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Sample records for ionic strength saline

  1. How Phytoplankton Membranes Cope With Steep Ionic Strength (Salinity) Gradient?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparovic, B.; Sesar, T.; Cankovic, M.; Ljubešić, Z.; Hrustić, E.; Zhu, Z.; Zhang, R.; Du, J.

    2016-02-01

    We report on phytoplankton accommodation on stressful conditions being steep ionic strength, i.e. salinity, changes, the conditions regularly found in the estuaries. We aimed defining how lipid composition of phytoplankton membrane structure is accommodated to prevent spontaneous osmosis. Salinity-dependent lipid profiles for particulate lipid extracts from blooming periods of the two opposing estuaries: eutrophic and polluted Wenchang River Estuary and pristine oligotrophic/mesotrophic Krka River Estuary were characterized by thin layer chromatography (TLC). The composition of phytoplankton pigments which was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. Domination of pigment Fucoxanthin in both estuaries indicates diatoms were major blooming group. While total particulate lipid concentration was almost an order of magnitude higher in the Wenchang River estuary (on average 238 µg/L) than in the Krka River Estuary (on average 36 µg/L), the lipid composition was similar. This implies that salinity stress is the main influential factor on phytoplankton lipid composition rather than availability of nutrients. Details on the lipid composition that follow salinity changes will be discussed.

  2. Salinity-dependent diatom biosilicification implies an important role of external ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Vrieling, Engel G; Sun, Qianyao; Tian, Mingwen; Kooyman, Patricia J; Gieskes, Winfried W C; van Santen, Rutger A; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2007-06-19

    The role of external ionic strength in diatom biosilica formation was assessed by monitoring the nanostructural changes in the biosilica of the two marine diatom species Thalassiosira punctigera and Thalassiosira weissflogii that was obtained from cultures grown at two distinct salinities. Using physicochemical methods, we found that at lower salinity the specific surface area, the fractal dimensions, and the size of mesopores present in the biosilica decreased. Diatom biosilica appears to be denser at the lower salinity that was applied. This phenomenon can be explained by assuming aggregation of smaller coalescing silica particles inside the silica deposition vesicle, which would be in line with principles in silica chemistry. Apparently, external ionic strength has an important effect on diatom biosilica formation, making it tempting to propose that uptake of silicic acid and other external ions may take place simultaneously. Uptake and transport of reactants in the proximity of the expanding silica deposition vesicle, by (macro)pinocytosis, are more likely than intracellular stabilization and transport of silica precursors at the high concentrations that are necessary for the formation of the siliceous frustule components.

  3. A comparison of a low ionic strength saline medium with routine methods for antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Wicker, B; Wallas, C H

    1976-01-01

    Antibody detection studies were undertaken in order to compare a low ionic strength (LIS) medium with a conventional albumin-fortified isotonic medium. Tests were performed in parallel with both media at room temperature and at 37 C. A 30mM NaCl solution was used as the LIS medium and in this study this enhanced antibody reactions without causing nonspecific reactions. The LIS medium detected all of more than 50 Rh and more than 75 non-Rh antibodies after 15 minutes of incubation. Often 30 to 60 minutes of incubation were required to detect these antibodies by the routine method. Several antibodies that were detected with the LIS medium after 15 minutes of incubation were either undetected or had given a nonspecific pattern of activity after 60 minutes incubation in the routine medium. When an antibody was present, the LIS medium invariably gave stronger, more clear-cut results. It is concluded that the LIS medium is generally more sensitive than a conventional medium in detecting antibodies since such a medium will detect clinically significant antibodies after only 15 minutes incubation as well as detect antibodies missed by a conventional medium. An antibody detection system utilizing this medium has obvious applicability to a hospital transfusion service.

  4. Controls of ionic strength and macromolecule chemistry on calcite nucleation: Salinity and ion hydration as levers for regulating biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dove, P. M.; Giuffre, A. J.; Mergelsberg, S. T.; Han, N.; De Yoreo, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Organisms form shells and skeletons with remarkable fidelity by controlling the timing and placement of the minerals that nucleate and subsequently grow. An extensive effort has identified features of the organic matrix that regulate this process. Recent measurements from our group show the energy barrier to nucleation onto polysaccharide (PS) substrates is dependent upon hydrophilicity through functional group chemistry and suggest that free energy of the macromolecule-liquid interface influences where and when mineral nucleation occurs (Giuffre et al., 2013, PNAS). The importance of interfacial free energy in regulating nucleation raises the question of whether local changes in salinity or electrolyte composition can be tuned to further modulate the onset of calcite nucleation. Using alginate (negatively charged by carboxyl groups) and chitosan (small positive charge by amine groups), the rate of calcite nucleation was measured at controlled supersaturations and pH as a function of NaCl concentration (65-600 mM). Analyses of the data show the thermodynamic barrier to calcite nucleation onto both types of PS increases with ionic strength. The evidence suggests this effect arises from an increasing concentration of solvated ions at the PS-water interface while also increasing the hydrophilic character of that interface; thus decreasing the substrate-liquid interfacial free energy. To test this explanation, a second group of nucleation experiments used a suite of electrolytes (alkali chlorides for alginate and sodium halides for chitosan) while holding ionic strength constant. Indeed, the nucleation barriers for calcite formation are electrolyte-specific and correlated with the hydration free energy of the ion. This suggests solvated electrolyte ions indirectly regulate calcite nucleation onto substrates through their competition with the substrate for water thereby influencing net interfacial free energy. These effects are consistent with the long

  5. Sr2+/Ca2+ and 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during inorganic calcite formation: III. Impact of salinity/ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianwu; Niedermayr, Andrea; Köhler, Stephan J.; Böhm, Florian; Kısakürek, Basak; Eisenhauer, Anton; Dietzel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In order to apply Sr/Ca and 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during calcium carbonate (CaCO3) formation as a proxy to reconstruct paleo-environments, it is essential to evaluate the impact of various environmental factors. In this study, a CO2 diffusion technique was used to crystallize inorganic calcite from aqueous solutions at different ionic strength/salinity by the addition of NaCl at 25 °C. Results show that the discrimination of Sr2+ versus Ca2+ during calcite formation is mainly controlled by precipitation rate (R in μmol/m2/h) and is weakly influenced by ionic strength/salinity. In analogy to Sr incorporation, 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during precipitation of calcite is weakly influenced by ionic strength/salinity too. At 25 °C the calcium isotope fractionation between calcite and aqueous calcium ions (Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq = δ44/40Cacalcite − δ44/40Caaq) correlates inversely to log R values for all experiments. In addition, an inverse relationship between Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq and log DSr, which is independent of temperature, precipitation rate, and aqueous (Sr/Ca)aq ratio, is not affected by ionic strength/salinity either. Considering the log DSr and Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq relationship, Sr/Ca and δ44/40Cacalcite values of precipitated calcite can be used as an excellent multi-proxy approach to reconstruct environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) of calcite growth and diagenetic alteration. PMID:22347722

  6. The effect of ionic strength on oil adhesion in sandstone – the search for the low salinity mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hilner, E.; Andersson, M. P.; Hassenkam, T.; Matthiesen, J.; Salino, P. A.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Core flood and field tests have demonstrated that decreasing injection water salinity increases oil recovery from sandstone reservoirs. However, the microscopic mechanism behind the effect is still under debate. One hypothesis is that as salinity decreases, expansion of the electrical double layer decreases attraction between organic molecules and pore surfaces. We have developed a method that uses atomic force microscopy (AFM) in chemical force mapping (CFM) mode to explore the relationship between wettability and salinity. We functionalised AFM tips with alkanes and used them to represent tiny nonpolar oil droplets. In repeated measurements, we brought our “oil” close to the surface of sand grains taken from core plugs and we measured the adhesion between the tip and sample. Adhesion was constant in high salinity solutions but below a threshold of 5,000 to 8,000 ppm, adhesion decreased as salinity decreased, rendering the surface less oil wet. The effect was consistent, reproducible and reversible. The threshold for the onset of low salinity response fits remarkably well with observations from core plug experiments and field tests. The results demonstrate that the electric double layer force always contributes at least in part to the low salinity effect, decreasing oil wettability when salinity is low. PMID:25899050

  7. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Ionic Strength

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the ionic strength module, when to list ionic strength as a candidate cause, ways to measure ionic strength, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for ionic strength, ionic strength module references and literature reviews.

  8. Ionic Strength Sensing in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boqun; Poolman, Bert; Boersma, Arnold J

    2017-09-06

    Knowledge of the ionic strength in cells is required to understand the in vivo biochemistry of the charged biomacromolecules. Here, we present the first sensors to determine the ionic strength in living cells, by designing protein probes based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). These probes allow observation of spatiotemporal changes in the ionic strength on the single-cell level.

  9. Ionic strength and DOC determinations from various freshwater sources to the San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Y.R.; Kuwabara, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    An exact estimation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within the salinity gradient of zinc and copper metals is significant in understanding the limit to which DOC could influence metal speciation. A low-temperature persulfate/oxygen/ultraviolet wet oxidation procedure was utilized for analyzing DOC samples adapted for ionic strength from major freshwater sources of the northern and southern regions of San Francisco Bay. The ionic strength of samples was modified with a chemically defined seawater medium up to 0.7M. Based on the results, a minimum effect of ionic strength on oxidation proficiency for DOC sources to the Bay over an ionic strength gradient of 0.0 to 0.7 M was observed. There was no major impacts of ionic strength on two Suwanee River fulvic acids. In general, the noted effects associated with ionic strength were smaller than the variances seen in the aquatic environment between high- and low-temperature methods.

  10. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Ionic Strength - Detailed Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the ionic strength module, when to list ionic strength as a candidate cause, ways to measure ionic strength, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for ionic strength, ionic strength module references and literature reviews.

  11. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Ionic Strength - Simple Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the ionic strength module, when to list ionic strength as a candidate cause, ways to measure ionic strength, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for ionic strength, ionic strength module references and literature reviews.

  12. TOUGHREACT Testing in High Ionic Strength Brine Sandstone Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu

    2008-09-01

    Deep saline formations and oil and gas reservoirs often contain concentrated brine solutions of ionic strength greater than 1 (I > 1 M). Geochemical modeling, involving high ionic strength brines, is a challenge. In the original TOUGHREACT code (Xu et al., 2004; Xu et al., 2006), activity coefficients of charged aqueous species are computed using an extended Debye-Huckel (DH) equation and parameters derived by Helgeson et al. (1981). The DH model can deal with ionic strengths from dilute to moderately saline water (up to 6 molal for an NaCl-dominant solution). The equations implemented for the DH model are presented in Appendix A. During the course of the Yucca Mountain project, a Pitzer ion-interaction model was implemented into TOUGHREACT. This allows the application of this simulator to problems involving much more concentrated aqueous solutions, such as those involving geochemical processes in and around high-level nuclear waste repositories where fluid evaporation and/or boiling is expected to occur (Zhang et al., 2007). The Pitzer ion-interaction model, which we refer to as the Pitzer virial approach, and associated ion-interaction parameters have been applied successfully to study non-ideal concentrated aqueous solutions. The formulation of the Pitzer model is presented in Appendix B; detailed information can be founded in Zhang et al. (2007). For CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, the Pitzer ion-interaction model for highly concentrated brines was incorporated into TOUGHREACT/ECO2N, then was tested and compared with a previously implemented extended Debye-Hueckel (DH) ion activity model. The comparison was made through a batch geochemical system using a Gulf Coast sandstone saline formation.

  13. Ionic Strength Responsive Sulfonated Polystyrene Opals.

    PubMed

    Nucara, Luca; Piazza, Vincenzo; Greco, Francesco; Robbiano, Valentina; Cappello, Valentina; Gemmi, Mauro; Cacialli, Franco; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2017-02-08

    Stimuli-responsive photonic crystals (PCs) represent an intriguing class of smart materials very promising for sensing applications. Here, selective ionic strength responsive polymeric PCs are reported. They are easily fabricated by partial sulfonation of polystyrene opals, without using toxic or expensive monomers and etching steps. The color of the resulting hydrogel-like ordered structures can be continuously shifted over the entire visible range (405-760 nm) by changing the content of ions over an extremely wide range of concentration (from about 70 μM to 4 M). The optical response is completely independent from pH and temperature, and the initial color can be fully recovered by washing the sulfonated opals with pure water. These new smart photonic materials could find important applications as ionic strength sensors for environmental monitoring as well as for healthcare screening.

  14. Indirect antiglobulin test-crossmatch using low-ionic-strength saline-albumin enhancement medium and reduced incubation time: effectiveness in the detection of most clinically significant antibodies and impact on blood utilization.

    PubMed

    Dinardo, C L; Bonifácio, S L; Mendrone, A

    2014-01-01

    Indirect antiglobulin test-crossmatch (IAT-XM) using enhancement media such as low-ionic-strength saline (LISS) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) usually requires 15 minutes of incubation. These methods are necessary when testing samples from blood recipients who have a higher risk of alloimmunization. In emergency situations, IAT-XM can be time-consuming and can influence presurgery routine, resulting in more red blood cell (RBC) units being tested and stored to avoid the transfusion of uncrossmatched ones. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of a LISS-albumin enhancer to intensify antigen-antibody reaction after 5 minutes of 37oC incubation and compare this performance with that of other enhancers, gel, and conventional tube testing. Second, the study evaluated the impact of this method's implementation in the C:T ratio (crossmatched to transfused RBC units) of a transfusion laboratory. Ninety serum samples containing alloantibodies of potential clinical significance were tested against phenotyped RBCs using four different methods: (1) tube with LISS-albumin enhancer (5 minutes of incubation), (2) tube with LISS-albumin and PEG (15 minutes of incubation), (3) gel, and (4) conventional tube method (60 minutes of incubation). In parallel, the study compared the C:T ratio of a tertiary-hospital transfusion laboratory in two different periods: 3 months before and 3 months after the implementation of the 5-minute IAT-XM protocol. The use of LISS-albumin with 5 minutes of incubation exhibited the same performance as LISS-albumin, PEG, and gel with 15 minutes of incubation. Conventional tube method results were equally comparable, but reactions were significantly less intense, except for anti-c (p = 0.406). Accuracy was 100 percent for all selected methods. After the implementation of the 5-minute IAT-XM protocol, the C:T ratio fell from 2.74 to 1.29 (p < 0.001). IAT-XM can have its incubation time reduced to 5 minutes with the use of LISS

  15. Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus intermedius adhesion to fibronectin films are oppositely influenced by ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Dijkstra, Rene J B; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C

    2008-10-07

    Bacterial adhesion to protein-coated surfaces is mediated by an interplay of specific and nonspecific interactions. Although nonspecific interactions are ubiquitously present, little is known about the physicochemical mechanisms of specific interactions. The aim of this paper is to determine the influence of ionic strength on the adhesion of two streptococcal strains to fibronectin films. Streptococcus mutans LT11 and Streptococcus intermedius NCTC11324 both possess antigen I/II with the ability to bind fibronectin from solution, but S. intermedius binds approximately 20x less fibronectin than does the S. mutans strain under identical conditions. Both strains as well as fibronectin films are negatively charged in low ionic strength phosphate buffered saline (PBS, 10x diluted), but bacteria appear uncharged in high ionic strength PBS. Physicochemical modeling on the basis of overall cell surface properties (cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potentials) demonstrates that both strains should favor adhesion to fibronectin films in a high ionic strength environment as compared to in a low ionic strength environment, where electrostatic repulsion between equally charged surfaces is dominant. Adhesion of S. intermedius to fibronectin films in a parallel plate flow chamber was completely in line with this modeling, while in addition atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicated stronger adhesion forces upon retraction between fibronectin-coated tips and the cell surfaces in high ionic strength PBS than in low ionic strength PBS. Thus, the dependence of the interaction on ionic strength is dominated by the overall negative charge on the interacting surfaces. Adhesion of S. mutans to fibronectin films, however, was completely at odds with theoretical modeling, and the strain adhered best in low ionic strength PBS. Moreover, AFM indicated weaker repulsive forces upon approach between fibronectin-coated tips and the cell surfaces in low ionic strength PBS than in high ionic

  16. The dynamics of Bax channel formation: influence of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Vidyaramanan; Walsh, Timothy; Chang, Kai-Ti; Colombini, Marco

    2012-08-08

    Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) is a complex multistep process. Studies of MOMP in vivo are limited by the stochastic variability of MOMP between cells and rapid completion of IMS protein release within single cells. In vitro models have provided useful insights into MOMP. We have investigated the dynamics of Bax-mediated MOMP in isolated mitochondria using ionic strength as a tool to control the rate of MOMP. We find that Bax can induce both transient permeabilization, detected by protein release, and more substantial long-lasting permeabilization, measured by the rate of oxidation of added cytochrome c. We found that higher ionic strength causes Bax to form small channels quickly but the expansion of these early channels is impeded. This inhibitory effect of ionic strength is independent of tBid. Channels formed under low ionic strength are not destabilized by raising the ionic strength. Increase in ionic strength also increases the ability of Bcl-xL to inhibit Bax-mediated MOMP. Ionic strength does not affect Bax insertion into mitochondria. Thus, ionic strength influences the assembly of Bax molecules already in membrane into channels. Ionic strength can be used as an effective biophysical tool to study Bax-mediated channel formation.

  17. Do zwitterions contribute to the ionic strength of a solution?

    PubMed Central

    Stellwagen, Earle; Prantner, Jason D.; Stellwagen, Nancy C.

    2008-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis has been used to determine whether zwitterions contribute to the ionic strength of a solution, by measuring the mobility of a double-stranded DNA oligomer in cacodylate-buffered solutions containing various concentrations of the ionic salt tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA+Cl−) or the zwitterion tricine+/−. The mobility of the DNA decreased as the square root of ionic strength, as expected by the Debye-Hückel-Onsager theory of electrophoresis, when TEA+Cl− was added to the buffer. However, the mobility was independent of the concentration of added tricine+/−. Hence, zwitterions do not contribute to the ionic strength of a solution. PMID:18022379

  18. Reproduction of Venezulean Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus at Low Ionic Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-28

    AD/A-006 206 REPRODUCTION OF VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS AT LOW IONIC STRENGTH T.M. Sokolova, et al Army Medical Research Institute of... Reproduction of Venezuelan equine encephalo- Translation myelitis virus at low ionic strength 6. PERFORM4ING ORG. REPORT NU14BER II!LTT, 0491 7. AUTHOR(a... REPRODUCTION OF VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS AT LOW IONIC STRFNGTH Article by T. M. Sokolova, I. B. Tazulakhova, S. S. Grigoryan and F. I. e v

  19. "Switchable water": aqueous solutions of switchable ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Sean M; Jessop, Philip G

    2010-04-26

    "Salting out" is a standard method for separating water-soluble organic compounds from water. In this method, adding a large amount of salt to the aqueous solution forces the organic compound out of the aqueous phase. However, the method can not be considered sustainable because it creates highly salty water. A greener alternative would be a method that allows reversible salting out. Herein, we describe aqueous solutions of switchable ionic strength. Aqueous solutions of a diamine in water have essentially zero ionic strength but are converted by CO(2) into solutions of high ionic strength. The change is reversible. Application to the reversible salting out of THF from water is described.

  20. Effect of ionic strength and presence of serum on lipoplexes structure monitorized by FRET

    PubMed Central

    Madeira, Catarina; Loura, Luís MS; Prieto, Manuel; Fedorov, Aleksander; Aires-Barros, M Raquel

    2008-01-01

    Background Serum and high ionic strength solutions constitute important barriers to cationic lipid-mediated intravenous gene transfer. Preparation or incubation of lipoplexes in these media results in alteration of their biophysical properties, generally leading to a decrease in transfection efficiency. Accurate quantification of these changes is of paramount importance for the success of lipoplex-mediated gene transfer in vivo. Results In this work, a novel time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) methodology was used to monitor lipoplex structural changes in the presence of phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) and fetal bovine serum. 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP)/pDNA lipoplexes, prepared in high and low ionic strength solutions, are compared in terms of complexation efficiency. Lipoplexes prepared in PBS show lower complexation efficiencies when compared to lipoplexes prepared in low ionic strength buffer followed by addition of PBS. Moreover, when serum is added to the referred formulation no significant effect on the complexation efficiency was observed. In physiological saline solutions and serum, a multilamellar arrangement of the lipoplexes is maintained, with reduced spacing distances between the FRET probes, relative to those in low ionic strength medium. Conclusion The time-resolved FRET methodology described in this work allowed us to monitor stability and characterize quantitatively the structural changes (variations in interchromophore spacing distances and complexation efficiencies) undergone by DOTAP/DNA complexes in high ionic strength solutions and in presence of serum, as well as to determine the minimum amount of potentially cytotoxic cationic lipid necessary for complete coverage of DNA. This constitutes essential information regarding thoughtful design of future in vivo applications. PMID:18302788

  1. Mechanistic Study of Electroosmotic Transport Across Hydrated Nail Plates: Effects of pH and Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    HAO, JINSONG; LI, S. KEVIN

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of pH and ionic strength on electroosmotic transport in transungual iontophoresis. Transungual iontophoretic transport of model neutral permeants mannitol (MA) and urea (UR) across fully hydrated human nail plates in phosphate-buffered saline of different pH and ionic strengths were investigated in vitro. Two protocols were involved in the transport experiments with each protocol divided into stages including passive and iontophoresis transport at 0.1 and/or 0.3 mA. Nail plate electrical resistance and water uptake of nail clippings were measured at various pH and ionic strengths. In the pH study, electroosmosis enhanced the anodal transport of MA at pH 9 and cathodal transport at pH 3. The Peclet numbers of MA were more than two times higher than those of UR under these conditions. No significant electroosmosis enhancement was observed for MA and UR at pH 5. In the ionic strength study, a decrease in solution ionic strength from 0.7 to 0.04 M enhanced electroosmotic transport. Nail electrical resistance increased with decreasing the ionic strength of the equilibrating solution, but reached a plateau when the ionic strength was less than approximately 0.07 M. Solution pH and ionic strength had no significant effect on nail hydration. Under the studied pH and ionic strength conditions, the effects of electroosmosis were small compared to the direct-field effects in transungual iontophoretic transport of small to moderate size permeants. PMID:18386836

  2. Behavior of colloidal gold nanoparticles in different ionic strength media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreto, Ângela; Luis, Luis G.; Girão, Ana V.; Trindade, Tito; Soares, Amadeu M. V. M.; Oliveira, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    The increased applications of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) may lead to environmental release and transport to estuarine environments where NPs are expected to aggregate/agglomerate with increasing ionic strength. However, more stable NPs that may be resistant to high ionic strength media and more dispersed in the aquatic environment are being synthesized. Thus, understanding colloidal NPs' behavior in different ionic strength media is crucial for the assessment of the consequences of their environmental release. This work assessed the behavior of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), with diverse sizes and coatings, in media with different ionic strengths (from biological buffers to artificial seawater). Overall, in biological buffers and artificial seawater, citrate-coated AuNPs were unstable, displaying significantly increased sizes (between 100 and 400 nm), whereas no significant alterations (less than 5 % oscillation) were found for AuNPs with other coatings (bovine serum albumin, polyvinylpyrrolidone, and polyethylene glycol). Data suggest that coated AuNPs, and probably other NPs, may be dispersed in the environment from freshwater to estuarine systems.

  3. The Concept of Ionic Strength Eighty Years after Its Introduction in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manuel E. Sastre de Vicente

    2004-01-01

    Some comments on the relationship of ionic strength to macroscopic concepts such as thermodynamic quantities and microscopic ones such as molecule size are presented. The meaning of ionic strength is also reviewed.

  4. Human fibrinogen monolayers on latex particles: role of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Bratek-Skicki, Anna; Żeliszewska, Paulina; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Cieśla, Michał

    2013-03-19

    The adsorption of human serum fibrinogen on polystyrene latex particles was studied using the microelectrophoretic and concentration depletion methods. Measurements were carried out for pH 3.5 and an ionic strength range of 10(-3) to 0.15 M NaCl. The electrophoretic mobility of latex was determined as a function of the amount of adsorbed fibrinogen (surface concentration). A monotonic increase in the electrophoretic mobility (zeta potential) of the latex was observed, indicating a significant adsorption of fibrinogen on latex for all ionic strengths. No changes in the latex mobility were observed for prolonged time periods, suggesting the irreversibility of fibrinogen adsorption. The maximum coverage of fibrinogen on latex particles was precisely determined using the depletion method. The residual protein concentration after making contact with latex particles was determined by electrokinetic measurements and AFM imaging where the surface coverage of fibrinogen on mica was quantitatively determined. The maximum fibrinogen coverage increased monotonically with ionic strength from 1.8 mg m(-2) for 10(-3) M NaCl to 3.6 mg m(-2) for 0.15 M NaCl. The increase in the maximum coverage was interpreted in terms of the reduced electrostatic repulsion among adsorbed fibrinogen molecules. The experimental data agree with theoretical simulations made by assuming a 3D unoriented adsorption of fibrinogen. The stability of fibrinogen monolayers on latex was also determined in ionic strength cycling experiments. It was revealed that cyclic variations in NaCl concentration between 10(-3) and 0.15 M induced no changes in the latex electrophoretic mobility, suggesting that there were no irreversible molecule orientation changes in the monolayers. On the basis of these experimental data, a robust procedure of preparing fibrinogen monolayers on latex particles of well-controlled coverage was proposed.

  5. Derivation of a benchmark for freshwater ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Susan M; Suter, Glenn W; Zheng, Lei

    2013-02-01

    Because increased ionic strength has caused deleterious ecological changes in freshwater streams, thresholds for effects are needed to inform resource-management decisions. In particular, effluents from surface coal mining raise the ionic strength of receiving streams. The authors developed an aquatic life benchmark for specific conductance as a measure of ionic strength that is expected to prevent the local extirpation of 95% of species from neutral to alkaline waters containing a mixture of dissolved ions in which the mass of SO (4)2- + HCO (3)- ≥ Cl(-). Extirpation concentrations of specific conductance were estimated from the presence and absence of benthic invertebrate genera from 2,210 stream samples in West Virginia. The extirpation concentration is the 95th percentile of the distribution of the probability of occurrence of a genus with respect to specific conductance. In a region with a background of 116 µS/cm, the 5th percentile of the species sensitivity distribution of extirpation concentrations for 163 genera is 300 µS/cm. Because the benchmark is not protective of all genera and protects against extirpation rather than reduction in abundance, this level may not fully protect sensitive species or higher-quality, exceptional waters. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  6. Media ionic strength impacts embryonic responses to engineered nanoparticle exposure

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Lisa; Zaikova, Tatiana; Richman, Erik K.; Hutchison, James E.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic zebrafish were used to assess the impact of solution ion concentrations on agglomeration and resulting in vivo biological responses of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The minimum ion concentration necessary to support embryonic development was determined. Surprisingly, zebrafish exhibit no adverse outcomes when raised in nearly ion-free media. During a rapid throughput screening of AuNPs, 1.2-nm 3-mercaptopropionic acid-functionalized AuNPs (1.2-nm 3-MPA-AuNPs) rapidly agglomerate in exposure solutions. When embryos were exposed to 1.2-nm 3-MPA-AuNPs dispersed in low ionic media, both morbidity and mortality were induced, but when suspended in high ionic media, there was little to no biological response. We demonstrated that the media ionic strength greatly affects agglomeration rates and biological responses. Most importantly, the insensitivity of the zebrafish embryo to external ions indicates that it is possible, and necessary, to adjust the exposure media conditions to optimize NP dispersion prior to assessment. PMID:21809903

  7. Formation of polyelectrolyte multilayers: ionic strengths and growth regimes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kan; Besseling, Nicolaas A M

    2016-01-28

    This article presents a study of layer-by-layer (LbL) formation of poly-electrolyte multilayers (PEMs). Upon increasing ionic strength LbL growth patterns vary from linear for the lowest salt concentrations ([NaCl] = 0, 0.001, and 0.01 M) to exponential (for [NaCl] = 0.5 and 1 M). The slope of the linear growth at the lowest ionic strengths increases with increasing [NaCl]. During the LbL process at 0.5 M NaCl we observe a cross over from exponential to linear growth for which the slope is orders of magnitude larger than those observed at low salt concentrations. We provide a comprehensive interpretation of these growth behaviors, which are also reported for many other LbL PEM systems, based on the generic features of the phase diagram of aqueous solutions of mixtures of oppositely charged poly-electrolytes. Processes occurring in LbL formation of PEMs can be understood as moving in the direction of equilibrium, while never achieving it. The experimental model system in this study was: polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride/polystyrene sulfonate (PDADMAC/PSS). PEM formation was followed in situ by optical reflectometry in combination with well-controlled transport conditions (impinging jet stagnation point flow).

  8. SORPTION OF CU AND ZN TO KAOLINITE AND IRON OXIDE: EFFECTS OF HUMIC ACID AND IONIC STRENGTH AND IMPLICATIONS FOR STORMWATER RUNOFF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heavy metals are common pollutants in wet weather flows and urban waterways. Changes in ionic strength, whether from mixing with saline waters, road salt, or from the large osmotic adjustment needed for the Microtox toxicity assay, affect the aqueous chemistry of stormwater runof...

  9. SORPTION OF CU AND ZN TO KAOLINITE AND IRON OXIDE: EFFECTS OF HUMIC ACID AND IONIC STRENGTH AND IMPLICATIONS FOR STORMWATER RUNOFF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heavy metals are common pollutants in wet weather flows and urban waterways. Changes in ionic strength, whether from mixing with saline waters, road salt, or from the large osmotic adjustment needed for the Microtox toxicity assay, affect the aqueous chemistry of stormwater runof...

  10. Transient streaming potentials under varying pore-water ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malama, B.

    2014-12-01

    Streaming potentials (SP) are generated when polar fluids such as groundwater flow through porous media that have charged mineral surfaces. This is due to the flow-shearing of the diffuse layer of the electric double layer (EDL), which is known to form in the fluid phase at the fluid-rock interface. Previous works have suggested that the EDL vanishes at high pore-fluid ionic strengths resulting in vanishing SP signals. However, recent observations in sea-water intrusion applications by Jackson and coworkers indicate that measurable SP signals are obtainable in flows of fluids with high ionic strengths through silica sand. We demonstrate the repeatability of these observations through a series of laboratory flow experiments performed on 98% silica sand in a falling-head permeameter with brines of concentrations ranging from 0.001M to about 5 M NaCl. The results of the experiments, which clearly show measurable SP signals even at the highest concentration of 5 M NaCl, are reported. They are also used to estimate the hydraulic conductivity and electrokinetic coupling coefficient. The linearity assumption for the relation between pressure and SP differentials is evaluated for high pore-water NaCl concentrations. Additionally, displacement of one brine by another of different NaCl concentration yields dramatic transient SP responses that may be harnessed in the development of early-detection/warning technologies for sea-water intrusion applications. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S Department of Energy.

  11. The Effect of Ionic Strength on the Solubility of an Electrolyte

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    2004-01-01

    A simple experiment was conducted for studying and demonstrating visually and dramatically the effect of ionic strength on the solubility of an electrolyte is described. It is seen that the experiment visually illustrates the effect of ionic strength on electrolyte solubility by the appearance of the two solutions and by the difference in the…

  12. Ionic Strength-Induced Formation of Smectite Quasicrystals Enhances Nitroaromatic Compound Sorption

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The influence of ionic strength on nitroaromatic compound sorption from water by K+- and Ca2+-saturated smectite (SWy-2) was examined. The results indicated that sorption of 1,3-dinitrobenzene by K-SWy-2 increased up to 2.2 times as KCl ionic strength increased from 0.01 to 0.30 M. In contrast, sorp...

  13. A role of ionic strength on the inotropic effects of osmolarity change in frog atrium.

    PubMed

    Ohba, M

    1984-01-01

    The influence of varying the ionic strength of the bathing solution on the contraction of chemically skinned frog atrial muscle fibers was studied. The rate of tension development activated by calcium slows as the ionic strength is elevated. The size of caffeine contracture, however, was larger in the fiber preloaded with calcium at a higher ionic strength. There was a decrease in the maintained tension at 10(-6) M Ca when a fiber was bathed in a high ionic strength solution. Returning to a normal ionic strength solution caused a transient tension increase. When the fiber was bathed in a low ionic strength solution, the maintained tension increased transiently to a high value and then declined to reach a plateau. The response was also observed in a solution of pCa 8. In the caffeine-treated fiber or in the fiber bathed in ATP free solution, although the maintained tension level was changed corresponding to the altered ionic strength, the transient responses were blocked. These responses were not much influenced by the kinds of salts used to change the ionic strength. When osmolarity of the medium was altered by sucrose, transient responses were not induced. The results could qualitatively explain the isometric tension change of an intact fiber of frog atrium bathed in a hyper- or hypotonic solution.

  14. The Effect of Ionic Strength on the Solubility of an Electrolyte

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    2004-01-01

    A simple experiment was conducted for studying and demonstrating visually and dramatically the effect of ionic strength on the solubility of an electrolyte is described. It is seen that the experiment visually illustrates the effect of ionic strength on electrolyte solubility by the appearance of the two solutions and by the difference in the…

  15. Prokaryotic Community Structure Driven by Salinity and Ionic Concentrations in Plateau Lakes of the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Miao, Li-Li; Wang, Fang; Chu, Li-Min; Wang, Jia-Li; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2016-01-08

    well as whole communities along gradients of salinity and ionic concentrations.

  16. Prokaryotic Community Structure Driven by Salinity and Ionic Concentrations in Plateau Lakes of the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Miao, Li-Li; Wang, Fang; Chu, Li-Min; Wang, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    communities along gradients of salinity and ionic concentrations. PMID:26746713

  17. Effects of ionic strength on membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyuan; Zhang, Meijia; Peng, Wei; He, Yiming; Lin, Hongjun; Chen, Jianrong; Hong, Huachang; Wang, Aijun; Yu, Haiying

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the effects of ionic strength on membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) were investigated. Ionic strength in range of 0.005-0.05mol/L exerted no apparent impacts on the resistance of virgin membrane, fouled membrane and pore clogging. Thermodynamic analysis showed existences of a secondary energy minimum and an energy barrier in the process of the sludge flocs approaching to membrane surface. Increase in ionic strength could significantly reduce the energy barrier. It was revealed that there existed a critical ionic strength above that the energy barrier would disappear, facilitating adhesion of the foulants. Cake resistance was not significantly affected by the ionic strength, but highly depended on SMP in supernatant. The high cake resistance caused by SMP could be explained by the osmotic pressure mechanism. The obtained results provided new insights into membrane fouling in MBRs.

  18. Silver nanoparticle aggregation not triggered by an ionic strength mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botasini, Santiago; Méndez, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    The synthesis of stable colloidal solutions of silver nanoparticles is a major goal in the industry to control their fate in aqueous solutions. The present work studies 10-20-nm silver nanoparticle aggregation triggered by the presence of chloride ions. The aggregation process was followed by UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. We found that the mechanism involved differs from the classic explanation of nanoparticle aggregation triggered by an increase in the ionic strength. Moreover, our results give evidence that even when nanoparticles are resistant to an increment of the total amount of ions, the formation of insoluble salts in the vicinity of the nanoparticle is enough to induce the aggregation. The presence of silver chloride around the silver nanoparticles was documented by an X-ray diffraction pattern and electrochemical methods because chloride anions are ubiquitous in real media; this alternative process jeopardized the development of many applications with silver nanoparticles that depend on the use of stable colloids.

  19. Ionic Strength Is a Barrier to the Habitability of Mars.

    PubMed

    Fox-Powell, Mark G; Hallsworth, John E; Cousins, Claire R; Cockell, Charles S

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic availability of water (water activity) strictly limits microbial propagation on Earth, particularly in hypersaline environments. A considerable body of evidence indicates the existence of hypersaline surface waters throughout the history of Mars; therefore it is assumed that, as on Earth, water activity is a major limiting factor for martian habitability. However, the differing geological histories of Earth and Mars have driven variations in their respective aqueous geochemistry, with as-yet-unknown implications for habitability. Using a microbial community enrichment approach, we investigated microbial habitability for a suite of simulated martian brines. While the habitability of some martian brines was consistent with predictions made from water activity, others were uninhabitable even when the water activity was biologically permissive. We demonstrate experimentally that high ionic strength, driven to extremes on Mars by the ubiquitous occurrence of multivalent ions, renders these environments uninhabitable despite the presence of biologically available water. These findings show how the respective geological histories of Earth and Mars, which have produced differences in the planets' dominant water chemistries, have resulted in different physicochemical extremes which define the boundary space for microbial habitability. Habitability-Mars-Salts-Water activity-Life in extreme environments. Astrobiology 16, 427-442.

  20. Ionic Strength Is a Barrier to the Habitability of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Powell, Mark G.; Hallsworth, John E.; Cousins, Claire R.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic availability of water (water activity) strictly limits microbial propagation on Earth, particularly in hypersaline environments. A considerable body of evidence indicates the existence of hypersaline surface waters throughout the history of Mars; therefore it is assumed that, as on Earth, water activity is a major limiting factor for martian habitability. However, the differing geological histories of Earth and Mars have driven variations in their respective aqueous geochemistry, with as-yet-unknown implications for habitability. Using a microbial community enrichment approach, we investigated microbial habitability for a suite of simulated martian brines. While the habitability of some martian brines was consistent with predictions made from water activity, others were uninhabitable even when the water activity was biologically permissive. We demonstrate experimentally that high ionic strength, driven to extremes on Mars by the ubiquitous occurrence of multivalent ions, renders these environments uninhabitable despite the presence of biologically available water. These findings show how the respective geological histories of Earth and Mars, which have produced differences in the planets' dominant water chemistries, have resulted in different physicochemical extremes which define the boundary space for microbial habitability.

  1. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, J. J.; Sosnick, T. R.; Freed, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other.

  2. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, J. J.; Sosnick, T. R.; Freed, K. F.

    2014-12-14

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other.

  3. Electrostatic interactions of colloidal particles at vanishing ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Sainis, Sunil K; Merrill, Jason W; Dufresne, Eric R

    2008-12-02

    Electrostatic interactions of colloidal particles are typically screened by mobile ions in the solvent. We measure the forces between isolated pairs of colloidal polymer microspheres as the density of bulk ions vanishes. The ionic strength is controlled by varying the concentration of surfactant (NaAOT) in a nonpolar solvent (hexadecane). While interactions are well-described by the familiar screened-Coulomb form at high surfactant concentrations, they are experimentally indistinguishable from bare Coulomb interactions at low surfactant concentration. Interactions are strongest just above the critical micelle concentration, where particles can obtain high surface potentials without significant screening, kappaa < 1. Exploiting the absence of significant charge renormalization, we are able to construct a simple thermodynamic model capturing the role of reverse micelles in charging the particle surface. These measurements provide novel access to electrostatic forces in the limit where the particle size is much less than the screening length, which is relevant not just to the nonpolar suspensions described here, but also to aqueous suspensions of nanoparticles.

  4. Ionic Effects on Supercritical CO2-Brine Interfacial Tensions: Molecular Dynamics Simulations and a Universal Correlation with Ionic Strength, Temperature, and Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lingling; Ji, Jiayuan; Tao, Lu; Lin, Shangchao

    2016-09-13

    For geological CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers, the interfacial tension (IFT) between supercritical CO2 and brine is critical for the storage security and design of the storage capacitance. However, currently, no predictive model exists to determine the IFT of supercritical CO2 against complex electrolyte solutions involving various mixed salt species at different concentrations and compositions. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the effect of salt ions on the incremental IFT at the supercritical CO2-brine interface with respect to that at the reference supercritical CO2-water interface. Supercritical CO2-NaCl solution, CO2-CaCl2 solution and CO2-(NaCl+CaCl2) mixed solution systems are simulated at 343 K and 20 MPa under different salinities and salt compositions. We find that the valence of the cations is the primary contributor to the variation in IFT, while the Lennard-Jones potentials for the cations pose a smaller impact on the IFT. Interestingly, the incremental IFT exhibits a general linear correlation with the ionic strength in the above three electrolyte systems, and the slopes are almost identical and independent of the solution types. Based on this finding, a universal predictive formula for IFTs of CO2-complex electrolyte solution systems is established, as a function of ionic strength, temperature, and pressure. The predicted IFTs using the established formula agree perfectly (with a high statistical confidence level of ∼96%) with a wide range of experimental data for CO2 interfacing with different electrolyte solutions, such as those involving MgCl2 and Na2SO4. This work provides an efficient and accurate route to directly predict IFTs in supercritical CO2-complex electrolyte solution systems for practical engineering applications, such as geological CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers and other interfacial systems involving complex electrolyte solutions.

  5. Ionic strength assay via polyacrylate-ferriferrous oxide magnetic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Ran; Sun, Ye; Wang, He-Fang

    2015-05-21

    Convenient reading out and/or determination of ionic strength (IS) is of great significance for both scientific research and real life applications. We presented here a novel method for the rapid and sensitive IS assay based on the electrolyte-induced sensitive wavelength blueshifts of the reflection spectra of polyacrylate capped Fe3O4 magnetic photonic crystals (PA-Fe3O4-MPCs). For HCl, MgSO4 and the common electrolytes corresponding to the salinity of seawater (including NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, CaCl2, Na2SO4 and their mixtures), the PA-Fe3O4-MPCs displayed wavelength blueshifts identical to the total IS of the aqueous solutions, regardless of the kind of above-mentioned electrolytes in the solutions. Besides, the PA-Fe3O4-MPCs exhibited relatively high sensitivity (an average of 294 nm L mmol(-1) in the range of 0.05-0.30 mmol L(-1), and an even higher value of 386 nm L mmol(-1) at 0.05-0.15 mmol L(-1)) and fast response (within 8 s) to the IS of aqueous solutions. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for IS (NaCl, 0.1 mmol L(-1)) was 4.4% (n = 5). The developed method was applied to determine the salinity of seawater samples, and the determined results were validated by the traditional standard chlorinity titration and electric conductimetry method. The recoveries were in the range of 92-104%. The proposed PA-Fe3O4-MPCs based reflectometry method would have great potential for IS and salinity assays.

