it is best to wash with alcohol and ether. The product, crystalline under a microscope, can be analyzed only approximately. It approaches the formula CuO2H2O. In alkaline solution it appears to act catalytically in causing the decomposition of other peroxides, so that Na2O2 cannot be used to prepare it. On the addition of acids the H2O2 is regenerated. The dry substance decomposes much more slowly than the moist but is not very stable.

  10. Copper metallothioneins.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Jenifer; Jung, Hunmin; Meloni, Gabriele

    2017-04-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are a class of low molecular weight and cysteine-rich metal binding proteins present in all the branches of the tree of life. MTs efficiently bind with high affinity several essential and toxic divalent and monovalent transition metals by forming characteristic polynuclear metal-thiolate clusters within their structure. MTs fulfil multiple biological functions related to their metal binding properties, with essential roles in both Zn(II) and Cu(I) homeostasis as well as metal detoxification. Depending on the organism considered, the primary sequence, and the specific physiological and metabolic status, Cu(I)-bound MT isoforms have been isolated, and their chemistry and biology characterized. Besides the recognized role in the biochemistry of divalent metals, it is becoming evident that unique biological functions in selectively controlling copper levels, its reactivity as well as copper-mediated biochemical processes have evolved in some members of the MT superfamily. Selected examples are reviewed to highlight the peculiar chemical properties and biological functions of copper MTs. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 69(4):236-245, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Effect of sliding velocity on the tribological behavior of copper and associated nanostructure development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emge, Andrew

    The unlubricated sliding of metals is important in many mechanical devices covering a wide range of sliding velocities. However, the effect of sliding velocity on the tribological behavior of unlubricated metals has not been widely studied. Similarly, the relationship between microstructures developed at high sliding velocities and tribological behavior has not been studied in depth. Microstructures produced at low sliding velocities have been studied extensively and commonly include nanocrystalline or fine grained material near the sliding surface with heavily deformed microstructures further from the surface. The current research relates two aspects of the sliding friction of ductile metals, the effect of sliding velocity and the production of nanocrystalline tribomaterial. The project focused on the effects of sliding velocity on the frictional behavior of oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper sliding against 440C stainless steel, Nitronic 40 stainless steel, and copper. Low velocity tests were performed with a pin on disk tribometer. High velocity tests were performed with a rotating barrel gas gun (RBGG) which combined impact with sliding. The RBGG provides sliding velocities as high as 5.5 m/s and impact velocities as high as 12 m/s while maintaining sliding times on the order of tens of microseconds. Changes in the coefficient of friction, microstructure, and composition were studied. Surface and subsurface microstructures of the worn samples were characterized with a range of instruments including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), focused ion beam (FIB) milling and imaging, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with EDS, orientation imaging microscopy (OIM), and nanoindentation. In the case of self-mated copper the sliding velocity had little effect on the coefficient of friction for both experimental apparatuses. For the case of copper sliding against 440C stainless steel on the pin on disk system

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of aluminum and copper cleaning procedures for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.A.; McDowell, M.W.; Noonan, J.R. )

    1994-07-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), presently under construction, will produce x rays of unprecedented brightness. The storage ring where the x rays will be produced will be constructed from an extruded 6063 aluminum alloy, while transition pieces (flanges, etc.) will be made from a 2219 aluminum alloy. In addition, cooled photon absorbers will be placed in strategic locations throughout the ring to intercept the majority of the unused high power-density radiation. These will be made of either CDA-101 (OFHC) copper or glidcop (a dispersion strengthened copper alloy). Before any of these components can be assembled they must be cleaned to remove surface contaminants so that the ultrahigh vacuum ([lt]0.1 nTorr) necessary for successful operation can be achieved. Many recipes for cleaning aluminum and copper exist; however, most of them involve the use of chemicals that present safety and/or environmental concerns. We have undertaken an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of the effects of a variety of commercially available cleaners on the surface cleanliness of aluminum and copper. Several important results have been identified in this study. A simple alkaline detergent in an ultrasonic bath cleans aluminum alloys as effectively as the more aggressive cleaning solutions. The detergent can be used at 65 [degree]C to clean the 6063 alloy and at 50 [degree]C to clean the 2219 alloy. A citric acid based cleaner was found to be effective at cleaning copper, although the surface oxidizes rapidly. To date, we have been unable to find a universal cleaning procedure, i.e., one that is optimal for cleaning both Al and Cu.

  13. Copper allergy from dental copper amalgam?

    PubMed

    Gerhardsson, Lars; Björkner, Bert; Karlsteen, Magnus; Schütz, Andrejs

    2002-05-06

    A 65-year-old female was investigated due to a gradually increasing greenish colour change of her plastic dental splint, which she used to prevent teeth grinding when sleeping. Furthermore, she had noted a greenish/bluish colour change on the back of her black gloves, which she used to wipe her tears away while walking outdoors. The investigation revealed that the patient had a contact allergy to copper, which is very rare. She had, however, had no occupational exposure to copper. The contact allergy may be caused by long-term exposure of the oral mucosa to copper from copper-rich amalgam fillings, which were frequently used in childhood dentistry up to the 1960s in Sweden. The deposition of a copper-containing coating on the dental splint may be caused by a raised copper intake from drinking water, increasing the copper excretion in saliva, in combination with release of copper due to electrochemical corrosion of dental amalgam. The greenish colour change of the surface of the splint is probably caused by deposition of a mixture of copper compounds, e.g. copper carbonates. Analysis by the X-ray diffraction technique indicates that the dominant component is copper oxide (Cu2O and CuO). The corresponding greenish/bluish discoloration observed on the back of the patient's gloves may be caused by increased copper excretion in tears.

  14. COPPER CORROSION RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Copper release and corrosion related issues continue to be important to many water systems. The objective of this presentation is to discuss the current state of copper research at the USEPA. Specifically, the role of aging on copper release, use of phosphates for copper corrosio...

  15. Copper and Copper Proteins in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology. PMID:24672633

  16. Copper and copper proteins in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Montes, Sergio; Rivera-Mancia, Susana; Diaz-Ruiz, Araceli; Tristan-Lopez, Luis; Rios, Camilo

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that has been linked to pathological and beneficial effects in neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease, free copper is related to increased oxidative stress, alpha-synuclein oligomerization, and Lewy body formation. Decreased copper along with increased iron has been found in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus of Parkinson's disease patients. Copper influences iron content in the brain through ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activity; therefore decreased protein-bound copper in brain may enhance iron accumulation and the associated oxidative stress. The function of other copper-binding proteins such as Cu/Zn-SOD and metallothioneins is also beneficial to prevent neurodegeneration. Copper may regulate neurotransmission since it is released after neuronal stimulus and the metal is able to modulate the function of NMDA and GABA A receptors. Some of the proteins involved in copper transport are the transporters CTR1, ATP7A, and ATP7B and the chaperone ATOX1. There is limited information about the role of those biomolecules in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease; for instance, it is known that CTR1 is decreased in substantia nigra pars compacta in Parkinson's disease and that a mutation in ATP7B could be associated with Parkinson's disease. Regarding copper-related therapies, copper supplementation can represent a plausible alternative, while copper chelation may even aggravate the pathology.

  17. Arizona Copper

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Arizona produces 60% of the total copper mined in the US; in 2007, 750,000 tons of copper came out of the state. One of the major mining districts is located about 30 km south of Tucson. Starting around 1950, open-pit mining replaced underground operations, and the ASARCO-Mission complex, Twin Buttes, and Sierrita mines became large open pit operations. Accompanying copper mineralization, silver, molybdenum, zinc, lead and gold are extracted. In addition to the pits themselves, enormous leach ponds and tailings piles surround the pits. The image was acquired May 31, 2012, covers an area of 22 by 28 km, and is located at 31.9 degrees north, 111 degrees west. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on Terra. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. More information about ASTER is available at asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/ Credit: NASA

  18. Explosive Welding of Aluminum, Titanium and Zirconium to Copper Sheet Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegazy, A. A.; Mote, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The main material properties affecting the explosive weldability of a certain metal combination are the yield strength, the ductility, the density and the sonic velocity of the two metals. Successful welding of the metal combination depends mainly on the correct choice of the explosive welding parameters; i.e., the stand off distance, the weight of the explosive charge relative to the weight of the flyer plate and the detonation velocity of the explosive. Based on the measured and the handbook values of the properties of interest, the explosive welding parameters were calculated and the arrangements for the explosive welding of the Al alloy 6061-T6, titanium and zirconium to OFHC copper were determined. The relatively small sheet metal thickness (1/8") and the fact that the thickness of the explosive layer must exceed a certain minimum value were considered during the determination of the explosive welding conditions. The results of the metallographic investigations and the measurements of the shear strength at the interface demonstrate the usefulness of these calculations to minimize the number of experimental trials.

  19. The analysis of beryllium-copper diffusion joint after HHF test

    SciTech Connect

    Guiniatouline, R.N.; Mazul, I.V.; Rubkin, S.Y.

    1995-09-01

    The development of beryllium-copper joints which can withstand to relevant ITER divertor conditions is one of the important tasks at present time. One of the main problem for beryllium-copperjoints, is the inter-metallic layers, the strength and life time of joints significantly depends from the width and contents of the intermetallic layers. The objective of this work is to study the diffusion joint of TGP-56 beryllium to OFHC copper after thermal response and thermocyclic tests with beryllium-copper mockup. The BEY test were performed at e-beam facility (EBTS, SNLA). The following methods were used for analyses: the roentgenographic analysis; X-ray spectrum analysis; the fracture graphic analysis. During the investigation the followed studies were done: the analysis of diffusion boundary Be-Cu, which was obtained at the crossection of one of the tiles, the analysis of the debonded surfaces of a few beryllium tiles and corresponding copper parts; the analysis of upper surface of one of the tiles after HHF tests. The results of this work have showed that: the joint roentgenographic and elements analyses indicated the following phases in the diffusion zone: Cu{sub 2}Be ({approximately}170 {mu}m), CuBe ({approximately}30{mu}m), CuBe{sub 2} ({approximately}1 {mu}m) and solid solution of copper in beryllium. The phases Cu{sub 2}Be, CuBe and solid solution of copper in beryllium were indicated using quantitative microanalysis and phases CuBe, CuBe{sub 2}, Cu, Be - by roentgenographic analysis; the source of fracture (initial crack) is located in the central part of the tiles, the crack caused by the influence of residual stresses during cooling of a mock-up after fabrication and developed under the conditions of slow elastic-plastic growing during the process of thermal fatigue testing. The analysis gives the important data about joint`s quality and also may be used for any type of joints and its comparison for ITER applications.

  20. Copper:caeruloplasmin ratio

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Patrick J; Viljoen, Adie; House, Ivan M; Reynolds, Timothy M; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2007-01-01

    Investigation of copper status can be a diagnostic challenge. The non‐caeruloplasmin‐bound copper (NCC) has deficiencies; accordingly, the copper:caeruloplasmin ratio has been suggested as an alternative index of copper status. A reference interval for this index was derived. In addition to making the interpretation of copper easier, the copper:caeruloplasmin ratio should also enable adjustment for relatively high caeruloplasmin concentrations without recourse to producing gender‐ and age‐derived intervals. The copper:caeruloplasmin ratio has weaknesses similar to those identified for NCC in that immunological methods used for caeruloplasmin can cross react with apocaeruloplasmin and there is no standardised method for caeruloplasmin. Caeruloplasmin assays also have uncertainty from precision, bias and specificity and, accordingly, method‐related differences may have a large effect on the copper:caeruloplasmin ratio in a manner similar to the NCC. PMID:17405985

  1. Aquatic Life Criteria - Copper

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Documents pertain to Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality criteria for Copper (2007 Freshwater, 2016 Estuarine/marine). These documents contain the safe levels of Copper in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  2. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  3. Demystifying Controlling Copper Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The LCR systematically misses the highest health and corrosion risk sites for copper. Additionally, there are growing concerns for WWTP copper in sludges and discharge levels. There are many corrosion control differences between copper and lead. This talk explains the sometimes c...

  4. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  5. [Copper IUDs (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Thiery, M

    1983-10-01

    Following initial development of the Grafenberg ring in the 1920's, IUDs fell into disuse until the late 1950s, when plastic devices inserted using new technology began to gain worldwide acceptance. Further research indicated that copper had a significant antifertility effect which increased with increasing surface area, and several copper IUDs were developed and adapted, including the Copper T 200, the Copper T 220C, and the Copper T 380 A, probably the most effective yet. The Gravigard and Multiload are 2 other copper devices developed according to somewhat different principles. Copper devices are widely used not so much because of their great effectiveness as because of their suitability for nulliparous patients and their ease of insertion, which minimizes risk of uterine perforation. Records of 2584 women using Copper IUDs for 7190 women-years and 956 women using devices without copper for 6059 women-years suggest that the copper devices were associated with greater effectiveness and fewer removals for complications. Research suggests that the advantages of copper IUDs become more significant with increased duration of use. Contraindications to copper devices include allergy to copper and hepatolenticular degeneration. No carcinogenic or teratogenic effect of copper devices has been found, but further studies are needed to rule out other undesirable effects. Significant modifications of copper devices in recent years have been developed to increase their effectiveness, prolong their duration of usefulness, facilitate insertion and permit insertion during abortion or delivery. The upper limit of the surface area of copper associated with increased effectiveness appears to be between 200-300 sq mm, and at some point increases in copper exposure may provoke expulsion of the IUD. The duration of fertility inhibition of copper IUDs is usually estimated at 2-3 years, but recent research indicates that it may be 6-8 years, and some devices may retain copper surface

  6. Antimicrobial applications of copper.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Marin; Hartemann, Philippe; Engels-Deutsch, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Copper has long been known to have antimicrobial activity and is used in drinking water treatment and transportation. It has been recognized by the American Environmental Protection Agency as the first metallic antimicrobial agent in 2008. With ongoing waterborne hospital-acquired infections and antibiotic resistance, research on copper as an antimicrobial agent is again very attractive. Many studies have shown that the use of copper surface and copper particles could significantly reduce the environmental bioburden. This review highlights in its first part all the conditions described in the literature to enhance copper antimicrobial activity. Secondly, the different antimicrobial applications of copper in water treatment, hospital care units and public applications are presented. Finally, the future research needs on copper as an antimicrobial agent are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute copper toxicity following copper glycinate injection.

    PubMed

    Oon, S; Yap, C-H; Ihle, B U

    2006-11-01

    We present a patient who developed multi-organ failure due to severe copper toxicity following attempted suicide by s.c. injection of copper glycinate. Acute copper toxicity is rare in the developed world, although it occurs more frequently in developing world countries, where it is a common mode of suicide. Acute toxicity usually results from oral ingestion and there are several local and systemic effects. Specific management can be difficult as there is little evidence regarding the efficacy of chelating agents in acute toxicity.

  8. Tritium migration to the surfaces of Type 316 stainless steel; aluminum 6061; and oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, M.; Shmayda, W. T.; Schroder, W. U.

    2016-05-25

    The migration of tritium to the surfaces of aluminum 6061, oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper (OFHC), and stainless-steel 316 from the bulk metal was studied using low-pressure Tonks–Langmuir argon plasma. The plasma is shown to be effective at removing tritium from metal surfaces in a controlled manner. Tritium is removed in decreasing quantities with successive plasma exposures, which suggests a depletion of the surface and near-surface tritium inventories. A diffusion model was developed to predict tritium migration from the bulk and its accumulation in the water layers present on the metal surface. The model reproduces the rate of tritium re-growth on the surface for all three metals and can be used to calculate the triton solubility in the water layers present on metal surfaces. The ratio of surface-to-bulk solubilities at the water-layer/bulk-metal interface uniquely determines the concentration ratio between these two media. Removing the tritium-rich water layers induces tritium to migrate from the bulk to the surface. Furthermore, this process is driven by a concentration gradient that develops in the bulk because of the perturbation on the surface.

  9. Tritium migration to the surfaces of Type 316 stainless steel; aluminum 6061; and oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper

    DOE PAGES

    Sharpe, M.; Shmayda, W. T.; Schroder, W. U.

    2016-05-25

    The migration of tritium to the surfaces of aluminum 6061, oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper (OFHC), and stainless-steel 316 from the bulk metal was studied using low-pressure Tonks–Langmuir argon plasma. The plasma is shown to be effective at removing tritium from metal surfaces in a controlled manner. Tritium is removed in decreasing quantities with successive plasma exposures, which suggests a depletion of the surface and near-surface tritium inventories. A diffusion model was developed to predict tritium migration from the bulk and its accumulation in the water layers present on the metal surface. The model reproduces the rate of tritium re-growth on themore » surface for all three metals and can be used to calculate the triton solubility in the water layers present on metal surfaces. The ratio of surface-to-bulk solubilities at the water-layer/bulk-metal interface uniquely determines the concentration ratio between these two media. Removing the tritium-rich water layers induces tritium to migrate from the bulk to the surface. Furthermore, this process is driven by a concentration gradient that develops in the bulk because of the perturbation on the surface.« less

  10. Tritium migration to the surfaces of Type 316 stainless steel; aluminum 6061; and oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, M.; Shmayda, W. T.; Schroder, W. U.

    2016-05-25

    The migration of tritium to the surfaces of aluminum 6061, oxygen-free, high-conductivity copper (OFHC), and stainless-steel 316 from the bulk metal was studied using low-pressure Tonks–Langmuir argon plasma. The plasma is shown to be effective at removing tritium from metal surfaces in a controlled manner. Tritium is removed in decreasing quantities with successive plasma exposures, which suggests a depletion of the surface and near-surface tritium inventories. A diffusion model was developed to predict tritium migration from the bulk and its accumulation in the water layers present on the metal surface. The model reproduces the rate of tritium re-growth on the surface for all three metals and can be used to calculate the triton solubility in the water layers present on metal surfaces. The ratio of surface-to-bulk solubilities at the water-layer/bulk-metal interface uniquely determines the concentration ratio between these two media. Removing the tritium-rich water layers induces tritium to migrate from the bulk to the surface. Furthermore, this process is driven by a concentration gradient that develops in the bulk because of the perturbation on the surface.

  11. Copper in developmental stuttering.

    PubMed

    Alm, Per A

    2005-01-01

    It has previously been reported that men with developmental stuttering showed reduced concentration of copper in the blood, and a negative correlation between the copper level and the severity of stuttering. Disorders of copper metabolism may result in dysfunction of the basal ganglia system and dystonia, a motor disorder sharing some traits of stuttering. It has been shown that copper ions affect the dopamine and the GABA systems. With this background we investigated the plasma level of copper, the copper binding protein ceruloplasmin, and the estimated level of free copper in stuttering adults. Sixteen men with developmental stuttering were compared with 16 men without speech problems. The samples were assayed in one batch in a pseudorandom and counterbalanced order. No significant differences were found between stuttering men and the control group in any of the biological variables, and no negative correlation between copper and the general severity of stuttering was shown. On the contrary, an explorative analysis resulted in a positive correlation between high plasma copper and superfluous muscular activity during stuttering (r=0.51, p=0.04). This result indicates that there is no relation between developmental stuttering and low plasma copper in the main population of stuttering adults.

  12. Handling of Copper and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles by Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bulcke, Felix; Dringen, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    Copper is an essential trace element for many important cellular functions. However, excess of copper can impair cellular functions by copper-induced oxidative stress. In brain, astrocytes are considered to play a prominent role in the copper homeostasis. In this short review we summarise the current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms which are involved in the handling of copper by astrocytes. Cultured astrocytes efficiently take up copper ions predominantly by the copper transporter Ctr1 and the divalent metal transporter DMT1. In addition, copper oxide nanoparticles are rapidly accumulated by astrocytes via endocytosis. Cultured astrocytes tolerate moderate increases in intracellular copper contents very well. However, if a given threshold of cellular copper content is exceeded after exposure to copper, accelerated production of reactive oxygen species and compromised cell viability are observed. Upon exposure to sub-toxic concentrations of copper ions or copper oxide nanoparticles, astrocytes increase their copper storage capacity by upregulating the cellular contents of glutathione and metallothioneins. In addition, cultured astrocytes have the capacity to export copper ions which is likely to involve the copper ATPase 7A. The ability of astrocytes to efficiently accumulate, store and export copper ions suggests that astrocytes have a key role in the distribution of copper in brain. Impairment of this astrocytic function may be involved in diseases which are connected with disturbances in brain copper metabolism.

  13. Copper-Silicon Bronzes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1933-05-11

    copper alloys which have good static properties are disa:cinting in their endurance properties. The silicide allo~rs that are given high tensile strength...notched endurance tests and on cast alloys of this type, are lacking. uowever, preliminary reports state that a copper beryllium alloy of about 2 1/2...properties re- main almost the same. Grain size increases with sil- icon. III A study of hardening copper by heat treating its alloys with silicides

  14. Hair copper in intrauterine copper device users.

    PubMed

    Thiery, M; Heyndrickx, A; Uyttersprot, C

    1984-03-01

    The antifertility effect of copper-bearing IUDs is based on continuous release of copper, which is a result of the reaction between the metal and the uterine secretions. Released cupric ions collect in the endometrium and in the uterine fluid but significant accumulation has not been found in the bloodstream or elsewhere. Following Laker's suggestion that hair be used for monitoring essential trace elements, e.g., copper, we checked the copper content of the hair of women wearing copper-bearing IUDs. Samples of untreated pubic hair removed by clipping before diagnostic curettage were obtained from 10 young (24-34 years old), white caucasian females who until then had been wearing an MLCu250 IUD for more than 1 year. Pubes from 10 comparable (sex, age, race) subjects who had never used a Cu-containing device served as controls. The unwashed material was submitted to the toxicology laboratory, where the copper content was assessed by flameless atomic absorption, a technique whose lower limit of measurement lies at a concentration of 0.05 mcg Cu/ml fluid (50 ppb). Hair samples were washed to remove extraneous traces of metal according to the prescriptions of the International Atomic Energy Agency, weighed, and mineralized, after which a small volume (10 mcl) of the diluted fluid was fed into the graphite furnace. Each sample (75-150 mg) was analyzed 4 times, both before and after washing. Since the cleaning procedure reduces the weight of the sample (mainly by the removal of fat, dust, etc.) this explains why the percentage copper content of washed hair is higher than that of unwashed hair belonging to the same subject. The results indicate that there was no significant difference (Mann-Whitney U test) between the mean copper levels of both unwashed and washed pubes from women who were using or had never used an MLCu250 IUD. We therefore conclude that the use of this copper-containing device is not associated with significant accumulation of copper in (pubic) hair.

  15. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, Henry

    1993-01-01

    A process for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

  16. Biogenic nanoparticles: copper, copper oxides, copper sulphides, complex copper nanostructures and their applications.

    PubMed

    Rubilar, Olga; Rai, Mahendra; Tortella, Gonzalo; Diez, Maria Cristina; Seabra, Amedea B; Durán, Nelson

    2013-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles have been the focus of intensive study due to their potential applications in diverse fields including biomedicine, electronics, and optics. Copper-based nanostructured materials have been used in conductive films, lubrification, nanofluids, catalysis, and also as potent antimicrobial agent. The biogenic synthesis of metallic nanostructured nanoparticles is considered to be a green and eco-friendly technology since neither harmful chemicals nor high temperatures are involved in the process. The present review discusses the synthesis of copper nanostructured nanoparticles by bacteria, fungi, and plant extracts, showing that biogenic synthesis is an economically feasible, simple and non-polluting process. Applications for biogenic copper nanoparticles are also discussed.

  17. Multiphase separation of copper nanowires.

    PubMed

    Qian, Fang; Lan, Pui Ching; Olson, Tammy; Zhu, Cheng; Duoss, Eric B; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Han, T Yong-Jin

    2016-09-22

    This communication reports a new method to purify copper nanowires with nearly 100% yield from undesired copper nanoparticle side-products formed during batch processes of copper nanowire synthesis. This simple separation method can yield large quantities of long, uniform, high-purity copper nanowires to meet the requirements of nanoelectronics applications as well as provide an avenue for purifying copper nanowires in the industrial scale synthesis of copper nanowires, a key step for commercialization and application of nanowires.

  18. Multiphase separation of copper nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Qian, Fang; Lan, Pui Ching; Olson, Tammy; ...

    2016-01-01

    This communication reports a new method to purify copper nanowires with nearly 100% yield from undesired copper nanoparticle side-products formed during batch processes of copper nanowire synthesis. This simple separation method can yield large quantities of long, uniform, high-purity copper nanowires to meet the requirements of nanoelectronics applications as well as provide an avenue for purifying copper nanowires in the industrial scale synthesis of copper nanowires, a key step for commercialization and application of nanowires.

  19. Multiphase separation of copper nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Fang; Lan, Pui Ching; Olson, Tammy; Zhu, Cheng; Duoss, Eric B.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.; Han, T. Yong-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Here, this communication reports a new method to purify copper nanowires with nearly 100% yield from undesired copper nanoparticle side-products formed during batch processes of copper nanowire synthesis. Also, this simple separation method can yield large quantities of long, uniform, high-purity copper nanowires to meet the requirements of nanoelectronics applications as well as provide an avenue for purifying copper nanowires in the industrial scale synthesis of copper nanowires, a key step for commercialization and application of nanowires.

  20. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

    1996-12-10

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  1. Copper-containing zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Geoffrey L.; Kanazirev, Vladislav

    1996-01-01

    A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

  2. Copper Delivery by Metallochaperone Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, A.C.

    2010-03-08

    Copper is an essential element in all living organisms, serving as a cofactor for many important proteins and enzymes. Metallochaperone proteins deliver copper ions to specific physiological partners by direct protein-protein interactions. The Atx1-like chaperones transfer copper to intracellular copper transporters, and the CCS chaperones shuttle copper to copper,zinc superoxide dismutase. Crystallographic studies of these two copper chaperone families have provided insights into metal binding and target recognition by metallochaperones and have led to detailed molecular models for the copper transfer mechanism.

  3. Improved Electroformed Structural Copper and Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Hudson, W.; Babcock, B.; Edwards, R.

    1998-01-01

    Electroforming offers a superior means for fabricating internally cooled heat exchangers and structures subjected to thermal environments. Copper is deposited from many such applications because of the good thermal conductivity. It suffers from mediocre yield strength as a structural material and loses mechanical strength at intermediate temperatures. Mechanical properties similar to those of electroformed nickel are desired. Phase 1 examined innovative means to improve deposited copper structural performance. Yield strengths as high as 483 MPa (70 ksi) were obtained with useful ductility while retaining a high level of purity essential to good thermal conductivity. Phase 2 represents a program to explore new additive combinations in copper electrolytes to produce a more fine, equiaxed grain which can be thermally stabilized by other techniques such as alloying in modest degrees and dispersion strengthening. Evaluation of new technology - such as the codeposition of fullerness (diamond-like) particles were made to enhance thermal conductivity in low alloys. A test fire quality tube-bundle engine was fabricated using these copper property improvement concepts to show the superiority of the new coppers and fabrications methods over competitive technologies such as brazing and plasma deposition.

  4. COPPER RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides an update and overview of new research results and remaining research needs with respect to copper corrosion control issues. The topics to be covered include: occurrence of elevated copper release in systems that meet the Action Level; impact of water c...

  5. Green Luminescent Copper Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, Y.; Annapurna, S.; Bhikshamaiah, G.; Singh, A. K.

    2016-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles are synthesized by a green chemical reduction method using Gum Kondagogu extract as stabilizer. The as-prepared powder samples are characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS), UV-Visible Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The as-prepared copper nanoparticles are found to be FCC crystalline and nearly monodispersed with particles size 19 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) measurement showed strong green visible emission and PL intensity was found enhanced with the presence of natural extract on copper nanoparticle surface. The increase in the PL intensity was mainly due to copper nanoparticles. Photoluminescence spectra of copper nanoparticles show an emission peak at 430 nm when illuminated at 325 nm.

  6. Bioaccessibility and Solubility of Copper in Copper-Treated Lumber

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper (MC)-treated lumber is a recent replacement for Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) and Ammonium Copper (AC)-treated lumbers; though little is known about the potential risk of copper (Cu) exposure from incidental ingestion of MC-treated wood. The bioaccessibility o...

  7. Bioaccessibility and Solubility of Copper in Copper-Treated Lumber

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper (MC)-treated lumber is a recent replacement for Chromated Copper Arsenate (CCA) and Ammonium Copper (AC)-treated lumbers; though little is known about the potential risk of copper (Cu) exposure from incidental ingestion of MC-treated wood. The bioaccessibility o...

  8. Killing of bacteria by copper surfaces involves dissolved copper.

    PubMed

    Molteni, Cristina; Abicht, Helge K; Solioz, Marc

    2010-06-01

    Bacteria are rapidly killed on copper surfaces. However, the mechanism of this process remains unclear. Using Enterococcus hirae, the effect of inactivation of copper homeostatic genes and of medium compositions on survival and copper dissolution was tested. The results support a role for dissolved copper ions in killing.

  9. Embedding of copper sulfate and copper oxide on multipurpose paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almanza, D. L. V.; de Luna, J. L. A.; Herrera, M. U.

    2017-05-01

    Copper sulfate salts were embedded on multipurpose paper using simple soaking technique while copper oxide particles were embedded using in-situ technique. In simple soaking technique, the papers were simply soaked in copper sulfate solution in order for the copper salts to be incorporated in the paper. In the in-situ technique, the copper sulfate-embedded papers were soaked in sodium hydroxide solution for reactions to occur that will lead to the formation of copper oxide. Copper sulfate-embedded papers have blue green color while copper oxide-embedded papers have brown color. The copper sulfate-embedded paper shows excellent antimicrobial property against Staphylococcus aureus. Meanwhile, the copper oxide-embedded paper shows small zone of inhibition against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

  10. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  11. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D&D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness of separating

  12. [Copper and the human body].

    PubMed

    Krízek, M; Senft, V; Motán, J

    1997-11-19

    Copper is one of the essential trace elements. It is part of a number of enzymes. Deficiency of the element is manifested by impaired haematopoesis, bone metabolism, disorders of the digestive, cardiovascular and nervous system. Deficiency occurs in particular in patients suffering from malnutrition, malabsorption, great copper losses during administration of penicillamine. Sporadically copper intoxications are described (suicidal intentions or accidental ingestion of beverages with a high copper content). Acute exposure to copper containing dust is manifested by metal fume fever. Copper salts can produce local inflammations. Wilson's disease is associated with inborn impaired copper metabolism. In dialyzed patients possible contaminations of the dialyzate with copper must be foreseen as well as the possible release of copper from some dialyzation membranes. With the increasing amount of copper in the environment it is essential to monitor the contamination of the environment.

  13. Targeting copper in cancer therapy: 'Copper That Cancer'.

    PubMed

    Denoyer, Delphine; Masaldan, Shashank; La Fontaine, Sharon; Cater, Michael A

    2015-11-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient involved in fundamental life processes that are conserved throughout all forms of life. The ability of copper to catalyze oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, which can inadvertently lead to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), necessitates the tight homeostatic regulation of copper within the body. Many cancer types exhibit increased intratumoral copper and/or altered systemic copper distribution. The realization that copper serves as a limiting factor for multiple aspects of tumor progression, including growth, angiogenesis and metastasis, has prompted the development of copper-specific chelators as therapies to inhibit these processes. Another therapeutic approach utilizes specific ionophores that deliver copper to cells to increase intracellular copper levels. The therapeutic window between normal and cancerous cells when intracellular copper is forcibly increased, is the premise for the development of copper-ionophores endowed with anticancer properties. Also under investigation is the use of copper to replace platinum in coordination complexes currently used as mainstream chemotherapies. In comparison to platinum-based drugs, these promising copper coordination complexes may be more potent anticancer agents, with reduced toxicity toward normal cells and they may potentially circumvent the chemoresistance associated with recurrent platinum treatment. In addition, cancerous cells can adapt their copper homeostatic mechanisms to acquire resistance to conventional platinum-based drugs and certain copper coordination complexes can re-sensitize cancer cells to these drugs. This review will outline the biological importance of copper and copper homeostasis in mammalian cells, followed by a discussion of our current understanding of copper dysregulation in cancer, and the recent therapeutic advances using copper coordination complexes as anticancer agents.

  14. Micromachining with copper lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Martyn R. H.; Bell, Andy; Foster-Turner, Gideon; Rutterford, Graham; Chudzicki, J.; Kearsley, Andrew J.

    1997-04-01

    In recent years the copper laser has undergone extensive development and has emerged as a leading and unique laser for micromachining. The copper laser is a high average power (10 - 250 W), high pulse repetition rate (2 - 32 kHz), visible laser (511 nm and 578 nm) that produces high peak power (typically 200 kW), short pulses (30 ns) and very good beam quality (diffraction limited). This unique set of laser parameters results in exceptional micro-machining in a wide variety of materials. Typical examples of the capabilities of the copper laser include the drilling of small holes (10 - 200 micrometer diameter) in materials as diverse as steel, ceramic, diamond and polyimide with micron precision and low taper (less than 1 degree) cutting and profiling of diamond. Application of the copper laser covers the electronic, aerospace, automotive, nuclear, medical and precision engineering industries.

  15. Volatility of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.A.; Simonson, J.M.; Joyce, D.B.

    1996-08-01

    The relevant aqueous thermodynamics of copper and its oxides are evaluated and summarized with emphasis on solubility, hydrolysis, and complexation. The solubilities of metallic copper, solid cuprous and cupric oxides in steam measured by Pocock and Stewart in 1963 are discussed and the latter data are fitted in the form of established empirical equations and compared to other existing results. No other sources of data were found for the solubility of copper and cupric oxide in steam and even these data are very limited. Discussion of corresponding available solubility data on both oxide phases in liquid water is given. The possible effects of complexing agents are considered. A brief discussion is provided of the role of surface adsorption in determining the fate of dissolved copper in the boiler. 37 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Bacterial Killing by Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lam, Ee Wen; Elowsky, Christian G.; Quaranta, Davide; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Metallic copper surfaces rapidly and efficiently kill bacteria. Cells exposed to copper surfaces accumulated large amounts of copper ions, and this copper uptake was faster from dry copper than from moist copper. Cells suffered extensive membrane damage within minutes of exposure to dry copper. Further, cells removed from copper showed loss of cell integrity. Acute contact with metallic copper surfaces did not result in increased mutation rates or DNA lesions. These findings are important first steps for revealing the molecular sensitive targets in cells lethally challenged by exposure to copper surfaces and provide a scientific explanation for the use of copper surfaces as antimicrobial agents for supporting public hygiene. PMID:21148701

  17. Copper and copper-nickel alloys as zebra mussel antifoulants

    SciTech Connect

    Dormon, J.M.; Cottrell, C.M.; Allen, D.G.; Ackerman, J.D.; Spelt, J.K.

    1996-04-01

    Copper has been used in the marine environment for decades as cladding on ships and pipes to prevent biofouling by marine mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). This motivated the present investigation into the possibility of using copper to prevent biofouling in freshwater by both zebra mussels and quagga mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis collectively referred to as zebra mussels). Copper and copper alloy sheet proved to be highly effective in preventing biofouling by zebra mussels over a three-year period. Further studies were conducted with copper and copper-nickel mesh (lattice of expanded metal) and screen (woven wire with a smaller hole size), which reduced the amount of copper used. Copper screen was also found to be strongly biofouling-resistant with respect to zebra mussels, while copper mesh reduced zebra mussel biofouling in comparison to controls, but did not prevent it entirely. Preliminary investigations into the mechanism of copper antifouling, using galvanic couples, indicated that the release of copper ions from the surface of the exposed metal into the surrounding water is directly or indirectly responsible for the biofouling resistance of copper.

  18. Preparation of high purity copper fluoride by fluorinating copper hydroxyfluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. B.; Lundquist, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    Copper fluoride containing no more than 50 ppm of any contaminating element was prepared by the fluorination of copper hydroxyfluoride. The impurity content was obtained by spark source mass spectrometry. High purity copper fluoride is needed as a cathode material for high energy density batteries.

  19. 24-hour urine copper test

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with providing a urine sample. Alternative Names Quantitative urinary copper Images Copper urine test References McPherson ... for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis ...

  20. Agricultural soils spiked with copper mine wastes and copper concentrate: implications for copper bioavailability and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Ginocchio, Rosanna; Sánchez, Pablo; de la Fuente, Luz María; Camus, Isabel; Bustamante, Elena; Silva, Yasna; Urrestarazu, Paola; Torres, Juan C; Rodríguez, Patricio H

    2006-03-01

    A better understanding of exposure to and effects of copper-rich pollutants in soils is required for accurate environmental risk assessment of copper. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to study copper bioavailability and bioaccumulation in agricultural soils spiked with different types of copper-rich mine solid wastes (copper ore, tailing sand, smelter dust, and smelter slag) and copper concentrate. A copper salt (copper sulfate, CuSO4) that frequently is used to assess soil copper bioavailability and phytotoxicity also was included for comparison. Results showed that smelter dust, tailing sand, and CuSO4 are more likely to be bioavailable and, thus, toxic to plants compared with smelter slag, concentrate, and ore at equivalent total copper concentrations. Differences may be explained by intrinsic differences in copper solubilization from the source materials, but also by their capability to decrease soil pH (confounding effect). The copper toxicity and bioaccumulation in plants also varied according to soil physicochemical characteristics (e.g., pH and total organic carbon) and the available levels of plant nutrients, such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. Chemistry/mineralogy of mine materials, soil/pore-water chemistry, and plant physiological status thus should be integrated for building adequate models to predict phytotoxicity and environmental risk of copper.

  1. The mineralogy of copper electrorefining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. T.; Dutrizac, J. E.

    1990-08-01

    The impurities in copper anodes occur both in solid solution in the copper metal matrix and in discrete inclusions at the copper grain boundaries. During electrorefining, all the impurities undergo extensive chemical and/or morphological changes. These changes impact significantly on anode passivation, cathode quality, electrolyte purification and, of course, the subsequent recovery of by-products from the anode slimes. Recently, mineralogical studies have been undertaken to characterize the various impurities and elucidate their transformations during copper electrorefining.

  2. Copper-phosphorus alloys offer advantages in brazing copper

    SciTech Connect

    Rupert, W.D.

    1996-05-01

    Copper-phosphorus brazing alloys are used extensively for joining copper, especially refrigeration and air-conditioning copper tubing and electrical conductors. What is the effect of phosphorus when alloyed with copper? The following are some of the major effects: (1) It lowers the melt temperature of copper (a temperature depressant). (2) It increases the fluidity of the copper when in the liquid state. (3) It acts as a deoxidant or a fluxing agent with copper. (4) It lowers the ductility of copper (embrittles). There is a misconception that silver improves the ductility of the copper-phosphorus alloys. In reality, silver added to copper acts in a similar manner as phosphorus. The addition of silver to copper lowers the melt temperature (temperature depressant) and decreases the ductility. Fortunately, the rate and amount at which silver lowers copper ductility is significantly less than that of phosphorus. Therefore, taking advantage of the temperature depressant property of silver, a Ag-Cu-P alloy can be selected at approximately the same melt temperature as a Cu-P alloy, but at a lower phosphorus content. The lowering of the phosphorus content actually makes the alloy more ductile, not the silver addition. A major advantage of the copper-phosphorus alloys is the self-fluxing characteristic when joining copper to copper. They may also be used with the addition of a paste flux on brass, bronze, and specialized applications on silver, tungsten and molybdenum. Whether it is selection of the proper BCuP alloy or troubleshooting an existing problem, the suggested approach is a review of the desired phosphorus content in the liquid metal and how it is being altered during application. In torch brazing, a slight change in the oxygen-fuel ratio can affect the joint quality or leak tightness.

  3. High adherence copper plating process

    DOEpatents

    Nignardot, H.

    1993-09-21

    A process is described for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing the surface of an aluminum or steel substrate for the electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to either substrate.

  4. Brazing copper to dispersion-strengthened copper

    SciTech Connect

    Ryding, D.G.; Allen, D.; Lee, R.

    1996-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a state-of-the-art synchrotron light source that will produce intense x-ray beams, which will allow the study of smaller samples and faster reactions and processes at a greater level of detail that has been possible to date. The beam is produced by using third-generation insertion devices in a 7 GeV electron/positron storage ring that is 1100 meters in circumference. The heat load from these intense high power devices is very high and certain components must sustain total heat loads of 3 to 15 kW and heat fluxes of 30 W/mm{sup 2}. Because the beams will cycle on and off many times, thermal shock and fatigue will be a problem. High heat flux impinging on a small area causes a large thermal gradient that results in high stress. GlidCop{reg_sign}, a dispersion strengthened copper, is the desired material because of its high thermal conductivity and superior mechanical properties as compared to copper and its alloys. GlidCop is not amenable to joining by fusion welding, and brazing requires diligence because of high diffusivity. Brazing procedures were developed using optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  6. Ballistic perforation of oxygen-free high conductivity copper and 7039 aluminum targets: A microstructural and hydrocode study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Christine

    This research involves an effort to study and compare the residual microstructures and dynamic behavior of two metallic targets of finite thicknesses, namely OFHC (oxygen-free high-conductivity) copper and 7039 aluminum, subjected to ballistic impact and perforation by a tungsten heavy alloy (WHA) projectile. Also included in this work is an attempt to validate mathematical modelling of experimental results through the use of a computer hydrocode, AUTODYN-2D, which allows for the simulation of ballistic penetration/perforation events and possible differentiation of fundamental mechanisms through validation strategies. These targets represent two very different FCC materials. The 7039 aluminum is extremely hard in contrast to a softer, ductile copper. The "failure" mechanisms appear to be different on a macroscopic scale, but may be similar on a microscopic scale. A preliminary investigation of the residual penetration channels in these two targets revealed significant microstructural differences. In the 7039 aluminum target there is a limited extent of microstructural deformation seen through optical microscopy, though numerous shear bands are observed near the channel wall and at the spalled region. Observations of the OHFC target, on the other hand, show a narrow region of recrystallized grains adjacent to the crater wall, beyond which is an extensive area of microband clusters. Similar features have been observed previously in connection with hypervelocity impact cratering in copper. This investigation will attempt to provide clues to the fundamental issues involved in the differing dynamic behavior of the two FCC materials. A detailed analysis of microstructures and their evolution will be conducted through metallography and transmission electron microscopy. Microhardness measurements will be performed to correlate the results of ballistic computer simulations through residual stress and hardness profiles. Computational modeling will be used to simulate the

  7. Creative Copper Crests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knab, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to create an art activity that would link the computer-created business cards of fourth-grade students with an upcoming school-wide medieval event. Creating family crests from copper foil would be a great connection, since they, like business cards, are an individual's way to identify themselves to others.…

  8. Creative Copper Crests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knab, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to create an art activity that would link the computer-created business cards of fourth-grade students with an upcoming school-wide medieval event. Creating family crests from copper foil would be a great connection, since they, like business cards, are an individual's way to identify themselves to others.…

  9. Copper uptake by Penicillium brevicompactum.

    PubMed

    Tsekova, K; Dentcheva, V; Ianis, M

    2001-01-01

    The copper binding properties of Penicillium brevicompactum biomass were influenced by growth phase of mycelium and concentration of copper in reaction mixtures. The efficiency of copper uptake increased with growth time and was largest at the mid-logarithmic growth phase. The time course of copper uptake was biphasic. Double reciprocal plots of absorption velocity of copper vs. copper concentration gave straight lines at concentration between 0.5 to 4 mM. The apparent affinity of copper to the biomass of the stationary growth phase was the same as that of logarithmic growth phase and Km values were about 1.4 mM. Pretreatment of the mycelium with glucose increased the amount of metal uptake about five times in comparison with the controls.

  10. Production of ultrahigh purity copper using waste copper nitrate solution.

    PubMed

    Choi, J Y; Kim, D S

    2003-04-25

    The production of ultrahigh purity copper (99.9999%) by electrolysis in the presence of a cementation barrier has been attempted employing a waste nitric copper etching solution as the electrolyte. The amount of copper deposited on the cathode increased almost linearly with electrolysis time and the purity of copper was observed to increase as the electrolyte concentration was increased. At some point, however, as the electrolyte concentration increased, the purity of copper decreased slightly. As the total surface area of cementation barrier increased, the purity of product increased. The electrolyte temperature should be maintained below 35 degrees C in the range of investigated electrolysis conditions to obtain the ultrahigh purity copper. Considering that several industrial waste solutions contain valuable metallic components the result of present study may support a claim that electrowinning is a very desirable process for their treatment and recovery.

  11. Copper Vapor Generator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    percent measured during this program in a static copper vapor apparatus developed at PIB . This efficiency has been calculated by dividing the energy of a... laser medium. A measure of beam quality may be defined in terms ot the energy delivered in the tar field in relatum to the energy delivered by a...phase of the work the homogeneity requirements for the medium of a high -power laser was reviewed. These requirements were translated into measurable

  12. Copper@polypyrrole nanocables

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A simple hydrothermal redox reaction between microcrystalline CuOHCl and pyrrole leads to the isolation of striking nanostructures formed by polypyrrole-coated copper nanocables. These multicomponent cables that feature single-crystalline face-centered cubic Cu cores (ca. 300 nm wide and up to 200 μm long) are smoothly coated by conducting polypyrrole, which in addition to its functionality, offers protection against oxidation of the metal core. PMID:23009710

  13. Jet-printed copper metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Cheong Min

    Macroelectronics is a technology for making electronic circuits over very large areas at low cost. Flat panel displays, sensor arrays, and thin film solar cells are examples of macroelectronics. Crucial to the success of this new technology is the development of inexpensive electronic processes, materials, and devices. Direct printing techniques, which eliminate processing steps and save device and process materials, are the key to high volume and high throughput manufacturing. Copper metallization has been receiving increasing attention in both microelectronics and macroelectronics. Copper has high conductivity, density, melting point, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity. However, copper is also hard to dry etch. For these reasons we have developed and demonstrated a directly printed copper source/drain metallization technique and applied it to the fabrication of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistors (TFTs). The maximum process temperature of 200°C is compatible with conventional active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) technology. In this dissertation, we show the process of depositing copper films by jet printing. We discuss the preparation and the properties of the copper precursor material used in the jet printing. We survey the conversion process from copper precursor to copper under varying processing conditions. The resulting copper film is probed for its physical, electrical, and mechanical properties. To demonstrate the feasibility of the jet printing technique, we print copper source/drain contacts for a-Si:H TFTs. The photolithography-free TFT fabrication process uses the printed xerographic toner technique developed earlier in this laboratory. We show that functional TFTs can be made with printed copper source and drain contacts. The jet printing of copper contacts represents a further step toward an all-printed thin film transistor technology.

  14. Copper vapor lasers - Recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, R. R.; Maldonado, G.; Webb, C. E.

    1989-06-01

    A 100W copper vapor laser is studied for use as an amplifier. The gain is measured with temporal and radial resolution throughout the gain period and the absorption is monitored throughout the interpulse period. Preliminary results are presented. Evidence of upper level coupling in an operating copper laser is also observed. A large population transfer between upper levels in an oven containing copper vapor is only observed in the presence of a very strong U.V. probe beam.

  15. Copper shows its mettle worldwide.

    PubMed

    Vessey, Angela

    2012-10-01

    While MRSA rates in England continue to fall, NHS Trusts are looking for smarter ways to achieve further reductions in infection rates, or to support their 'zero-tolerance approaches', and, according to the Copper Development Association (CDA), the not-for-profit, membership-based organisation which supports and promotes 'the correct and efficient use of copper and its alloys', deployment of antimicrobial copper touch surfaces is being adopted in many hospitals and other healthcare facilities worldwide as 'an additional and cost-effective infection control measure'. CDA Director Angela Vessey highlights the benefits, and examines some of the growing number of healthcare installations of 'antimicrobial copper' worldwide.

  16. Oxidation Mechanism of Copper Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskinen, Pekka; Patana, Sonja; Kobylin, Petri; Latostenmaa, Petri

    2014-09-01

    The oxidation mechanism of copper selenide was investigated at deselenization temperatures of copper refining anode slimes. The isothermal roasting of synthetic, massive copper selenide in flowing oxygen and oxygen - 20% sulfur dioxide mixtures at 450-550 °C indicate that in both atmospheres the mass of Cu2Se increases as a function of time, due to formation of copper selenite as an intermediate product. Copper selenide oxidises to copper oxides without formation of thick copper selenite scales, and a significant fraction of selenium is vaporized as SeO2(g). The oxidation product scales on Cu2Se are porous which allows transport of atmospheric oxygen to the reaction zone and selenium dioxide vapor to the surrounding gas. Predominance area diagrams of the copper-selenium system, constructed for selenium roasting conditions, indicate that the stable phase of copper in a selenium roaster gas with SO2 is the sulfate CuSO4. The cuprous oxide formed in decomposition of Cu2Se is further sulfated to CuSO4.

  17. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1987-07-30

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  18. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, Milton; Sinha, Shome N.

    1990-01-01

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  19. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOEpatents

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1990-05-15

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  20. Synthesis of copper/copper oxide nanoparticles by solution plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Genki; Hosokai, Sou; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Akiyama, Tomohiro

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of copper/copper oxide nanoparticles via a solution plasma, in which the effect of the electrolyte and electrolysis time on the morphology of the products was mainly examined. In the experiments, a copper wire as a cathode was immersed in an electrolysis solution of a K2CO3 with the concentration from 0.001 to 0.50 M or a citrate buffer (pH = 4.8), and was melted by the local-concentration of current. The results demonstrated that by using the K2CO3 solution, we obtained CuO nanoflowers with many sharp nanorods, the size of which decreased with decreasing the concentration of the solution. Spherical particles of copper with/without pores formed when the citrate buffer was used. The pores in the copper nanoparticles appeared when the applied voltage changed from 105 V to 130 V, due to the dissolution of Cu2O.

  1. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-08

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters.

  2. Antimony activities in copper mattes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, M.; Toguri, J. M.

    1987-03-01

    A mass spectrometric technique combined with a double Knudsen cell was used to determine the antimony and copper activities in the Cu-Sb binary system at 1373 K and in the two-melt composition range of the Cu-S-Sb ternary system at 1423 K. The antimony and copper activities were calculated based on the intensity ration of the gaseous Sb and Cu species, over the unknown and known activity samples, respectively. γ{Sb/o} were found to be 1.1×10-2 in molten copper at 1373 K, and 1.8×10-2 and 0.44 in a copper-rich phase and in a matter phase, of the Cu-S-Sb ternary system at 1423 K, respectively. These values indicate, that antimony can be removed during the matte smelting and slagging stage of the copper smelting process. Interaction parameters of antimony in molten copper slagging stage of the copper smelting process. Interaction parameters of antimony in molten copper at 1423 K were calculated and found to be 10.7, -5.4, and 6.3 for ɛ{Sb/Sb} · ρSb Sb, and ɛ{Sb/S}, respectively.

  3. Lead and Copper Control 101

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is an overview of the most important water treatment strategies for the control of lead and copper release from drinking water corrosion. In addition to the sections specifically on lead and copper treatment, sections are included that cover sampling to find le...

  4. Lead and Copper Control 101

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is an overview of the most important water treatment strategies for the control of lead and copper release from drinking water corrosion. In addition to the sections specifically on lead and copper treatment, sections are included that cover sampling to find le...

  5. Effects of copper(II) and copper oxides on THMs formation in copper pipe.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Qu, Jiuhui; Liu, Huijuan; Hu, Chengzhi

    2007-08-01

    Little is known about how the growth of trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water is affected in copper pipe. The formation of THMs and chlorine consumption in copper pipe under stagnant flow conditions were investigated. Experiments for the same water held in glass bottles were performed for comparison. Results showed that although THMs levels firstly increased in the presence of chlorine in copper pipe, faster decay of chlorine as compared to the glass bottle affected the rate of THMs formation. The analysis of water phase was supplemented by surface analysis of corrosion scales using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX). The results showed the scales on the pipe surface mainly consisted of Cu(2)O, CuO and Cu(OH)(2) or CuCO(3). Designed experiments confirmed that the fast depletion of chlorine in copper pipe was mainly due to effect of Cu(2)O, CuO in corrosion scales on copper pipe. Although copper(II) and copper oxides showed effect on THMs formation, the rapid consumption of chlorine due to copper oxide made THM levels lower than that in glass bottles after 4h. The transformations of CF, DCBM and CDBM to BF were accelerated in the presence of copper(II), cupric oxide and cuprous oxide. The effect of pH on THMs formation was influenced by effect of pH on corrosion of copper pipe. When pH was below 7, THMs levels in copper pipe was higher as compared to glass bottle, but lower when pH was above 7.

  6. Optical Properties of Copper Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenskii, A. V.; Zvekov, A. A.; Nikitin, A. P.; Anan'eva, M. V.

    2015-12-01

    Spectral dependences of the light extinction, absorption, and scattering efficiency factors of copper nanoparticles attendant to variations of their radii are calculated. A plasmon maximum is observed on the spectral dependence of the extinction efficiency factor for nanoparticle radii 10-60 nm. The maximum of the absorption efficiency factor is shifted toward red wavelengths with increasing radius of copper nanoparticles. Results are interpreted based on the special features of the spectral dependence of the complex copper refractive index. It is shown that the copper nanoparticles with radius of 35 nm placed into a transparent matrix with refractive index of 1.54 (secondary explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate) possess a very high value of the absorption efficiency factor (2.9) of the second harmonic of a neodymium laser. Our investigations suggest that the copper nanoparticles are perspective material for application in compositions for optical detonator capsules.

  7. 21 CFR 73.1647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Copper powder. 73.1647 Section 73.1647 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1647 Copper powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive copper powder is a very fine free-flowing metallic powder prepared from virgin electrolytic copper....

  8. 21 CFR 73.1647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copper powder. 73.1647 Section 73.1647 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1647 Copper powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive copper powder is a very fine free-flowing metallic powder prepared from virgin electrolytic copper....

  9. 21 CFR 184.1260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 184.1260 Section 184.1260 Food... GRAS § 184.1260 Copper gluconate. (a) Copper gluconate (cupric gluconate (CH2OH(CHOH)4COO)2Cu, CAS Reg... ingredient is used in food at levels not to exceed current good manufacturing practice. Copper gluconate...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 184.1260 Section 184.1260 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1260 Copper gluconate. (a) Copper gluconate (cupric gluconate... practice. Copper gluconate may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g) of the...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 184.1260 Section 184.1260 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1260 Copper gluconate. (a) Copper gluconate (cupric gluconate... practice. Copper gluconate may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g) of the...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 184.1260 Section 184.1260 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1260 Copper gluconate. (a) Copper gluconate (cupric gluconate... practice. Copper gluconate may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g) of the...

  13. 49 CFR 192.279 - Copper pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copper pipe. 192.279 Section 192.279 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... Copper pipe. Copper pipe may not be threaded except that copper pipe used for joining screw fittings...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copper gluconate. 184.1260 Section 184.1260 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1260 Copper gluconate. (a) Copper gluconate (cupric gluconate... practice. Copper gluconate may be used in infant formula in accordance with section 412(g) of the...

  15. 21 CFR 73.1647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Copper powder. 73.1647 Section 73.1647 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1647 Copper powder. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive copper powder is a very fine free-flowing metallic powder prepared from virgin electrolytic copper....

  16. Metabolism and functions of copper in brain.

    PubMed

    Scheiber, Ivo F; Mercer, Julian F B; Dringen, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    Copper is an important trace element that is required for essential enzymes. However, due to its redox activity, copper can also lead to the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cellular uptake, storage as well as export of copper have to be tightly regulated in order to guarantee sufficient copper supply for the synthesis of copper-containing enzymes but also to prevent copper-induced oxidative stress. In brain, copper is of importance for normal development. In addition, both copper deficiency as well as excess of copper can seriously affect brain functions. Therefore, this organ possesses ample mechanisms to regulate its copper metabolism. In brain, astrocytes are considered as important regulators of copper homeostasis. Impairments of homeostatic mechanisms in brain copper metabolism have been associated with neurodegeneration in human disorders such as Menkes disease, Wilson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. This review article will summarize the biological functions of copper in the brain and will describe the current knowledge on the mechanisms involved in copper transport, storage and export of brain cells. The role of copper in diseases that have been connected with disturbances in brain copper homeostasis will also be discussed.

  17. Selecting copper and copper alloys; Part 2: Cast products

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, D.T. ); Kundig, K.J.A. , Randolph, NJ )

    1994-06-01

    This article provides an introduction to the properties, characteristics, and applications of cast coppers and copper alloys. An overview of alloy families is presented since it is impractical to describe all 130 standard grades in detail. However, additional technical information is readily available from the Copper Development Assn. Inc. (CDA) and the resources listed in the references and bibliography at the end of the article. Copper casting alloys are primarily selected for either their corrosion resistance, or their combination of corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. The materials also feature good castability, high machinability, and, compared with other corrosion-resistant alloys, reasonable cost. Additional benefits include biofouling resistance--important in marine applications--and a spectrum of attractive colors. Many of the alloys also have favorable tribological properties, which explains their widespread use for sleeve bearings, wear plates, gears, and other wear-prone components.

  18. Analysis on dynamic tensile extrusion behavior of UFG OFHC Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyung-Tae; Park, Leeju; Kim, Hak Jun; Kim, Seok Bong; Lee, Chong Soo

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests with the strain rate order of ~105 s-1 were conducted on coarse grained (CG) Cu and ultrafine grained (UFG) Cu. ECAP of 16 passes with route Bc was employed to fabricate UFG Cu. DTE tests were carried out by launching the sphere samples to the conical extrusion die at a speed of ~475 m/sec in a vacuumed gas gun system. UFG Cu was fragmented into 3 pieces and showed a DTE elongation of ~340%. CG Cu exhibited a larger DTE elongation of ~490% with fragmentation of 4 pieces. During DTE tests, dynamic recrystallization occurred in UFG Cu, but not in CG Cu. In order to examine the DTE behavior of CG Cu and UFG Cu under very high strain rates, a numerical analysis was undertaken by using a commercial finite element code (LS-DYNA 2D axis-symmetric model) with the Johnson - Cook model. The numerical analysis correctly predicted fragmentation and DTE elongation of CG Cu. But, the experimental DTE elongation of UFG Cu was much smaller than that predicted by the numerical analysis. This difference is discussed in terms of microstructural evolution of UFG Cu during DTE tests.

  19. Modeling Temperature and Strain Rate History Effects in OFHC Cu

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Temperature Histories Many experiments were conducted above room temperature. Three-zone furnaces and induction heaters were used to heat the specimens...ADIABATIC HEATING 338 XI VI.9: PARAMETER MATRIX 342 VI.10: RESPONSE MATRIX 343 VI.11: CORRELATION OF FACTOR AND PARAMETER 346 Xll LIST OF FIGURES...111.15: Hopkinson bar experiment setup at SNL. Induction heater coil and water cooling system are shown 59 111.16: Configuration of the modified

  20. Interpulse kinetics in copper and copper halide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.

    1983-01-01

    The various rate processes that govern the interpulse relaxation in metal vapor and metal halide vapor lasers are considered. Computer calculations indicate that the rapid metastable levels relaxation observed in copper and copper halide laser experiments requires the existence of a relatively small resonance in the cross section for metastable excitation or deexcitation near threshold. The accurate calculation of interpulse relaxation requires knowledge of rate constants presently not well known; this is especially so for metal halide lasers.

  1. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  2. Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J [Lakewood, CO; Miedaner, Alexander [Boulder, CO; Van Hest, Maikel [Lakewood, CO; Ginley, David S [Evergreen, CO; Nekuda, Jennifer A [Lakewood, CO

    2011-11-15

    Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

  3. Majorana Electroformed Copper Mechanical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Overman, Nicole R.; Overman, Cory T.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Edwards, Danny J.; Hoppe, Eric W.

    2012-04-30

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize ultra high purity electroformed copper for a variety of detector components and shielding. A preliminary mechanical evaluation was performed on the Majorana prototype electroformed copper material. Several samples were removed from a variety of positions on the mandrel. Tensile testing, optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and hardness testing were conducted to evaluate mechanical response. Analyses carried out on the Majorana prototype copper to this point show consistent mechanical response from a variety of test locations. Evaluation shows the copper meets or exceeds the design specifications.

  4. Copper atomic-scale transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kavalenka, Maryna N; Röger, Moritz; Albrecht, Daniel; Hölscher, Hendrik; Leuthold, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    We investigated copper as a working material for metallic atomic-scale transistors and confirmed that copper atomic-scale transistors can be fabricated and operated electrochemically in a copper electrolyte (CuSO4 + H2SO4) in bi-distilled water under ambient conditions with three microelectrodes (source, drain and gate). The electrochemical switching-on potential of the atomic-scale transistor is below 350 mV, and the switching-off potential is between 0 and −170 mV. The switching-on current is above 1 μA, which is compatible with semiconductor transistor devices. Both sign and amplitude of the voltage applied across the source and drain electrodes (U bias) influence the switching rate of the transistor and the copper deposition on the electrodes, and correspondingly shift the electrochemical operation potential. The copper atomic-scale transistors can be switched using a function generator without a computer-controlled feedback switching mechanism. The copper atomic-scale transistors, with only one or two atoms at the narrowest constriction, were realized to switch between 0 and 1G 0 (G 0 = 2e2/h; with e being the electron charge, and h being Planck’s constant) or 2G 0 by the function generator. The switching rate can reach up to 10 Hz. The copper atomic-scale transistor demonstrates volatile/non-volatile dual functionalities. Such an optimal merging of the logic with memory may open a perspective for processor-in-memory and logic-in-memory architectures, using copper as an alternative working material besides silver for fully metallic atomic-scale transistors. PMID:28382242

  5. The copper deposits of Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, B.S.; Burbank, W.S.

    1929-01-01

    The copper district of Keweenaw Point, in the northern peninsula of Michigan, is the second largest producer of copper in the world.  The output of the district since 1845 has been more than 7,500,000,000 pounds and showed a rather steady and consistent increase from the beginning of production to the end of the World War in 1918, since which there has been a marked decrease.

  6. Recent advances in copper radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guiyang; Singh, Ajay N; Oz, Orhan K; Sun, Xiankai

    2011-04-01

    Copper has five radioisotopes ((60)Cu, (61)Cu, (62)Cu, (64)Cu, and (67)Cu) that can be used in copper radiopharmaceuticals. These radioisotopes decay by mixed emissions of β+, β-, and γ with a wide range of half-lives from 9.74 min ((62)Cu) to 2.58 d ((67)Cu), which enable the design and synthesis of a variety of radiopharmaceuticals for different biomedical applications in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. However, due to the availability and production cost, the research efforts in copper radiopharmaceuticals are mainly focused on the use of (64)Cu (t(1/2) = 12.7 h; 17.4% β+, 43% EC, 39% β-), a radioisotope with low positron energy (E β+max = 0.656 MeV) that is ideal for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging quantification and β- emissions along with Auger electron for radiotherapy. Driven by the ever-increasing availability of preclinical and clinical PET scanners, a considerable interest has been seen in the development of novel copper radiopharmaceuticals in the past decade for a variety of diseases as represented by PET imaging of cancer. To avoid unnecessary literature redundancy, this review focuses on the unrepresented research aspects of copper chemistry (e.g. electrochemistry) and their uses in the evaluation of novel nuclear imaging probe design and recent advances in the field towards the practical use of copper radiopharmaceuticals.

  7. Release of Micronized Copper Particles from Pressure ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Micronized copper pressure treated lumber (PTL) has recently been introduced to the consumer market as a replacement for ionized copper PTL. The presence of particulate rather than aqueous copper raises concerns about the exposure of humans as well as the environment to the particles. Two common pathways of exposure, leaching during contact with water and transfer during physical contact, were investigated to gage potential human and environmental risk during intended use of the product. Characterization, leaching tests, and wipe tests were conducted on two representative formulations of micronized copper PTL (micronized copper azole or MCA) to quantify the levels of copper present in the treated material and the amount of copper released during use as well as to determine the form (particle or ion) of the copper after it was released. Additionally, an ionized copper pressure treated wood (alkaline copper azole or ACA) was tested for comparison. The characterization showed that copper carbonate is the primary particle form in the MCA treated wood, but other forms are also present, particularly in the MCA-1 formulation, which contained a large amount of organically complexed copper. Microscopy showed that MCA-1 contained particles roughly half the size of MCA-2. The leaching results indicate that mostly (> ~95%) ionic copper is released from the MCA wood and that the particulate copper that was released is attached to cellulose and not free in solution. A sma

  8. Porins Increase Copper Susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Speer, Alexander; Rowland, Jennifer L.; Haeili, Mehri; Niederweis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Copper resistance mechanisms are crucial for many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, during infection because the innate immune system utilizes copper ions to kill bacterial intruders. Despite several studies detailing responses of mycobacteria to copper, the pathways by which copper ions cross the mycobacterial cell envelope are unknown. Deletion of porin genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis leads to a severe growth defect on trace copper medium but simultaneously increases tolerance for copper at elevated concentrations, indicating that porins mediate copper uptake across the outer membrane. Heterologous expression of the mycobacterial porin gene mspA reduced growth of M. tuberculosis in the presence of 2.5 μM copper by 40% and completely suppressed growth at 15 μM copper, while wild-type M. tuberculosis reached its normal cell density at that copper concentration. Moreover, the polyamine spermine, a known inhibitor of porin activity in Gram-negative bacteria, enhanced tolerance of M. tuberculosis for copper, suggesting that copper ions utilize endogenous outer membrane channel proteins of M. tuberculosis to gain access to interior cellular compartments. In summary, these findings highlight the outer membrane as the first barrier against copper ions and the role of porins in mediating copper uptake in M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis. PMID:24013632

  9. Porins increase copper susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Speer, Alexander; Rowland, Jennifer L; Haeili, Mehri; Niederweis, Michael; Wolschendorf, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Copper resistance mechanisms are crucial for many pathogenic bacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, during infection because the innate immune system utilizes copper ions to kill bacterial intruders. Despite several studies detailing responses of mycobacteria to copper, the pathways by which copper ions cross the mycobacterial cell envelope are unknown. Deletion of porin genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis leads to a severe growth defect on trace copper medium but simultaneously increases tolerance for copper at elevated concentrations, indicating that porins mediate copper uptake across the outer membrane. Heterologous expression of the mycobacterial porin gene mspA reduced growth of M. tuberculosis in the presence of 2.5 μM copper by 40% and completely suppressed growth at 15 μM copper, while wild-type M. tuberculosis reached its normal cell density at that copper concentration. Moreover, the polyamine spermine, a known inhibitor of porin activity in Gram-negative bacteria, enhanced tolerance of M. tuberculosis for copper, suggesting that copper ions utilize endogenous outer membrane channel proteins of M. tuberculosis to gain access to interior cellular compartments. In summary, these findings highlight the outer membrane as the first barrier against copper ions and the role of porins in mediating copper uptake in M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis.

  10. Release of Micronized Copper Particles from Pressure ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Micronized copper pressure treated lumber (PTL) has recently been introduced to the consumer market as a replacement for ionized copper PTL. The presence of particulate rather than aqueous copper raises concerns about the exposure of humans as well as the environment to the particles. Two common pathways of exposure, leaching during contact with water and transfer during physical contact, were investigated to gage potential human and environmental risk during intended use of the product. Characterization, leaching tests, and wipe tests were conducted on two representative formulations of micronized copper PTL (micronized copper azole or MCA) to quantify the levels of copper present in the treated material and the amount of copper released during use as well as to determine the form (particle or ion) of the copper after it was released. Additionally, an ionized copper pressure treated wood (alkaline copper azole or ACA) was tested for comparison. The characterization showed that copper carbonate is the primary particle form in the MCA treated wood, but other forms are also present, particularly in the MCA-1 formulation, which contained a large amount of organically complexed copper. Microscopy showed that MCA-1 contained particles roughly half the size of MCA-2. The leaching results indicate that mostly (> ~95%) ionic copper is released from the MCA wood and that the particulate copper that was released is attached to cellulose and not free in solution. A sma

  11. Copper status of ewes fed increasing amounts of copper from copper sulfate or copper proteinate.

    PubMed

    Eckert, G E; Greene, L W; Carstens, G E; Ramsey, W S

    1999-01-01

    The Cu status of mature, crossbred ewes fed two sources (CuSO4 vs. Cu proteinate) and three levels (10, 20, or 30 mg/kg) of dietary Cu was determined in a 73-d feeding trial. Ewes (n = 30) were fed a basal diet containing rice meal feed, cottonseed hulls, cottonseed meal, meat and bone meal, cracked corn, and vitamin-mineral supplements at 2.5% of BW to meet NRC requirements for protein, energy, macrominerals, and microminerals, excluding Cu. The basal diet contained 5 mg/kg Cu, 113 mg/kg Fe, .1 mg/kg Mo, and .17% S. Copper sulfate or Cu proteinate was added to the basal diet to supply 10, 20, or 30 mg/kg of dietary copper in a 2x3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Ewes were housed in 3.7- x 9.1-m pens in an open-sided barn. Blood samples were collected on d 28 and 73. Ewes were slaughtered on d 74, and liver and other tissues were collected to determine Cu concentrations. An interaction (P = .08) occurred between source and level for liver Cu. The interaction existed due to an increase in liver Cu concentrations when ewes were fed increasing dietary Cu from CuSO4 but not when fed Cu proteinate diets. There was no source x level interaction (P>.10) for the blood constituents measured. On d 73, plasma ceruloplasmin activity was greater (P<.05) in ewes fed Cu proteinate than in those fed CuSO4 (33.1 vs. 26.8 microM x min(-1) x L(-1)). Increasing the concentration of dietary Cu did not affect (P>.10) plasma ceruloplasmin. Packed cell volume (PCV), red blood cell count (RBC), white blood cell count, whole blood hemoglobin (wHb), plasma hemoglobin, and plasma Cu were similar between sources of Cu. Ewes fed 20 mg/kg Cu had lower (P<.05) PCV, RBC, and wHb than those fed 10 or 30 mg/kg Cu diets. Feeding up to 30 mg/kg Cu from these sources did not cause an observable Cu toxicity during the 73-d period.

  12. Thiol-based copper handling by the copper chaperone Atox1.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Yuta; Inouye, Sachiye; Akagi, Reiko

    2017-04-01

    Human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) plays a crucial role in cellular copper homeostasis. Atox1 captures cytosolic copper for subsequent transfer to copper pumps in trans Golgi network, thereby facilitating copper supply to various copper-dependent oxidereductases matured within the secretory vesicles. Atox1 and other copper chaperones handle cytosolic copper using Cys thiols which are ideal ligands for coordinating Cu(I). Recent studies demonstrated reversible oxidation of these Cys residues in copper chaperones, linking cellular redox state to copper homeostasis. Highlighted in this review are unique redox properties of Atox1 and other copper chaperones. Also, summarized are the redox nodes in the cytosol which potentially play dominant roles in the redox regulation of copper chaperones. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 69(4):246-254, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Genes involved in copper resistance influence survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on copper surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Elguindi, Jutta; Wagner, Janine; Rensing, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 on copper cast alloys and the influence of genes on survival on copper containing medium and surfaces. Methods and Results Different strains of P. aeruginosa were inoculated on copper containing medium or different copper cast alloys and the survival rate determined. The survival rates were compared to rates on copper-free medium and stainless steel as control. In addition, the effect of temperature on survival was examined. Conclusions Copper cast alloys had previously shown to be bactericidal to various bacteria but the mechanism of copper-mediated killing is still not known. In this report we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa PAO1 is rapidly killed on different copper cast alloys and that genes involved in conferring copper resistance in copper-containing medium also influenced survival on copper cast alloys. We also show that the rate of killing is influenced by temperature. PMID:19239551

  14. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOEpatents

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.; Davis, John W.

    2000-07-18

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by sintering a stack of individual copper and tungsten powder blend layers having progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in successive powder blend layers in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  15. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  16. Compound Copper Chalcogenide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Claudia; Ibáñez, Maria; Dobrozhan, Oleksandr; Singh, Ajay; Cabot, Andreu; Ryan, Kevin M

    2017-05-10

    This review captures the synthesis, assembly, properties, and applications of copper chalcogenide NCs, which have achieved significant research interest in the last decade due to their compositional and structural versatility. The outstanding functional properties of these materials stems from the relationship between their band structure and defect concentration, including charge carrier concentration and electronic conductivity character, which consequently affects their optoelectronic, optical, and plasmonic properties. This, combined with several metastable crystal phases and stoichiometries and the low energy of formation of defects, makes the reproducible synthesis of these materials, with tunable parameters, remarkable. Further to this, the review captures the progress of the hierarchical assembly of these NCs, which bridges the link between their discrete and collective properties. Their ubiquitous application set has cross-cut energy conversion (photovoltaics, photocatalysis, thermoelectrics), energy storage (lithium-ion batteries, hydrogen generation), emissive materials (plasmonics, LEDs, biolabelling), sensors (electrochemical, biochemical), biomedical devices (magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray computer tomography), and medical therapies (photochemothermal therapies, immunotherapy, radiotherapy, and drug delivery). The confluence of advances in the synthesis, assembly, and application of these NCs in the past decade has the potential to significantly impact society, both economically and environmentally.

  17. Iatrogenic copper deficiency associated with long-term copper chelation for treatment of copper storage disease in a Bedlington Terrier.

    PubMed

    Seguin, M A; Bunch, S E

    2001-05-15

    A 9-year-old Bedlington Terrier was evaluated because of weight loss, inappetence, and hematemesis. Copper storage disease had been diagnosed previously on the basis of high hepatic copper concentration. Treatment had included dietary copper restriction and administration of trientine for chelation of copper. A CBC revealed microcytic hypochromic anemia. High serum activities of liver enzymes, high bile acid concentrations, and low BUN and albumin concentrations were detected. Vomiting resolved temporarily with treatment, but the clinicopathologic abnormalities persisted. Results of transcolonic portal scintigraphy suggested an abnormal shunt fraction. Results of liver biopsy and copper quantification revealed glycogen accumulation and extremely low hepatic copper concentration. Serum and hair copper concentrations were also low. Chelation and dietary copper restriction were tapered and discontinued. Clinical signs and all clinicopathologic abnormalities improved during a period of several months.

  18. Femtosecond laser ablation of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Yeow-Whatt; Lu, Yong-Feng; Hong, Ming-Hui; Chong, Tow Chong

    2003-02-01

    In recent years, femtosecond (fs) laser ablation has attracted much interest in both basic and applied physics, mainly because of its potential application in micromachining and pulsed laser deposition. Ultrashort laser ablation have the capability to ablate materials precisely with little or no collateral damage, even with materials that are impervious to laser energy from conventional pulsed lasers. The extreme intensities and short timescale at which ultrashort pulsed lasers operate differentiate them from other lasers such as nanosecond laser. In this work, we investigate the expansion dynamics of Cu (copper) plasma generated by ultrashort laser ablation of pure copper targets by optically examining the plasma plume. Time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy measurements by using intensified charged couple detector array (ICCD) imaging were used to detect the species present in the plasma and to study the laser-generated plasma formation and evolution. Temporal emission profiles are measured. Our interest in the dynamics of laser-generated copper plasma arises from the fact that copper has been considered as a substitute for Aluminum (Al) interconnects/metallization in ULSI devices (for future technology). It is important to know the composition and behavior of copper plasma species for the understanding of the mechanisms involved and optimizing the micro-machining processes and deposition conditions.

  19. Biliary copper excretion by hepatocyte lysosomes in the rat. Major excretory pathway in experimental copper overload

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, J.B. Jr.; Myers, B.M.; Kost, L.J.; Kuntz, S.M.; LaRusso, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that lysosomes are the main source of biliary copper in conditions of hepatic copper overload. We used a rat model of oral copper loading and studied the relationship between the biliary output of copper and lysosomal hydrolases. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given tap water with or without 0.125% copper acetate for up to 36 wk. Copper loading produced a 23-fold increase in the hepatic copper concentration and a 30-65% increase in hepatic lysosomal enzyme activity. Acid phosphatase histochemistry showed that copper-loaded livers contained an increased number of hepatocyte lysosomes; increased copper concentration of these organelles was confirmed directly by both x ray microanalysis and tissue fractionation. The copper-loaded rats showed a 16-fold increase in biliary copper output and a 50-300% increase in biliary lysosomal enzyme output. In the basal state, excretory profiles over time were similar for biliary outputs of lysosomal enzymes and copper in the copper-loaded animals but not in controls. After pharmacologic stimulation of lysosomal exocytosis, biliary outputs of copper and lysosomal hydrolases in the copper-loaded animals remained coupled: injection of colchicine or vinblastine produced an acute rise in the biliary output of both lysosomal enzymes and copper to 150-250% of baseline rates. After these same drugs, control animals showed only the expected increase in lysosomal enzyme output without a corresponding increase in copper output. We conclude that the hepatocyte responds to an increased copper load by sequestering excess copper in an increased number of lysosomes that then empty their contents directly into bile. The results provide direct evidence that exocytosis of lysosomal contents into biliary canaliculi is the major mechanism for biliary copper excretion in hepatic copper overload.

  20. 21 CFR 73.1125 - Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). 73.1125 Section 73.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT....1125 Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity. (1) The...

  1. 21 CFR 73.1125 - Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). 73.1125 Section 73.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT....1125 Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity. (1) The...

  2. 21 CFR 73.1125 - Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). 73.1125 Section 73.1125 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT....1125 Potassium sodium copper chloropyhllin (chlorophyllin-copper complex). (a) Identity. (1) The...

  3. Placental copper transport in the brindled mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Garnica, A.; Bates, J.

    1986-03-01

    Pregnant brindled (brin) mice were injected at 16 or 19 days gestation with 2 doses of CuCl/sub 2/ 6 mcg/g/dose, separated by 12 h, and sacrificed 6 h after the second. The copper conc. in placenta (P) and kidneys (K) of uninjected (UI) brin mice were higher than in UI controls, while conc. in liver (L) and fetal carcass (F) were lower. After injection (I), placental copper conc. increased while the carcass conc. remained unchanged. Brin mouse is a model for the human inborn error of copper metabolism, Menkes syndrome, which is characterized by signs of copper deficiency. These data indicate that metabolism of copper in brin fetus is abnormal, but depressed fetal copper levels cannot be corrected by acute copper dosing because of the sequestration of copper in placenta.

  4. Molecular Mediators Governing Iron-Copper Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Sukru; Collins, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Given their similar physiochemical properties, it is a logical postulate that iron and copper metabolism are intertwined. Indeed, iron-copper interactions were first documented over a century ago, but the homeostatic effects of one on the other has not been elucidated at a molecular level to date. Recent experimental work has, however, begun to provide mechanistic insight into how copper influences iron metabolism. During iron deficiency, elevated copper levels are observed in the intestinal mucosa, liver, and blood. Copper accumulation and/or redistribution within enterocytes may influence iron transport, and high hepatic copper may enhance biosynthesis of a circulating ferroxidase, which potentiates iron release from stores. Moreover, emerging evidence has documented direct effects of copper on the expression and activity of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. This review summarizes current experimental work in this field, with a focus on molecular aspects of iron-copper interplay and how these interactions relate to various disease states. PMID:24995690

  5. Copper tolerance and virulence in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ladomersky, Erik; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for all aerobic organisms. It functions as a cofactor in enzymes that catalyze a wide variety of redox reactions due to its ability to cycle between two oxidation states, Cu(I) and Cu(II). This same redox property of copper has the potential to cause toxicity if copper homeostasis is not maintained. Studies suggest that the toxic properties of copper are harnessed by the innate immune system of the host to kill bacteria. To counter such defenses, bacteria rely on copper tolerance genes for virulence within the host. These discoveries suggest bacterial copper intoxication is a component of host nutritional immunity, thus expanding our knowledge of the roles of copper in biology. This review summarizes our current understanding of copper tolerance in bacteria, and the extent to which these pathways contribute to bacterial virulence within the host. PMID:25652326

  6. Determination of copper in clarified apple juices.

    PubMed

    Zeiner, Michaela; Juranović Cindrić, Iva; Kröppl, Michaela; Stingeder, Gerhard

    2010-03-24

    Inorganic copper compounds are not considered as synthetic fertilizers for apple trees as they are traditional fertilizers. Thus, they are used in organic farming for soil or foliar applications. The European Union is for health reasons interested in reducing copper in apple orchards. Because the fertilizer application rate affects the nutrition of apples, the applied copper might also be reflected in the copper concentration of apple juices. Thus, the determination of copper is of concern for investigating the application of copper-containing fertilizers. Samples of clarified apple juice commercially available in the European market were analyzed for their copper content. Prior to quantification by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, the juices were processed by a microwave-assisted digestion system using HNO(3). All samples were also measured directly after dilution with HNO(3). The copper concentrations measured using both methods were all below the limit of detection (17 microg/L).

  7. Leaching of Copper Ore by Thiobacillus Ferrooxidans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John; Biaha, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative laboratory exercise based upon the procedures copper manufacturers employ to increase copper production is described. The role of chemoautotrophic microorganisms in biogeologic process is emphasized. Safety considerations when working with bacteria are included. (KR)

  8. Thermotransport in liquid aluminum-copper alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A thermotransport study was made on a series of liquid aluminum-copper alloys which contained from trace amounts to 33 weight percent copper. The samples in the form of narrow capillaries were held in known temperature gradient of thermotransport apparatus until the stationary state was reached. The samples were analyzed for the concentration of copper along the length. Copper was observed to migrate to the colder regions in all the samples. The heat of transport, Q*, was determined for each composition from a plot of concentration of copper versus reciprocal absolute temperature. The value of Q* is the highest at trace amounts of copper (4850 cal/gm-atom), but decreases with increasing concentration of copper and levels off to 2550 cal/gm-atom at about 25 weight percent copper. The results are explained on the basis of electron-solute interaction and a gas model of diffusion.

  9. Leaching of Copper Ore by Thiobacillus Ferrooxidans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John; Biaha, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative laboratory exercise based upon the procedures copper manufacturers employ to increase copper production is described. The role of chemoautotrophic microorganisms in biogeologic process is emphasized. Safety considerations when working with bacteria are included. (KR)

  10. Copper tolerance and virulence in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ladomersky, Erik; Petris, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for all aerobic organisms. It functions as a cofactor in enzymes that catalyze a wide variety of redox reactions due to its ability to cycle between two oxidation states, Cu(I) and Cu(II). This same redox property of copper has the potential to cause toxicity if copper homeostasis is not maintained. Studies suggest that the toxic properties of copper are harnessed by the innate immune system of the host to kill bacteria. To counter such defenses, bacteria rely on copper tolerance genes for virulence within the host. These discoveries suggest bacterial copper intoxication is a component of host nutritional immunity, thus expanding our knowledge of the roles of copper in biology. This review summarizes our current understanding of copper tolerance in bacteria, and the extent to which these pathways contribute to bacterial virulence within the host.

  11. Copper content in foods of Java Island and estimation of daily copper intake

    SciTech Connect

    Rivai, I.F.; Suzuki, S.; Koyama, H.; Hyodo, K.; Djuangsih, N.; Soemarwoto, O.

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this study was first to determine copper content in soil, foodstuff and feces of villagers, and estimate the daily copper intake of the villagers and a guest. The data obtained may help clarify the relationships of copper content in the soil-plant (food)-daily intake-feces in Indonesia. Secondly, the percentage of copper contribution of food groups was calculated to determine the influence of the food patterns of villagers and a guest on daily copper intake. Finally, evaluation was made of daily copper intake of villagers in terms of estimated daily copper requirement by WHO.

  12. Application of saccharose as copper(II) ligand for electroless copper plating solutions.

    PubMed

    Norkus, Eugenijus; Prusinskas, Kestutis; Vaskelis, Algirdas; Jaciauskiene, Jane; Stalnioniene, Irena; Macalady, Donald L

    2007-01-15

    Saccharose, forming sufficiently stable complexes with copper(II) ions in alkaline solutions, was found to be a suitable ligand for copper(II) chelating in alkaline (pH>12) electroless copper deposition solutions. Reduction of copper(II)-saccharose complexes by hydrated formaldehyde was investigated and the copper deposits formed were characterized. The thickness of the compact copper coatings obtained under optimal operating conditions in 1h reaches ca. 2 microm at ambient temperature. The plating solutions were stable and no signs of Cu(II) reduction in the bulk solution were observed. Results were compared with those systems operating with other copper(II) ligands.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1261 - Copper sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copper sulfate. 184.1261 Section 184.1261 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1261 Copper sulfate. (a) Copper sulfate (cupric sulfate, CuSO4·5H2O, CAS... the reaction of sulfuric acid with cupric oxide or with copper metal. (b) The ingredient must be of...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1261 - Copper sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Copper sulfate. 184.1261 Section 184.1261 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1261 Copper sulfate. (a) Copper sulfate (cupric sulfate, CuSO4·5 H2O, CAS... the reaction of sulfuric acid with cupric oxide or with copper metal. (b) The ingredient must be of...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1261 - Copper sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copper sulfate. 184.1261 Section 184.1261 Food and....1261 Copper sulfate. (a) Copper sulfate (cupric sulfate, CuSO4·5 H2O, CAS Reg. No. 7758-99-8) usually... sulfuric acid with cupric oxide or with copper metal. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1261 - Copper sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Copper sulfate. 184.1261 Section 184.1261 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1261 Copper sulfate. (a) Copper sulfate (cupric sulfate, CuSO4·5H2O, CAS... the reaction of sulfuric acid with cupric oxide or with copper metal. (b) The ingredient must be of...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1261 - Copper sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Copper sulfate. 184.1261 Section 184.1261 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1261 Copper sulfate. (a) Copper sulfate (cupric sulfate, CuSO4·5 H2O, CAS... the reaction of sulfuric acid with cupric oxide or with copper metal. (b) The ingredient must be of...

  18. Textured carbon surfaces on copper by sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curren, A. N. (Inventor); Jensen, K. A. (Inventor); Roman, R. F. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A very thin layer of highly textured carbon is applied to a copper surface by a triode sputtering process. A carbon target and a copper substrate are simultaneously exposed to an argon plasma in a vacuum chamber. The resulting carbon surface is characterized by a dense, random array of needle like spires or peaks which extend perpendicularly from the copper surface. The coated copper is especially useful for electrode plates in multistage depressed collectors.

  19. Contribution of Copper Ion Resistance to Survival of Escherichia coli on Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Taudte, Nadine; Nies, Dietrich H.; Grass, Gregor

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of touch surfaces poses a serious threat for public health. The use of bactericidal surface materials, such as copper and its alloys, might constitute a way to aid the use of antibiotics and disinfectants, thus minimizing the risk of emergence and spread of multiresistant germs. The survival of Escherichia coli on metallic copper surfaces has been studied previously; however, the mechanisms underlying bacterial inactivation on copper surfaces have not been elucidated. Data presented in this study suggest that bacteria are killed rapidly on dry copper surfaces. Several factors, such as copper ion toxicity, copper chelators, cold, osmotic stress, and reactive oxygen species, but not anaerobiosis, influenced killing rates. Strains deleted in copper detoxification systems were slightly more sensitive than was the wild type. Preadaptation to copper enhanced survival rates upon copper surface exposure. This study constitutes a first step toward understanding the reasons for metallic copper surface-mediated killing of bacteria. PMID:18156321

  20. Copper Post-CMP Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starosvetsky, D.; Ein-Eli, Y.

    Copper on-chip interconnects Damascene technology utilizes chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) in order to remove copper overburden after its electro deposition and achieve global planarization of patterned surface. CMP is a simultaneous action of mechanical overburden metal removal and its electrochemical dissolution. It is performed with the movement of a polisher pad in acidic or alkaline aqueous CMP electrolytes (slurry) containing dispersive abrasive particles (Al2O3 or SiO2), pH buffer, certain electrolyte salts to control ionic strength, oxidants, and corrosion inhibitors. Mechanical and chemical interactions with a patterned wafer surface introduce different defects and contaminations in interlayer dielectric (ILD) surfaces and copper layers. These can either be mechanical (physical) or chemical-based defects and contaminants [1-6].