  6. High-performance ionic diode membrane for salinity gradient power generation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Guo, Wei; Feng, Dan; Wang, Huanting; Zhao, Dongyuan; Jiang, Lei

    2014-09-03

    Salinity difference between seawater and river water is a sustainable energy resource that catches eyes of the public and the investors in the background of energy crisis. To capture this energy, interdisciplinary efforts from chemistry, materials science, environmental science, and nanotechnology have been made to create efficient and economically viable energy conversion methods and materials. Beyond conventional membrane-based processes, technological breakthroughs in harvesting salinity gradient power from natural waters are expected to emerge from the novel fluidic transport phenomena on the nanoscale. A major challenge toward real-world applications is to extrapolate existing single-channel devices to macroscopic materials. Here, we report a membrane-scale nanofluidic device with asymmetric structure, chemical composition, and surface charge polarity, termed ionic diode membrane (IDM), for harvesting electric power from salinity gradient. The IDM comprises heterojunctions between mesoporous carbon (pore size ∼7 nm, negatively charged) and macroporous alumina (pore size ∼80 nm, positively charged). The meso-/macroporous membrane rectifies the ionic current with distinctly high ratio of ca. 450 and keeps on rectifying in high-concentration electrolytes, even in saturated solution. The selective and rectified ion transport furthermore sheds light on salinity-gradient power generation. By mixing artificial seawater and river water through the IDM, substantially high power density of up to 3.46 W/m(2) is discovered, which largely outperforms some commercial ion-exchange membranes. A theoretical model based on coupled Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations is established to quantitatively explain the experimental observations and get insights into the underlying mechanism. The macroscopic and asymmetric nanofluidic structure anticipates wide potentials for sustainable power generation, water purification, and desalination.

  7. Phagocytosis by Acanthamoeba castellanii: ionic strength dependence of the probability of cell attachment; ingestion and contact seam morphology.

    PubMed

    Obaray, N; Coakley, W T.

    2001-10-01

    The phagocytosis of glutaraldehyde-fixed horse erythrocytes by Acanthamoeba castellanii has been examined in iso-osmolal phosphate buffered saline/sucrose suspending phases of ionic strength, I, ranging from 0.17 to 0.0017. The erythrocytes were exposed, at a ratio of 15:1, to 5x10(6) amoeba in 0.2 ml volumes. The average number of erythrocytes forming a contact with an amoeba over 30 min (T(30)) was well described by T(30)=5.2 exp(-0.112xI(-0.5)). The index of the exponential 'probability of attachment' term may also be expressed in terms of either surface potential (psi(0)) or the Debye length (kappa(-1)). The probability term is formally similar to a Bolzmann factor. Electron microscopy showed that contact spreading of the amoeba over the erythrocyte took place by formation of discrete contacts and that the lateral separation distance between contacts was 0.66, 1.36 and 1.59 &mgr;m for ionic strengths 0.17, 0.052 and 0.0017, respectively. The direction of change in lateral contact separation distance was consistent with published changes in focal contact separation when amoeba move over glass or when human erythrocyte-erythrocyte adhesion occurs in different ionic strength media. The direction was also consistent with interfacial instability theory predictions for the dependence of localised membrane contact formation on interaction potential. The proportion of attached cells that were subsequently ingested correlated more strongly with the number of contacts formed along the cell-cell contact region (seam) than with the seam length at different ionic strengths.

  8. Modeling colloid and microorganism transport and release with transients in solution ionic strength

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The transport and fate of colloids, microorganisms, and nanoparticles in subsurface environments is strongly influenced by transients in solution ionic strength (IS). A sophisticated dual-permeability transport model that is capable of simulating exponential, hyperexponential, uniform, and nonmonot...

  9. Agarose gel structure using atomic force microscopy: gel concentration and ionic strength effects.

    PubMed

    Maaloum, M; Pernodet, N; Tinland, B

    1998-07-01

    Agarose gels have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experiments were especially designed to work in aqueous conditions, allowing direct observation of the "unperturbed" gel without invasive treatment. AFM images clearly show strong dependence of pore diameter and its distribution on ionic strength of the solvent. As the ionic strength increases, the distribution becomes broader and the position of its maximum shifts toward higher values. The evolution of the distribution curves indicates that gels become more homogeneous with decreasing Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) buffer concentration. An empirical law of the mean pore diameter as a function of the ionic strength is established. In agreement with our previous work we found that, for a given ionic strength, the pore diameter increases when the agarose concentration decreases and that the wide pore diameter distribution narrows as the gel concentration increases.

  10. Ionic strength dependent vesicle adsorption and phase behavior of anionic phospholipids on a gold substrate.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Sumit Kumar; Seneca, Senne; Ethirajan, Anitha; Neupane, Shova; Renner, Frank Uwe; Losada-Pérez, Patricia

    2016-03-08

    The authors report on the effect of ionic strength on the formation of supported vesicle layers of anionic phospholipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-glycerol (DMPG) and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS) onto gold. Using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring the authors show that vesicle adsorption is mainly governed by NaCl concentration, reflecting the importance of electrostatic interactions in anionic lipids, as compared to zwitterionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. At low ionic strength, low or no adsorption is observed as a result of vesicle-vesicle electrostatic repulsion. At medium ionic strength, the negative charges of DMPG and DMPS are screened resulting in larger adsorption and a highly dissipative intact vesicle layer. In addition, DMPS exhibits a peculiar behavior at high ionic strength that depends on the temperature of the process.

  11. Determination of electroosmotic and electrophoretic mobility of DNA and dyes in low ionic strength solutions.

    PubMed

    Lallman, Joshua; Flaugh, Rachel; Kounovsky-Shafer, Kristy L

    2017-08-23

    Nanocoding, a genome analysis platform, relies on very low ionic strength conditions to elongate DNA molecules up to 1.06 (fully stretched DNA = 1). Understanding how electroosmotic and electrophoretic forces vary, as ionic strength decreases, will enable better Nanocoding devices, or other genome analysis platforms, to be developed. Using gel electrophoresis to determine overall mobility (includes contributions from electrophoretic and electroosmotic forces) in different ionic strength conditions, linear DNA molecules (pUC19 (2.7 kb), pBR322 (4.4 kb), ΦX174 (5.4 kb), and PSNAPf-H2B (6.2 kb)) were analyzed in varying gel concentrations (1.50, 1.25, 1.00, 0.75, and 0.50%). Additionally, buffer concentration (Tris-EDTA, TE) was varied to determine free solution mobility at different ionic strength solutions. As ionic strength decreased from 13.8 to 7.3 mM, overall mobility increased. As TE buffer decreased (< 7.3 mM), overall mobility drastically decreased as ionic strength decreased. Rhodamine B dye was utilized to determine the electroosmotic mobility. As the ionic strength decreased, electroosmotic mobility increased. The experimental electrophoretic mobility was compared to theoretical considerations for electrophoretic mobility (Pitts and Debye-Hückel-Onsager). Electroosmotic forces decreased the overall mobility of DNA molecules and bromophenol blue migration in a gel matrix as ionic strength decreased. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Intranasal M cell uptake of nanoparticles is independently influenced by targeting ligands and buffer ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Rajapaksa, Thejani E; Bennett, Kaila M; Hamer, Mary; Lytle, Christian; Rodgers, Victor G J; Lo, David D

    2010-07-30

    In mucosal tissues, epithelial M cells capture and transport microbes across the barrier to underlying immune cells. Previous studies suggested that high affinity ligands targeting M cells may be used to deliver mucosal vaccines; here, we show that particle composition and dispersion buffer ionic strength can independently influence their uptake in vivo. First, addition of a poloxamer 188 to nanoparticle formulations increased uptake of intranasally administered nanoparticles in vivo, but the effect was dependent on the presence of the M cell-targeting ligand. Second, solvent ionic strength is known to effect electrostatic interactions; accordingly, reduced ionic strength increased the electrostatic potential between the epithelium and the particles. Interestingly, below a critical ionic strength, intranasal particle uptake in vivo significantly was increased even when controlled for osmolarity. Similar results were obtained for uptake of bacterial particles. Surprisingly, at low ionic strength, the specific enhancement effect by the targeting peptide was negligible. Modeling of the electrostatic forces predicted that the enhancing effects of the M cell-targeting ligand only are enabled at high ionic strength, as particle electrostatic forces are reduced through Debye screening. Thus, electrostatic forces can have a dramatic effect on the in vivo M cell particle uptake independent of the action of targeting ligands. Examination of these forces will be helpful to optimizing mucosal vaccine and drug delivery.

  13. Transport of ferrihydrite nanoparticles in saturated porous media: role of ionic strength and flow rate.

    PubMed

    Tosco, Tiziana; Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2012-04-03

    The use of nanoscale ferrihydrite particles, which are known to effectively enhance microbial degradation of a wide range of contaminants, represents a promising technology for in situ remediation of contaminated aquifers. Thanks to their small size, ferrihydrite nanoparticles can be dispersed in water and directly injected into the subsurface to create reactive zones where contaminant biodegradation is promoted. Field applications would require a detailed knowledge of ferrihydrite transport mechanisms in the subsurface, but such studies are lacking in the literature. The present study is intended to fill this gap, focusing in particular on the influence of flow rate and ionic strength on particle mobility. Column tests were performed under constant or transient ionic strength, including injection of ferrihydrite colloidal dispersions, followed by flushing with particle-free electrolyte solutions. Particle mobility was greatly affected by the salt concentration, and particle retention was almost irreversible under typical salt content in groundwater. Experimental results indicate that, for usual ionic strength in European aquifers (2 to 5 mM), under natural flow condition ferrihydrite nanoparticles are likely to be transported for 5 to 30 m. For higher ionic strength, corresponding to contaminated aquifers, (e.g., 10 mM) the travel distance decreases to few meters. A simple relationship is proposed for the estimation of travel distance with changing flow rate and ionic strength. For future applications to aquifer remediation, ionic strength and injection rate can be used as tuning parameters to control ferrihydrite mobility in the subsurface and therefore the radius of influence during field injections.

  14. Effects of Ionic Strength on Passive and Iontophoretic Transport of Cationic Permeant Across Human Nail

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kelly A.; Hao, Jinsong; Li, S. Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Transport across the human nail under hydration can be modeled as hindered transport across aqueous pore pathways. As such, nail permselectivity to charged species can be manipulated by changing the ionic strength of the system in transungual delivery to treat nail diseases. The present study investigated the effects of ionic strength upon transungual passive and iontophoretic transport. Methods Transungual passive and anodal iontophoretic transport experiments of tetraethylammonium ion (TEA) were conducted under symmetric conditions in which the donor and receiver had the same ionic strength in vitro. Experiments under asymmetric conditions were performed to mimic the in vivo conditions. Prior to the transport studies, TEA uptake studies were performed to assess the partitioning of TEA into the nail. Results Permselectivity towards TEA was inversely related to ionic strength in both passive and iontophoretic transport. The permeability and transference number of TEA were higher at lower ionic strengths under the symmetric conditions due to increased partitioning of TEA into the nail. Transference numbers were smaller under the asymmetric conditions compared with their symmetric counterparts. Conclusions The results demonstrate significant ionic strength effects upon the partitioning and transport of a cationic permeant in transungual transport, which may be instrumental in the development of transungual delivery systems. PMID:19267187

  15. Effects of ionic strength on passive and iontophoretic transport of cationic permeant across human nail.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kelly A; Hao, Jinsong; Li, S Kevin

    2009-06-01

    Transport across the human nail under hydration can be modeled as hindered transport across aqueous pore pathways. As such, nail permselectivity to charged species can be manipulated by changing the ionic strength of the system in transungual delivery to treat nail diseases. The present study investigated the effects of ionic strength upon transungual passive and iontophoretic transport. Transungual passive and anodal iontophoretic transport experiments of tetraethylammonium ion (TEA) were conducted under symmetric conditions in which the donor and receiver had the same ionic strength in vitro. Experiments under asymmetric conditions were performed to mimic the in vivo conditions. Prior to the transport studies, TEA uptake studies were performed to assess the partitioning of TEA into the nail. Permselectivity towards TEA was inversely related to ionic strength in both passive and iontophoretic transport. The permeability and transference number of TEA were higher at lower ionic strengths under the symmetric conditions due to increased partitioning of TEA into the nail. Transference numbers were smaller under the asymmetric conditions compared with their symmetric counterparts. The results demonstrate significant ionic strength effects upon the partitioning and transport of a cationic permeant in transungual transport, which may be instrumental in the development of transungual delivery systems.

  16. Changes in the standard transformed thermodynamic properties of enzyme-catalyzed reactions with ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Alberty, Robert A

    2007-04-12

    The ionic strength has significant effects on the thermodynamic properties of ionic species and on the transformed thermodynamic properties of biochemical reactants at specified pH values. These effects are discussed for species, reactants, and enzyme-catalyzed reactions. This has led to three new thermodynamic properties: (z(j)(2) - NH(j)), (z(2) - N(H))(i), and Delta(r)(z((2)-N(H)), which are referred to as ionic strength coefficients. The first of these is a property of a species, the second is a property of a reactant, and the third is the property of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The effects of ionic strength on standard thermodynamic properties of species, standard transformed thermodynamic properties of reactants, and standard transformed thermodynamic properties of enzyme-catalyzed reactions are proportional to these new thermodynamic properties.

  17. Cesium migration in saturated silica sand and Hanford sediments as impacted by ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Flury, Markus; Czigány, Szabolcs; Chen, Gang; Harsh, James B

    2004-07-01

    Large amounts of 137Cs have been accidentally released to the subsurface from the Hanford nuclear site in the state of Washington, USA. The cesium-containing liquids varied in ionic strengths, and often had high electrolyte contents, mainly in the form of NaNO3 and NaOH, reaching concentrations up to several moles per liter. In this study, we investigated the effect of ionic strengths on Cs migration through two types of porous media: silica sand and Hanford sediments. Cesium sorption and transport was studied in 1, 10, 100, and 1000 mM NaCl electrolyte solutions at pH 10. Sorption isotherms were constructed from batch equilibrium experiments and the batch-derived sorption parameters were compared with column breakthrough curves. Column transport experiments were analyzed with a two-site equilibrium-nonequilibrium model. Cesium sorption to the silica sand in batch experiments showed a linear sorption isotherm for all ionic strengths, which matched well with the results from the column experiments at 100 and 1000 mM ionic strength; however, the column experiments at 1 and 10 mM ionic strength indicated a nonlinear sorption behavior of Cs to the silica sand. Transport through silica sand occurred under one-site sorption and equilibrium conditions. Cesium sorption to Hanford sediments in both batch and column experiments was best described with a nonlinear Freundlich isotherm. The column experiments indicated that Cs transport in Hanford sediments occurred under two-site equilibrium and nonequilibrium sorption. The effect of ionic strength on Cs transport was much more pronounced in Hanford sediments than in silica sands. Effective retardation factors of Cs during transport through Hanford sediments were reduced by a factor of 10 when the ionic strength increased from 100 to 1000 mM; for silica sand, the effective retardation was reduced by a factor of 10 when ionic strength increased from 1 to 1000 mM. A two order of magnitude change in ionic strength was needed in

  18. Cesium migration in saturated silica sand and Hanford sediments as impacted by ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, Markus; Czigány, Szabolcs; Chen, Gang; Harsh, James B.

    2004-07-01

    Large amounts of 137Cs have been accidentally released to the subsurface from the Hanford nuclear site in the state of Washington, USA. The cesium-containing liquids varied in ionic strengths, and often had high electrolyte contents, mainly in the form of NaNO 3 and NaOH, reaching concentrations up to several moles per liter. In this study, we investigated the effect of ionic strengths on Cs migration through two types of porous media: silica sand and Hanford sediments. Cesium sorption and transport was studied in 1, 10, 100, and 1000 mM NaCl electrolyte solutions at pH 10. Sorption isotherms were constructed from batch equilibrium experiments and the batch-derived sorption parameters were compared with column breakthrough curves. Column transport experiments were analyzed with a two-site equilibrium-nonequilibrium model. Cesium sorption to the silica sand in batch experiments showed a linear sorption isotherm for all ionic strengths, which matched well with the results from the column experiments at 100 and 1000 mM ionic strength; however, the column experiments at 1 and 10 mM ionic strength indicated a nonlinear sorption behavior of Cs to the silica sand. Transport through silica sand occurred under one-site sorption and equilibrium conditions. Cesium sorption to Hanford sediments in both batch and column experiments was best described with a nonlinear Freundlich isotherm. The column experiments indicated that Cs transport in Hanford sediments occurred under two-site equilibrium and nonequilibrium sorption. The effect of ionic strength on Cs transport was much more pronounced in Hanford sediments than in silica sands. Effective retardation factors of Cs during transport through Hanford sediments were reduced by a factor of 10 when the ionic strength increased from 100 to 1000 mM; for silica sand, the effective retardation was reduced by a factor of 10 when ionic strength increased from 1 to 1000 mM. A two order of magnitude change in ionic strength was needed in

  19. Ionic strength-dependent changes in tentacular ion exchangers with variable ligand density. I. Structural properties.

    PubMed

    Bhambure, Rahul; Gillespie, Christopher M; Phillips, Michael; Graalfs, Heiner; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-09-09

    The ligand density critically affects the performance of ion-exchange resins in such measures as the adsorption capacity and transport characteristics. However, for tentacular and other polymer-modified exchangers, the mechanistic basis of the effect of ligand density on performance is not yet fully understood. In this study we map the ionic strength-dependent structural changes in tentacular cation exchangers with variable ligand densities as the basis for subsequent investigation of effects on functional properties. Inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to assess the effect of ionic strength on the pore size and intraparticle architecture of resin variants with different ligand densities. Comparison of ISEC and cryo-SEM results shows a considerable reduction in average pore size with increasing ligand density; these methods also confirm an increase of average pore size at higher ionic strengths. SAXS analysis of ionic strength-dependent conformational changes in the grafted polyelectrolyte layer shows a characteristic ionomer peak at values of the scattering vector q (0.1-0.2Å(-1)) that depend on the ligand density and the ionic strength of the solution. This peak attribution reflects nanoscale changes in the structure of the grafted polyelectrolyte chains that can in turn be responsible for observed pore-size changes in the resins. Finally, salt breakthrough experiments confirm a stronger Donnan exclusion effect on pore accessibility for small ions in the high ligand density variant.

  20. Nanoparticle transport in water-unsaturated porous media: effects of solution ionic strength and flow rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prédélus, Dieuseul; Lassabatere, Laurent; Louis, Cédric; Gehan, Hélène; Brichart, Thomas; Winiarski, Thierry; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the influence of ionic strength and flow on nanoparticle (NP) retention rate in an unsaturated calcareous medium, originating from a heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit of the region of Lyon (France). Laboratory columns 10 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length were used. Silica nanoparticles (Au-SiO2-FluoNPs), with hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 50 to 60 nm and labeled with fluorescein derivatives, were used to simulate particle transport, and bromide was used to characterize flow. Three flow rates and five different ionic strengths were tested. The transfer model based on fractionation of water into mobile and immobile fractions was coupled with the attachment/detachment model to fit NPs breakthrough curves. The results show that increasing flow velocity induces a decrease in nanoparticle retention, probably as the result of several physical but also geochemical factors. The results show that NPs retention increases with ionic strength. However, an inversion of retention occurs for ionic strength >5.10-2 M, which has been scarcely observed in previous studies. The measure of zeta potential and DLVO calculations show that NPs may sorb on both solid-water and air-water interfaces. NPs size distribution shows the potential for nanoparticle agglomeration mostly at low pH, leading to entrapment in the soil pores. These mechanisms are highly sensitive to both hydrodynamic and geochemical conditions, which explains their high sensitivity to flow rates and ionic strength.

  1. Ionic strength-dependent changes in tentacular ion exchangers with variable ligand density. II. Functional properties.

    PubMed

    Bhambure, Rahul; Angelo, James M; Gillespie, Christopher M; Phillips, Michael; Graalfs, Heiner; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2017-07-14

    The effect of ligand density was studied on protein adsorption and transport behavior in tentacular cation-exchange sorbents at different ionic strengths. Results were obtained for lysozyme, lactoferrin and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) in order to examine the effects of protein size and charge. The combination of ligand density and ionic strength results in extensive variability of the static and dynamic binding capacities, transport rate and binding affinity of the proteins. Uptake and elution experiments were performed to quantify the transport behavior of selected proteins, specifically to estimate intraparticle protein diffusivities. The observed trend of decreasing uptake diffusivities with an increase in ligand density was correlated to structural properties of the ligand-density variants, particularly the accessible porosity. Increasing the ionic strength of the equilibration buffer led to enhanced mass transfer during uptake, independent of the transport model used, and specifically for larger proteins like lactoferrin and mAb, the most significant effects were evident in the sorbent of the highest ligand density. For lysozyme, higher ligand density leads to higher static and dynamic binding capacities whereas for lactoferrin and the mAb, the binding capacity is a complex function of accessible porosity due to ionic strength-dependent changes. Ligand density has a less pronounced effect on the elution rate, presumably due to ionic strength-dependent changes in the pore architecture of the sorbents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Neptunium (V) Adsorption to a Halophilic Bacterium Under High Ionic Strength Conditions: A Surface Complexation Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ams, David A

    2012-06-11

    Rationale for experimental design: Np(V) -- important as analog for Pu(V) and for HLW scenarios; High ionic strength -- relevant to salt-based repositories such as the WIPP; Halophilic microorganisms -- representative of high ionic strength environments. For the first time showed: Significant adsorbant to halophilic microorganisms over entire pH range under high ionic strength conditions; Strong influence of ionic strength with increasing adsorption with increasing ionic strength (in contrast to trends of previous low ionic strength studies); Effect of aqueous Np(V) and bacterial surface site speciation on adsorption; and Developed thermodynamic models that can be incorporated into geochemical speciation models to aid in the prediction of the fate and transport of Np(V) in more complex systems.

  3. Ionic and osmotic relations in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) plants grown at various salinity levels.

    PubMed

    Hariadi, Yuda; Marandon, Karl; Tian, Yu; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik; Shabala, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Ionic and osmotic relations in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) were studied by exposing plants to six salinity levels (0-500 mM NaCl range) for 70 d. Salt stress was administered either by pre-mixing of the calculated amount of NaCl with the potting mix before seeds were planted or by the gradual increase of NaCl levels in the irrigation water. For both methods, the optimal plant growth and biomass was achieved between 100 mM and 200 mM NaCl, suggesting that quinoa possess a very efficient system to adjust osmotically for abrupt increases in NaCl stress. Up to 95% of osmotic adjustment in old leaves and between 80% and 85% of osmotic adjustment in young leaves was achieved by means of accumulation of inorganic ions (Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-)) at these NaCl levels, whilst the contribution of organic osmolytes was very limited. Consistently higher K(+) and lower Na(+) levels were found in young, as compared with old leaves, for all salinity treatments. The shoot sap K(+) progressively increased with increased salinity in old leaves; this is interpreted as evidence for the important role of free K(+) in leaf osmotic adjustment under saline conditions. A 5-fold increase in salinity level (from 100 mM to 500 mM) resulted in only a 50% increase in the sap Na(+) content, suggesting either a very strict control of xylem Na(+) loading or an efficient Na(+) removal from leaves. A very strong correlation between NaCl-induced K(+) and H(+) fluxes was observed in quinoa root, suggesting that a rapid NaCl-induced activation of H(+)-ATPase is needed to restore otherwise depolarized membrane potential and prevent further K(+) leak from the cytosol. Taken together, this work emphasizes the role of inorganic ions for osmotic adjustment in halophytes and calls for more in-depth studies of the mechanisms of vacuolar Na(+) sequestration, control of Na(+) and K(+) xylem loading, and their transport to the shoot.

  4. Ionic and osmotic relations in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) plants grown at various salinity levels

    PubMed Central

    Hariadi, Yuda; Marandon, Karl; Tian, Yu; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik; Shabala, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Ionic and osmotic relations in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) were studied by exposing plants to six salinity levels (0–500 mM NaCl range) for 70 d. Salt stress was administered either by pre-mixing of the calculated amount of NaCl with the potting mix before seeds were planted or by the gradual increase of NaCl levels in the irrigation water. For both methods, the optimal plant growth and biomass was achieved between 100 mM and 200 mM NaCl, suggesting that quinoa possess a very efficient system to adjust osmotically for abrupt increases in NaCl stress. Up to 95% of osmotic adjustment in old leaves and between 80% and 85% of osmotic adjustment in young leaves was achieved by means of accumulation of inorganic ions (Na+, K+, and Cl–) at these NaCl levels, whilst the contribution of organic osmolytes was very limited. Consistently higher K+ and lower Na+ levels were found in young, as compared with old leaves, for all salinity treatments. The shoot sap K+ progressively increased with increased salinity in old leaves; this is interpreted as evidence for the important role of free K+ in leaf osmotic adjustment under saline conditions. A 5-fold increase in salinity level (from 100 mM to 500 mM) resulted in only a 50% increase in the sap Na+ content, suggesting either a very strict control of xylem Na+ loading or an efficient Na+ removal from leaves. A very strong correlation between NaCl-induced K+ and H+ fluxes was observed in quinoa root, suggesting that a rapid NaCl-induced activation of H+-ATPase is needed to restore otherwise depolarized membrane potential and prevent further K+ leak from the cytosol. Taken together, this work emphasizes the role of inorganic ions for osmotic adjustment in halophytes and calls for more in-depth studies of the mechanisms of vacuolar Na+ sequestration, control of Na+ and K+ xylem loading, and their transport to the shoot. PMID:20732880

  5. Role of Heavy Meromyosin in Heat-Induced Gelation in Low Ionic Strength Solution Containing L-Histidine.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Toru; Yoshida, Yuri; Yasui, Masanori; Ito, Toshiaki; Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Hattori, Akihito; Nishimura, Takanori

    2015-08-01

    The gelation of myosin has a very important role in meat products. We have already shown that myosin in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine forms a transparent gel after heating. To clarify the mechanism of this unique gelation, we investigated the changes in the nature of myosin subfragments during heating in solutions with low and high ionic strengths with and without L-histidine. The hydrophobicity of myosin and heavy meromyosin (HMM) in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine was lower than in high ionic strength solution. The SH contents of myosin and HMM in low ionic strength solution containing l-histidine did not change during the heating process, whereas in high ionic strength solution they decreased slightly. The heat-induced globular masses of HMM in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine were smaller than those in high ionic strength solution. These findings suggested that the polymerization of HMM molecules by heating was suppressed in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine, resulting in formation of the unique gel. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Small angle neutron scattering studies of the structure of nucleosome cores at low ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mita, Kazuei; Zama, Mitsuo; Ichimura, Sachiko; Niimura, Nobuo; Kaji, Keisuke; Hirai, Mitsuhiro; Ishikawa, Yoshikazu

    1983-05-01

    The structure of the nucleosome core particle at low ionic strenth (10-0.04 mM Na +) has been studied by small angle neutron scattering in various H 2O/D 2O mixtures. At 0.04 mM Na +,the radius of gyration obtained at 39% D 2O where scattering from the DNA dominates was 32 Å, and at 65% D 2O where scattering from the histones dominates, 40 Å. An abrupt increase in the radius of gyration from 35 to 40 Å was observed at about 1 mM ionic strength at 65% D 2O, with decreasing the ionic strength from 10 mM. No loss of the histone secondary structure was detected by circular dichroism over the range of the ionic strength examined. These results suggest that at low ionic strength (⪅1 mM) the histones are located outside of the nucleosome core particle accompanied by an alteration of the tertiary and/or quaternary structure of the histone octamer, with the DNA in a folded conformation.

  7. Delineating Effects of Ionic Strength and Suspended Solids on Ammonia Volatilization from Dairy Manure Slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, K.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia emission is a major concern due to its adverse effects on animal and human health. Ionic strength and suspended solids play key roles in the ammonia volatilization process. These two parameters, however, are usually lumped together in form of total solids. The objective of this study was to separate the contribution of suspended solids (SS) from that of ionic strength (IS) on ammonia volatilization in liquid dairy manure. A two-way factorial experiment was conducted to simultaneously test the effects of IS and SS on ammonium dissociation: a key element of the ammonia volatilization process. The fraction of ammonia (β) in total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) was experimentally determined in a convective emission chamber, for each level of SS and IS, at a constant wind speed of 1.5 m s-1, and air and liquid temperature of 25°C. The two way analysis of variance showed a significant effect of SS concentration (p = 0.04) on fraction of ammonia in the liquid dairy manure, while the effect of ionic strength was marginal (p = 0.05). The highest dissociation of ammonium was observed in manure with the lowest SS concentration (0%) and the lowest ionic strength (0.10 mol L-1). Significant increases in suspended solids concentration and ionic strength were necessary to influence the ammonium dissociation in dairy manure. Results revealed that substantially high content of suspended solids (> 3.0%) or relatively high dilution of manure with water (30%) were necessary for these two parameters to play significant roles in the ammonia volatilization mechanism in liquid dairy manure. Results also showed that the β was more sensitive to the changes in suspended solids concentration than in the changes in ionic strength within the ranges of SS and IS examined in this study. Overall, the SS and IS effects on ammonium dissociation (and by extension on ammonia volatilization process) were thus found negligible within the normal ranges of liquid dairy manure characteristics.

  8. Effects of ionic strength and fulvic acid on adsorption of Tb(III) and Eu(III) onto clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poetsch, Maria; Lippold, Holger

    2016-09-01

    High salinity and natural organic matter are both known to facilitate migration of toxic or radioactive metals in geochemical systems, but little is known on their combined effect. We investigated complexation of Tb(III) and Eu(III) (as analogues for trivalent actinides) with fulvic acid and their adsorption onto a natural clay in the presence of NaCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2 up to very high ionic strengths. 160Tb, 152Eu and 14C-labelled fulvic acid were employed as radiotracers, allowing investigations at very low concentrations according to probable conditions in far-field scenarios of nuclear waste repositories. A combined Kd approach (Linear Additive Model) was tested for suitability in predicting solid-liquid distribution of metals in the presence of organic matter based on the interactions in the constituent subsystems. In this analysis, it could be shown that high ionic strength does not further enhance the mobilizing potential of humic matter. A quantitative reproduction of the influence of fulvic acid failed for most systems under study. Assumptions and limitations of the model are discussed.

  9. Neptunium(V) adsorption to bacteria at low and high ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ams, David A; Swanson, Juliet S; Reed, Donald T; Fein, Jeremy B

    2010-12-08

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO{sub 2}{sup +} aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, weakly interacting with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface contaminant. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO{sub 2}{sup +}) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacterialNp mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight the key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. Similarities in adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities in the characteristics of the moieties between all bacterial cell walls. Differences in adsorption behavior may reflect differences in ionic strength effects, rather than

  10. Gelatinization kinetic of waxy starches under pressure according to ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonin, Hélène; Guyon, Claire; de Lamballerie, Marie; Lebail, Alain

    2010-12-01

    High pressure is a potential technology for the texturization of food products at ambient temperature. In this area, waxy starches are particularly interesting because they gelatinize quickly under sufficient pressure. However, gelatinization may be influenced by other components in the food matrix. Here, we investigate the influence of increasing ionic strength on gelatinization rate and kinetics at 500 MPa for waxy corn and waxy rice starches. We show that increasing ionic strength strongly retards and inhibits starch gelatinization under pressure and leads to heterogeneous gels with remnant granules.

  11. Neptunium(V) Adsorption to Bacteria at Low and High Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ams, D.; Swanson, J. S.; Reed, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO2+ aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, interacts weakly with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface containment. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO2+) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacteria/Np mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria used were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. The observed adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities and differences in the characteristics of the moieties between the cell walls of common gram-negative soil and halophilic bacteria. Moreover, differences in adsorption behavior may also reflect ionic

  12. Influence of the ionic strength of acidic background electrolytes on the separation of proteins by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Bekri, Samya; Leclercq, Laurent; Cottet, Hervé

    2016-02-05

    The ionic strength is one of the key parameters for optimizing CE separations. However, only a few data are available in the literature about the ionic strength effect on the separation of proteins. The effect of ionic strength on separation performances is rather complex since many different parameters are involved: such as the protein effective mobility, the electroosmotic mobility, the separation efficiency via the electromigration dispersion, as well as the viscosity and temperature of the background electrolyte. In the present work, the influence of ionic strength on the electrophoretic separation of five model proteins has been investigated in acidic conditions, on successive multi-ionic layers coated capillary, in counter-electroosmotic mode with anodic electroosmotic flow. The decrease in effective and electroosmotic mobilities with increasing ionic strength were compared using the slope-plot approach, which is very helpful for understanding the observed changes in apparent selectivity and resolution. The relative decrease of the protein effective mobility was about 30-40% of the mobility determined at 5mM ionic strength per ionic strength decade. It was found that relatively low ionic strength (∼5-10mM) was preferable to optimize the overall separation of the five model proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Disentangling the contributions of osmotic and ionic effects of salinity on stomatal, mesophyll, biochemical and light limitations to photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsu-Wei; Kahlen, Katrin; Stützel, Hartmut

    2015-08-01

    There are conflicting opinions on the relative importance of photosynthetic limitations under salinity. Quantitative limitation analysis of photosynthesis provides insight into the contributions of different photosynthetic limitations, but it has only been applied under saturating light conditions. Using experimental data and modelling approaches, we examined the influence of light intensity on photosynthetic limitations and quantified the osmotic and ionic effects of salinity on stomatal (LS ), mesophyll (LM ), biochemical (LB ) and light (LL ) limitations in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) under different light intensities. Non-linear dependencies of LS , LM and LL to light intensity were found. Osmotic effects on LS and LM increased with the salt concentration in the nutrient solution (Ss ) and the magnitude of LM depended on light intensity. LS increased with the Na(+) concentration in the leaf water (Sl ) and its magnitude depended on Ss . Biochemical capacity declined linearly with Sl but, surprisingly, the relationship between LB and Sl was influenced by Ss . Our results suggest that (1) improvement of stomatal regulation under ionic stress would be the most effective way to alleviate salinity stress in cucumber and (2) osmotic stress may alleviate the ionic effects on LB but aggravate the ionic effects on LS .

  14. Red cell volume regulation: the pivotal role of ionic strength in controlling swelling-dependent transport systems.

    PubMed

    Motais, R; Guizouarn, H; Garcia-Romeu, F

    1991-10-10

    A volume increase of trout erythrocytes can be induced either by beta-adrenergic stimulation of a Na+/H+ antiport in an isotonic medium (isotonic swelling) or by suspending red cells in an hypotonic medium (hypotonic swelling). In both cases cells regulate their volume by a loss of osmolytes via specific pathways. After hypotonic swelling several volume-dependent pathways were activated allowing K+, Na+, taurine and choline to diffuse. All these pathways were fully inhibited by furosemide and inhibitors of the anion exchanger (DIDS, niflumic acid), and the K+ loss was mediated essentially via a 'Cl(-)-independent' pathway. After isotonic swelling, the taurine, choline and Na+ pathways were practically not activated and the K+ loss was strictly 'Cl(-)-dependent'. Thus cellular swelling is a prerequisite for activation of these pathways but, for a given volume increase, the degree of activation and the degree of anion-dependence of the K+ pathway depend on the nature of the stimulus, whether hormonal or by reduction of osmolality. It appears that the pattern of the response induced by hormonal stimulation is not triggered by either cellular cAMP (since it can be reproduced in the absence of hormone by isotonic swelling in an ammonium-containing saline) or by the tonicity of the medium in which swelling occurs since after swelling in an isotonic medium containing urea, the cells adopt the regulatory pattern normally observed after hypotonic swelling. We demonstrated that the stimulus is the change in cellular ionic strength induced by swelling: when ionic strength drops, the cells adopt the hypotonic swelling pattern; when ionic strength increases, the isotonic swelling pattern is activated. To explain this modulating effect of ionic strength a speculative model is proposed, which also allows the integration of two further sets of experimental results: (i) all the volume-activated transport systems are blocked by inhibitors of the anion exchanger and (ii) a Cl

  15. Cardiac strength-interval curves calculated using a bidomain tissue with a parsimonious ionic current

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Bradley J.

    2017-01-01

    The strength-interval curve plays a major role in understanding how cardiac tissue responds to an electrical stimulus. This complex behavior has been studied previously using the bidomain formulation incorporating the Beeler-Reuter and Luo-Rudy dynamic ionic current models. The complexity of these models renders the interpretation and extrapolation of simulation results problematic. Here we utilize a recently developed parsimonious ionic current model with only two currents—a sodium current that activates rapidly upon depolarization INa and a time-independent inwardly rectifying repolarization current IK—which reproduces many experimentally measured action potential waveforms. Bidomain tissue simulations with this ionic current model reproduce the distinctive dip in the anodal (but not cathodal) strength-interval curve. Studying model variants elucidates the necessary and sufficient physiological conditions to predict the polarity dependent dip: a voltage and time dependent INa, a nonlinear rectifying repolarization current, and bidomain tissue with unequal anisotropy ratios. PMID:28222136

  16. Enhancement and Mitigation Mechanisms of Protein Fouling of Ultrafiltration Membranes under Different Ionic Strengths.

    PubMed

    Miao, Rui; Wang, Lei; Mi, Na; Gao, Zhe; Liu, Tingting; Lv, Yongtao; Wang, Xudong; Meng, Xiaorong; Yang, Yongzhe

    2015-06-02

    To determine further the enhancement and mitigation mechanisms of protein fouling, filtration experiments were carried out with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) ultrafiltration (UF) membranes and bovine serum albumin (BSA) over a range of ionic strengths. The interaction forces, the adsorption behavior of BSA on the membrane surface, and the structure of the BSA adsorbed layers at corresponding ionic strengths were investigated. Results indicate that when the ionic strength increased from 0 to 1 mM, there was a decrease in the PVDF-BSA and BSA-BSA electrostatic repulsion forces, resulting in a higher deposition rate of BSA onto the membrane surface, and the formation of a denser BSA layer; consequently, membrane fouling was enhanced. However, at ionic strengths of 10 and 100 mM, membrane fouling and the BSA removal rate decreased significantly. This was mainly due to the increased hydration repulsion forces, which caused a decrease in the PVDF-BSA and BSA-BSA interaction forces accompanied by a decreased hydrodynamic radius and increased diffusion coefficient of BSA. Consequently, BSA passed more easily through the membrane and into permeate. There was less accumulation of BSA on the membrane surface. A more nonrigid and open structure BSA layer was formed on the membrane surface.

  17. Effects of chloride and ionic strength on physical morphology, dissolution, and bacterial toxicity of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Bryant A; Afrooz, A R M Nabiul; Bae, Sungwoo; Aich, Nirupam; Katz, Lynn; Saleh, Navid B; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we comprehensively evaluate chloride- and ionic-strength-mediated changes in the physical morphology, dissolution, and bacterial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which are one of the most-used nanomaterials. The findings isolate the impact of ionic strength from that of chloride concentration. As ionic strength increases, AgNP aggregation likewise increases (such that the hydrodynamic radius [HR] increases), fractal dimension (Df) strongly decreases (providing increased available surface relative to suspensions with higher Df), and the release of Ag(aq) increases. With increased Ag(+) in solution, Escherichia coli demonstrates reduced tolerance to AgNP exposure (i.e., toxicity increases) under higher ionic strength conditions. As chloride concentration increases, aggregates are formed (HR increases) but are dominated by AgCl(0)(s) bridging of AgNPs; relatedly, Df increases. Furthermore, AgNP dissolution strongly increases under increased chloride conditions, but the dominant, theoretical, equilibrium aqueous silver species shift to negatively charged AgClx((x-1)-) species, which appear to be less toxic to E. coli. Thus, E. coli demonstrates increased tolerance to AgNP exposure under higher chloride conditions (i.e., toxicity decreases). Expression measurements of katE, a gene involved in catalase production to alleviate oxidative stress, support oxidative stress in E. coli as a result of Ag(+) exposure. Overall, our work indicates that the environmental impacts of AgNPs must be evaluated under relevant water chemistry conditions.

  18. The structure of pH dependent block copolymer micelles: charge and ionic strength dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Pople, John A

    2002-08-06

    We characterize the structures of various polyelectrolyte block copolymer micelles in dilute aqueous solution as a function of pH and ionic strength. The block copolymers carry a common core block 2-(diethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DEAEMA) and one of three coronal blocks: 2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA), polyethylene oxide (PEO), and DMAEMA whose side-chain amine groups are selectively quaternized with benzyl chloride (Q-DMAEMA). The PEO-DEAEMA, DMAEMA-DEAEMA, and Q-DMAEMA-DEAEMA copolymers form micelles with electrostatically neutral, weakly charged, and highly charged coronae, respectively. We adjust the fractional charge a on the DEAEMA and DMAEMA blocks by adjusting the solution pH. For DMAEMA-DEAEMA micelles increasing the fractional charge a swells the micelle corona while decreasing the aggregation number due to electrostatic repulsions. The decrease in aggregation number is also observed with increasing a for the PEO-DEAEMA and Q-DMAEMA-DEAEMA micelles, due to electrostatic repulsions between the hydrophobic DEAEMA blocks. Increasing the ionic strength causes the DMAEMA-DEAEMA micelle corona to shrink as the salt screens electrostatic repulsions within the corona. In all three copolymers increases in the ionic strength causes the micelle aggregation number to increase by screening the electrostatic repulsions between chains. Trends in the corona thickness with varying fractional charge and ionic strength are compared with a number of theoretical models providing additional insight into the micelle structure.

  19. Quantifying bacterial attachment and detachment using leaching solutions of various ionic strengths after bacterial pulse.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nag-Choul; Choi, Jae-Woo; Kwon, Kyu-Sang; Lee, Sang-Gil; Lee, Soonjae

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we quantified the attachment and detachment of bacteria during transport in order to elucidate the contributions of reversible attachment on bacterial breakthrough curves. The first set of breakthrough experiment was performed for a laboratory sand column using leaching solutions of deionized water and mineral salt medium (MSM) of 200 mM with reference to KCl solution by employing Pseudomonas putida as a model bacterium. In the second set of experiment, the ionic strengths of leaching solutions immediately after bacterial pulse were lowered to tenfold and 100-fold diluted system (2 and 20 mM MSM) to focus on the influence of physicochemical factor. Results have shown that bacterial retention occurred in the sand column due to the physical deposition and physicochemical attachment. The physicochemical attachment was attributed to the high ionic strength (200 mM MSM) of leaching solution and the formation of primary energy minimum. Replacing the 200 mM leaching solution with the lower ionic strengths after pulse resulted in the increased tailing of breakthrough curve due to the detachment from the attached bacteria. The detachment could be well explained by DLVO theory, which showed the formation of energy barrier and disappearance of the secondary minimum as the ionic strength gradually decreased. Analysis of mass recovery revealed that 12-20% of the attachment was due to physical and physicochemical attachment, respectively, where the latter consisted of 25-75% of irreversible and reversible attachment respectively.

  20. Polarographic determination of lead hydroxide formation constants at low ionic strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lind, Carol J.

    1978-01-01

    Values of formation constants for lead hydroxide at 25 ??C were calculated from normal pulse polarographic measurements of 10-6 M lead in 0.01 M sodium perchlorate. The low concentrations simulate those found in many freshwaters, permitting direct application of the values when considering distributions of lead species. The precise evaluation of species distribution in waters at other ionic strengths requires activity coefficient corrections. As opposed to much of the previously published work done at high ionic strength, the values reported here were obtained at low ionic strength, permitting use of smaller and better defined activity coefficient corrections. These values were further confirmed by differential-pulse polarography and differential-pulse anodic stripping voltammetry data. The logs of the values for ??1??? ??2???, and ??3??? were calculated to be 6.59, 10.80, and 13.63, respectively. When corrected to zero ionic strength these values were calculated to be 6.77, 11.07, and 13.89, respectively.

  1. The ionic strength effect on microcystin and natural organic matter surrogate adsorption onto PAC.

    PubMed

    Campinas, Margarida; Rosa, Maria João

    2006-07-15

    This work aims to contribute to a better understanding of the ionic strength effect on microcystin and natural organic matter (NOM) surrogate adsorption by analyzing the importance of adsorbate molecular size, and surface concentration. Adsorption kinetics and/or isotherms were performed on PAC Norit SA-UF for four microcystin variants (MC-LR, MC-LY, MC-LW, MC-LF), and three NOM surrogates (salicylic acid (SA), tannic acid (TA), Aldrich humic acid (AHA)) at different solution ionic strengths. Results showed that the ionic strength effect depends upon the adsorbate surface concentration, cation charge (mono or divalent), and adsorbate molecular size. Potassium seemed not to affect the MC-LR adsorption, while calcium enhanced MC-LR kinetics and adsorption capacity. K+ and, particularly, Ca2+ improved the adsorption kinetics of the other microcystin variants. For identical surface concentration and ionic strength, the impact of K+ and Ca2+ on NOM surrogates depended on the adsorbate molecular size: K+ effect was only observed for AHA, whereas Ca2+ caused no effect on SA adsorption, slightly enhanced TA adsorption, and greatly enhanced AHA adsorption. MC-LR isotherms with two salt concentrations (KCl or CaCl2) indicated that, for the studied range of equilibrium surface concentration (5.3-18.7 mg/g), an enhanced adsorption regime prevails, and no transition regime was observed.

  2. Effects of molecular model, ionic strength, divalent ions, and hydrophobic interaction on human neurofilament conformation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonseong; Kim, Seonghoon; Chang, Rakwoo; Jayanthi, Lakshmi; Gebremichael, Yeshitila

    2013-01-07

    The present study examines the effects of the model dependence, ionic strength, divalent ions, and hydrophobic interaction on the structural organization of the human neurofilament (NF) brush, using canonical ensemble Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of a coarse-grained model with the amino-acid resolution. The model simplifies the interactions between the NF core and the sidearm or between the sidearms by the sum of excluded volume, electrostatic, and hydrophobic interactions, where both monovalent salt ions and solvents are implicitly incorporated into the electrostatic interaction potential. Several important observations are made from the MC simulations of the coarse-grained model NF systems. First, the mean-field type description of monovalent salt ions works reasonably well in the NF system. Second, the manner by which the NF sidearms are arranged on the surface of the NF backbone core has little influence on the lateral extension of NF sidearms. Third, the lateral extension of the NF sidearms is highly affected by the ionic strength of the system: at low ionic strength, NF-M is most extended but at high ionic strength, NF-H is more stretched out because of the effective screening of the electrostatic interaction. Fourth, the presence of Ca(2+) ions induces the attraction between negatively charged residues, which leads to the contraction of the overall NF extension. Finally, the introduction of hydrophobic interaction does not change the general structural organization of the NF sidearms except that the overall extension is contracted.

  3. Phosphorylation and Ionic Strength Alter the LRAP-HAP Interface in the N-terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Junxia; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-04-02

    The conditions present during enamel crystallite development change dramatically as a function of time, including the pH, protein concentration, surface type and ionic strength. In this work, we investigate the role that two of these changing conditions, pH and ionic strength, have in modulating the interaction of amelogenin, LRAP, with hydroxyapatite (HAP). Using solid state NMR dipolar recoupling and chemical shift data, we investigate the structure, orientation and dynamics of three regions in the N-terminus of the protein, L15 to V19, V19 to L23 and K24 to S28. These regions are also near the only phosphorylated residue in the protein, pS16, therefore, changes in the LRAP-HAP interaction as a function of phosphorylation (LRAP(-P) vs. LRAP(+P)) were also investigated. All of the regions and conditions studies for the surface immobilized proteins showed restricted motion, with more mobility under all conditions for L15(+P) and K24(-P). The structure and orientation of the LRAP-HAP interaction in the N-terminus of the phosphorylated protein is very stable to changing solution conditions. From REDOR dipolar recoupling data, the structure and orientation in the region L15V19(+P) did not change significantly as a function of pH or ionic strength. The structure and orientation of the region V19L23(+P) were also stable to changes in pH, with the only significant change observed at high ionic strength, where the region becomes extended, suggesting this may be an important region in regulating mineral development. Chemical shift studies also suggest minimal changes in all three regions studied for both LRAP(-P) and LRAP(+P) as a function of pH or ionic strength. Phosphorylation also alters the LRAP-HAP interface. All of the three residues investigated (L15, V19, and K24) are closer to the surface in LRAP(+P), but K24S28 also changes structure as a result of phosphorylation, from a random coil to a largely helical structure, and V19L23 becomes more extended at high ionic

  4. Multi-ionic effects on energy production based on double layer expansion by salinity exchange.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M M; Ahualli, S; Iglesias, Guillermo R; González-Caballero, Fernando; Delgado, Ángel V; Jiménez, M L

    2015-05-15

    It has been recently shown that the free energy change upon salinity mixing in river mouths can be harvested taking advantage of the fact that the capacitance of charged solid/liquid interfaces (electrical double layers, EDLs) depends strongly on the ionic composition of the liquid medium. This has led to a new generation of techniques called Capmix technologies, one of them (CDLE or capacitive energy extraction based on DL expansion) based precisely on such dependence. Despite the solution composition playing a crucial role on the whole process, most of the research carried out so far has mainly focused on pure sodium chloride solutions. However, the effect of other species usually present in river and seawaters should be considered both theoretically and experimentally in order to succeed in optimizing a future device. In this paper, we analyse solutions of a more realistic composition from two points of view. Firstly, we find both experimentally and theoretically that the presence of ions other than sodium and chloride, even at low concentrations, may lead to a lower energy extraction in the process. Secondly, we experimentally consider the possible effects of other materials usually dispersed in natural water (mineral particles, microbes, shells, pollutants) by checking their accumulation in the carbon films used, after being exposed for a long period to natural sea water during CDLE cycles.

  5. Ionic strength-dependent changes in tentacular ion exchangers with variable ligand density. I. Structural properties

    PubMed Central

    Bhambure, Rahul; Gillespie, Christopher M.; Phillips, Michael; Graalfs, Heiner; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2016-01-01

    The ligand density critically affects the performance of ion-exchange resins in such measures as the adsorption capacity and transport characteristics. However, for tentacular and other polymer-modified exchangers, the mechanistic basis of the effect of ligand density on performance is not yet fully understood. In this study we map the ionic strength-dependent structural changes in tentacular cation exchangers with variable ligand densities as the basis for subsequent investigation of effects on functional properties. Inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to assess the effect of ionic strength on the pore size and intraparticle architecture of resin variants with different ligand densities. Comparison of ISEC and cryo-SEM results shows a considerable reduction in average pore size with increasing ligand density; these methods also confirm an increase of average pore size at higher ionic strengths. SAXS analysis of ionic strength-dependent conformational changes in the grafted polyelectrolyte layer shows a characteristic ionomer peak at values of the scattering vector q (0.1 < q < 0.2 Å−1) that depend on the ligand density and the ionic strength of the solution. This peak attribution reflects nanoscale changes in the structure of the grafted polyelectrolyte chains that can in turn be responsible for observed pore-size changes in the tentacular resins. Finally, salt breakthrough experiments confirm a stronger Donnan exclusion effect on pore accessibility for small ions in the high ligand density variant. PMID:27544749

  6. The influences of pH and ionic strength on the sorption of tylosin on goethite.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuetao; Yang, Chen; Wu, Yinai; Dang, Zhi

    2014-02-01

    As one of the widely used antibiotics in the world, the environmental risks of tylosin (TYL) received more and more attention. In order to assess its environmental fate and ecological effects accurately, it is necessary to understand the sorption properties of TYL on the soils/sediments. The sorption of TYL on goethite at different pH and ionic strength conditions were measured through a series of batch experiments and the sorption data of TYL were fitted by Freundlich and dual-mode sorption models. It was obvious that sorption was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength. Sorption capacity of TYL increased as the pH increased and ionic strength decreased. The pH and ionic strength-dependent trends might be related with complexation between cationic/neutral TYL species and goethite. The sorption affinity of TYL on goethite decreased as ionic strength increased, which only occurred at higher TYL concentrations, suggested that inner complex might have dominated process at low concentrations and outer complex might occur at higher concentrations of TYL. Spectroscopic evidence indicated that tricarbonylamide and hydroxyl functional groups of TYL might be accounted for the sorption on mineral surfaces. The experimental data of TYL sorption could be fitted by surface complexation model (FITEQL), indicating that ≡FeOH with TYL interaction could be reasonably represented as a complex formation of a monoacid with discrete sites on goethite. The sorption mechanism of TYL might be related with surface complexation, electrostatic repulsion, and H-bounding on goethite. It should be noticed that the heterogeneous of sorption affinity of TYL on goethite at various environment to assess its environment risk.

  7. Enhanced purification of plasmid DNA isoforms by exploiting ionic strength effects during ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Currie, David; Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-04-01

    The solution structure of plasmid DNA is known to be a strong function of solution conditions due to intramolecular electrostatic interactions between the charged phosphate groups along the DNA backbone. The objective of this work was to determine whether it was possible to enhance the use of ultrafiltration for separation of different plasmid isoforms by proper selection of the solution ionic strength and ion type. Experiments were performed with a 3.0 kbp plasmid using composite regenerated cellulose ultrafiltration membranes. The transmission of the linear isoform was nearly independent of solution ionic strength, but increased significantly with increasing filtrate flux due to the elongation of the highly flexible plasmid in the converging flow field into the membrane pores. In contrast, the transmission of the open-circular and supercoiled plasmids both increased with increasing NaCl or MgCl2 concentration due to the change in plasmid size and conformational flexibility. The effect of ionic strength was greatest for the supercoiled plasmid, providing opportunities for enhanced purification of this therapeutically active isoform. This behavior was confirmed using experiments performed with binary mixtures of the different isoforms. These results clearly demonstrate the potential for enhancing the performance of membrane systems for plasmid DNA separations by proper selection of the ionic conditions.

  8. Constitutive expression of a salinity-induced wheat WRKY transcription factor enhances salinity and ionic stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Yuxiang; Tian, Yanchen; Han, Lu; Yang, Xinchao

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •A class II WRKY transcription factor, TaWRKY79 was isolated and characterized. •TaWRKY79 was induced by NaCl or abscisic acid. •843 bp regulatory segment was sufficient to respond to ABA or NaCl treatment. •TaWRKY79 enhanced salinity and ionic tolerance while reduced sensitivity to ABA. •TaWRKY79 increased salinity and ionic tolerance in an ABA-dependent pathway. -- Abstract: The isolation and characterization of TaWRKY79, a wheat class II WRKY transcription factor, is described. Its 1297 bp coding region includes a 987 bp long open reading frame. TaWRKY79 was induced by stressing seedlings with either NaCl or abscisic acid (ABA). When a fusion between an 843 bp segment upstream of the TaWRKY79 coding sequence and GUS was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana, GUS staining indicated that this upstream segment captured the sequence(s) required to respond to ABA or NaCl treatment. When TaWRKY79 was constitutively expressed as a transgene in A. thaliana, the transgenic plants showed an improved capacity to extend their primary root in the presence of either 100 mM NaCl, 10 mM LiCl or 2 μM ABA. The inference was that TaWRKY79 enhanced the level of tolerance to both salinity and ionic stress, while reducing the level of sensitivity to ABA. The ABA-related genes ABA1, ABA2 ABI1 and ABI5 were all up-regulated in the TaWRKY79 transgenic plants, suggesting that the transcription factor operates in an ABA-dependent pathway.

  9. Intracellular Temperature Sensing: An Ultra-bright Luminescent Nanothermometer with Non-sensitivity to pH and Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Helin; Fan, Yanyan; Wang, Jianhai; Song, Zhongsen; Shi, Hao; Han, Rongcheng; Sha, Yinlin; Jiang, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence thermometry usually suffer from cellular complexity of the biochemical environment (such as pH and ionic strength), and thus the accuracy and reliability of the determined intracellular temperature are directly affected. Herein, a photoluminescent nanothermometer composed of polymer encapsulated quantum dots (P-QD) has been developed. And the prepared nanothermometer exhibits some advantages: such as non-sensitivity to pH and ionic strength, as well as high detection sensitivity and ultrahigh reversibility. The intracellular temperature was accurately determined under physiological conditions with different pH and ionic strength, and direct measurement of thermogenesis in individual cells has been achieved. PMID:26445905

  10. The influence of ionic strength on DNA diffusion in gel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanxi; Jee, Ah-Young; Kim, Hyeong-Ju; Granick, Steve

    Cations are known to reduce the rigidity of the DNA molecules by screening the negative charge along the sugar phosphate backbone. This was established by optical tweezer pulling experiment of immobilized DNA strands. However, little is known regarding the influence of ions on the motion of DNA molecules as they thread through network meshes. We imaged in real time the Brownian diffusion of fluorescent labeled lambda-DNA in an agarose gel network in the presence of salt with monovalent or multivalent cations. Each movie was analyzed using home-written program to yield a trajectory of center of the mass and the accompanying history of the shape fluctuations. One preliminary finding is that ionic strength has a profound influence on the slope of the trace of mean square displacement (MSD) versus time. The influence of ionic strength on DNA diffusion in gel networks.

  11. Variation of stability constants of thorium citrate complexes and of thorium hydrolysis constants with ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G.R.; Erten, H.N.; Xia, Y.X.

    1995-09-01

    Citrate is among the organic anions that are expected to be present in the wastes planned for deposition in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository. In this study, a solvent extraction method has been used to measure the stability constants of Thorium(IV)[Th(IV)] with citrate anions in aqueous solutions with (a) NaClO{sub 4} and (b) NaCl as the background electrolytes. The ionic strengths were varied up to 5 m (NaCl) and 14 m (NaClO{sub 4}). The data from the NaClO{sub 4} solutions at varying pH values were used to calculate the hydrolysis constants for formation of Th(OH){sup 3+} at the different ionic strengths.

  12. Virus removal capacity at varying ionic strength during nanofiltration of AlphaNine® SD.

    PubMed

    Jorba, Nuria; Shitanishi, Kenneth T; Winkler, Clint J; Herring, Steven W

    2014-09-01

    Nanofiltration is incorporated into the manufacturing processes of many protein biopharmaceuticals to enhance safety by providing the capacity to retain pathogens while allowing protein drugs to pass through the filter. Retention is mainly a function of size; however, the shape of the pathogen may also influence retention. The ability of the Viresolve(®) Pro nanofilter to remove different sized viruses during the manufacture of a Coagulation Factor IX (Alphanine(®) SD) was studied at varying ionic strength, a process condition with the potential to affect virus shape and, hence, virus retention. Eight viruses were tested in a scale-down of the nanofiltration process. Five of the viruses (EMCV, Reo, BVDV, HIV, PRV) were nanofiltered at normal sodium processing conditions and three (PPV, HAV and WNV) were nanofiltered at higher and lower sodium. Representative Reduction Factors for all viruses were ≥4.50 logs and removal was consistent over a wide range of ionic strength.

  13. An Aqueous Thermodynamic Model for Polymerized Silica Species to High Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Cho, Herman M.; Rustad, James R.; Mason, Marvin J.

    2001-06-01

    The development of an aqueous thermodynamic model for polymerized silica species is presented which is valid to high ionic strengths and high dissolved silica concentration ({approx}0.1m) at low temperature (22-25 C). The model is based upon the equations of Pitzer and has been parameterized from solubility, electromotive force (emf), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data. The description of the silica speciation reactions at high dissolved silica and basic conditions (pH > 10) required the inclusion of monomeric, dimeric, trimeric (linear, cyclic and substituted), tetrameric (linear and cyclic) and hexameric (prismatic) species. The standard state equilibrium constants for the formation of these species, as well as the necessary Pitzer ion-interaction parameters to describe the ionic strength dependence of the formation reactions were determined.

  14. Ionic strength dependence of localized contact formation between membranes: nonlinear theory and experiment.

    PubMed Central

    Coakley, W T; Gallez, D; de Souza, E R; Gauci, H

    1999-01-01

    Erythrocyte membrane surface or suspending phase properties can be experimentally modified to give either spatially periodic local contacts or continuous contact along the seams of interacting membranes. Here, for cells suspended in a solution of the uncharged polysaccharide dextran, the average lateral separation between localized contacts in spatially periodic seams at eight ionic strengths, decreasing from 0.15 to 0.065, increased from 0.65 to 3.4 micrometers. The interacting membranes and intermembrane aqueous layer were modeled as a fluid film, submitted to a disjoining pressure, responding to a displacement perturbation either through wave growth resulting in spatially periodic contacts or in perturbation decay, to give a plane continuous film. Measured changes of lateral contact separations with ionic strength change were quantitatively consistent with analytical predictions of linear theory for an instability mechanism dependent on the membrane bending modulus. Introduction of a nonlinear approach established the consequences of the changing interaction potential experienced by different parts of the membrane as the disturbance grew. Numerical solutions of the full nonlinear governing equations correctly identified the ionic strength at which the bifurcation from continuous seam to a stationary periodic contact pattern occurred and showed a decrease in lateral contact and wave crest separation with increasing ionic strength. The nonlinear approach has the potential to recognize the role of nonspecific interactions in initiating the localized approach of membranes, and then incorporate the contribution of specific molecular interactions, of too short a range to influence the beginning of perturbation growth. This new approach can be applied to other biological processes such as neural cell adhesion, phagocytosis, and the acrosome reaction. PMID:10423428

  15. Synergies of media surface roughness and ionic strength on particle deposition during filtration.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; Zhao, Weigao; Normani, Stefano D; Zhao, Peng; Emelko, Monica B

    2017-05-01

    Although it is widely believed that media/collector roughness can enhance particle deposition on surfaces, this effect has not been consistently observed nor systematically described. Here, column tests were conducted to: 1) evaluate media roughness impacts on particle deposition in the presence of an energy barrier (i.e., at low ionic strength conditions), and 2) describe the concurrent impacts of collector surface roughness and suspension fluid ionic strength on particle deposition in packed beds. This work presents a first, systematic demonstration that media/collector surface roughness consistently influences particle deposition in a non-linear, non-monotonic manner, irrespective of the presence of an energy barrier. Notably, ionic strength-associated changes in DLVO interaction energy could not solely explain observed differences in particle deposition associated with collector surface roughness. Particle-to-roughness element and particle-to-smooth/bottom surface interactions contributed to a critical roughness size associated with a minimum DLVO interaction energy; however, that critical size is not necessarily the same as the critical size associated with minimal particle deposition rates. Surface roughness and ionic strength concurrently affected particle deposition in a manner that is not simply additive; rather, particle deposition rates were highly correlated with inverse Debye-Hückel length (i.e., ln [κ(-1)]) using second-order polynomial functions. Notably, the secondary energy minimum alone appears inadequate for explaining the observed particle deposition behavior. These relationships may provide insight for further development of physico-chemical filtration models for describing particle deposition on surfaces. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of ionic strength on Cd(II) partitioning between alginate gel and aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Kalis, Erwin J J; Davis, Thomas A; Town, Raewyn M; Van Leeuwen, Herman P

    2009-02-15

    Alginate gel is representative of polysaccharide-based components of cell walls which contain a large number of negatively charged functional groups. The structural charge gives rise to a Donnan potential in the gel, which impacts significantly on the partitioning of ions between the aqueous medium and the gel. We measured the Donnan potential and partitioning of Cd2+ in alginate gel as a function of ionic strength in the range 1-100 mM. The Cd2+ partition coefficient between gel and medium, as measured by in situ microelectrode voltammetry, reaches values between 10 and 100 in the 0.1-1 mM ionic strength range, and agrees well with Donnan partition calculations based on the charge density of the gels. The total Cd(II) concentration in the gel correlates approximately linearly with the free [Cd2+]gel. The results imply that metal ion activities in the biopolymer gel phase may generally differ drastically from those in the bulk medium to an extent that strongly depends on ionic strength. This feature must be taken into account in estimations of exposure conditions for predictions of bioavailability.

  17. A novel pH- and ionic-strength-sensitive carboxy methyl dextran hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rhongsheng; Tang, Mingguo; Bowyer, Adrian; Eisenthal, Robert; Hubble, John

    2005-08-01

    A fast and simple method for the preparation of pH-sensitive hydrogel membranes for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications has been developed using carbodiimide chemistry. The hydrogels were formed by the intermolecular cross-linking of carboxymethyl dextran (CM-dextran) using 1-ethyl-(3-3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Infrared spectra of the hydrogels suggest the formation of ester bonds between the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups in the CM-dextran. The porosity of the hydrogels produced, as shown by protein diffusion, increases in response to changes in the pH and the ionic strength of the external medium. The results show pH-dependent swelling behaviour arising from the acidic pedant groups in the polymer network. The diffusion of the protein lysozyme through the hydrogel membranes increased with increases in both pH (5.0-9.0) and ionic strength. The effect of changes of pH and ionic strength on the hydrogel's permeability was shown to be reversible. Scanning electron microscopy of these hydrogels showed that pH-dependent changes in permeability are mirrored by morphological changes in gel structure.

  18. Effects of humic acid and ionic strength on TiO₂ nanoparticles sublethal toxicity to zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fang, T; Yu, L P; Zhang, W C; Bao, S P

    2015-12-01

    The stability and bioavailability of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) suspension could be modified by the physicochemical properties of solution. In the present study, the effect of humic acid (HA) and ionic strength (by adding NaCl) on aggregation and sedimentation of TiO2 NPs suspension were investigated. Accordingly, the sublethal toxicity of TiO2 NPs suspensions with different HA and NaCl concentrations toward zebrafish (Danio rerio) was evaluated by monitoring the changes of superoxide dismutase, catalase, malonaldehyde and glutathione in gill, liver and intestine. The results showed that the aggregations formation and hydrodynamic diameter of TiO2 NPs in suspensions are not essential characteristics to decide toxicity. The varied oxidative stress responses detected in gill, liver and intestine derived from different toxicity mechanisms of TiO2 NPs. Nevertheless, the oxidative stress could be suppressed by the adding of HA and/or the increase of ionic strength, which can decrease the bioavailability of TiO2 NPs in water. The study suggests that the environmental factors, such as HA and ionic strength, are important for the fate (aggregation and sedimentation) and toxicity of nanomaterials in aquatic environment.

  19. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Impact of increasing ionic strength during synthesis, reflux, and hydrothermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Isley, Sara L.; Jordan, David S.; Penn, R. Lee

    2009-01-08

    This work investigates the role of ionic strength during synthesis, reflux, and hydrothermal aging of sol-gel synthesized titanium dioxide. Research presented here uses X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements to quantify anatase, brookite, and rutile phases as functions of synthetic and aging variables. In addition, the Scherrer equation is used to obtain average crystallite sizes for each phase quantified. Results presented in this work demonstrate that the most control over the sol-gel products can be obtained by modifying the pH during hydrolysis. In addition, while varying the ionic strength during reflux and hydrothermal aging can result in enhanced control over the crystalline phase and crystallite size, the most control can be achieved by varying the ionic strength during synthesis. Finally, sol-gel synthesis at low pH (-0.6) and high-chloride concentration (3 M NaCl) produced a heterogeneous sample composed of nanocrystalline anatase (3.8 nm) and rutile (2.9 nm)

  20. The Effect of Low Ionic Strength Extracellular Solutions on the Resting Potential in Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, David

    1967-01-01

    Intracellular measurements of the resting potential were made in fibers of the frog sartorius muscle in solutions of varying salt composition and concentration to determine the effects of low ionic strength extracellular solutions on the resting potential. Changes in the glass microelectrode tip potential in low ionic strength solutions were minimized by adding ThCl4 to the extracellular solution. These experimental conditions allowed measurement of the relationship of the resting potential to the concentration of the salt in the extracellular solution by replacing it with the nonionic substance, sucrose. Substitution of sucrose for the extracellular NaCl produced a stable depolarization which was logarithmically related to the NaCl concentration. Substitution of sucrose for choline Cl, instead of NaCl, produced the same degree of depolarization. When Na salts of anions less permeable than chloride (Br, I, NO3) were used, the resting potentials in 116 mM solutions were close to those with chloride (±3mv). The depolarizations produced in low ionic strength solutions of these salts were significantly less than those with chloride. PMID:6034754

  1. Colloid transport and deposition in water-saturated Yucca Mountain tuff as determined by ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Gamerdinger, A P; Kaplan, D I

    2001-08-15

    Colloid mobility and deposition were determined in model systems consisting of quartz sand or crushed Yucca Mountain tuff, latex microspheres (colloidal particles), and simulated groundwater. Ionic strength (I) was manipulated as a first step in defining limiting conditions for colloid transport in a system modeled after geochemical conditions at the Yucca Mountain site. Solutions of deionized water (DI), 0.1x, 1x, and 10x (the ionic strength of simulated groundwater) (I = 0.0116 M) were used in saturated columns under steady-state flow conditions. Separate experiments with conservative tracers indicated stable hydrodynamic conditions that were independent of I. Colloids were completely mobile (no deposition) in the DI and 0.1x solutions; deposition increased to 11-13% for 1x and to 89-97% for 10x treatments with similar results for sand and tuff. Deposition was described as a pseudo-first-order process; however, a decreasing rate of deposition was apparent for colloid transport at the 10x condition through the tuff. A linear dependence of colloid removal (extent and deposition rate coefficient) on I is illustrated for the model Yucca Mountain system and for a glass-KCl system reported in the literature. This simple relationship for saturated systems may be useful for predicting deposition efficiencies under conditions of varying ionic strength.

  2. Dynamics in BSA solutions at low ionic strengths as observed by holographic relaxation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barish, Amy O.; Gabriel, Don A.; Johnson, Charles S., Jr.

    1987-09-01

    Holographic relaxation techniques (HRS) were used to study dynamics in solutions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) labeled with azobenzene-p-isothiocyanate (ABITC). The ionic strengths ranged from 0.5 to 100 mM and the protein concentrations were 3 to 50 g/L. A single diffusive component was observed above 25 mM salt, but at lower ionic strengths two components were resolved. Also, electrophoresis combined with holographic relaxation spectroscopy (EHRS) showed two components. A photoionization model, in which the net charge of the BSA-ABITC molecule is altered by the writing laser pulse, is proposed to explain the results. The coupled diffusion problem for the bleached and unbleached macroions and the counter and coions is solved to obtain the concentration and ionic strength dependences of the diffusion coefficients. Also, effective diffusion coefficients for the components in EHRS are obtained. Overall, there is good agreement between this simple model and experiment; however, the macroion charges required in the theory are roughly a factor of two lower than those found by titration and electrolysis.

  3. Spectroscopic and redox studies of actinides in high ionic strength solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, P.D.; Clark, D.L.; Tait, C.D.

    1996-12-31

    The redox behavior of pure oxidation states of environmentally relevant actinides (U, Np, Pu) in high ionic strength solutions at near neutral pH conditions are not well known. It is expected that relatively reducing conditions will be present in many geological waste disposal sites, and such conditions have important implications for the leachability of radioactive wastes into the environment. Millimolar concentrations of actinide ions in several oxidation states (U(VI), Np(VI), Pu(III), (IV), (V), (VI)) were prepared and the absorbtion spectra obtained in high ionic strength solutions by UV-Vis-NIR and/or photoacoustic spectroscopy. Spectroscopic results indicate that actinyl species have greater solubility under such conditions due to complexation by chloride ions. Actinyl carbonate and chloride complexes were prepared in high ionic strength solutions (approx. 5M) and the redox reactions monitored by UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy after exposure to a variety of inorganic reducing reagents (Fe{sup 0}, Fe{sub 2+}, S{sup 2-}, H{sub 2}). Several reducing agents were shown to be effective at limiting the solubility of the Pu(VI) complexes. These results will be discussed along with results of ongoing experiments.

  4. Dissolution kinetics and mechanisms at dolomite-water interfaces: effects of electrolyte specific ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Xu, Man; Sullivan, Katie; Vanness, Garrett; Knauss, Kevin G; Higgins, Steven R

    2013-01-02

    Elucidating dissolution kinetics and mechanisms at carbonate mineral-water interfaces is essential to many environmental and geochemical processes, including geologic CO(2) sequestration in deep aquifers. In the present work, effects of background electrolytes on dolomite (CaMg(CO(3))(2)) reactivity were investigated by measuring step dissolution rates using in situ hydrothermal atomic force microscopy (HAFM) at 90 °C. Cleaved surfaces of dolomite were exposed to sodium chloride and tetramethylammonium chloride (TMACl) aqueous solutions with ionic strengths (I) ranging from 0 to 0.77 m at pH 4 and pH 9. HAFM results demonstrated that dolomite step retreat rates increased with increasing solution ionic strength and decreasing pH. Comparison of [481] and [441] steps revealed that the anisotropy of [481] and [441] step speeds became significant as solution ionic strength increased, with NaCl exerting more pronounced effects than TMACl for the same I. To interpret the different trends observed for NaCl and TMACl, a dissolution mechanism involving orientation-dependent ion adsorption and consequent edge free energy changes is proposed.

  5. Colloid transport in dolomite rock fractures: effects of fracture characteristics, specific discharge, and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Pulin K; Sleep, Brent E

    2012-09-18

    The effects of fracture characteristics, specific discharge, and ionic strength on microsphere transport in variable-aperture dolomite rock fractures were studied in a laboratory-scale system. Fractures with different aperture distributions and mineral compositions were artificially created in two dolomite rock blocks. Transport tests were conducted with bromide and carboxylate-modified latex microspheres (20, 200, and 500 nm diameter). Under overall unfavorable attachment conditions, there was significant retention of the 20 nm microsphere and minimal retention of the 500 nm microsphere for all conditions examined. Aperture variability produced significant spatial variation in colloid transport. Flushing with low ionic strength solution (1 mM) following microsphere transport at 12 mM ionic strength solution produced a spike in effluent microsphere concentrations, consistent with retention of colloids in secondary energy minima. Surface roughness and charge heterogeneity effects may have also contributed to the effect of microsphere size on retention. Matrix diffusion influenced bromide transport but was not a dominant factor in transport for any microsphere size. Calibrated one-dimensional, two-site kinetic model parameters for colloid transport in fractured dolomite were sensitive to the physical and chemical properties of both the fractured dolomite and the colloids, indicating the need for mechanistic modeling for accurate prediction.

  6. Signal Amplification in Field Effect-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosensing by Tuned Buffer Concentration with Ionic Strength Adjuster.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satyendra; Kumar, Narendra; Panda, Siddhartha

    2016-04-01

    Miniaturization of the sandwich enzyme-based immunosensor has several advantages but could result in lower signal strength due to lower enzyme loading. Hence, technologies for amplification of the signal are needed. Signal amplification in a field effect-based electrochemical immunosensor utilizing chip-based ELISA is presented in this work. First, the molarities of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and concentrations of KCl as ionic strength adjuster were optimized to maximize the GOx glucose-based enzymatic reactions in a beaker for signal amplification measured by change in the voltage shift with an EIS device (using 20 μl of solution) and validated with a commercial pH meter (using 3 ml of solution). The PBS molarity of 100 μM with 25 mM KCl provided the maximum voltage shift. These optimized buffer conditions were further verified for GOx immobilized on silicon chips, and similar trends with decreased PBS molarity were obtained; however, the voltage shift values obtained on chip reaction were lower as compared to the reactions occurring in the beaker. The decreased voltage shift with immobilized enzyme on chip could be attributed to the increased Km (Michaelis-Menten constant) values in the immobilized GOx. Finally, a more than sixfold signal enhancement (from 8 to 47 mV) for the chip-based sandwich immunoassay was obtained by altering the PBS molarity from 10 to 100 μM with 25 mM KCl.

  7. Removal of natural organic matter by titanium tetrachloride: The effect of total hardness and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y X; Shon, H K; Phuntsho, S; Gao, B Y

    2014-02-15

    This study is the first attempt to investigate the effect of total hardness and ionic strength on coagulation performance and the floc characteristics of titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4). Membrane fouling under different total hardness and ionic strength conditions was also evaluated during a coagulation-ultrafiltration (C-UF) hybrid process. Coagulation experiments were performed with two simulated waters, using humic acid (HA, high molecular weight) and fulvic acid (FA, relatively low molecular weight), respectively, as model natural organic matter (NOM). Results show that both particle and organic matter removal can be enhanced by increasing total hardness and ionic strength. Floc characteristics were significantly influenced by total hardness and ionic strength and were improved in terms of floc size, growth rate, strength, recoverability and compactness. The results of the UF tests show that the pre-coagulation with TiCl4 significantly improves the membrane permeate fluxes. Under different total hardness and ionic strength conditions, the membrane permeate flux varied according to both NOM and floc characteristics. The increase in total hardness and ionic strength improved the membrane permeate flux in the case of HA simulated water treatment.

  8. The effect of high ionic strength on neptunium (V) adsorption to a halophilic bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ams, David A.; Swanson, Juliet S.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Richmann, Michael; Reed, Donald T.

    2013-06-01

    The mobility of neptunium (V) in subsurface high ionic strength aqueous systems may be strongly influenced by adsorption to the cell wall of the halophilic bacteria Chromohalobacter sp. This study is the first to evaluate the adsorption of neptunium (V) to the surface of a halophilic bacterium as a function of pH from approximately 2 to 10 and at ionic strengths of 2 and 4 M. This is also the first study to evaluate the effects of carbonate complexation with neptunium (V) on adsorption to whole bacterial cells under high pH conditions. A thermodynamically-based surface complexation model was adapted to describe experimental adsorption data under high ionic strength conditions where traditional corrections for aqueous ion activity are invalid. Adsorption of neptunium (V) was rapid and reversible under the conditions of the study. Adsorption was significant over the entire pH range evaluated for both ionic strength conditions and was shown to be dependent on the speciation of the sites on the bacterial surface and neptunium (V) in solution. Adsorption behavior was controlled by the relatively strong electrostatic attraction of the positively charged neptunyl ion to the negatively charged bacterial surface at pH below circum-neutral. At pH above circum-neutral, the adsorption behavior was controlled by the presence of negatively charged neptunium (V) carbonate complexes resulting in decreased adsorption, although adsorption was still significant due to the adsorption of negatively charged neptunyl-carbonate species. Adsorption in 4 M NaClO4 was enhanced relative to adsorption in 2 M NaClO4 over the majority of the pH range evaluated, likely due to the effect of increasing aqueous ion activity at high ionic strength. The protonation/deprotonation characteristics of the cell wall of Chromohalobacter sp. were evaluated by potentiometric titrations in 2 and 4 M NaClO4. Bacterial titration results indicated that Chromohalobacter sp. exhibits similar proton buffering

  9. β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) binding to highly charged cationic polymer-grafted magnetic nanoparticles: effect of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Xu, Yisheng; Han, Haoya; Liu, Miaomiao; Chen, Kaimin; Wang, Siyi; Wang, Jie; Xu, Jun; Li, Li; Guo, Xuhong

    2015-12-15

    Poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) (PMATAC) modified magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with a high zeta potential of ca. 50mV were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The prepared NPs consist of a magnetic core around 13nm and a PMATAC shell around 20nm attached on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles. Thermodynamic binding parameters between β-lactoglobulin and these polycationic NPs were investigated at different ionic strengths by high-resolution turbidimetry, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Both turbidity and ITC show that binding affinities for BLG display a non-monotonic ionic strength dependence trend and a maximum appears at ionic strength of 50mM. Such observation should arise from the coeffects of protein charge anisotropy visualized by DelPhi electrostatic modeling and the strong electrostatic repulsion among highly charged NPs at a variety of ionic strengths.

  10. Controlling adsorption and passivation properties of bovine serum albumin on silica surfaces by ionic strength modulation and cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Sut, Tun Naw; Jackman, Joshua A; Ferhan, Abdul Rahim; Yoon, Bo Kyeong; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2017-03-29

    Understanding the physicochemical factors that influence protein adsorption onto solid supports holds wide relevance for fundamental insights into protein structure and function as well as for applications such as surface passivation. Ionic strength is a key parameter that influences protein adsorption, although how its modulation might be utilized to prepare well-coated protein adlayers remains to be explored. Herein, we investigated how ionic strength can be utilized to control the adsorption and passivation properties of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on silica surfaces. As protein stability in solution can influence adsorption kinetics, the size distribution and secondary structure of proteins in solution were first characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. A non-monotonic correlation between ionic strength and protein aggregation was observed and attributed to colloidal agglomeration, while the primarily α-helical character of the protein in solution was maintained in all cases. Quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) experiments were then conducted in order to track protein adsorption onto silica surfaces as a function of ionic strength, and the measurement responses indicated that total protein uptake at saturation coverage is lower with increasing ionic strength. In turn, the QCM-D data and the corresponding Voigt-Voinova model analysis support that the surface area per bound protein molecule is greater with increasing ionic strength. While higher protein uptake under lower ionic strengths by itself did not result in greater surface passivation under subsequent physiologically relevant conditions, the treatment of adsorbed protein layers with a gluteraldehyde cross-linking agent stabilized the bound protein in this case and significantly improved surface passivation. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that ionic strength modulation influences BSA adsorption

  11. Ionic strength affects tertiary structure and aggregation propensity of a monoclonal antibody adsorbed to silicone oil-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Alana; Bonam, Kurt; Bee, Jared S; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2013-02-01

    Therapeutic proteins formulated in prefilled syringes lubricated with silicone oil come in contact with silicone oil-water interfaces for their entire shelf lives. Thus, the interactions between protein and silicone oil were studied to determine the effect of silicone oil on a monoclonal antibody's stability, both at the interface and in the bulk solution. The influence of ionic strength on these interactions was also investigated through the addition of various monovalent and divalent salts to sample formulations. The tertiary structure of the antibody was perturbed when it adsorbed to the silicone oil-water interface in solutions at low ionic strength. However, the tertiary structure of the antibody at the interface was not perturbed when the ionic strength of the formulation was increased. Even at low ionic strength, the secondary structure of the antibody adsorbed to the silicone oil-water interface was retained, suggesting that at low ionic strength, the adsorbed antibody assumes a molten globule-like conformation. This partially unfolded species was aggregation-prone, especially during agitation. Silicone oil-induced aggregation of the antibody was inhibited at higher ionic strength. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Protein sieving characteristics of sub-20-nm pore size filters at varying ionic strength during nanofiltration of Coagulation Factor IX.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Clint J; Jorba, Nuria; Shitanishi, Kenneth T; Herring, Steven W

    2013-05-01

    Nanofiltration assures that protein therapeutics are free of adventitious agents such as viruses. Nanofilter pores must allow passage of protein drugs but be small enough to retain viruses. Five nanofilters have been evaluated to identify those that can be used interchangeably to yield a high purity Coagulation Factor IX product. When product preparations prior to nanofiltration were analyzed using electrophoresis, Western blot, liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry and size exclusion HPLC, factor IX, inter - α - trypsin inhibitor and C4b binding protein (C4BP) were observed. C4BP was removed from product by all five nanofilters when nanofiltration was performed at physiological ionic strength. However, at high ionic strength, C4BP was removed by only two nanofilters. HPLC indicated that the Stokes radius of C4BP was larger at low ionic strength than at high ionic strength. The results suggest that C4BP exists in an open conformation at physiological ionic strength and is removed by nanofiltration whereas, at high ionic strength, the protein collapses to an extent that allows passage through some nanofilters. Manufacturers should be aware that protein contaminants in other nanofiltered protein drugs could behave similarly and conditions of nanofiltration must be evaluated to ensure consistent product purity.