  1. Laser sintering of copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenou, Michael; Ermak, Oleg; Saar, Amir; Kotler, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Copper nanoparticle (NP) inks serve as an attractive potential replacement to silver NP inks in functional printing applications. However their tendency to rapidly oxidize has so far limited their wider use. In this work we have studied the conditions for laser sintering of Cu-NP inks in ambient conditions while avoiding oxidation. We have determined the regime for stable, low-resistivity copper (< ×3 bulk resistivity value) generation in terms of laser irradiance and exposure duration and have indicated the limits on fast processing. The role of pre-drying conditions on sintering outcome has also been studied. A method, based on spectral reflectivity measurements, was used for non-contact monitoring of the sintering process evolution. It also indicates preferred spectral regions for sintering. Finally, we illustrated how selective laser sintering can generate high-quality, fine line (<5 µm wide) and dense copper circuits.

  2. The copper microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Pilon, Marinus

    2017-02-01

    1030 I. 1030 II. 1030 III. 1031 IV. 1031 V. 1032 VI. 1033 VII. 1034 VIII. 1034 1034 References 1034 SUMMARY: Copper (Cu) microRNAs are upregulated by Cu deficiency and mediate the post-transcriptional downregulation of transcripts that encode Cu proteins, suggesting a role directly related to Cu. However, expression and phenotypic analyses of copper microRNA mutants and over-expressors have suggested roles mainly in tolerance to abiotic stresses. To reconcile available data, a model is proposed which emphasizes the mobile nature of copper microRNA molecules in the regulation of Cu homeostasis. It is proposed that the Cu-microRNA regulatory circuits are further co-opted by plants to regulate both beneficial and pathogenic interactions with microbes. Further exploration of Cu-microRNA functions that account for the cell-to-cell mobility should give novel insight into plant microbe interactions and the integration of micronutrition and development.

  3. 21 CFR 524.463 - Copper naphthenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copper naphthenate. 524.463 Section 524.463 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.463 Copper naphthenate. (a) Amount. The drug is a 37.5 percent solution of copper naphthenate. (b) Sponsors. See...

  4. 21 CFR 524.463 - Copper naphthenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Copper naphthenate. 524.463 Section 524.463 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.463 Copper naphthenate. (a) Amount. The drug is a 37.5 percent solution of copper naphthenate. (b) Sponsors. See...

  5. Copper toxicity in aquaculture: A practical approach

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Copper sulfate is used as a therapeutant for various applications in aquaculture. There is a great deal of information on the toxicity of copper, especially in low-alkalinity waters; however, much of this information is fragmented, and a comprehensive guide of copper toxicity and safe concentration...

  6. 21 CFR 524.463 - Copper naphthenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Copper naphthenate. 524.463 Section 524.463 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.463 Copper naphthenate. (a) Amount. The drug is a 37.5 percent solution of copper naphthenate. (b) Sponsors. See...

  7. 21 CFR 524.463 - Copper naphthenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Copper naphthenate. 524.463 Section 524.463 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS OPHTHALMIC AND TOPICAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 524.463 Copper naphthenate. (a) Amount. The drug is a 37.5 percent solution of copper naphthenate. (b) Sponsors. See...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copper powder. 73.2647 Section 73.2647 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2647 Copper powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive copper powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 582.5260 Section 582.5260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5260 Copper gluconate. (a) Product. Copper gluconate. (b) Tolerance. This substance is...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 582.5260 Section 582.5260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5260 Copper gluconate. (a) Product. Copper gluconate. (b) Tolerance. This substance is...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 582.5260 Section 582.5260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5260 Copper gluconate. (a) Product. Copper gluconate. (b) Tolerance. This substance is...

  12. THE EVOLUTION OF SYNTHETICALLY PRECIPITATED COPPER SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to explore the effect of water quality, particularly chloride and sulfate, on copper mineral formation. Copper-sulfate and chloride compounds are often found on the surface of copper pipes in drinking water distribution systems. When attempting to ...

  13. Lead and Copper Rule Tier Schedule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Lead and Copper Rule Tier Schedule may be used by public water systems in Wyoming and on EPA R8 Tribal Lands as a guide to properly identify their lead and copper tap sample sites to comply with the Lead and Copper Rule.

  14. THE EVOLUTION OF SYNTHETICALLY PRECIPITATED COPPER SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to explore the effect of water quality, particularly chloride and sulfate, on copper mineral formation. Copper-sulfate and chloride compounds are often found on the surface of copper pipes in drinking water distribution systems. When attempting to ...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 582.5260 Section 582.5260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5260 Copper gluconate. (a) Product. Copper gluconate. (b) Tolerance. This substance is...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5260 - Copper gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copper gluconate. 582.5260 Section 582.5260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5260 Copper gluconate. (a) Product. Copper gluconate. (b) Tolerance. This substance is...

  17. Measuring bioavailable copper using anodic stripping voltammetry

    SciTech Connect

    Deaver, E.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr.

    1996-11-01

    Since speciation can affect bioavailability and toxicity of copper in aquatic systems, accurate predictions of effects of bioavailable forms require detection and/or measurement of these forms. To develop an approach for measurement of bioavailable copper, a copper sulfate solution was used in 10-d aqueous and sediment toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca Saussure. These tests encompassed ranges of pH, alkalinity, hardness, and conductivity. Changes in copper speciation were measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for dissolved copper and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) for labile copper, and concentrations were evaluated relative to amphipod survival. Ten-day LC50s based on AA-measured aqueous copper concentrations ranged from 42 to 142 {micro}g Cu/L, and LC50s based on DPASV-measured copper concentrations ranged from 17.4 to 24.8 {micro}g Cu/L. In 10-d tests using copper-amended sediments with diverse characteristics and AA-measured copper concentrations spanning an order of magnitude, total copper concentrations were not predictive of sediment toxicity, but H. azteca survival was explained by DPASV measurements that varied by {le}4%. In order to make defensible estimates of the potential risk of metals in sediments or water, it is essential to identify the fraction of total metal that is bioavailable. In these experiments, DPASV was useful for measuring bioavailable copper in aqueous and sediment tests with H. azteca.

  18. Copper accumulation in the crayfish (Orconectes rusticus)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.L.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the crayfish, O. rusticus could fulfill Nehring's (1976) criteria for a good biological monitor of heavy metal pollution. Since there is some evidence that the cupric ion is the most toxic form of aqueous copper, crayfish-accumulated copper was compared to both total and cupric copper in the culture water.

  19. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquefying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper. 6 figs.

  20. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquifying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper.

  1. Relationship between soil copper content and copper content of selected crop plants in central Chile.

    PubMed

    Badilla-Ohlbaum, R; Ginocchio, R; Rodríguez, P H; Céspedes, A; González, S; Allen, H E; Lagos, G E

    2001-12-01

    A survey of copper levels in agricultural soils of central Chile revealed two soil clusters-one with a mean copper level of 162 mg/kg and one with a mean copper level of 751 mg/kg of soil. Samples of soils from both soil clusters were characterized on the basis of physicochemical characteristics, and copper extractability was compared by saturation and CaCl2 extraction as well as an acid-leaching procedure (TCLP). We also measured the copper content of various tissues of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and onion (Allium cepa) crops growing on these soils. Other than copper levels, soils from the two clusters were quite similar, with slightly greater levels of molybdenum and cadmium in the high-copper soils. Within each cluster, extracted copper levels and total soil copper levels were not correlated. However, the three extraction procedures solubilized significantly more copper from the high-Cu soils. Mineralogical characterization of the soil particles and depth profiles of soil metal levels in a subsample of sites suggested that highly insoluble copper ore and mining wastes might account for the high copper levels. Neither total nor extractable copper levels allowed statistical prediction of the levels of copper in plant tissue. The edible tissues of both crops had the same mean copper content, regardless of the copper soil level. However, copper contents of stems and leaves were significantly higher for plants growing on the high-Cu soils. These results show that in these soils, high copper levels are associated with very insoluble copper species and thus low bioavailability of copper to crop plants.

  2. Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

    2009-06-09

    To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

  3. Joining of alumina via copper/niobium/copper interlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Robert A.; Chapman, Daniel R.; Danielson, David T.; Glaeser, Andreas M.

    2000-03-15

    Alumina has been joined at 1150 degrees C and 1400 degrees C using multilayer copper/niobium/copper interlayers. Four-point bend strengths are sensitive to processing temperature, bonding pressure, and furnace environment (ambient oxygen partial pressure). Under optimum conditions, joints with reproducibly high room temperature strengths (approximately equal 240 plus/minus 20 MPa) can be produced; most failures occur within the ceramic. Joints made with sapphire show that during bonding an initially continuous copper film undergoes a morphological instability, resulting in the formation of isolated copper-rich droplets/particles at the sapphire/interlayer interface, and extensive regions of direct bonding between sapphire and niobium. For optimized alumina bonds, bend tests at 800 degrees C-1100 degrees C indicate significant strength is retained; even at the highest test temperature, ceramic failure is observed. Post-bonding anneals at 1000 degrees C in vacuum or in gettered argon were used to assess joint stability and to probe the effect of ambient oxygen partial pressure on joint characteristics. Annealing in vacuum for up to 200 h causes no significant decrease in room temperature bend strength or change in fracture path. With increasing anneal time in a lower oxygen partial pressure environment, the fracture strength decreases only slightly, but the fracture path shifts from the ceramic to the interface.

  4. Copper vs. Copper at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (2005)

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab - Fulvia Pilat

    2016-07-12

    To investigate a new form of matter not seen since the Big Bang, scientists are using a new experimental probe: collisions between two beams of copper ions. The use of intermediate size nuclei is expected to result in intermediate energy density - not as

  5. Electrochemical nucleation and growth of copper and copper alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Wenbo

    This dissertation aims to contribute to a fundamental understanding of the physicochemical processes occurring in electrochemical nucleation and growth. To this end, the effects of various anions (chloride (Cl-), sulfate (SO42-) and sulfamate (NH2SO 3-)) on the electrochemical kinetics and the mechanism of copper reduction, as well as on the microstructure of the resulting films, were studied. On the basis of this work, the deposition of copper alloys (Cu-Ag with positive heat of mixing, Cu-Au with negative heat of mixing) was investigated with the main objective to achieve an insight on the role of solid state thermodynamics on the electrocrystallization process. Chloride ions cause two competing effects: at low chloride concentration the formation of an adsorbed chloride layer introduces an additional reaction pathway, resulting in an overall depolarization of the reduction process with no significant change of the Tafel slope. At high chloride concentration, complexation phenomena induce a cathodic polarization of the deposition process and a decrease in the Tafel slope. Chlorides cause a decrease in the density and an increased size of copper nuclei. Sulfamate depolarizes copper reduction the most and results in the largest nucleus density. Chloride promotes the faceting, and dendritic growth of copper deposits along <110> direction by introducing interfacial anisotropy. Addition of Ag in the solution or in the electrode substrate enhances copper deposition and results in an additional reduction peak. Codeposition of Cu-Ag increases nucleus density and decreases nucleus size. Such enhancement of copper deposition, the increase in nucleus density and the decrease in nucleus size by Ag could be due to the continued formation of a surface alloy of Cu-Ag and the fast interface dynamics of Ag deposition. Cu can be underpotentially codeposited in the Cu-Au alloy. Homogeneous solid solutions are grown under conditions of underpotential deposition of Cu, while

  6. The Intestinal Copper Exporter CUA-1 Is Required for Systemic Copper Homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chun, Haarin; Sharma, Anuj Kumar; Lee, Jaekwon; Chan, Jefferson; Jia, Shang; Kim, Byung-Eun

    2017-01-06

    Copper plays key catalytic and regulatory roles in biochemical processes essential for normal growth, development, and health. Defects in copper metabolism cause Menkes and Wilson's disease, myeloneuropathy, and cardiovascular disease and are associated with other pathophysiological states. Consequently, it is critical to understand the mechanisms by which organisms control the acquisition, distribution, and utilization of copper. The intestinal enterocyte is a key regulatory point for copper absorption into the body; however, the mechanisms by which intestinal cells transport copper to maintain organismal copper homeostasis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a mechanism by which organismal copper homeostasis is maintained by intestinal copper exporter trafficking that is coordinated with extraintestinal copper levels in Caenorhabditis elegans Specifically, we show that CUA-1, the C. elegans homolog of ATP7A/B, localizes to lysosome-like organelles (gut granules) in the intestine under copper overload conditions for copper detoxification, whereas copper deficiency results in a redistribution of CUA-1 to basolateral membranes for copper efflux to peripheral tissues. Worms defective in gut granule biogenesis exhibit defects in copper sequestration and increased susceptibility to toxic copper levels. Interestingly, however, a splice isoform CUA-1.2 that lacks a portion of the N-terminal domain is targeted constitutively to the basolateral membrane irrespective of dietary copper concentration. Our studies establish that CUA-1 is a key intestinal copper exporter and that its trafficking is regulated to maintain systemic copper homeostasis. C. elegans could therefore be exploited as a whole-animal model system to study regulation of intra- and intercellular copper trafficking pathways. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Advantages and challenges of increased antimicrobial copper use and copper mining.

    PubMed

    Elguindi, Jutta; Hao, Xiuli; Lin, Yanbing; Alwathnani, Hend A; Wei, Gehong; Rensing, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Copper is a highly utilized metal for electrical, automotive, household objects, and more recently as an effective antimicrobial surface. Copper-containing solutions applied to fruits and vegetables can prevent bacterial and fungal infections. Bacteria, such as Salmonellae and Cronobacter sakazakii, often found in food contamination, are rapidly killed on contact with copper alloys. The antimicrobial effectiveness of copper alloys in the healthcare environment against bacteria causing hospital-acquired infections such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Clostridium difficile has been described recently. The use of copper and copper-containing materials will continue to expand and may lead to an increase in copper mining and production. However, the copper mining and manufacturing industry and the consumer do not necessarily enjoy a favorable relationship. Open pit mining, copper mine tailings, leaching products, and deposits of toxic metals in the environment often raises concerns and sometimes public outrage. In addition, consumers may fear that copper alloys utilized as antimicrobial surfaces in food production will lead to copper toxicity in humans. Therefore, there is a need to mitigate some of the negative effects of increased copper use and copper mining. More thermo-tolerant, copper ion-resistant microorganisms could improve copper leaching and lessen copper groundwater contamination. Copper ion-resistant bacteria associated with plants might be useful in biostabilization and phytoremediation of copper-contaminated environments. In this review, recent progress in microbiological and biotechnological aspects of microorganisms in contact with copper will be presented and discussed, exploring their role in the improvement for the industries involved as well as providing better environmental outcomes.

  8. Metabolic crossroads of iron and copper

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James F; Prohaska, Joseph R; Knutson, Mitchell D

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between the essential dietary metals, iron and copper, have been known for many years. This review highlights recent advances in iron-copper interactions with a focus on tissues and cell types important for regulating whole-body iron and copper homeostasis. Cells that mediate dietary assimilation (enterocytes) and storage and distribution (hepatocytes) of iron and copper are considered, along with the principal users (erythroid cells) and recyclers of red cell iron (reticuloendothelial macrophages). Interactions between iron and copper in the brain are also discussed. Many unanswered questions regarding the role of these metals and their interactions in health and disease emerge from this synopsis, highlighting extensive future research opportunities. PMID:20384844

  9. CopperCore Service Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogten, Hubert; Martens, Harrie; Nadolski, Rob; Tattersall, Colin; van Rosmalen, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    In an e-learning environment there is a need to integrate various e-learning services like assessment services, collaboration services, learning design services and communication services. In this article we present the design and implementation of a generic integrative service framework, called CopperCore Service Integration (CCSI). We will…

  10. CopperCore Service Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogten, Hubert; Martens, Harrie; Nadolski, Rob; Tattersall, Colin; van Rosmalen, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    In an e-learning environment there is a need to integrate various e-learning services like assessment services, collaboration services, learning design services and communication services. In this article we present the design and implementation of a generic integrative service framework, called CopperCore Service Integration (CCSI). We will…

  11. Building a Copper Pipe "Xylophone."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapp, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Explains how to use the equation for frequency of vibration of a transversely oscillating bar or pipe with both ends free to vibrate to build a simple and inexpensive xylophone from a 3-meter section of copper pipe. The instrument produces a full major scale and can be used to investigate various musical intervals. (Author/NB)

  12. Crystallization of copper metaphosphate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the valence state of copper in copper metaphosphate glass on the crystallization behavior and glass transition temperature has been investigated. The crystallization of copper metaphosphate is initiated from the surface and its main crystalline phase is copper metaphosphate (Cu(PO)3),independent of the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)). However, the crystal morphology, the relative crystallization rates, and their temperature dependences are affected by the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu (total)) ratio in the glass. On the other hand, the totally oxidized glass crystallizes from all over the surface. The relative crystallization rate of the reduced glass to the totally oxidized glass is large at low temperature, but small at high temperature. The glass transition temperature of the glass increases as the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)) ratio is raised. It is also found that the atmosphere used during heat treatment does not influence the crystallization of the reduced glass, except for the formation of a very thin CuO surface layer when heated in air.

  13. Building a Copper Pipe "Xylophone."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapp, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Explains how to use the equation for frequency of vibration of a transversely oscillating bar or pipe with both ends free to vibrate to build a simple and inexpensive xylophone from a 3-meter section of copper pipe. The instrument produces a full major scale and can be used to investigate various musical intervals. (Author/NB)

  14. Tetraphenylphosphonium copper(I) dicyanamide.

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, J. A.; Geiser, U.; Materials Science Division

    2007-01-01

    In the title compound, {l_brace}(C{sub 24}H{sub 20}P)[Cu(C{sub 2}N{sub 3}){sub 2}]{r_brace}{sub n}, the copper(I) dicyanamide anion forms a distorted three-dimensional single diamondoid network. Templating tetraphenylphosphonium cations reside within the cavities of the polymeric anion.

  15. Copper sulfate: Liquid or crystals?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two separate experiments were conducted to evaluate copper toxicity to channel catfish and free-swimming Ichthyophthirius multifiliis or Ich (the stage of Ich that can be treated); the compounds we used were CuSO4 crystals and a non-chelated liquid CuSO4 product. In 96 hr tests conducted in aquaria...

  16. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COPPER ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-05-12

    A low melting point plutonium alloy useful as fuel is a homogeneous liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor is described. Vessels of tungsten or tantalum are useful to contain the alloy which consists essentially of from 10 to 30 atomic per cent copper and the balance plutonium and cerium. with the plutontum not in excess of 50 atomic per cent.

  17. COPPER CORROSION AND SOLUBILITY RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster provides a very cursory summary of TTEB in-house copper research experimental systems, and extramural research projects. The field studies summarized are the Indian Hill (OH) study of the use of orthophosphate for reducing cuprosolvency in a high alkalinity water, an...

  18. Crystallization of copper metaphosphate glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the valence state of copper in copper metaphosphate glass on the crystallization behavior and glass transition temperature has been investigated. The crystallization of copper metaphosphate is initiated from the surface and its main crystalline phase is copper metaphosphate (Cu(PO)3),independent of the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)). However, the crystal morphology, the relative crystallization rates, and their temperature dependences are affected by the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu (total)) ratio in the glass. On the other hand, the totally oxidized glass crystallizes from all over the surface. The relative crystallization rate of the reduced glass to the totally oxidized glass is large at low temperature, but small at high temperature. The glass transition temperature of the glass increases as the (Cu sup 2+)/(Cu(total)) ratio is raised. It is also found that the atmosphere used during heat treatment does not influence the crystallization of the reduced glass, except for the formation of a very thin CuO surface layer when heated in air.

  19. Reactivity test between beryllium and copper

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, H.; Kato, M.

    1995-09-01

    Beryllium has been expected for using as plasma facing material on ITER. And, copper alloy has been proposed as heat sink material behind plasma facing components. Therefore, both materials must be joined. However, the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper alloy does not clear in detail. For example, other authors reported that beryllium reacted with copper at high temperature, but it was not obvious about the generation of reaction products and increasing of the reaction layer. In the present work, from this point, for clarifying the elementary process of reaction between beryllium and copper, the out-of-pile compatibility tests were conducted with diffusion couples of beryllium and copper which were inserted in the capsule filled with high purity helium gas (6N). Annealing temperatures were 300, 400, 500, 600 and 700{degrees}C, and annealing periods were 100, 300 and 1000h. Beryllium specimens were hot pressed beryllium, and copper specimens were OFC (Oxygen Free Copper).

  20. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOEpatents

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.

    1999-11-23

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  1. Catastrophic Oxidation of Copper: A Brief Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, V. V.; Klimashin, A. A.

    2012-10-01

    A brief review of the current understanding of copper accelerated oxidation in the presence of low-melting oxides (Bi2O3, MoO3, and V2O5) is given. Special attention is paid to the kinetics, thermodynamics, and mechanisms of accelerated oxidation of copper. The mechanisms of two stages (fast and superfast) of the copper accelerated oxidation are considered. It is shown that the fast oxidation of copper occurs by a diffusion mechanism. Oxygen diffusion along the liquid channels in the oxide scale is the rate-limiting step in the overall mechanism. The superfast oxidation of copper occurs by a fluxing mechanism. Realization of the particular mechanism depends on the mass ratio of low-melting oxide to the metal. The mass ratios of low-melting oxide to the metal and the oxygen partial pressures for superfast oxidation of copper are established. A model of the fast oxidation of copper is discussed.

  2. Chronic copper toxicity in a dairy herd

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, David J.; Schiefer, H. Bruno; Blakley, Barry R.

    1990-01-01

    The addition of excessive copper to a commercially prepared dairy ration caused chronic copper toxicity in a dairy herd. A formulation error by a feed company resulted in copper levels of 800 to 1,000 mg/kg in the “as fed concentrate,” amounting to about 400-500 mg copper/kg of the whole ration. Five animals died with typical signs of acute copper toxicity, including intravascular hemolysis and methemoglobinemia. A further 39 cows died on the farm from a combination of debilitation and secondary infectious causes, and 215 were sent to slaughter because of debilitation and poor milk production. The mortality of calves born to dams that had been fed the toxic concentrate was approximately 50%. We postulate that dairy cows, particularly pregnant cows, may be more susceptible to copper toxicity than other cattle, and suggest reexamination of the presently allowable maximum levels of copper supplementation of diets for dairy cattle. PMID:17423660

  3. Copper uptake and retention in liver parenchymal cells isolated from nutritionally copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Berg, G.J.; de Goeij, J.J.; Bock, I.; Gijbels, M.J.; Brouwer, A.; Lei, K.Y.; Hendriks, H.F. )

    1991-08-01

    Copper uptake and retention were studied in primary cultures of liver parenchymal cells isolated from copper-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper-deficient diet (less than 1 mg Cu/kg) for 10 wk. Copper-deficient rats were characterized by low copper concentrations in plasma and liver, anemia, low plasma ceruloplasmin oxidase activity and increased 64Cu whole-body retention. Freshly isolated liver parenchymal cells from copper-deficient rats showed a higher 64Cu influx, which was associated with a higher apparent Vmax of 45 {plus minus} 4 pmol Cu.mg protein-1.min-1 as compared with 30 {plus minus} 3 pmol Cu.mg protein-1.min-1 for cells isolated from copper-sufficient rats. No significant difference in the apparent Km (approximately 30 mumol/L) was observed. Relative 64Cu efflux from cells from copper-deficient rats was significantly smaller than the efflux from cells from copper-sufficient rats after prelabeling as determined by 2-h efflux experiments. Analysis of the medium after efflux from cells from copper-deficient rats showed elevated protein-associated 64Cu, suggesting a higher incorporation of radioactive copper during metalloprotein synthesis. Effects of copper deficiency persist in primary cultures of parenchymal cells derived from copper-deficient rats, and short-term cultures of these cells offer a prospect for the study of cell biological aspects of the metabolic adaptation of the liver to copper deficiency.

  4. Copper economy in Chlamydomonas: Prioritized allocation and reallocation of copper to respiration vs. photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kropat, Janette; Gallaher, Sean D.; Urzica, Eugen I.; Nakamoto, Stacie S.; Strenkert, Daniela; Tottey, Stephen; Mason, Andrew Z.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic elements, although required only in trace amounts, permit life and primary productivity because of their functions in catalysis. Every organism has a minimal requirement of each metal based on the intracellular abundance of proteins that use inorganic cofactors, but elemental sparing mechanisms can reduce this quota. A well-studied copper-sparing mechanism that operates in microalgae faced with copper deficiency is the replacement of the abundant copper protein plastocyanin with a heme-containing substitute, cytochrome (Cyt) c6. This switch, which is dependent on a copper-sensing transcription factor, copper response regulator 1 (CRR1), dramatically reduces the copper quota. We show here that in a situation of marginal copper availability, copper is preferentially allocated from plastocyanin, whose function is dispensable, to other more critical copper-dependent enzymes like Cyt oxidase and a ferroxidase. In the absence of an extracellular source, copper allocation to Cyt oxidase includes CRR1-dependent proteolysis of plastocyanin and quantitative recycling of the copper cofactor from plastocyanin to Cyt oxidase. Transcriptome profiling identifies a gene encoding a Zn-metalloprotease, as a candidate effecting copper recycling. One reason for the retention of genes encoding both plastocyanin and Cyt c6 in algal and cyanobacterial genomes might be because plastocyanin provides a competitive advantage in copper-depleted environments as a ready source of copper. PMID:25646490

  5. Grain Refinement of Deoxidized Copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balart, María José; Patel, Jayesh B.; Gao, Feng; Fan, Zhongyun

    2016-10-01

    This study reports the current status of grain refinement of copper accompanied in particular by a critical appraisal of grain refinement of phosphorus-deoxidized, high residual P (DHP) copper microalloyed with 150 ppm Ag. Some deviations exist in terms of the growth restriction factor ( Q) framework, on the basis of empirical evidence reported in the literature for grain size measurements of copper with individual additions of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 wt pct of Mo, In, Sn, Bi, Sb, Pb, and Se, cast under a protective atmosphere of pure Ar and water quenching. The columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) has been observed in copper, with an individual addition of 0.4B and with combined additions of 0.4Zr-0.04P and 0.4Zr-0.04P-0.015Ag and, in a previous study, with combined additions of 0.1Ag-0.069P (in wt pct). CETs in these B- and Zr-treated casts have been ascribed to changes in the morphology and chemistry of particles, concurrently in association with free solute type and availability. No further grain-refining action was observed due to microalloying additions of B, Mg, Ca, Zr, Ti, Mn, In, Fe, and Zn (~0.1 wt pct) with respect to DHP-Cu microalloyed with Ag, and therefore are no longer relevant for the casting conditions studied. The critical microalloying element for grain size control in deoxidized copper and in particular DHP-Cu is Ag.

  6. The copper metallome in prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Rensing, Christopher; McDevitt, Sylvia Franke

    2013-01-01

    As a trace element copper has an important role in cellular function like many other transition metals. Its ability to undergo redox changes [Cu(I) ↔ Cu(II)] makes copper an ideal cofactor in enzymes catalyzing electron transfers. However, this redox change makes copper dangerous for a cell since it is able to be involved in Fenton-like reactions creating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cu(I) also is a strong soft metal and can attack and destroy iron-sulfur clusters thereby releasing iron which can in turn cause oxidative stress. Therefore, copper homeostasis has to be highly balanced to ensure proper cellular function while avoiding cell damage.Throughout evolution bacteria and archaea have developed a highly regulated balance in copper metabolism. While for many prokaryotes copper uptake seems to be unspecific, others have developed highly sophisticated uptake mechanisms to ensure the availability of sufficient amounts of copper. Within the cytoplasm copper is sequestered by various proteins and molecules, including specific copper chaperones, to prevent cellular damage. Copper-containing proteins are usually located in the cytoplasmic membrane with the catalytic domain facing the periplasm, in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria, or they are secreted, limiting the necessity of copper to accumulate in the cytoplasm. To prevent cellular damage due to excess copper, bacteria and archaea have developed various copper detoxification strategies. In this chapter we attempt to give an overview of the mechanisms employed by bacteria and archaea to handle copper and the importance of the metal for cellular function as well as in the global nutrient cycle.

  7. Variations of serum copper values in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vukelić, Jelka; Kapamadzija, Aleksandra; Petrović, Djordje; Grujić, Zorica; Novakov-Mikić, Aleksandra; Kopitović, Vesna; Bjelica, Artur

    2012-01-01

    Copper is essential micronutrient and has an important role in the human body. The serum copper increases during pregnancy and is doubled at full term. Lower levels of serum copper in pregnancy are connected with some pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to estimate the levels of serum copper in normal and pathological pregnancies, comparing them with values of serum copper in non-pregnant women, to determine if serum copper is lower in some pathological pregnancies and if this is of some importance. A total of 2170 plasma samples for copper analyses were made in the following groups: healthy non-pregnant women; healthy pregnant women from the 5th-40th gestational week, during the first delivery stage and during the first three postpartum weeks, in pregnant women with habitual abortion, imminent abortion, abortion in progress, missed abortion (9th-24th weeks), missed labour and premature rupture of membranes (29th-40th weeks). Levels of serum copper were determined by colorimetric technique of bathocuproin with disulphate as a chromogen. Serum copper values in non-pregnant women range from 11.6-25.8 micromol/L. In healthy pregnant women, there is a constant trend of the increase of serum copper. The mean serum copper values revealed three significant peaks at the 22nd, 27th and 35th gestational week. Serum copper values in the patients with some pathological pregnancies in relation to the serum copper values of the healthy pregnant women were significantly lower. Serum copper values can be used as an indicator of some pathological pregnancies.

  8. A Plasmodium falciparum copper-binding membrane protein with copper transport motifs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Copper is an essential catalytic co-factor for metabolically important cellular enzymes, such as cytochrome-c oxidase. Eukaryotic cells acquire copper through a copper transport protein and distribute intracellular copper using molecular chaperones. The copper chelator, neocuproine, inhibits Plasmodium falciparum ring-to-trophozoite transition in vitro, indicating a copper requirement for malaria parasite development. How the malaria parasite acquires or secretes copper still remains to be fully elucidated. Methods PlasmoDB was searched for sequences corresponding to candidate P. falciparum copper-requiring proteins. The amino terminal domain of a putative P. falciparum copper transport protein was cloned and expressed as a maltose binding fusion protein. The copper binding ability of this protein was examined. Copper transport protein-specific anti-peptide antibodies were generated in chickens and used to establish native protein localization in P. falciparum parasites by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Six P. falciparum copper-requiring protein orthologs and a candidate P. falciparum copper transport protein (PF14_0369), containing characteristic copper transport protein features, were identified in PlasmoDB. The recombinant amino terminal domain of the transport protein bound reduced copper in vitro and within Escherichia coli cells during recombinant expression. Immunolocalization studies tracked the copper binding protein translocating from the erythrocyte plasma membrane in early ring stage to a parasite membrane as the parasites developed to schizonts. The protein appears to be a PEXEL-negative membrane protein. Conclusion Plasmodium falciparum parasites express a native protein with copper transporter characteristics that binds copper in vitro. Localization of the protein to the erythrocyte and parasite plasma membranes could provide a mechanism for the delivery of novel anti-malarial compounds. PMID:23190769

  9. Accumulation and hyperaccumulation of copper in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, V.; Trnkova, L.; Huska, D.; Babula, P.; Kizek, R.

    2009-04-01

    Copper is natural component of our environment. Flow of copper(II) ions in the environment depends on solubility of compounds containing this metal. Mobile ion coming from soil and rocks due to volcanic activity, rains and others are then distributed to water. Bio-availability of copper is substantially lower than its concentration in the aquatic environment. Copper present in the water reacts with other compounds and creates a complex, not available for organisms. The availability of copper varies depending on the environment, but moving around within the range from 5 to 25 % of total copper. Thus copper is stored in the sediments and the rest is transported to the seas and oceans. It is common knowledge that copper is essential element for most living organisms. For this reason this element is actively accumulated in the tissues. The total quantity of copper in soil ranges from 2 to 250 mg / kg, the average concentration is 30 mg / kg. Certain activities related to agriculture (the use of fungicides), possibly with the metallurgical industry and mining, tend to increase the total quantity of copper in the soil. This amount of copper in the soil is a problem particularly for agricultural production of food. The lack of copper causes a decrease in revenue and reduction in quality of production. In Europe, shows the low level of copper in total 18 million hectares of farmland. To remedy this adverse situation is the increasing use of copper fertilizers in agricultural soils. It is known that copper compounds are used in plant protection against various illnesses and pests. Mining of minerals is for the development of human society a key economic activity. An important site where the copper is mined in the Slovakia is nearby Smolníka. Due to long time mining in his area (more than 700 years) there are places with extremely high concentrations of various metals including copper. Besides copper, there are also detected iron, zinc and arsenic. Various plant species

  10. Canine Models for Copper Homeostasis Disorders.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Leegwater, Peter A J; Fieten, Hille

    2016-02-04

    Copper is an essential trace nutrient metal involved in a multitude of cellular processes. Hereditary defects in copper metabolism result in disorders with a severe clinical course such as Wilson disease and Menkes disease. In Wilson disease, copper accumulation leads to liver cirrhosis and neurological impairments. A lack in genotype-phenotype correlation in Wilson disease points toward the influence of environmental factors or modifying genes. In a number of Non-Wilsonian forms of copper metabolism, the underlying genetic defects remain elusive. Several pure bred dog populations are affected with copper-associated hepatitis showing similarities to human copper metabolism disorders. Gene-mapping studies in these populations offer the opportunity to discover new genes involved in copper metabolism. Furthermore, due to the relatively large body size and long life-span of dogs they are excellent models for development of new treatment strategies. One example is the recent use of canine organoids for disease modeling and gene therapy of copper storage disease. This review addresses the opportunities offered by canine genetics for discovery of genes involved in copper metabolism disorders. Further, possibilities for the use of dogs in development of new treatment modalities for copper storage disorders, including gene repair in patient-derived hepatic organoids, are highlighted.

  11. Metallic Copper as an Antimicrobial Surface▿

    PubMed Central

    Grass, Gregor; Rensing, Christopher; Solioz, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria, yeasts, and viruses are rapidly killed on metallic copper surfaces, and the term “contact killing” has been coined for this process. While the phenomenon was already known in ancient times, it is currently receiving renewed attention. This is due to the potential use of copper as an antibacterial material in health care settings. Contact killing was observed to take place at a rate of at least 7 to 8 logs per hour, and no live microorganisms were generally recovered from copper surfaces after prolonged incubation. The antimicrobial activity of copper and copper alloys is now well established, and copper has recently been registered at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as the first solid antimicrobial material. In several clinical studies, copper has been evaluated for use on touch surfaces, such as door handles, bathroom fixtures, or bed rails, in attempts to curb nosocomial infections. In connection to these new applications of copper, it is important to understand the mechanism of contact killing since it may bear on central issues, such as the possibility of the emergence and spread of resistant organisms, cleaning procedures, and questions of material and object engineering. Recent work has shed light on mechanistic aspects of contact killing. These findings will be reviewed here and juxtaposed with the toxicity mechanisms of ionic copper. The merit of copper as a hygienic material in hospitals and related settings will also be discussed. PMID:21193661

  12. Microbiological influences in 'blue water' copper corrosion.

    PubMed

    Critchley, M M; Pasetto, R; O'Halloran, R J

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the influence of micro-organisms associated with copper corrosion on 'blue water' corrosion in drinking water. Laboratory rigs comprising of polycarbonate containers attached to annealed copper plumbing tubes were filled with Melbourne drinking water and sterilized by autoclaving. The copper tubes were inoculated with sterile or nonsterile extracts obtained from corroding copper and allowed to stand for 7 days. The extracts were drained and the tubes flushed and filled with sterile water from the rig. The water within the tubes was removed weekly for analysis and the tubes were refilled with freshly aerated water. The tube water sampled was analysed for pH, total copper and the presence of micro-organisms. Sterile rigs and rigs containing nonsterile water, both without tube inoculums, were used as controls. The results demonstrated that tubes inoculated with nonsterile corrosion extracts showed statistically higher copper release compared with the other rigs. Copper release as blue water was only observed after a lag period of 9 weeks. The internal surfaces of tubes releasing copper showed significant amounts of corrosion products and the presence of biofilm. Bacteria isolated from the corroding tubes included Acidovorax spp. and Sphingomonas sp. The results demonstrate a microbial role in blue water, as corrosion was induced in new copper tubes by exposure to nonsterile copper corrosion products. The potential for micro-organisms present in corrosion products to initiate blue water corrosion presents significant implications for the management of corrosion in distribution systems. Copyright 2004 The Society for Applied Microbiology

  13. Canine Models for Copper Homeostasis Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Leegwater, Peter A. J.; Fieten, Hille

    2016-01-01

    Copper is an essential trace nutrient metal involved in a multitude of cellular processes. Hereditary defects in copper metabolism result in disorders with a severe clinical course such as Wilson disease and Menkes disease. In Wilson disease, copper accumulation leads to liver cirrhosis and neurological impairments. A lack in genotype-phenotype correlation in Wilson disease points toward the influence of environmental factors or modifying genes. In a number of Non-Wilsonian forms of copper metabolism, the underlying genetic defects remain elusive. Several pure bred dog populations are affected with copper-associated hepatitis showing similarities to human copper metabolism disorders. Gene-mapping studies in these populations offer the opportunity to discover new genes involved in copper metabolism. Furthermore, due to the relatively large body size and long life-span of dogs they are excellent models for development of new treatment strategies. One example is the recent use of canine organoids for disease modeling and gene therapy of copper storage disease. This review addresses the opportunities offered by canine genetics for discovery of genes involved in copper metabolism disorders. Further, possibilities for the use of dogs in development of new treatment modalities for copper storage disorders, including gene repair in patient-derived hepatic organoids, are highlighted. PMID:26861285

  14. Copper sensitivity of Oregon coastal phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    The copper sensitivity of natural populations of Oregon coastal phytoplankton was studied using both additions of ionic copper and Cu-TRIS free ion activity buffers in coastal seawater. Phytoplankton growth rate, taxonomic composition and copper content were examined in treatment additions. The growth rate results suggested that the deficiency of another trace metal increased the apparent toxicity of copper to phytoplankton, especially in TRIS-free ion activity buffered seawater. Laboratory experiments with isolated coastal phytoplankton species indicated that manganese deficiency exacerbated copper toxicity, and that manganese deficiency was induced in TRIS buffered seawater by a TRIS-catalyzed oxidation of Mn. When manganese additions to natural populations were employed inconjunction with ionic copper additions and TRIS-free ion regulated seawater, they showed that ambient manganese concentrations were low enough to shift the onset of copper toxicity to lower copper concentrations. The results suggest that while acute toxicity to phytoplankton by ambient concentrations of copper is unlikely, the interactions of copper and other metals, especially manganese, may influence natural coastal phytoplankton populations in more subtle ways, such as taxonomic composition.

  15. Copper transport and regulation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoin, Jude; Ekici, Seda; Daldal, Fevzi; Ait-Mohand, Samia; Guérin, Brigitte; Labbé, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been successfully used as a model to gain fundamental knowledge in understanding how eukaryotic cells acquire copper during vegetative growth. These studies have revealed the existence of a heteromeric Ctr4–Ctr5 plasma membrane complex that mediates uptake of copper within the cells. Furthermore, additional studies have led to the identification of one of the first vacuolar copper transporters, Ctr6, as well as the copper-responsive Cuf1 transcription factor. Recent investigations have extended the use of S. pombe to elucidate new roles for copper metabolism in meiotic differentiation. For example, these studies have led to the discovery of Mfc1, which turned out to be the first example of a meiosis-specific copper transporter. Whereas copper-dependent transcriptional regulation of the Ctr family members is under the control of Cuf1 during mitosis or meiosis, meiosis-specific copper transporter Mfc1 is regulated by the recently discovered transactivator Mca1. It is foreseeable that identification of novel meiotic copper-related proteins will serve as stepping stones to unravel fundamental aspects of copper homoeostasis. PMID:24256274

  16. Metallic copper as an antimicrobial surface.

    PubMed

    Grass, Gregor; Rensing, Christopher; Solioz, Marc

    2011-03-01

    Bacteria, yeasts, and viruses are rapidly killed on metallic copper surfaces, and the term "contact killing" has been coined for this process. While the phenomenon was already known in ancient times, it is currently receiving renewed attention. This is due to the potential use of copper as an antibacterial material in health care settings. Contact killing was observed to take place at a rate of at least 7 to 8 logs per hour, and no live microorganisms were generally recovered from copper surfaces after prolonged incubation. The antimicrobial activity of copper and copper alloys is now well established, and copper has recently been registered at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as the first solid antimicrobial material. In several clinical studies, copper has been evaluated for use on touch surfaces, such as door handles, bathroom fixtures, or bed rails, in attempts to curb nosocomial infections. In connection to these new applications of copper, it is important to understand the mechanism of contact killing since it may bear on central issues, such as the possibility of the emergence and spread of resistant organisms, cleaning procedures, and questions of material and object engineering. Recent work has shed light on mechanistic aspects of contact killing. These findings will be reviewed here and juxtaposed with the toxicity mechanisms of ionic copper. The merit of copper as a hygienic material in hospitals and related settings will also be discussed.

  17. Nanoscale Copper and Copper Compounds for Advanced Device Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lih-Juann

    2016-12-01

    Copper has been in use for at least 10,000 years. Copper alloys, such as bronze and brass, have played important roles in advancing civilization in human history. Bronze artifacts date at least 6500 years. On the other hand, discovery of intriguing properties and new applications in contemporary technology for copper and its compounds, particularly on nanoscale, have continued. In this paper, examples for the applications of Cu and Cu alloys for advanced device applications will be given on Cu metallization in microelectronics devices, Cu nanobats as field emitters, Cu2S nanowire array as high-rate capability and high-capacity cathodes for lithium-ion batteries, Cu-Te nanostructures for field-effect transistor, Cu3Si nanowires as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers, single-crystal Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanotip arrays for high-efficiency solar cell, multilevel Cu2S resistive memory, superlattice Cu2S-Ag2S heterojunction diodes, and facet-dependent Cu2O diode.

  18. Copper toxicity and copper-zinc interactions in amphibian embryos.

    PubMed

    Herkovits, J; Helguero, L A

    1998-09-29

    The copper hazard was evaluated by means of a 7-day toxicity test with Bufo arenarum embryos. The LC50 and LC10 values from 24 to 168 h of exposure were approx. 0.085 and 0.05 mg Cu2+/1, respectively, while the LC90 resulted in 0.155 mg Cu2+/1 but in this case from 96 h onwards the LC90 diminished up to approx. 0.105 mg Cu2+/1. These data plotted as Toxicity Profiles (TOP) provide a better understanding of concentration and time-dependent thresholds. For instance, exposure threshold occurs within the first 24 h of treatment while for concentration thresholds LC10 and LC90 seem to be more meaningful than LC50 because the S.D. of this last value is overlapping those of LC10 and LC90 for most of the exposure period evaluated. Toxicity data corresponds to a pH of 6.8 which is normal for the maintaining media. Combined treatments of copper and zinc point out a beneficial effect of zinc proportional to the zinc concentration in the maintaining media, e.g. 100% of protection was achieved with 30 mg Zn2+/1 for a copper concentration exerting 90% of mortality. The presence of Cu2+ did not enhance Zn2+ toxicity. The results are discussed in terms of water quality criteria for wildlife and human health protection purposes.