  13. The improved resistance to high salinity induced by trehalose is associated with ionic regulation and osmotic adjustment in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bowen; Yang, Lei; Cong, Weiwei; Zu, Yuangang; Tang, Zhonghua

    2014-04-01

    The effects of exogenous trehalose (Tre) on salt tolerance of pharmaceutical plant Catharanthus roseus and the physiological mechanisms were both investigated in this study. The results showed that the supplement of Tre in saline condition (250 mM NaCl) largely alleviated the inhibitory effects of salinity on plant growth, namely biomass accumulation and total leaf area per plant. In this saline condition, the decreased level of relative water content (RWC) and photosynthetic rate were also greatly rescued by exogenous Tre. This improved performance of plants under high salinity induced by Tre could be partly ascribed to its ability to decrease accumulation of sodium, and increase potassium in leaves. The exogenous Tre led to high levels of fructose, glucose, sucrose and Tre inside the salt-stressed plants during whole the three-week treatment. The major free amino acids such as proline, arginine, threonine and glutamate were also largely elevated in the first two-week course of treatment with Tre in saline solution. It was proposed here that Tre might act as signal to make the salt-stressed plants actively increase internal compatible solutes, including soluble sugars and free amino acids, to control water loss, leaf gas exchange and ionic flow at the onset of salt stress. The application of Tre in saline condition also promoted the accumulation of alkaloids. The regulatory role of Tre in improving salt tolerance was optimal with an exogenous concentration of 10 mM Tre. Larger concentrations of Tre were supra-optimum and adversely affected plant growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. High-Strength Composite Fibers from Cellulose-Lignin Blends Regenerated from Ionic Liquid Solution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yibo; Asaadi, Shirin; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Reza, Mehedi; Alekhina, Marina; Rautkari, Lauri; Michud, Anne; Hauru, Lauri; Hummel, Michael; Sixta, Herbert

    2015-12-07

    Composite fibres that contain cellulose and lignin were produced from ionic liquid solutions by dry-jet wet spinning. Eucalyptus dissolving pulp and organosolv/kraft lignin blends in different ratios were dissolved in the ionic liquid 1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium acetate to prepare a spinning dope from which composite fibres were spun successfully. The composite fibres had a high strength with slightly decreasing values for fibres with an increasing share of lignin, which is because of the reduction in crystallinity. The total orientation of composite fibres and SEM images show morphological changes caused by the presence of lignin. The hydrophobic contribution of lignin reduced the vapour adsorption in the fibre. Thermogravimetric analysis curves of the composite fibres reveal the positive effect of the lignin on the carbonisation yield. Finally, the composite fibre was found to be a potential raw material for textile manufacturing and as a precursor for carbon fibre production.

  15. Fabrication of carbon nanotube high-frequency nanoelectronic biosensor for sensing in high ionic strength solutions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Girish S; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2013-07-22

    The unique electronic properties and high surface-to-volume ratios of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and semiconductor nanowires (NW) make them good candidates for high sensitivity biosensors. When a charged molecule binds to such a sensor surface, it alters the carrier density in the sensor, resulting in changes in its DC conductance. However, in an ionic solution a charged surface also attracts counter-ions from the solution, forming an electrical double layer (EDL). This EDL effectively screens off the charge, and in physiologically relevant conditions ~100 millimolar (mM), the characteristic charge screening length (Debye length) is less than a nanometer (nm). Thus, in high ionic strength solutions, charge based (DC) detection is fundamentally impeded. We overcome charge screening effects by detecting molecular dipoles rather than charges at high frequency, by operating carbon nanotube field effect transistors as high frequency mixers. At high frequencies, the AC drive force can no longer overcome the solution drag and the ions in solution do not have sufficient time to form the EDL. Further, frequency mixing technique allows us to operate at frequencies high enough to overcome ionic screening, and yet detect the sensing signals at lower frequencies. Also, the high transconductance of SWNT transistors provides an internal gain for the sensing signal, which obviates the need for external signal amplifier. Here, we describe the protocol to (a) fabricate SWNT transistors, (b) functionalize biomolecules to the nanotube, (c) design and stamp a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-fluidic chamber onto the device, and (d) carry out high frequency sensing in different ionic strength solutions.

  16. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na+], and [Cl−] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  17. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na(+)], and [Cl(-)] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  18. Ionic strength and pH as control parameters for spontaneous surface oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, N M; Pimienta, V; Tadmouri, R; Miller, R; Vollhardt, D

    2012-05-01

    A system far from equilibrium, where the surfactant transfer from a small drop located in the aqueous bulk to the air-water interface results in spontaneous nonlinear oscillations of surface tension, is theoretically and experimentally considered. The oscillations in this system are the result of periodically arising and terminating Marangoni instability. The surfactant under consideration is octanoic acid, the dissociated form of which is much less surface-active than the protonated form. Numerical simulations show how the system behavior can be controlled by changes in pH and ionic strength of the aqueous phase. The results of numerical simulations are in good agreement with experimental data.

  19. Sol formation ability of Ca/Na-montmorillonite at low ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birgersson, Martin; Hedström, Magnus; Karnland, Ola

    Various colloidal phases of Wyoming type Ca/Na-montmorillonite have been investigated experimentally by sedimentation and swelling tests of originally pure Ca- or Na-montmorillonite in different CaCl 2/NaCl solutions of low ionic strength. Forces contributing to colloid (de)stability are discussed, and the experimental findings are compared with a theoretical sol formation zone in the [Ca 2+]-[Na +] diagram derived from simple assumptions regarding the forces. It is found that the sol formation ability drastically lowers when calcium ions are present in the system. This effect could be due to an explicit influence of these ions on edge face interactions.

  20. Ionic strength and temperature induced conformational changes in mononucleosomes and oligonucleosomes. [Chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, K.S.; Kent, J.C.; Parthasarathy, N.; Radhakrishnan, G.; Ramanathan, B.

    1980-10-01

    Chromatin is a nucleohistone complex which exhibits a repeat unit structure as inferred from nuclease digestion studies. The repeat unit, or nucleosome, is defined as approx. 200 base pairs of DNA wrapped about the surface of an octameric histone complex (two copies each of the histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4). We report in this communication preliminary studies on the conformation of chromatin mononucleosomes and oligonucleosomes as a function of temperature and ionic strength. The methods used were conductivity, fluorescence of bound proflavine, and quasielastic light scattering.

  1. Effects of starvation on the transport of Escherichia coli K12 in saturated porous media are dependent on pH and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Walczak, J. J.; Wang, L.; Bardy, S. L.; Li, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this research, we investigate the effects of starvation on the transport of E. coli K12 in saturated porous media. Particularly, we examine the relationship between such effects and the pH and ionic strength of the electrolyte solutions that were used to suspend bacterial cells. E. coli K12 (ATCC 10798) cells were cultured using either Luria-Bertani Miller (LB-Miller) broth (10 g trypton, 5 g yeast extract and 10 g NaCl in 1 L of deionized water) or LB-Luria broth (10 g tryptone, 5 g yeast extract and 0.5 g NaCl in 1 L of deionized water). Both broths had similar pH (~7.1) but differed in ionic strength (LB-Miller: ~170 mM, LB-Luria: ~ 8 mM). The bacterial cells were then harvested and suspended using one of the following electrolyte solutions: phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (pH ~7.2; ionic strength ~170 mM), 168 mM NaCl (pH ~5.7), 5% of PBS (pH ~ 7.2; ionic strength ~ 8 mM) and 8 mM NaCl (pH ~ 5.7). Column transport experiments were performed at 0, 21 and 48 hours following cell harvesting to evaluate the change in cell mobility over time under “starvation” conditions. Our results showed that 1) starvation increased the mobility of E. coli K12 cells; 2) the most significant change in mobility occurred when bacterial cells were suspended in an electrolyte solution that had different pH and ionic strength (i.e., LB-Miller culture suspended in 8 mM NaCl and LB-Luria culture suspended in 168 mM Nacl); and 3) the change in cell mobility primarily occurred within the first 21 hours. The size of the bacterial cells was measured and the surface properties (e.g., zeta potential, hydrophobicity, cell-bound protein, LPS sugar content, outer membrane protein profiles) of the bacterial cells were characterized. We found that the measured cell surface properties could not fully explain the observed changes in cell mobility caused by starvation.

  2. Effect of Electric Field Strength on Diffusion of Ionic Drugs from Polyacrylamide Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirivat, Anuvat; Niamlang, Sumonman

    2010-03-01

    The apparent diffusion coefficients, Dapp, and the release mechanisms of ionic-drugs from drug-loaded polyacrylamide hydrogels, drug-loaded PAAM, were investigated for the effects of various drug sizes (Lactic acid, 3.11 å; Sulfanilamide,3.47 å; Ampicillin, 5.14 å), matrix pore sizes, and electric filed strengths. The Dapp of the drugs from the drug-loaded PAAM increases with decreasing drug size, increasing matrix pore size or applied electric field strength. The increase in Dapp can be attributed to the combination of the iontophoresis and the electroporation of the matrix pore. The Dapp of drug from the drug-loaded PAAM apparently obey the scaling behavior: Dapp/Do=(drug size/pore size)m with the scaling exponent m equal to 0.73 and 0.50 at the electric fields of 0 and 0.1 V, respectively.

  3. Manufacturing of agarose-based chromatographic adsorbents--effect of ionic strength and cooling conditions on particle structure and mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Nicolas; Bowen, James; Pacek, Andrzej; Zhang, Zhibing

    2012-02-01

    The effect of ionic strength of agarose solution and quenching temperature of the emulsion on the structure and mechanical strength of agarose-based chromatographic adsorbents was investigated. Solutions of agarose containing different amounts of NaCl were emulsified at elevated temperature in mineral oil using a high-shear mixer. The hot emulsion was quenched at different temperatures leading to the gelation of agarose and formation of soft particles. Analysis of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images of particle surfaces shows that pore size of particles increases with ionic strength and/or high quenching temperature. Additionally it has been found that the compressive strength of particles measured by micromanipulation also increases with ionic strength of the emulsion and/or high quenching temperature but these two parameters have no significant effect on the resulting particle size and particle size distribution. Results from both characterization methods were compared with Sepharose 4B, a commercial agarose-based adsorbent. This is the first report examining the effect of ionic strength and cooling conditions on the microstructure of micron-sized agarose beads for bioseparation.

  4. Interactions of a bacterial trehalose lipid with phosphatidylglycerol membranes at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Teruel, José A; Ortiz, Antonio; Aranda, Francisco J

    2014-07-01

    Trehalose lipids are bacterial biosurfactants which present interesting physicochemical and biological properties. These glycolipids have a number of different commercial applications and there is an increasing interest in their use as therapeutic agents. The amphiphilic nature of trehalose lipids points to the membrane as their hypothetical site of action and therefore the study of the interaction between these biosurfactants and biological membranes is critical. In this study, we examine the interactions between a trehalose lipid (TL) from Rhodococcus sp. and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) membranes at low ionic strength, by means of differential scanning calorimetry, light scattering, fluorescence polarization and infrared spectroscopy. We describe that there are extensive interactions between TL and DMPG involving the perturbation of the thermotropic intermediate phase of the phospholipid, the destabilization and shifting of the DMPG gel to liquid crystalline phase transition to lower temperatures, the perturbation of the sample transparency, and the modification of the order of the phospholipid palisade in the gel phase. We also report an increase of fluidity of the phosphatidylglycerol acyl chains and dehydration of the interfacial region of the bilayer. These changes would increase the monolayer negative spontaneous curvature of the phospholipid explaining the destabilizing effect on the intermediate state exerted by this biosurfactant. The observations contribute to get insight into the biological mechanism of action of the biosurfactant and help to understand the properties of the intermediate phase display by DMPG at low ionic strength.

  5. Relationship of land use and elevated ionic strength in Appalachian watersheds.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Susan M; Wilkes, Samuel P; Zheng, Lei

    2013-02-01

    Coal mining activities have been implicated as sources that increase stream specific conductance in Central Appalachia. The present study characterized potential sources of elevated ionic strength for small subwatersheds within the Coal, Upper Kanawha, Gauley, and New Rivers in West Virginia. From a large monitoring data set developed by the West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection, 162 < 20-km(2)-watersheds were identified that had detailed land cover information in southwestern West Virginia with at least one water chemistry sample. Scatter plots of specific conductance were generated for nine land cover classifications: open water, agriculture, forest, residential, barren, total mining, valley fill, abandoned mine lands, and mining excluding valley fill and abandoned mine lands. Conductivity was negatively correlated with the percentage of forest area and positively associated with other land uses. In a multiple regression, the percentage of area in valley fill was the strongest contributor to increased ionic strength, followed by percentage of area in urban (residential/buildings) land use and other mining land use. Based on the 10th quantile regression, 300 µS/cm was exceeded at 3.3% of area in valley fill. In most catchments, HCO 3(-) and SO 4(2-) concentrations were greater than Cl(-) concentration. These findings confirm coal mining activities as the primary source of high conductivity waters. Such activities might be redressed with the goal of protecting sources of dilute freshwater in the region. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  6. Biotite dissolution and Cr(VI) reduction at elevated pH and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y. Thomas; Bigham, Jerry M.; Traina, Samuel J.

    2005-08-01

    The effects of elevated pH, ionic strength, and temperature on sediments in the vadose zone are of primary importance in modeling contaminant transport and understanding the environmental impact of tank leakage at nuclear waste storage facilities like those of the Hanford site. This study was designed to investigate biotite dissolution under simulated high level waste (HLW) conditions and its impact on Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. Biotite dissolution increased with NaOH concentrations in the range of 0.1 to 2 mol L -1. There was a corresponding release of K, Fe, Si, and Al to solution, with Si and Al showing a complex pattern due to the formation of secondary zeolite minerals. Dissolved Fe concentrations were an order of magnitude lower than the other elements, possibly due to the formation of green rust and Fe(OH) 2. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) also increased with increased NaOH concentration. A homogeneous reduction of chromate by Fe(II) aq released through biotite dissolution was probably the primary pathway responsible for this reaction. Greater ionic strengths increased biotite dissolution and consequently increased Fe(II) aq release and Cr(VI) removal. The results indicated that HLW would cause phyllosilicate dissolution and the formation of secondary precipitates that would have a major impact on radionuclide and contaminant transport in the vadose zone at the Hanford site.

  7. Experimental determination of lead carbonate solubility at high ionic strengths: A Pitzer model description

    DOE PAGES

    Xiong, Yongliang

    2015-05-06

    In this article, solubility measurements of lead carbonate, PbCO3(cr), cerussite, as a function of total ionic strengths are conducted in the mixtures of NaCl and NaHCO3 up to I = 1.2 mol•kg–1 and in the mixtures of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 up to I = 5.2 mol•kg–1, at room temperature (22.5 ± 0.5 °C). The solubility constant (log Ksp) for cerussite, PbCO3(cr) = Pb2+ + CO32- was determined as –13.76 ± 0.15 (2σ) with a set of Pitzer parameters describing the specific interactions of PbCO3(aq), Pb(CO3)22-, and Pb(CO3)Cl– with the bulk-supporting electrolytes, based on the Pitzer model. The model developed inmore » this work can reproduce the experimental results including model-independent solubility values from the literature over a wide range of ionic strengths with satisfactory accuracy. The model is expected to find applications in numerous fields, including the accurate description of chemical behavior of lead in geological repositories, the modeling of formation of oxidized Pb–Zn ore deposits, and the environmental remediation of lead contamination.« less

  8. General strategy for biodetection in high ionic strength solutions using transistor-based nanoelectronic sensors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ning; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hong, Guosong; Fu, Tian-Ming; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-03-11

    Transistor-based nanoelectronic sensors are capable of label-free real-time chemical and biological detection with high sensitivity and spatial resolution, although the short Debye screening length in high ionic strength solutions has made difficult applications relevant to physiological conditions. Here, we describe a new and general strategy to overcome this challenge for field-effect transistor (FET) sensors that involves incorporating a porous and biomolecule permeable polymer layer on the FET sensor. This polymer layer increases the effective screening length in the region immediately adjacent to the device surface and thereby enables detection of biomolecules in high ionic strength solutions in real-time. Studies of silicon nanowire field-effect transistors with additional polyethylene glycol (PEG) modification show that prostate specific antigen (PSA) can be readily detected in solutions with phosphate buffer (PB) concentrations as high as 150 mM, while similar devices without PEG modification only exhibit detectable signals for concentrations ≤10 mM. Concentration-dependent measurements exhibited real-time detection of PSA with a sensitivity of at least 10 nM in 100 mM PB with linear response up to the highest (1000 nM) PSA concentrations tested. The current work represents an important step toward general application of transistor-based nanoelectronic detectors for biochemical sensing in physiological environments and is expected to open up exciting opportunities for in vitro and in vivo biological sensing relevant to basic biology research through medicine.

  9. Ion Accumulation and Migration Effects on Redox Cycling in Nanopore Electrode Arrays at Low Ionic Strength.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chaoxiong; Xu, Wei; Wichert, William R A; Bohn, Paul W

    2016-03-22

    Ion permselectivity can lead to accumulation in zero-dimensional nanopores, producing a significant increase in ion concentration, an effect which may be combined with unscreened ion migration to improve sensitivity in electrochemical measurements, as demonstrated by the enormous current amplification (∼2000-fold) previously observed in nanopore electrode arrays (NEA) in the absence of supporting electrolyte. Ionic strength is a key experimental factor that governs the magnitude of the additional current amplification (AFad) beyond simple redox cycling through both ion accumulation and ion migration effects. Separate contributions from ion accumulation and ion migration to the overall AFad were identified by studying NEAs with varying geometries, with larger AFad values being achieved in NEAs with smaller pores. In addition, larger AFad values were observed for Ru(NH3)6(3/2+) than for ferrocenium/ferrocene (Fc(+)/Fc) in aqueous solution, indicating that coupling efficiency in redox cycling can significantly affect AFad. While charged species are required to observe migration effects or ion accumulation, poising the top electrode at an oxidizing potential converts neutral species to cations, which can then exhibit current amplification similar to starting with the cation. The electrical double layer effect was also demonstrated for Fc/Fc(+) in acetonitrile and 1,2-dichloroethane, producing AFad up to 100× at low ionic strength. The pronounced AFad effects demonstrate the advantage of coupling redox cycling with ion accumulation and migration effects for ultrasensitive electrochemical measurements.

  10. Effect of added salt and increase in ionic strength on skim milk electroacidification performances.

    PubMed

    Bazinet, L; Ippersiel, D; Gendron, C; Mahdavi, B; Amiot, J; Lamarche, F

    2001-05-01

    Bipolar-memibrane electroacidification (BMEA) technology which uses the property of bipolar membranes to split water and the demineralization action of cation-exchange membranes (CEM), was tested for the production of acid casein. BMEA has numerous advantages in comparison with conventional isoelectric precipitation processes of proteins used in the dairy industry. BMEA uses electricity to generate the desired ionic species to acidify the treated solutions. The process can be precisely controlled, as electro-acidification rate is regulated by the effective current density in the cell. Water dissociation at the bipolar membrane interface is continuous and avoids local excess of acid. In-situ generation of dangerous chemicals (acids and bases) reduces the risks associated with the handling, transportation, use and elimination of these products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of BMEA in different conditions of added ionic strength (p(added) = 0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 M) and added salt (CaCl2, NaCl and KCl). The combination of KCl and p(added) = 0.5 M gave the best results with a 45% decrease in energy consumption. The increased energy efficiency was the result of a decrease in the anode/cathode voltage difference. This was due to an increase of conductivity, produced by addition of salt, necessary to compensate for the lack of sufficiently mobile ions in the skim milk. However, the addition of salts, irrespective of type or ionic strength, increased the required operation time. The protein profile of isolates were similar under all experimental conditions, except at 1.0 M-CaCl2.

  11. Dielectric spectroscopy of single human erythrocytes at physiological ionic strength: dispersion of the cytoplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Gimsa, J; Müller, T; Schnelle, T; Fuhr, G

    1996-01-01

    Usually dielectrophoretic and electrorotation measurements are carried out at low ionic strength to reduce electrolysis and heat production. Such problems are minimized in microelectrode chambers. In a planar ultramicroelectrode chamber fabricated by semiconductor technology, we were able to measure the dielectric properties of human red blood cells in the frequency range from 2 kHz to 200 MHz up to physiological ion concentrations. At low ionic strength, red cells exhibit a typical electrorotation spectrum with an antifield rotation peak at low frequencies and a cofield rotation peak at higher ones. With increasing medium conductivity, both electrorotational peaks shift toward higher frequencies. The cofield peak becomes antifield for conductivities higher than 0.5 S/m. Because the polarizability of the external medium at these ionic strengths becomes similar to that of the cytoplasm, properties can be measured more sensitively. The critical dielectrophoretic frequencies were also determined. From our measurements, in the wide conductivity range from 2 mS/m to 1.5 S/m we propose a single-shell erythrocyte model. This pictures the cell as an oblate spheroid with a long semiaxis of 3.3 microns and an axial ratio of 1:2. Its membrane exhibits a capacitance of 0.997 x 10(-2) F/m2 and a specific conductance of 480 S/m2. The cytoplasmic parameters, a conductivity of 0.4 S/m at a dielectric constant of 212, disperse around 15 MHz to become 0.535 S/m and 50, respectively. We attribute this cytoplasmic dispersion to hemoglobin and cytoplasmic ion properties. In electrorotation measurements at about 60 MHz, an unexpectedly low rotation speed was observed. Around 180 MHz, the speed increased dramatically. By analysis of the electric chamber circuit properties, we were able to show that these effects are not due to cell polarization but are instead caused by a dramatic increase in the chamber field strength around 180 MHz. Although the chamber exhibits a resonance around 180

  12. Dielectric spectroscopy of single human erythrocytes at physiological ionic strength: dispersion of the cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Gimsa, J; Müller, T; Schnelle, T; Fuhr, G

    1996-07-01

    Usually dielectrophoretic and electrorotation measurements are carried out at low ionic strength to reduce electrolysis and heat production. Such problems are minimized in microelectrode chambers. In a planar ultramicroelectrode chamber fabricated by semiconductor technology, we were able to measure the dielectric properties of human red blood cells in the frequency range from 2 kHz to 200 MHz up to physiological ion concentrations. At low ionic strength, red cells exhibit a typical electrorotation spectrum with an antifield rotation peak at low frequencies and a cofield rotation peak at higher ones. With increasing medium conductivity, both electrorotational peaks shift toward higher frequencies. The cofield peak becomes antifield for conductivities higher than 0.5 S/m. Because the polarizability of the external medium at these ionic strengths becomes similar to that of the cytoplasm, properties can be measured more sensitively. The critical dielectrophoretic frequencies were also determined. From our measurements, in the wide conductivity range from 2 mS/m to 1.5 S/m we propose a single-shell erythrocyte model. This pictures the cell as an oblate spheroid with a long semiaxis of 3.3 microns and an axial ratio of 1:2. Its membrane exhibits a capacitance of 0.997 x 10(-2) F/m2 and a specific conductance of 480 S/m2. The cytoplasmic parameters, a conductivity of 0.4 S/m at a dielectric constant of 212, disperse around 15 MHz to become 0.535 S/m and 50, respectively. We attribute this cytoplasmic dispersion to hemoglobin and cytoplasmic ion properties. In electrorotation measurements at about 60 MHz, an unexpectedly low rotation speed was observed. Around 180 MHz, the speed increased dramatically. By analysis of the electric chamber circuit properties, we were able to show that these effects are not due to cell polarization but are instead caused by a dramatic increase in the chamber field strength around 180 MHz. Although the chamber exhibits a resonance around 180

  13. Using UCST Ionic Liquid as a Draw Solute in Forward Osmosis to Treat High-Salinity Water.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yujiang; Feng, Xiaoshuang; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xinbo; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Gnanou, Yves; Lai, Zhiping

    2016-01-19

    The concept of using a thermoresponsive ionic liquid (IL) with an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) as a draw solute in forward osmosis (FO) was successfully demonstrated here experimentally. A 3.2 M solution of protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Hbet][Tf2N]) was obtained by heating and maintaining the temperature above 56 °C. This solution successfully drew water from high-salinity water up to 3.0 M through FO. When the IL solution cooled to room temperature, it spontaneously separated into a water-rich phase and an IL-rich phase: the water-rich phase was the produced water that contained a low IL concentration, and the IL-rich phase could be used directly as the draw solution in the next cycle of the FO process. The thermal stability, thermal-responsive solubility, and UV-vis absorption spectra of the IL were also studied in detail.

  14. Effects of pH and ionic strength on the thermodynamics of human serum albumin-photosensitizer binding

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Cecil L.; Dickson, TiReJe; Hayes, Ronald; Thomas, Lana

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the effects of pH and ionic strength on thermodynamic parameters governing the interaction of human serum albumin with zinc phthalocyanine tetrasulfonic acid. Fluorescence emission of zinc phthalocyanine increases at 686 nm with increasing concentrations of the protein. The non-linear correlation between protein concentration and emission of the photosensitizer was fitted using Chipman’s analysis to calculate the binding affinities. The standard enthalpy and entropy changes were estimated from van’t Hoff analysis of data that were acquired from temperature ramping studies. Results show that reaction is primarily driven by solution dynamics and that the change in enthalpy for the system becomes increasingly unfavorable with increasing pH and ionic strength. The effect of ionic strength on the entropy change for binding is shown to be significantly greater than the effects of pH. The interplay between entropy and enthalpy changes is demonstrated. PMID:24058218

  15. Some rootstocks improve pepper tolerance to mild salinity through ionic regulation.

    PubMed

    Penella, Consuelo; Nebauer, Sergio G; Quiñones, Ana; San Bautista, Alberto; López-Galarza, Salvador; Calatayud, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Grafting has been proposed as an interesting strategy that improves the responses of crops under salinity. In pepper, we reported increased fruit yield of the commercial 'Adige' cultivar under salinity when grafted onto accessions Capsicum chinense Jacq. 'ECU-973' (12) and Capsicum baccatum L. var. pendulum 'BOL-58' (14), whereas no effect was observed when grafted onto accession Capsicum annuum L var. 'Serrano' (5). We also analysed the physiological and biochemical mechanisms related to the tolerance conferred by these rootstocks. Responses to salinity (40 mM NaCl) were studied in the different plant combinations for 30 days by determining water relations, mineral content, proline accumulation, photosynthetic parameters, nitrate reductase activity and antioxidant capacity. Higher salt tolerance was achieved when the 'Adige' cultivar was grafted onto the 12 genotype, which allowed not only lower Na(+) and Cl(-) accumulation in the scion, but also ion selectivity maintenance, particularly Na(+)/K(+) discrimination. These traits led to a minor negative impact on photosynthesis, nitrate reductase activity and lipid peroxidation in grafted scion leaves. This work suggests that using tolerant pepper rootstocks that maintain the scion's ion homeostasis is a promising strategy to provide salinity tolerance and can consequently improve crop yield.

  16. Relationship between intracellular ionic strength and expression of tonicity-responsive genes in rat papillary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Bartels, Helmut; Fraek, Maria-L; Beck, Franz-X

    2002-08-15

    Intracellular ionic strength may play an important role in regulating the expression of genes encoding osmolyte-accumulating molecules. To establish whether a strict relation exists between these variables, intracellular ionic strength (sum of Na+, Cl- and K+ concentrations) and the relative abundance of mRNA derived from various tonicity-sensitive genes was examined using electron microprobe analysis and Northern blots on primary cultures of rat papillary collecting duct (PCD) cells following acute or long-term alterations in medium tonicity. Hypertonic medium (450 mosmol kg(-1)) evoked an initial rise in intracellular ionic strength (269 +/- 5 vs. 194 +/- 7 mmol (kg wet weight (wt))(-1) in isotonic controls; means +/- S.E.M.), which subsequently declined gradually, and a significantly higher abundance of bgt1 (Na+- and Cl- -dependent betaine transporter), smit (Na+/myo-inositol cotransporter), ar (aldose reductase) and osp94 (osmotic stress protein 94) mRNAs. Conversely, exposure to hypotonic medium (200 mosmol kg(-1)) for 12 h was associated with significantly reduced intracellular ionic strength (153 +/- 4 mmol (kg wet wt)(-1)) and significantly reduced the abundance of smit and ar mRNAs. PCD cells preconditioned in hypotonic medium and re-exposed to isotonic medium showed significantly higher abundance of these mRNAs than isotonic controls, although the intracellular ionic strength did not differ. Two further tonicity-sensitive genes responded differently to medium tonicity: while the abundance of hsp70 (heat shock protein 70) mRNA increased significantly following both hypo- and hypertonic stress, inos (inducible nitric oxide synthase) mRNA abundance correlated inversely with medium tonicity. These findings support the view that the effect of intracellular ionic strength on the expression of bgt1, smit, ar and osp94 is modulated by additional factors such as cell volume, and that its effect on the pathways regulating hsp70 and inos is even more complex.

  17. Relationship between intracellular ionic strength and expression of tonicity-responsive genes in rat papillary collecting duct cells

    PubMed Central

    Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Bartels, Helmut; Fraek, Maria-L; Beck, Franz-X

    2002-01-01

    Intracellular ionic strength may play an important role in regulating the expression of genes encoding osmolyte-accumulating molecules. To establish whether a strict relation exists between these variables, intracellular ionic strength (sum of Na+, Cl− and K+ concentrations) and the relative abundance of mRNA derived from various tonicity-sensitive genes was examined using electron microprobe analysis and Northern blots on primary cultures of rat papillary collecting duct (PCD) cells following acute or long-term alterations in medium tonicity. Hypertonic medium (450 mosmol kg−1) evoked an initial rise in intracellular ionic strength (269 ± 5 vs. 194 ± 7 mmol (kg wet weight (wt))−1 in isotonic controls; means ± s.e.m.), which subsequently declined gradually, and a significantly higher abundance of bgt1 (Na+- and Cl−-dependent betaine transporter), smit (Na+/myo-inositol cotransporter), ar (aldose reductase) and osp94 (osmotic stress protein 94) mRNAs. Conversely, exposure to hypotonic medium (200 mosmol kg−1) for 12 h was associated with significantly reduced intracellular ionic strength (153 ± 4 mmol (kg wet wt)−1) and significantly reduced the abundance of smit and ar mRNAs. PCD cells preconditioned in hypotonic medium and re-exposed to isotonic medium showed significantly higher abundance of these mRNAs than isotonic controls, although the intracellular ionic strength did not differ. Two further tonicity-sensitive genes responded differently to medium tonicity: while the abundance of hsp70 (heat shock protein 70) mRNA increased significantly following both hypo- and hypertonic stress, inos (inducible nitric oxide synthase) mRNA abundance correlated inversely with medium tonicity. These findings support the view that the effect of intracellular ionic strength on the expression of bgt1, smit, ar and osp94 is modulated by additional factors such as cell volume, and that its effect on the pathways regulating hsp70 and inos is even more complex. PMID

  18. Ionic strength effect on molecular structure of hyaluronic acid investigated by flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bitnara; Woo, Sohee; Park, Young-Soo; Hwang, Euijin; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-02-01

    This study describes the effect of ionic strength on the molecular structure of hyaluronic acid (HA) in an aqueous solution using flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering (FlFFF-MALS). Sodium salts of HA (NaHA) raw materials (∼2 × 10(6) Da) dispersed in different concentrations of NaCl prepared by repeated dilution/ultrafiltration procedures were examined in order to study conformational changes in terms of the relationship between the radius of gyration and molecular weight (MW) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) of NaHA in solution. This was achieved by varying the ionic strength of the carrier solution used in a frit-inlet asymmetrical FlFFF (FIAF4) channel. Experiments showed that the average MW of NaHA increased as the ionic strength of the NaHA solution decreased due to enhanced entanglement or aggregation of HA molecules. Relatively large molecules (greater than ∼5 MDa) did not show a large increase in RMS radius value as the NaCl concentration decreased. Conversely, smaller species showed larger changes, suggesting molecular expansion at lower ionic strengths. When the ionic strength of the FlFFF carrier solution was decreased, the HA species in a salt-rich solution (0.2 M NaCl) underwent rapid molecular aggregation during FlFFF separation. However, when salt-depleted HA samples (I = 4.66∼0.38 mM) were analyzed with FFF carrier solutions of a high ionic strength, the changes in both molecular structure and size were somewhat reversible, although there was a delay in correction of the molecular structure.

  19. Ionic Strength Effects on Amyloid Formation by Amylin Are a Complicated Interplay between Debye Screening, Ion Selectivity, and Hofmeister Effects

    PubMed Central

    Marek, Peter J.; Patsalo, Vadim; Green, David F.; Raleigh, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid formation plays a role in a wide range of human diseases. The rate and extent of amyloid formation depends on solution conditions including pH and ionic strength. Amyloid fibrils often adopt structures with parallel, in-register β-sheets, which generate quasi-infinite arrays of aligned side chains. These arrangements can lead to significant electrostatic interactions between adjacent polypeptide chains. The effect of ionic strength and ion composition on the kinetics of amyloid formation by islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is examined. IAPP is a basic 37-residue polypeptide responsible for islet amyloid formation in type 2 diabetes. Poisson–Boltzmann calculations revealed significant electrostatic repulsion in a model of the IAPP fibrillar state. The kinetics of IAPP amyloid formation are strongly dependent on ionic strength, varying by more than a factor of 10 over the range of 20 to 600 mM NaCl at pH 8.0, but the effect is not entirely due to Debye screening. At low ionic strength the rate depends strongly on the identity of the anion, nearly varying by a factor of four and scales with the electroselectivity series, implicating anion binding. At high ionic strength the rate varies by only 8% and scales with the Hofmeister series. At intermediate ionic strength no clear trend is detected, likely because of convolution of different effects. The effects of salts on the growth phase and lag phase of IAPP amyloid formation are strongly correlated. At pH 5.5, where the net charge on IAPP is larger, the effect of different anions scales with the electroselectivity series at all salt concentrations. PMID:23016872

  20. Interfacial interactions of pectin with bovine serum albumin studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring: effect of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyong; Ruengruglikit, Chada; Wang, Yu-Wen; Huang, Qingrong

    2007-12-12

    The effect of ionic strength ( I) on the interfacial interactions between pectin and the bovine serum albumin (BSA) surface has been investigated using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). As I increases from 0.01 to 0.02 M, the frequency shift (Delta F) decreases, whereas the energy dissipation shift (Delta D) changes toward a higher value. Further increase of I from 0.02 to 0.5 M causes both Delta F and Delta D to gradually return to almost zero. The adsorbed mass and thickness of the pectin adlayer estimated from the Voigt model confirm that the adsorption of pectin and the formation of thicker pectin adlayers on a BSA surface are favored by the increase of ionic strength at I = 0.01 approximately 0.02 M. An increase of I above 0.02 M hinders pectin adsorption and causes the formation of a thinner pectin adlayer. The ionic strength-enhanced effect at I values lower than 0.02 M is explained as an increase of ionic strength that can screen the electrostatic repulsion to a larger extent than the electrostatic attraction between pectin and BSA. However, when I is higher than 0.02 M, both electrostatic repulsion and attraction can be significantly screened by the increasing ionic strength, resulting in the ionic strength-reduced effect. On the other hand, the high viscoelasticity of the pectin adlayer revealed by the Voigt model suggests the formation of a network-structured pectin adlayer on the BSA surface, which contains two steps for higher pectin adsorptions at I = 0.0125 approximately 0.1 M by the indication of two slopes in Delta D-Delta F plots.

  1. Determination of Surface Charge of Titanium Dioxide (Anatase) at High Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonen, M. A.; Strongin, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Charge development on mineral surfaces is an important control on the fate of minor and trace elements in a wide range of environments, including in possible radioactive waste repositories. Formation waters have often a high ionic strength. In this study, we determined the zeta potential (ζ) of anatase in potassium chloride solutions with concentrations up to 3M (25°C). The zeta potential is the potential at the hydrodynamic shear plane. In this study, we made use of the electro-acoustic effect. This effect is based on the development of a measureable potential/current when the electrical double layer outside the shearplane is separated from a charged particle through rapid oscillation induced by a sound wave. The advantage of this type of measurement is that the particles are not subjected to a high electric field (common to typical zeta potential measurements), which leads to electrode reactions and a shift of solution pH. Measurements were collected by subtracting the ion vibration current (IVI) due to the presence of potassium and chloride ions from the CVI. The correction is necessary for measurements in solutions with I > 0.25 M. This subtraction was done at each of the measurement conditions by centrifuging the slurrly, measuring the IVI of the supernatant, reconstituting the slurry, and then measuring CVI of the slurry. Subtraction of IVI at each condition is critical because IVI changes with pH and accounts for most of raw signal. The results show that the anatase isoelectric point shifts from a pH ~6.5 to a value of ~4.5 at 1M KCl. At ionic strength in excess of 1 M KCl, the surface appears to be slightly negatively charged accross the pH range accessible by this technique (pH 2.5-10). The loss of an isoelectric point suggests that KCl is no longer an indifferent electrolyte at 1 M KCl and higher. The results are in disagreement with earlier measurements in which anatase was shown to have a positive charge at high ionic strength across the pH scale. The

  2. The ionic strength dependence of lead (II) carbonate complexation in perchlorate media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easley, Regina A.; Byrne, Robert H.

    2011-10-01

    Lead speciation in many aqueous geochemical systems is dominated by carbonate complexation. However, direct observations of Pb complexation by carbonate ions are few in number. This work represents the first investigation of the equilibrium Pb+CO32-⇌PbCO30 over a range of ionic strength. Through spectrophotometric observations of PbCO30 formation at 25 °C in NaHCO 3-NaClO 4 solutions, PbCO30 formation constants of the form COβ1=[PbCO30]/[Pb][CO32-] were determined between 0.001 and 5.0 molal ionic strength. Formation constant results were well represented by the equation: logCO3β1=(6.789±0.022)-{4.088·I0.5}/{1+1.5I0.5}+(0.244±0.012)I . This result, combined with previous critical assessments of formation constants for the equilibrium PbCO30+CO32-⇌Pb(CO)22-, was used to estimate the ionic strength dependence for the equilibrium Pb+2CO32-⇌Pb(CO)22-: logCO3β2=(10.41±0.18)-{4.088·I0.5}/{1+1.5I0.5}-(0.31±0.33)I where COβ2=[Pb(CO)22-]/[Pb][CO32-]2. The carbonate complexation constants produced in this study, combined with previous complexation constants for formation of Pb chloride and hydroxide species, were used to predict formation constants for mixed-ligand species Pb(CO)Cl, Pb(OH)Cl, and Pb(CO)OH. Formation constant estimates for the system Pb-HCO3-Cl-H were then used to assess Pb speciation in seawater. In the absence of complexation by organics, approximately 1.9% of the total lead in surface seawater ( S = 35, t = 25 °C, pH ˜8.2 (free H concentration scale)) is present as free hydrated Pb. Carbonate complexes, PbCO30 and Pb(CO)Cl, are predominant forms of Pb in seawater at high pH, and lead chloride complexes are predominant species at low pH. For pH >7.7 the sum concentration of PbCO30, Pb(CO)Cl, PbOH, and Pb(OH)Cl in seawater exceeds the sum concentration of Pb, PbCl, PbCl20, and PbCl3-.

  3. Leaching of metal(loid)s from a construction material: influence of the particle size, specific surface area and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Schmukat, A; Duester, L; Ecker, D; Schmid, H; Heil, C; Heininger, P; Ternes, T A

    2012-08-15

    Construction materials are tested worldwide for a potential release of dangerous substances to prevent adverse effects on humans and biota. It is crucial to identify and understand the processes which are decisive for the release of hazardous substances. The current study compares the results of different test methods. Taking copper slag as model material, the influence of material particle size, eluant composition and ionic strength was tested. Ionic strength and salinity significantly influenced the release of metal(loid)s in the water phase. Furthermore, it was elucidated that colloids can cause methodological artefacts. The available specific surface area exhibited a positive correlation with the release of hazardous substances. The specific surface areas of materials were determined by the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller model (BET) and four other methods. The aluminium foil method showed the best results with regard to the statistical uncertainty, compared to a 3D laser scanning method. With help of the roughness factor λ it is possible to compare the results from surface area measurements with different material particle sizes (0-250 mm). This comparability offers the potential to match the release of metal(loid)s from laboratory studies with field applications and catchment area calculations/modelling, based on the release per m(2). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrolysis, formation and ionization constants at 25/sup 0/C, and at high temperature-high ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Phillips, C.A.; Skeen, J.