  19. Investigations of copper speciation and bioavailability

    SciTech Connect

    Deaver, E.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    Speciation, or form in which copper occurs, can effect the bioavailability and therefore, the toxicity of that element. One needs to determine the bioavailable forms of copper in sediment/water effects on organisms. In both water and sediment experiments, physical/chemical factors influencing copper speciation were evaluated and related to organism responses. Ten day aqueous experiments encompassing a range of pH (6.5--8.1), alkalinity (10--70 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}), hardness (10--70 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}) and conductivity (30--300 umhos/cm) were conducted using Hyalella azteca. Amphipod survival was evaluated relative to changes in water characteristics and concomitant changes in copper speciation as measured using atomic adsorption spectroscopy (AA) for acid extractable copper, and differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) for labile copper. Ten day LC50s based on AA measured copper concentrations ranged from 42 to 142 ug/L Cu, and LC50s based on DPASV measured copper concentrations ranged from 17.4--24.8 ug/L Cu. Ten day sediment experiments encompassing a range of sediment pH, organic carbon content, acid volatile sulfides and redox concentrations were also conducted using H. azteca. Overlying water (AA and DPASV) and sediment copper concentrations (AA) were measured and evaluated relative to organism survival. Ten day sediment test LC50s based on DPASV measured copper concentrations in overlying water were 18.5 and 18 ug/L Cu for experiments in sandy and silty sediments, respectively. Organism survival, used as a measure of bioavailable copper, was evaluated in relation to measured copper species concentrations and used to develop guidelines for predicting copper toxicity in freshwater systems.

  20. Biosorption and bioreduction of copper from different copper compounds in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, Robson; Okeke, Benedict C; Pieniz, Simone; Bento, Fátima M; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2013-06-01

    High copper concentration is toxic for living organisms including humans. Biosorption is a bioremediation technique that can remove copper and other pollutants from aqueous medium and soils, consequently cleaning the environment. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate the influence of different copper compounds (Cu(II) as CuCl2; Cu(II) as CuSO4; and Cu(I) as CuCl) on copper bioreduction and biosorption using four copper-resistant bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere of two plants (Avena sativa and Plantago lanceolata) in aqueous matrix. Copper resistance profile, bioreduction, and biosorption after 48 h of incubation were evaluated. The isolates displayed high copper resistance. However, isolate A1 did not grow very well in the CuCl2 and isolate T5 was less resistant to copper in aqueous solutions amended with CuCl (Cu(I)). The best copper source for copper bioreduction and biosorption was CuSO4 and the isolates removed as much as ten times more copper than in aqueous solutions amended with the other copper compounds. Moreover, Cu(I) did not succumb to biosorption, although the microbes were resistant to aqueous solutions of CuCl. In summary, Cu(II) from CuSO4 was furthermost susceptible to bioreduction and biosorption for all isolates. This is an indication that copper contamination of the environment from the use of CuSO4 as an agrochemical is amenable to bioremediation.

  1. Accumulation of copper and other metals by copper-resistant plant-pathogenic and saprophytic pseudomonads

    SciTech Connect

    Cooksey, D.A.; Azad, H.R. )

    1992-01-01

    Copper-resistant strains of Pseudomonas syringae carrying the cop operon produce periplasmic copper-binding proteins, and this sequestration outside the cytoplasm has been proposed as a resistance mechanism. In this study, strain PS61 of P. syringae carrying the cloned cop operon accumulated more total cellular copper than without the operon. Several other copper-resistant pseudomonads with homology to cop were isolated from plants, and these bacteria also accumulated copper. Two highly resistant species accumulated up to 115 to 120 mg of copper per g (dry weight) of cells. P. putida 08891 was more resistant to several metals than P. syringae pv. tomato PT23, but this increased resistance was not correlated with an increased accumulation of metals other than copper. Several metals were accumulated by both PT23 and P. putida, but when copper was added to induce the cop operon, there was generally no increase of accumulation of the other metals, suggesting that the cop operon does not contribute to accumulation of these other metals. The exceptions were aluminium for PT23 and iron for P. putida, which accumulated to higher levels when copper was added to the cultures. The results of this study support the role of copper sequestration in the copper resistance mechanism of P. syringae and suggest that this mechanism is common to several copper-resistant Pseudomonas species found on plants to which antimicrobial copper compounds are applied for plant disease control.

  2. Copper-induced production of copper-binding supernatant proteins by the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood-Sears, V.; Gordon, A.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Growth of the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus is temporarily inhibited by micromolar levels of copper. During the copper-induced lag phase, supernatant compounds and detoxify copper are produced. In this study two copper-inducible supernatant proteins having molecular masses of ca. 21 and 19 kilodaltons (CuBP1 and CuPB2) were identified; these proteins were, respectively, 25 and 46 times amplified in supernatants of copper-challenged cultures compared with controls. Experiments in which chloramphenicol was added to cultures indicated that there was de novo synthesis of these proteins in response to copper. When supernatants were separated by gel permeation chromatography, CuBP1 and CuPB2 coeluted with a copper-induced peak in copper-binding activity. CuBP1 and CuBP2 from whole supernatants were concentrated and partially purified by using a copper-charged immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography column, confirming the affinity of these proteins for copper. A comparison of cell pellets and supernatants demonstrated that CuBP1 was more concentrated in supernatants than in cells. Our data are consistent with a model for a novel mechanism of copper detoxification in which excretion of copper-binding protein is induced by copper.

  3. Evaluation of copper resistant bacteria from vineyard soils and mining waste for copper biosorption.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, R; Pieniz, S; Okeke, B C; Camargo, F A O

    2011-01-01

    Vineyard soils are frequently polluted with high concentrations of copper due application of copper sulfate in order to control fungal diseases. Bioremediation is an efficient process for the treatment of contaminated sites. Efficient copper sorption bacteria can be used for bioremoval of copper from contaminated sites. In this study, a total of 106 copper resistant bacteria were examined for resistance to copper toxicity and biosorption of copper. Eighty isolates (45 from vineyard Mollisol, 35 from Inceptisol) were obtained from EMBRAPA (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária) experimental station, Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil (29°09'53.92″S and 51°31'39.40″W) and 26 were obtained from copper mining waste from Caçapava do Sul, RS, Brazil (30°29'43.48″S and 53'32'37.87W). Based on resistance to copper toxicity and biosorption, 15 isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Maximal copper resistance and biosorption at high copper concentration were observed with isolate N2 which removed 80 mg L(-1) in 24 h. Contrarily isolate N11 (Bacillus pumilus) displayed the highest specific copper biosorption (121.82 mg/L/OD unit in 24 h). GenBank MEGABLAST analysis revealed that isolate N2 is 99% similar to Staphylococcus pasteuri. Results indicate that several of our isolates have potential use for bioremediation treatment of vineyards soils and mining waste contaminated with high copper concentration.

  4. Plasmid-encoded copper resistance and precipitation by Mycobacterium scrofulaceum.

    PubMed Central

    Erardi, F X; Failla, M L; Falkinham, J O

    1987-01-01

    A copper-tolerant Mycobacterium scrofulaceum strain was able to remove copper from culture medium by sulfate-dependent precipitation as copper sulfide. Such precipitation of copper sulfide was not observed in a derivative that lacks a 173-kilobase plasmid. In addition, the plasmid-carrying strain has a sulfate-independent copper resistance mechanism. PMID:3662522

  5. Copper as a target for prostate cancer therapeutics: copper-ionophore pharmacology and altering systemic copper distribution.

    PubMed

    Denoyer, Delphine; Pearson, Helen B; Clatworthy, Sharnel A S; Smith, Zoe M; Francis, Paul S; Llanos, Roxana M; Volitakis, Irene; Phillips, Wayne A; Meggyesy, Peter M; Masaldan, Shashank; Cater, Michael A

    2016-06-14

    Copper-ionophores that elevate intracellular bioavailable copper display significant therapeutic utility against prostate cancer cells in vitro and in TRAMP (Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate) mice. However, the pharmacological basis for their anticancer activity remains unclear, despite impending clinical trails. Herein we show that intracellular copper levels in prostate cancer, evaluated in vitro and across disease progression in TRAMP mice, were not correlative with copper-ionophore activity and mirrored the normal levels observed in patient prostatectomy tissues (Gleason Score 7 & 9). TRAMP adenocarcinoma cells harbored markedly elevated oxidative stress and diminished glutathione (GSH)-mediated antioxidant capacity, which together conferred selective sensitivity to prooxidant ionophoric copper. Copper-ionophore treatments [CuII(gtsm), disulfiram & clioquinol] generated toxic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TRAMP adenocarcinoma cells, but not in normal mouse prostate epithelial cells (PrECs). Our results provide a basis for the pharmacological activity of copper-ionophores and suggest they are amendable for treatment of patients with prostate cancer. Additionally, recent in vitro and mouse xenograft studies have suggested an increased copper requirement by prostate cancer cells. We demonstrated that prostate adenocarcinoma development in TRAMP mice requires a functional supply of copper and is significantly impeded by altered systemic copper distribution. The presence of a mutant copper-transporting Atp7b protein (tx mutation: A4066G/Met1356Val) in TRAMP mice changed copper-integration into serum and caused a remarkable reduction in prostate cancer burden (64% reduction) and disease severity (grade), abrogating adenocarcinoma development. Implications for current clinical trials are discussed.

  6. Copper as a target for prostate cancer therapeutics: copper-ionophore pharmacology and altering systemic copper distribution

    PubMed Central

    Denoyer, Delphine; Pearson, Helen B.; Clatworthy, Sharnel A.S.; Smith, Zoe M.; Francis, Paul S.; Llanos, Roxana M.; Volitakis, Irene; Phillips, Wayne A.; Meggyesy, Peter M.; Masaldan, Shashank; Cater, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Copper-ionophores that elevate intracellular bioavailable copper display significant therapeutic utility against prostate cancer cells in vitro and in TRAMP (Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate) mice. However, the pharmacological basis for their anticancer activity remains unclear, despite impending clinical trails. Herein we show that intracellular copper levels in prostate cancer, evaluated in vitro and across disease progression in TRAMP mice, were not correlative with copper-ionophore activity and mirrored the normal levels observed in patient prostatectomy tissues (Gleason Score 7 & 9). TRAMP adenocarcinoma cells harbored markedly elevated oxidative stress and diminished glutathione (GSH)-mediated antioxidant capacity, which together conferred selective sensitivity to prooxidant ionophoric copper. Copper-ionophore treatments [CuII(gtsm), disulfiram & clioquinol] generated toxic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TRAMP adenocarcinoma cells, but not in normal mouse prostate epithelial cells (PrECs). Our results provide a basis for the pharmacological activity of copper-ionophores and suggest they are amendable for treatment of patients with prostate cancer. Additionally, recent in vitro and mouse xenograft studies have suggested an increased copper requirement by prostate cancer cells. We demonstrated that prostate adenocarcinoma development in TRAMP mice requires a functional supply of copper and is significantly impeded by altered systemic copper distribution. The presence of a mutant copper-transporting Atp7b protein (tx mutation: A4066G/Met1356Val) in TRAMP mice changed copper-integration into serum and caused a remarkable reduction in prostate cancer burden (64% reduction) and disease severity (grade), abrogating adenocarcinoma development. Implications for current clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27175597

  7. Thermoelectric Study of Copper Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Mengliang; Liu, Weishu; Ren, Zhifeng; Opeil, Cyril

    2014-03-01

    Nanostructuring has been shown to be an effective approach in reducing lattice thermal conductivity and improving the figure of merit of thermoelectric materials. Copper selenide is a layered structure material, which has a low thermal conductivity and p-type Seebeck coefficient at low temperatures. We have evaluated several hot-pressed, nanostructured copper selenide samples with different dopants for their thermoelectric properties. The phenomenon of the charge-density wave observed in the nanocomposite, resistivity, Seebeck, thermal conductivity and carrier mobility will be discussed. Funding for this research was provided by the Solid State Solar - Thermal Energy Conversion Center (S3TEC), an Energy Frontier Research Center sponsored by the DOE, Office of Basic Energy Science, Award No. DE-SC0001299/ DE-FG02-09ER46577.

  8. Copper-philic carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgamwar, Sachin U.; Sharma, Niti Nipun

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotube is having poor wet-ability with copper metal. Wet-ability of carbon nanotube was improved by exposing and creating more active sites on the surface of carbon nanotube. Carbon nanotubes were subjected to the prolong ultrasonication treatment of 20×103 Hz and 500W, which helped in disentanglement of carbon nanotube agglomerates and in breaking the weak bonds like pentagonal or heptagonal structure on the surface and on the CNT cap. Disentanglement of the carbon nanotube, resulted in exposing the defective sites on the surface and breaking of weak bonds, which assisted in creating the new defects on the surface. This process results in generates more active sites on the surface and it helps in improving the wet-ability of the carbon nanotube in copper.

  9. Reduction reaction analysis of nanoparticle copper oxide for copper direct bonding using formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Masahisa; Akaike, Masatake; Matsuoka, Naoya; Suga, Tadatomo

    2017-04-01

    Copper direct bonding is required for electronics devices, especially power devices, and copper direct bonding using formic acid is expected to lower the bonding temperature. In this research, we analyzed the reduction reaction of copper oxide using formic acid with a Pt catalyst by electron spin resonance analysis and thermal gravimetry analysis. It was found that formic acid was decomposed and radicals were generated under 200 °C. The amount of radicals generated was increased by adding the Pt catalyst. Because of these radicals, both copper(I) oxide and copper(II) oxide start to be decomposed below 200 °C, and the reduction of copper oxide is accelerated by reactants such as H2 and CO from the decomposition of formic acid above 200 °C. The Pt catalyst also accelerates the reaction of copper oxide reduction. Herewith, it is considered that the copper surface can be controlled more precisely by using formic acid to induce direct bonding.

  10. Exclusion of copper from altered hepatocytes in white perch (Morone americana) with hepatic copper storage.

    PubMed

    Bunton, T E

    1995-01-01

    Iron is excluded from foci of hepatocellular alteration in carcinogenesis of rodents and some fish. Among white perch (Morone americana), there is a condition of hepatic copper storage in which copper-loaded livers are produced naturally. In a group of fish collected from the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland (USA), from September to December 1990, we observed hepatic lesions which excluded copper similar to the phenomenon of iron exclusion, in a white perch with over 3,600 micrograms/g wet weight hepatic copper. The lesions were of two types: one with cells morphologically different from normal hepatocytes and which had diminished to absolute exclusion of copper with the copper specific histochemical stain rubeinic acid, and a second with cells morphologically similar to normal hepatocytes which had only a partial exclusion of copper. Although the exact cause and nature of the lesions was not determined, intrinsic copper toxicity, environmental pollution, or a combination of these factors may have contributed to their development.

  11. Explosive compact-coating of tungsten–copper alloy to a copper surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xiaojie; Yan, Honghao; Wang, Xiaohong; Miao, Yusong

    2017-03-01

    This study proposed a new method for coating tungsten–copper alloy to copper surface. First, the tungsten–copper alloy powder was pre-compacted to the copper surface. Then, the powder in the hydrogen atmosphere was sintered, and the pre-compacted powder was compacted by explosive compact-coating. Finally, diffusion sintering was conducted to improve the density of the coating layer. The theoretical density of the coating reached 99.3%. Microstructure characteristics indicated that tungsten and copper powders were well mixed. Tungsten particles were larger than copper particles. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) fracture surface analysis was different from the traditional fracture of metals. Coating and substrate joint surfaces, which were analyzed by SEM, indicated that the tungsten–copper alloy was sintered on the copper surface. The hardness of the coating layer was 197.6–245.2 HV, and the hardness of the substrate was approximately 55 HV.

  12. COPPER VESSEL, MAGIC AND DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Franz–Helmut; Thoss, Gabriele

    1986-01-01

    The use of a copper vessel as a magic and a medical aid in South Indian Folkmedicine is described. The authors discuss its relation to the neglected external treatments of Siddha Medicine and the use of cupping glasses in West Germany. With this article they want to rise the interest in a comparative study of the different medical systems and to emphasize the use of the external treatments in Siddha Medicine, which are rarely practiced today. PMID:22557555

  13. Durable Copper Polyimide Adhesive Bonds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-24

    the outer surface is primarily cupric oxide, and that there is a gradient through the thickness that becomes progressively richer in cuprous oxide...Further, they state that cuprous is an unstable forr and may be oxidized to cupric oxide during high- temperature pressing by reacting with residual...least forty years ago by Campbell and Thomas, when they showed that copper almost instantaneously developed a "tarnish" of cuprous oxide(5). The test

  14. Risks and benefits of copper in light of new insights of copper homeostasis.

    PubMed

    de Romaña, Daniel López; Olivares, Manuel; Uauy, Ricardo; Araya, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient involved in a variety of biological processes indispensable to sustain life. At the same time, it can be toxic when present in excess, the most noticeable chronic effect being liver damage. Potent, efficient regulatory mechanisms control copper absorption in the digestive tract and copper biliary excretion; absorption ranges between 12 and 60% in humans, depending on Cu intake, presence of other factors in the diet that may promote or inhibit its absorption and on the copper status of the individual. Current evidence suggests that copper deficiency may be more prevalent than previously thought, while copper toxicity is uncommon under customary daily life conditions. Menkes syndrome and Wilson disease are genetic conditions associated with severe copper deficiency and severe copper toxicity, respectively. Effects of milder degrees of copper deficiency and excess copper exposure are not well described, mainly due to lack of sensitive and specific indicators; serum copper concentration and ceruloplasmin are the most frequently used indicators, but they only detect rather intense changes of copper status. Of the many proteins assessed as potential markers of copper status the chaperone of Zn-Cu superoxide dismutase (CCS1) has yielded promising results; data on its performance under different conditions are needed to confirm its use as an indicator of early copper deficiency. Defining copper requirements and upper safe limits of consumption (UL) is a complex process since there are adverse health consequences from both copper deficiency and copper excess (U shape curve). The regulatory framework for risk assessment of essential trace elements introduced by the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) has proposed a homeostatic model to determine the Adequate Range of Oral Intake (AROI) of essential trace elements; the nadir of the resulting U shape curve serves to define the AROI. At this range of intake physiological

  15. In situ Fabrication of Monolithic Copper Azide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Li, Mingyu; Zeng, Qingxuan; Wu, Xingyu

    2016-04-01

    Fabrication and characterization of monolithic copper azide were performed. The monolithic nanoporous copper (NPC) with interconnected pores and nanoparticles was prepared by decomposition and sintering of the ultrafine copper oxalate. The preferable monolithic NPC can be obtained through decomposition and sintering at 400°C for 30 min. Then, the available monolithic NPC was in situ reacted with the gaseous HN3 for 24 h and the monolithic NPC was transformed into monolithic copper azide. Additionally, the copper particles prepared by electrodeposition were also reacted with the gaseous HN3 under uniform conditions as a comparison. The fabricated monolithic copper azide was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC).

  16. Copper and zinc in selected foods.

    PubMed

    Lawler, M R; Klevay, L M

    1984-09-01

    Few data on the copper and zinc contents of convenience items and frozen foods have been reported in the literature. In this study, selected meats, frozen vegetables, and convenience items were analyzed for copper and zinc content by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Foods found to have the highest copper content tended to be highest in zinc as well. Beef liver was an outstanding source of both minerals. Protein foods were generally good sources of zinc, supplying more than 2 mg/100-gm serving. Foods containing more than 0.2 mg copper per 100 gm were considered to be good sources. Examples included chicken livers, garbanzo beans, frozen Mexican-style dinner, and frozen brownies. Most of the other foods analyzed contained relatively small amounts of copper and zinc. Nevertheless, the contribution of such foods to the total daily copper and zinc intake illustrates the desirability of including a wide variety of foods in the diet.

  17. Copper: a metal for the ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doebrich, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Copper was one of the first metals ever extracted and used by humans, and it has made vital contributions to sustaining and improving society since the dawn of civilization. Copper was first used in coins and ornaments starting about 8000 B.C., and at about 5500 B.C., copper tools helped civilization emerge from the Stone Age. The discovery that copper alloyed with tin produces bronze marked the beginning of the Bronze Age at about 3000 B.C. Copper is easily stretched, molded, and shaped; is resistant to corrosion; and conducts heat and electricity efficiently. As a result, copper was important to early humans and continues to be a material of choice for a variety of domestic, industrial, and high-technology applications today.

  18. Copper hepatotoxicity attenuated by zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Schilsky, M.; Blank, R.; Stockert, R.; Sternlieb, I.; Scheinberg, I.H.

    1987-05-01

    The manifestations of hepatocellular copper toxicity and the role of zinc in its prevention have been investigated. When incubated for 48 hrs in media to which increasing concentrations of Cu acetate are added, HepG2 cells exhibit reduced viability with an LD/sub 50/ of 750 uM. Morphology, cell membranes and mitochondria appeared to be normal after 1 hr exposure to 1000 uM Cu acetate, but progressive abnormalities were noted between 3 and 12 hrs. In the first hour of exposure to this concentration of copper, protein synthesis (/sup 35/S-methionine uptake into TCA precipitates) was reduced to 20% of control while transcription (/sup 3/H-uridine incorporation) increased to 139% of controls. Preincubation with 200 uM Zn acetate for 2 hr increased cellular survival and allowed protein synthesis to proceed at 80% of control levels during exposure to 1000 uM Cu acetate. /sup 67/Cu uptake was unaltered by incubation with up to 500 uM Zn acetate. SDS-PAGE of cellular proteins after treatment with 200 uM Zn produced a different banding pattern suggesting induction of specific proteins. Since the addition of 1000 uM Cu acetate to a wheat-germ-translation-system using B-globin mRNA reduced translation by 95%, they conclude from this and the foregoing data that copper inhibits protein synthesis at the level of translation and that zinc mitigates this inhibition in hepatocytes.

  19. Effects of dietary supplementation with copper sulfate or tribasic copper chloride on broiler performance, relative copper bioavailability, and oxidation stability of vitamin E in feed.

    PubMed

    Luo, X G; Ji, F; Lin, Y X; Steward, F A; Lu, L; Liu, B; Yu, S X

    2005-06-01

    An experiment was conducted using a total of 420, 1-d-old, Arbor Acres commercial male chicks to compare copper sulfate and tribasic copper chloride (TBCC) as sources of supplemental copper for broilers. Chicks were randomly allotted to 1 of 7 treatments for 6 replicates of 10 birds each and were fed a basal corn-soybean meal diet (11.45 mg/kg copper) supplemented with 0, 150, 300, or 450 mg/kg copper from copper sulfate or TBCC for 21 d. Chicks fed 450 mg/kg copper as copper sulfate had lower (P < 0.01) average daily feed intake and average daily gain than those consuming other diets. Feeding supplemental copper increased linearly (P < 0.0001) liver copper concentrations regardless of copper source. The slopes of regressions of log10 liver copper on different independent variables used in regressions differ (P < 0.05) between the 2 copper sources. Linear regression over nonzero dietary levels of log10 transformed liver copper concentration on added copper intake resulted in a slope ratio estimate of 109.0 +/- 3.4% (with a 95% confidence interval from 102.2 to 115.8) for bioavailability of copper from TBCC compared with 100 for that in copper sulfate. When the feeds were stored at room temperature for 10 or 21 d, the vitamin E content in the feed fortified with 300 mg/kg copper as TBCC was higher (P < 0.01) than that in the feed added with 300 mg/kg copper as CuSO4. The vitamin E contents in liver and plasma of broilers given TBCC were also higher (P < 0.01) than those of birds fed copper sulfate. The results from this study indicate that TBCC is a safer product and more available to broilers than copper sulfate, and it is chemically less active than copper sulfate in promoting the oxidation of vitamin E in feed.

  20. Electrochemical synthesis of highly crystalline copper nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Amandeep; Gupta, Tanish; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Sanjeev; Singh, Karamjeet; Thakur, Anup

    2015-05-15

    Copper nanowires were fabricated within the pores of anodic alumina template (AAT) by template synthesis method at pH = 2.9. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to investigate the structure, morphology and composition of fabricated nanowires. These characterizations revealed that the deposited copper nanowires were highly crystalline in nature, dense and uniform. The crystalline copper nanowires are promising in application of future nanoelectronic devices and circuits.

  1. Copper chloride cathode for a secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Distefano, Salvador (Inventor); Nagasubramanian, Ganesan (Inventor); Bankston, Clyde P. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Higher energy and power densities are achieved in a secondary battery based on molten sodium and a solid, ceramic separator such as a beta alumina and a molten catholyte such as sodium tetrachloroaluminate and a copper chloride cathode. The higher cell voltage of copper chloride provides higher energy densities and the higher power density results from increased conductivity resulting from formation of copper as discharge proceeds.

  2. CNC Machining Of The Complex Copper Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popan, Ioan Alexandru; Balc, Nicolae; Popan, Alina

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the machining process of the complex copper electrodes. Machining of the complex shapes in copper is difficult because this material is soft and sticky. This research presents the main steps for processing those copper electrodes at a high dimensional accuracy and a good surface quality. Special tooling solutions are required for this machining process and optimal process parameters have been found for the accurate CNC equipment, using smart CAD/CAM software.

  3. Copper chloride cathode for a secondary battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Distefano, Salvador; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Bankston, Clyde P.

    1990-07-01

    Higher energy and power densities are achieved in a secondary battery based on molten sodium and a solid, ceramic separator such as a beta alumina and a molten catholyte such as sodium tetrachloroaluminate and a copper chloride cathode. The higher cell voltage of copper chloride provides higher energy densities and the higher power density results from increased conductivity resulting from formation of copper as discharge proceeds.

  4. The direct electrorefining of copper matte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Douglas J.

    1993-03-01

    Direct electrorefining of copper matte would be a desirable alternative to copper converting and its associated troublesome sulfur dioxide emissions. After more than 100 years of study, however, no commercial process has been developed, even though an analogous process for the direct electrorefining of nickel matte anodes has been operating successfully for several decades. The unique difficulties associated with copper matte electrorefining are related to the properties of the matte's decomposition products.

  5. Pressure leaching las cruces copper ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezowsky, R. M.; Xue, T.; Collins, M. J.; Makwana, M.; Barton-Jones, I.; Southgate, M.; Maclean, J. K.

    1999-12-01

    A hydrometallurgical process was developed for treating the Las Cruces massive sulfide-ore deposit located near Seville, Spain. A two-stage countercurrent leach process, consisting of an atmospheric leach and a pressure leach, was developed to effectively leach copper from the copper-bearing minerals and to generate a solution suitable for the subsequent solvent-extraction and copper-electrowinning operations. The results of batch and continuous miniplant tests are presented.

  6. Radioactivity at the Copper Creek copper lode prospect, Eagle district, east-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedow, Helmuth; Tolbert, Gene Edward

    1952-01-01

    Investigation of radioactivity anomalies at the Copper Creek copper lode prospect, Eagle district, east-central Alaska, during 1949 disclosed that the radioactivity is associated with copper mineralization in highly metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. These rocks are a roof pendant in the Mesozoic "Charley River" batholith. The radioactivity is probably all due to uranium associated with bornite and malachite.

  7. The copper-transporting ATPase pump and its potential role in copper-tolerance

    Treesearch

    Katie Ohno; C.A. Clausen; Frederick Green; G. Stanosz

    2016-01-01

    Copper-tolerant brown-rot decay fungi exploit intricate mechanisms to neutralize the efficacy of copper-containing preservative formulations. The production and accumulation oxalate is the most widely recognized theory regarding the mechanism of copper-tolerance in these fungi. The role of oxalate, however, may be only one part of a series of necessary components...

  8. Release of Micronized Copper Particles from Pressure Treated Wood Products.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper pressure treated lumber (PTL) has recently been introduced to the consumer market as a replacement for ionized copper PTL. The presence of particulate rather than aqueous copper raises concerns about possible human or environmental exposure. Two common pathways ...

  9. Release of Micronized Copper Particles from Pressure Treated Wood Products.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micronized copper pressure treated lumber (PTL) has recently been introduced to the consumer market as a replacement for ionized copper PTL. The presence of particulate rather than aqueous copper raises concerns about possible human or environmental exposure. Two common pathways ...

  10. Surface structure influences contact killing of bacteria by copper

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Marco; Solioz, Marc; Edongué, Hervais; Arzt, Eduard; Schneider, Andreas S

    2014-01-01

    Copper kills bacteria rapidly by a mechanism that is not yet fully resolved. The antibacterial property of copper has raised interest in its use in hospitals, in place of plastic or stainless steel. On the latter surfaces, bacteria can survive for days or even weeks. Copper surfaces could thus provide a powerful accessory measure to curb nosocomial infections. We here investigated the effect of the copper surface structure on the efficiency of contact killing of Escherichia coli, an aspect which so far has received very little attention. It was shown that electroplated copper surfaces killed bacteria more rapidly than either polished copper or native rolled copper. The release of ionic copper was also more rapid from electroplated copper compared to the other materials. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the bacteria nudged into the grooves between the copper grains of deposited copper. The findings suggest that, in terms of contact killing, more efficient copper surfaces can be engineered. PMID:24740976

  11. Neutron-activation analysis applied to copper ores and artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, N. F.

    1970-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis is used for quantitative identification of trace metals in copper. Establishing a unique fingerprint of impurities in Michigan copper would enable identification of artifacts made from this copper.

  12. Evaluations of bioavailable copper in amended wetland sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Deaver, E.; Rodgers, J.H. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Copper sulfate was added to the water column of six of twelve wetland mesocosms. In successive 10d experiments using invertebrates Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans, sediment toxicity and copper bioavailability were examined in sediments collected monthly from wetlands amended with copper sulfate, untreated wetlands, and control sediments. Evaluations included examinations of temporal changes in toxicity, bioavailability of aqueous and sediment associated copper, and comparison of organism responses to copper. In some cases copper remained acutely toxic over the 6 month study period, however, total copper concentrations in sediment had no relation to bioavailable copper. The relationship of copper speciation to bioavailability was discerned by measuring total copper (AA), labile copper (ASV) and copper ion activity (ISE) during these sediment toxicity experiments.

  13. Surface structure influences contact killing of bacteria by copper.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, Marco; Solioz, Marc; Edongué, Hervais; Arzt, Eduard; Schneider, Andreas S

    2014-06-01

    Copper kills bacteria rapidly by a mechanism that is not yet fully resolved. The antibacterial property of copper has raised interest in its use in hospitals, in place of plastic or stainless steel. On the latter surfaces, bacteria can survive for days or even weeks. Copper surfaces could thus provide a powerful accessory measure to curb nosocomial infections. We here investigated the effect of the copper surface structure on the efficiency of contact killing of Escherichia coli, an aspect which so far has received very little attention. It was shown that electroplated copper surfaces killed bacteria more rapidly than either polished copper or native rolled copper. The release of ionic copper was also more rapid from electroplated copper compared to the other materials. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the bacteria nudged into the grooves between the copper grains of deposited copper. The findings suggest that, in terms of contact killing, more efficient copper surfaces can be engineered.

  14. Material flows generated by pyromet copper smelting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, T.G.

    2005-01-01

    Copper production through smelting generates large volumes of material flows. As copper contained in ore becomes copper contained in concentrate to be fed into the smelting process, it leaves behind an altered landscape, sometimes mine waste, and always mill tailings. Copper concentrate, fluxing materials, fuels, oxygen, recyclables, scrap and water are inputs to the process. Dust (recycled), gases - containing carbon dioxide (CO2) (dissipated) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) (mostly collected, transformed and sold) and slag (discarded or sold) - are among the significant process outputs. This article reports estimates of the flows of these input/output materials for a particular set of smelters studied in some countries.

  15. The role of copper in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, D J; Bartnikas, T B; Gitlin, J D

    1999-08-01

    Copper is an essential trace metal which plays a fundamental role in the biochemistry of the human nervous system. Menkes disease and Wilson disease are inherited disorders of copper metabolism and the dramatic neurodegenerative phenotypes of these two diseases underscore the essential nature of copper in nervous system development as well as the toxicity of this metal when neuronal copper homeostasis is perturbed. Ceruloplasmin contains 95% of the copper found in human plasma and inherited loss of this essential ferroxidase is associated with progressive neurodegeneration of the retina and basal ganglia. Gain-of-function mutations in the cytosolic copper enzyme superoxide dismutase result in the motor neuron degeneration of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and current evidence suggests a direct pathogenic role for copper in this process. Recent studies have also implicated copper in the pathogenesis of neuronal injury in Alzheimer's disease and the prion-mediated encephalopathies, suggesting that further elucidation of the mechanisms of copper trafficking and metabolism within the nervous system will be of direct relevance to our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

  16. [Copper in methane oxidation: a review].

    PubMed

    Su, Yao; Kong, Jiao-Yan; Zhang, Xuan; Xia, Fang-Fang; He, Ruo

    2014-04-01

    Methane bio-oxidation plays an important role in the global methane balance and warming mitigation, while copper has a crucial function in methane bio-oxidation. On one side, copper is known to be a key factor in regulating the expression of the genes encoding the two forms of methane monooxygenases (MMOs) and is the essential metal element of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). On the other side, the content and fractionation of copper in the environment have great effects on the distribution of methanotrophs and their metabolic capability of methane and non-methane organic compounds, as well as on the copper-specific uptake systems in methanotrophs. Thus, it is meaningful to know the role of copper in methane bio-oxidation for comprehensive understanding of this process and is valuable for guiding the application of methanotrophs in greenhouse gas removal and pollution remediation. In this paper, the roles of copper in methane oxidation were reviewed, including the effect of copper on methanotrophic community structure and activity, the expression and activity of MMOs as well as the copper uptake systems in methanotrophs. The future studies of copper and methane oxidation were also discussed.

  17. High intensity copper atom beam - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, A. J.; Santavicca, D.

    1973-01-01

    The development of a nozzle which gas-dynamically accelerates neutral copper atoms at controlled energy levels and flux rates suitable for the investigation of inelastic copper atom collision processes is reported. Preliminary test data demonstrate that vapor-deposited rhenium nozzles do not degrade in the presence of copper vapor at high temperatures. Operation with high purity helium gas at nozzle stagnation temperatures in the range 2650-2700 K and total stagnation pressures from 1/4 to 2 atm with continuous copper atom flux rates of approximately 10 to the 18th power per second has been maintained, for a total time of 8-1/2 h to date.

  18. Electroforming copper targets for RTNS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, W.K.; Dini, J.W.; Logan, C.M.

    1981-02-06

    Copper targets used in RTNS II, which is the world's most intense 14-MeV neutron source, contain water cooling channels for temperature control. There are two methods for fabricating these targets: (1) diffusion bonding a copper panel containing photoetched channels to another copper panel, and (2) an electroforming technique which involves filling the photoetched channels with wax, plating thick copper to seal over the channels and then removing the wax. Development of this latter process and results obtained with it are described.

  19. Unraveling the Amycolatopsis tucumanensis copper-resistome.

    PubMed

    Dávila Costa, José Sebastián; Kothe, Erika; Abate, Carlos Mauricio; Amoroso, María Julia

    2012-10-01

    Heavy metal pollution is widespread causing serious ecological problems in many parts of the world; especially in developing countries where a budget for remediation technology is not affordable. Therefore, screening for microbes with high accumulation capacities and studying their stable resistance characteristics is advisable to define cost-effective any remediation strategies. Herein, the copper-resistome of the novel copper-resistant strain Amycolatopsis tucumanensis was studied using several approaches. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that proteins of the central metabolism, energy production, transcriptional regulators, two-component system, antioxidants and protective metabolites increased their abundance upon copper-stress conditions. Transcriptome analysis revealed that in presence of copper, superoxide dismutase, alkyl hydroperoxide reductase and mycothiol reductase genes were markedly induced in expression. The oxidative damage of protein and lipid from A. tucumanensis was negligible compared with that observed in the copper-sensitive strain Amycolatopsis eurytherma. Thus, we provide evidence that A. tucumamensis shows a high adaptation towards copper, the sum of which is proposed as the copper-resistome. This adaptation allows the strain to accumulate copper and survive this stress; besides, it constitutes the first report in which the copper-resistome of a strain of the genus Amycolatopsis with bioremediation potential has been evaluated.

  20. 40 CFR 415.360 - Applicability; description of the copper salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... copper salts production subcategory. 415.360 Section 415.360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Copper Salts Production Subcategory § 415.360 Applicability; description of the copper... copper salts, including (a) copper sulfate, copper chloride, copper iodide, and copper nitrate, and...

  1. 40 CFR 415.360 - Applicability; description of the copper salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... copper salts production subcategory. 415.360 Section 415.360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Copper Salts Production Subcategory § 415.360 Applicability; description of the copper... copper salts, including (a) copper sulfate, copper chloride, copper iodide, and copper nitrate, and...

  2. 40 CFR 415.360 - Applicability; description of the copper salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... copper salts production subcategory. 415.360 Section 415.360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Copper Salts Production Subcategory § 415.360 Applicability; description of the copper... copper salts, including (a) copper sulfate, copper chloride, copper iodide, and copper nitrate, and...

  3. 40 CFR 415.360 - Applicability; description of the copper salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... copper salts production subcategory. 415.360 Section 415.360 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Copper Salts Production Subcategory § 415.360 Applicability; description of the copper... copper salts, including (a) copper sulfate, copper chloride, copper iodide, and copper nitrate, and...

  4. Copper Nanoparticles in Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Francisco; Moglie, Yanina; Radivoy, Gabriel

    2015-09-15

    The challenges of the 21st century demand scientific and technological achievements that must be developed under sustainable and environmentally benign practices. In this vein, click chemistry and green chemistry walk hand in hand on a pathway of rigorous principles that help to safeguard the health of our planet against negligent and uncontrolled production. Copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), the paradigm of a click reaction, is one of the most reliable and widespread synthetic transformations in organic chemistry, with multidisciplinary applications. Nanocatalysis is a green chemistry tool that can increase the inherent effectiveness of CuAAC because of the enhanced catalytic activity of nanostructured metals and their plausible reutilization capability as heterogeneous catalysts. This Account describes our contribution to click chemistry using unsupported and supported copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) as catalysts prepared by chemical reduction. Cu(0)NPs (3.0 ± 1.5 nm) in tetrahydrofuran were found to catalyze the reaction of terminal alkynes and organic azides in the presence of triethylamine at rates comparable to those achieved under microwave heating (10-30 min in most cases). Unfortunately, the CuNPs underwent dissolution under the reaction conditions and consequently could not be recovered. Compelling experimental evidence on the in situ generation of highly reactive copper(I) chloride and the participation of copper(I) acetylides was provided. The supported CuNPs were found to be more robust and efficient catalyst than the unsupported counterpart in the following terms: (a) the multicomponent variant of CuAAC could be applied; (b) the metal loading could be substantially decreased; (c) reactions could be conducted in neat water; and (d) the catalyst could be recovered easily and reutilized. In particular, the catalyst composed of oxidized CuNPs (Cu2O/CuO, 6.0 ± 2.0 nm) supported on carbon (CuNPs/C) was shown to be highly versatile and very

  5. Differential gene expression in response to copper in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains possessing dissimilar copper resistance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xueling; Hu, Qi; Hou, Dongmei; Miao, Bo; Liu, Xueduan

    2010-01-01

    Locus afe_0454 from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (At.ferrooxidans) is annotated as related to copper resistance in The Institute for Genomic Research database. In our study, two At.ferrooxidans strains, 26(#) and DC, with different levels of copper ion resistance were isolated from acid mine drainages at two major copper mines in China, and their copper-resistance capacity was determined. The 26(#) strain had a copper-tolerance level of 0.22 mol/L, whereas the DC strain had a lower copper-tolerance level of 0.04 mol/L. The mutant 26(#) was generated from strain 26(#), and its copper-tolerance level was 0.25 mol/L. Using real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, differential expression of the afe_0454 gene during copper ion stress of these three strains was investigated. The results showed that the expression of afe_0454 was increased under copper ion stress, indicating that the afe_0454 gene is sensitive to copper levels. Furthermore, the afe_0454 gene expression ratio varied in the different copper-resistant strains. Gene expression was highest in the highest copper-resistant strain. The deduced amino acid sequence of the afe_0454 gene was 56.87% non-polar, indicating the AFE_0454 protein was hydrophobic. Searching with the AFE_0454 protein in The Institute for Genomic Research database showed that the structure of the copper resistance protein D (CopD), which transports copper ions outside of the cell, had the highest sequence identity (46%). Bioinformatics analysis showed that the AFE_0454 protein has eight transmembrane helixes and was predicted to be localized to the plasma membrane. These results strongly suggested that the AFE_0454 protein is likely a transmembrane protein and might be directly involved in copper ion resistance.

  6. Synthesis of Commercial Products from Copper Wire-Drawing Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, J.; Fernández, B.

    2014-06-01

    Copper powder and copper sulfate pentahydrate were obtained from copper wire-drawing scale. The hydrometallurgical recycling process proposed in this article yields a high-purity copper powder and analytical grade copper sulfate pentahydrate. In the first stage of this process, the copper is dissolved in sulfuric acid media via dismutation of the scale. In the second stage, copper sulfate pentahydrate is precipitated using ethanol. Effects such as pH, reaction times, stirring speed, initial copper concentration, and ethanol/solution volume ratio were studied during the precipitation from solution reaction. The proposed method is technically straightforward and provides efficient recovery of Cu from wire-drawing scale.

  7. A Copper (II) Aspirinate Project for the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudek, Emily

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that involves the synthesis of copper (II) aspirinate and the analysis of copper content in the product using electrogravimetric, spectrophotometric, and titrimetric methods. (MLH)

  8. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  9. Electrochemical nucleation and growth of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radisic, Aleksandar

    2005-12-01

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to provide more insight into nucleation and growth processes during electrochemical deposition of copper on various metallic and semiconductor substrates. Electrodeposition is the current method used in forming copper interconnects in integrated circuits, primarily due to the ability of this technique to fill high aspect ratio features with complex geometries at high deposition rates, leading to high throughput and lower manufacturing costs. Important processing steps prior to electroplating involve the deposition of a thin diffusion barrier layer, to prevent copper diffusion into silicon, and deposition of a copper seed layer by means of physical vapor deposition (PVD). The copper seed layer provides good electrical contact and improved adhesion to the diffusion barrier layer. As the feature sizes in integrated circuits continue to decrease, industry is forced to explore the possibility of electrochemical deposition of high quality copper films without the use of a copper seed layer. It is not a priori clear that copper films deposited on diffusion barriers will follow the same growth mode as copper films deposited on copper seed layers, and whether it will be possible to achieve the "superfilling" effects without the copper seed layer. The growth of copper films on diffusion barrier materials occurs through Volmer-Weber (3D island) mode of growth. As a result, high nucleus densities are essential in depositing continuous thin films. For complex structures with small length scales, such as trenches and vias in integrated circuits, a detailed understanding of nucleation and growth, and the influence of parameters such as potential and solution chemistry on the deposition mechanism is critical in designing processes for obtaining the void-free features. The goal of our research is to improve the understanding of the electrochemical nucleation and growth processes necessary for successful electrodeposition of copper onto

  10. Laboratory evolution of copper tolerant yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Yeast strains endowed with robustness towards copper and/or enriched in intracellular Cu might find application in biotechnology processes, among others in the production of functional foods. Moreover, they can contribute to the study of human diseases related to impairments of copper metabolism. In this study, we investigated the molecular and physiological factors that confer copper tolerance to strains of baker's yeasts. Results We characterized the effects elicited in natural strains of Candida humilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the exposure to copper in the culture broth. We observed that, whereas the growth of Saccharomyces cells was inhibited already at low Cu concentration, C. humilis was naturally robust and tolerated up to 1 g · L-1 CuSO4 in the medium. This resistant strain accumulated over 7 mg of Cu per gram of biomass and escaped severe oxidative stress thanks to high constitutive levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase. Both yeasts were then "evolved" to obtain hyper-resistant cells able to proliferate in high copper medium. While in S. cerevisiae the evolution of robustness towards Cu was paralleled by the increase of antioxidative enzymes, these same activities decreased in evolved hyper-resistant Candida cells. We also characterized in some detail changes in the profile of copper binding proteins, that appeared to be modified by evolution but, again, in a different way in the two yeasts. Conclusions Following evolution, both Candida and Saccharomyces cells were able to proliferate up to 2.5 g · L-1 CuSO4 and to accumulate high amounts of intracellular copper. The comparison of yeasts differing in their robustness, allowed highlighting physiological and molecular determinants of natural and acquired copper tolerance. We observed that different mechanisms contribute to confer metal tolerance: the control of copper uptake, changes in the levels of enzymes involved in oxidative stress response and changes in the copper

  11. Annual Copper Mountain Conferences on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, Copper Mountain, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Stephen F.

    2016-03-25

    This project supported the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, held from 2007 to 2015, at Copper Mountain, Colorado. The subject of the Copper Mountain Conference Series alternated between Multigrid Methods in odd-numbered years and Iterative Methods in even-numbered years. Begun in 1983, the Series represents an important forum for the exchange of ideas in these two closely related fields. This report describes the Copper Mountain Conference on Multigrid and Iterative Methods, 2007-2015. Information on the conference series is available at http://grandmaster.colorado.edu/~copper/.

  12. Synthesis of Copper/Copper-Oxide Nanoparticles: Optical and Structural Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Swarnkar, R. K.; Singh, S. C.; Gopal, R.

    2009-06-29

    In the present study, we have synthesized copper/copper-oxide nanoparticles by laser ablation of copper metal in aqueous solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The focused output of 1064 nm wavelength of pulsed Nd:YAG laser is used for ablation. The synthesized nanoparticles are characterized by UV-visible absorption, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The synthesis of copper/copper oxide nanoparticles are confirmed by XRD and Raman studies. The possible mechanism of nanoparticle formation is also discussed.

  13. Synthesis of copper nanoparticles by electrolysis of DNA utilizing copper as sacrificial anode.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dinesh Pratap; Srivastava, Onkar Nath

    2007-06-01

    Copper nanoparticles have been synthesized by anodic oxidation through a simple electrolysis process employing de-oxy ribonucleic acid (DNA) as electrolyte. Platinum was taken as cathode and copper as anode. The applied voltage was 4 V and the electrolysis was performed for duration of 1 h. The copper nanoparticles were prepared in situ from the electron beam irradiation on residues of electrolyte consisting of DNA and copper particles: DNA (Cu) complexes. The size of the nanoparticles ranges between 5-50 nm. A tentative explanation has been given for the formation of copper nanoparticles.

  14. Geomorphology of the lower Copper River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabets, Timothy P.

    1997-01-01

    The Copper River, located in southcentral Alaska, drains an area of more than 24,000 square miles. About 30 miles above its mouth, this large river enters Miles Lake, a proglacial lake formed by the retreat of Miles Glacier. Downstream from the outlet of Miles Lake, the Copper River flows past the face of Childs Glacier before it enters a large, broad, alluvial flood plain. The Copper River Highway traverses this flood plain and in 1995, 11 bridges were located along this section of the highway. These bridges cross parts of the Copper River and in recent years, some of these bridges have sustained serious damage due to the changing course of the Copper River. Although the annual mean discharge of the lower Copper River is 57,400 cubic feet per second, most of the flow occurs during the summer months from snowmelt, rainfall, and glacial melt. Approximately every six years, an outburst flood from Van Cleve Lake, a glacier-dammed lake formed by Miles Glacier, releases approximately 1 million acre-feet of water into the Copper River. When the outflow rate from Van Cleve Lake reaches it peak, the flow of the Copper River will increase between 150,000 to 190,000 cubic feet per second. Data collected by bedload sampling and continuous seismic reflection indicated that Miles Lake traps virtually all the bedload being transported by the Copper River as it enters the lake from the north. The reservoir-like effect of Miles Lake results in the armoring of the channel of the Copper River downstream from Miles Lake, past Childs Glacier, until it reaches the alluvial flood plain. At this point, bedload transport begins again. The lower Copper River transports 69 million tons per year of suspended sediment, approximately the same quantity as the Yukon River, which drains an area of more than 300,000 square miles. By correlating concurrent flows from a long-term streamflow-gaging station on the Copper River with a short-term streamflow-gaging station at the outlet of Miles Lake

  15. Geomorphology of the lower Copper River, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brabets, T.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Copper River, located in southcentral Alaska, drains an area of more than 24,000 square miles. About 30 miles above its mouth, this large river enters Miles Lake, a proglacial lake formed by the retreat of Miles Glacier. Downstream from the outlet of Miles Lake, the Copper River flows past the face of Childs Glacier before it enters a large, broad, alluvial flood plain. The Copper River Highway traverses this flood plain and in 1996, 11 bridges were located along this section of the highway. These bridges cross parts or all of the Copper River and in recent years, some of these bridges have sustained serious damage due to the changing course of the Copper River. Although the annual mean discharge of the lower Copper River is 57,400 cubic feet per second, most of the flow occurs during the summer months from snowmelt, rainfall, and glacial melt. Approximately every six years, an outburst flood from Van Cleve Lake, a glacier-dammed lake formed by Miles Glacier, releases approximately 1 million acre-feet of water into the Copper River. At the peak outflow rate from Van Cleve Lake, the flow of the Copper River will increase an additional 140,000 and 190,000 cubic feet per second. Bedload sampling and continuous seismic reflection were used to show that Miles Lake traps virtually all the bedload being transported by the Copper River as it enters the lake from the north. The reservoir-like effect of Miles Lake results in the armoring of the channel of the Copper River downstream from Miles Lakes, past Childs Glacier, until it reaches the alluvial flood plain. At this point, bedload transport begins again. The lower Copper River transports 69 million tons per year of suspended sediment, approximately the same quantity as the Yukon River, which drains an area of more than 300,000 square miles. By correlating concurrent flows from a long-term streamflow- gaging station on the Copper River with a short-term streamflow-gaging station at the outlet of Miles Lake, long

  16. Potentially novel copper resistance genes in copper-enriched activated sludge revealed by metagenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Guan; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Zhang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we utilized the Illumina high-throughput metagenomic approach to investigate diversity and abundance of both microbial community and copper resistance genes (CuRGs) in activated sludge (AS) which was enriched under copper selective stress up to 800 mg/L. The raw datasets (~3.5 Gb for each sample, i.e., the copper-enriched AS and the control AS) were merged and normalized for the BLAST analyses against the SILVA SSU rRNA gene database and self-constructed copper resistance protein database (CuRD). Also, the raw metagenomic sequences were assembled into contigs and analyzed based on Open Reading Frames (ORFs) to identify potentially novel copper resistance genes. Among the different resistance systems for copper detoxification under the high copper stress condition, the Cus system was the most enriched system. The results also indicated that genes encoding multi-copper oxidase played a more important role than those encoding efflux proteins. More significantly, several potentially novel copper resistance ORFs were identified by Pfam search and phylogenic analysis. This study demonstrated a new understanding of microbial-mediated copper resistance under high copper stress using high-throughput shotgun sequencing technique.

  17. Initiation of electroless nickel plating on copper, palladium-activated copper, gold, and platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Flis, J.; Duquette, D.J.

    1984-02-01

    The catalytic activity of copper, palladium-activated copper, gold, and platinum for electro-oxidation of hypophosphite and electroless nickel plating was investigated in an ammoniacal solution of pH 8.8 at 50/sup 0/C by potential measurements and linear sweep voltammetry from -0.3 to -0.92V vs. SCE. Early stages of nickel plating on copper-palladium substrates were studied by scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with EDAX. It was found that palladium-activated copper and gold were catalytically active in the entire range of potentials examined; copper was active below -0.6 platinum was not active at all. Small amounts of electrolytically deposited nickel considerably increased the electro-oxidation rate of hypophosphite on copper, gold, and palladium. TEM examinations showed that activation of copper in a PdCl/sub 2//HCl solution resulted in the deposition of palladium in the form of separate patches. Electroless nickel deposition on copper substrates with separate palladium spots took place on copper and palladium independently of each other. The deposition on palladium was faster than that on copper. It was concluded that the activation of copper substrates around palladium spots occurred solely through a spontaneous potential shift, induced by electro-oxidation of hypophosphite on the palladium spots. It was suggested that small amounts of one metal synergistically enhanced the catalytic activity of the other metals.

  18. Increased blood and urine copper after residential exposure to copper naphthenate

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, R.E.; Welch, L.; Branch, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Despite widespread industrial use of copper naphthenate, there are no reports of the relationship of copper naphthenate and copper absorption in humans or animals. We report a family of three individuals who lived in a home where copper naphthenate was sprayed on the inner foundation. Subsequently, these individuals developed non-specific complaints. In two of these individuals, serum copper levels were elevated when first measured months after copper naphthenate was sprayed in the home. A gradual decline over several years in urine and serum copper levels was observed in the individual who maintained follow-up. It is not known if symptoms reflected exposure to naphthenate, the solvent vehicle, volatilized copper, or the stress of exposure to a malodorous compound perceived as toxic. Exposure to copper naphthenate may be another cause of an elevated serum and urine copper level but the interpretation of these levels as normal' or toxic' requires additional study for clarification. This report suggests the need for further study of the absorption and relative toxicity of copper naphthenate.

  19. Copper-complexing ligands produced by an intact estuarine microbial community in response to copper stress.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, J.; Dryden, C.; Gordon, A.

    2002-12-01

    Copper is both an important nutrient and a pollutant in the marine environment. By studying the interactions between microorganisms and copper in the Elizabeth River (VA), home to a major Naval Base, we field tested the hypothesis that picoplankton and/or bacterioplankton produce strong, copper-complexing ligands in response to elevated copper concentrations. A simple light/ dark test was used to distinguish between heterotrophic and phototrophic ligand production. Samples were bottled and moored, submerged one meter, for a week. Direct counts using DAPI stain and epiflourescence were conducted to find concentrations of picoplankton and bacterioplankton. Using cathodic stripping voltammetry, we found the total copper concentrations, and then from a titration of the ligands by copper, the ligand concentrations and conditional stability constants were obtained. The Elizabeth River naturally had between 10-20 nM total dissolved copper concentrations. However when copper complexation was considered we found that the levels of bio-available Cu(II) ions were much lower. In fact in the natural samples the levels were not high enough to affect the relative reproductive rates of several microorganisms. Naturally there was a 50 nM "buffer zone" of ligand to total dissolved copper concentration. Furthermore, when stressed with excess copper, healthy picoplankton produced enough ligand to alleviate toxicity, and rebuild the buffer zone. However bacterioplankton only produced enough ligand so that they were no longer affected. Therefore, intact estuarine communities regulate copper bioavailability and toxicity with ligand production.

  20. Regulation of gemma formation in the copper moss Scopelophila cataractae by environmental copper concentrations.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Toshihisa; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2011-09-01

    Considerable attention has recently been focused on the use of hyperaccumulator plants for the phytoremediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals. The moss, Scopelophila cataractae (Mitt.) Broth., is a typical hyperaccumulator that is usually observed only in copper-rich environments and which accumulates high concentrations of copper in its tissues. However, many of the physiological processes and mechanisms for metal hyperaccumulation in S. cataractae remain unknown. To address this issue, we examined the mechanisms regulating gemma formation, which is considered the main strategy by which S. cataractae relocates to new copper-rich areas. From this study we found that treatment of S. cataractae with high concentrations of copper suppressed gemma formation but promoted protonemal growth. The suppressive effect was not observed by treatment with heavy metals other than copper. These results suggest the importance of copper-sensitive asexual reproduction in the unique life strategy of the copper moss, S. cataractae.

  1. Mechanical Separation of Metallic Copper from Polymer-Insulated Copper Wire

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, Seiji; Takeuchi, Sakae; Hisyamudin Bin Muhd Nor, Nik

    2011-01-17

    It is very important to recycling of polymer-insulated copper wire to remove copper from the wire without any contamination. A rolling machine and a blender were used to separate and recover the copper wires from a polymer coated cable. In the experiment using a rolling machine, the recovery of copper was improved by an increase in the number of rolling times and by lowering the cable temperature. All of the copper was recovered from a cable of 115 K in temperature. In the other experiment using a blender, the weight of the recovery of copper was increased by shortening the cable length and by increasing the rotary speed of the blender and the treating time. All the copper in a cut cable of 3mm long was recovered from a cable.

  2. Treatment of Wilson's disease with zinc. II. Validation of oral /sup 64/copper with copper balance

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, G.M.; Brewer, G.J.; Juni, J.E.; Prasad, A.S.; Dick, R.D.

    1986-12-01

    The efficacy of zinc as a therapeutic agent to control copper balance in Wilson's disease patients has been previously documented with balance studies. In an attempt to develop a simpler and faster tool for evaluating the adequacy of zinc therapy, a technique that measures the uptake into blood of a small oral dose of /sup 64/copper was studied in conjunction with copper balance. The mean peak /sup 64/copper uptake into blood of nine Wilson's disease patients on D-penicillamine, trien, or no medication was 6.04 +/- 2.74%, comparable with normal controls. Seven patients on zinc therapy had a markedly and significantly reduced mean uptake of 0.79 +/- 1.05% after treatment. The data demonstrate that the prevention of copper uptake into blood in Wilson's disease patients by zinc therapy can be evaluated by /sup 64/copper uptake and that peak uptakes of less than 1% occur in patients with neutral or negative copper balance.

  3. The distribution of copper in neonatal mottled mutant mice after exposure to copper and penicillamine

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, D.M.; Port, A.E.

    1982-08-01

    Tissue copper levels of brindled (Mo/sup br/) mice and normal littermates after single and repeated dosing with CuCl/sub 2/ and/or D-penicillamine are examined, together with a study of the cytosol distribution of copper after CuCl/sub 2/ treatment. The results confirm that the mutant mouse kidney is capable of extensive copper accumulation in association with the low MW copper-binding protein. Deficient tissues such as brain, heart and spleen are able to sequester sufficient of the exogenous copper to raise their levels to the normal control level, whereas mutant liver levels, even after copper treatment, remain below normal, indicating that the Mo gene affects the ability of the liver to retain copper.

  4. Inborn errors of copper metabolism

    PubMed Central

    KALER, STEPHEN G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Wilson disease, Menkes disease, occipital horn syndrome, and X-linked distal hereditary motor neuropathy are genetic disorders of copper metabolism that span a broad spectrum of neurological dysfunction (Table 180.1). The occurrence of these disorders indicates the fundamental importance of ATP7A and ATP7B. Further research to clarify the mechanisms suggested by these clinical and biochemical phenotypes may yield insight about the roles of ATP7A and ATP7B in neuronal cells, and lead to improved treatments. PMID:23622398

  5. NON-UNIFORM COPPER CORROSION: RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pinhole leaks due to copper pitting corrosion are a major cause of home plumbing failure. This study documents cases of copper pitting corrosion found in homes supplied by Butler County Environmental Services in Ohio. SEM. XRD, and optical microscopy were used to document pit s...

  6. COPPER PITTING AND PINHOLE LEAK RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized copper corrosion or pitting is a significant problem at many water utilities across the United States. Copper pinhole leak problems resulting from extensive pitting are widely under reported. Given the sensitive nature of the problem, extent of damage possible, costs o...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... manufacturing practice. (c) Labeling. The color additive and any mixture prepared therefrom intended solely or... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2647 Copper powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive copper powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... manufacturing practice. (c) Labeling. The color additive and any mixture prepared therefrom intended solely or... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2647 Copper powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive copper powder shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73...

  9. Copper toxicosis in a dairy goat herd.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Jennifer; Angelos, John; Puschner, Birgit; Miller, Grant; George, Lisle

    2007-08-15

    A closed herd of 400 mixed-breed dairy goats was examined because of a decrease in milk production and increase in mortality rate. Nine animals had died within a 1-month period. Clinical signs were evident only in lactating goats and included anorexia and recumbency. In the most severely affected goats, signs progressed to neurologic abnormalities and death. Serum aspartate aminotransferase activity, gamma-glutamyltransferase activity, and total bilirubin concentration were high in clinically affected does, but no evidence of hemolysis was found. A diagnosis of copper toxicosis was made on the basis of high liver and kidney copper concentrations and histologic evidence of hepatic necrosis. Goats were found to have been fed a mineral mix containing 3,050 ppm copper for 9 months prior to the onset of copper toxicosis. Overall, there was no consistent relationship between serum hepatic enzyme activities, serum copper concentration, and liver copper concentration. Clinically affected goats were treated with penicillamine, ammonium molybdate, sodium thiosulfate, and vitamin E. Penicillamine increased urine copper excretion in treated does versus untreated control animals. An increased incidence of infectious disease was identified in the herd 9 months later. Liver vitamin E concentration was low in 10 of the 12 goats that underwent necropsy. Findings suggested that penicillamine may be an effective treatment for goats with copper toxicosis. Production losses months after the diagnosis was made suggested that the intoxication had a prolonged animal welfare and economic impacts.

  10. Differential bacteriophage mortality on exposure to copper.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyu; Dennehy, John J

    2011-10-01

    Many studies report that copper can be used to control microbial growth, including that of viruses. We determined the rates of copper-mediated inactivation for a wide range of bacteriophages. We used two methods to test the effect of copper on bacteriophage survival. One method involved placing small volumes of bacteriophage lysate on copper and stainless steel coupons. Following exposure, metal coupons were rinsed with lysogeny broth, and the resulting fluid was serially diluted and plated on agar with the corresponding bacterial host. The second method involved adding copper sulfate (CuSO(4)) to bacteriophage lysates to a final concentration of 5 mM. Aliquots were removed from the mixture, serially diluted, and plated with the appropriate bacterial host. Significant mortality was observed among the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) bacteriophages Φ6 and Φ8, the single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) bacteriophage PP7, the ssDNA bacteriophage ΦX174, and the dsDNA bacteriophage PM2. However, the dsDNA bacteriophages PRD1, T4, and λ were relatively unaffected by copper. Interestingly, lipid-containing bacteriophages were most susceptible to copper toxicity. In addition, in the first experimental method, the pattern of bacteriophage Φ6 survival over time showed a plateau in mortality after lysates dried out. This finding suggests that copper's effect on bacteriophage is mediated by the presence of water.

  11. Common Sense Copper and RF Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhollan, G.

    2005-01-18

    The purpose of this document is to gather together both fundamental information on copper and on the cleaning and operation of copper in RF gun structures. While incomplete, this is a living document and will be added to and updated as necessary.

  12. Copper Regulates Cyclic AMP-Dependent Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi; Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Chan, Jefferson; Kaluarachchi, Harini; Muchenditsi, Abigael; Pendyala, Venkata S.; Jia, Shang; Aron, Allegra T.; Ackerman, Cheri M.; Vander Wal, Mark N.; Guan, Timothy; Smaga, Lukas P.; Farhi, Samouil L.; New, Elizabeth J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Chang, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Cell signaling relies extensively on dynamic pools of redox-inactive metal ions such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc, but their redox-active transition metal counterparts such as copper and iron have been studied primarily as static enzyme cofactors. Here we report that copper is an endogenous regulator of lipolysis, the breakdown of fat, which is an essential process in maintaining the body's weight and energy stores. Utilizing a murine model of genetic copper misregulation, in combination with pharmacological alterations in copper status and imaging studies in a 3T3-L1 white adipocyte model, we demonstrate that copper regulates lipolysis at the level of the second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP), by altering the activity of the cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase PDE3B. Biochemical studies of the copper-PDE3B interaction establish copper-dependent inhibition of enzyme activity and identify a key conserved cysteine residue within a PDE3-specific loop that is essential for the observed copper-dependent lipolytic phenotype. PMID:27272565

  13. NON-UNIFORM COPPER CORROSION: RESEARCH UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pinhole leaks due to copper pitting corrosion are a major cause of home plumbing failure. This study documents cases of copper pitting corrosion found in homes supplied by Butler County Environmental Services in Ohio. SEM. XRD, and optical microscopy were used to document pit s...

  14. Fetal polyol metabolism in copper deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, M.; Lewis, C.G.; Beal, T. )

    1989-02-09

    Since pregnant rats consuming fructose, copper deficient diets fail to give birth, the relationship between maternal copper deficiency, polyol metabolism and fetal mortality was investigated. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were fed from conception one of the following diets: fructose, copper deficient; fructose, copper adequate; starch, copper deficient or starch, copper adequate. The deficient diets contained 0.6 ug Cu and the adequate 6.0 ug Cu/g diet. Pregnancy was terminated at day 19 of gestation. Glucose, sorbitol and fructose were measured in maternal blood, placenta and fetal liver. Fructose consumption during pregnancy resulted in higher levels of fructose and sorbitol in maternal blood when compared to starch. In the fructose dietary groups, the placenta and fetal liver contained extremely high levels of glucose, fructose and sorbitol compared to the corresponding metabolites from the starch dietary groups. Copper deficiency further elevated fructose and sorbitol concentrations in the placenta and fetal liver respectively. Since high tissue levels of glucose, fructose and sorbitol have been shown to have deleterious effects on cellular metabolism, these data suggest that when fructose was fed during pregnancy the combination of an aberration of carbohydrate metabolism with copper deficiency could be responsible for the pathology and mortality of the developing fetus.

  15. 21 CFR 73.2647 - Copper powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2647 Copper powder. (a) Identity and specifications. The....1647 (a)(1) and (b). (b) Uses and restrictions. Copper powder may be safely used in coloring cosmetics generally, including cosmetics intended for use in the area of the eye, in amounts consistent with good...

  16. Lead and Copper Control 101-slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is an overview of the most important water treatment strategies for the control of lead and copper release from drinking water corrosion. In addition to the sections specifically on lead and copper treatment, sections are included that cover sampling to find le...

  17. Additive monitoring and interactions during copper electroprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Dale Wade

    The electrochemical deposition of copper has been a major focus of research for decades. Renewed interest in copper electroplating is not limited to the copper producers but is also a major concern of semiconductor manufacturers. The focus on copper electrochemistry by the semiconductor manufacturers has increased since IBM's announcement in 1997 that copper will be used for metallization in high speed/power semiconductors [1--3]. The desire to use copper instead of aluminum is simply a reflection on copper's superior conductivity (lower RC time constants) and resistance to electromigration (generally proportional to the melting point). This dissertation is the compilation of the research into analytical techniques for monitoring surface-active additives in common sulfuric acid/copper sulfate plating baths. Chronopotentiometric, DC and AC voltammetry were the major analytical techniques used in this research. Several interactions between the additives will also be presented along with their apparent decline in activity. The decline in activity is well known in the industry and is also detected by these methods as presented in chapters 4 and 5. Finally, a systemic approach for monitoring the additive Galactosal, which is commonly used in electrowinning, will be outlined. The monitoring system proposed herein would have to be adjusted for each electrowinning facility because each has a unique chemistry and cell configuration.

  18. COPPER PITTING AND PINHOLE LEAK RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized copper corrosion or pitting is a significant problem at many water utilities across the United States. Copper pinhole leak problems resulting from extensive pitting are widely under reported. Given the sensitive nature of the problem, extent of damage possible, costs o...

  19. Lead and Copper Control 101-slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is an overview of the most important water treatment strategies for the control of lead and copper release from drinking water corrosion. In addition to the sections specifically on lead and copper treatment, sections are included that cover sampling to find le...

  20. Copper deficiency in calves in northcentral Manitoba.

    PubMed

    Smart, M E; Gudmundson, J; Brockman, R P; Cymbaluk, N; Doige, C

    1980-12-01

    Four seven month old Simmental calves were examined because of unthriftiness, a persistent cough, stiffness and lameness. The calves had gastrointestinal and pulmonary parasitism. Analysis of the blood copper levels of these calves and of cows and calves on the farm indicated a generalized deficiency. Only the calves affected with parasitism showed signs of clinical copper deficiency.

  1. Fluidized-bed copper oxide process

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, P.P.; Takahashi, G.S.; Leshock, D.G.

    1991-10-14

    The fluidized-bed copper oxide process was developed to simultaneously remove sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide contaminants from the flue gas of coal-fired utility boilers. This dry and regenerable process uses a copper oxide sorbent in a fluidized-bed reactor. Contaminants are removed without generating waste material. (VC)

  2. Cellular copper distribution: a mechanistic systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Banci, Lucia; Bertini, Ivano; Cantini, Francesca; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone

    2010-08-01

    Copper is an essential but potentially harmful trace element required in many enzymatic processes involving redox chemistry. Cellular copper homeostasis in mammals is predominantly maintained by regulating copper transport through the copper import CTR proteins and the copper exporters ATP7A and ATP7B. Once copper is imported into the cell, several pathways involving a number of copper proteins are responsible for trafficking it specifically where it is required for cellular life, thus avoiding the release of harmful free copper ions. In this study we review recent progress made in understanding the molecular mechanisms of copper transport in cells by analyzing structural features of copper proteins, their mode of interaction, and their thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, thus contributing to systems biology of copper within the cell.

  3. Response of gram-positive bacteria to copper stress.

    PubMed

    Solioz, Marc; Abicht, Helge K; Mermod, Mélanie; Mancini, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus hirae, Lactococcus lactis, and Bacillus subtilis have received wide attention in the study of copper homeostasis. Consequently, copper extrusion by ATPases, gene regulation by copper, and intracellular copper chaperoning are understood in some detail. This has provided profound insight into basic principles of how organisms handle copper. It also emerged that many bacterial species may not require copper for life, making copper homeostatic systems pure defense mechanisms. Structural work on copper homeostatic proteins has given insight into copper coordination and bonding and has started to give molecular insight into copper handling in biological systems. Finally, recent biochemical work has shed new light on the mechanism of copper toxicity, which may not primarily be mediated by reactive oxygen radicals.

  4. Effects of pattern characteristics on copper CMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenbiao, Ruan; Lan, Chen; Zhigang, Li; Tianchun, Ye

    2009-04-01

    Copper chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is influenced by geometric characteristics such as line width and pattern density, as well as by the more obvious parameters such as slurry chemistry, pad type, polishing pressure and rotational speed. Variations in the copper thickness across each die and across the wafer can impact the circuit performance and reduce the yield. In this paper, we propose a modeling method to simulate the polishing behavior as a function of layout pattern factors. Under the same process conditions, the pattern density, the line width and the line spacing have a strong influence on copper dishing, dielectric erosion and topography. The test results showed: the wider the copper line or the spacing, the higher the copper dishing; the higher the density, the higher the dielectric erosion; the dishing and erosion increase slowly as a function of increasing density and go into saturation when the density is more than 0.7.

  5. Update on copper oxide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Cava, R.J.

    1995-05-01

    The early high-{Tc} superconductors Ba{sub 2}YCu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} remain the most studied for their potential application. The number and variety of new copper oxide superconductors discovered since 1986 is remarkable. Although physicists like to take credit for the superconductivity revolution, it is really a revolution in new materials. New materials of continually increasing complexity have driven the field forward since its beginning. It is no accident that the chemically simplest copper oxide superconductors were discovered first. Higher {Tc} values have been caused by the rapid growth in general knowledge in the material community of the empirical factors necessary for the occurrence of high-{Tc} superconductivity. The growth is based on improving chemical understanding of previous discoveries. The chemical understanding and complexity of cuprate superconductors continue to increase. The appearance in 1993 of mercury-based materials has further raised {Tc} values.

  6. [Atomic absorption spectrophotometry study of copper ion release by copper-bearing intrauterine devices].

    PubMed

    Berthou, J; Chrétien, F C; Driguez, P A

    1998-11-01

    Copper release from copper-bearing IUD's was studied in vitro and in vivo using atomic absorption spectrophotometry in deionized water, normal saline solution and normal ovulatory cervical mucus. In these media, copper release from a 375 mm2 DIU occurs without latency, showing comparable amounts for identical time intervals. Daily copper release was shown to be respectively 8 and 11 times higher in cervical mucus and normal saline solution than in deionized water. Although copper ions are detectable in ovulatory cervical mucus under physiological conditions, the copper content appears 5 to 6 times higher in women bearing a copper IUD. Obviously, the copper amount is dependent on the copper exposed surface: the daily in vitro release from a 250 mm2 IUD is 18% inferior to that observed from a 375 mm2 model. In vivo, the daily copper release in ovulatory mucus of 380 or 200 mm2 IUD users is respectively 5 and 3.5 times higher than in controls.

  7. Evaluation of copper speciation and water quality factors that affect aqueous copper tasting response.

    PubMed

    Cuppett, Jonathan D; Duncan, Susan E; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2006-09-01

    This study determined taste thresholds for copper as its speciation was varied among free cupric ion, complexed cupric ion, and precipitated cupric particles. The impact of copper chemistry on taste is important as copper is added to many beverages and can be present in drinking water as a natural mineral or due to corrosion of copper plumbing. A one-of-five test was used to define thresholds with solutions containing 0.025-8 mg/l Cu (from copper sulfate) in distilled or mineralized water of varying pH. The mineralized water was designed to mimic the composition of a typical tap water. Group thresholds for copper in either distilled-deionized water or mineralized water were not significantly different and ranged from 0.4 to 0.8 mg/l Cu. A difference from control test was used to assess the impact of soluble and particulate copper on taste. Soluble copper species, including free cupric ion and complexed copper species, were readily tasted, while particulate copper was poorly tasted.

  8. Copper accumulation in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) exposed to water borne copper sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.; Griffin, B.; Schlenk, D.; Kadlubar, F.; Brand, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    Liver and axial muscle of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) was analyzed for residual copper after exposure to water borne copper sulfate. Copper sulfate was continuously introduced into well water in three fiber glass tanks to achieve 1.7 mg/L, 2.7 mg/L and 3.6 mg/L copper sulfate concentrations in exposure waters. Milli-Q quality water was metered into a fourth tank at the same rate for unexposed fish. Actual levels of copper in exposure waters were determined by daily sampling and analysis by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAA). Tissue samples were taken from six fish from each of the exposed and unexposed tanks at two-week intervals, Samples were collected until tissue analysis indicated an equilibrium had been established between the uptake and elimination in both the muscle and liver tissue. Elimination was followed until a clear rate of deputation could be established. Samples were digested in nitric acid in a micro wave digestor and analyzed by GFAA. Results of tissue analysis will be presented to demonstrate bioaccumulation and the effect of copper concentration, length of copper exposure, and gender on copper uptake, establishment of tissue:environmental copper equilibrium, and rate of copper elimination following exposure.

  9. Corrosion of a new copper-gold or copper-platinum intrauterine device.

    PubMed

    Gal-Or, L; Gonen, R; Zilberman, A; Scharf, M

    1982-11-01

    It has been shown previously that supplementing plastic intrauterine devices (IUDs) with copper wire enhances the antifertility effect of the device. The use of copper intrauterine contraceptive devices, however, is currently limited to two to three years, mainly because of wire fragmentation, which was observed as early as after eight months of use. In the resulting search for a long-lasting device, two new systems of duplex wire, with gold and platinum cores electrolytically coated with copper, were devised and studied. Initially, duplex wires and controls were exposed to physiological solution. Copper dissolution rate and corrosion morphology were studied by weight-loss measurements and optical metallography. Similar systems were then surgically implanted in rat uteri for varying periods of up to 26 weeks. Electron microanalysis of corrosion products, in addition to weight-loss measurements and metallography, was performed. The results showed that a uniform and ductile copper coating is obtainable by electroplating on gold and platinum wires. Rate of copper dissolution is similar to that of solid copper wire. No dissolution of gold and platinum in the controls or coated wires was detected by weight loss, metallography, or atomic absorption measurements. Microanalysis of the deposits and corrosion products on the wires in the uteri environment showed sulfur, chlorine, and calcium, in addition to copper. The results of this study suggest that supplementing IUDs with copper-coated gold or platinum wires may result in significant prolongation of the life span of the device by preventing uncontrolled loss of copper caused by wire fragmentation.

  10. Molecular Responses of Mouse Macrophages to Copper and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Inferred from Proteomic Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Carrière, Marie; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Habert, Aurélie; Chevallet, Mireille; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The molecular responses of macrophages to copper-based nanoparticles have been investigated via a combination of proteomic and biochemical approaches, using the RAW264.7 cell line as a model. Both metallic copper and copper oxide nanoparticles have been tested, with copper ion and zirconium oxide nanoparticles used as controls. Proteomic analysis highlighted changes in proteins implicated in oxidative stress responses (superoxide dismutases and peroxiredoxins), glutathione biosynthesis, the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and mitochondrial proteins (especially oxidative phosphorylation complex subunits). Validation studies employing functional analyses showed that the increases in glutathione biosynthesis and in mitochondrial complexes observed in the proteomic screen were critical to cell survival upon stress with copper-based nanoparticles; pharmacological inhibition of these two pathways enhanced cell vulnerability to copper-based nanoparticles, but not to copper ions. Furthermore, functional analyses using primary macrophages derived from bone marrow showed a decrease in reduced glutathione levels, a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and inhibition of phagocytosis and of lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production. However, only a fraction of these effects could be obtained with copper ions. In conclusion, this study showed that macrophage functions are significantly altered by copper-based nanoparticles. Also highlighted are the cellular pathways modulated by cells for survival and the exemplified cross-toxicities that can occur between copper-based nanoparticles and pharmacological agents. PMID:23882024

  11. Effect of chelators on copper metabolism and copper pools in mouse hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McArdle, H.J.; Gross, S.M.; Creaser, I.; Sargeson, A.M.; Danks, D.M.

    1989-04-01

    Disorders of copper storage are usually treated by chelation therapy. It is generally thought that the chelators act by mobilizing copper from the liver, hence allowing excretion in the urine. This paper has examined the effect of chelators on copper uptake and storage in mouse hepatocytes. Penicillamine, a clinically important chelator, does not block the uptake of copper or remove copper from hepatocytes. Two other copper chelators, sar and diamsar, which form very stable and kinetically inert Cu2+ complexes by encapsulating the metal ion in an organic cage, were shown to block copper accumulation by the cells and to remove up to 80% of cell-associated copper. They also removed most (approximately 80%) of the /sup 64/Cu accumulated by the cells in 30 min, but released only a small percentage (less than 20%) of that accumulated over 18 h. The results show that copper in the hepatocyte can be divided into at least two pools, an easily accessible one, and another, not removable even after long-term incubation with any of the chelators. Most of the copper normally found in the cell appeared to be associated with the former pool.

  12. Evaluation of copper resistant bacteria from vineyard soils and mining waste for copper biosorption

    PubMed Central

    Andreazza, R.; Pieniz, S.; Okeke, B.C.; Camargo, F.A.O

    2011-01-01

    Vineyard soils are frequently polluted with high concentrations of copper due application of copper sulfate in order to control fungal diseases. Bioremediation is an efficient process for the treatment of contaminated sites. Efficient copper sorption bacteria can be used for bioremoval of copper from contaminated sites. In this study, a total of 106 copper resistant bacteria were examined for resistance to copper toxicity and biosorption of copper. Eighty isolates (45 from vineyard Mollisol, 35 from Inceptisol) were obtained from EMBRAPA (Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária) experimental station, Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil (29°09′53.92″S and 51°31′39.40″W) and 26 were obtained from copper mining waste from Caçapava do Sul, RS, Brazil (30°29′43.48″S and 53′32′37.87W). Based on resistance to copper toxicity and biosorption, 15 isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Maximal copper resistance and biosorption at high copper concentration were observed with isolate N2 which removed 80 mg L−1 in 24 h. Contrarily isolate N11 (Bacillus pumilus) displayed the highest specific copper biosorption (121.82 mg/L/OD unit in 24 h). GenBank MEGABLAST analysis revealed that isolate N2 is 99% similar to Staphylococcus pasteuri. Results indicate that several of our isolates have potential use for bioremediation treatment of vineyards soils and mining waste contaminated with high copper concentration. PMID:24031606

  13. 19 CFR 10.98 - Copper-bearing fluxing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Copper-bearing fluxing material. 10.98 Section 10... Material § 10.98 Copper-bearing fluxing material. (a) For the purpose of this section, ores usable as a... copper. (b) (c) There shall be filed in connection with the entry of such copper-bearing ores, either for...

  14. 19 CFR 10.98 - Copper-bearing fluxing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Copper-bearing fluxing material. 10.98 Section 10... Material § 10.98 Copper-bearing fluxing material. (a) For the purpose of this section, ores usable as a... copper. (b) (c) There shall be filed in connection with the entry of such copper-bearing ores, either for...

  15. 19 CFR 10.98 - Copper-bearing fluxing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Copper-bearing fluxing material. 10.98 Section 10... Material § 10.98 Copper-bearing fluxing material. (a) For the purpose of this section, ores usable as a... copper. (b) (c) There shall be filed in connection with the entry of such copper-bearing ores, either for...

  16. 19 CFR 10.98 - Copper-bearing fluxing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Copper-bearing fluxing material. 10.98 Section 10... Material § 10.98 Copper-bearing fluxing material. (a) For the purpose of this section, ores usable as a... copper. (b) (c) There shall be filed in connection with the entry of such copper-bearing ores, either for...

  17. 19 CFR 10.98 - Copper-bearing fluxing material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Copper-bearing fluxing material. 10.98 Section 10... Material § 10.98 Copper-bearing fluxing material. (a) For the purpose of this section, ores usable as a... copper. (b) (c) There shall be filed in connection with the entry of such copper-bearing ores, either for...

  18. Bacterial stimulation of copper phytoaccumulation by bioaugmentation with rhizosphere bacteria.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, Robson; Okeke, Benedict C; Lambais, Márcio Rodrigues; Bortolon, Leandro; de Melo, George Wellington Bastos; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio de Oliveira

    2010-11-01

    Copper contaminated areas pose environmental health risk to living organisms. Remediation processes are thus required for both crop production and industrial activities. This study employed bioaugmentation with copper resistant bacteria to improve phytoremediation of vineyard soils and copper mining waste contaminated with high copper concentrations. Oatmeal plant (Avena sativa L.) was used for copper phytoextraction. Three copper resistant bacterial isolates from oatmeal rhizosphere (Pseudomonas putida A1; Stenotrophomonas maltophilia A2 and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus A6) were used for the stimulation of copper phytoextraction. Two long-term copper contaminated vineyard soils (Mollisol and Inceptisol) and copper mining waste from Southern Brazil were evaluated. Oatmeal plants substantially extracted copper from vineyard soils and copper mining waste. As much as 1549 mg of Cu kg⁻¹ dry mass was extracted from plants grown in Inceptisol soil. The vineyard Mollisol copper uptake (55 mg Cu kg⁻¹ of dry mass) in the shoots was significantly improved upon inoculation of oatmeal plants with isolate A2 (128 mg of Cu kg⁻¹ of shoot dry mass). Overall oatmeal plant biomass displayed higher potential of copper phytoextraction with inoculation of rhizosphere bacteria in vineyard soil to the extent that 404 and 327 g ha⁻¹ of copper removal were respectively observed in vineyard Mollisol bioaugmented with isolate A2 (S. maltophilia) and isolate A6 (A. calcoaceticus). Results suggest potential application of bacterial stimulation of phytoaccumulation of copper for biological removal of copper from contaminated areas. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. THE IMPACT OF ORTHOPHOSPHATE ON COPPER CORROSION AND CHLORINE DEMAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1991, EPA promulgated the Lead and Copper Rule, which established a copper action level of 1.3 mg/L in a 1-liter, first-draw sample collected from the consumer’s tap. Excessive corrosion of copper can lead to elevated copper levels at the consumer's tap, and in some cases, can...

  20. THE IMPACT OF ORTHOPHOSPHATE ON COPPER CORROSION AND CHLORINE DEMAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1991, EPA promulgated the Lead and Copper Rule, which established a copper action level of 1.3 mg/L in a 1-liter, first-draw sample collected from the consumer’s tap. Excessive corrosion of copper can lead to elevated copper levels at the consumer's tap, and in some cases, can...

  1. Recombination activity of copper in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdeva, R.; Istratov, A. A.; Weber, E. R.

    2001-10-01

    The carrier recombination activity of copper in n-type and p-type silicon has been investigated. The minority carrier diffusion length has been found to decrease monotonically with increasing copper concentration in n Si and to exhibit a step-like behavior in p-type silicon at Cu concentrations above a certain critical level. It is suggested that the impact of copper on the minority carrier diffusion length is determined by the formation of copper precipitates. This process is retarded in perfect silicon due to the large lattice mismatch between Cu3Si and the silicon lattice and even more retarded in p Si, due to electrostatic repulsion effects between the positively charged copper precipitates and interstitial copper ions. Comparison of the impact of Cu on minority carrier diffusion length obtained with p-Si samples of different resistivity confirmed the electrostatic model. Studies of the impact of copper on minority carrier diffusion length in samples with internal gettering sites indicated that they provide heterogeneous nucleation sites for Cu precipitation at subcritical Cu concentration. Above a certain threshold of Cu concentration, the bulk recombination activity is dominated by quasihomogeneous formation of Cu precipitates, a process that is not detectably affected by the presence of oxide precipitates.

  2. Electrochromism in copper oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, T.J.; Slack, J.L.; Rubin, M.D.

    2000-08-15

    Transparent thin films of copper(I) oxide prepared on conductive SnO2:F glass substrates by anodic oxidation of sputtered copper films or by direct electrodeposition of Cu2O transformed reversibly to opaque metallic copper films when reduced in alkaline electrolyte. In addition, the same Cu2O films transform reversibly to black copper(II) oxide when cycled at more anodic potentials. Copper oxide-to-copper switching covered a large dynamic range, from 85% and 10% photopic transmittance, with a coloration efficiency of about 32 cm2/C. Gradual deterioration of the switching range occurred over 20 to 100 cycles. This is tentatively ascribed to coarsening of the film and contact degradation caused by the 65% volume change on conversion of Cu to Cu2O. Switching between the two copper oxides (which have similar volumes) was more stable and more efficient (CE = 60 cm2/C), but covered a smaller transmittance range (60% to 44% T). Due to their large electrochemical storage capacity and tolerance for alkaline electrolytes, these cathodically coloring films may be useful as counter electrodes for anodically coloring electrode films such as nickel oxide or metal hydrides.

  3. Copper Delivery to Chloroplast Proteins and its Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Guadalupe; Pilon, Marinus

    2016-01-01

    Copper is required for photosynthesis in chloroplasts of plants because it is a cofactor of plastocyanin, an essential electron carrier in the thylakoid lumen. Other chloroplast copper proteins are copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and polyphenol oxidase, but these proteins seem to be dispensable under conditions of low copper supply when transcripts for these proteins undergo microRNA-mediated down regulation. Two ATP-driven copper transporters function in tandem to deliver copper to chloroplast compartments. This review seeks to summarize the mechanisms of copper delivery to chloroplast proteins and its regulation. We also delineate some of the unanswered questions that still remain in this field. PMID:26793223

  4. Copper Delivery to Chloroplast Proteins and its Regulation.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Guadalupe; Pilon, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Copper is required for photosynthesis in chloroplasts of plants because it is a cofactor of plastocyanin, an essential electron carrier in the thylakoid lumen. Other chloroplast copper proteins are copper/zinc superoxide dismutase and polyphenol oxidase, but these proteins seem to be dispensable under conditions of low copper supply when transcripts for these proteins undergo microRNA-mediated down regulation. Two ATP-driven copper transporters function in tandem to deliver copper to chloroplast compartments. This review seeks to summarize the mechanisms of copper delivery to chloroplast proteins and its regulation. We also delineate some of the unanswered questions that still remain in this field.