    1985-02-01

    Thermochemical data for nuclear waste disposal are compiled. The resulting computerized database consists of critically evaluated data on Gibbs energy of formation, enthalpy of formation, entropy and heat capacity of selected substances for about 16 elements at 25/sup 0/C and zero ionic strength. Elements covered are Am, As, Br, C, Cl, F, I, Mo, Np, N, O, P, Pu, Si, Sr, S, and U. Values of these thermodynamic properties were used to calculate equilibrium quotients for hydrolysis, complexation and ionization reactions up to 300/sup 0/C and 3 ionic strength, for selected chemical reactions.

  5. Constitutive expression of a salinity-induced wheat WRKY transcription factor enhances salinity and ionic stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuxiang; Tian, Yanchen; Han, Lu; Yang, Xinchao

    2013-10-25

    The isolation and characterization of TaWRKY79, a wheat class II WRKY transcription factor, is described. Its 1297 bp coding region includes a 987 bp long open reading frame. TaWRKY79 was induced by stressing seedlings with either NaCl or abscisic acid (ABA). When a fusion between an 843 bp segment upstream of the TaWRKY79 coding sequence and GUS was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana, GUS staining indicated that this upstream segment captured the sequence(s) required to respond to ABA or NaCl treatment. When TaWRKY79 was constitutively expressed as a transgene in A. thaliana, the transgenic plants showed an improved capacity to extend their primary root in the presence of either 100 mM NaCl, 10 mM LiCl or 2 μM ABA. The inference was that TaWRKY79 enhanced the level of tolerance to both salinity and ionic stress, while reducing the level of sensitivity to ABA. The ABA-related genes ABA1, ABA2 ABI1 and ABI5 were all up-regulated in the TaWRKY79 transgenic plants, suggesting that the transcription factor operates in an ABA-dependent pathway. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Constitutive expression of a salinity-induced wheat WRKY transcription factor enhances salinity and ionic stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuxiang; Tian, Yanchen; Han, Lu; Yang, Xinchao

    2013-11-15

    The isolation and characterization of TaWRKY79, a wheat class II WRKY transcription factor, is described. Its 1297 bp coding region includes a 987 bp long open reading frame. TaWRKY79 was induced by stressing seedlings with either NaCl or abscisic acid (ABA). When a fusion between an 843 bp segment upstream of the TaWRKY79 coding sequence and GUS was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana, GUS staining indicated that this upstream segment captured the sequence(s) required to respond to ABA or NaCl treatment. When TaWRKY79 was constitutively expressed as a transgene in A. thaliana, the transgenic plants showed an improved capacity to extend their primary root in the presence of either 100 mM NaCl, 10 mM LiCl or 2 μM ABA. The inference was that TaWRKY79 enhanced the level of tolerance to both salinity and ionic stress, while reducing the level of sensitivity to ABA. The ABA-related genes ABA1, ABA2 ABI1 and ABI5 were all up-regulated in the TaWRKY79 transgenic plants, suggesting that the transcription factor operates in an ABA-dependent pathway.

  7. Prediction of the zeta potentials and ionic descriptors of a silica hydride stationary phase with mobile phases of different pH and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Kulsing, Chadin; Yang, Yuanzhong; Matyska, Maria T; Pesek, Joseph J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Hearn, Milton T W

    2015-02-15

    In this study, the zeta potentials of a silica hydride stationary phase (Diamond Hydride™) in the presence of different water-acetonitrile mixtures (from 0-80% (v/v) acetonitrile) of different ionic strengths (from 0-40mM) and pH values (from pH 3.0-7.0) have been investigated. Debye-Hückel theory was applied to explain the effect of changes in the pH and ionic strength of these aqueous media on the negative zeta potential of this stationary phase. The experimental zeta potentials of the Diamond Hydride™ particles as a function of acetonitrile content up to 50% (v/v) correlated (R(2)=0.998) with the predicted zeta potential values based on this established theory, when the values of the dissociation constant of all related species, as well as viscosity, dielectric constant and refractive index of the aqueous medium were taken into consideration. Further, the retention behavior of basic, acidic and neutral analytes was investigated under mobile phase conditions of higher pH and lower ionic strength. Under these conditions, the Diamond Hydride™ stationary phase surface became more negative, as assessed from the increasingly more negative zeta potentials, resulting in the ion exchange characteristics becoming more dominant and the basic analytes showing increasing retention. Ionic descriptors were derived from these chromatographic experiments based on the assumption that linear solvation energy relationships prevail. The results were compared with predicted ionic descriptors based on the different calculated zeta potential values resulting in an overall correlation of R(2)=0.888. These studies provide fundamental insights into the impact on the separation performance of changes in the zeta potential of the Diamond Hydride™ surface with the results relevant to other silica hydride and, potentially, to other types of stationary phase materials. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Sorption of cyromazine on humic acid: Effects of pH, ionic strength and foreign ions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Lin, Zhi-rong; Dong, Yuan-hua

    2014-02-01

    Cyromazine (CY) is a triazine pesticide used as an insect growth inhibitor for fly control in cattle manure, field crops, vegetables, and fruits. Sorption of CY onto humic acid (HA) may affect its environmental fate. In this study, HA was used to investigate the sorption of CY at different solution chemistry conditions (pH, ionic strength) and in the presence of foreign ions and norfloxacin. All sorption isotherms fitted well with the Freundlich and Langmuir models. The sorption reached a maximum at initial pH 4.0 over the initial pH range of 3.0-7.0, implying that the primary sorption mechanism was cation exchange interaction between CY+ species and the negatively charged functional groups of HA. Increasing Ca2+ concentration resulted in a considerable reduction in the Kd values of CY, hinting that Ca2+ had probably competed with CY+ for the cation exchange sites on the surfaces of HA. The sorption of CY on HA in different ionic media followed the order of NH4Cl ≈ KCl > K2SO4 > ZnCl2 ≈ CaCl2 at pH 5.0. Spectroscopic evidence demonstrated that the amino groups and triazine ring of CY was responsible for sorption onto HA, while the carboxyl group and the O-alkyl structure of HA participated in adsorbing CY.

  9. Construction and deconstruction of PLL/DNA multilayered films for DNA delivery: effect of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kefeng; Wang, Youxiang; Ji, Jian; Lin, Quankui; Shen, Jiacong

    2005-12-10

    Through the layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly technique, DNA was incorporated into the multilayered films with poly-l-lysine (PLL). The effect of ionic strength on the construction and deconstruction of the PLL/DNA films was investigated. It was found that the salt concentration of the deposition solution had a significant effect on the construction of the films, which might attribute to the effect of salt ions on the conformation of polyelectrolytes and interaction between PLL and DNA molecules. A salt-induced deconstruction of the PLL/DNA films was observed. The extent of the deconstruction increased with the salt concentration in the incubation solution. The mechanism of the deconstruction was discussed. Taking the advantages of the LbL technique, the erasable PLL/DNA films could deposit onto a variety of surfaces, such as vascular stent, intervention catheter and tissue engineering scaffold, to serve as a novel DNA delivery system.

  10. Autotrophic denitrification in microbial fuel cells treating low ionic strength waters.

    PubMed

    Puig, Sebastià; Coma, Marta; Desloover, Joachim; Boon, Nico; Colprim, Jesús; Balaguer, M Dolors

    2012-02-21

    The presence of elevated concentrations of nitrates in drinking water has become a serious concern worldwide. The use of autotrophic denitrification in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for waters with low ionic strengths (i.e., 1000 μS·cm(-1)) has not been considered previously. This study evaluated the feasibility of MFC technology for water denitification and also identified and quantified potential energy losses that result from their usage. The low conductivity (<1600 μS·cm(-1)) of water limited the nitrogen removal efficiency and power production of MFCs and led to the incomplete reduction of nitrate and the nitrous oxide (N(2)O) production (between 4 and 20% of nitrogen removed). Cathodic overpotential was identified as the main energy loss factors (83-90% of total losses). That high overpotential was influenced by denitrification intermediates (NO(2)(-) and N(2)O) and the potential used by microorganisms for growth, activation, and maintenance.

  11. Cytochrome c binding to Apaf-1: The effects of dATP and ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Purring-Koch, Cherie; McLendon, George

    2000-01-01

    In the apoptosis pathway in mammals, cytochrome c and dATP are critical cofactors in the activation of caspase 9 by Apaf-1. Until now, the detailed sequence of events in which these cofactors interact has been unclear. Here, we show through fluorescence polarization experiments that cytochrome c can bind to Apaf-1 in the absence of dATP; when dATP is added to the cytochrome c·Apaf-1 complex, further assembly occurs to produce the apoptosome. These findings, along with the discovery that the exposed heme edge of cytochrome c is involved in the cytochrome c·Apaf-1 interaction, are confirmed through enhanced chemiluminescence visualization of native PAGE gels and through acrylamide fluorescence quenching experiments. We also report here that the cytochrome c·Apaf-1 interaction depends highly on ionic strength, indicating that there is a strong electrostatic interaction between the two proteins. PMID:11035811

  12. Motion of Molecular Probes and Viscosity Scaling in Polyelectrolyte Solutions at Physiological Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Sozanski, Krzysztof; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Sznajder, Anna; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We investigate transport properties of model polyelectrolyte systems at physiological ionic strength (0.154 M). Covering a broad range of flow length scales—from diffusion of molecular probes to macroscopic viscous flow—we establish a single, continuous function describing the scale dependent viscosity of high-salt polyelectrolyte solutions. The data are consistent with the model developed previously for electrically neutral polymers in a good solvent. The presented approach merges the power-law scaling concepts of de Gennes with the idea of exponential length scale dependence of effective viscosity in complex liquids. The result is a simple and applicable description of transport properties of high-salt polyelectrolyte solutions at all length scales, valid for motion of single molecules as well as macroscopic flow of the complex liquid. PMID:27536866

  13. DNA Cholesteric Pitch as a Function of Density and Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Christopher B.; Hong, Helen; Strey, Helmut H.

    2005-01-01

    The nature of chiral interactions among chiral biopolymers, such as DNA, protein α-helices, and rodlike virus particles, remains elusive. In particular, a satisfactory model connecting molecular chiral interactions and the pitch of the resulting chiral mesophases is lacking. We report the measurement of short-fragment (146-bp) DNA cholesteric spherulite pitch as a function of osmotic pressure, average DNA interaxial spacing, and salt concentration. We determined cholesteric pitch and interaxial spacing by polarizing optical microscopy and x-ray scattering, respectively, from which the twist-angle between DNA molecules can be calculated. Surprisingly, we found that decreasing ionic strength resulted in weaker chiral interactions between DNA chains, as evidenced by the decrease in the twist-angle, and consequent increase in the cholesteric pitch, for a fixed interaxial spacing. We propose that this behavior can be explained by increased smearing-out of the helical charge pattern along DNA as the Debye screening length is increased. PMID:16040751

  14. Conformations of polyelectrolyte macromolecules with different charge density in solutions of different ionic strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommes, O. A.; Okatova, O. V.; Pavlov, G. M.

    2016-11-01

    Studies of charged polymer chains are interesting in both fundamental and applied aspects. Especially, polyelectrolytes attract huge attention of researchers due to their ability to form interpolymer complexes with synthetic and biopolymers. The study was carried out on the fractions of hydrophilic copolymers of N-methyl-N-vinyl acetamide and N-methyl-N-vinyl amine hydrochloride of different degrees of polymerization and of different charge density using methods of molecular hydrodynamics. Hydrodynamic and conformational characteristics as well as molar masses of isolated molecules were estimated. In addition, the intrinsic viscosity of fractions was studied at the extreme ionic strengths - in distilled water (∼10-6M) and in 6M NaCl. Scaling relations for intrinsic viscosity, sedimentation and translational diffusion coefficients with molar mass were obtained. Conformational behavior of macromolecules with different linear charge density was compared.

  15. Multilaboratory study of the shifts in the IEP of anatase at high ionic strengths.

    PubMed

    Kosmulski, Marek; Dukhin, Andrei S; Priester, Torsten; Rosenholm, Jarl B

    2003-07-01

    The zeta-potentials of anatase at pH 2-11 in 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 1 moldm(-3) NaI were studied using the DT 1200 in three laboratories. At [NaI]=1 moldm(-3) the zeta-potentials were positive over the entire pH range. The previously observed tendency of the isoelectric point of anatase to shift to high pH at high ionic strength (M. Kosmulski, J.B. Rosenholm, J. Phys. Chem. 100 (1996) 11681) and the salt specificity of this effect were confirmed. The zeta-potentials obtained in different laboratories using DT 1200 are consistent within 3 mV.

  16. The effects of variable water salinity and ionic composition on the plasma status of the Pacific Hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii).

    PubMed

    Sardella, B A; Baker, D W; Brauner, C J

    2009-08-01

    Hagfish are the most pleisiomorphic extant craniates, and based on the similarity of ionic concentrations between their internal milieu and seawater (SW), they have long been touted as a model for osmo- and ionoconformation. As a result, the lack of direct symmetry between hagfish plasma and the environment with respect to [Na(+)], [Cl(-)], [Mg(2+)], and [Ca(2+)] have been left largely unexplored. In order to determine the capacity of hagfish to regulate their blood compartment, we exposed Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii) to 24, 32, 40, and 48 g/l salinity for 48 h, as well as to two treatments where a portion of the water [Na(+)] was replaced with either Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) at constant salinity for up to 6 days. Following exposure, we measured plasma ion status, pH, and total carbon dioxide (TCO(2)). As expected, our results indicated that hagfish had no capacity to regulate plasma osmolality, [Na(+)], or [Cl(-)], but they did maintain plasma [Mg(2+)] and [Ca(2+)] nearly constant despite fluctuation of environmental salinity or elevated water [Mg(2+)] and [Ca(2+)] (two- and sevenfold, respectively). Furthermore, exposure to elevated water [Mg(2+)] and [Ca(2+)] resulted in a large increase of plasma TCO(2) with little to no increase of plasma pH. We concluded that hagfish may control plasma [Mg(2+)] and [Ca(2+)] at levels below that of their environment via secretion of HCO(3) (-), similar to the mechanisms described in the intestine of teleosts. We speculate that secretion of HCO(3) (-) likely evolved to maintain plasma [Mg(2+)] and [Ca(2+)] below environmental levels (both of which negatively affect nervous function and muscle contraction if elevated), and was an exaptation for the development of water-absorption mechanisms in the intestine of marine osmoregulators. The ancestors of modern hagfish are thought to have never entered freshwater, thus investigations into their ionoregulatory ability potentially have profound implications regarding the evolution of

  17. Experimental determination of lead carbonate solubility at high ionic strengths: A Pitzer model description

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yongliang

    2015-05-06

    In this article, solubility measurements of lead carbonate, PbCO3(cr), cerussite, as a function of total ionic strengths are conducted in the mixtures of NaCl and NaHCO3 up to I = 1.2 mol•kg–1 and in the mixtures of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 up to I = 5.2 mol•kg–1, at room temperature (22.5 ± 0.5 °C). The solubility constant (log Ksp) for cerussite, PbCO3(cr) = Pb2+ + CO32- was determined as –13.76 ± 0.15 (2σ) with a set of Pitzer parameters describing the specific interactions of PbCO3(aq), Pb(CO3)22-, and Pb(CO3)Cl with the bulk-supporting electrolytes, based on the Pitzer model. The model developed in this work can reproduce the experimental results including model-independent solubility values from the literature over a wide range of ionic strengths with satisfactory accuracy. The model is expected to find applications in numerous fields, including the accurate description of chemical behavior of lead in geological repositories, the modeling of formation of oxidized Pb–Zn ore deposits, and the environmental remediation of lead contamination.

  18. Mechanical strength and ionic conductivity of polymer electrolyte membranes prepared from cellulose acetate-lithium perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudiarti, T.; Wahyuningrum, D.; Bundjali, B.; Made Arcana, I.

    2017-07-01

    The need for secondary batteries is increasing every year. The secondary battery using a liquid electrolyte has some weaknesses. A solid polymer electrolyte is the alternative electrolytes developed to replace the liquid electrolyte type. This study was conducted to determine the effect of lithium perchlorate content on the polymer electrolyte membranes of cellulose acetate-LiClO4. The cellulose acetate-LiClO4 membranes were prepared by mixing cellulose acetate and LiClO4 in various compositions using tetrahydrofurane (THF) as solvent. The effect of LiClO4 ratios on the polymer electrolyte membranes was studied by analysis of the functional groups using FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) spectroscopy measurement, the ionic conductivity by EIS (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy) method, and mechanical properties by tensile tester measurements. The ionic conductivity of the membranes increased with the increasing in the ratios of lithium perchlorate content in the membranes and reached the optimum value at 1.79×10-4 S cm-1 corresponded to the cellulose acetate doped with 25% (w/w) LiClO4 membrane. The presence of 10% (w/w) LiClO4 content within cellulose acetate membranes can increase the mechanical properties of the membranes from 19.89 to 43.29 MPa for tensile strength, and from 2.55 to 4.53% for elongation at break. However, when the cellulose acetate membranes containing ratio of LiClO4 more than 10% (w/w), consequently the tensile strength tended to decrease and the elongation at break was increased.

  19. Soluble hydrocarbons uptake by porous carbonaceous adsorbents at different water ionic strength and temperature: something to consider in oil spills.

    PubMed

    Flores-Chaparro, Carlos E; Ruiz, Luis Felipe Chazaro; Alfaro-De la Torre, Ma Catalina; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, petrochemical operations involve risks to the environment and one of the biggest is oil spills. Low molecular aromatics like benzene, toluene, and naphthalene dissolve in water, and because of their toxicological characteristics, these produce severe consequences to the environment. The oil spill cleanup strategies are mainly designed to deal with the heavy fractions accumulated on the water surface. Unfortunately, very limited information is available regarding the treatment of dissolved fractions.A commercial (Filtrasorb 400) and modified activated carbons were evaluated to remove benzene, toluene, and naphthalene from water, which are the most soluble aromatic hydrocarbons, at different ionic strengths (I) and temperatures (0-0.76 M and 4-25 °C, respectively). This allowed simulating the conditions of fresh and saline waters when assessing the performance of these adsorbents. It was found that the hydrocarbons adsorption affinity increased 12 % at a I of 0.5 M, due to the less negative charge of the adsorbent, while at a high I (≃0.76 M) in a synthetic seawater, the adsorption capacity decreased 21 % that was attributed to the adsorbent's pores occlusion by water clusters. Approximately, 40 h were needed to reach equilibrium; however, the maximum adsorption rate occurred within the first hour in all the cases. Moreover, the hydrocarbons adsorption and desorption capacities increased when the temperature augmented from 4 to 25 °C. On the other hand, thermally and chemically modified materials showed that the interactions between adsorbent-contaminant increased with the basification degree of the adsorbent surface.

  20. Pea lectin receptor-like kinase functions in salinity adaptation without yield penalty, by alleviating osmotic and ionic stresses and upregulating stress-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Neha; Pandey, Prashant; Srivastava, Vineet Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-05-01

    Lectin receptor-like kinases (LecRLKs) are members of RLK family composed of lectin-like extracellular recognition domain, transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic kinase domain. LecRLKs are plasma membrane proteins believed to be involved in signal transduction. However, most of the members of the protein family even in plants have not been functionally well characterized. Herein, we show that Pisum sativum LecRLK (PsLecRLK) localized in plasma membrane systems and/or other regions of the cell and its transcript upregulated under salinity stress. Overexpression of PsLecRLK in transgenic tobacco plants confers salinity stress tolerance by alleviating both the ionic as well the osmotic component of salinity stress. The transgenic plants show better tissue compartmentalization of Na(+) and higher ROS scavenging activity which probably results in lower membrane damage, improved growth and yield maintenance even under salinity stress. Also, expression of several genes involved in cellular homeostasis is perturbed by PsLecRLK overexpression. Alleviation of osmotic and ionic components of salinity stress along with reduced oxidative damage and upregulation of stress-responsive genes in transgenic plants under salinity stress conditions could be possible mechanism facilitating enhanced stress tolerance. This study presents PsLecRLK as a promising candidate for crop improvement and also opens up new avenue to investigate its signalling pathway.

  1. Systematic Approach for Calculating the Concentrations of Chemical Species in Multiequilibrium Problems: Inclusion of the Ionic Strength Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeza-Baeza, Juan J.; Garcia-Alvarez-Coque, M. Celia

    2012-01-01

    A general systematic approach including ionic strength effects is proposed for the numerical calculation of concentrations of chemical species in multiequilibrium problems. This approach extends the versatility of the approach presented in a previous article and is applied using the Solver option of the Excel spreadsheet to solve real problems…

  2. CHLORIDEDETERMINATION IN HIGH IONIC STRENGTH SOLUTION OF AMMONIUM ACETATE USING NEGATIVE ION ELECTRON SPRAY IONIZATION (HPLC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A precise ion chromatography method has been developed for the determination of chloride in high ionic strength ammonium acetate solutions (10-5 M-5 M) using sodium carbonate/sodium bicarbonate as eluent. Negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry was used for q...

  3. EFFECTS OF PH, SOLID/SOLUTION RATIO, IONIC STRENGTH, AND ORGANIC ACIDS ON PB AND CD SOPRTION ON KAOLINITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potentiometric and ion-selective electrode titrations together with batch sorption/desorption experiments, were performed to explain the aqueous and surface complexation reactions between kaolinite, Pb, Cd and three organic acids. Variables included pH, ionic strength, metal conc...

  4. A novel conductance glucose biosensor in ultra-low ionic strength solution triggered by the oxidation of Ag nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Song, Yonghai; Chen, Jingyi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Ping; Li, Hongbo; Wang, Li

    2015-09-03

    A simple, sensitive and effective method to detect glucose in ultra-low ionic strength solution containing citrate-capped silver nanoparticles (CCAgNPs) was developed by monitoring the change of solution conductance. Glucose was catalyzed into gluconic acid firstly by glucose oxidase in an O2-saturated solution accompanied by the reduction of O2 into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Then, CCAgNPs was oxidized by H2O2 into Ag(+) and the capping regent of citrate was released at the same time. All these resulted Ag(+), gluconic acid and the released citrate would contribute to the increase of solution ionic strength together, leading to a detectable increase of solution conductance. And a novel conductance glucose biosensor was developed with a routine linear range of 0.06-4.0 mM and a suitable detection limit of 18.0 μM. The novel glucose biosensor was further applied in energy drink sample and proven to be suitable for practical system with low ionic strength. The proposed conductance biosensor achieved a significant breakthrough of glucose detection in ultra-low ionic strength media.

  5. EFFECTS OF PH, SOLID/SOLUTION RATIO, IONIC STRENGTH, AND ORGANIC ACIDS ON PB AND CD SOPRTION ON KAOLINITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potentiometric and ion-selective electrode titrations together with batch sorption/desorption experiments, were performed to explain the aqueous and surface complexation reactions between kaolinite, Pb, Cd and three organic acids. Variables included pH, ionic strength, metal conc...

  6. Ionic strength dependence of the oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 in sodium chloride particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Hashim M.; Iedema, Martin J.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Cowin, James P.

    2014-06-20

    The reaction of sulfur dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of deliquesced (>75% RH) sodium particles was studied by utilizing a crossflow-mini reactor. The reaction kinetics was followed by observing chloride depletion in particles by computer-controlled scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, namely SEM/EDX. The reactions take place in concentrated mixed salt brine aerosols, for which no complete kinetic equilibrium data previously existed. We measured the Henry’s law solubility of H2O2 to close that gap. We also calculated the reaction rate as the particle transforms continuously from concentrated NaCl brine to eventually a mixed NaHSO4 plus H2SO4 brine solution. The reaction rate of the SO2 oxidation by H2O2 was found to be influenced by the change in ionic strength as the particle undergoes compositional transformation, following closely the dependence of the third order rate constant on ionic strength as predicted rates using previously established rate equations. This is the first study that has measured the ionic strength dependence of sulfate formation (in non-aqueous media) from oxidation of mixed salt brine aerosols in the presence of H2O2. It also gives the first report of the Henry’s law constant of H2O2 dependence on ionic strength.

  7. Retention behavior of microparticles in gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF): effect of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Woo, In Suk; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Seungho

    2015-01-01

    Retention behavior of micron-sized particles in gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) was studied in this study. Effects of ionic strength and flow rate as well as the viscosity of the GrFFF carrier liquid was investigated on the size-based selectivity (Sd), retention ratio (R), and plate height (H) of micron-sized particles using polystyrene latex beads as model particles. It was found that the retention ratio of microparticles increases with increasing flow rate or the viscosity of the carrier liquid as the particles are forced away from the accumulation wall by increased hydrodynamic lift forces (HLF). On the other hand, the retention time increases (retention ratio decreases) with increasing ionic strength of the carrier liquid at the same flow rate, due to decreased repulsive interaction between the particles and the channel accumulation wall (glass in this study) allowing the particles approach closer to the wall. Results suggest the ionic strength of the carrier liquid plays a critical role in determining retention of microparticles in GrFFF as well as the viscosity or the flow rate of the carrier liquid. It was found that the resolution and the separation time could be improved by increasing the carrier viscosity and by carefully adjusting the ionic strength of the carrier liquid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ionic Strength Effect on the Rate of Reduction of Hexacyanoferrate (III) by Ascorbic Acid: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Kenneth W.; Olson, June A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment that allows students to test the effect of ionic strength on the rates of a reaction between ions. The reduction of hexacyanoferrate III by ascorbic acid is detailed. Comparisons with the iodine clock reaction are made. (CS)

  9. Force spectroscopy unravels the role of ionic strength on DNA-cisplatin interaction: Modulating the binding parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, L.; Rocha, M. S.

    2017-09-01

    In the present work we have gone a step forward in the understanding of the DNA-cisplatin interaction, investigating the role of the ionic strength on the complexes formation. To achieve this task, we use optical tweezers to perform force spectroscopy on the DNA-cisplatin complexes, determining their mechanical parameters as a function of the drug concentration in the sample for three different buffers. From such measurements, we determine the binding parameters and study their behavior as a function of the ionic strength. The equilibrium binding constant decreases with the counterion concentration ([Na]) and can be used to estimate the effective net charge of cisplatin in solution. The cooperativity degree of the binding reaction, on the other hand, increases with the ionic strength, as a result of the different conformational changes induced by the drug on the double-helix when binding under different buffer conditions. Such results can be used to modulate the drug binding to DNA, by appropriately setting the ionic strength of the surrounding buffer. The conclusions drawn provide significant new insights on the complex cooperative interactions between the DNA molecule and the class of platinum-based compounds, much used in chemotherapies.

  10. Ionic Strength Effect on the Rate of Reduction of Hexacyanoferrate (III) by Ascorbic Acid: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Kenneth W.; Olson, June A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment that allows students to test the effect of ionic strength on the rates of a reaction between ions. The reduction of hexacyanoferrate III by ascorbic acid is detailed. Comparisons with the iodine clock reaction are made. (CS)

  11. The role of ionic strength and grain size on the transport of colloids in unsaturated sand columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitropoulou, Polyxeni N.; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2013-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to better understand the combined effects of ionic strength, and sand grain size on colloid fate and transport in unsaturated porous media. Spherical fluorescent polymer microspheres with three different sizes (0.075, 0.30 and 2.1 μm), and laboratory columns packed with two size fractions of clean quartz sand (0.513 and 0.181 mm) were used. The saturation level of the packed columns was set to 83-95% with solutions having a wide range of ionic strength (0.1-1000 mM). The electrophoretic mobility of colloids and sand grains were evaluated for all the experimental conditions employed. The various experimental collision efficiencies were quantified using the classical colloid filtration theory. The theoretical collision efficiencies were estimated with appropriate DLVO energies using a Maxwell model. The experimental results suggested that the retention of the bigger colloids (2.1 μm) was slightly higher compared to the conservative tracer and smaller colloids (0.3 and 0.075 μm) in deionized-distilled-water, indicating sorption at air-water interfaces or straining. Moreover, relatively smaller attachment was observed onto fine than medium quartz sand. The mass recovery of the 0.3 μm microspheres in NaCl solution was shown to significantly decrease with increasing ionic strength. Both the experimental and theoretical collision efficiencies based on colloid interactions with solid-water interfaces, were increased with increasing ionic strength.

  12. State-of-the-Art pH Electrode Quality Control for Measurements of Acidic, Low Ionic Strength Waters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Metcalf, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the derivation of the relationship between the pH measurement error and the resulting percentage error in hydrogen ion concentration including the use of variable activity coefficients. The relative influence of the ionic strength of the solution on the percentage error is shown. (CW)

  13. Systematic Approach for Calculating the Concentrations of Chemical Species in Multiequilibrium Problems: Inclusion of the Ionic Strength Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeza-Baeza, Juan J.; Garcia-Alvarez-Coque, M. Celia

    2012-01-01

    A general systematic approach including ionic strength effects is proposed for the numerical calculation of concentrations of chemical species in multiequilibrium problems. This approach extends the versatility of the approach presented in a previous article and is applied using the Solver option of the Excel spreadsheet to solve real problems…

  14. CHLORIDEDETERMINATION IN HIGH IONIC STRENGTH SOLUTION OF AMMONIUM ACETATE USING NEGATIVE ION ELECTRON SPRAY IONIZATION (HPLC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A precise ion chromatography method has been developed for the determination of chloride in high ionic strength ammonium acetate solutions (10-5 M-5 M) using sodium carbonate/sodium bicarbonate as eluent. Negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry was used for q...

  15. TiO₂ nanoparticle transport and retention through saturated limestone porous media under various ionic strength conditions.

    PubMed

    Esfandyari Bayat, Ali; Junin, Radzuan; Derahman, Mohd Nawi; Samad, Adlina Abdul

    2015-09-01

    The impact of ionic strength (from 0.003 to 500mM) and salt type (NaCl vs MgCl2) on transport and retention of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) in saturated limestone porous media was systematically studied. Vertical columns were packed with limestone grains. The NPs were introduced as a pulse suspended in aqueous solutions and breakthrough curves in the column outlet were generated using an ultraviolent-visible spectrometry. Presence of NaCl and MgCl2 in the suspensions were found to have a significant influence on the electrokinetic properties of the NP aggregates and limestone grains. In NaCl and MgCl2 solutions, the deposition rates of the TiO2-NP aggregates were enhanced with the increase in ionic strength, a trend consistent with traditional Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Furthermore, the NP aggregates retention increased in the porous media with ionic strength. The presence of salts also caused a considerable delay in the NPs breakthrough time. MgCl2 as compared to NaCl was found to be more effective agent for the deposition and retention of TiO2-NPs. The experimental results followed closely the general trends predicted by the filtration and DLVO calculations. Overall, it was found that TiO2-NP mobility in the limestone porous media depends on ionic strength and salt type. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Ionic Strength on Bacterial Adhesion and Stability of Flocs in a Wastewater Activated Sludge System

    PubMed Central

    Zita, Anna; Hermansson, Malte

    1994-01-01

    The success of biological wastewater treatment is to a large extent governed by the ability of bacteria to induce floc formation, thereby facilitating the separation of particles from the treated water. We performed studies on the dynamics of floc stability, the desorption of cells from the flocs, and the reflocculation of detached material. The floc stability was affected by the ionic strength of the medium in a way that strongly suggests that the interactions between the floc components can be explained by the theory of Derjaugin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO theory). At increasing concentrations of electrolytes, the stability of the flocs increased. However, above an ionic strength of about 0.1 the floc stability decreased, and it seems that at this high electrolyte concentration the DLVO theory cannot be applied. The reversibility of the electrostatic double-layer effects was experimentally shown by treating the sludge repeatedly with a low-ionic-strength solution until parts of the flocs detached. When salt was added at this point, flocs re-form, resulting in a dramatic decrease in the turbidity of the supernatant liquid. Both reflocculation and detachment of floc material were seen with calcium as well as with potassium. This finding clearly indicates that the reflocculation and destabilization of flocs were due to changes in double-layer thickness rather than bridging effects of multivalent ions such as calcium. The results indicate that the ionic strength may well be an important factor for the floc stability in wastewater in situ. Images PMID:16349365

  17. Low absorption state of phycocyanin from Acaryochloris marina antenna system: on the interplay between ionic strength and excitonic coupling.

    PubMed

    Nganou, Collins

    2013-07-28

    This paper studies the excitonic factor in the excited state energy transfer of phycobilisome (PBS) by using a polarized time-resolved pump-probe and by changing the ionic strength of the cofactors' medium in the PBS of Acaryochloris marina (A. marina). As a result, the interplay between the surrounding medium and the closely excited adjacent cofactors is shown to be a negligible factor of the excitonic decay kinetics at 618 nm of the phycocyanin (PC), while it appears as a driving factor of an increase in excitonic delocalization at 630 nm. The obtained anisotropy values are consistent with the contribution of ionic strength in the excitonic mechanism in PBS. These values were 0.38 in high ionic strength and 0.4 in low ionic strength at 618 nm, and 0.52 in high ionic strength and 0.4 in low ionic strength at 630-635 nm. The anisotropy value of 0.52 in high phosphate is similar at 630 nm and 635 nm, which is consistent with an excitonic delocalization band at 635 nm. The 635 nm band is suggested to show the true low energy level of PC in A. marina PBS. The anisotropy decay kinetic at 630 nm suggests that the excited state population of PC is not all equilibrated in 3 ps because of the existence of the 10 ps decay kinetic component. The presence of the slow kinetic decay component in high, and low ionic strength, is consistent with a 10 and 14 ps energy transfer pathway, while the 450 fs kinetic decay component is consistent with the presence of an additional excitation energy transfer pathway between adjacent α84 and β84. Furthermore, the 450 fs decay kinetic is suggested to be trapped in the trimer, while the 400 fs decay kinetic rules out an excitonic flow from low energy level PC to allophycoyanin. This excitonic flow may occur between β84 in adjacent trimers, towards the low energy state of the PBS rod.

  18. Colloidal particle transport in unsaturated porous media: Influence of flow velocity and ionic strength on colloidal particle retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predelus, Dieuseul; Coutinho, Paiva Artur; Lassabatere, Laurent; Winiarsky, Thierry; Angulo Jaramillo, Rafael

    2014-05-01

    Recently, anthropogenic colloidal particles are increasingly present into the environment. They can carry contaminants or constitute themselves a risk for the environment. Several factors can influence the fate of colloidal particles in soils. This work presents the investigation of effects of flow velocity and ionic strength on colloidal particles retention in unsaturated porous media. Experiments were carried out in laboratory column (D = 10 cm, L = 30 cm) with compacted mixture sand-gravel from a fluvioglacial basin of Lyon, France. Fluorescents nanoparticles (D = 50 to 60 nm) of silica doped with fluorescent organic molecules (fluorescein) have been used to simulate colloid particle transport. A solution of a non-reactive tracer, Br-, was used to determine the water flow behavior. Three different unsaturated water flow velocities (i.e. V = 0.025, 0.064 and 0.127 cm/min) and five ionic strengths (i.e. IS = 1, 5, 50, 100 and 200 mM at pH=8.5) have been tested for the case of a pulse injection of a colloidal particle solution at a concentration of 2 mg/L. Breakthrough curves are modeled by the non-equilibrium transfer model MIM (mobile and immobile water fraction), taking into account a sink term to reflect the colloidal particles adsorption. Results show that, when the flow velocity increases, the colloidal particle retention decreases. The decrease in flow velocity allows a better homogenization of the flow. In addition, colloidal entrapment is favored by the fact that their pore velocity is reduced. The retention of colloidal particle is function of ionic strength as well. Indeed, when the ionic strength increases, the retention increases. However for ionic strength higher than 50 mM, the retention decreases suggesting that there is a threshold value for the ionic strength with respect to the retention of colloidal particles. The retention profiles at the end of experiments indicate that the colloidal particles are retained at the inlet of the columns

  19. Low absorption state of phycocyanin from Acaryochloris marina antenna system: On the interplay between ionic strength and excitonic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nganou, Collins

    2013-07-01

    This paper studies the excitonic factor in the excited state energy transfer of phycobilisome (PBS) by using a polarized time-resolved pump-probe and by changing the ionic strength of the cofactors' medium in the PBS of Acaryochloris marina (A. marina). As a result, the interplay between the surrounding medium and the closely excited adjacent cofactors is shown to be a negligible factor of the excitonic decay kinetics at 618 nm of the phycocyanin (PC), while it appears as a driving factor of an increase in excitonic delocalization at 630 nm. The obtained anisotropy values are consistent with the contribution of ionic strength in the excitonic mechanism in PBS. These values were 0.38 in high ionic strength and 0.4 in low ionic strength at 618 nm, and 0.52 in high ionic strength and 0.4 in low ionic strength at 630-635 nm. The anisotropy value of 0.52 in high phosphate is similar at 630 nm and 635 nm, which is consistent with an excitonic delocalization band at 635 nm. The 635 nm band is suggested to show the true low energy level of PC in A. marina PBS. The anisotropy decay kinetic at 630 nm suggests that the excited state population of PC is not all equilibrated in 3 ps because of the existence of the 10 ps decay kinetic component. The presence of the slow kinetic decay component in high, and low ionic strength, is consistent with a 10 and 14 ps energy transfer pathway, while the 450 fs kinetic decay component is consistent with the presence of an additional excitation energy transfer pathway between adjacent α84 and β84. Furthermore, the 450 fs decay kinetic is suggested to be trapped in the trimer, while the 400 fs decay kinetic rules out an excitonic flow from low energy level PC to allophycoyanin. This excitonic flow may occur between β84 in adjacent trimers, towards the low energy state of the PBS rod.

  20. Behavioural salinity preferences of juvenile green sturgeon Acipenser medirostris acclimated to fresh water and full-strength salt water.

    PubMed

    Poletto, J B; Cocherell, D E; Klimley, A P; Cech, J J; Fangue, N A

    2013-02-01

    To quantify the salinity preference of juvenile green sturgeon Acipenser medirostris, two groups of A. medirostris [140 days post hatch (dph); total length (L(T) ) 38.0-52.5 cm] were acclimated to either near fresh water (mean ± s.e. salinity = 3.2 ± 0.6) or full-strength salt water (34.1 ± 1.2) over 8 weeks. Following acclimation, the two groups were divided into experimental and control groups, where experimental A. medirostris from both freshwater and saltwater acclimations were individually introduced (200-220 dph) into a rectangular salinity-preference flume (maximum salinity gradient: 5-33). Control A. medirostris were presented with only their acclimation water (fresh water or salt water) on both sides of the flume. It was demonstrated that A. medirostris acclimated to both salt water and fresh water spent a significantly greater amount of time on the side of the testing area with the highest salinity concentration (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively) while control A. medirostris spent an equal amount of time on each side of the flume. These findings indicate that juvenile A. medirostris are not only capable of detecting salt water within the first year of their lives but perhaps are actively seeking out saline environments as they move through a watershed. Establishing A. medirostris salinity preferences provides a better understanding of the early life history of this threatened species, shedding light on possible outmigration timing.

  1. Protein interactions studied by SAXS: effect of ionic strength and protein concentration for BSA in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fajun; Skoda, Maximilian W A; Jacobs, Robert M J; Martin, Richard A; Martin, Christopher M; Schreiber, Frank

    2007-01-11

    We have studied a series of samples of bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions with protein concentration, c, ranging from 2 to 500 mg/mL and ionic strength, I, from 0 to 2 M by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The scattering intensity distribution was compared to simulations using an oblate ellipsoid form factor with radii of 17 x 42 x 42 A, combined with either a screened Coulomb, repulsive structure factor, SSC(q), or an attractive square-well structure factor, SSW(q). At pH = 7, BSA is negatively charged. At low ionic strength, I < 0.3 M, the total interaction exhibits a decrease of the repulsive interaction when compared to the salt-free solution, as the net surface charge is screened, and the data can be fitted by assuming an ellipsoid form factor and screened Coulomb interaction. At moderate ionic strength (0.3-0.5 M), the interaction is rather weak, and a hard-sphere structure factor has been used to simulate the data with a higher volume fraction. Upon further increase of the ionic strength (I >or= 1.0 M), the overall interaction potential was dominated by an additional attractive potential, and the data could be successfully fitted by an ellipsoid form factor and a square-well potential model. The fit parameters, well depth and well width, indicate that the attractive potential caused by a high salt concentration is weak and long-ranged. Although the long-range, attractive potential dominated the protein interaction, no gelation or precipitation was observed in any of the samples. This is explained by the increase of a short-range, repulsive interaction between protein molecules by forming a hydration layer with increasing salt concentration. The competition between long-range, attractive and short-range, repulsive interactions accounted for the stability of concentrated BSA solution at high ionic strength.