  5. Copper accumulation by stickleback nests containing spiggin.

    PubMed

    Pinho, G L L; Martins, C M G; Barber, I

    2016-07-01

    The three-spined stickleback is a ubiquitous fish of marine, brackish and freshwater ecosystems across the Northern hemisphere that presents intermediate sensitivity to copper. Male sticklebacks display a range of elaborate reproductive behaviours that include nest construction. To build the nests, each male binds nesting material together using an endogenous glycoprotein nesting glue, known as 'spiggin'. Spiggin is a cysteine-rich protein and, therefore, potentially binds heavy metals present in the environment. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of stickleback nests to accumulate copper from environmental sources. Newly built nests, constructed by male fish from polyester threads in laboratory aquaria, were immersed in copper solutions ranging in concentration from 21.1-626.6 μg Cu L(-1). Bundles of polyester threads from aquaria without male fish were also immersed in the same copper solutions. After immersion, nests presented higher amounts of copper than the thread bundles, indicating a higher capacity of nests to bind this metal. A significant, positive correlation between the concentration of copper in the exposure solution and in the exposed nests was identified, but there was no such relationship for thread bundles. Since both spiggin synthesis and male courtship behaviour are under the control of circulating androgens, we predicted that males with high courtship scores would produce and secrete high levels of the spiggin protein. In the present study, nests built by high courtship score males accumulated more copper than those built by low courtship score males. Considering the potential of spiggin to bind metals, the positive relationship between fish courtship and spiggin secretion seems to explain the higher amount of copper on the nests from the fish showing high behaviour scores. Further work is now needed to determine the consequences of the copper binding potential of spiggin in stickleback nests for the health and survival of

  6. The alteration of copper homeostasis in inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Han, Ming; Lin, Zhexuan; Zhang, Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Significant changes of copper homeostasis were triggered by lipopolysaccharides, which result in systemic inflammatory response and contribute to hepatic injury. Administration of lipopolysaccharides resulted in the increase of plasma "free" copper and total copper concentrations, whereas, the decrease of "free" copper and total copper contents in liver tissue. Copper-associated proteins were detected and showed a down-regulation of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, and up-regulation of copper metabolism domain containing 1 and copper transporter 1. The alteration of these proteins would lower the apoptotic threshold. Meanwhile, the increasing of circulation copper might cause oxidative injury through Fenton reaction and contribute to tissue injury. Our findings underscored the possibility that these changes in systemic copper homeostasis might provide a novel insight of the characteristic of the acute phase of inflammatory response and the underlying influence on tissue injury.

  7. Copper localization, elemental content, and thallus colour in the copper hyperaccumulator lichen Lecanora sierra from California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purvis, O.W.; Bennett, J.P.; Spratt, J.

    2011-01-01

    An unusual dark blue-green lichen, Lecanora sierrae, was discovered over 30 years ago by Czehura near copper mines in the Lights Creek District, Plumas County, Northern California. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy, Czehura found that dark green lichen samples from Warren Canyon contained 4% Cu in ash and suggested that its colour was due to copper accumulation in the cortex. The present study addressed the hypothesis that the green colour in similar material we sampled from Warren Canyon in 2008, is caused by copper localization in the thallus. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis of specimens of L. sierrae confirmed that copper localization took place in the cortex. Elemental analyses of L. sierrae and three other species from the same localities showed high enrichments of copper and selenium, suggesting that copper selenates or selenites might occur in these lichens and be responsible for the unusual colour.

  8. Copper localization, elemental content, and thallus colour in the copper hyperaccumulator lichen Lecanora sierrae from California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purvis, O.W.; Bennett, J.P.; Spratt, J.

    2011-01-01

    An unusual dark blue-green lichen, Lecanora sierrae, was discovered over 30 years ago by Czehura near copper mines in the Lights Creek District, Plumas County, Northern California. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy, Czehura found that dark green lichen samples from Warren Canyon contained 4% Cu in ash and suggested that its colour was due to copper accumulation in the cortex. The present study addressed the hypothesis that the green colour in similar material we sampled from Warren Canyon in 2008, is caused by copper localization in the thallus. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis of specimens of L. sierrae confirmed that copper localization took place in the cortex. Elemental analyses of L. sierrae and three other species from the same localities showed high enrichments of copper and selenium, suggesting that copper selenates or selenites might occur in these lichens and be responsible for the unusual colour. Copyright ?? 2011 British Lichen Society.

  9. Copper binding triggers compaction in N-terminal tail of human copper pump ATP7B.

    PubMed

    Mondol, Tanumoy; Åden, Jörgen; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2016-02-12

    Protein conformational changes are fundamental to biological reactions. For copper ion transport, the multi-domain protein ATP7B in the Golgi network receives copper from the cytoplasmic copper chaperone Atox1 and, with energy from ATP hydrolysis, moves the metal to the lumen for loading of copper-dependent enzymes. Although anticipated, conformational changes involved in ATP7B's functional cycle remain elusive. Using spectroscopic methods we here demonstrate that the four most N-terminal metal-binding domains in ATP7B, upon stoichiometric copper addition, adopt a more compact arrangement which has a higher thermal stability than in the absence of copper. In contrast to previous reports, no stable complex was found in solution between the metal-binding domains and the nucleotide-binding domain of ATP7B. Metal-dependent movement of the first four metal-binding domains in ATP7B may be a trigger that initiates the overall catalytic cycle.

  10. The Role of Copper Chaperone Atox1 in Coupling Redox Homeostasis to Intracellular Copper Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Hatori, Yuta; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Human antioxidant protein 1 (Atox1) is a small cytosolic protein with an essential role in copper homeostasis. Atox1 functions as a copper carrier facilitating copper transfer to the secretory pathway. This process is required for activation of copper dependent enzymes involved in neurotransmitter biosynthesis, iron efflux, neovascularization, wound healing, and regulation of blood pressure. Recently, new cellular roles for Atox1 have emerged. Changing levels of Atox1 were shown to modulate response to cancer therapies, contribute to inflammatory response, and protect cells against various oxidative stresses. It has also become apparent that the activity of Atox1 is tightly linked to the cellular redox status. In this review, we summarize biochemical information related to a dual role of Atox1 as a copper chaperone and an antioxidant. We discuss how these two activities could be linked and contribute to establishing the intracellular copper balance and functional identity of cells during differentiation. PMID:27472369

  11. Copper concentration of liver tissue under long-term copper-histidine therapy in a patient with Menkes disease.

    PubMed

    Kroepfl, T; Mair, E; Deutsch, J; Brunner-Krainz, M; Paschke, E; Plecko, B

    2006-08-01

    Copper-histidine is the treatment of choice in Menkes disease but bears the potential risk of copper overload and induced liver cirrhosis. We report normal copper concentrations of liver tissue over an 8-year treatment period with copper-histidine.

  12. Copper-Exchanged Zeolite L Traps Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Seshan, Panchalam K.

    1991-01-01

    Brief series of simple chemical treatments found to enhance ability of zeolite to remove oxygen from mixture of gases. Thermally stable up to 700 degrees C and has high specific surface area which provides high capacity for adsorption of gases. To increase ability to adsorb oxygen selectively, copper added by ion exchange, and copper-exchanged zeolite reduced with hydrogen. As result, copper dispersed atomically on inner surfaces of zeolite, making it highly reactive to oxygen, even at room temperature. Reactivity to oxygen even greater at higher temperatures.

  13. Nanosecond pulsed laser blackening of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guang; Hourd, Andrew C.; Abdolvand, Amin

    2012-12-01

    Nanosecond (12 ns) pulsed laser processing of copper at 532 nm resulted in the formation of homogenously distributed, highly organized microstructures. This led to the fabrication of large area black copper substrates with absorbance of over 97% in the spectral range from 250 nm to 750 nm, and a broadband absorbance of over 80% between 750 nm and 2500 nm. Optical and chemical analyses of the fabricated black metal are presented and discussed. The employed laser is an industrially adaptable source and the presented technique for fabrication of black copper could find applications in broadband thermal radiation sources, solar energy absorbers, irradiative heat transfer devices, and thermophotovoltaics.

  14. [Biomachining of metal copper by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans].

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Zhang, D; Wu, Y

    2000-06-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was employed in the biomachining process of metal copper(Cu0). The bacteria growth and the changes of Fe3+ concentration during machining processes have been studied. Biomachining and chemical machining have been compared. The results showed that the concentrations of bacteria and Fe3+ determine the speed of machining copper. The biomachining is more fast that chemical maching because bacteria are able to regenerate Fe3+ oxidizing copper. It was also found that the Cu2+ produced from the machining processes inhibit the growth of bacteria. Cu2+ has to be removed.

  15. Copper: Toxicological relevance and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gaetke, Lisa M.; Chow-Johnson, Hannah S.; Chow, Ching K.

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a vital mineral essential for many biological processes. The vast majority of all Cu in healthy humans is associated with enzyme prosthetic groups or bound to proteins. Cu homeostasis is tightly regulated through a complex system of Cu transporters and chaperone proteins. Excess or toxicity of Cu, which is associated with the pathogenesis of hepatic disorder, neurodegenerative changes and other disease conditions, can occur when Cu homeostasis is disrupted. The capacity to initiate oxidative damage is most commonly attributed to Cu-induced cellular toxicity. Recently, altered cellular events, including lipid metabolism, gene expression, alpha-synuclein aggregation, activation of acidic sphingomyelinase and release of ceramide, and temporal and spatial distribution of Cu in hepatocytes, as well as Cu-protein interaction in the nerve system, have been suggested to play a role in Cu toxicity. However, whether these changes are independent of, or secondary to, an altered cellular redox state of Cu remain to be elucidated. PMID:25199685

  16. Copper Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoshan; Darwin, K. Heran

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is a trace element essential for the growth and development of almost all organisms, including bacteria. However, Cu overload in most systems is toxic. Studies show Cu accumulates in macrophage phagosomes infected with bacteria, suggesting Cu provides an innate immune mechanism to combat invading pathogens. To counteract the host-supplied Cu, increasing evidence suggests that bacteria have evolved Cu resistance mechanisms to facilitate their pathogenesis. In particular, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, has evolved multiple pathways to respond to Cu. Here, we summarize what is currently known about Cu homeostasis in Mtb and discuss potential sources of Cu encountered by this and other pathogens in a mammalian host. PMID:25614981

  17. Purification of human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase by copper chelate affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Weslake, R.J.; Chesney, S.L.; Petkau, A.; Friesen, A.D.

    1986-05-15

    Copper, zinc superoxide dismutase was isolated from human red blood cell hemolysate by DEAE-Sepharose and copper chelate affinity chromatography. Enzyme preparations had specific activities ranging from 3400 to 3800 U/mg and recoveries were approximately 60% of the enzyme activity in the lysate. Copper chelate affinity chromatography resulted in a purification factor of about 60-fold. The homogeneity of the superoxide dismutase preparation was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis, analytical gel filtration chromatography, and isoelectric focusing.

  18. Double-discharge copper vapor laser with copper chloride as a lasant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. J.; Nerheim, N. M.; Russell, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    A copper vapor laser utilizing copper chloride as a lasant in a heated discharge tube has been studied. The lasing action was observed only when two successive discharge current pulses at suitable time intervals were applied. The first pulse is considered to be a dissociation pulse to produce copper and chlorine atoms; the second to be a pumping pulse to produce population inversion. The maximum energy density measured to date was 17 microjoule/cu cm.

  19. Oxalic acid overproduction by copper-tolerant brown-rot basidiomycetes on southern yellow pine treated with copper-based preservatives

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen; Frederick Green

    2003-01-01

    Accumulation of oxalic acid (OA) by brown-rot fungi and precipitation of copper oxalate crystals in wood decayed by copper-tolerant decay fungi has implicated OA in the mechanism of copper tolerance. Understanding the role of OA in copper tolerance is important due to an increasing reliance on copper-based wood preservatives. In this study, four copper-tolerant brown-...

  20. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC. PMID:26755872

  1. Molecular imaging and therapy targeting copper metabolism in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wachsmann, Jason; Peng, Fangyu

    2016-01-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide. Significant efforts have been devoted to identify new biomarkers for molecular imaging and targeted therapy of HCC. Copper is a nutritional metal required for the function of numerous enzymatic molecules in the metabolic pathways of human cells. Emerging evidence suggests that copper plays a role in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Increased accumulation of copper ions was detected in tissue samples of HCC and many other cancers in humans. Altered copper metabolism is a new biomarker for molecular cancer imaging with position emission tomography (PET) using radioactive copper as a tracer. It has been reported that extrahepatic mouse hepatoma or HCC xenografts can be localized with PET using copper-64 chloride as a tracer, suggesting that copper metabolism is a new biomarker for the detection of HCC metastasis in areas of low physiological copper uptake. In addition to copper modulation therapy with copper chelators, short-interference RNA specific for human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) may be used to suppress growth of HCC by blocking increased copper uptake mediated by hCtr1. Furthermore, altered copper metabolism is a promising target for radionuclide therapy of HCC using therapeutic copper radionuclides. Copper metabolism has potential as a new theranostic biomarker for molecular imaging as well as targeted therapy of HCC.

  2. Copper accumulation and oxidative stress in the sea anemone, Aiptasia pallida, after waterborne copper exposure.

    PubMed

    Main, W P L; Ross, C; Bielmyer, G K

    2010-03-01

    Copper is a common marine pollutant yet its effects on symbiotic cnidarians are largely understudied. To further understand the impact of elevated copper concentrations on marine symbiotic organisms, toxicity tests were conducted using the model sea anemone, Aiptasia pallida, with and without its zooxanthellae symbiont. Symbiotic and aposymbiotic A. pallida were exposed to sublethal copper concentrations (0, 5, 15, and 50 microg/L) for 7d and copper accumulation, behavior, and the activity of the oxidative stress enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) were measured. Additionally, acute 96-h toxicity tests were conducted to determine LC(50) values of the organisms after copper exposure. Both symbiotic and aposymbiotic A. pallida rapidly accumulated copper in a time and dose dependent manner. However, higher copper concentrations accumulated in the aposymbiotic as compared to the symbiotic A. pallida. In response to the highest two copper exposures (15 and 50 microg/L) symbiotic A. pallida upregulated CAT activity to combat the damaging effects of hydrogen peroxide. Contrary to these results, SOD activity significantly decreased during the highest copper exposure, when compared to controls. CAT activity was not detected and SOD was substantially (>10 fold) reduced in aposymbiotic A. pallida, suggesting that the zooxanthellae are associated with the oxidative stress response. Copper exposure as low as 5 microg/L caused tentacle retraction and increased mucus production in both symbiotic and aposymbiotic anemones. The LC(50) values for symbiotic and aposymbiotic A. pallida exposed to copper for 96 h were 148 microg/L (95% confidence interval=126.4, 173.8) and 206 microg/L (95% confidence interval=175.2, 242.2), respectively. Understanding the varying responses of symbiotic and aposymbiotic A. pallida to copper stress may advance our comprehension of the functional roles of zooxanthellae and host. Although the mechanism of copper toxicity has not been

  3. Featured Article: Effect of copper on nuclear translocation of copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Ge, Yan; Kang, Y James

    2016-08-01

    Copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase-1 (CCS-1), facilitating copper insertion into superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD-1), is present in the nucleus. However, it is unknown how CCS-1 is translocated to the nucleus. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of copper on nuclear translocation of CCS-1. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were subjected to hypoxia, causing an increase in both copper and CCS-1 in the nucleus. Treatment with tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) not only decreased the total cellular concentration and the nuclear translocation of copper, but also completely suppressed the entry of CCS-1 to the nucleus. On the other hand, siRNA targeting CCS-1 neither inhibited the increase in total concentrations nor blocked the nuclear translocation of copper. This study thus demonstrates that under hypoxia condition, both copper and CCS-1 are transported to the nucleus. The nuclear translocation of CCS-1 is copper dependent, but the nuclear translocation of copper could take place alternatively in a CCS-1-independent pathway. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  4. Effects of stimulation of copper bioleaching on microbial community in vineyard soil and copper mining waste.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, Robson; Okeke, Benedict C; Pieniz, Simone; Bortolon, Leandro; Lambais, Márcio R; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2012-04-01

    Long-term copper application in vineyards and copper mining activities cause heavy metal pollution sites. Such sites need remediation to protect soil and water quality. Bioremediation of contaminated areas through bioleaching can help to remove copper ions from the contaminated soils. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of different treatments for copper bioleaching in two diverse copper-contaminated soils (a 40-year-old vineyard and a copper mining waste) and to evaluate the effect on microbial community by applying denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons and DNA sequence analysis. Several treatments with HCl, H(2)SO(4), and FeSO(4) were evaluated by stimulation of bioleaching of copper in the soils. Treatments and extractions using FeSO(4) and H(2)SO(4) mixture at 30°C displayed more copper leaching than extractions with deionized water at room temperature. Treatment with H(2)SO(4) supported bioleaching of as much as 120 mg kg(-1) of copper from vineyard soil after 115 days of incubation. DGGE analysis of the treatments revealed that some treatments caused greater diversity of microorganisms in the vineyard soil compared to the copper mining waste. Nucleotide Blast of PCR-amplified fragments of 16S rRNA gene bands from DGGE indicated the presence of Rhodobacter sp., Silicibacter sp., Bacillus sp., Paracoccus sp., Pediococcus sp., a Myxococcales, Clostridium sp., Thiomonas sp., a firmicute, Caulobacter vibrioides, Serratia sp., and an actinomycetales in vineyard soil. Contrarily, Sphingomonas was the predominant genus in copper mining waste in most treatments. Paracoccus sp. and Enterobacter sp. were also identified from DGGE bands of the copper mining waste. Paracoccus species is involved in the copper bioleaching by sulfur oxidation system, liberating the copper bounded in the soils and hence promoting copper bioremediation. Results indicate that stimulation of bioleaching with a combination of FeSO(4

  5. Effect of fission neutron irradiation on the tensile and electrical properties of copper and copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fabritsiev, S.A.; Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the properties of several copper alloys following fission reactor irradiation at ITER-relevant temperatures of 80 to 200{degrees}C. This study provides some of the data needed for the ITER research and development Task T213. These low temperature irradiations caused significant radiation hardening and a dramatic decrease in the work hardening ability of copper and copper alloys. The uniform elongation was higher at 200{degree}C compared to 100{degree}C, but still remained below 1% for most of the copper alloys.

  6. Featured Article: Effect of copper on nuclear translocation of copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase-1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Ge, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Copper chaperone for superoxide dismutase-1 (CCS-1), facilitating copper insertion into superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD-1), is present in the nucleus. However, it is unknown how CCS-1 is translocated to the nucleus. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of copper on nuclear translocation of CCS-1. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were subjected to hypoxia, causing an increase in both copper and CCS-1 in the nucleus. Treatment with tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) not only decreased the total cellular concentration and the nuclear translocation of copper, but also completely suppressed the entry of CCS-1 to the nucleus. On the other hand, siRNA targeting CCS-1 neither inhibited the increase in total concentrations nor blocked the nuclear translocation of copper. This study thus demonstrates that under hypoxia condition, both copper and CCS-1 are transported to the nucleus. The nuclear translocation of CCS-1 is copper dependent, but the nuclear translocation of copper could take place alternatively in a CCS-1-independent pathway. PMID:27190267

  7. Liver copper concentrations in cull cattle in the UK: are cattle being copper loaded?

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, N. R.; Holmes-Pavord, H. R.; Bone, P. A.; Ander, E. L.; Young, S. D.

    2015-01-01

    With the release of the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs/Advisory Committee on Animal Feed Guidance Note for Supplementing Copper to Bovines it was noted that the current copper status of the national herd was not known. Liver samples were recovered from 510 cull cattle at a single abattoir across a period of three days. The samples were wet-ashed and liver copper concentrations determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. Breed, age and previous location information were obtained from the British Cattle Movement Service. Dairy breeds had higher liver copper concentrations than beef breeds. Holstein-Friesian and ‘other’ dairy breeds had 38.3 per cent and 40 per cent of cattle above the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency (AHVLA) reference range (8000 µmol/kg dry matter), respectively, whereas only 16.9 per cent of animals in the combined beef breeds exceeded this value. It was found that underlying topsoil copper concentration was not related to liver copper content and that age of the animal also had little effect on liver concentration. In conclusion, over 50 per cent of the liver samples tested had greater-than-normal concentrations of copper with almost 40 per cent of the female dairy cattle having liver copper concentrations above the AHVLA reference range, indicating that a significant proportion of the UK herd is at risk of chronic copper toxicity. PMID:26489996

  8. [Study of effects of copper deficiency on internal organ through a copper deficiency model in rat].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan-Zhen; Li, Ming; Huang, Cheng-Yu; Zhang, Yin-Zhu

    2007-06-01

    To establish copper deficiency model in rats, and observe the damnification on internal organ of copper deficiency rats. 27 male weanling SD rats with 5-week-old were randomized into 3 groups (n = 9), i.e., control group 1, control group2 and copper deficiency group (CuD). The rats of the control group 1 were fed commercial feed with copper level of 7.0 mg/kg, the rats of the control group 2 and the copper deficiency group were fed half-purified diet with copper level of 0.73 mg/kg. In afternoons, rats were orally perfused copper sulphate solution with copper concentration 0 (control group 1), 0.133 (control group 2) and 0 mg/ml (copper deficiency group), respectively, the volume was 1% of body weight, so theory copper level of the feed in the control group2 was 11.37 mg/kg. All of rats had free access to both food and de-ionized water. Rats were sacrificed at the end of test feeding on the 42nd day, blood was sampled for analyzing the plasma ceruloplasmin activity (PCP) and its content (PPD), and erythrocyte Cu-Zn SOD (EC Cu-Zn SOD); liver was sampled for analyzing the content of Metallothionein (MT), and liver copper (LC). The organic tissues of kidney, brain, heart, liver, spleen, lung and testes are sampled for histopathologic examination. The PCP and EC Cu-Zn SOD, PPD, LC and LMT of rats in copper deficiency group was significantly lower than those of rats in control group1 and control group2 (except EC Cu-Zn SOD) (P < 0.01). The cardiac muscle fibers of a part of rats in copper deficiency group were broken and eosinophilic. The endothelial cell of a coronary artery branch was presented proliferation and swelling, subendothelial space was broadened. An arteriole in the lung was showed thickening of the wall, and presented obliteration of the lumen. No obvious pathological changes of other internal organ were found. Copper deficiency model in rats is successfully established after rats ingesting diet of low copper for 42 days. Slightly pathologic changes in the

  9. Reduction of copper sulphate with elemental iron for preparation of copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazim, Muhammad

    Reduction of copper sulphate with elemental iron also known as cementation is a well known process used for the recovery of copper for a long time. In this study, the kinetics of the reaction of copper sulphate with iron wire and iron powder has been investigated. The reaction kinetics was studied as a function of different process parameters such as initial concentration, temperature and pH. In this research work, the effects of the above three parameters were studied for both types of iron substrates. It was found that with the iron wire the reaction obeys first order kinetics with respect to copper concentration whereas with the iron powder the order was found to be 1.5. The initial concentration was found to have considerable effect on the reaction kinetics of copper sulphate with elemental iron. The rate of reaction increases with an increase in the initial copper concentration up to a certain level and then decreases for the case of iron wire. However, for the reaction of copper sulphate with iron powder, the reaction rate decreases with an increase in the initial copper concentration. The effect of temperature on the reaction rate of copper sulphate for both types iron substrates (iron wire and iron powder) has also been studied in the temperature range of 23-54ºC. In both the cases, the reaction rate increases with an increase in temperature according to Arrhenius law. The activation energy for the reactions of copper sulphate with iron wire and iron powder was found to be 25.36 kJ/mol and 26.32 kJ/mol, respectively. The copper cementation reaction was found to be suitable to operate at a pH of 2.5-3 for iron wire and a pH of 3-4 for iron powder considering possible inhibition by copper hydroxyl complex formation at higher pH and the possible excess iron consumption by hydrogen reduction at lower pH. The copper particles were produced by the reduction of copper sulphate with elemental iron. The produced copper particles were obtained in the micro to nano

  10. Opportunity at Copper Cliff, Sol 3153

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-19

    This 180-degree 3-D mosaic of images from the navigation camera on the NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover close to the outcrop called Copper Cliff, which is in the center of this scene.

  11. Opportunity at Copper Cliff, Sol 3153

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-19

    This 180-degree mosaic of images from the navigation camera on the NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover close to the outcrop called Copper Cliff, which is in the center of this scene.

  12. Lead and Copper Rule Revisions White Paper

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) Revisions White Paper provides examples of regulatory options to improve the existing rule. The paper highlights key challenges, opportunities, and analytical issues presented by these options.

  13. Atom chips on direct bonded copper substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Squires, Matthew B.; Stickney, James A.; Carlson, Evan J.; Baker, Paul M.; Buchwald, Walter R.; Wentzell, Sandra; Miller, Steven M.

    2011-02-15

    We present the use of direct bonded copper (DBC) for the straightforward fabrication of high power atom chips. Atom chips using DBC have several benefits: excellent copper/substrate adhesion, high purity, thick (>100 {mu}m) copper layers, high substrate thermal conductivity, high aspect ratio wires, the potential for rapid (<8 h) fabrication, and three-dimensional atom chip structures. Two mask options for DBC atom chip fabrication are presented, as well as two methods for etching wire patterns into the copper layer. A test chip, able to support 100 A of current for 2 s without failing, is used to determine the thermal impedance of the DBC. An assembly using two DBC atom chips is used to magnetically trap laser cooled {sup 87}Rb atoms. The wire aspect ratio that optimizes the magnetic field gradient as a function of power dissipation is determined to be 0.84:1 (height:width).

  14. Bioaccumulation of copper by Trichoderma viride.

    PubMed

    Anand, Purnima; Isar, Jasmine; Saran, Saurabh; Saxena, Rajendra Kumar

    2006-05-01

    Studies were carried out on interaction of Trichoderma viride with copper and reports bioaccumulation as a mechanism of copper tolerance during growth. There was a marked increase in the lag phase of the growth, which was concentration dependent. At a concentration of 100 mg/L of CuCl2.2H2O, 81% of Cu(II) were removed by 3.4 g/L of the biomass in 72 h. The process was temperature and pH dependent. The maximum copper bioaccumulation occurred at 30 degrees C, pH 5.0. Metabolic inhibitors such as sodium azide (NaN3) and 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) drastically reduced the extent of Cu(II) bioaccumulation. Electron microscopy and cell fractionation studies revealed that 70-80% of copper was present as a layer on the cell wall surface.

  15. Copper foil provides uniform heat sink path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, I. E., Jr.; Schreihans, F. A.

    1966-01-01

    Thermal path prevents voids and discontinuities which make heat sinks in electronic equipment inefficient. The thermal path combines the high thermal conductivity of copper with the resiliency of silicone rubber.

  16. Electroless Copper Deposition: A Sustainable Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutnahorsky, Marika Renee

    A sustainable electroless copper coating process was developed for plating automotive fasteners shaped from AISI 9255 low carbon, high silicon steel. The objective was to minimize the ionic and organic species present in each step of the plating process. A sulfuric acid solution inhibited with quinine was defined to clean the steel prior to plating. The corrosivity of the solution was examined through electrochemical and weight loss measurements to evaluate the efficiency of the cleaning process at high temperatures and high acid concentrations. An electroless copper coating process was then developed using a simple copper sulfate chemistry inhibited with quinine to extend the possible operating window. Finally, benzotriazole was evaluated as a possible anti-oxidant coating. Accelerated thioacetamide corrosion tests were used to evaluate the corrosion inhibition of benzotriazole on copper coatings.

  17. 21 CFR 524.463 - Copper naphthenate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and ponies for thrush caused by organisms susceptible to copper naphthenate. (3) Limitations. Use on horses and ponies only. Avoid contact around eyes. Do not contaminate feed. Do not use in horses...

  18. Thermal Conductances of Pressed Copper Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L.; Kittel, P.; Spivak, A.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes investigation of thermal conductivities of smooth copper contacts pressed together at liquid-helium temperatures. Investigation prompted by need for accurate thermal models for infrared detectors and other cryogenic instruments.

  19. Copper Acquisition and Utilization in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aaron D; Logeman, Brandon L; Thiele, Dennis J

    2017-09-08

    Fungal cells colonize and proliferate in distinct niches, from soil and plants to diverse tissues in human hosts. Consequently, fungi are challenged with the goal of obtaining nutrients while simultaneously elaborating robust regulatory mechanisms to cope with a range of availability of nutrients, from scarcity to excess. Copper is essential for life but also potentially toxic. In this review we describe the sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms by which fungi acquire, utilize, and control this biochemically versatile trace element. Fungal pathogens, which can occupy distinct host tissues that have their own intrinsic requirements for copper homeostasis, have evolved mechanisms to acquire copper to successfully colonize the host, disseminate to other tissues, and combat host copper bombardment mechanisms that would otherwise mitigate virulence.

  20. Water requirements of the copper industry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mussey, Orville Durey

    1961-01-01

    The copper industry in 1955 used about 330 million gallons of water per day in the mining and manufacturing of primary copper. This amount is about 0.3 percent of the total estimated withdrawals of industrial water in the United States in 1955. These facts were determined by a survey, in 1956, of the amount and chemical quality of the water used by the copper industry. A large part of this water was used in Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah, where about five-sixths of the domestic copper is mined. Much of the remaining water use was near New York City where most of the electrolytic refineries are located, and the rest of the water was used in widely scattered places. A little more than 100,000 gallons of water per ton of copper was used in the production of copper from domestic ores. Of this amount about 70,000 gallons per ton was used in mining and concentrating the ore, and about 30,000 gallons per ton was used to reduce the concentrate to refined copper. In areas where water was scarce or expensive, the unit water use was a little more than half the average. About 60 mgd (million gallons per day) or 18 percent of the water was used consumptively, and nearly all of the consumptive use occurred in the water-short areas of the West. Of the water used in mining and manufacturing primary copper 75 percent was surface water and 25 percent was ground water, 89 percent of this water was self-supplied by the copper companies and 11 percent came from public supplies. Much of the water used in producing primary copper was of comparatively poor quality; about 46 percent was saline containing 1,000 ppm (parts per million) or more of dissolved solids and 54 percent was fresh. Water that is used for concentration of copper ores by flotation or even any water that comes in contact with the ore at any time before it reaches the flotation plant must be free of petroleum products because they interfere with the flotation process. The water used in mining and ore concentration

  1. Diamine Ligands in Copper-Catalyzed Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Surry, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The utility of copper-mediated cross-coupling reactions has been significantly increased by the development of mild reaction conditions and the ability to employ catalytic amounts of copper. The use of diamine-based ligands has been important in these advances and in this review we discuss these systems, including the choice of reaction conditions and applications in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, natural products and designed materials. PMID:22384310

  2. Forming Refractory Insulation On Copper Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlock, J.; Roberts, G.

    1995-01-01

    Alternative insulating process forms flexible coat of uncured refractory insulating material on copper wire. Coated wire formed into coil or other complex shape. Wire-coating apparatus forms "green" coat on copper wire. After wire coiled, heating converts "green" coat to refractory electrical insulator. When cured to final brittle form, insulating material withstands temperatures above melting temperature of wire. Process used to make coils for motors, solenoids, and other electrical devices to be operated at high temperatures.

  3. Copper staves in the blast furnace

    SciTech Connect

    Helenbrook, R.G.; Kowalski, W.; Grosspietsch, K.H.; Hille, H.

    1996-08-01

    Operational data for stave cooling systems for two German blast furnaces show good correlation with predicted thermal results. Copper staves have been installed in blast furnaces in the zones exposed to the highest thermal loads. The good operational results achieved confirm the choice of copper staves in the areas of maximum heat load. Both temperature measurements and predictions establish that the MAN GHH copper staves do not experience large temperature fluctuations and that the hot face temperatures will be below 250 F. This suggests that the copper staves maintain a more stable accretion layer than the cast iron staves. Contrary to initial expectations, heat flux to the copper staves is 50% lower than that to cast iron staves. The more stable accretion layer acts as an excellent insulator for the stave and greatly reduces the number of times the hot face of the stave is exposed to the blast furnace process and should result in a more stable furnace operation. In the future, it may be unnecessary to use high quality, expensive refractories in front of copper staves because of the highly stable accretion layer that appears to rapidly form due to the lower operating temperature of the staves. There is a balance of application regions for cast iron and copper staves that minimizes the capital cost of a blast furnace reline and provides an integrated cooling system with multiple campaign life potential. Cast iron staves are proven cooling elements that are capable of multiple campaign life in areas of the blast furnace which do not experience extreme heat loads. Copper staves are proving to be an effective and reliable blast furnace cooling element that are subject to virtually no wear and are projected to have a longer campaign service life in the areas of highest thermal load in the blast furnace.

  4. Forming Refractory Insulation On Copper Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlock, J.; Roberts, G.

    1995-01-01

    Alternative insulating process forms flexible coat of uncured refractory insulating material on copper wire. Coated wire formed into coil or other complex shape. Wire-coating apparatus forms "green" coat on copper wire. After wire coiled, heating converts "green" coat to refractory electrical insulator. When cured to final brittle form, insulating material withstands temperatures above melting temperature of wire. Process used to make coils for motors, solenoids, and other electrical devices to be operated at high temperatures.

  5. NMR in Copper-Oxide Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    The anomalous part of the NMR relaxation rate of copper nuclei in the normal state of copper-oxide metals is calculated using the orbital magnetic parts of the fluctuations derived in a recent theory to explain the long wavelength transport anomalies. Oxygen and yttrium reside on lattice sites at which the anomalous contribution is absent at all hole densities. The frequency, momentum dependence, and the form factor of the fluctuations is predicted. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Recovering selenium from copper refinery slimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvärinen, Olli; Lindroos, Leo; Yllö, Erkki

    1989-07-01

    The selenium contained within copper refinery slimes may be recovered advantageously by roasting at about 600°C. While roasting in air is inefficient, roasting in a sulfating atmosphere enables practically complete selenium recovery. Based on laboratory tests, a new selenium recovery process was adopted at Outokumpu Copper Refinery. In this process, sulfation is achieved by feeding sulfur dioxide and oxygen into the roasting furnace.

  7. The Influence of Copper on Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1917-02-07

    quenching in oil instead of water. He con- cludes that the presence of copper need not cause apprehension, although tere may not be any advantage in its...present work of .r. Breuil, to be h- zein de- scribed, re 2 resents on; of the most extended investigations on the zffect of copper on the properties...Clevenger and Ray, which will now be described. Experimantal. MAKING INGOTS. 𔄂mall, circular, oil fired fuinace used, (using IoA pressure burner), to heat

  8. Copper mercaptides as sulfur dioxide indicators

    DOEpatents

    Eller, Phillip G.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    1979-01-01

    Organophosphine copper(I) mercaptide complexes are useful as convenient and semiquantitative visual sulfur dioxide gas indicators. The air-stable complexes form 1:1 adducts in the presence of low concentrations of sulfur dioxide gas, with an associated color change from nearly colorless to yellow-orange. The mercaptides are made by mixing stoichiometric amounts of the appropriate copper(I) mercaptide and phosphine in an inert organic solvent.

  9. Copper transport and compartmentation in grape cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, Viviana; Hanana, Mohsen; Blumwald, Eduardo; Gerós, Hernâni

    2012-11-01

    Copper-based fungicides have been widely used against several grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) diseases since the late 1800s when the Bordeaux mixture was developed, but their intensive use has raised phytotoxicity concerns. In this study, physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches were combined to investigate the impacts of copper in grape cells and how it is transported and compartmented intracellularly. Copper reduced the growth and viability of grape cells (CSB, Cabernet Sauvignon Berry) in a dose-dependent manner above 100 µM and was accumulated in specific metal ion sinks. The copper-sensitive probe Phen Green SK was used to characterize copper transport across the plasma membrane of CSB cells. The transport system (K(m) = 583 µM; V(max) = 177 × 10(-6) %ΔF min(-1) protoplast(-1)) was regulated by copper availability in the culture medium, stimulated by Ca(2+) and inhibited by Zn(2+). The pH-sensitive fluorescent probe ACMA (9-amino-6-chloro-2-methoxyacridine) was used to evaluate the involvement of proton-dependent copper transport across the tonoplast. Cu(2+) compartmentation in the vacuole was dependent on the transmembrane pH gradient generated by both V-H(+)-ATPase and V-H(+)-pyrophosphatase (PPase). High copper levels in the growth medium did not affect the activity of V-H(+)-PPase but decreased the magnitude of the H(+) gradient generated by V-H(+)-ATPase. Expression studies of VvCTr genes showed that VvCTr1 and VvCTr8 were distinctly affected by CuSO(4) availability in grape cell cultures and that both genes were highly expressed in the green stage of grape berries.

  10. Effects of copper on proeutectoid cementite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasynczuk, J. A.; Fisher, R. M.; Thomas, G.

    1986-12-01

    The effect of copper on proeutectoid cementite precipitation was investigated by examining the isothermal transformation characteristics of Fe-C and Fe-C-Cu alloys that had comparable carbon contents. The TTT diagrams generated for the Fe-1.43 wt pct C and the Fe-1.49 wt pct C-4.90 wt pct Cu alloys showed that the kinetics of proeutectoid cementite precipitation were not significantly affected by copper. The morphology of the proeutectoid cementite, as seen in the optical microscope, was also substantially the same in both alloys. However, transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of small epsilon-copper precipitates within the proeutectoid cementite of the copper containing steel. It was concluded that this precipitation of ɛ-Cu took place at the cementite : austenite interphase boundaries, and that the transport of copper to the precipitates was accomplished by interphase boundary diffusion. The small influence of copper on the kinetics of proeutectoid cementite precipitation is discussed in terms of diffusional growth theories and the structure of the cementite : austenite interphase boundary.

  11. Bonding and structure of copper nitrenes.

    PubMed

    Cundari, Thomas R; Dinescu, Adriana; Kazi, Abul B

    2008-11-03

    Copper nitrenes are of interest as intermediates in the catalytic aziridination of olefins and the amination of C-H bonds. However, despite advances in the isolation and study of late-transition-metal multiply bonded complexes, a bona fide structurally characterized example of a terminal copper nitrene has, to our knowledge, not been reported. In anticipation of such a report, terminal copper nitrenes are studied from a computational perspective. The nitrene complexes studied here are of the form (beta-diketiminate)Cu(NPh). Density functional theory (DFT), complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure techniques, and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods are employed to study such species. While DFT methods indicate that a triplet (S = 1) is the ground state, CASSCF calculations indicate that a singlet (S = 0) is the ground state, with only a small energy gap between the singlet and triplet. Moreover, the ground-state (open-shell) singlet copper nitrene is found to be highly multiconfigurational (i.e., biradical) and to possess a bent geometry about the nitrene nitrogen, contrasting with the linear nitrene geometry of the triplet copper nitrenes. CASSCF calculations also reveal the existence of a closed-shell singlet state with some degree of multiple bonding character for the copper-nitrene bond.

  12. Regulation of copper transporter 2 expression by copper and cisplatin in human ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Blair, Brian G; Larson, Christopher A; Adams, Preston L; Abada, Paolo B; Safaei, Roohangiz; Howell, Stephen B

    2010-06-01

    Down-regulation of copper transporter 1 (CTR1) reduces uptake and sensitivity, whereas down-regulation of CTR2 enhances both. Cisplatin (DDP) triggers the rapid degradation of CTR1 and thus limits its own accumulation. We sought to determine the effect of DDP and copper on the expression of CTR2. Changes in CTR1 and CTR2 mRNA and protein levels in human ovarian carcinoma 2008 cells and ATOX1(+/+) and ATOX1(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts in response to exposure to DDP and copper were measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis, and deconvolution microscopy. DDP triggered rapid degradation of CTR1 in 2008 human ovarian cancer cells. However, it increased the expression of CTR2 mRNA and protein levels. Expression of CTR2 was heavily modulated by changes in intracellular copper concentration; copper depletion produced rapid disappearance of CTR2, whereas excess copper increased the level of CTR2 protein. This increase was associated with an increase in CTR2 mRNA and prolongation of the CTR2 half-life. Consistent with prior observations that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated knockdown of CTR2 enhanced DDP uptake and tumor cell kill, reduction of CTR2 by copper starvation also enhanced DDP uptake and cytotoxicity. Comparison of the ability of copper and DDP to modulate the expression of CTR1 in ATOX1(+/+) and ATOX1(-/-) indicated that ATOX1 participates in the regulation of CTR2 expression. Unlike CTR1, the expression of CTR2 is increased rather than decreased by DDP. Therefore, these two copper transporters have opposite effects on DDP sensitivity. CTR2 expression is regulated by copper availability via the copper-dependent regulator ATOX1.

  13. Regulation of Copper Transporter 2 Expression by Copper and Cisplatin in Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Brian G.; Larson, Christopher A.; Adams, Preston L.; Abada, Paolo B.; Safaei, Roohangiz

    2010-01-01

    Down-regulation of copper transporter 1 (CTR1) reduces uptake and sensitivity, whereas down-regulation of CTR2 enhances both. Cisplatin (DDP) triggers the rapid degradation of CTR1 and thus limits its own accumulation. We sought to determine the effect of DDP and copper on the expression of CTR2. Changes in CTR1 and CTR2 mRNA and protein levels in human ovarian carcinoma 2008 cells and ATOX1(+/+) and ATOX1(−/−) mouse embryo fibroblasts in response to exposure to DDP and copper were measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis, and deconvolution microscopy. DDP triggered rapid degradation of CTR1 in 2008 human ovarian cancer cells. However, it increased the expression of CTR2 mRNA and protein levels. Expression of CTR2 was heavily modulated by changes in intracellular copper concentration; copper depletion produced rapid disappearance of CTR2, whereas excess copper increased the level of CTR2 protein. This increase was associated with an increase in CTR2 mRNA and prolongation of the CTR2 half-life. Consistent with prior observations that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated knockdown of CTR2 enhanced DDP uptake and tumor cell kill, reduction of CTR2 by copper starvation also enhanced DDP uptake and cytotoxicity. Comparison of the ability of copper and DDP to modulate the expression of CTR1 in ATOX1(+/+) and ATOX1(−/−) indicated that ATOX1 participates in the regulation of CTR2 expression. Unlike CTR1, the expression of CTR2 is increased rather than decreased by DDP. Therefore, these two copper transporters have opposite effects on DDP sensitivity. CTR2 expression is regulated by copper availability via the copper-dependent regulator ATOX1. PMID:20194531

  14. Cellular glutathione plays a key role in copper uptake mediated by human copper transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Maryon, Edward B.; Molloy, Shannon A.