  2. Colloid transport in unsaturated porous media: the role of water content and ionic strength on particle straining.

    PubMed

    Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A; van Genuchten, Martinus Th; Walker, Sharon L

    2008-02-19

    Packed column and mathematical modeling studies were conducted to explore the influence of water saturation, pore-water ionic strength, and grain size on the transport of latex microspheres (1.1 microm) in porous media. Experiments were carried out under chemically unfavorable conditions for colloid attachment to both solid-water interfaces (SWI) and air-water interfaces (AWI) using negatively charged and hydrophilic colloids and modifying the solution chemistry with a bicarbonate buffer to pH 10. Interaction energy calculations and complementary batch experiments were conducted and demonstrated that partitioning of colloids to the SWI and AWI was insignificant across the range of the ionic strengths considered. The breakthrough curve and final deposition profile were measured in each experiment indicating colloid retention was highly dependent on the suspension ionic strength, water content, and sand grain size. In contrast to conventional filtration theory, most colloids were found deposited close to the column inlet, and hyper-exponential deposition profiles were observed. A mathematical model, accounting for time- and depth-dependent straining, produced a reasonably good fit for both the breakthrough curves and final deposition profiles. Experimental and modeling results suggest that straining--the retention of colloids in low velocity regions of porous media such as grain junctions--was the primary mechanism of colloid retention under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The extent of stagnant regions of flow within the pore structure is enhanced with decreasing water content, leading to a greater amount of retention. Ionic strength also contributes to straining, because the number of colloids that are held in the secondary energy minimum increases with ionic strength. These weakly associated colloids are prone to be translated to stagnation regions formed at grain-grain junctions, the solid-water-air triple point, and dead-end pores and then becoming

  3. The role of biomacromolecular crowding, ionic strength, and physicochemical gradients in the complexities of life's emergence.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2009-06-01

    We have developed a general scenario of prebiotic physicochemical evolution during the Earth's Hadean eon and reviewed the relevant literature. We suggest that prebiotic chemical evolution started in microspaces with membranous walls, where external temperature and osmotic gradients were coupled to free-energy gradients of potential chemical reactions. The key feature of this scenario is the onset of an emergent evolutionary transition within the microspaces that is described by the model of complex vectorial chemistry. This transition occurs at average macromolecular crowding of 20 to 30% of the cell volume, when the ranges of action of stabilizing colloidal forces (screened electrostatic forces, hydration, and excluded volume forces) become commensurate. Under these conditions, the macromolecules divide the interior of microspaces into dynamically crowded macromolecular regions and topologically complementary electrolyte pools. Small ions and ionic metabolites are transported vectorially between the electrolyte pools and through the (semiconducting) electrolyte pathways of the crowded macromolecular regions from their high electrochemical potential (where they are biochemically produced) to their lower electrochemical potential (where they are consumed). We suggest a sequence of tentative transitions between major evolutionary periods during the Hadean eon as follows: (i) the early water world, (ii) the appearance of land masses, (iii) the pre-RNA world, (iv) the onset of complex vectorial chemistry, and (v) the RNA world and evolution toward Darwinian thresholds. We stress the importance of high ionic strength of the Hadean ocean (short Debye's lengths) and screened electrostatic interactions that enabled the onset of the vectorial structure of the cytoplasm and the possibility of life's emergence.

  4. The Role of Biomacromolecular Crowding, Ionic Strength, and Physicochemical Gradients in the Complexities of Life's Emergence

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2009-01-01

    Summary: We have developed a general scenario of prebiotic physicochemical evolution during the Earth's Hadean eon and reviewed the relevant literature. We suggest that prebiotic chemical evolution started in microspaces with membranous walls, where external temperature and osmotic gradients were coupled to free-energy gradients of potential chemical reactions. The key feature of this scenario is the onset of an emergent evolutionary transition within the microspaces that is described by the model of complex vectorial chemistry. This transition occurs at average macromolecular crowding of 20 to 30% of the cell volume, when the ranges of action of stabilizing colloidal forces (screened electrostatic forces, hydration, and excluded volume forces) become commensurate. Under these conditions, the macromolecules divide the interior of microspaces into dynamically crowded macromolecular regions and topologically complementary electrolyte pools. Small ions and ionic metabolites are transported vectorially between the electrolyte pools and through the (semiconducting) electrolyte pathways of the crowded macromolecular regions from their high electrochemical potential (where they are biochemically produced) to their lower electrochemical potential (where they are consumed). We suggest a sequence of tentative transitions between major evolutionary periods during the Hadean eon as follows: (i) the early water world, (ii) the appearance of land masses, (iii) the pre-RNA world, (iv) the onset of complex vectorial chemistry, and (v) the RNA world and evolution toward Darwinian thresholds. We stress the importance of high ionic strength of the Hadean ocean (short Debye's lengths) and screened electrostatic interactions that enabled the onset of the vectorial structure of the cytoplasm and the possibility of life's emergence. PMID:19487732

  5. Influence of ionic strength and beta2-glycoprotein I concentration on agglutination of like-charged phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Perutková, Šárka; Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Rozman, Blaž; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Iglič, Aleš

    2013-11-01

    The effect of ionic strength on adhesion between negatively charged giant unilamellar vesicles induced by beta2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) was studied experimentally and theoretically. Measuring the effective angle of contact between adhering vesicles indicated that the strength of adhesion between vesicles decreases with increasing ionic strength, and increases with concentration of β2-GPI. In the theoretical part we focused on the study of the average orientation of β2-GPI near the charged membrane and its role in mediating the attractive interactions between the vesicles. β2-GPI proteins were modelled as rods with internal distribution of electric charge. The predictions of Monte Carlo simulations show orthogonal orientation of some of the membrane attached β2-GPI in narrow gap between two vesicles. On the contrary, at larger distances between vesicles the proteins are parallelly attached to the membrane surface. A local minimum of the free energy corresponding to β2-GPI-mediated adhesion of two neighbouring vesicles was predicted. The strength of adhesion was confirmed to decrease at high ionic strength.

  6. Effects of ionic strength, temperature, and pH on degradation of selected antibiotics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loftin, K.A.; Adams, C.D.; Meyer, M.T.; Surampalli, R.

    2008-01-01

    Aqueous degradation rates, which include hydrolysis and epimerization, for chlorretracycline (CTC), oxytetracycline (OTC), tetracycline (TET), lincomycin (LNC), sulfachlorpyridazine (SCP), sulfadimethoxine (SDM), sulfathiazole (STZ), trimethoprim (TRM), and tylosin A (TYL) were studied as a function of ionic strength (0.0015, 0.050, or 0.084 mg/L as Na2HPO4), temperature (7, 22, and 35??C), and pH (2, 5, 7, 9, and 11). Multiple linear regression revealed that ionic strength did not significantly affect (?? = 0.05) degradation rates for all compounds, but temperature and pH affected rates for CTC, OTC, and TET significandy (?? = 0.05). Degradation also was observed for TYL at pH 2 and 11. No significant degradation was observed for LNC, SCR SDM, STZ, TRM, and TYL (pH 5, 7, and 9) under study conditions. Pseudo first-order rate constants, half-lives, and Arrhenius coefficients were calculated where appropriate. In general, hydrolysis rates for CTC, OTC, and TET increased as pH and temperature increased following Arrhenius relationships. Known degradation products were used to confirm that degradation had occurred, but these products were not quantified. Half-lives ranged from less than 6 h up to 9.7 wk for the tetracyclines and for TYL (pH 2 and 11), but no degradation of LIN, the sulfonamides, or TRM was observed during the study period. These results indicate that tetracyclines and TYL at pH 2 and 11 are prone to pH-mediated transformation and hydrolysis in some cases, but not the sulfonamides, LIN nor TRM are inclined to degrade under study conditions. This indicates that with the exception of CTC OTC, and TET, pH-mediated reactions such as hydrolysis and epimerization are not likely removal mechanisms in surface water, anaerobic swine lagoons, wastewater, and ground water. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  7. Stability of the Cadmium Complex with the Bacterial Trihydroxamate Siderophore Desferrioxamine B at Seawater Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, E. A.; Schijf, J.

    2010-12-01

    strength. Whereas this is orders of magnitude smaller than values for DFOB complexes of other divalent transition metals (e.g., β(Cu2+) ~ 1014), it nevertheless makes DFOB one of the strongest known biogenic Cd ligands, rivaling synthetic ligands such as NTA. We present measurements of the stability constant of the Cd(II)-DFOB complex that were obtained by potentiometric titration of DFOB in the presence of Cd in a non-complexing background electrolyte (NaClO4) at seawater ionic strength (0.7 M). The titrations were corrected for hydrolysis and also performed at different Cd:DFOB ratios to detect any polynuclear species. Stability constants were derived from non-linear regressions of the data using FITEQL4.0. The results may provide new insights into the marine biogeochemistry of cadmium and its potential effects on primary productivity.

  8. Transport of bacteriophage PRD1 through saturated clean sand columns as a function of pH and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, G.; Schijven, J. F.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Behrends, T.; Gerritse, J.

    2010-12-01

    Groundwater is a major source for drinking water, because of its good microbial quality in its natural state as compared with fresh surface water. Nevertheless, it may be contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms, especially viruses, and that may hamper drinking water production. The two most significant processes controlling virus mobility in the subsurface environment are virus attachment and inactivation. Based on previous studies, many factors have been identified that impact these processes, among them, pH and ionic strength (IS) seem to have the largest influence on virus removal. The objective of this work was to investigate the effects of pH and IS on virus removal in saturated porous media. In addition, it was the objective to determine quantitative relations for these effects. In order to do so, a systematic study was conducted in columns with clean sand under saturated conditions at various pH and IS values within the range of field conditions using bacteriophage PRD1 as a model virus. These experiments were conducted in a 50-cm column with clean quartz sand under saturated conditions and various combinations of pH and ionic strength. Values of pH were 5, 6, 7 and 8 and ionic strength values were 1, 10 and 20 mM. Bacteriophage PRD1 was used as a conservative model virus for virus removal. Attachment, detachment and inactivation rate coefficients were determined from fitting the breakthrough curves. Attachment rate coefficients were found to increase with decreasing pH and increasing ionic strength. Results were used to calculate sticking efficiency values and an empirical formula for it as a function of pH and ionic strength was developed. The applicability of this empirical formula at field scale requires further investigation. Effects of pH and ionic strength on the values of the detachment rate coefficients as well as on inactivation rate coefficients of attached virus particles were also determined but required higher certainty to obtain

  9. Effects of temperature, pH, and ionic strength on the Henry's law constant of triethylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Chun-Bo; Roberts, Jason E.; Zeng, Guang; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Liu, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The Henry's law constants (KH) of triethylamine (TEA) in pure water and in 1-octanol were measured for the temperatures pertinent to the lower troposphere (278-298 K) using a bubble column system coupled to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The KH values of TEA in water and 1-octanol at 298 K are 5.75 ± 0.86 mol L-1 atm-1 and 115.62 ± 5.78 mol L-1 atm-1. The KH values display strong dependence on temperature, pH, and ionic strength. The characteristic times for TEA to establish an equilibrium between gas and droplet with a size of 5.6 µm are ~33 s (298 K, pH = 5.6); ~8.9 × 102 s (278 K, pH = 5.6); ~1.3 × 103 s (298 K, pH = 4.0); and 3.6 × 104 s (278 K, pH = 4.0). The evaluation of TEA partitioning between gas phase and condensed phase implies that TEA predominantly resides in rainwater, and TEA loss to organic aerosol is negligible.

  10. Effects of ionic strength on SAXS data for proteins revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2011-01-14

    The combination of small-angle X-ray solution scattering (SAXS) experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is now becoming a powerful tool to study protein conformations in solution at an atomic resolution. In this study, we investigated effects of ionic strength on SAXS data theoretically by using MD simulations of hen egg white lysozyme at various NaCl concentrations from 0 to 1 M. The calculated SAXS excess intensities showed a significant dependence on ion concentration, which originates from the different solvent density distributions in the presence and absence of ions. The addition of ions induced a slow convergence of the SAXS data, and a ∼20 ns simulation is required to obtain convergence of the SAXS data with the presence of ions whereas only a 0.2 ns simulation is sufficient in the absence of ions. To circumvent the problem of the slow convergence in the presence of ions, we developed a novel method that reproduces the SAXS excess intensities with the presence of ions from short MD trajectories in pure water. By applying this method to SAXS data for the open and closed forms of transferrin at 1 M ion concentration, the correct form could be identified by simply using short MD simulations of the protein in pure water for 0.2 ns.

  11. Arginine dipeptides affect insulin aggregation in a pH- and ionic strength-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nuhu, Mariam M; Curtis, Robin

    2015-03-01

    Solutions containing arginine or mixtures of arginine and other amino acids are commonly used for protein liquid formulations to overcome problems such as high viscosities, aggregation, and phase separation. The aim of this work is to examine whether the stabilizing properties of arginine can be improved by incorporating the amino acid into a dipeptide. A series of arginine-containing dipeptides have been tested for their ability to suppress insulin aggregation over a range of pH and ionic strength. The aggregation is monitored at room temperature using a combination of turbidimetry and light scattering for solutions at pH 5.5 or 3.7, whereas thermal-induced aggregation is measured at pH 7.5. In addition, intrinsic fluorescence has been used to quantify additive binding to insulin. The dipeptide diArg is the most effective additive in solutions at pH 5.5 and 3.7, whereas the dipeptide Arg-Phe almost completely eliminates thermally-induced aggregation of insulin at pH 7.5 up to temperature of 90°C. Insulin has been chosen as a model system because the molecular forces controlling its aggregation are well known. From this understanding, we are able to provide a molecular basis for how the various dipeptides affect insulin aggregation. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Particulate hematite diffusion in sodium polyacrylate solutions. The effect of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Bremmell, Kristen E; Dunstan, David E; Scales, Peter J; Healy, Thomas W

    2002-03-15

    The diffusion coefficients of hematite particles in polyelectrolyte solution have been investigated using dynamic light scattering. Two apparent diffusion coefficients, a fast and a slow diffusional mode, are observed for the hematite particles in high-molecular-weight sodium polyacrylate solution at pH 10.5. The slow diffusion coefficient (Dslow) shows a decrease with increase in polyelectrolyte concentration. The fast diffusion coefficient (Dfast) shows an increase to a maximum with increasing polyelectrolyte concentration and then a rapid decrease as the polyelectrolyte concentration increases further. With an increase in ionic strength from 10(-4) to 0.1 M NaNO3, the maximum value of Dfast increased in magnitude, while the polyacrylate concentration at which the maximum occurs is seen to increase. The dependence of Dfast on the measurement angle indicates that it is coupled to the fluctuations of the chains. The observed behavior is attributed to the hematite probe particle sensing both macroscopic (viscous) and elastic fluctuations associated with the polyelectrolyte motion.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Silver Nanoparticle Transport under Variable Flow and Ionic Strength in Soil.

    PubMed

    Makselon, Joanna; Zhou, Dan; Engelhardt, Irina; Jacques, Diederik; Klumpp, Erwin

    2017-02-21

    Unsaturated column experiments were conducted with an undisturbed loamy sand soil to investigate the influence of flow interruption (FI) and ionic strength (IS) on the transport and retention of surfactant-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNP) and the results were compared to those obtained under continuous flow conditions. AgNP concentrations for breakthrough curves (BTCs) and retention profiles (RPs) were analyzed by ICP-MS. Experimental results were simulated by the numerical code HP1 (Hydrus-PhreeqC) with the DLVO theory, extended colloid filtration theory and colloid release model. BTCs of AgNP showed a dramatic drop after FI compared to continuous flow conditions. Evaporation increased due to FI, resulting in increased electrical conductivity of the soil solution, which led to a totally reduced mobility of AgNP. A reduction of IS after FI enhanced AgNP mobility slightly. Here the strongly increased Al and Fe concentration in the effluent suggested that soil colloids facilitated the release of AgNP (cotransport). The numerical model reproduced the measured AgNP BTCs and indicated that attachment to the air-water interface (AWI) occurring during FI was the key process for AgNP retention.

  14. Effects of ionic strength on SAXS data for proteins revealed by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori

    2011-01-01

    The combination of small-angle X-ray solution scattering (SAXS) experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is now becoming a powerful tool to study protein conformations in solution at an atomic resolution. In this study, we investigated effects of ionic strength on SAXS data theoretically by using MD simulations of hen egg white lysozyme at various NaCl concentrations from 0 to 1 M. The calculated SAXS excess intensities showed a significant dependence on ion concentration, which originates from the different solvent density distributions in the presence and absence of ions. The addition of ions induced a slow convergence of the SAXS data, and a ˜20 ns simulation is required to obtain convergence of the SAXS data with the presence of ions whereas only a 0.2 ns simulation is sufficient in the absence of ions. To circumvent the problem of the slow convergence in the presence of ions, we developed a novel method that reproduces the SAXS excess intensities with the presence of ions from short MD trajectories in pure water. By applying this method to SAXS data for the open and closed forms of transferrin at 1 M ion concentration, the correct form could be identified by simply using short MD simulations of the protein in pure water for 0.2 ns.

  15. Ionic strength-dependent persistence lengths of single-stranded RNA and DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huimin; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Sutton, Julie L.; Webb, Watt W.; Pollack, Lois

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic RNA molecules carry out essential processes in the cell including translation and splicing. Base-pair interactions stabilize RNA into relatively rigid structures, while flexible non-base-paired regions allow RNA to undergo conformational changes required for function. To advance our understanding of RNA folding and dynamics it is critical to know the flexibility of these un-base-paired regions and how it depends on counterions. Yet, information about nucleic acid polymer properties is mainly derived from studies of ssDNA. Here we measure the persistence lengths (lp) of ssRNA. We observe valence and ionic strength-dependent differences in lp in a direct comparison between 40-mers of deoxythymidylate (dT40) and uridylate (rU40) measured using the powerful combination of SAXS and smFRET. We also show that nucleic acid flexibility is influenced by local environment (an adjoining double helix). Our results illustrate the complex interplay between conformation and ion environment that modulates nucleic acid function in vivo. PMID:22203973

  16. Ionic strength-dependent persistence lengths of single-stranded RNA and DNA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huimin; Meisburger, Steve P; Pabit, Suzette A; Sutton, Julie L; Webb, Watt W; Pollack, Lois

    2012-01-17

    Dynamic RNA molecules carry out essential processes in the cell including translation and splicing. Base-pair interactions stabilize RNA into relatively rigid structures, while flexible non-base-paired regions allow RNA to undergo conformational changes required for function. To advance our understanding of RNA folding and dynamics it is critical to know the flexibility of these un-base-paired regions and how it depends on counterions. Yet, information about nucleic acid polymer properties is mainly derived from studies of ssDNA. Here we measure the persistence lengths (l(p)) of ssRNA. We observe valence and ionic strength-dependent differences in l(p) in a direct comparison between 40-mers of deoxythymidylate (dT(40)) and uridylate (rU(40)) measured using the powerful combination of SAXS and smFRET. We also show that nucleic acid flexibility is influenced by local environment (an adjoining double helix). Our results illustrate the complex interplay between conformation and ion environment that modulates nucleic acid function in vivo.

  17. Protein diffusion through charged nanopores with different radii at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Stroeve, Pieter; Rahman, Masoud; Naidu, Lekkala Dev; Chu, Gilbert; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Ramirez, Patricio; Mafe, Salvador

    2014-10-21

    The diffusion of two similar molecular weight proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine haemoglobin (BHb), through nanoporous charged membranes with a wide range of pore radii is studied at low ionic strength. The effects of the solution pH and the membrane pore diameter on the pore permeability allow quantifying the electrostatic interaction between the charged pore and the protein. Because of the large screening Debye length, both surface and bulk diffusion occur simultaneously. By increasing the pore diameter, the permeability tends to the bulk self-diffusion coefficient for each protein. By decreasing the pore diameter, the charges on the pore surface electrostatically hinder the transport even at the isoelectric point of the protein. Surprisingly, even at pore sizes 100 times larger than the protein, the electrostatic hindrance still plays a major role in the transport. The experimental data are qualitatively explained using a two-region model for the membrane pore and approximated equations for the pH dependence of the protein and pore charges. The experimental and theoretical results should be useful for designing protein separation processes based on nanoporous charged membranes.

  18. Peculiarities of interaction of porphyrins with tRNA at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Dalyan, Y; Vardanyan, I; Chavushyan, A; Balayan, G

    2010-08-01

    The interaction of meso-tetra-(4N-oxyethylpyridyl)porphyrin (TOEPyP4) and its Zn(II)-, Cu(II)-, Mn(III)-derivatives with tRNA from E.Coli at low ionic strength (micro=0.02M) was studied using UV/Vis spectrophotometry and Circular Dichroism (CD) methods. An unusual Induced Circular Dichroism (ICD) spectra profile of the ZnTOEPyP4-tRNA complex is found. It is demonstrated that ZnTOEPyP4 is ordered in a stack, not only on helical sites, but also on loops of a hairpin form of tRNA. TOEPyP4 and CuTOEPyP4 are able to intercalate in the helical sites of this form of tRNA. MnTOEPyP4 interacts with tRNA via external non-ordered mechanism. It is established that all porphyrins are bound with tRNA more strongly than with DNA.

  19. LRRC8 proteins form volume-regulated anion channels that sense ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Ruhma; Qiu, Zhaozhu; Dubin, Adrienne E.; Murthy, Swetha E.; Florendo, Maria N.; Mason, Daniel E.; Mathur, Jayanti; Cahalan, Stuart M.; Peters, Eric C.; Montal, Mauricio; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Summary The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) is activated when a cell swells, and plays a central role in maintaining cell volume in response to osmotic challenges. SWELL1 (LRRC8A) was recently identified as an essential component of VRAC. However, the identity of the pore-forming subunits of VRAC, and how the channel is gated by cell swelling are unknown. Here we show that SWELL1 with up to four other LRRC8 subunits assemble into heterogeneous complexes of ~800 kDa. When reconstituted into bilayers, LRRC8 complexes are sufficient to form anion channels activated by osmolality gradients. In bilayers as well as in cells, the single-channel conductance of the complexes depends on the LRRC8 composition. Finally, low ionic strength (Γ), in the absence of an osmotic gradient, activates the complexes in bilayers. These data demonstrate that LRRC8 proteins together constitute the VRAC pore, and that hypotonic stress can activate VRAC through a decrease in cytoplasmic Γ. PMID:26824658

  20. LRRC8 Proteins Form Volume-Regulated Anion Channels that Sense Ionic Strength.

    PubMed

    Syeda, Ruhma; Qiu, Zhaozhu; Dubin, Adrienne E; Murthy, Swetha E; Florendo, Maria N; Mason, Daniel E; Mathur, Jayanti; Cahalan, Stuart M; Peters, Eric C; Montal, Mauricio; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2016-01-28

    The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) is activated when a cell swells, and it plays a central role in maintaining cell volume in response to osmotic challenges. SWELL1 (LRRC8A) was recently identified as an essential component of VRAC. However, the identity of the pore-forming subunits of VRAC and how the channel is gated by cell swelling are unknown. Here, we show that SWELL1 and up to four other LRRC8 subunits assemble into heterogeneous complexes of ∼800 kDa. When reconstituted into bilayers, LRRC8 complexes are sufficient to form anion channels activated by osmolality gradients. In bilayers, as well as in cells, the single-channel conductance of the complexes depends on the LRRC8 composition. Finally, low ionic strength (Γ) in the absence of an osmotic gradient activates the complexes in bilayers. These data demonstrate that LRRC8 proteins together constitute the VRAC pore and that hypotonic stress can activate VRAC through a decrease in cytoplasmic Γ. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of ionic strength on electrical properties of polyelectrolyte multilayers on colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milkova, V.; Radeva, Ts

    2010-12-01

    The effect of ionic strength on the electrical properties of poly(styrene sulfonate)/poly(allylamine) (PSS/PAH) multilayer film was investigated using electric light scattering and electrophoresis. A multilayer film was created by sequential adsorption of fully charged polymers from solutions containing 10 - 1 M NaCl and its properties were compared to those of a PSS/PAH film prepared in the absence of salt. All measurements were carried out after rinsing the films with an aqueous solution of HCl to adjust the pH to 4.6. We found that the electrical polarizability of the film coated particles and its frequency of relaxation increase when the film was constructed in the presence of salt. The increase in the electrical polarizability value is due to the screening-enhanced adsorption. We hypothesize that the increase in the relaxation frequency of the electrical polarizability is a consequence of the adsorption of the polymer chains in more coiled conformations. This restricts the movement of small ions to shorter distances than in the film prepared without salt. In both cases, the small ions are located near the film surface, which indicates the key role of the last deposited polymer for the behavior of the entire PSS/PAH film.

  2. Chemical Speciation of Am, Cm, and Eu with ETDA at High Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G.R.; Cernochova, K.; Mathur, Jagidsh

    2004-03-29

    The solubility of the actinides in the high level waste tank solutions is enhanced by complexation of these metal ions with one or more of the organic components of the waste (e.g. EDTA, NTA, etc.). The complexation of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with EDTA has been studied at an ionic strength of 5.0 M (NaClO4) and pcH 3.60 in the temperature range of 0 to 60 C by the solvent extraction technique using di-2-(ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid in heptane as the extractant. Stability constant values (log ? ) between 15 to 16 were obtained, which increased with increasing temperature. The complexation enthalpies have been obtained from the temperature dependence of the stability constants. The nature of the species of the Eu3+-EDTA complex formed in these solutions was determined by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime measurements. Between pcH 3.60 and 7.0 the species formed was EuEDTA(H2O)3--whereas at a pcH of 9.0 it was Eu(OH)EDTA(H2O)2 2-. This research was supported by an USDOE-EMSP contract.

  3. Effect of Molecular Crowding and Ionic Strength on the Isothermal Hybridization of Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Markarian, Marie Z.; Schlenoff, Joseph B.

    2010-01-01

    The isothermal hybridization of complimentary oligonucleotides, 15-mer, 25-mer, 35-mer, and a molecular beacon, was investigated under varying conditions of molecular crowding and ionic strength, using hypochromicity to follow strand pairing and polyethylene glycol as a crowding agent. Thermodynamic analysis of the results revealed the addition of counterions to the oligonucleotide backbones, Δψ, to be dependent on the strand G-C content and the molecular crowding. A decrease in Δψ was observed with both increasing GC% and solution PEG content. In contrast, the number of bound water molecules depended on the activity of Na+, where two regimes were observed. At aNa+⟨0.05 and increasing molecular crowding, water molecules were released into the DNA solutions and oligonucleotide pairing was favored with both increasing hydrophobic forces, while at aNa+≥0.05, water molecules were bound to the strands and the extent of double strand formation decreased with increasing PEG wt%. PMID:20701389

  4. The Effect of Macromolecular Crowding, Ionic Strength and Calcium Binding on Calmodulin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Liang, Kao-Chen; Czader, Arkadiusz; Waxham, M. Neal; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2011-01-01

    The flexibility in the structure of calmodulin (CaM) allows its binding to over 300 target proteins in the cell. To investigate the structure-function relationship of CaM, we combined methods of computer simulation and experiments based on circular dichroism (CD) to investigate the structural characteristics of CaM that influence its target recognition in crowded cell-like conditions. We developed a unique multiscale solution of charges computed from quantum chemistry, together with protein reconstruction, coarse-grained molecular simulations, and statistical physics, to represent the charge distribution in the transition from apoCaM to holoCaM upon calcium binding. Computationally, we found that increased levels of macromolecular crowding, in addition to calcium binding and ionic strength typical of that found inside cells, can impact the conformation, helicity and the EF hand orientation of CaM. Because EF hand orientation impacts the affinity of calcium binding and the specificity of CaM's target selection, our results may provide unique insight into understanding the promiscuous behavior of calmodulin in target selection inside cells. PMID:21829336

  5. Modeling the effects of pH and ionic strength on swelling of polyelectrolyte gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A. D.; deClaville Christiansen, J.

    2015-03-01

    A model is developed for the elastic response of a polyelectrolyte gel under unconstrained and constrained swelling in a water bath with an arbitrary pH, where a monovalent salt is dissolved. A gel is treated as a three-phase medium consisting of an equivalent polymer network, solvent (water), and solute (mobile ions). Transport of solvent and solute is thought of as their diffusion through the network accelerated by an electric field formed by mobile and fixed ions and accompanied by chemical reactions (self-ionization of water molecules, dissociation of functional groups attached to polymer chains, and formation of ion pairs between bound charges and mobile counter-ions). Constitutive equations are derived by means of the free energy imbalance inequality for an arbitrary three-dimensional deformation with finite strains. Adjustable parameters in the governing relations are found by fitting equilibrium swelling diagrams on several hydrogels. The effects of pH, ionic strength of solution, and constraints on equilibrium water uptake are studied numerically.

  6. A computer program for geochemical analysis of acid-rain and other low-ionic-strength, acidic waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnsson, P.A.; Lord, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    ARCHEM, a computer program written in FORTRAN 77, is designed primarily for use in the routine geochemical interpretation of low-ionic-strength, acidic waters. On the basis of chemical analyses of the water, and either laboratory or field determinations of pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen, the program calculates the equilibrium distribution of major inorganic aqueous species and of inorganic aluminum complexes. The concentration of the organic anion is estimated from the dissolved organic concentration. Ionic ferrous iron is calculated from the dissolved oxygen concentration. Ionic balances and comparisons of computed with measured specific conductances are performed as checks on the analytical accuracy of chemical analyses. ARCHEM may be tailored easily to fit different sampling protocols, and may be run on multiple sample analyses. (Author 's abstract)

  7. Computer program for geochemical analysis of acid-rain and other low-ionic-strength, acidic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.A.; Lord, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    ARCHEM, a computer program written in FORTRAN 77, is designed primarily for use in the routine geochemical interpretation of low-ionic-strength, acidic waters. On the basis of chemical analyses of the water, and either laboratory or field determinations of pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen, the program calculates the equilibrium distribution of major inorganic aqueous species and of inorganic aluminum complexes. The concentration of the organic anion is estimated from the dissolved organic concentration. Ionic ferrous iron is calculated from the dissolved oxygen concentration. Ionic balances and comparisons of computed with measured specific conductances are performed as checks on the analytical accuracy of chemical analyses. ARCHEM may be tailored easily to fit different sampling protocols, and may be run on multiple sample analyses. 34 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. Effect of Ionic Strength and Ion Pairing on Sound Absorption in Aqueous Solutions of MgSO4 and NaC1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-15

    the data of Kurtze and Tam are in better agreement with theol.. The extension to high ionic strength of Debye - Huckel theory derived for low ionic...strength of ". Debye - Huckel theory derived for low ionic strength is discussed briefly. INTRODUCTION Below 300 kHz sound absorption in low concentration...0.178 (131 for MgSO 4, NaSO 4 " and MgCI respectively. The Debye - Huckel equation [251 [261 1271 -log fij - AI z, zsl 7+ i (10) J-: . ,.i_. -,,_,, , J

  9. Liquid-liquid phase separation of a monoclonal antibody at low ionic strength: Influence of anion charge and concentration.

    PubMed

    Reiche, Katharina; Hartl, Josef; Blume, Alfred; Garidel, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) of a monoclonal antibody solution was investigated at low ionic strength in the presence of oligovalent anions, such as citrate, trimellitate, pyromellitate and mellitate. Phase separation was observed at the isoelectric point of the antibody at pH8.7 as well as in more acidic pH regions in the presence of the tested oligovalent ions. This can be attributed to charge neutralization via binding of the oligovalent anions to the positively charged antibody. The influence of the anion concentration on liquid-liquid phase separation with respect to the net charge of the antibody was examined. Similarities to the formation of a complex coacervate were shown to apply. These findings enable us to understand the usage of excipients to rationally induce or avoid liquid-liquid phase separation at low ionic strength. Furthermore we present a method to directly examine the competition of different ions for the solvation shell, called buffer equilibration.

  10. Systematic study of the effect of pH and Ionic strength on virus transport under saturated condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, G.; Schijven, J.; Hassanizadeh, S.

    2008-12-01

    This research is carried out in the framework of determining protection zones around abstraction wells against groundwater contamination. The focus is on determining the interaction (attachment, inactivation and straining) of bacteriophages with soil under various hydro- and geochemical conditions at laboratory scale and to translate this interaction into quantitative relations. We have primarily focussed on conditions prevailing in Dutch groundwater systems and the presence of dissolved organic matter (from sewage and manure). Here, we report on a series of column experiments under saturated conditions in order to evaluate the impact of ionic strength and pH on the transport and fate of viruses. We use the bacteriophage PRD1 as a surrogate tracer for pathogenic enteric viruses. This research has resulted in empirical relationships between sticking efficiency and pH and ionic strength.

  11. Characterisation of cationic potato starch by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Influence of ionic strength and degree of substitution.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Stalin

    2014-06-15

    The properties of a paper sheet depend on the absorption together with the physico-chemical properties of additives used in the paper processing. The effect of ionic strength and degree of substitution of cationic potato starch on the elution pattern of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation was analysed. The effect of starch derivatisation, in either dry or wet phase, was also investigated. Average molar mass showed no difference between the starches obtained from the two derivatisation processes. Apparent densities showed that dry cationic starch had higher density than wet cationic starch for a hydrodynamic radius between 50 and 100 nm. Elution times of native and three cationic starches increased when the ionic strength increased from 50 to 100mM. No differences in the molar mass among cationic starches with different degree of substitution suggested no degradation due to a derivatisation process. Large sample loads can be used at 100mM without overloading.

  12. Improved thermodynamic model for interaction of EDTA with trivalent actinides and lanthanide to ionic strength of 6.60 m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Punam; Xiong, Yongliang; Borkowski, Marian; Choppin, Gregory R.

    2014-05-01

    The dissociation constants of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (H4EDTA), and the stability constants of Am3+, Cm3+and Eu3+ with EDTA4- have been determined at 25 °C, over a range of concentration varying from 0.1 to 6.60 m NaClO4 using potentiometric titration and an extraction technique, respectively. The formation of only 1:1 complex, M(EDTA)-, where (M = Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+), was observed under the experimental conditions. The observed ionic strength dependencies of the dissociation constants and the stability constants have been described successfully over the entire ionic strength range using the Pitzer model. The thermodynamic stability constant: logβ1010=20.55±0.18 for Am3+, logβ1010=20.43±0.20 for Cm3+ and logβ1010=20.65±0.19 for Eu3+ were calculated by extrapolation of data to zero ionic strength in an NaClO4 medium. In addition, logβ1010 of 20.05 ± 0.40 for Am3+ was obtained by simultaneously modeling data both in NaCl and NaClO4 media. For all stability constants, the Pitzer model gives an excellent representation of the data using interaction parameters β(0), β(1), and Cϕ determined in this work. The improved model presented in this work would enable researchers to model accurately the potential mobility of actinides (III) and light rare earth elements to ionic strength of 6.60 m in low temperature environments in the presence of EDTA.

  13. Effect of pH, ionic strength, and temperature on the phosphate adsorption onto lanthanum-doped activated carbon fiber.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianyong; Wan, Lihua; Zhang, Ling; Zhou, Qi

    2011-12-15

    Phosphate removal from polluted water is crucial to preventing eutrophication. Herein, we present the investigation on phosphate adsorption in aqueous solutions by using lanthanum-doped activated carbon fiber (ACF-La). Various batch sorption conditions, e.g., pH, ionic strength, and temperature were tested, and the adsorption mechanisms were discussed. The sorption capacity of ACF-La was higher in acidic solutions than that in basic ones, suggesting that the Lewis acid-base interaction gradually dominated the adsorption process with the increase in pH values. The degree of phosphate removal decreased with the enhancement of the ionic strength of the solution, meaning that the adsorption of phosphate on ACF-La was strongly dependent on ionic strength. Employing the pseudo first- and second-order, and intra-particle diffusion models to evaluate the adsorption kinetics of phosphate onto ACF-La indicated that the second-order model best fits the experimental data. The presence of chloride ion in solutions increased the effect of intra-particle diffusion on the adsorption of phosphate onto ACF-La but reduced the overall rate of the adsorption. The thermodynamic parameters were determined which revealed the feasibility, spontaneity, and endothermic nature of adsorption. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sorption-desorption of fipronil in some soils, as influenced by ionic strength, pH and temperature.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand; Srivastava, Anjana; Srivastava, Prakash C

    2016-08-01

    The sorption-desorpion of fipronil insecticide is influenced by soil properties and variables such as pH, ionic strength, temperature, etc. A better understanding of soil properties and these variables in sorption-desorption processes by quantification of fipronil using liquid chromatography may help to optimise suitable soil management to reduce contamination of surface and groundwaters. In the present investigation, the sorption-desorption of fipronil was studied in some soils at varying concentrations, ionic strengths, temperatures and pH values, and IR specta of fipronil sorbed onto soils were studied. The sorption of fipronil onto soils conformed to the Freundlich isotherm model. The sorption-desorption of fipronil varied with ionic strength in each of the soils. Sorption decreased but desorption increased with temperature. Sorption did not change with increasing pH, but for desorption there was no correlation. The cumulative desorption of fipronil from soil was significantly and inversely related to soil organic carbon content. IR spectra of sorbed fipronil showed the involvement of amino, nitrile, sulfone, chloro and fluoro groups and the pyrazole nucleus of the fipronil molecule. The sorption of fipronil onto soils appeared to be a physical process with the involvement of hydrogen bonding. An increase in soil organic carbon may help to reduce desorption of fipronil. High-temperature regimes are more conducive to the desorption. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Dioctahedral smectite reactions at elevated temperatures: Effects of K-availability, Na/K ratio and ionic strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrothermal experiments were conducted to measure the effects of K availability, Na/K ratio and ionic strength in chloride solutions on the rate and extent of the reaction of smectite to interstratified illite/smectite. The < 2 ??m fraction of a bentonite was treated hydrothermally at temperatures of 200, 250, 300, 350, 400 and 450??C for run times of up to 30 days in the presence of 0.33, 0.66 and 1.00 equivalents of K per O10(OH)2. The effect of K-content on reaction progress is dramatic at low (0.33 eq.) K concentrations, but diminishes above a concentration of 0.66 equivalents. The effect of K-content is also more important at lower temperatures than at higher temperatures. Addition of K above that required to satisfy the cation exchange capacity of the smectite reduced the amount of chlorite byproduct and produced authigenic K-feldspar at the highest K-concentration. Similar experiments were run using Na/K equivalent ratios of 0 to 25 and total solution molalities of 0 to 3.75 molal. Because these experiments were small fixed-volume experiments, it was necessary to vary two of the three key variables (K-content, Na/K ratio, ionic strength simultaneously. The data suggest, however, that K-content has a much stronger effect than either Na/K ratio or ionic strength on illitization reaction progress. ?? 1992.

  16. Solubilization of myofibrillar proteins in water or low ionic strength media: Classical techniques, basic principles, and novel functionalities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Tume, Ron K; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2017-10-13

    The qualitative characteristics of meat products are closely related to the functionality of muscle proteins. Myofibrillar proteins (MPs), comprising approximately 50% of total muscle proteins, are generally considered to be insoluble in solutions of low ionic strength (< 0.2 M), requiring high concentrations of salt (> 0.3 M) for solubilization. These soluble proteins are the ones which determine many functional properties of meat products, including emulsification and thermal gelation. In order to increase the utilization of meat and meat products, many studies have investigated the solubilization of MPs in water or low ionic strength media and determining their functionality. However, there still remains a lack of systematic information on the functional properties of MPs solubilized in this manner. Hence, this review will explore some typical techniques that have been used. The main procedures used for their solubilization, the fundamental principles and their functionalities in water (low ionic strength medium) are comprehensively discussed. In addition, advantages and disadvantages of each technique are summarized. Finally, future considerations are presented to facilitate progress in this new area and to enable water soluble muscle MPs to be utilized as novel meat ingredients in the food industry.

  17. Solubilisation of myosin in a solution of low ionic strength L-histidine: Significance of the imidazole ring.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Zou, Yufeng; Han, Minyi; Pan, Lihua; Xing, Tong; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-04-01

    Myosin, a major muscle protein, can be solubilised in a low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine (His). To elucidate which chemical constituents in His are responsible for this solubilisation, we investigated the effects of 5mM His, imidazole (Imi), L-α-alanine (Ala), 1-methyl-L-histidine (M-his) and L-carnosine (Car) on particle properties of myosin suspensions and conformational characteristics of soluble myosin at low ionic strength (1 mM KCl, pH 7.5). His, Imi and Car, each containing an imidazole ring, were able to induce a myosin suspension, which had small particle size species and high absolute zeta potential, thus increasing the solubility of myosin. His, Imi and Car affected the tertiary structure and decreased the α-helix content of soluble myosin. Therefore, the imidazole ring of His appeared to be the significant chemical constituent in solubilising myosin at low ionic strength solution, presumably by affecting its secondary structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transport and retention of colloid particles in partially saturated porous media: effect of surfactant and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zevi, Y.; Dathe, A.; Gao, B.; Cakmak, M.; Richards, B. K.; Parlange, J.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2006-12-01

    The effect of surfactant and ionic strength concentration on colloid transport through saturated or partially saturated media has typically been studied inferentially using breakthrough curves. In this work, we made pore-scale observations in a small flow chamber to count colloids retained on the grain, air and liquid interfaces using a confocal microscope system and public domain image analysis software ImageJ. Stacks of images were analyzed for colloid retention in which the ionic strength and concentration of surfactant (nonionic Surfynol 485) were varied. The number of mobile (free in the water phase) colloids and attached colloids (retained at the surface of sand grains) for each image were quantified. We found that as ionic strength increased, the location where the colloids were retained changed from the air/water meniscus/solid (AWmS) interface to the water/solid (WS) interface. In addition, we observed that increasing the surfactant concentration reduced the retention of colloids due to decreased contact angle and surface tension.

  19. Transport and aggregation of Al2O3 nanoparticles through saturated limestone under high ionic strength conditions: measurements and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Ali Esfandyari; Junin, Radzuan; Ghadikolaei, Farshad Daraei; Piroozian, Ali

    2014-12-01

    Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanoparticles (NPs) are being utilized in a broad range of applications; thus, noticeable quantities of these particles are being released into the environment. Issues of how and where these particles distribute into the subsurface remain major challenges. In this study, mechanisms governing the transport and aggregation of Al2O3-NPs (Alpha-40 nm) through saturated limestone porous media under different ionic strength conditions were evaluated. For this aim, 50 mg of Al2O3-NPs was dispersed in 1 L of different electrolyte solutions including NaCl and CaCl2. Ionic strength range was selected from deionized water up to 500 mM. Breakthrough curves in the column effluent were measured by UV-VIS spectrometry. It was found that the presence of NaCl and CaCl2 in the suspensions led to formation of ion bridges among NPs. Thus, the stability of Al2O3-NPs significantly declined and NPs started to flocculate and form bigger clusters. Furthermore, ionic strength caused considerable delay in NPs breakthrough in the effluents and reduction of NPs recovery. CaCl2 compared to NaCl was found more effective in instability and deposition of Al2O3-NPs. In addition, the obtained results from transport experiments were checked against classical filtration and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theories. The results were found to be in agreement with named theories.

  20. High ionic strength narrows the population of sites participating in protein ion-exchange adsorption: a single-molecule study.

    PubMed

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Kulla, Eliona; Kang, Marci K; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C; Landes, Christy F

    2014-05-23

    The retention and elution of proteins in ion-exchange chromatography is routinely controlled by adjusting the mobile phase salt concentration. It has repeatedly been observed, as judged from adsorption isotherms, that the apparent heterogeneity of adsorption is lower at more-eluting, higher ionic strength. Here, we present an investigation into the mechanism of this phenomenon using a single-molecule, super-resolution imaging technique called motion-blur Points Accumulation for Imaging in Nanoscale Topography (mbPAINT). We observed that the number of functional adsorption sites was smaller at high ionic strength and that these sites had reduced desorption kinetic heterogeneity, and thus narrower predicted elution profiles, for the anion-exchange adsorption of α-lactalbumin on an agarose-supported, clustered-charge ligand stationary phase. Explanations for the narrowing of the functional population such as inter-protein interactions and protein or support structural changes were investigated through kinetic analysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and microscopy of agarose microbeads, respectively. The results suggest the reduction of heterogeneity is due to both electrostatic screening between the protein and ligand and tuning the steric availability within the agarose support. Overall, we have shown that single molecule spectroscopy can aid in understanding the influence of ionic strength on the population of functional adsorbent sites participating in the ion-exchange chromatographic separation of proteins.

  1. High ionic strength narrows the population of sites participating in protein ion-exchange adsorption: A single-molecule study

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chen, Jixin; Mansur, Andrea P.; Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Kulla, Eliona; Kang, Marci; Shuang, Bo; Kourentzi, Katerina; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Dhamane, Sagar; Willson, Richard C.; Landes, Christy F.

    2014-01-01

    The retention and elution of proteins in ion-exchange chromatography is routinely controlled by adjusting the mobile phase salt concentration. It has repeatedly been observed, as judged from adsorption isotherms, that the apparent heterogeneity of adsorption is lower at more-eluting, higher ionic strength. Here, we present an investigation into the mechanism of this phenomenon using a single-molecule, super-resolution imaging technique called motion-blur Points Accumulation for Imaging in Nanoscale Topography (mbPAINT). We observed that the number of functional adsorption sites was smaller at high ionic strength and that these sites had reduced desorption kinetic heterogeneity, and thus narrower predicted elution profiles, for the anion-exchange adsorption of α-lactalbumin on an agarose-supported, clustered-charge ligand stationary phase. Explanations for the narrowing of the functional population such as inter-protein interactions and protein or support structural changes were investigated through kinetic analysis, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and microscopy of agarose microbeads, respectively. The results suggest the reduction of heterogeneity is due to both electrostatic screening between the protein and ligand and tuning the steric availability within the agarose support. Overall, we have shown that single molecule spectroscopy can aid in understanding the influence of ionic strength on the population of functional adsorbent sites participating in the ion-exchange chromatographic separation of proteins. PMID:24751557

  2. Sorption of triclosan onto activated carbon, kaolinite and montmorillonite: effects of pH, ionic strength, and humic acid.

    PubMed

    Behera, Shishir Kumar; Oh, Seok-Young; Park, Hung-Suck

    2010-07-15

    Sorption of triclosan on three sorbents, viz., activated carbon, kaolinite and montmorillonite was studied as a function of pH, ionic strength and humic acid (HA) concentration through controlled batch experiments. Triclosan sorption was found to be higher in the acidic pH range, as varying pH showed significant influence on the surface charge of the sorbents and degree of ionization of the sorbate. Sorption capacity of the sorbents increased with an increase in the ionic strength of solution. At low pH (pH 3), the overall increase in triclosan sorption was 1.2, approximately 4 and 3.5 times, respectively for activated carbon, kaolinite and montmorillonite when ionic strength was increased from 1x10(-3) to 5x10(-1) M. Triclosan sorption onto activated carbon decreased from 31.4 to 10.6 mg g(-1) by increasing the HA concentration to 200 mg C L(-1). However, during sorption onto kaolinite and montmorillonite, the effect of HA was very complex probably due to (i) hydrophobicity (log K(ow)=4.76) of triclosan; and (ii) complexation of HA with triclosan. Though triclosan sorption onto activated carbon is higher, the potential of kaolinite and montmorillonite in controlling the transport of triclosan in subsurface environment can still be appreciable.

  3. The effect of pH and ionic strength of dissolution media on in-vitro release of two model drugs of different solubilities from HPMC matrices.

    PubMed

    Asare-Addo, Kofi; Conway, Barbara R; Larhrib, Hassan; Levina, Marina; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R; Tetteh, John; Boateng, Joshua; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2013-11-01

    The evaluation of the effects of different media ionic strengths and pH on the release of hydrochlorothiazide, a poorly soluble drug, and diltiazem hydrochloride, a cationic and soluble drug, from a gel forming hydrophilic polymeric matrix was the objective of this study. The drug to polymer ratio of formulated tablets was 4:1. Hydrochlorothiazide or diltiazem HCl extended release (ER) matrices containing hypromellose (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)) were evaluated in media with a pH range of 1.2-7.5, using an automated USP type III, Bio-Dis dissolution apparatus. The ionic strength of the media was varied over a range of 0-0.4M to simulate the gastrointestinal fed and fasted states and various physiological pH conditions. Sodium chloride was used for ionic regulation due to its ability to salt out polymers in the midrange of the lyotropic series. The results showed that the ionic strength had a profound effect on the drug release from the diltiazem HCl K100LV matrices. The K4M, K15M and K100M tablets however withstood the effects of media ionic strength and showed a decrease in drug release to occur with an increase in ionic strength. For example, drug release after the 1h mark for the K100M matrices in water was 36%. Drug release in pH 1.2 after 1h was 30%. An increase of the pH 1.2 ionic strength to 0.4M saw a reduction of drug release to 26%. This was the general trend for the K4M and K15M matrices as well. The similarity factor f2 was calculated using drug release in water as a reference. Despite similarity occurring for all the diltiazem HCl matrices in the pH 1.2 media (f2=64-72), increases of ionic strength at 0.2M and 0.4M brought about dissimilarity. The hydrochlorothiazide tablet matrices showed similarity at all the ionic strength tested for all polymers (f2=56-81). The values of f2 however reduced with increasing ionic strengths. DSC hydration results explained the hydrochlorothiazide release from their HPMC matrices. There was an increase in

  4. Colloid release and clogging in porous media: Effects of solution ionic strength and flow velocity.

    PubMed

    Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A; Vanderzalm, Joanne L; Patterson, Bradley M; Harris, Brett; Prommer, Henning

    2015-10-01

    The release and retention of in-situ colloids in aquifers play an important role in the sustainable operation of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) schemes. The processes of colloid release, retention, and associated permeability changes in consolidated aquifer sediments were studied by displacing native groundwater with reverse osmosis-treated (RO) water at various flow velocities. Significant amounts of colloid release occurred when: (i) the native groundwater was displaced by RO-water with a low ionic strength (IS), and (ii) the flow velocity was increased in a stepwise manner. The amount of colloid release and associated permeability reduction upon RO-water injection depended on the initial clay content of the core. The concentration of released colloids was relatively low and the permeability reduction was negligible for the core sample with a low clay content of about 1.3%. In contrast, core samples with about 6 and 7.5% clay content exhibited: (i) close to two orders of magnitude increase in effluent colloid concentration and (ii) more than 65% permeability reduction. Incremental improvement in the core permeability was achieved when the flow velocity increased, whereas a short flow interruption provided a considerable increase in the core permeability. This dependence of colloid release and permeability changes on flow velocity and colloid concentration was consistent with colloid retention and release at pore constrictions due to the mechanism of hydrodynamic bridging. A mathematical model was formulated to describe the processes of colloid release, transport, retention at pore constrictions, and subsequent permeability changes. Our experimental and modeling results indicated that only a small fraction of the in-situ colloids was released for any given change in the IS or flow velocity. Comparison of the fitted and experimentally measured effluent colloid concentrations and associated changes in the core permeability showed good agreement, indicating that the

  5. Temperature and Ionic Strength Effects on the Chlorosome Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Zhu, Liying; Urban, Volker S; Collins, Aaron M.; Biswas, Pratim; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-03-15

    Chlorosomes, the peripheral light-harvesting antenna complex from green photosynthetic bacteria, are the largest and one of the most efficient light-harvesting antenna complexes found in nature. In contrast to other light-harvesting antennas, chlorosomes are constructed from more than 150,000 self-assembled bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) and contain relatively few proteins that play secondary roles. These unique properties have led to chlorosomes as an attractive candidate for developing biohybrid solar cell devices. In this article, we investigate the temperature and ionic strength effects on the viability of chlorosomes from the photosynthetic green bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus using small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering. Our studies indicate that chlorosomes remain intact up to 75 °C and that salt induces the formation of large aggregates of chlorosomes. No internal structural changes are observed for the aggregates. The salt-induced aggregation, which is a reversible process, is more efficient with divalent metal ions than with monovalent metal ions. Moreover, with treatment at 98 °C for 2 min, the bulk of the chlorosome pigments are undamaged, while the baseplate is destroyed. Chlorosomes without the baseplate remain rodlike in shape and are 30-40% smaller than with the baseplate attached. Further, chlorosomes are stable from pH 5.5 to 11.0. Together, this is the first time such a range of characterization tools have been used for chlorosomes, and this has enabled elucidation of properties that are not only important to understanding their functionality but also may be useful in biohybrid devices for effective light harvesting.

  6. Temperature and Ionic Strength Effects on the Chlorosome Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Zhu, Liying; Urban, Volker S.; Collins, Aaron M.; Biswas, Pratim; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2011-03-15

    Chlorosomes, the peripheral light-harvesting antenna complex from green photosynthetic bacteria, are the largest and one of the most efficient light-harvesting antenna complexes found in nature. In contrast to other light-harvesting antennas, chlorosomes are constructed from more than 150,000 self-assembled bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) and contain relatively few proteins that play secondary roles. These unique properties have led to chlorosomes as an attractive candidate for developing biohybrid solar cell devices. In this article, we investigate the temperature and ionic strength effects on the viability of chlorosomes from the photosynthetic green bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus using small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering. Our studies indicate that chlorosomes remain intact up to 75 °C and that salt induces the formation of large aggregates of chlorosomes. No internal structural changes are observed for the aggregates. The salt-induced aggregation, which is a reversible process, is more efficient with divalent metal ions than with monovalent metal ions. Moreover, with treatment at 98 °C for 2 min, the bulk of the chlorosome pigments are undamaged, while the baseplate is destroyed. Chlorosomes without the baseplate remain rodlike in shape and are 30-40% smaller than with the baseplate attached. Further, chlorosomes are stable from pH 5.5 to 11.0. In conclusion, together, this is the first time such a range of characterization tools have been used for chlorosomes, and this has enabled elucidation of properties that are not only important to understanding their functionality but also may be useful in biohybrid devices for effective light harvesting.

  7. The effects of ion identity and ionic strength on the dissolution rate of a gibbsitic bauxite

    SciTech Connect

    Mogollon, J.L.; Perez-Diaz, A.; Lo Monaco, S.

    2000-03-01

    The influence of cation and anion identity and concentration, on the far from equilibrium dissolution rate of gibbsite, was studied at 298 K. Input solutions, with initial pH = 3.5 and variable salt type and concentration, were flowed at different rates, through columns packed with a unconsolidated gibbsitic bauxite from Los Pijigueaos-Venezuela ore deposit. It was observed cations Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+} have no influence on the far from equilibrium dissolution rate. Anions have two different effects: concentration increases of monovalent anions (Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) causes a decrease in the rate, as a function of [anion]{sup ({minus}0.11{+-}0.01)}; and increases of sulfate concentration causes an increase in the rate as a function of [SO{sub 4}{sup =}]{sup (0.4{+-}0.1)}. According to calculations, these two effects have a remarkable influence upon the lifetime of gibbsite under weathering conditions. Based on Transition State Theory, it is proposed the experimental observations are due to an electrostatic effect on the activated complex (AC) of the gibbsite dissolution reaction. For this AC the product of the charge of the involved chemical entities is negative. When SO{sub 4}{sup =} participates in the AC the product of the charges switches to positive and therefore, the electrostatic interaction increase the dissolution rate. The dissolution rates are independent of the solution saturation degree below {Delta}Gr = {minus}0.74 kcal/mol. It is inferred that the critical {Delta}Gr is a constant of the solid, not affected by the solution characteristics, e.g., pH, ionic strength, cation and anion identities.

  8. Ionic-strength- and pH-dependent conformational states of human plasma fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Benecky, M J; Wine, R W; Kolvenbach, C G; Mosesson, M W

    1991-04-30

    In order to provide a more detailed understanding of human plasma fibronectin (PFn) solution structure, we examined the effects of pH and ionic strength (mu) variation on the sedimentation velocities (s20,w), fluorescence polarization-derived mean harmonic rotational relaxation times (rho H), far-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD), and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of dimeric PFn and the monomeric 190/170-kDa PFn fragment. By comparing the biophysical properties of PFn with those of the 190/170-kDa PFn fragment, we could assess the relative importance of intrasubunit and intersubunit electrostatic forces in the stabilization of PFn structure. The rho H derived from isothermal polarization measurements on 1-pyrenebutyrate conjugated PFn decreased markedly (4.5----1.05-1.23 microseconds) when mu was increased from 0.2 to 1.2 or when the pH was adjusted from 7.4 to 2.0 or 11.0. We also noted a significant decrease in the PFn s20,w (13----8.5-9.6S) under these same solvent conditions. In contrast, the rho H and s20,w of the monomeric 190/170-kDa PFn fragment were relatively insensitive to changes in mu or pH. Computer simulations of the observed pH-dependent changes in the far-UV CD of PFn and the 190/170-kDa PFn fragment revealed only minor differences in protein secondary structure. We also observed only small bathochromic shifts (1-3 nm) in the emission maxima of PFn and 190/170-kDa PFn fragment tryptophan fluorescence under acidic or high mu conditions. These results suggest that minimal changes in PFn tertiary (i.e., intrasubunit) structure occur at pH 2, 11, or at mu = 1.2.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Extensive structural change of the envelope protein of dengue virus induced by a tuned ionic strength: conformational and energetic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrève, Léo; Fuzo, Carlos A.; Caliri, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The Dengue has become a global public health threat, with over 100 million infections annually; to date there is no specific vaccine or any antiviral drug. The structures of the envelope (E) proteins of the four known serotype of the dengue virus (DENV) are already known, but there are insufficient molecular details of their structural behavior in solution in the distinct environmental conditions in which the DENVs are submitted, from the digestive tract of the mosquito up to its replication inside the host cell. Such detailed knowledge becomes important because of the multifunctional character of the E protein: it mediates the early events in cell entry, via receptor endocytosis and, as a class II protein, participates determinately in the process of membrane fusion. The proposed infection mechanism asserts that once in the endosome, at low pH, the E homodimers dissociate and insert into the endosomal lipid membrane, after an extensive conformational change, mainly on the relative arrangement of its three domains. In this work we employ all-atom explicit solvent Molecular Dynamics simulations to specify the thermodynamic conditions in that the E proteins are induced to experience extensive structural changes, such as during the process of reducing pH. We study the structural behavior of the E protein monomer at acid pH solution of distinct ionic strength. Extensive simulations are carried out with all the histidine residues in its full protonated form at four distinct ionic strengths. The results are analyzed in detail from structural and energetic perspectives, and the virtual protein movements are described by means of the principal component analyses. As the main result, we found that at acid pH and physiological ionic strength, the E protein suffers a major structural change; for lower or higher ionic strengths, the crystal structure is essentially maintained along of all extensive simulations. On the other hand, at basic pH, when all histidine residues are in

  10. Effect of Ionic Strength on Initial Interactions of Escherichia coli with Surfaces, Studied On-Line by a Novel Quartz Crystal Microbalance Technique

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Karen; Elwing, Hans; Hermansson, Malte

    1999-01-01

    A novel quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique was used to study the adhesion of nonfimbriated and fimbriated Escherichia coli mutant strains to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces at different ionic strengths. This technique enabled us to measure both frequency shifts (Δf), i.e., the increase in mass on the surface, and dissipation shifts (ΔD), i.e., the viscoelastic energy losses on the surface. Changes in the parameters measured by the extended QCM technique reflect the dynamic character of the adhesion process. We were able to show clear differences in the viscoelastic behavior of fimbriated and nonfimbriated cells attached to surfaces. The interactions between bacterial cells and quartz crystal surfaces at various ionic strengths followed different trends, depending on the cell surface structures in direct contact with the surface. While Δf and ΔD per attached cell increased for nonfimbriated cells with increasing ionic strengths (particularly on hydrophobic surfaces), the adhesion of the fimbriated strain caused only low-level frequency and dissipation shifts on both kinds of surfaces at all ionic strengths tested. We propose that nonfimbriated cells may get better contact with increasing ionic strengths due to an increased area of contact between the cell and the surface, whereas fimbriated cells seem to have a flexible contact with the surface at all ionic strengths tested. The area of contact between fimbriated cells and the surface does not increase with increasing ionic strengths, but on hydrophobic surfaces each contact point seems to contribute relatively more to the total energy loss. Independent of ionic strength, attached cells undergo time-dependent interactions with the surface leading to increased contact area and viscoelastic losses per cell, which may be due to the establishment of a more intimate contact between the cell and the surface. Hence, the extended QCM technique provides new qualitative information about the direct contact

  11. Effect of ionic strength and pH on hydraulic properties and structure of accumulating solid assemblages during microfiltration of montmorillonite suspensions.

    PubMed

    Santiwong, Suvinai R; Guan, Jing; Waite, T David

    2008-01-01

    The structure and hydraulic behaviour of colloidal montmorillonite assemblages formed during constant-pressure microfiltration of feed suspensions under various pH and ionic strengths have been investigated with flux versus time data analysed using both conventional cake filtration theory and a more rigorous sorptivity-diffusivity approach. Size distribution and fractal dimension analyses revealed a shift in assemblage structure from porous to compact as a result of a step-increase in electrolyte concentrations. The hydraulic conductivity of the filter cakes was dramatically affected by suspension ionic strength with significantly higher hydraulic conductivity observed at the higher ionic strengths compared to that observed at lower ionic strengths. Results obtained using the sorptivity-diffusivity model were consistent with conventional cake filtration theory and provided useful insights into the bulk properties of the filter cakes. Cake moisture ratio profiles of the montmorillonite system showed that high suspension ionic strength resulted in denser or less voluminous filter cakes that retained less water than was the case at the low ionic strength. These results suggest that, under low ionic strength conditions, the clay particles associate in suspension in assemblages of high aspect ratio which subsequently form highly "cross-linked" voluminous honeycomb type structures of low permeability once deposited upon the membrane. However, under sufficiently high ionic strength conditions, the high aspect ratio montmorillonite assemblages form nematic structures on deposition on the membrane that are denser yet more permeable than the structures formed at lower salt concentration. The distinct change in properties of the deposited clay on increase in salt concentration may well be indicative of transition from a gel to a nematically ordered phase.

  12. Effect of pH and ionic strength on the binding of paraquat and MCPA by soil fulvic and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, A; López, R; Gondar, D; Antelo, J; Fiol, S; Arce, F

    2009-06-01

    The effect of pH and ionic strength on the interaction between pesticides (paraquat and MCPA) and humic substances (soil extracted humic acid and fulvic acid) was interpreted with a simple electrostatic model. Potentiometric titrations were carried out, the charge curves for the humic substances were obtained for three values of ionic strength, and the parameters that define proton binding to humic and fulvic acid were calculated by application of the NICA-Donnan model. The binding isotherms were obtained for paraquat-humic acid and paraquat-fulvic acid at three different pH values and two ionic strengths, and the MCPA-fulvic acid binding isotherms for two pH values and two ionic strengths. Binding experiments were carried out by use of a membrane dialysis technique and the concentrations of pesticide were measured by HPLC. The amount of paraquat bound to the humic substances increased with pH, decreased with increasing ionic strength, decreased in the presence of Ca(2+) and was greater for humic acid than for fulvic acid. Much less binding was observed with MCPA than with paraquat, and therefore the isotherms were not well defined. The application of a simple electrostatic model enabled us to conclude that the effect of pH and ionic strength on binding of paraquat to humic substances is due to the effect that these parameters have on the humic substance charge, and the model provided an excellent reproduction of the experimental binding isotherms.

  13. Recognition of left-handed Z-DNA of short unmodified oligonucleotides under physiological ionic strength conditions.

    PubMed Central

    D'Urso, Alessandro; Choi, Jung Kyu; Shabbir-Hussain, Murtaza; Ngwa, Fidelis N.; Lambousis, Maria I.; Purrello, Roberto; Balaz, Milan

    2014-01-01

    The left-handed Z-DNA form of the short unmodified alternating guanine-cytosine oligonucleotides, 5′-(dGdC)24 and 5′-(dGdC)18, was selectively detected under physiological ionic strength and pH conditions using the anionic nickel(II) porphyrin, NiTPPS. No spectroscopic signal was observed for NiTPPS with any right-handed oligonucleotides under identical conditions. The 48-mer 5′-(dGdC)24 Z-form was detected at concentrations as low as 100 nM. The binding of NiTPPS to the B- and Z-oligonucleotides was studied quantitatively by UV-vis absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopies. NiTPPS was found to be a universal DNA binder, with binding affinity and geometry depending on the ionic composition of the solution, rather than on the DNA helical twist. This is the first example of a successful spectroscopic detection of the Z-DNA of short unmodified oligonucleotides under physiological pH and ionic strength conditions. PMID:20510880

  14. Electric and flow linear dichroism of unfolded and condensed chromatin: a comparative study at low and intermediate ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Hagmar, P; Marquet, R; Colson, P; Kubista, M; Nielsen, P; Norden, B; Houssier, C

    1989-08-01

    Identical samples containing polynucleosomal chains of chicken erythrocyte (CE) and Ehrlich ascites tumour (EA) chromatin were studied under various ionic conditions with regard to electric linear dichroism (ELD) and flow linear dichroism (FLD). Both orientation techniques consistently confirmed that, in the limit of very low ionic strength and in the absence of multivalent cations, the reduced linear dichroism of chromatin is negative in the DNA-base absorption band, as expected for an extended zig-zag polynucleosomal conformation. With increasing electrolyte content, both ELD and FLD decreased drastically in amplitude, but in contrast to the ELD which remains negative in an intermediate range of low ionic strength (0.1-0.5 mM Mg2+) the FLD changes sign and becomes positive. The ELD and FLD amplitudes decrease with higher Mg2+ concentrations and FLD even vanishes in the region of 0.2-0.4 mM; both signals are positive above 0.4-0.5 mM Mg2+. The origin of the dissimilarities between ELD and FLD observations is still not fully understood. Several possibilities are considered: ELD signals are more influenced than FLD by the presence of short chromatin chains, nucleosomes and small pieces of naked DNA, while FLD is more susceptible to the presence of large, easily orientable, scattering aggregates. Different preferred orientation directions of the chromatin fibre with respect to electric and hydrodynamic fields may also be involved. Finally, FLD and ELD probably "see" different features of the chromatin structure.

  15. Investigation of low ionic strength effect on passive monovalent cation transport through erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, I; Ihrig, I; Erdmann, A

    1993-01-01

    Effect of low ionic force on the passive transport of univalent cations through the erythrocyte membranes is considered. It is postulated that this effect is complex and cannot be explained on the basis of electrodiffusion. Data are presented on the already known transport pathways in the erythrocyte membranes for univalent cations. Characteristics of residual cation transport (the "leak" flux) through the erythrocyte membranes also affected by the low ionic force are presented.

  16. Stability of YREE complexes with the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B at seawater ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Emily A.; Schijf, Johan

    2011-11-01

    Organic complexation of yttrium and the rare earth elements (YREEs), although generally believed to be important, is an understudied aspect of YREE solution speciation in the open ocean. We report the first series of stability constants for complexes of YREEs (except Ce and Pm) with the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB), representing a class of small organic ligands that have an extraordinary selectivity for Fe(III) and are found in surface seawater at low-picomolar concentrations. Constants were measured by potentiometric titration of DFOB (pH 3-10) in the presence of single YREEs, in simple media at seawater ionic strength (NaClO 4 or NaCl, I = 0.7 M). Under these circumstances, the terminal amine of DFOB does not deprotonate. The four acid dissociation constants of the siderophore were determined separately by potentiometric titration of DFOB alone. Values for the bidentate (log β1), tetradentate (log β2), and hexadentate (log β3) complexes of La-Lu range from 4.88 to 6.53, 7.70 to 11.27, and 10.09 to 15.19, respectively, while Y falls between Gd and Tb in each case. Linear free-energy relations of the three stability constants with the first YREE hydrolysis constant, log β1∗, yield regression coefficients of >0.97. On the other hand, plots of the constants vs. the radius of the inner hydration sphere display an increasing deviation from linearity for the lightest REEs (La > Pr > Nd). This may signify steric constraints in DFOB folding around bulkier cations, a larger mismatch in coordination number, or a substantial degree of covalence in the YREE-hydroxamate bond. Complexes of the YREEs with DFOB are many orders of magnitude more stable than those with carbonate, the dominant inorganic YREE ligand in seawater. Speciation modeling with MINEQL indicates that, for an average seawater composition, the hexadentate complex could constitute as much as 28% of dissolved Lu at free DFOB concentrations as low as 10 -13 M. Such conditions might

  17. Osmo and ionic regulation of black tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon Fabricius 1798) juveniles exposed to K(+) deficient inland saline water at different salinities.

    PubMed

    Tantulo, Uras; Fotedar, Ravi

    2007-02-01

    An 11-day trial was conducted to investigate the osmoregulatory capacity (OC) and regulation of K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) of Penaeus monodon juveniles when exposed to K(+) deficient inland saline water (ISW) of four different salinities (5, 15, 25 and 35 ppt). The survival of juveniles showed a positive linear relationship (R(2) ranging from 0.72 to 0.98) with salinity. At the end of the trial, juveniles were able to survive only in 5 ppt of ISW and showed no changes in OC when transferred from ocean water (OW) to ISW. Further, the OC of juveniles in 5 ppt of ISW was significantly different (P<0.05) from the OC of juveniles exposed to 15, 25 and 35 ppt and exhibited strong serum K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) regulation monitored over 16 h. In contrast, at 35 ppt, significant decrease (P<0.05) in serum K(+) and Mg(2+) concentrations and accumulation of serum Na(+) concentration occurred after 16 h of exposure to ISW. At higher salinity, an increase in serum Na(+) concentration leads to an increase in the serum osmolality of the juveniles, which in turn causes decrease in the OC of the juveniles. The results of this study suggest that K(+) deficiency in ISW has a negative effect on survival, OC and the ability of P. monodon juveniles to regulate serum Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) concentrations. These effects are compounded as salinity increases.

  18. Effects of kaolinite colloids on Cd2 + transport through saturated sand under varying ionic strength conditions: Column experiments and modeling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikiniyadhanee, Rakkreat; Chotpantarat, Srilert; Ong, Say Kee

    2015-11-01

    Column experiments were performed under various ionic strengths (0.0-0.9 mM) using 10 mg L- 1 of Cd2 + without kaolinite colloids and 10 mg L- 1 Cd2 + mixed with 100 mg L- 1 kaolinite colloids. The nonequilibrium two-site model (TSM) described the behavior of both Cd2 + transport and Cd2 + co-transported with kaolinite colloids better than the equilibrium model (CDeq) (R2 = 0.978-0.996). The results showed that an increase in ionic strength negatively impacted the retardation factors (R) of both Cd2 + and Cd2 + mixed with kaolinite colloids. The presence of kaolinite colloids increased the retardation factors of Cd2 + from 7.23 to 7.89, 6.76 to 6.61 and 3.79 to 6.99 for ionic strengths of 0.225, 0.45 and 0.9 mM, respectively. On the other hand, the presence of kaolinite colloids decreased the retardation factor of Cd2 + from 8.13 to 7.83 for ionic strength of 0.0 mM. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites (f) parameters, kinetic constant for sorption sites (α) and Freundlich constant (Kf) were estimated from HYDRUS-1D of TSM for Cd2 + transport. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites was found to increase for an increase in ionic strength. Kf values of Cd2 + transport without kaolinite colloids for 0.0, 0.225 and 0.45 mM were found to be higher than those of Cd2 + transport with kaolinite colloids, except for ionic strength of 0.9 mM. Hence, the presence of kaolinite colloids probably retarded the mobility of Cd2 + in porous media for higher ionic strengths. Furthermore, retardation factors and Kf values of both Cd2 + transport and Cd2 + co-transport were shown to decrease when ionic strength increased. Interestingly, according to TSM, the fraction of instantaneous sorption sites tends to increase for an increase in ionic strength, which imply that the mechanism of Cd2 + sorption onto quartz sand can be better described using equilibrium sorption rather than nonequilibrium sorption for an increase in ionic strength.

  19. Effects of kaolinite colloids on Cd²⁺ transport through saturated sand under varying ionic strength conditions: Column experiments and modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Wikiniyadhanee, Rakkreat; Chotpantarat, Srilert; Ong, Say Kee

    2015-11-01

    Column experiments were performed under various ionic strengths (0.0-0.9 mM) using 10 mg L(-1) of Cd(2+) without kaolinite colloids and 10 mg L(-1) Cd(2+) mixed with 100 mg L(-1) kaolinite colloids. The nonequilibrium two-site model (TSM) described the behavior of both Cd(2+) transport and Cd(2+) co-transported with kaolinite colloids better than the equilibrium model (CD(eq)) (R(2)=0.978-0.996). The results showed that an increase in ionic strength negatively impacted the retardation factors (R) of both Cd(2+) and Cd(2+) mixed with kaolinite colloids. The presence of kaolinite colloids increased the retardation factors of Cd(2+) from 7.23 to 7.89, 6.76 to 6.61 and 3.79 to 6.99 for ionic strengths of 0.225, 0.45 and 0.9 mM, respectively. On the other hand, the presence of kaolinite colloids decreased the retardation factor of Cd(2+) from 8.13 to 7.83 for ionic strength of 0.0 mM. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites (f) parameters, kinetic constant for sorption sites (α) and Freundlich constant (K(f)) were estimated from HYDRUS-1D of TSM for Cd(2+) transport. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites was found to increase for an increase in ionic strength. K(f) values of Cd(2+) transport without kaolinite colloids for 0.0, 0.225 and 0.45 mM were found to be higher than those of Cd(2+) transport with kaolinite colloids, except for ionic strength of 0.9 mM. Hence, the presence of kaolinite colloids probably retarded the mobility of Cd(2+) in porous media for higher ionic strengths. Furthermore, retardation factors and K(f) values of both Cd(2+) transport and Cd(2+) co-transport were shown to decrease when ionic strength increased. Interestingly, according to TSM, the fraction of instantaneous sorption sites tends to increase for an increase in ionic strength, which imply that the mechanism of Cd(2+) sorption onto quartz sand can be better described using equilibrium sorption rather than nonequilibrium sorption for an increase in ionic strength.

  20. Release of colloids from primary minimum contact under unfavorable conditions by perturbations in ionic strength and flow rate.

    PubMed

    Pazmino, Eddy; Trauscht, Jacob; Johnson, William P

    2014-08-19

    Colloid release from surfaces in response to ionic strength and flow perturbations has been mechanistically simulated. However, these models do not address the mechanism by which colloid attachment occurs, at least in the presence of bulk colloid-collector repulsion (unfavorable conditions), which is a prevalent environmental condition. We test whether a mechanistic model that predicts colloid attachment under unfavorable conditions also predicts colloid release in response to reduced ionic strength (IS) and increased fluid velocity (conditions thought prevalent for mobilization of environmental colloids). The model trades in mean-field colloid-collector interaction for discrete representation of surface heterogeneity, which accounts for a combination of attractive and repulsive interactions simultaneously, and results in an attached colloid population (in primary minimum contact with the surface) having a distribution of strengths of attraction. The model moderates equilibrium separation distance by inclusion of steric interactions. By using the same model parameters to quantitatively predict attachment under unfavorable conditions, simulated release of colloids (for all three sizes) from primary minimum attachment in response to perturbations qualitatively matched experimental results, demonstrating that both attachment and detachment were mechanistically simulated.

  1. Variations of intracellular pH in human erythrocytes via K(+)(Na(+))/H(+) exchange under low ionic strength conditions.

    PubMed

    Kummerow, D; Hamann, J; Browning, J A; Wilkins, R; Ellory, J C; Bernhardt, I

    2000-08-01

    The change of intracellular pH of erythrocytes under different experimental conditions was investigated using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF and correlated with (ouabain + bumetanide + EGTA)-insensitive K(+) efflux and Cl(-) loss. When human erythrocytes were suspended in a physiological NaCl solution (pH(o) = 7.4), the measured pH(i) was 7.19 + or - 0.04 and remained constant for 30 min. When erythrocytes were transferred into a low ionic strength (LIS) solution, an immediate alkalinization increased the pH(i) to 7.70 + or - 0.15, which was followed by a slower cell acidification. The alkalinization of cells in LIS media was ascribed to a band 3 mediated effect since a rapid loss of approximately 80% of intracellular Cl(-) content was observed, which was sensitive to known anion transport inhibitors. In the case of cellular acidification, a comparison of the calculated H(+) influx with the measured unidirectional K(+) efflux at different extracellular ionic strengths showed a correlation with a nearly 1:1 stoichiometry. Both fluxes were enhanced by decreasing the ionic strength of the solution resulting in a H(+) influx and a K(+) efflux in LIS solution of 108.2 + or - 20.4 mmol (l(cells) hr)(-1) and 98.7 + or - 19.3 mmol (l(cells) hr)(-1), respectively. For bovine and porcine erythrocytes, in LIS media, H(+) influx and K(+) efflux were of comparable magnitude, but only about 10% of the fluxes observed in human erythrocytes under LIS conditions. Quinacrine, a known inhibitor of the mitochondrial K(+)(Na(+))/H(+) exchanger, inhibited the K(+) efflux in LIS solution by about 80%. Our results provide evidence for the existence of a K(+)(Na(+))/H(+) exchanger in the human erythrocyte membrane.

  2. Effects of ionic strength and temperature on the aggregation and deposition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixin; Yang, Xuezhi; Wang, Qi; Zeng, Yuxuan; Ding, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The aggregation and deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) determines their transport and fate in natural waters. Therefore, the aggregation kinetics of humic-acid treated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (HA-MWCNTs) was investigated by time-resolved dynamic light scattering in NaCl and CaCl2 electrolyte solutions. Increased ionic strength induced HA-MWCNT aggregation due to the less negative zeta potential and the reduced electrostatic repulsion. The critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values of HA-MWCNTs were 80mmol/L in NaCl and 1.3mmol/L in CaCl2 electrolyte, showing that Ca(2+) causes more serious aggregation than Na(+). The aggregation behavior of HA-MWCNTs was consistent with Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory. The deposition kinetics of HA-MWCNTs was measured by the optical absorbance at 800nm. The critical deposition concentrations for HA-MWCNT in NaCl and CaCl2 solutions were close to the CCC values, therefore the rate of deposition cannot be increased by changing the ionic strength in the diffusion-limited aggregation regime. The deposition process was correlated to the aggregation since larger aggregates increased gravitational deposition and decreased random Brownian diffusion. HA-MWCNTs hydrodynamic diameters were evaluated at 5, 15 and 25°C. Higher temperature caused faster aggregation due to the reduced electrostatic repulsion and increased random Brownian motion and collision frequency. HA-MWCNTs aggregate faster at higher temperature in either NaCl or CaCl2 electrolyte due to the decreased electrostatic repulsion and increased random Brownian motion. Our results suggest that CNT aggregation and deposition are two correlated processes governed by the electrolyte, and CNT transport is favored at low ionic strength and low temperature. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Adsorption of lysozyme, beta-casein and their layer-by-layer formation on hydrophilic surfaces: Effect of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Lundin, Maria; Elofsson, Ulla M; Blomberg, Eva; Rutland, Mark W

    2010-05-01

    The adsorbed amount and layer structure of lysozyme, beta-casein and mixed layers of the two proteins were studied on hydrophilic silica and quartz surfaces using the following techniques: ellipsometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF). Particular emphasis was put on the effect of solution ionic strength on the layer formation. Both lysozyme and beta-casein showed a higher affinity for the silica surface when adsorbed from a solution of low ionic strength even though beta-casein and silica are negatively charged at the pH used. No beta-casein remained adsorbed after rinsing with a 150mM buffer solution. The adsorbed amount of lysozyme on silica exceeded a monolayer coverage irrespective of the solution conditions and displayed a rigid structure. beta-Casein forms more than a single layer on pre-adsorbed lysozyme; an inner flat layer and an outer layer with an extended structure, which largely desorbs on rinsing. The build-up through sequential adsorption of lysozyme and beta-casein is favoured at intermediate and high ionic strength. The total adsorbed amount increased slightly with each deposition cycle and the mixed lysozyme/beta-casein layers contain higher amounts of protein compared to those of pure lysozyme or beta-casein. Sequential adsorption gives rise to a proteinaceous layer consisting of both lysozyme and beta-casein. The protein layers are probably highly interpenetrated with no clear separation between them. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. On the ionic strength dependence of the electrophoretic mobility: From 2D to 3D slope-plots.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Hervé; Wu, Hengfu; Allison, Stuart A

    2017-03-01

    Determining the charge and the nature (small ion, nanoparticle, or polyelectrolyte) of an unknown solute from its electrophoretic characteristics remains a challenging issue. In this work, we demonstrate that, if the knowledge of the effective electrophoretic mobility (μep ) at a given ionic strength is not sufficient to characterize a given solute, the combination of this parameter with (i) the relative decrease of the electrophoretic mobility with the ionic strength (S), and (ii) the hydrodynamic radius (Rh ), is sufficient (in most cases) to deduce the nature of the solute and its charge. These three parameters are experimentally accessible by CZE and Taylor dispersion analysis performed on the same instrumentation. 3D representation of the three aforementioned parameters (μep ; S and Rh ) is proposed to visualize the differences in the electrophoretic behavior between solutes according to their charge and nature. Surprisingly, such 3D slope plot in the case of small ions and nanoparticles looks like a "whale-tail," while polyelectrolyte contour plot represents a rather simple and monotonous map that is independent of solute size. This work also sets how to estimate the effective charge of a solute from a given experimental (S,Rh,μ ep 5 mM ) triplet, which is not possible to obtain unambiguously with only (Rh,μ ep 5 mM ) or (S,μ ep 5 mM ) doublet, where μ ep 5 mM is the effective electrophoretic mobility at 5 mM ionic strength. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Effect of dissolved organic matter on the stability of magnetite nanoparticles under different pH and ionic strength conditions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun-Dong; Zevi, Yuniati; Kou, Xiao-Ming; Xiao, John; Wang, Xue-Jun; Jin, Yan

    2010-07-15

    Upon release of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) into the subsurface environment, their fate and transport and hence their potential environmental and public health impacts will largely depend on how stable these NPs are as suspended particles in the natural environment. In this study, we systematically examine the effect of humic acid (HA) on surface charge status and aggregation potential of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) NPs, selected as a model for metal oxide NPs, over a wide range of solution pH and ionic strength. Through zeta potential (ZP) measurements, we found that HA can adsorb to magnetite particles hence modifying their surface charge status. At low loadings, the presence of HA can induce a shift in the point zero of charge of due to partial neutralization of the positive charges on magnetite NPs. At high loadings, however, HA is capable of completely cover magnetite particles giving rise to a suspension ZP profile similar to its own (observed in presence of 20 mg L(-)(1) HA). These impacts on surface charge correspond well with the observed aggregation behaviors in the absence and presence of HA. From the dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements, fast aggregation, which is independent of solution chemistry, took place when the pH is close to the point zero charge (PZC) and the ionic strength is above the critical coagulation concentration (CCC). At high ionic strength, a small dose (2 mg L(-)(1)) of HA stabilized the NPs' suspension significantly. This stabilization effect is substantially enhanced with increasing HA concentration. The calculated DLVO (Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek) interaction energy profiles, using experimentally determined values of Hamaker constant, adequately support the experimental observations. The DLVO analysis further reveals the possible presence of secondary energy minima and the possibility of deaggregation of magnetite agglomerates. The complexation of HA-NPs and the HA effects on NPs aggregations were confirmed by atomic

  6. Structural instability of shell-like assemblies of a keplerate-type polyoxometalate induced by ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Veen, Sandra J; Kegel, Willem K

    2009-11-19

    We demonstrate a new structural instability of shell-like assemblies of polyoxometalates. Besides the colloidal instability, that is, the formation of aggregates that consist of many single layered POM-shells, these systems also display an instability on a structural scale within the shell-like assemblies. This instability occurs at significantly lower ionic strength than the colloidal stability limit and only becomes evident after a relatively long time. For the polyoxometalate, abbreviated as {Mo(72)Fe(30)}, it is shown that the structural stability limit of POM-shells lies between a NaCl concentration of 1.00 and 5.00 mM in aqueous solution.