    2013-01-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient. Following entry via the human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1), copper is delivered to several copper chaperones, which subsequently transfer the metal to specific targets via protein:protein interactions. It is has been assumed, but not demonstrated, that chaperones acquire copper directly from hCTR1. However, some reports have pointed to an intermediary role for glutathione (GSH), an abundant copper-binding tri-peptide. To address the issue of how transported copper is acquired by the copper chaperones in vivo, we measured the initial rate of 64Cu uptake in cells in which the cellular levels of copper chaperones or GSH were substantially depleted or elevated. Knockdown or overexpression of copper chaperones ATOX1, CCS, or both had no effect on the initial rate of 64Cu entry into HEK293 cells having endogenous or overexpressed hCTR1. In contrast, depleting cellular GSH using l-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) caused a 50% decrease in the initial rate of 64Cu entry in HEK293 cells and other cell types. This decrease was reversed by washout of BSO or GSH replenishment with a permeable ester. BSO treatment under our experimental conditions had no significant effects on the viability, ATP levels, or metal content of the cells. Attenuated 64Cu uptake in BSO was not due to oxidation of the cysteine in the putative metal-binding motif (HCH) at the intracellular hCTR1 COOH terminus, because a mutant lacking this motif was fully active, and 64Cu uptake was still reduced by BSO treatment. Our data suggest that GSH plays an important role in copper handling at the entry step. PMID:23426973

  15. Copper-resistant bacteria enhance plant growth and copper phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Renxiu; Luo, Chunling; Chen, Yahua; Wang, Guiping; Xu, Yue; Shen, Zhenguo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of rhizospheric bacteria in solubilizing soil copper (Cu) and promoting plant growth. The Cu-resistant bacterium DGS6 was isolated from a natural Cu-contaminated soil and was identified as Pseudomonas sp. DGS6. This isolate solubilized Cu in Cu-contaminated soil and stimulated root elongation of maize and sunflower. Maize was more sensitive to inoculation with DGS6 than was sunflower and exhibited greater root elongation. In pot experiment, inoculation with DGS6 increased the shoot dry weight of maize by 49% and sunflower by 34%, and increased the root dry weight of maize by 85% and sunflower by 45%. Although the concentrations of Cu in inoculated and non-inoculated seedlings did not differ significantly, the total accumulation of Cu in the plants increased after inoculation. DGS6 showed a high ability to solubilize P and produce iron-chelating siderophores, as well as significantly improved the accumulation of P and Fe in both maize and sunflower shoots. In addition, DGS6 produced indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and ACC deaminase, which suggests that it may modulate ethylene levels in plants. The bacterial strain DGS6 could be a good candidate for re-vegetation of Cu-contaminated sites. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of International Journal of Phytoremediation to view the supplemental file.

  16. Copper stable isotopes to trace copper behavior in wetland systems.

    PubMed

    Babcsányi, Izabella; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Granet, Mathieu; Chabaux, François

    2014-05-20

    Wetlands are reactive zones of the landscape that can sequester metals released by industrial and agricultural activities. Copper (Cu) stable isotope ratios (δ(65)Cu) have recently been used as tracers of transport and transformation processes in polluted environments. Here, we used Cu stable isotopes to trace the behavior of Cu in a stormwater wetland receiving runoff from a vineyard catchment (Alsace, France). The Cu loads and stable isotope ratios were determined in the dissolved phase, suspended particulate matter (SPM), wetland sediments, and vegetation. The wetland retained >68% of the dissolved Cu and >92% of the SPM-bound Cu, which represented 84.4% of the total Cu in the runoff. The dissolved Cu became depleted in (65)Cu when passing through the wetland (Δ(65)Cuinlet-outlet from 0.03‰ to 0.77‰), which reflects Cu adsorption to aluminum minerals and organic matter. The δ(65)Cu values varied little in the wetland sediments (0.04 ± 0.10‰), which stored >96% of the total Cu mass within the wetland. During high-flow conditions, the Cu flowing out of the wetland became isotopically lighter, indicating the mobilization of reduced Cu(I) species from the sediments and Cu reduction within the sediments. Our results demonstrate that the Cu stable isotope ratios may help trace Cu behavior in redox-dynamic environments such as wetlands.

  17. Method for providing uranium with a protective copper coating

    DOEpatents

    Waldrop, Forrest B.; Jones, Edward

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for providing uranium metal with a protective coating of copper. Uranium metal is subjected to a conventional cleaning operation wherein oxides and other surface contaminants are removed, followed by etching and pickling operations. The copper coating is provided by first electrodepositing a thin and relatively porous flash layer of copper on the uranium in a copper cyanide bath. The resulting copper-layered article is then heated in an air or inert atmosphere to volatilize and drive off the volatile material underlying the copper flash layer. After the heating step an adherent and essentially non-porous layer of copper is electro-deposited on the flash layer of copper to provide an adherent, multi-layer copper coating which is essentially impervious to corrosion by most gases.

  18. The Intestinal Copper Exporter CUA-1 Is Required for Systemic Copper Homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans*♦

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Haarin; Sharma, Anuj Kumar; Lee, Jaekwon; Chan, Jefferson; Jia, Shang; Kim, Byung-Eun

    2017-01-01

    Copper plays key catalytic and regulatory roles in biochemical processes essential for normal growth, development, and health. Defects in copper metabolism cause Menkes and Wilson's disease, myeloneuropathy, and cardiovascular disease and are associated with other pathophysiological states. Consequently, it is critical to understand the mechanisms by which organisms control the acquisition, distribution, and utilization of copper. The intestinal enterocyte is a key regulatory point for copper absorption into the body; however, the mechanisms by which intestinal cells transport copper to maintain organismal copper homeostasis are poorly understood. Here, we identify a mechanism by which organismal copper homeostasis is maintained by intestinal copper exporter trafficking that is coordinated with extraintestinal copper levels in Caenorhabditis elegans. Specifically, we show that CUA-1, the C. elegans homolog of ATP7A/B, localizes to lysosome-like organelles (gut granules) in the intestine under copper overload conditions for copper detoxification, whereas copper deficiency results in a redistribution of CUA-1 to basolateral membranes for copper efflux to peripheral tissues. Worms defective in gut granule biogenesis exhibit defects in copper sequestration and increased susceptibility to toxic copper levels. Interestingly, however, a splice isoform CUA-1.2 that lacks a portion of the N-terminal domain is targeted constitutively to the basolateral membrane irrespective of dietary copper concentration. Our studies establish that CUA-1 is a key intestinal copper exporter and that its trafficking is regulated to maintain systemic copper homeostasis. C. elegans could therefore be exploited as a whole-animal model system to study regulation of intra- and intercellular copper trafficking pathways. PMID:27881675

  19. Copper modulates the degradation of copper chaperone for Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase by the 26 S proteosome.

    PubMed

    Bertinato, Jesse; L'Abbé, Mary R

    2003-09-12

    Copper chaperones are copper-binding proteins that directly insert copper into specific targets, preventing the accumulation of free copper ions that can be toxic to the cell. Despite considerable advances in the understanding of copper transfer from copper chaperones to their target, to date, there is no information regarding how the activity of these proteins is regulated in higher eukaryotes. The insertion of copper into the antioxidant enzyme Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) depends on the copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS). We have recently reported that CCS protein is increased in tissues of rats fed copper-deficient diets suggesting that copper may regulate CCS expression. Here we show that whereas copper deficiency increased CCS protein in rats, mRNA level was unaffected. Rodent and human cell lines cultured in the presence of the specific copper chelator 2,3,2-tetraamine displayed a dose-dependent increase in CCS protein that could be reversed with the addition of copper but not iron or zinc to the cells. Switching cells from copper-deficient to copper-rich medium promoted the rapid degradation of CCS, which could be blocked by the proteosome inhibitors MG132 and lactacystin but not a cysteine protease inhibitor or inhibitors of the lysosomal degradation pathway. In addition, CCS degradation was slower in copper-deficient cells than in cells cultured in copper-rich medium. Together, these data show that copper regulates CCS expression by modulating its degradation by the 26 S proteosome and suggest a novel role for CCS in prioritizing the utilization of copper when it is scarce.

  20. Estimating Dermal Transfer of Copper Particles from the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lumber pressure-treated with micronized copper was examined for the release of copper and copper micro/nanoparticles using a surface wipe method to simulate dermal transfer. In 2003, the wood industry began replacing CCA treated lumber products for residential use with copper based formulations. Micronized copper (nano to micron sized particles) has become the preferred treatment formulation. There is a lack of information on the release of copper, the fate of the particles during dermal contact, and the copper exposure level to children from hand-to-mouth transfer. For the current study, three treated lumber products, two micronized copper and one ionic copper, were purchased from commercial retailers. The boards were left to weather outdoors for approximately 1 year. Over the year time period, hand wipe samples were collected periodically to determine copper transfer from the wood surfaces. The two micronized formulations and the ionic formulation released similar levels of total copper. The amount of copper released was high initially, but decreased to a constant level (~1.5 mg m-2) after the first month of outdoor exposure. Copper particles were identified on the sampling cloths during the first two months of the experiment, after which the levels of copper were insufficient to collect interpretable data. After 1 month, the particles exhibited minimal changes in shape and size. At the end of 2-months, significant deterioration of the particles was

  1. Estimating Dermal Transfer of Copper Particles from the ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lumber pressure-treated with micronized copper was examined for the release of copper and copper micro/nanoparticles using a surface wipe method to simulate dermal transfer. In 2003, the wood industry began replacing CCA treated lumber products for residential use with copper based formulations. Micronized copper (nano to micron sized particles) has become the preferred treatment formulation. There is a lack of information on the release of copper, the fate of the particles during dermal contact, and the copper exposure level to children from hand-to-mouth transfer. For the current study, three treated lumber products, two micronized copper and one ionic copper, were purchased from commercial retailers. The boards were left to weather outdoors for approximately 1 year. Over the year time period, hand wipe samples were collected periodically to determine copper transfer from the wood surfaces. The two micronized formulations and the ionic formulation released similar levels of total copper. The amount of copper released was high initially, but decreased to a constant level (~1.5 mg m-2) after the first month of outdoor exposure. Copper particles were identified on the sampling cloths during the first two months of the experiment, after which the levels of copper were insufficient to collect interpretable data. After 1 month, the particles exhibited minimal changes in shape and size. At the end of 2-months, significant deterioration of the particles was

  2. Copper redistribution in murine macrophages in response to Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Achard, Maud E S; Stafford, Sian L; Bokil, Nilesh J; Chartres, Jy; Bernhardt, Paul V; Schembri, Mark A; Sweet, Matthew J; McEwan, Alastair G

    2012-05-15

    The movement of key transition metal ions is recognized to be of critical importance in the interaction between macrophages and intracellular pathogens. The present study investigated the role of copper in mouse macrophage responses to Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium. The copper chelator BCS (bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, disodium salt) increased intracellular survival of S. Typhimurium within primary mouse BMM (bone-marrow-derived macrophages) at 24 h post-infection, implying that copper contributed to effective host defence against this pathogen. Infection of BMM with S. Typhimurium or treatment with the TLR (Toll-like receptor) 4 ligand LPS (lipopolysaccharide) induced the expression of several genes encoding proteins involved in copper transport [Ctr (copper transporter) 1, Ctr2 and Atp7a (copper-transporting ATPase 1)], as well as the multi-copper oxidase Cp (caeruloplasmin). Both LPS and infection with S. Typhimurium triggered copper accumulation within punctate intracellular vesicles (copper 'hot spots') in BMM as indicated by the fluorescent reporter CS1 (copper sensor 1). These copper hot spots peaked in their accumulation at approximately 18 h post-stimulation and were dependent on copper uptake into cells. Localization studies indicated that the copper hot spots were in discrete vesicles distinct from Salmonella containing vacuoles and lysosomes. We propose that copper hot spot formation contributes to antimicrobial responses against professional intracellular bacterial pathogens.

  3. Synthesis of the copper chelator TGTA and evaluation of its ability to protect biomolecules from copper induced degradation during copper catalyzed azide-alkyne bioconjugation reactions.

    PubMed

    Ekholm, F S; Pynnönen, H; Vilkman, A; Koponen, J; Helin, J; Satomaa, T

    2016-01-21

    One of the most successful bioconjugation strategies to date is the copper(I)-catalyzed cycloaddition reaction (CuAAC), however, the typically applied reaction conditions have been found to degrade sensitive biomolecules. Herein, we present a water soluble copper chelator which can be utilized to protect biomolecules from copper induced degradation.

  4. Copper Recycling in the United States in 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    As one of a series of reports that describe the recycling of metal commodities in the United States, this report discusses the flow of copper from production through distribution and use, with particular emphasis on the recycling of industrial scrap (new scrap1) and used products (old scrap) in the year 2004. This materials flow study includes a description of copper supply and demand for the United States to illustrate the extent of copper recycling and to identify recycling trends. Understanding how materials flow from a source through disposition can aid in improving the management of natural resource delivery systems. In 2004, the U.S. refined copper supply was 2.53 million metric tons (Mt) of refined unalloyed copper. With adjustment for refined copper exports of 127,000 metric tons (t) of copper, the net U.S. refined copper supply was 2.14 Mt of copper. With this net supply and a consumer inventory decrease of 9,000 t of refined copper, 2.42 Mt of refined copper was consumed by U.S. semifabricators (brass mills, wire rod mills, ingot makers, and foundries and others) in 2004. In addition to the 2.42 Mt of refined copper consumed in 2004, U.S. copper semifabricators consumed 853,000 t of copper contained in recycled scrap. Furthermore, 61,000 t of copper contained in scrap was consumed by noncopper alloy makers, for example, steelmakers and aluminum alloy makers. Old scrap recycling efficiency for copper was estimated to be 43 percent of theoretical old scrap supply, the recycling rate for copper was 30 percent of apparent supply, and the new-scrap-to-old-scrap ratio for U.S. copper product production was 3.2 (76:24).

  5. A role for copper in protozoan grazing - two billion years selecting for bacterial copper resistance.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiuli; Lüthje, Freja; Rønn, Regin; German, Nadezhda A; Li, Xuanji; Huang, Fuyi; Kisaka, Javan; Huffman, David; Alwathnani, Hend A; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rensing, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    The Great Oxidation Event resulted in integration of soft metals in a wide range of biochemical processes including, in our opinion, killing of bacteria by protozoa. Compared to pressure from anthropologic copper contamination, little is known on impacts of protozoan predation on maintenance of copper resistance determinants in bacteria. To evaluate the role of copper and other soft metals in predatory mechanisms of protozoa, we examined survival of bacteria mutated in different transition metal efflux or uptake systems in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Our data demonstrated a strong correlation between the presence of copper/zinc efflux as well as iron/manganese uptake, and bacterial survival in amoebae. The growth of protozoa, in turn, was dependent on bacterial copper sensitivity. The phagocytosis of bacteria induced upregulation of Dictyostelium genes encoding the copper uptake transporter p80 and a triad of Cu(I)-translocating PIB -type ATPases. Accumulated Cu(I) in Dictyostelium was monitored using a copper biosensor bacterial strain. Altogether, our data demonstrate that Cu(I) is ultimately involved in protozoan predation of bacteria, supporting our hypothesis that protozoan grazing selected for the presence of copper resistance determinants for about two billion years. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Impact of copper ligand mutations on a cupredoxin with a green copper center.

    PubMed

    Roger, Magali; Sciara, Giuliano; Biaso, Frédéric; Lojou, Elisabeth; Wang, Xie; Bauzan, Marielle; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Vila, Alejandro J; Ilbert, Marianne

    2017-05-01

    Mononuclear cupredoxins contain a type 1 copper center with a trigonal or tetragonal geometry usually maintained by four ligands, a cystein, two histidines and a methionine. The recent discovery of new members of this family with unusual properties demonstrates, however, the versatility of this class of proteins. Changes in their ligand set lead to drastic variation in their metal site geometry and in the resulting spectroscopic and redox features. In our work, we report the identification of the copper ligands in the recently discovered cupredoxin AcoP. We show that even though AcoP possesses a classical copper ligand set, it has a highly perturbed copper center. In depth studies of mutant's properties suggest a high degree of constraint existing in the copper center of the wild type protein and even the addition of exogenous ligands does not lead to the reconstitution of the initial copper center. Not only the chemical nature of the axial ligand but also constraints brought by its covalent binding to the protein backbone might be critical to maintain a green copper site with high redox potential. This work illustrates the importance of experimentally dissecting the molecular diversity of cupredoxins to determine the molecular determinants responsible for their copper center geometry and redox potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Aspartate aminotransferase is potently inhibited by copper complexes: Exploring copper complex-binding proteome.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuqi; Lu, Liping; Yuan, Caixia; Feng, Sisi; Zhu, Miaoli

    2017-05-01

    Recent researches indicated that a copper complex-binding proteome that potently interacted with copper complexes and then influenced cellular metabolism might exist in organism. In order to explore the copper complex-binding proteome, a copper chelating ion-immobilized affinity chromatography (Cu-IMAC) column and mass spectrometry were used to separate and identify putative Cu-binding proteins in primary rat hepatocytes. A total of 97 putative Cu-binding proteins were isolated and identified. Five higher abundance proteins, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), catalase (CAT), calreticulin (CRT) and albumin (Alb) were further purified using a SP-, and (or) Q-Sepharose Fast Flow column. The interaction between the purified proteins and selected 11 copper complexes and CuCl2 was investigated. The enzymes inhibition tests demonstrated that AST was potently inhibited by copper complexes while MDH and CAT were weakly inhibited. Schiff-based copper complexes 6 and 7 potently inhibited AST with the IC50 value of 3.6 and 7.2μM, respectively and exhibited better selectivity over MDH and CAT. Fluorescence titration results showed the two complexes tightly bound to AST with binding constant of 3.89×10(6) and 3.73×10(6)M(-1), respectively and a stoichiometry ratio of 1:1. Copper complex 6 was able to enter into HepG2 cells and further inhibit intracellular AST activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A study of high copper amalgams. I. A comparison of amalgamation on high copper alloy tablets.

    PubMed

    Okabe, T; Mitchell, R; Butts, M B; Wright, A H; Fairhurst, C W

    1978-01-01

    Two types of high copper alloy powder have been amalgamated by plating tablets of compacted powder with Hg. Gamma1 Ag-Hg crystals form on both types of tablet. On one type, zeta Cu-Sn crystals are also formed. An amalgamation mechanism for this latter type of high copper amalgam is discussed.

  9. Putting copper into action: copper-impregnated products with potent biocidal activities.

    PubMed

    Borkow, Gadi; Gabbay, Jeffrey

    2004-11-01

    Copper ions, either alone or in copper complexes, have been used for centuries to disinfect liquids, solids, and human tissue. Today copper is used as a water purifier, algaecide, fungicide, nematocide, molluscicide, and antibacterial and antifouling agent. Copper also displays potent antiviral activity. We hypothesized that introducing copper into clothing, bedding, and other articles would provide them with biocidal properties. A durable platform technology has been developed that introduces copper into cotton fibers, latex, and other polymeric materials. This study demonstrates the broad-spectrum antimicrobial (antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal) and antimite activities of copper-impregnated fibers and polyester products. This technology enabled the production of antiviral gloves and filters (which deactivate HIV-1 and other viruses), antibacterial self-sterilizing fabrics (which kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci), antifungal socks (which alleviate symptoms of athlete's foot), and anti-dust mite mattress covers (which reduce mite-related allergies). These products did not have skin-sensitizing properties, as determined by guine pig maximization and rabbit skin irritation tests. Our study demonstrates the potential use of copper in new applications. These applications address medical issues of the greatest importance, such as viral transmissions; nosocomial, or healthcare-associated, infections; and the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  10. Copper intake and health threat by consuming seafood from copper-contaminated coastal environments in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.C. . School of Public Health); Jeng, W.L.; Hung, T.C. . Inst. of Oceanography); Jeng, M.S. . Inst. of Zoology)

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the impact of copper pollution on the main aquaculture coast of Taiwan and the potential risk from eating the green oysters cultured along the polluted coast. The data show that the highest average concentration of copper in oysters was observed in the Erhjin Chi estuary from 1986 to 1990. The copper concentration in both the seawater and the sediment collected along the Erhjin Chi estuary was also the highest in all sampling locations. Copper concentration in oysters collected from Erhjin Chi, Hsiangshan, and Anping from 1988 to 1990 was, respectively, 61, 29, and 22 times higher than that of 10 years ago. The potential frisk from consuming oysters is relatively higher than that of other seafoods due the high bioaccumulation of oysters. The oysters in the Erhjin Chi estuary had an average concentration of copper of 3,075 [+-] 826 [mu]g/g during the past three years (1988--1990). The average copper intake from oysters for an adult with 70 kg body weight was 12.6 mg/d. The estimate indicated that the average copper intake from the oysters for female individuals is 14 times more than that of international limits. Based on the average value, long-term intake of copper through consumption of oysters cultured along the Erhjin Chi estuary be critical, especially for some high-risk groups.

  11. Abrasive Wear Behaviour of COPPER-SiC and COPPER-SiO2 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umale, Tejas; Singh, Amarjit; Reddy, Y.; Khatitrkar, R. K.; Sapate, S. G.

    The present paper reports abrasive wear behaviour of copper matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide and silica particles. Copper - SiC (12%) and Copper-SiO2 (9%) composites were prepared by powder metallurgical technique. Metallography, image analysis and hardness studies were carried out on copper composites. The abrasive wear experiments were carried out using pin on disc apparatus. The effect of sliding distance and load was studied on Copper - SiC (12%) and Copper-SiO2 (9%) composites. The abrasive wear volume loss increased with sliding distance in both the composites although the magnitude of increase was different in each case. Copper - SiC (12%) composites exhibited relatively better abrasion resistance as compared to and Copper-SiO2 (9%) composites. The abraded surfaces were observed under scanning electron microscope to study the morphology of abraded surfaces and operating wear mechanism. The analysis of wear debris particles was also carried out to substantiate the findings of the investigation.

  12. Sulfidation treatment of copper-containing plating sludge towards copper resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Kuchar, D; Fukuta, T; Onyango, M S; Matsuda, H

    2006-11-02

    The present study is concerned with the sulfidation treatment of copper-containing plating sludge towards copper resource recovery by flotation of copper sulfide from treated sludge. The sulfidation treatment was carried out by contacting simulated or real copper plating sludge with Na(2)S solution for a period of 5 min to 24 h. The initial molar ratio of S(2-) to Cu(2+) (S(2-) to Me(2+) in the case of real sludge) was adjusted to 1.00, 1.25 or 1.50, while the solid to liquid ratio was set at 1:50. As a result, it was found that copper compounds were converted to various copper sulfides within the first 5 min. In the case of simulated copper sludge, CuS was identified as the main sulfidation product at the molar ratio of S(2-) to Cu(2+) of 1.00, while Cu(7)S(4) (Roxbyite) was mainly found at the molar ratios of S(2-) to Cu(2+) of 1.50 and 1.25. Based on the measurements of oxidation-reduction potential, the formation of either CuS or Cu(7)S(4) at different S(2-) to Cu(2+) molar ratios was attributed to the changes in the oxidation-reduction potential. By contrast, in the case of sulfidation treatment of real copper sludge, CuS was predominantly formed, irrespective of S(2-) to Me(2+) molar ratio.

  13. Copper-associated liver disease: a proteomics study of copper challenge in a sheep model.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Deborah M; Beynon, Robert J; Robertson, Duncan H L; Loughran, Michael J; Haywood, Susan

    2004-02-01

    Sheep display a variant phenotype with respect to their susceptibility to copper and derivative pathology. The North Ronaldsay sheep are acutely sensitive to environmental copper while the Cambridge breed is much more copper-tolerant. A study of protein expression in the liver of the two different breeds of sheep as a result of copper challenge would aid in the understanding of their differing pathophysiologies and contribute to knowledge of copper toxicosis in man. In this initial study, Cambridge breed sheep were challenged with oral copper and liver proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. Proteins whose expression pattern was modified by copper exposure were then identified by peptide mass fingerprinting using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. In conclusion, the pattern of changes in protein expression were consistent with an early adaptive response to oxidative challenge. This was followed by evidence of an impaired ability of the liver to compensate as copper loading increased, accompanied by oxidative stress-induced injury.

  14. Speciation and leachability of copper in mine tailings from porphyry copper mining: influence of particle size.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik K; Yianatos, Juan B; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2005-09-01

    Mine tailing from the El Teniente-Codelco copper mine situated in VI Region of Chile was analysed in order to evaluate the mobility and speciation of copper in the solid material. Mine tailing was sampled after the rougher flotation circuits, and the copper content was measured to 1150 mg kg (-1) dry matter. This tailing was segmented into fractions of different size intervals: 0-38, 38-45, 45-53, 53-75, 75-106, 106-150, 150-212, and >212 microm, respectively. Copper content determination, sequential chemical extraction, and desorption experiments were carried out for each size interval in order to evaluate the speciation of copper. It was found that the particles of smallest size contained 50-60% weak acid leachable copper, whereas only 32% of the copper found in largest particles could be leached in weak acid. Copper oxides and carbonates were the dominating species in the smaller particles, and the larger particles contained considerable amounts of sulphides.

  15. Non-enzymic copper reduction by menaquinone enhances copper toxicity in Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    PubMed

    Abicht, Helge K; Gonskikh, Yulia; Gerber, Simon D; Solioz, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Lactococcus lactis possesses a pronounced extracellular Cu(2+)-reduction activity which leads to the accumulation of Cu(+) in the medium. The kinetics of this reaction were not saturable by increasing copper concentrations, suggesting a non-enzymic reaction. A copper-reductase-deficient mutant, isolated by random transposon mutagenesis, had an insertion in the menE gene, which encodes O-succinylbenzoic acid CoA ligase. This is a key enzyme in menaquinone biosynthesis. The ΔmenE mutant was deficient in short-chain menaquinones, and exogenously added menaquinone complemented the copper-reductase-deficient phenotype. Haem-induced respiration of wild-type L. lactis efficiently suppressed copper reduction, presumably by competition by the bd-type quinol oxidase for menaquinone. As expected, the ΔmenE mutant was respiration-deficient, but could be made respiration-proficient by supplementation with menaquinone. Growth of wild-type cells was more copper-sensitive than that of the ΔmenE mutant, due to the production of Cu(+) ions by the wild-type. This growth inhibition of the wild-type was strongly attenuated if Cu(+) was scavenged with the Cu(I) chelator bicinchoninic acid. These findings support a model whereby copper is non-enzymically reduced at the membrane by menaquinones. Respiration effectively competes for reduced quinones, which suppresses copper reduction. These findings highlight novel links between copper reduction, respiration and Cu(+) toxicity in L. lactis.

  16. Copper-2 Ingestion, Plus Increased Meat Eating Leading to Increased Copper Absorption, Are Major Factors Behind the Current Epidemic of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Brewer, George J

    2015-12-02

    It has become clear that copper toxicity is playing a major role in Alzheimer's disease; but why is the brain copper toxicity with cognition loss in Alzheimer's disease so much different clinically than brain copper toxicity in Wilson's disease, which results in a movement disorder? Furthermore, why is the inorganic copper of supplement pills and in drinking water so much more damaging to cognition than the organic copper in food? A recent paper, which shows that almost all food copper is copper-1, that is the copper-2 of foods reverts to the reduced copper-1 form at death or harvest, gives new insight into these questions. The body has an intestinal transport system for copper-1, Ctr1, which channels copper-1 through the liver and into safe channels. Ctr1 cannot absorb copper-2, and some copper-2 bypasses the liver, ends up in the blood quickly, and is toxic to cognition. Humans evolved to handle copper-1 safely, but not copper-2. Alzheimer's is at least in part, a copper-2 toxicity disease, while Wilson's is a general copper overload disease. In this review, we will show that the epidemiology of the Alzheimer's epidemic occurring in developed, but not undeveloped countries, fits with the epidemiology of exposure to copper-2 ingestion leached from copper plumbing and from copper supplement pill ingestion. Increased meat eating in developed countries is also a factor, because it increases copper absorption, and thus over all copper exposure.

  17. The Amyloid Precursor Protein of Alzheimer's Disease in the Reduction of Copper(II) to Copper(I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Multhaup, Gerd; Schlicksupp, Andrea; Hesse, Lars; Beher, Dirk; Ruppert, Thomas; Masters, Colin L.; Beyreuther, Konrad

    1996-03-01

    The transition metal ion copper(II) has a critical role in chronic neurologic diseases. The amyloid precursor protein (APP) of Alzheimer's disease or a synthetic peptide representing its copper-binding site reduced bound copper(II) to copper(I). This copper ion-mediated redox reaction led to disulfide bond formation in APP, which indicated that free sulfhydryl groups of APP were involved. Neither superoxide nor hydrogen peroxide had an effect on the kinetics of copper(II) reduction. The reduction of copper(II) to copper(I) by APP involves an electron-transfer reaction and could enhance the production of hydroxyl radicals, which could then attack nearby sites. Thus, copper-mediated toxicity may contribute to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Potential phytoextraction and phytostabilization of perennial peanut on copper-contaminated vineyard soils and copper mining waste.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, Robson; Bortolon, Leandro; Pieniz, Simone; Giacometti, Marcelo; Roehrs, Dione D; Lambais, Mácio R; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2011-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the potential of perennial peanut (Arachis pintoi) for copper phytoremediation in vineyard soils (Inceptisol and Mollisol) contaminated with copper and copper mining waste. Our results showed high phytomass production of perennial peanut in both vineyard soils. Macronutrient uptakes were not negatively affected by perennial peanut cultivated in all contaminated soils. Plants cultivated in Mollisol showed high copper concentrations in the roots and shoots of 475 and 52 mg kg(-1), respectively. Perennial peanut plants showed low translocation factor values for Cu, although these plants showed high bioaccumulation factor (BCF) for both vineyard soils, Inceptisol and Mollisol, with BCF values of 3.83 and 3.24, respectively, being characterized as a copper hyperaccumulator plant in these soils. Copper phytoextraction from Inceptisol soil was the highest for both roots and entire plant biomass, with more than 800 mg kg(-1) of copper in whole plant. The highest potential copper phytoextraction by perennial peanut was in Inceptisol soil with copper removal of 2,500 g ha(-1). Also, perennial peanut showed high potential for copper phytoremoval in copper mining waste and Mollisol with 1,700 and 1,500 g of copper per hectare, respectively. In addition, perennial peanuts characterized high potential for phytoextraction and phytostabilization of copper in vineyard soils and copper mining waste.

  19. Copper Corrosion and Biocorrosion Events in Premise Plumbing

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Diego A.; Alsina, Marco A.; Pastén, Pablo A.

    2017-01-01

    Corrosion of copper pipes may release high amounts of copper into the water, exceeding the maximum concentration of copper for drinking water standards. Typically, the events with the highest release of copper into drinking water are related to the presence of biofilms. This article reviews this phenomenon, focusing on copper ingestion and its health impacts, the physicochemical mechanisms and the microbial involvement on copper release, the techniques used to describe and understand this phenomenon, and the hydrodynamic effects. A conceptual model is proposed and the mathematical models are reviewed. PMID:28872628

  20. Metal cotolerance to copper, lead, and zinc in Festuca rubra

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, M.H.

    1982-10-01

    Tillers of red fescue (Festuca rubra) were collected from three copper-contaminated sites: Prescot (Lancashire, near the copper refinery factory), Great Orme (Clwyd, copper mine), and Ecton (Staffordshire, copper mine), as well as from an uncontaminated area (Festuca rubra S59). By comparing their indexes of tolerance, it was discovered that tillers from Ecton which contained a rather high level of copper, lead, and zinc were tolerant to all three metals. This variety of F. rubra would be useful for reclaiming nonferrous mine spoils which contain a high level of the three commonly occurring heavy metals, i.e., copper, lead and zinc.

  1. Copper Corrosion and Biocorrosion Events in Premise Plumbing.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Ignacio T; Fischer, Diego A; Alsina, Marco A; Pavissich, Juan P; Pastén, Pablo A; Pizarro, Gonzalo E

    2017-09-05

    Corrosion of copper pipes may release high amounts of copper into the water, exceeding the maximum concentration of copper for drinking water standards. Typically, the events with the highest release of copper into drinking water are related to the presence of biofilms. This article reviews this phenomenon, focusing on copper ingestion and its health impacts, the physicochemical mechanisms and the microbial involvement on copper release, the techniques used to describe and understand this phenomenon, and the hydrodynamic effects. A conceptual model is proposed and the mathematical models are reviewed.

  2. Copper in microbial pathogenesis: meddling with the metal

    PubMed Central

    Samanovic, Marie I.; Ding, Chen; Thiele, Dennis J.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2012-01-01

    Transition metals such as iron, zinc, copper and manganese are essential for the growth and development of organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. Numerous studies have focused on the impact of iron availability during bacterial and fungal infections, and increasing evidence suggests that copper is also involved in microbial pathogenesis. Not only is copper an essential co-factor for specific microbial enzymes, but several recent studies also strongly suggest that copper is used to restrict pathogen growth in vivo. Here, we review evidence that animals use copper as an anti-microbial weapon and, in turn, microbes have developed mechanisms to counteract the toxic effects of copper. PMID:22341460

  3. The neurotoxicity of iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) is ameliorated by copper.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Henrik A

    2005-03-01

    Iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) was given to rats on diets with normal copper levels, 5 ppm, and to rats on diets with high copper levels, 100 ppm. The former developed neurological symptoms, namely choreoathetoid head movements, circling and retropulsion, while the latter only showed vague incoordination. Since rats, raised on a copper deficient diet alone, i.e. 0.9 ppm develop the same symptoms, we assume that IDPN chelates copper. The axons of the motor nerve cells show metachromatic degeneration in the rats given IDPN on a diet with normal copper level, but not in the rats on a high copper level.

  4. Endophytic Chaetomium globosum enhances maize seedling copper stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Abou Alhamed, M F; Shebany, Y M

    2012-09-01

    This study aims at characterisation of the impact of Chaetomium globosum on copper stress resistance of maize seedlings. Higher levels of copper treatment decreased maize dry weight and induced a marked increase in osmotic solutes, antioxidant enzyme activity and the level of lipid peroxidation. On the other hand, addition of the endophytic C. globosum alleviated the toxic effect of copper on maize growth. The combination of copper sulphate and Chaetomium increased seedling dry weight, osmotic solute content and antioxidant enzyme activity compared to copper sulphate alone, while lipid peroxidation levels were also decreased. The fungal scavenger system might be important for supporting the ability of maize seedlings to resist copper toxicity.

  5. Copper in microbial pathogenesis: meddling with the metal.

    PubMed

    Samanovic, Marie I; Ding, Chen; Thiele, Dennis J; Darwin, K Heran

    2012-02-16

    Transition metals such as iron, zinc, copper, and manganese are essential for the growth and development of organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. Numerous studies have focused on the impact of iron availability during bacterial and fungal infections, and increasing evidence suggests that copper is also involved in microbial pathogenesis. Not only is copper an essential cofactor for specific microbial enzymes, but several recent studies also strongly suggest that copper is used to restrict pathogen growth in vivo. Here, we review evidence that animals use copper as an antimicrobial weapon and that, in turn, microbes have developed mechanisms to counteract the toxic effects of copper.

  6. Copper(I) electrode function of two types of copper(II) ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Neshkova, M; Sheytanov, H

    1985-08-01

    The response of two types of solid-state copper ion-selective electrodes with homogeneous membranes of CuAgSe and Cu(2-x)Se has been investigated in copper(I) solutions, prepared electrochemically by insitu generation from a copper anode in chloride medium. The selectivity coefficient K(pot)(Cu+, Cu(2+)) both types of electrodes has been determined. It is 10(-5.7) for the copper selenide sensor, and 10(-6.2) for the copper silver selenide one. These values are very close to that calculated for an exchange reaction proceeding on the electrode surface. The similarity in K(pot)(Cu+ ,Cu(2+)) values for different chalcogenidebased sensors suggests a common potential-generating mechanism. High chloride concentration does not interfere with the electrode response towards Cu(I), but distorts the electrode response to Cu(II).

  7. Magnetic field effects on copper metal deposition from copper sulfate aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Chikako; Maeda, Aya; Katsuki, Akio; Maki, Syou; Morimoto, Shotaro; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2014-05-08

    Effects of a magnetic field (≤0.5 T) on electroless copper metal deposition from the reaction of a copper sulfate aqueous solution and a zinc thin plate were examined in this study. In a zero field, a smooth copper thin film grew steadily on the plate. In a 0.38 T field, a smooth copper thin film deposited on a zinc plate within about 1 min. Then, it peeled off repeatedly from the plate. The yield of consumed copper ions increased about 2.1 times compared with that in a zero field. Mechanism of this magnetic field effect was discussed in terms of Lorentz force- and magnetic force-induced convection and local volta cell formation.

  8. Thermal stability of copper silicide passivation layers in copper-based multilevel interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hymes, S.; Kumar, K. S.; Murarka, S. P.; Ding, P. J.; Wang, W.; Lanford, W. A.

    1998-04-01

    Copper thin films were exposed to a dilute silane mixture at temperatures in the range of 190-363 °C. The resulting silicide surface layers were characterized by four-point probe, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and x-ray diffraction. A definitive stability regime is observed in which progressively higher copper content phases exist with increasing temperature. Cu3Si, formed in silane, on annealing converts to Cu5Si and eventually to no silicide layer by a silicon diffusion reaction that in an inert ambient drives silicon into underlying copper to form a solid solution. In oxidizing ambients, a similar phenomenon occurs but now silicon also diffuses to surfaces where it oxidizes to form a self-passivating SiO2 layer on surface. These results have important implications governing integration of copper silicide as a passivation layer and silicon hydride based dielectric deposition in copper-based multilevel interconnect in ultralarge scale integration.

  9. Extracting copper from copper oxide ore by a zwitterionic reagent and dissolution kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jiu-shuai; Wen, Shu-ming; Deng, Jian-ying; Wu, Dan-dan

    2015-03-01

    Sulfamic acid (SA), which possesses a zwitterionic structure, was applied as a leaching reagent for the first time for extracting copper from copper oxide ore. The effects of reaction time, temperature, particle size, reagent concentration, and stirring speed on this leaching were studied. The dissolution kinetics of malachite was illustrated with a three-dimensional diffusion model. A novel leaching effect of SA on malachite was eventually demonstrated. The leaching rate increased with decreasing particle size and increasing concentration, reaction temperature and stirring speed. The activation energy for SA leaching malachite was 33.23 kJ/mol. Furthermore, the effectiveness of SA as a new reagent for extracting copper from copper oxide ore was confirmed by experiment. This approach may provide a solution suitable for subsequent electrowinning. In addition, results reported herein may provide basic data that enable the leaching of other carbonate minerals of copper, zinc, cobalt and so on in an SA system.

  10. Transpassive Dissolution of Copper and Rapid Formation of Brilliant Colored Copper Oxide Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredj, Narjes; Burleigh, T. David; New Mexico Tech Team

    2014-03-01

    This investigation describes an electrochemical technique for growing adhesive copper oxide films on copper with attractive colors ranging from gold-brown to pearl with intermediate colors from red violet to gold green. The technique consists of anodically dissolving copper at transpassive potentials in hot sodium hydroxide, and then depositing brilliant color films of Cu2O onto the surface of copper after the anodic potential has been turned off. The color of the copper oxide film depends on the temperature, the anodic potential, the time t1 of polarization, and the time t2, which is the time of immersion after potential has been turned off. The brilliant colored films were characterized using glancing angle x-ray diffraction, and the film was found to be primarily Cu2O. Cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were also used to characterize these films.

  11. Serum copper and zinc levels and copper/zinc ratio in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yücel, I; Arpaci, F; Ozet, A; Döner, B; Karayilanoğlu, T; Sayar, A; Berk, O

    1994-01-01

    Serum copper, zinc levels, and the Cu/Zn ratio were evaluated in 31 patients with breast cancer and 35 healthy controls. Copper and zinc were determined by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry. The mean serum copper level and the mean Cu/Zn ratio in patients with breast cancer were significantly higher than the control group (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001). In addition, the mean serum zinc level in patients with breast cancer was significantly lower than the control group (p < 0.001). Neither serum copper and zinc levels nor the Cu/Zn ratio were of value in discriminating of the disease activity and severity. Interestingly, the Cu/Zn ratio in premenopausal patients was higher than postmenopausal patients (p < 0.05) and this was not related to age. The further combined biological and epidemiological studies are necessary to investigate the roles of copper and zinc in breast cancer.

  12. Utilization of Copper Alloys for Marine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drach, Andrew

    Utilization of copper alloy components in systems deployed in marine environment presents potential improvements by reducing maintenance costs, prolonging service life, and increasing reliability. However, integration of these materials faces technological challenges, which are discussed and addressed in this work, including characterization of material performance in seawater environment, hydrodynamics of copper alloy components, and design procedures for systems with copper alloys. To characterize the hydrodynamic behavior of copper alloy nets, mesh geometry of the major types of copper nets currently used in the marine aquaculture are analyzed and formulae for the solidity and strand length are proposed. Experimental studies of drag forces on copper alloy net panels are described. Based on these studies, empirical values for normal drag coefficients are proposed for various types of copper netting. These findings are compared to the previously published data on polymer nets. It is shown that copper nets exhibit significantly lower resistance to normal currents, which corresponds to lower values of normal drag coefficient. The seawater performance (corrosion and biofouling) of copper alloys is studied through the field trials of tensioned and untensioned specimens in a one-year deployment in the North Atlantic Ocean. The corrosion behavior is characterized by weight loss, optical microscopy, and SEM/EDX analyses. The biofouling performance is quantified in terms of the biomass accumulation. To estimate the effects of stray electrical currents on the seawater corrosion measurements, a low cost three-axis stray electric current monitoring device is designed and tested both in the lab and in the 30-day field deployment. The system consists of a remotely operated PC with a set of pseudo-electrodes and a digital compass. The collected data is processed to determine magnitudes of AC and DC components of electric field and dominant AC frequencies. Mechanical behavior of

  13. The Copper Balance of Cities

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Ulrich; Lin, Chih-Yi; Kellner, Katharina; Ma, Hwong-wen; Brunner, Paul H

    2014-01-01

    Material management faces a dual challenge: on the one hand satisfying large and increasing demands for goods and on the other hand accommodating wastes and emissions in sinks. Hence, the characterization of material flows and stocks is relevant for both improving resource efficiency and environmental protection. This article focuses on the urban scale, a dimension rarely investigated in past metal flow studies. We compare the copper (Cu) metabolism of two cities in different economic states, namely, Vienna (Europe) and Taipei (Asia). Substance flow analysis is used to calculate urban Cu balances in a comprehensive and transparent form. The main difference between Cu in the two cities appears to be the stock: Vienna seems close to saturation with 180 kilograms per capita (kg/cap) and a growth rate of 2% per year. In contrast, the Taipei stock of 30 kg/cap grows rapidly by 26% per year. Even though most Cu is recycled in both cities, bottom ash from municipal solid waste incineration represents an unused Cu potential accounting for 1% to 5% of annual demand. Nonpoint emissions are predominant; up to 50% of the loadings into the sewer system are from nonpoint sources. The results of this research are instrumental for the design of the Cu metabolism in each city. The outcomes serve as a base for identification and recovery of recyclables as well as for directing nonrecyclables to appropriate sinks, avoiding sensitive environmental pathways. The methodology applied is well suited for city benchmarking if sufficient data are available. PMID:25866460

  14. Vitrification of copper flotation waste.

    PubMed

    Karamanov, Alexander; Aloisi, Mirko; Pelino, Mario

    2007-02-09

    The vitrification of an hazardous iron-rich waste (W), arising from slag flotation of copper production, was studied. Two glasses, containing 30wt% W were melted for 30min at 1400 degrees C. The first batch, labeled WSZ, was obtained by mixing W, blast furnace slag (S) and zeolite tuff (Z), whereas the second, labeled WG, was prepared by mixing W, glass cullet (G), sand and limestone. The glass frits showed high chemical durability, measured by the TCLP test. The crystallization of the glasses was evaluated by DTA. The crystal phases formed were identified by XRD resulting to be pyroxene and wollastonite solid solutions, magnetite and hematite. The morphology of the glass-ceramics was observed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. WSZ composition showed a high rate of bulk crystallization and resulted to be suitable for producing glass-ceramics by a short crystallization heat-treatment. WG composition showed a low crystallization rate and good sinterability; glass-ceramics were obtained by sinter-crystallization of the glass frit.

  15. Grain Boundary Energies in Copper.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Ramli

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The dependence of grain boundary energy on boundary orientation was studied in copper annealed at 1000 ^circC. Grain boundary orientations and the disorientations across the boundaries were measured. A rotation matrix notation is used to interpret selected area electron channelling patterns observed in a scanning electron microscope. The Herring and Shewmon torque terms were investigated using wire specimens having a "bamboo" structure. The Herring torque terms were determined using the Hess relation. The (110) section of the Sigma 11 gamma-plot (i.e. the variation of grain boundary energy with boundary orientation) was evaluated. In this plot, minima in energies were found at the (311) and (332) mirror planes. Sigma 3 and Sigma9 boundaries were investigated in sheet specimens. The (110) and (111) sections of the Sigma3 gamma -plot were evaluated. In addition to the sharp cusps occurring at the Sigma3 {111} planes, the further shallower cusps occur at the incoherent Sigma 3 boundaries with the interfacial planes approximately parallel to {322} in one crystal and {11.44} in the other crystal. Flat and curved Sigma9 boundaries were investigated. The break up of Sigma9 boundaries into two Sigma3 boundaries and the relation between the Sigma3 and Sigma 9 gamma-plots was also examined. The (110) section of the Sigma9 gamma-plot was constructed.

  16. Elusive Terminal Copper Arylnitrene Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Bakhoda, Abolghasem Gus; Jiang, Quan; Bertke, Jeffery A; Cundari, Thomas R; Warren, Timothy H

    2017-06-01

    We report herein three new modes of reactivity between arylazides N3 Ar with a bulky copper(I) β-diketiminate. Addition of N3 Ar(X3) (Ar(X3) =2,4,6-X3 C6 H2 ; X=Cl or Me) to [(i) Pr2 NN]Cu(NCMe) results in triazenido complexes from azide attack on the β-diketiminato backbone. Reaction of [(i) Pr2 NN]Cu(NCMe) with bulkier azides N3 Ar leads to terminal nitrenes [(i) Pr2 NN]Cu]=NAr that dimerize via formation of a C-C bond at the arylnitrene p-position to give the dicopper(II) diketimide 4 (Ar=2,6-(i) Pr2 C6 H3 ) or undergo nitrile insertion to give diazametallocyclobutene 8 (Ar=4-Ph-2,6-iPr2 C6 H2 ). Importantly, reactivity studies reveal both 4 and 8 to be "masked" forms of the terminal nitrenes [(i) Pr2 NN]Cu=NAr that undergo nitrene group transfer to PMe3 , (t) BuNC, and even into a benzylic sp(3) C-H bond of ethylbenzene. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Development of highly faceted reduced graphene oxide-coated copper oxide and copper nanoparticles on a copper foil surface

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiro; Espinoza-Rivas, Andrés M; Pérez-Guzmán, Manuel A; Ortega-López, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Summary This work describes the formation of reduced graphene oxide-coated copper oxide and copper nanoparticles (rGO-Cu2ONPs, rGO-CuNPs) on the surface of a copper foil supporting graphene oxide (GO) at annealing temperatures of 200–1000 °C, under an Ar atmosphere. These hybrid nanostructures were developed from bare copper oxide nanoparticles which grew at an annealing temperature of 80 °C under nitrogen flux. The predominant phase as well as the particle size and shape strongly depend on the process temperature. Characterization with transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicates that Cu or Cu2O nanoparticles take rGO sheets from the rGO network to form core–shell Cu–rGO or Cu2O–rGO nanostructures. It is noted that such ones increase in size from 5 to 800 nm as the annealing temperature increases in the 200–1000 °C range. At 1000 °C, Cu nanoparticles develop a highly faceted morphology, displaying arm-like carbon nanorods that originate from different facets of the copper crystal structure. PMID:27547618

  18. Development of highly faceted reduced graphene oxide-coated copper oxide and copper nanoparticles on a copper foil surface.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Amaya, Rebeca; Matsumoto, Yasuhiro; Espinoza-Rivas, Andrés M; Pérez-Guzmán, Manuel A; Ortega-López, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the formation of reduced graphene oxide-coated copper oxide and copper nanoparticles (rGO-Cu2ONPs, rGO-CuNPs) on the surface of a copper foil supporting graphene oxide (GO) at annealing temperatures of 200-1000 °C, under an Ar atmosphere. These hybrid nanostructures were developed from bare copper oxide nanoparticles which grew at an annealing temperature of 80 °C under nitrogen flux. The predominant phase as well as the particle size and shape strongly depend on the process temperature. Characterization with transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicates that Cu or Cu2O nanoparticles take rGO sheets from the rGO network to form core-shell Cu-rGO or Cu2O-rGO nanostructures. It is noted that such ones increase in size from 5 to 800 nm as the annealing temperature increases in the 200-1000 °C range. At 1000 °C, Cu nanoparticles develop a highly faceted morphology, displaying arm-like carbon nanorods that originate from different facets of the copper crystal structure.

  19. Copper homeostasis in grapevine: functional characterization of the Vitis vinifera copper transporter 1.

    PubMed

    Martins, Viviana; Bassil, Elias; Hanana, Mohsen; Blumwald, Eduardo; Gerós, Hernâni

    2014-07-01

    The Vitis vinifera copper transporter 1 is capable of self-interaction and mediates intracellular copper transport. An understanding of copper homeostasis in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is particularly relevant to viticulture in which copper-based fungicides are intensively used. In the present study, the Vitis vinifera copper transporter 1 (VvCTr1), belonging to the Ctr family of copper transporters, was cloned and functionally characterized. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that VvCTr1 monomers are small peptides composed of 148 amino acids with 3 transmembrane domains and several amino acid residues typical of Ctr transporters. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) demonstrated that Ctr monomers are self-interacting and subcellular localization studies revealed that VvCTr1 is mobilized via the trans-Golgi network, through the pre-vacuolar compartment and located to the vacuolar membrane. The heterologous expression of VvCTr1 in a yeast strain lacking all Ctr transporters fully rescued the phenotype, while a deficient complementation was observed in a strain lacking only plasma membrane-bound Ctrs. Given the common subcellular localization of VvCTr1 and AtCOPT5 and the highest amino acid sequence similarity in comparison to the remaining AtCOPT proteins, Arabidopsis copt5 plants were stably transformed with VvCTr1. The impairment in root growth observed in copt5 seedlings in copper-deficient conditions was fully rescued by VvCTr1, further supporting its involvement in intracellular copper transport. Expression studies in V. vinifera showed that VvCTr1 is mostly expressed in the root system, but transcripts were also present in leaves and stems. The functional characterization of VvCTr-mediated copper transport provides the first step towards understanding the physiological and molecular responses of grapevines to copper-based fungicides.

  20. Copper transporter 2 regulates intracellular copper and sensitivity to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Carlos P; Fofana, Mariama; Chan, Jefferson; Chang, Christopher J; Howell, Stephen B

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian cells express two copper (Cu) influx transporters, CTR1 and CTR2. CTR1 serves as an influx transporter for both Cu and cisplatin (cDDP). In mouse embryo fibroblasts, reduction of CTR1 expression renders cells resistant to cDDP whereas reduction of CTR2 makes them hypersensitive both in vitro and in vivo. To investigate the role of CTR2 on intracellular Cu and cDDP sensitivity its expression was molecularly altered in the human epithelial 2008 cancer cell model. Intracellular exchangeable Cu(+) was measured with the fluorescent probe Coppersensor-3 (CS3). The ability of CS3 to report on changes in intracellular Cu(+) was validated by showing that Cu chelators reduced its signal, and that changes in signal accompanied alterations in expression of the major Cu influx transporter CTR1 and the two Cu efflux transporters, ATP7A and ATP7B. Constitutive knock down of CTR2 mRNA by ∼50% reduced steady-state exchangeable Cu by 22-23% and increased the sensitivity of 2008 cells by a factor of 2.6-2.9 in two separate clones. Over-expression of CTR2 increased exchangeable Cu(+) by 150% and rendered the 2008 cells 2.5-fold resistant to cDDP. The results provide evidence that CS3 can quantitatively assess changes in exchangeable Cu(+), and that CTR2 regulates both the level of exchangeable Cu(+) and sensitivity to cDDP in a model of human epithelial cancer. This study introduces CS3 and related sensors as novel tools for probing and assaying Cu-dependent sensitivity to anticancer therapeutics.

  1. Nondestructive tests of regenerative chambers. [evaluating nondestructive methods of determining metal bond integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Vecchies, L.; Wood, R.

    1974-01-01

    The capabilities and limitations of nondestructive evaluation methods were studied to detect and locate bond deficiencies in regeneratively cooled thrust chambers for rocket engines. Flat test panels and a cylinder were produced to simulate regeneratively cooled thrust chamber walls. Planned defects with various bond integrities were produced in the panels to evaluate the sensitivity, accuracy, and limitations of nondestructive methods to define and locate bond anomalies. Holography, acoustic emission, and ultrasonic scan were found to yield sufficient data to discern bond quality when used in combination and in selected sequences. Bonding techniques included electroforming and brazing. Materials of construction included electroformed nickel bonded to Nickel 200 and OFHC copper, electroformed copper bonded to OFHC copper, and 300 series stainless steel brazed to OFHC copper. Variations in outer wall strength, wall thickness, and defect size were evaluated for nondestructive test response.

  2. Determination of the taste threshold of copper in water.

    PubMed

    Zacarías, I; Yáñez, C G; Araya, M; Oraka, C; Olivares, M; Uauy, R

    2001-01-01

    Copper effects on human health represent a relevant issue in modern nutrition. One of the difficulties in assessing the early, acute effects of copper ingested via drinking water is that the taste of copper may influence the response and the capacity to taste copper in different waters is unknown. The purpose of the study was to determine the taste threshold of copper in different types of water, using soluble and insoluble salts (copper sulfate and copper chloride). Copper-containing solutions (range 1.0-8.0 mg/l Cu) were prepared in tap water, distilled deionized water and uncarbonated mineral water. Sixty-one healthy volunteers (17-50 years of age), with no previous training for sensory evaluation, participated in the study. A modified triangle test was used to define the taste threshold value. The threshold was defined as the lowest copper concentration detected by 50% of the subjects assessed. To evaluate the olfactory input in the threshold value obtained, 15 of 61 subjects underwent a second set of triangle tests with the nose open and clamped, using distilled water with copper sulfate at a concentration corresponding to the individual's threshold. The taste threshold in tap water was 2.6 mg/l Cu for both copper sulfate and copper chloride. The corresponding values for distilled deionized water were 2.4 and 2.5 mg/l Cu for copper sulfate and copper chloride, respectively. In uncarbonated mineral water the threshold values were slightly higher, 3.5 and 3.8 mg/l Cu for copper sulfate and for copper chloride, respectively, which are significantly higher than those observed in tap and distilled waters (P < 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis test). The taste threshold did not change significantly when the nose was clamped. In conclusion, the median values for copper taste threshold were low, ranging between 2.4 and 3.8 mg/l Cu, depending on the type of water.

  3. Copper at synapse: Release, binding and modulation of neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosi, Nadia; Rossi, Luisa

    2015-11-01

    Over the last decade, a piece of the research studying copper role in biological systems was devoted to unravelling a still elusive, but extremely intriguing, aspect that is the involvement of copper in synaptic function. These studies were prompted to provide a rationale to the finding that copper is released in the synaptic cleft upon depolarization. The copper pump ATP7A, which mutations are responsible for diseases with a prominent neurodegenerative component, seems to play a pivotal role in the release of copper at synapses. Furthermore, it was found that, when in the synaptic cleft, copper can control, directly or indirectly, the activity of the neurotransmitter receptors (NMDA, AMPA, GABA, P2X receptors), thus affecting excitability. In turn, neurotransmission can affect copper trafficking and delivery in neuronal cells. Furthermore, it was reported that copper can also modulate synaptic vesicles trafficking and the interaction between proteins of the secretory pathways. Interestingly, proteins with a still unclear role in neuronal system though associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases (the amyloid precursor protein, APP, the prion protein, PrP, α-synuclein, α-syn) show copper-binding domains. They may act as copper buffer at synapses and participate in the interplay between copper and the neurotransmitters receptors. Given that copper dysmetabolism occurs in several diseases affecting central and peripheral nervous system, the findings on the contribution of copper in synaptic transmission, beside its more consolidate role as a neuronal enzymes cofactor, may open new insights for therapy interventions.

  4. Astrocyte functions in the copper homeostasis of the brain.

    PubMed

    Scheiber, Ivo F; Dringen, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    Copper is an essential element that is required for a variety of important cellular functions. Since not only copper deficiency but also excess of copper can seriously affect cellular functions, the cellular copper metabolism is tightly regulated. In brain, astrocytes appear to play a pivotal role in the copper metabolism. With their strategically important localization between capillary endothelial cells and neuronal structures they are ideally positioned to transport copper from the blood-brain barrier to parenchymal brain cells. Accordingly, astrocytes have the capacity to efficiently take up, store and to export copper. Cultured astrocytes appear to be remarkably resistant against copper-induced toxicity. However, copper exposure can lead to profound alterations in the metabolism of these cells. This article will summarize the current knowledge on the copper metabolism of astrocytes, will describe copper-induced alterations in the glucose and glutathione metabolism of astrocytes and will address the potential role of astrocytes in the copper metabolism of the brain in diseases that have been connected with disturbances in brain copper homeostasis.

  5. Organic ligands reduce copper toxicity in Pseudomonas syringae

    SciTech Connect

    Azenha, M.; Vasconcelos, M.T.; Cabral, J.P.S.

    1995-03-01

    Pseudomonas syringae cells were exposed to 100 {mu}M copper alone, or to previously equilibrated copper sulfate-ligand solutions. Ligand concentrations were determined experimentally as those that reduced the free copper concentration to 5 {mu}M (determined with a Cu{sup 2+}-selective electrode). These values were in agreement with those calculated by computational equilibrium simulation based on published stability constants. Exposure of P. syringae cells to copper sulfate, chloride, or nitrate resulted in similar high mortality, suggesting that copper was responsible for cell death. Acetate, succinate, proline, lysine, cysteine, and EDTA significantly reduced both the amount of copper bound to the cells and cell death, indicating that not only strong chelating agents but also weak and moderate copper ligands can effectively antagonize copper toxicity. However, cysteine and EDTA were considerably more effective than acetate, succinate, proline, and lysine, indicating that copper toxicity is not simply a function of free copper concentration but depends on the nature of the ligand. The results suggested that a significant fraction of copper bound to acetate, succinate, proline, or lysine was displaced to the bacteria or, alternatively, mixed copper-ligand-cell complexes could be formed. On the contrary, none of these phenomena occurred for the copper complexes with cysteine or EDTA.

  6. Copper Resistance of the Emerging Pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Caitlin L.; Neu, Heather M.; Gilbreath, Jeremy J.; Michel, Sarah L. J.; Zurawski, Daniel V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is an important emerging pathogen that is capable of causing many types of severe infection, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Since A. baumannii can rapidly acquire antibiotic resistance genes, many infections are on the verge of being untreatable, and novel therapies are desperately needed. To investigate the potential utility of copper-based antibacterial strategies against Acinetobacter infections, we characterized copper resistance in a panel of recent clinical A. baumannii isolates. Exposure to increasing concentrations of copper in liquid culture and on solid surfaces resulted in dose-dependent and strain-dependent effects; levels of copper resistance varied broadly across isolates, possibly resulting from identified genotypic variation among strains. Examination of the growth-phase-dependent effect of copper on A. baumannii revealed that resistance to copper increased dramatically in stationary phase. Moreover, A. baumannii biofilms were more resistant to copper than planktonic cells but were still susceptible to copper toxicity. Exposure of bacteria to subinhibitory concentrations of copper allowed them to better adapt to and grow in high concentrations of copper; this copper tolerance response is likely achieved via increased expression of copper resistance mechanisms. Indeed, genomic analysis revealed numerous putative copper resistance proteins that share amino acid homology to known proteins in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Transcriptional analysis revealed significant upregulation of these putative copper resistance genes following brief copper exposure. Future characterization of copper resistance mechanisms may aid in the search for novel antibiotics against Acinetobacter and other highly antibiotic-resistant pathogens. IMPORTANCE Acinetobacter baumannii causes many types of severe nosocomial infections; unfortunately, some isolates have acquired resistance to almost every available antibiotic

  7. 40 CFR 421.60 - Applicability: Description of the secondary copper subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... secondary copper subcategory. 421.60 Section 421.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Copper Subcategory § 421.60 Applicability: Description of the secondary copper..., processing, and remelting of new and used copper scrap and residues to produce copper metal and copper...

  8. 40 CFR 421.60 - Applicability: Description of the secondary copper subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... secondary copper subcategory. 421.60 Section 421.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Copper Subcategory § 421.60 Applicability: Description of the secondary copper..., processing, and remelting of new and used copper scrap and residues to produce copper metal and copper...

  9. 40 CFR 421.60 - Applicability: Description of the secondary copper subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... secondary copper subcategory. 421.60 Section 421.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Copper Subcategory § 421.60 Applicability: Description of the secondary copper..., processing, and remelting of new and used copper scrap and residues to produce copper metal and copper...

  10. 40 CFR 421.60 - Applicability: Description of the secondary copper subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... secondary copper subcategory. 421.60 Section 421.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Copper Subcategory § 421.60 Applicability: Description of the secondary copper..., processing, and remelting of new and used copper scrap and residues to produce copper metal and copper...

  11. 40 CFR 421.60 - Applicability: Description of the secondary copper subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary copper subcategory. 421.60 Section 421.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Copper Subcategory § 421.60 Applicability: Description of the secondary copper..., processing, and remelting of new and used copper scrap and residues to produce copper metal and copper...

  12. Optical properties of stabilized copper nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mohindroo, Jeevan Jyoti; Garg, Umesh Kumar; Sharma, Anshul Kumar

    2016-05-06

    Optical studies involving calculation of Band Gap of the synthesized copper nanoparticles were carried out in the wavelength range of 500 to 650 nm at room temperature, the particles showed high absorption at 550 nm indicating their good absorptive properties. In this method water is used as the medium for reduction of copper ions in to copper Nanoparticles the stabilization of copper Nanoparticles was studied with starch both as a reductant and stabilizer,. The reaction mixture was heated using a kitchen microwave for about 5 minutes to attain the required temp for the reaction. The pH of the solution was adjusted to alkaline using 5% solution of NaOH. Formation of Copper Nanoparticles was indicated by change in color of the solution from blue to yellowish black which is supported by the UV absorption at 570 nm.the synthesized particles were washed with water and alcohol. The optical properties depend upon absorption of radiations which in turn depends upon ratio of electrons and holes present in the material and also on the shape of the nanoparticles. In the present investigation it was observed that optical absorption increases with increase in particle size. The optical band gap for the Nanoparticles was obtained from plots between hv vs. (αhv){sup 2} and hv vs. (αhv){sup 1/2}. The value of Band gap came out to be around 1.98–2.02 eV which is in close agreement with the earlier reported values.

  13. Optical properties of stabilized copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohindroo, Jeevan Jyoti; Garg, Umesh Kumar; Sharma, Anshul Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Optical studies involving calculation of Band Gap of the synthesized copper nanoparticles were carried out in the wavelength range of 500 to 650 nm at room temperature, the particles showed high absorption at 550nm indicating their good absorptive properties. In this method water is used as the medium for reduction of copper ions in to copper Nanoparticles the stabilization of copper Nanoparticles was studied with starch both as a reductant and stabilizer,. The reaction mixture was heated using a kitchen microwave for about 5 minutes to attain the required temp for the reaction. The pH of the solution was adjusted to alkaline using 5%solution of NaOH. Formation of Copper Nanoparticles was indicated by change in color of the solution from blue to yellowish black which is supported by the UV absorption at 570nm.the synthesized particles were washed with water and alcohol. The optical properties depend upon absorption of radiations which in turn depends upon ratio of electrons and holes present in the material and also on the shape of the nanoparticles. In the present investigation it was observed that optical absorption increases with increase in particle size. The optical band gap for the Nanoparticles was obtained from plots between hv vs. (αhv)2 and hv vs. (αhv)1/2. The value of Band gap came out to be around 1.98-2.02 eV which is in close agreement with the earlier reported values

  14. Electrodialytic remediation of copper mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik K; Rojo, Adrián; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2005-01-31

    Mining activities in Chile have generated large amounts of solid waste, which have been deposited in mine tailing impoundments. These impoundments cause concern to the communities due to dam failures or natural leaching to groundwater and rivers. This work shows the laboratory results of nine electrodialytic remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. The results show that electric current could remove copper from watery tailing if the potential gradient was higher than 2 V/cm during 21 days. With addition of sulphuric acid, the process was enhanced because the pH decreased to around 4, and the copper by this reason was released in the solution. Furthermore, with acidic tailing the potential gradient was less than 2 V/cm. The maximum copper removal reached in the anode side was 53% with addition of sulphuric acid in 21 days experiment at 20 V using approximately 1.8 kg mine tailing on dry basis. In addition, experiments with acidic tailing show that the copper removal is proportional with time.

  15. Metallic copper corrosion rates, moisture content, and growth medium influence survival of copper-ion resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Elguindi, Jutta; Moffitt, Stuart; Hasman, Henrik; Andrade, Cassandra; Raghavan, Srini; Rensing, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The rapid killing of various bacteria in contact with metallic copper is thought to be influenced by influx of copper ions into the cells but the exact mechanism is not fully understood. This study showed that the kinetics of contact-killing of copper surfaces depended greatly on the amount of moisture present, copper content of alloys, type of medium used, and type of bacteria. We examined antibiotic- and copper-ion resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium isolated from pig farms following the use of copper sulfate as feed supplement. The results showed rapid killing of both copper-ion resistant E. coli and E. faecium strains when samples in rich medium were spread in a thin, moist layer on copper alloys with 85% or greater copper content. E. coli strains were rapidly killed under dry conditions while E. faecium strains were less affected. Electroplated copper surface corrosion rates were determined from electro-chemical polarization tests using the Stern-Geary method and revealed decreased corrosion rates with benzotriazole and thermal oxide coating. Copper-ion resistant E. coli and E. faecium cells suspended in 0.8% NaCl showed prolonged survival rates on electroplated copper surfaces with benzotriazole coating and thermal oxide coating compared to surfaces without anti-corrosion treatment. Control of surface corrosion affected the level of copper ion influx into bacterial cells which contributed directly to bacterial killing. PMID:21085951

  16. Characterization of copper-resistant rhizosphere bacteria from Avena sativa and Plantago lanceolata for copper bioreduction and biosorption.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, Robson; Okeke, Benedict C; Pieniz, Simone; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2012-04-01

    Copper is a toxic heavy metal widely used to microbial control especially in agriculture. Consequently, high concentrations of copper residues remain in soils selecting copper-resistant organisms. In vineyards, copper is routinely used for fungi control. This work was undertaken to study copper resistance by rhizosphere microorganisms from two plants (Avena sativa L. and Plantago lanceolata L.) common in vineyard soils. Eleven rhizosphere microorganisms were isolated, and four displayed high resistance to copper. The isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as Pseudomonas putida (A1), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (A2) and Acinetobacter sp. (A6), isolated from Avena sativa rhizosphere, and Acinetobacter sp. (T5), isolated from Plantago lanceolata rhizosphere. The isolates displayed high copper resistance in the temperature range from 25°C to 35°C and pH in the range from 5.0 to 9.0. Pseudomonas putida A1 resisted as much as 1,000 mg L(-1) of copper. The isolates showed similar behavior on copper removal from liquid medium, with a bioremoval rate of 30% at 500 mg L(-1) after 24 h of growth. Speciation of copper revealed high copper biotransformation, reducing Cu(II) to Cu(I), capacity. Results indicate that our isolates are potential agents for copper bioremoval and bacterial stimulation of copper biosorption by Avena sativa and Plantago lanceolata.

  17. Metallic copper corrosion rates, moisture content, and growth medium influence survival of copper ion-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Elguindi, Jutta; Moffitt, Stuart; Hasman, Henrik; Andrade, Cassandra; Raghavan, Srini; Rensing, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    The rapid killing of various bacteria in contact with metallic copper is thought to be influenced by the influx of copper ions into the cells, but the exact mechanism is not fully understood. This study showed that the kinetics of contact killing of copper surfaces depended greatly on the amount of moisture present, copper content of alloys, type of medium used, and type of bacteria. We examined antibiotic- and copper ion-resistant strains of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium isolated from pig farms following the use of copper sulfate as feed supplement. The results showed rapid killing of both copper ion-resistant E. coli and E. faecium strains when samples in rich medium were spread in a thin, moist layer on copper alloys with 85% or greater copper content. E. coli strains were rapidly killed under dry conditions, while E. faecium strains were less affected. Electroplated copper surface corrosion rates were determined from electrochemical polarization tests using the Stern-Geary method and revealed decreased corrosion rates with benzotriazole and thermal oxide coating. Copper ion-resistant E. coli and E. faecium cells suspended in 0.8% NaCl showed prolonged survival rates on electroplated copper surfaces with benzotriazole coating and thermal oxide coating compared to surfaces without anti-corrosion treatment. Control of surface corrosion affected the level of copper ion influx into bacterial cells, which contributed directly to bacterial killing.

  18. Effect of copper impurity on polycrystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Koliwad, K. M.

    1978-01-01

    The presence of copper impurity, up to 10 to the 15th atoms/cc, in single crystal silicon has been shown to have no deleterious effect on the p-n junction solar cell performance. However, in polycrystalline silicon, copper atoms tend to migrate to the defect sites because of the structural sensitive properties of copper. This study was undertaken to investigate the influence of this behavior of copper impurity on the performance of p-n junction solar cells fabricated from structurally imperfect silicon. Two sets of polycrystalline silicon substrates containing copper were examined. In one set of samples, copper was incorporated during growth, whereas in the other, copper was diffused. Solar cells were fabricated on both the sets of substrates by a standard process. Dark and light I-V and spectral response characteristics of the cells were measured and compared with copper-free polycrystalline silicon solar cells. The results and the model are discussed.

  19. The conflict between copper grounding systems and CP

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, E.L.; Shamim, M.

    1999-09-01

    The common bonding of underground ferrous structures to massive copper grounding grids creates problems for corrosion engineers and their attempts to cathodically protect the ferrous structures. Conflicts between copper and ferrous underground systems are discussed and alternatives are presented.

  20. 21 CFR 73.125 - Sodium copper chlorophyllin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) The color additive sodium copper chlorophyllin is a green to black powder prepared from chlorophyll by saponification and replacement of magnesium by copper. Chlorophyll is extracted from alfalfa (Medicago...

  1. 21 CFR 73.125 - Sodium copper chlorophyllin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) The color additive sodium copper chlorophyllin is a green to black powder prepared from chlorophyll by saponification and replacement of magnesium by copper. Chlorophyll is extracted from alfalfa (Medicago...

  2. Pathogenic adaptations to host-derived antibacterial copper

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Kaveri S.; Henderson, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that both host and pathogen manipulate copper content in infected host niches during infections. In this review, we summarize recent developments that implicate copper resistance as an important determinant of bacterial fitness at the host-pathogen interface. An essential mammalian nutrient, copper cycles between copper (I) (Cu+) in its reduced form and copper (II) (Cu2+) in its oxidized form under physiologic conditions. Cu+ is significantly more bactericidal than Cu2+ due to its ability to freely penetrate bacterial membranes and inactivate intracellular iron-sulfur clusters. Copper ions can also catalyze reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which may further contribute to their toxicity. Transporters, chaperones, redox proteins, receptors and transcription factors and even siderophores affect copper accumulation and distribution in both pathogenic microbes and their human hosts. This review will briefly cover evidence for copper as a mammalian antibacterial effector, the possible reasons for this toxicity, and pathogenic resistance mechanisms directed against it. PMID:24551598

  3. Metals in Metal Salts: A Copper Mirror Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    A simple lecture demonstration is described to show the latent presence of metal atoms in a metal salt. Copper(II) formate tetrahydrate is heated in a round-bottom flask forming a high-quality copper mirror.

  4. Copper toxicosis in New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Ramirez, C J; Kim, D Y; Hanks, B C; Evans, T J

    2013-11-01

    Six 12- to 14-month-old New Zealand White rabbits were diagnosed with copper toxicosis. These rabbits were part of a group of 110 purchased and shipped overnight for research purposes. On arrival, the group experienced an abrupt diet change. Eight died over 3 weeks and 6 were submitted for postmortem examination. Microscopic findings included severe centrilobular to midzonal hepatocellular necrosis with rhodanine stain-positive copper granules in the remaining hepatocytes. Mild periportal fibrosis and biliary hyperplasia, hemoglobinuric nephrosis, and splenic erythrophagocytosis were also observed. Hepatic copper concentrations were elevated, ranging from 319 to 997 ppm. Clinical disease was not previously observed in younger rabbits gradually transitioned from the supplier's copper-supplemented diet. Copper toxicosis likely occurred in these rabbits from a combination of (1) increased duration of copper supplementation leading to increased hepatocellular stores and (2) stress leading to anorexia and release of hepatocellular copper stores similar to chronic copper toxicosis as described in sheep.

  5. Protective coating for copper in aluminum heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avazian, R.

    1978-01-01

    Application of ultrathin layer of molybdenum disulfied coating to copper tubing permits utilization of tubing in cast-aluminum heat exchangers. Coating prevents formation of copper/aluminum eutectic, but does not impede heat transfer.

  6. A limited legacy effect of copper in marine biofilms.

    PubMed

    McElroy, David J; Doblin, Martina A; Murphy, Richard J; Hochuli, Dieter F; Coleman, Ross A

    2016-08-15

    The effects of confounding by temporal factors remains understudied in pollution ecology. For example, there is little understanding of how disturbance history affects the development of assemblages. To begin addressing this gap in knowledge, marine biofilms were subjected to temporally-variable regimes of copper exposure and depuration. It was expected that the physical and biological structure of the biofilms would vary in response to copper regime. Biofilms were examined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, chlorophyll-a fluorescence and field spectrometry and it was found that (1) concentrations of copper were higher in those biofilms exposed to copper, (2) concentrations of copper remain high in biofilms after the source of copper is removed, and (3) exposure to and depuration from copper might have comparable effects on the photosynthetic microbial assemblages in biofilms. The persistence of copper in biofilms after depuration reinforces the need for consideration of temporal factors in ecology.

  7. Metals in Metal Salts: A Copper Mirror Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    A simple lecture demonstration is described to show the latent presence of metal atoms in a metal salt. Copper(II) formate tetrahydrate is heated in a round-bottom flask forming a high-quality copper mirror.

  8. Trace elements in human physiology and pathology. Copper.

    PubMed

    Tapiero, H; Townsend, D M; Tew, K D

    2003-11-01

    Copper is a trace element, important for the function of many cellular enzymes. Copper ions can adopt distinct redox states oxidized Cu(II) or reduced (I), allowing the metal to play a pivotal role in cell physiology as a catalytic cofactor in the redox chemistry of enzymes, mitochondrial respiration, iron absorption, free radical scavenging and elastin cross-linking. If present in excess, free copper ions can cause damage to cellular components and a delicate balance between the uptake and efflux of copper ions determines the amount of cellular copper. In biological systems, copper homeostasis has been characterized at the molecular level. It is coordinated by several proteins such as glutathione, metallothionein, Cu-transporting P-type ATPases, Menkes and Wilson proteins and by cytoplasmic transport proteins called copper chaperones to ensure that it is delivered to specific subcellular compartments and thereby to copper-requiring proteins.

  9. High-strength braze joints between copper and steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, R. F.

    1967-01-01

    High-strength braze joints between copper and steel are produced by plating the faying surface of the copper with a layer of gold. This reduces porosity in the braze area and strengthens the resultant joint.

  10. Modeling and control of copper loss in smelting slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Pengfu

    2011-12-01

    A series of technical improvements have been implemented to address the issue of high copper losses in rotary holding furnace (RHF) slag, which were experienced at the Xstrata Copper Smelter at Mount Isa in 2007 and 2008. The copper losses in smelting slag in the RHF were more than 3% in 2006 and 2007. Thermodynamic models and viscosity models have been applied in the operation of Xstrata Copper Smelter in Australia. The theory of RHF key performance indicators has also been developed to reduce the copper losses in RHF slag. The RHF KPIs Theory has been applied in Mount Isa Copper Smelter. The copper losses in RHF slag dropped from 3.1% in 2007 to 0.76% in April 2009. The average copper loss in RHF slag in 2009 and 2010 was about 0.9%.

  11. Pathogenic adaptations to host-derived antibacterial copper.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Kaveri S; Henderson, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that both host and pathogen manipulate copper content in infected host niches during infections. In this review, we summarize recent developments that implicate copper resistance as an important determinant of bacterial fitness at the host-pathogen interface. An essential mammalian nutrient, copper cycles between copper (I) (Cu(+)) in its reduced form and copper (II) (Cu(2+)) in its oxidized form under physiologic conditions. Cu(+) is significantly more bactericidal than Cu(2+) due to its ability to freely penetrate bacterial membranes and inactivate intracellular iron-sulfur clusters. Copper ions can also catalyze reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which may further contribute to their toxicity. Transporters, chaperones, redox proteins, receptors and transcription factors and even siderophores affect copper accumulation and distribution in both pathogenic microbes and their human hosts. This review will briefly cover evidence for copper as a mammalian antibacterial effector, the possible reasons for this toxicity, and pathogenic resistance mechanisms directed against it.

  12. Design considerations for the TF center conductor post for the Ignition Spherical Torus (IST)

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, G.R.; Haines, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    A trade-off study has been carried out to compare the differential costs of using high-strength alloy copper versus oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper for the center legs of the toroidal field (TF) coils of an Ignition Spherical Torus (IST). The electrical heating, temperatures, stresses, cooling requirements, material costs, pump costs, and power to drive the TF coils and pumps are all assessed for both materials for a range of compact tokamak reactors. The alloy copper material is found to result in a more compact reactor and to allow use of current densities of up to 170 MA/mS versus 40 MA/mS for the OFHC copper. The OFHC conductor system with high current density is $24 million less expensive than more conventional copper systems with 30 MA/mS. The alloy copper system costs $32 million less than conventional systems. Therefore, the alloy system offers a net savings of $8 million compared to the 50% cold-worked OFHC copper system. Although the savings are a significant fraction of the center conductor post cost, they are relatively insignificant in terms of the total device cost. It is concluded that the use of alloy copper contributes very little to the economic or technical viability of the compact IST. It is recommended that a similar systematic approach be applied to evaluating coil material and current density trade-offs for other compact copper-TF-coil tokamak designs. 9 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs.

  13. Thermal resistance across a copper/Kapton/copper interface at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, L.; Phelan, P.E.; Niemann, R.C.; Weber, B.R.

    1997-09-01

    The high-{Tc} superconductor current lead heat intercept connection, which is utilized as a thermal intercept to remove the Joule heat from the upper stage lead to a heat sink operating at 50--77 K, consists of a structure where a 152-{micro}m film is sandwiched between two concentric copper cylinders. The material chosen for the insulating film is Kapton MT, a composite film which has a relatively low thermal resistance, but yet a high voltage standoff capability. Here, the measured thermal conductance of a copper/Kapton MT/copper junction in a flat-plate geometry is compared to the results obtained from the actual heat intercept connection. Increasing the contact pressure reduces the thermal resistance to a minimum value determined by the film conduction resistance. A comparison between the resistance of the copper/Kapton MT/copper junction and a copper/G-10/copper junction demonstrates that the Kapton MT layer yields a lower thermal resistance while still providing adequate electrical isolation.

  14. Behaviour of non-standard composition copper bearing anodes from the copper refining process.

    PubMed

    Marković, R; Friedrich, B; Stajić-Trosić, J; Jordović, B; Jugović, B; Gvozdenović, M; Stevanović, J

    2010-10-15

    This paper addresses on investigation the possibility of electrolytic treatment the sulphur acidic waste solution, obtained in the conventional electrolytic copper refining process. Beside the high copper concentration, the high concentration of other metals, in this case nickel, is the main characteristic of these waste solutions. Due to this fact, the copper bearing anodes with non-standard nickel, lead, tin and antimony content were specially prepared for the refining process. Nickel content of all anodes was approximately 7.5 mass%, and the content of lead, tin and antimony was varied. The preliminary results, obtained using the standard electrochemical techniques, have indicated that the copper bearing anodes could be used under the same conditions as well as in the conventional copper refining process. The measurements in constant galvanostatic pulse have pointed out that the all chemical elements from copper bearing anodes were dissolved and only copper was deposited onto the cathode. It was also pointed out that Ni concentration in the base working electrolyte (sulphur acidic waste solution), after 72 h of process, increased to 102 mass% at T(1)=63+/-2 degrees C and up to 122 mass% at T(1)=73+/-2 degrees C, while arsenic concentration decreased to a minimum value.

  15. Coordination geometry around copper in a Schiff-base trinuclear copper complex using EXAFS spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Abhijeet; Shrivastava, B. D.; Gaur, D. C.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.; Jha, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Poswal, A.

    2012-05-01

    In the present investigation, we have studied extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra of a trinuclear Schiff-base copper complex tetraaqua-di-μ3-(N-salicylidene-DL-glutamato)-tricopper(II)heptahydrate, [Cu3(C12H10NO5)2 (H2O)4]. 7H2O, in which three metal sites are present. One metal site is square-pyramidal (4+1) and other two similar metal sites are tetragonally distorted octahedral (4+2). EXAFS has been recorded at the K-edge of copper in the complex at the dispersive EXAFS beamline at 2 GeV Indus-2 synchrotron source at RRCAT, Indore, India. The analysis of EXAFS spectra of multinuclear metal complexes pose some problems due to the presence of many absorbing atoms, even when the absorbing atoms may be of the same element. Hence, using the available crystal structure of the complex, theoretical models have been generated for the different copper sites separately, which are then fitted to the experimental EXAFS data. The two coordination geometries around the copper sites have been determined. The contributions of the different copper sites to the experimental spectrum have been estimated. The structural parameters, which include bond-lengths, coordination numbers and thermal disorders, for the two types of copper sites have been reported. Further, copper has been found to be in +2 oxidation state at these metal sites.

  16. Study of copper silicide retardation effects on copper diffusion in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. S.; Gong, H.; Liu, R.; Wee, A. T. S.; Cha, C. L.; See, A.; Chan, L.

    2001-10-01

    A B-buried layer with a dose of 1×1014atoms/cm2 was introduced into p-doped Si at a depth of 2.2 μm to enhance copper diffusion via its inherent gettering effect. Copper was then introduced into silicon either via a low-energy implantation followed by a thermal anneal, or through the thermal drive in of physical vapor deposited (PVD) copper film. Secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling of both annealed samples later indicated that while substantial amounts of copper was gettered by the B layer in the former sample, no copper was gettered by the B-buried layer in the latter sample. Further analysis with an x-ray diffraction technique showed that copper silicide, Cu3Si was formed in the latter sample. It is thus surmised that the formation of this silicide layer impeded the diffusion of copper towards the B-buried layer. This work investigates the cause of CuSix formation and the underlying reasons for the lower mobility of Cu in PVD Cu film samples.

  17. Effect of zinc on copper and iron bioavailability as influenced by dietary copper and fat source

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, A.C.; Jones, B.P.; Lin, F.; Sinthusek, G.; Frimpong, N.A.; Wu, S.

    1986-03-05

    In a number of experiments, they have observed that liver copper levels of young male rats fed low zinc diets were essentially the same as liver copper levels of rats fed adequate zinc. Liver iron levels of rats fed low zinc diets, however, tended to be markedly higher than liver iron levels of rats fed adequate zinc. Increases in dietary zinc (up to 200 ppm) were generally associated with decreases in liver iron deposition, but had little effect on liver copper deposition. Iron bioavailability appeared to be enhanced when fat sources high in saturated fatty acids were used, and there was evidence that the type of dietary fat influenced the effect of zinc on iron bioavailability. Liver copper deposition, however, did not appear to be markedly affected by the type of dietary fat suggesting that copper bioavailability is less affected by fat source. Increases in dietary copper were associated with increases in liver copper levels and decreases in liver iron levels of rats fed increasing levels of zinc. These data suggest that potential interrelationships between dietary factors not being considered as experimental variables could have significant effects on results and on the interrelationships between dietary variables which are being studied.

  18. Preparation of polyamine-functionalized copper specific adsorbents for selective adsorption of copper.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Wu, Ren'an; Wu, Minghuo; Zhao, Liang; Li, Ruibin; Zou, Hanfa

    2010-07-01

    The level of serum free copper is greatly elevated in Wilson's disease. For patients with acute Wilson's disease, liver transplantation is the only lifesaving treatment. Plasma exchange or albumin dialysis is often used as a bridge to liver transplantation to maintain a stable clinical status for patients. Hemoperfusion is another effective therapy in removing toxins from the plasma. However, hemoperfusion has not been reported to remove copper due to lack of copper specific adsorbent. In this work, copper chelating agents, triethylenetetramine and tetraethylenepentamine, were covalently immobilized onto macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate) microspheres to prepare copper specific adsorbents. The resulting adsorbents demonstrated good adsorption capacities of 63.44 and 58.48 mg/g, respectively, for Cu2+ ion. Additionally, with the interference of other metal ions such as Fe2+, Mg2+, Zn2+ and Ca2+, the prepared copper adsorbents still demonstrated good specificity toward Cu2+ ion. These results indicate that the adsorbents are promising adsorbents in hemoperfusion therapy for selective removal of copper for patients with severe Wilson's disease.

  19. Mechanism of Mineral Phase Reconstruction for Improving the Beneficiation of Copper and Iron from Copper Slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhengqi; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jan; Zhang, Feng

    2016-09-01

    To maximize the recovery of iron and copper from copper slag, the modification process by adding a compound additive (a mixture of hematite, pyrite and manganous oxide) and optimizing the cooling of the slag was studied. The phase reconstruction mechanism of the slag modification process was revealed by thermodynamic calculations, x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the synergy between the burnt lime and the compound additive promotes the generation of target minerals, such as magnetite and copper matte. In addition, the multifunctional compound additive is able to improve the fluidity of the molten slag, which facilitates the coalescence and growth of fine particles of the target minerals. As a result, the percentage of iron distributed in the form of magnetite increased from 32.9% to 65.1%, and that of the copper exiting in the form of metallic copper and copper sulfide simultaneously increased from 80.0% to 90.3%. Meanwhile, the grains of the target minerals in the modified slag grew markedly to a mean size of over 50 μm after slow cooling. Ultimately, the beneficiation efficiency of copper and iron was improved because of the ease with which the target minerals could be liberated.

  20. The Yin and Yang of copper during infection.

    PubMed

    Besold, Angelique N; Culbertson, Edward M; Culotta, Valeria C

    2016-04-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for both pathogens and the animal hosts they infect. However, copper can also be toxic in cells due to its redox properties and ability to disrupt active sites of metalloproteins, such as Fe-S enzymes. Through these toxic properties, copper is an effective antimicrobial agent and an emerging concept in innate immunity is that the animal host intentionally exploits copper toxicity in antimicrobial weaponry. In particular, macrophages can attack invading microbes with high copper and this metal is also elevated at sites of lung infection. In addition, copper levels in serum rise during infection with a wide array of pathogens. To defend against this toxic copper, the microbial intruder is equipped with a battery of copper detoxification defenses that promote survival in the host, including copper exporting ATPases and copper binding metallothioneins. However, it is important to remember that copper is also an essential nutrient for microbial pathogens and serves as important cofactor for enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase for respiration, superoxide dismutase for anti-oxidant defense and multi-copper oxidases that act on metals and organic substrates. We therefore posit that the animal host can also thwart pathogen growth by limiting their copper nutrients, similar to the well-documented nutritional immunity effects for starving microbes of essential zinc, manganese and iron micronutrients. This review provides both sides of the copper story and evaluates how the host can exploit either copper-the-toxin or copper-the-nutrient in antimicrobial tactics at the host-pathogen battleground.