  7. Influence of porewater velocity and ionic strength on DOC concentrations in and losses from peat-sand mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffner, Nora; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Fiedler, Sabine

    2015-04-01

    Organic soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle as they can act as a source or a sink for greenhouse gas emissions. The new IPCC Wetlands Supplement accounts for the first time for CO2 emissions from the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). While there is a wealth of studies on "true" peat soils, knowledge on DOC losses from organic soils heavily disturbed by e.g. mixing with sand is fragmentary. Moreover, there are only a few studies on the influence of soil hydrological properties on DOC transport. This study investigates physico-chemical controls on the concentration and losses of DOC from a peat-sand mixture in a saturated column experiment with undisturbed columns. The soil originates from the study site "Grosses Moor" (Northern Germany) which is a former bog where peat layers remaining after peat mining were mixed with the underlying mineral soil. We studied the influence of the flow regime and the ionic strength of the irrigation solution on DOC concentrations and losses. Three different pumping rates and two different ionic strengths determined by different concentrations of a sodium chloride-calcium chloride mixture in the irrigation solution were applied. Transport properties of the soil were obtained by analyzing breakthrough curves (BTCs) of a conservative tracer (potassium bromide). For interpretation of the BTCs, the transport model STANMOD which is based on the two-region (mobile/immobile) non-equilibrium concept was fitted to the data. The shape of the BTCs and the STANMOD results showed that three of the four columns had a dual porosity structure, which affects the porewater velocity and the contact area. After a large initial peak, DOC concentrations equilibrated to nearly constant values. Increased porewater velocities decreased the concentration of DOC, but increased the losses. A new equilibrium concentration was reached after nearly all changes of the porewater velocity. At maximum pumping rates as determined from

  8. Assessment of the Effects of Flow Rate and Ionic Strength on Microbial Fuel Cell Performance Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, D; Tsouris, Costas; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Borole, Abhijeet P

    2010-01-01

    Impedance changes of the anode, cathode and solution were examined for a microbial fuel cell (MFC) under varying conditions in order to improve its performance. An MFC inoculated with a pre-enriched microbial culture resulted in a startup time of ten days. Over this period, the anode impedance decreased below the cathode impedance, suggesting a cathode limited power output. Decreasing the anode flow rate did not impact the anode impedance significantly, while it increased the cathode impedance by 65% . Reducing the anode-medium ionic strength from 100% to 10% increased the cathode impedance by 48%.

  9. Ionic Strength, Surface Charge, and Packing Density Effects on the Properties of Peptide Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Leo, Norman; Liu, Juan; Archbold, Ian; Tang, Yongan; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2017-02-28

    The various environmental parameters of packing density, ionic strength, and solution charge were examined for their effects on the properties of the immobilized peptide mimotope CH19 (CGSGSGSQLGPYELWELSH) that binds with the therapeutic antibody Trastuzumab (Herceptin) on a gold substrate. The immobilization of CH19 onto gold was examined with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The QCM data showed the presence of intermolecular interactions resulting in the increase of viscoelastic properties of the peptide self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The CH19 SAM was diluted with CS7 (CGSGSGS) to decrease the packing density as CH19/CS7. The packing density and ionic strength parameters were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry, and QCM. AFM and ellipsometry showed a distinct conformational difference between CH19 and CH19/CS7, indicating a relationship between packing density and conformational state of the immobilized peptide. The CH19 SAM thickness was 40 Å with a rough topology, while the CH19/CS7 SAM thickness was 20 Å with a smooth topology. The affinity studies showed that the affinity of CH19 and CH19/CS7 to Trastuzumab were both on the order of 10(7) M(-1) in undiluted PBS buffer, while the dilution of the buffer by 1000× increased both SAMs affinities to Trastuzumab to the order of 10(15) M(-2) and changed the binding behavior from noncooperative to cooperative binding. This indicated that ionic strength had a more pronounced effect on binding properties of the CH19 SAM than packing density. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was conducted on the CH19/CS7 SAM, which showed an increase in impedance after each EIS measurement cycle. Cyclic voltammetry on the CH19/CS7 SAM decreased impedance to near initial values. The impact of the packing density, buffer ionic strength, and local charge perturbation of the peptide SAM properties was interpreted based on the titratable sites in CH19 that could participate in the proton transfer and

  10. Effect of carboxymethyl cellulose and ionic strength on stability of mineral suspensions in potash ore flotation systems.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, M; Laskowski, J S; Ansari, A

    2003-04-15

    The adsorption of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose from aqueous solutions varying in ionic strength from that of distilled water to 50% NaCl/KCl brine (about 3.5 mol/dm(3)) onto illite and dolomite has been studied. The purpose of this work was to investigate the solvency effects in the phenomena underlying the potash flotation process that is carried out in saturated brine. Based on viscosity measurements, the adsorption results were analyzed in terms of a simple model of polymer macromolecules in solution. Suspension stability measurements carried out concomitantly with adsorption tests showed the ranges of carboxymethyl cellulose concentration over which the tested suspensions either were aggregated or were restabilized.

  11. Evaluation of effects of pH and ionic strength on colloidal stability of IgG solutions by PEG-induced liquid-liquid phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ronald W.; Latypov, Ramil F.; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Meyer, Julie A.; Vunnum, Suresh; Benedek, George B.

    2016-11-01

    Colloidal stability of IgG antibody solutions is important for pharmaceutical and medicinal applications. Solution pH and ionic strength are two key factors that affect the colloidal stability of protein solutions. In this work, we use a method based on the PEG-induced liquid-liquid phase separation to examine the effects of pH and ionic strength on the colloidal stability of IgG solutions. We found that at high ionic strength (≥0.25M), the colloidal stability of most of our IgGs is insensitive to pH, and at low ionic strength (≤0.15M), all IgG solutions are much more stable at pH 5 than at pH 7. In addition, the PEG-induced depletion force is less efficient in causing phase separation at pH 5 than at pH 7. In contrast to the native inter-protein interaction of IgGs, the effect of depletion force on phase separation of the antibody solutions is insensitive to ionic strength. Our results suggest that the long-range electrostatic inter-protein repulsion at low ionic strength stabilizes the IgG solutions at low pH. At high ionic strength, the short-range electrostatic interactions do not make a significant contribution to the colloidal stability for most IgGs with a few exceptions. The weaker effect of depletion force at lower pH indicates a reduction of protein concentration in the condensed phase. This work advances our basic understanding of the colloidal stability of IgG solutions and also introduces a practical approach to measuring protein colloidal stability under various solution conditions.

  12. Evaluation of effects of pH and ionic strength on colloidal stability of IgG solutions by PEG-induced liquid-liquid phase separation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ronald W; Latypov, Ramil F; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Meyer, Julie A; Vunnum, Suresh; Benedek, George B

    2016-11-14

    Colloidal stability of IgG antibody solutions is important for pharmaceutical and medicinal applications. Solution pH and ionic strength are two key factors that affect the colloidal stability of protein solutions. In this work, we use a method based on the PEG-induced liquid-liquid phase separation to examine the effects of pH and ionic strength on the colloidal stability of IgG solutions. We found that at high ionic strength (≥0.25M), the colloidal stability of most of our IgGs is insensitive to pH, and at low ionic strength (≤0.15M), all IgG solutions are much more stable at pH 5 than at pH 7. In addition, the PEG-induced depletion force is less efficient in causing phase separation at pH 5 than at pH 7. In contrast to the native inter-protein interaction of IgGs, the effect of depletion force on phase separation of the antibody solutions is insensitive to ionic strength. Our results suggest that the long-range electrostatic inter-protein repulsion at low ionic strength stabilizes the IgG solutions at low pH. At high ionic strength, the short-range electrostatic interactions do not make a significant contribution to the colloidal stability for most IgGs with a few exceptions. The weaker effect of depletion force at lower pH indicates a reduction of protein concentration in the condensed phase. This work advances our basic understanding of the colloidal stability of IgG solutions and also introduces a practical approach to measuring protein colloidal stability under various solution conditions.

  13. Activation and inactivation of taurine efflux in hyposmotic and isosmotic swelling in cortical astrocytes: role of ionic strength and cell volume decrease.

    PubMed

    Cardin, V; Peña-Segura, C; Pasantes-Morales, H

    1999-06-15

    A decrease in intracellular ionic strength appears involved in the activation of swelling-elicited 3H-taurine efflux in cortical cultured astrocytes. Hyposmotic (50%) or isosmotic urea-induced swelling leading to a decrease of intracellular ionic strength, activated 3H-taurine efflux from a rate constant of about 0.008 min(-1) to 0.33 min(-1) (hyposmotic) and 0.59 min(-1) (urea). This efflux rate was markedly lower (maximal 0.03 min(-1)) in isosmotic swelling caused by K+ accumulation, where there is no decrease in ionic strength, or in cold (10 degrees C) hyposmotic medium (maximal 0.18 min(-1)), where swelling is reduced and consequently intracellular ionic strength is less affected. Also, astrocytes pretreated with hyperosmotic medium, which recover cell volume by ion accumulation, did not release 3H-taurine when they swelled by switching to isosmotic medium, but when volume was recovered by accumulation of urea, taurine release was restored. These results point to a key role of ionic strength in the activation of osmosensitive 3H-taurine efflux. In contrast, its inactivation was independent of the change in ionic strength but appears related to the reduction in cell volume after swelling, since despite the extent or direction of the change in ionic strength, the 3H-taurine efflux did not inactivate in isosmotic KCl-elicited swelling when cell volume did not recover nor in hyposmotic swelling when RVD was impaired by replacing NaCl in the medium by permeant osmolytes.

  14. Performance of a MBR pilot plant treating high strength wastewater subject to salinity increase: analysis of biomass activity and fouling behaviour.

    PubMed

    Di Bella, Gaetano; Di Trapani, Daniele; Torregrossa, Michele; Viviani, Gaspare

    2013-11-01

    Membrane bioreactors produce high quality effluents that could be suitable for reuse. However, when treating high strength wastewater subject to a salinity increase, a modification of biomass characteristics may occur. This circumstance is of importance, since it can have a significant impact in terms of biokinetic as well as fouling behaviour. The aim of the study was to evaluate the performance of a pilot plant MBR, in terms of biomass activity and membrane fouling, fed with high strength synthetic wastewater, when subject to a salinity increase. With normal salinity, the pilot plant showed high removal efficiencies and high biomass respiratory activity. On the other hand, the salinity increase significantly affected the removal efficiency as well as the SMP production. Furthermore, the salinity increase showed a strong effect on biomass activity, reducing in particular the respiration rates of autotrophic populations.

  15. Transport of aluminum oxide nanoparticles in saturated sand: effects of ionic strength, flow rate, and nanoparticle concentration.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Tanzina; George, Jessica; Shipley, Heather J

    2013-10-01

    The effect of ionic strength (IS), flow rate, and nanoparticle concentration on the transport and deposition of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3 NPs) in saturated sand was investigated. Mobility of Al2O3 NPs was influenced by IS, the highest mobility was observed in DI water (97% elution of the influent) and decreased with increasing ionic strength. Decreased mobility of the NPs was due to aggregation as the IS increased. Varying flow conditions did not have a significant effect on mobility. However, increased and faster elution was observed when the influent concentration was increased from 50 mg/L to 400 mg/L. The influent and effluent nanoparticle sizes were also measured using dynamic light scattering. For most conditions, the size was observed to be below 100 nm and there was no significant change to the influent and effluent particle sizes. Significant elution was observed although conditions were electrostatically favorable, which was attributed to the small, stable size (~82 nm) of the particles and blocking. DLVO theory was also applied to the data to better understand the mechanisms of mobility. It is necessary to consider these mechanisms for a reliable prediction of transport through the subsurface and potential removal methods such as filtration.

  16. IgG1 adsorption to siliconized glass vials-influence of pH, ionic strength, and nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Höger, Kerstin; Mathes, Johannes; Frieß, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the adsorption of an IgG1 antibody to siliconized vials was investigated with focus on the formulation parameters pH, ionic strength, and nonionic surfactants. Electrophoretic mobility measurements were performed to investigate the charge characteristics of protein and siliconized glass particles at different pH values. Calculation of the electrokinetic charge density allowed further insight into the energetic conditions in the protein-sorbent interface. Maximum adsorption of IgG1 was found at acidic pH values and could be correlated with energetically favorable minimal ion incorporation into the interface. The importance of electrostatic interactions for IgG1 adsorption at acidic pH values was also confirmed by the efficient adsorption reduction at decreased solution ionic strength. A second adsorption maximum around the pI of the protein was assigned to hydrophobic interactions with the siliconized surface. Addition of the nonionic surfactants poloxamer 188 or polysorbate 80 resulted in almost complete suppression of adsorption at pH 7.2, and a strong but less efficient effect at pH 4 on siliconized glass vials. This adsorption suppression was much less pronounced on borosilicate glass vials. From these results, it can be concluded that electrostatic interactions contribute substantially to IgG1 adsorption to siliconized glass vials especially at acidic formulation pH.

  17. Effect of ionic strength on the adsorption of copper and chromium ions by vermiculite pure clay mineral.

    PubMed

    El-Bayaa, A A; Badawy, N A; Alkhalik, E Abd

    2009-10-30

    It is important to assess the effects of ionic strength when studying adsorption of metal ions on clay mineral because the background salt may complex metals and compete for adsorption sites. The sorption behavior of vermiculite pure clay mineral has been studied with respect to copper and chromium as a function of ionic strength in single metal ion solutions. Background electrolytes used in these experiments were KCl, NaCl and NH4Cl. The studies were conducted by a batch method at temperature 25 degrees C. The adsorption capacity and adsorption energy for each metal ion were calculated from the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Also the competitive adsorption behavior of some heavy metal ions such as Cr(III), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) by vermiculite pure clay mineral was studied. The result shows the competition between coexisting heavy metal cations for the same adsorption sites of an adsorbent. However, when trivalent metal was added to the solution it competitively replaced divalent ions that had been previously adsorbed onto the vermiculite pure clay mineral, resulting in the desorption of these metals into the solution.

  18. Investigation of the Sedimentation Behavior of Aluminum Phosphate: Influence of pH, Ionic Strength, and Model Antigens.

    PubMed

    Muthurania, Kevin; Ignatius, Arun Alphonse; Jin, Zhaowei; Williams, Jennifer; Ohtake, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    Evaluation of the physical characteristics of vaccines formulated in the presence of adjuvants, such as aluminum salts (Alum), is an important step in the development of vaccines. Depending on the formulation conditions and the associated electrostatic interactions of the adjuvant particles, the vaccine suspension may transition between flocculated and deflocculated states. The impact of practical formulation parameters, including pH, ionic strength, and the presence of model antigens, has been correlated to the sedimentation behavior of aluminum phosphate suspensions. A novel approach for the characterization of suspension properties of Alum has been developed to predict the flocculated state of the system using a sedimentation analysis-based tool (Turbiscan®). Two sedimentation parameters, the settling onset time (Sonset) and the sedimentation volume ratio (SVR) can be determined simultaneously in a single measurement. The results demonstrate the suspension characteristics to be significantly altered by solution conditions (pH and ionic strength) and the charge state of bound antigens. Formulation conditions that promote the flocculated state of the suspension are characterized by faster Sonset and higher SVR, and are generally easy to resuspend. The Turbiscan® method described herein is a useful tool for the characterization of aluminum-containing suspensions and may be adapted for screening and optimization of suspension-based vaccine formulations in general. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  19. Influence of cellulose nanocrystals concentration and ionic strength on the elaboration of cellulose nanocrystals-xyloglucan multilayered thin films.

    PubMed

    Dammak, Abir; Moreau, Céline; Azzam, Firas; Jean, Bruno; Cousin, Fabrice; Cathala, Bernard

    2015-12-15

    The effect of the variation of CNC concentration on the growth pattern of CNC-XG films is investigated. We found that a transition in the growth slope occurs at a CNC concentration of roughly 3-4gL(-1). A close effect can be obtained by the increase of the ionic strength of the CNC suspensions, suggesting that electrostatic interactions are involved. Static light scattering investigation of CNC dispersions at increasing concentrations demonstrated that the particle-particle interactions change as the CNC concentration increases. Neutron Reflectivity (NR) was used to probe the internal structure of the films. The increase of the CNC concentration as well as the increase of the ionic strength in the CNC suspension were found to induce a densification of the adsorbed CNC layers, even though the mechanisms are not strictly identical in both cases. Small changes in these parameters provide a straightforward way of controlling the architecture of CNC-based multilayered thin films and, as a result, their functional properties.

  20. Dispersion and stability of bare hematite nanoparticles: effect of dispersion tools, nanoparticle concentration, humic acid and ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Dionne; Liu, Guangliang; Li, Chenzhong; Tachiev, Georgio; Cai, Yong

    2012-01-01

    The aggregation and sedimentation of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) can significantly affect the mobility and reactivity of IONPs and subsequently influence the interaction between IONPs and environmental contaminants. Dispersing bare IONPs into a stable suspension within nanoscale range is an important step for studying the interaction of IONPs with contaminants (e.g., toxic metals). In this study, different techniques to disperse bare IONPs (vortex, bath sonication and probe ultrasonication) and the effects of important environmental factors such as dissolved organic matter and ionic strength on the stability of IONPs dispersions were investigated. Vortex minimally dispersed IONPs with hydrodynamic diameter outside the “nanosize range” (698–2400nm). Similar to vortex, bath sonication could not disperse IONPs efficiently. Probe ultrasonication was more effective at dispersing IONPs (50% or more) with hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 120–140 nm with minimal changes in size and sedimentation of IONPs for a prolonged period of time. Over the course of 168 hours, considerable amounts of IONPs remained dispersed in the presence and absence of low ionic strength (0.1 mM of NaCl) and 100 mg/L of humic acid (HA). These results indicate that IONPs can be broken down efficiently into “nanosize range” by probe ultrasonication and a degree of stability can be achieved without the use of synthetic modifiers to enhance colloidal stability. This dispersion tool could be used to develop a laboratory method to study the adsorption mechanism between dispersed bare IONPs and toxic contaminants. PMID:22289174

  1. Yeast frataxin is stabilized by low salt concentrations: cold denaturation disentangles ionic strength effects from specific interactions.

    PubMed

    Sanfelice, Domenico; Puglisi, Rita; Martin, Stephen R; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Pastore, Annalisa; Temussi, Piero Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Frataxins are a family of metal binding proteins associated with the human Friedreich's ataxia disease. Here, we have addressed the effect of non-specifically binding salts on the stability of the yeast ortholog Yfh1. This protein is a sensitive model since its stability is strongly dependent on the environment, in particular on ionic strength. Yfh1 also offers the unique advantage that its cold denaturation can be observed above the freezing point of water, thus allowing the facile construction of the whole protein stability curve and hence the measurement of accurate thermodynamic parameters for unfolding. We systematically measured the effect of several cations and, as a control, of different anions. We show that, while strongly susceptible to ionic strength, as it would be in the cellular environment, Yfh1 stability is sensitive not only to divalent cations, which bind specifically, but also to monovalent cations. We pinpoint the structural bases of the stability and hypothesize that the destabilization induced by an unusual cluster of negatively charged residues favours the entrance of water molecules into the hydrophobic core, consistent with the generally accepted mechanism of cold denaturation.

  2. Influence of ionic strength and polyelectrolyte concentration on the electrical conductivity of suspensions of soft colloidal polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Sagou, Jean-Pierre S; Ahualli, Silvia; Thomas, Fabien; Duval, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    The electrokinetic properties of carboxymethyldextran, a soft and anionic polysaccharide, were analysed in aqueous NaNO3 solutions through measurements of the electrical conductivity of the suspensions. The results, which furnish new experimental support for the structure of soft polysaccharides in electrolyte solution show that the polyion concentration governs the conductance behavior of the suspension as the ionic strength decreases. This is particularly evident for large polymer concentrations, for which electrical double layer overlap is more likely. In contrast, the electrical conductivity of the suspension at high ionic strength reduces to the contribution of the ions in solution, as screening of the polyion charges is more efficient in such conditions. The applicability of Ohshima's general conductivity expression to these electrical conductivity measurements was examined, and a major discrepancy against the theory was observed. The calculated values of the electrical conductivity deduced on the basis of this theory were found to be lower than the experimental ones. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed and a numerical model, based on the use of a cell approach to account for hydrodynamic and electrical interactions between particles, has shown to be a good description of the experimental electrokinetic data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fabrication of flocculation-resistant pH/ionic strength/temperature multiresponsive hollow microspheres and their controlled release.

    PubMed

    Mu, Bin; Liu, Peng; Li, Xiaorui; Du, Pengcheng; Dong, Yun; Wang, Yunjiao

    2012-01-01

    pH/ionic strength/temperature multiresponsive hollow microspheres were successfully prepared by the Ce(IV) initiated grafting polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) onto the multilayered polyelectrolyte shells encapsulating the polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) microsphere templates fabricated by the layer-by-layer assembly of chitosan (CS) and alginate (SAL), after etching the templates by dialysis. The hollow structure of the obtained multiresponsive hollow microspheres was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which indicated that the inner diameter of the hollow microspheres was about 200 nm. The environmental responsive properties of the multiresponsive hollow microspheres were characterized with dynamic light scattering (DLS) in an aqueous system. The introduction of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) brushes onto the pH/ionic strength dual-responsive hollow microspheres achieved temperature-responsive characteristics. It also could prevent flocculation among the obtained multiresponsive hollow microspheres in a solution with higher salt concentration. Their controlled release of drug molecules (a model hydrophobic drug, dipyridamole (DIP)) was also investigated.

  4. Yeast Frataxin Is Stabilized by Low Salt Concentrations: Cold Denaturation Disentangles Ionic Strength Effects from Specific Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sanfelice, Domenico; Puglisi, Rita; Martin, Stephen R.; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Pastore, Annalisa; Temussi, Piero Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Frataxins are a family of metal binding proteins associated with the human Friedreich's ataxia disease. Here, we have addressed the effect of non-specifically binding salts on the stability of the yeast ortholog Yfh1. This protein is a sensitive model since its stability is strongly dependent on the environment, in particular on ionic strength. Yfh1 also offers the unique advantage that its cold denaturation can be observed above the freezing point of water, thus allowing the facile construction of the whole protein stability curve and hence the measurement of accurate thermodynamic parameters for unfolding. We systematically measured the effect of several cations and, as a control, of different anions. We show that, while strongly susceptible to ionic strength, as it would be in the cellular environment, Yfh1 stability is sensitive not only to divalent cations, which bind specifically, but also to monovalent cations. We pinpoint the structural bases of the stability and hypothesize that the destabilization induced by an unusual cluster of negatively charged residues favours the entrance of water molecules into the hydrophobic core, consistent with the generally accepted mechanism of cold denaturation. PMID:24802807

  5. Influence of electric field intensity, ionic strength, and migration distance on the mobility and diffusion in DNA surface electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Li, Bingquan; Fang, Xiaohua; Luo, Haobin; Petersen, Eric; Seo, Young-Soo; Samuilov, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Sokolov, Jonathan; Gersappe, Dilip; Chu, Benjamin

    2006-04-01

    In order to increase the separation rate of surface electrophoresis while preserving the resolution for large DNA chains, e.g., genomic DNA, the mobility and diffusion of Lambda DNA chains adsorbed on flat silicon substrate under an applied electric field, as a function of migration distance, ionic strength, and field intensity, were studied using laser fluorescence microscope. The mobility was found to follow a power law with the field intensity beyond a certain threshold. The detected DNA peak width was shown to be constant with migration distance, slightly smaller with stronger field intensity, but significantly decreased with higher ionic strength. The molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that the peak width was strongly related with the conformation of DNA chains adsorbed onto surface. The results also implied that there was no diffusion of DNA during migration on surface. Therefore, the Nernst-Einstein relation is not valid in the surface electrophoresis and the separation rate could be improved without losing resolution by decreasing separation distance, increasing buffer concentration, and field intensity. The results indicate the fast separation of genomic DNA chains by surface electrophoresis is possible.

  6. Influence of ionic strength and soil characteristics on the behavior of Cryptosporidium oocysts in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Balthazard-Accou, Ketty; Fifi, Urbain; Agnamey, Patrice; Casimir, Justin André; Brasseur, Philippe; Emmanuel, Evens

    2014-05-01

    The physico-chemical behavior of Cryptosporidium oocysts was investigated during their transfer through an alluvial formation from Les Cayes (Haiti) via batch tests. Five approximately 3 kg soil samples were collected and combined prior to batch tests from the alluvial formations. The experiments were carried out at soil pH by equilibrating different ranges of pure oocysts concentrations and soil samples with 3mM CaCl2 and 1mM NaBr as electrolyte. We used the Debye-Hückel equation describing ion activity in a solution for a given ionic strength. The equilibrium adsorption mechanism is used to enumerate the oocysts in the soil. The results suggest that the oocysts behavior in porous media depends on soil characteristics such as soil pH, the nature of the mineral and organic constituents of the soil and the ionic strength and activities in solution. These results show that a total transfer in batch containing NaBr solutions against a partial one in batch containing CaCl2 solutions depends on the oocysts media concentration. To confirm the oocysts number retained in soil, confocal microscopy was successfully used and the images demonstrate that the majority of oocysts were retained at the range of concentrations tested. The findings from this study demonstrated that the retention of C. Parvum in soils may be influenced by chemical conditions and soils characteristics, which are important for groundwater risk assessment.

  7. Effect of surface coatings, grain size, and ionic strength on the maximum attainable coverage of bacteria on sand surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bolster, C H; Mills, A L; Hornberger, G M; Herman, J S

    2001-08-01

    The injection of bacteria in the subsurface has been identified as a potential method for in situ cleanup of contaminated aquifers. For high bacterial loadings, the presence of previously deposited bacteria can result in decreased deposition rates--a phenomenon known as blocking. Miscible displacement experiments were performed on short sand columns (approximately 5 cm) to determine how bacterial deposition on positively charged metal-oxyhydroxide-coated sands is affected by the presence of previously deposited bacteria. Approximately 8 pore volumes of a radiolabeled bacterial suspension at a concentration of approximately 1 x 10(9) cells ml-1 were introduced into the columns followed by a 2-pore-volume flush of cell-free buffer. It was found that the presence of Al- and Fe-coated sand increased both deposition rates and maximum fractional surface coverage of bacteria on the sediment surfaces. The effect of grain size on maximum bacterial retention capacity, however, was not significant. Decreasing ionic strength from 10(-1) to 10(-2) M KCl resulted in noticeable decreases in sticking efficiency (alpha) and maximum surface coverage (thetamax) for clean silica sand--results consistent with DLVO theory. In columns containing positively charged Al- and Fe-coated sands, however, changes in alpha and thetamax due to decreasing ionic strength were minimal. These findings demonstrate the importance of geochemical controls on the maximum bacterial retention capacity of sands.

  8. Impacts of ionic strength on three-dimensional nanoparticle aggregate structure and consequences for environmental transport and deposition.

    PubMed

    Legg, Benjamin A; Zhu, Mengqiang; Comolli, Luis R; Gilbert, Benjamin; Banfield, Jillian F

    2014-12-02

    The transport of nanoparticles through aqueous systems is a complex process with important environmental policy ramifications. Ferrihydrite nanoparticles commonly form aggregates, with structures that depend upon solution chemistry. The impact of aggregation state on transport and deposition is not fully understood. In this study, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) were used to directly observe the aggregate structure of ferrihydrite nanoparticles and show how the aggregate structure responds to changing ionic strength. These results were correlated with complementary studies on ferrihydrite transport through saturated quartz sand columns. Within deionized water, nanoparticles form stable suspensions of low-density fractal aggregates that are resistant to collapse. The particles subsequently show limited deposition on sand grain surfaces. Within sodium nitrate solutions the aggregates collapse into denser clusters, and nanoparticle deposition increases dramatically by forming thick, localized, and mechanically unstable deposits. Such deposits limit nanoparticle transport and make transport less predictable. The action of ionic strength is distinct from simpler models of colloidal stability and transport, in that salt not only drives aggregation or attachment but also alters the behavior of preexisting aggregates by triggering their collapse.

  9. Stability constants for the formation of rare earth-inorganic complexes as a function of ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millero, Frank J.

    1992-08-01

    Recent studies have been made on the distribution of the rare earths (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) in natural waters relative to their concentration in shales. These metals have also been used as models for the behavior of the trivalent actinides. The speciation of the rare earths in natural waters is modelled by using ionic interaction models which require reliable stability constants. In this paper the stability constants for the formation of lanthanide complexes ( k mx∗) with Cl -, NO 3-, SO 42-, OH -, HCO 3-, H 2PO 4-, HPO 42-, and CO 32- determined in NaClO 44 at various ionic strengths have been extrapolated to infinite dilution using the Pitzer interaction model. The activity coefficients for free ions ( γM, γx) needed for this extrapolation have been estimated from the Pitzer equations. The thermodynamic stability constants ( KMX) and activity coefficients of the various ion pairs ( γMX) were determined from In ( solK MX∗/γ Mγ x) = In K mx+ In (γ MX). The activity coefficients of the ion pairs have been used to determine Pitzer parameters ( BMX) for the rare earth complexes. The values of BMX were found to be the same for complexes of the same charge. These results make it possible to estimate the stability constants for the formation of rare earth complexes over a wide range of ionic strengths. The stability constants have been used to determine the speciation of the lanthanides in seawater and in brines. The carbonate complexes dominate for all natural waters where the carbonate alkalinity is greater than 0.001 eq/L at a pH near 8.

  10. London-van der Waals and EDL effects in the coalescence of oil drops. 2: Ionic strength and pH effects

    SciTech Connect

    Deshiikan, S.R.; Papadopoulous, K.D.

    1995-09-15

    Coalescence of n-hexadecane oil drops (70--100 {micro}m in diameter) suspended inside an aqueous medium of varying pH and ionic strength is reported. The drops were produced in situ by micropipettes inside aqueous-phase-filled fine capillaries (100--160 {micro}m, i.d.) At constant pH values of 5.7 and 10.9 the ionic strength of the aqueous medium was changed with KCl so that the Debye length ({kappa}{sup {minus}1}) varied between 1.6 to 362 nm and 0.36 to 14 nm, respectively. Visual observations showed coalescence when {kappa}{sup {minus}1} was less than {approximately} 5.0 nm. The DLVO theory together with previously reported measurements of critical thickness of rupture of aqueous thin films also predicts coalescence under these conditions.The effect of change in pH at constant ionic strength ({kappa}{sup {minus}1} = 5.0 nm) was also studied. While theory predicts coalescence at all pH values with constant {kappa}{sup {minus}1}, coalescence time increases with pH. At similar conditions of high ionic strength, the coalescence times at very low pH are lower than at intermediate pH by two orders of magnitude, suggesting that pH is more important than ionic strength in controlling the coalescence of the oil drops.

  11. Application of quartz crystal microbalance to study the impact of pH and ionic strength on protein-silicone oil interactions.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Nitin; Maloney, Kevin M; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2011-06-30

    In this study, we have used quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to quantitate the adsorption of a protein on silicone oil coated surfaces as a function of protein concentration, pH and ionic strength using a 5 MHz quartz crystal. Protein adsorption isotherms were generated at different solution pH and ionic strengths. Surface saturation concentrations were selected from adsorption isotherms and used to generate adsorption profiles from pH 3.0 to 9.0, and at ionic strengths of 10 mM and 150 mM. At low ionic strength (10mM) and pH 5.0 (close to the isoelectric point of the protein), maximum adsorption of protein to the silicone oil surface was observed. At higher ionic strength (150 mM), no significant pH influence on adsorption was observed. QCM could be used as a reliable technique to study the binding of proteins to silicone oil coated surfaces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Deciphering the energetic barriers to calcium carbonate nucleation as a continuum of competing interfacial forces between polysaccharide chemistry and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, A. J.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Calcified skeletons are produced within complex assemblages of proteins and polysaccharides whose roles in mineralization are not well understood. Researchers have long-postulated that living organisms utilize organic matrices to actively guide the formation and growth of crystalline structures. The timing and placement of these features are most easily controlled during the nucleation stage. Our recent kinetic study of heterogeneous calcite nucleation found the energy barrier to formation is regulated by a systematic relationship to the competing interfacial energies between the substrate, crystal, and liquid (Giuffre et al., 2013). Chitosan presents a low energy barrier to nucleation because its near-neutral charge favors formation of a substrate-crystal interface, thus reducing substrate interactions with water. Progressively higher barriers are measured for negatively charged alginates and heparin that favor contact with the solution over the formation of new substrate-crystal interfaces. These results showed calcite nucleation is regulated by substrate-crystal interactions but could not quantify the larger continuum of competing forces that must regulate calcite nucleation. To determine these relationships, we estimate the energy barriers to nucleation and crystal-liquid interfacial energies by measuring the kinetics of homogeneous calcite nucleation in NaCl solutions at ionic strengths that extend to seawater salinity (0.6 M). The data show that solutions of greater ionic strength produce faster nucleation rates, smaller crystal-liquid interfacial energies, and lower barriers to nucleation, which concurs with recent theoretical and experimental findings that background electrolytes promote ion desolvation during nucleation. By applying this relationship to heterogeneous nucleation on chitosan and heparin in future work, we will quantify the relative contributions of substrate-crystal-liquid interfacial energies. The findings reiterate a directing role for PS

  13. Calibration of membrane inlet mass spectrometric measurements of dissolved gases: differences in the responses of polymer and nano-composite membranes to variations in ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Miranda, L D; Byrne, R H; Short, R T; Bell, R J

    2013-11-15

    This work examines the transmission behavior of aqueous dissolved methane, nitrogen, argon and carbon dioxide through two types of membranes: a polysiloxane nano-composite (PNC) membrane and a conventional polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane. Transmission properties at 30 °C were examined by membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) at nearly constant gas partial pressures in NaCl solutions over a range of ionic strength (0-1 molal). Gas flow rates were examined as a function of dissolved gas concentrations using the Setschenow equation. Although MIMS measurements with PDMS and PNC membranes produced signal responses that were directly proportional to aqueous dissolved gas concentrations, the proportionalities varied with ionic strength and were distinctly different for the two types of membranes. With the exception of carbon dioxide, the PNC membrane had membrane salting coefficients quite similar to Setschenow coefficients reported for gases in aqueous solution. In contrast, the PDMS membrane had membrane salting coefficients that were generally smaller than the corresponding Setschenow gas coefficient for each gas. Differences between Setschenow coefficients and membrane salting coefficients lead to MIMS calibrations (gas-flow vs. gas-concentration proportionalities) that vary with ionic strength. Accordingly, gas-flow vs. gas-concentration relationships for MIMS measurements with PDMS membranes are significantly dependent on ionic strength. In contrast, for PNC membranes, flow vs. concentration relationships are independent (argon, methane, nitrogen) or weakly dependent (CO2) on ionic strength. Comparisons of gas Setschenow and membrane salting coefficients can be used to quantitatively describe the dependence of membrane gas-flow on gas-concentrations and ionic strength for both PDMS and PNC membranes.

  14. Transient kinetics of electron transfer reactions of flavodoxin: ionic strength dependence of semiquinone oxidation by cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and ferric ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and computer modeling of reaction complexes.

    PubMed

    Simondsen, R P; Weber, P C; Salemme, F R; Tollin, G

    1982-12-07

    Electron transfer reactions between Clostridum pasteurianum flavodoxin semiquinone and various oxidants [horse heart cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and ferric ethylenediaminetetraacetic [horse heart cytochrome c, ferricyanide, and ferric ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)] have been studied as a function of ionic strength by using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The cytochrome c reaction is complicated by the existence of two cytochrome species which react at different rates and whose relative concentrations are ionic strength dependent. Only the faster of these two reactions is considered here. At low ionic strength, complex formation between cytochrome c and flavodoxin is indicated by a leveling off of the pseudo-first-order rate constant at high cytochrome c concentration. This is not observed for either ferricyanide or ferric EDTA. For cytochrome c, the rate and association constants for complex formation were found to increase with decreasing ionic strength, consistent with negative charges on flavodoxin interacting with the positively charged cytochrome electron transfer site. Both ferricyanide and ferric EDTA are negatively charged oxidants, and the rate data respond to ionic strength changes as would be predicted for reactants of the same charge sign. These results demonstrate that electrostatic interactions involving negatively charged groups are important in orienting flavodoxin with respect to oxidants during electron transfer. We have also carried out computer modeling studies of putative complexes of flavodoxin with cytochrome c and ferricyanide, which relate their structural properties to both the observed kinetic behavior and some more general features of physiological electron transfer processes. The results of this study are consistent with the ionic strength behavior described above.

  15. The Effect of Ionic Strength and Specific Anions on Substrate Binding and Hydrolytic Activities of Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Nørby, Jens G.; Esmann, Mikael

    1997-01-01

    The physiological ligands for Na,K-ATPase (the Na,K-pump) are ions, and electrostatic forces, that could be revealed by their ionic strength dependence, are therefore expected to be important for their reaction with the enzyme. We found that the affinities for ADP3−, eosin2−, p-nitrophenylphosphate, and Vmax for Na,K-ATPase and K+-activated p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity, were all decreased by increasing salt concentration and by specific anions. Equilibrium binding of ADP was measured at 0–0.5 M of NaCl, Na2SO4, and NaNO3 and in 0.1 M Na-acetate, NaSCN, and NaClO4. The apparent affinity for ADP decreased up to 30 times. At equal ionic strength, I, the ranking of the salt effect was NaCl ≈ Na2SO4 ≈ Na-acetate < NaNO3 < NaSCN < NaClO4. We treated the influence of NaCl and Na2SO4 on Kdiss for E·ADP as a “pure” ionic strength effect. It is quantitatively simulated by a model where the binding site and ADP are point charges, and where their activity coefficients are related to I by the limiting law of Debye and Hückel. The estimated net charge at the binding site of the enzyme was about +1. Eosin binding followed the same model. The NO3− effect was compatible with competitive binding of NO3− and ADP in addition to the general I-effect. Kdiss for E·NO3 was ∼32 mM. Analysis of Vmax/Km for Na,K-ATPase and K+-p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity shows that electrostatic forces are important for the binding of p-nitrophenylphosphate but not for the catalytic effect of ATP on the low affinity site. The net charge at the p-nitrophenylphosphate-binding site was also about +1. The results reported here indicate that the reversible interactions between ions and Na,K-ATPase can be grouped according to either simple Debye-Hückel behavior or to specific anion or cation interactions with the enzyme. PMID:9154904

  16. Ionic strength and composition affect the mobility of surface-modified Fe0 nanoparticles in water-saturated sand columns.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Navid; Kim, Hye-Jin; Phenrat, Tanapon; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Tilton, Robert D; Lowry, Gregory V

    2008-05-01

    The surfaces of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) used for groundwater remediation must be modified to be mobile in the subsurface for emplacement. Adsorbed polymers and surfactants can electrostatically, sterically, or electrosterically stabilize nanoparticle suspensions in water, but their efficacy will depend on groundwater ionic strength and cation type as well as physical and chemical heterogeneities of the aquifer material. Here, the effect of ionic strength and cation type on the mobility of bare, polymer-, and surfactant-modified NZVI is evaluated in water-saturated sand columns at low particle concentrations where filtration theory is applicable. NZVI surface modifiers include a high molecular weight (MW) (125 kg/mol) poly(methacrylic acid)-b-(methyl methacrylate)-b-(styrene sulfonate) triblock copolymer (PMAA-PMMA-PSS), polyaspartate which is a low MW (2-3 kg/mol) biopolymer, and the surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS, MW = 348.5 g/mol). Bare NZVI with an apparent zeta-potential of -30 +/- 3 mV was immobile. Polyaspartate-modified nanoiron (MRNIP) with an apparent zeta-potential of -39 +/- 1 mV was mobile at low ionic strengths (< 40 mM for Na+ and < 0.5 mM for Ca2+), and had a critical deposition concentration (CDC) of approximately 770 mM Na+ and approximately 4 mM for Ca2+. SDBS-modified NZVI with a similar apparent zeta-potential (-38.3 +/- 0.9 mV) showed similar behavior (CDC approximately 350 mM for Na+ and approximately 3.5 mM for Ca2+). Triblock copolymer-modified NZVI had the highest apparent zeta-potential (-50 +/- 1.2 mV), the greatest mobility in porous media, and a CDC of approximately 4 M for Na+ and approximately 100s of mM for Ca2+. The high mobility and CDC is attributed to the electrosteric stabilization afforded by the triblock copolymer but not the other modifiers which provide primarily electrostatic stabilization. Thus, electrosteric stabilization provides the best resistance to changing electrolyte conditions likely to

  17. Mechanisms of Pathogen and Surrogate Transport in Porous Media: Concurrent Effects of Grain Characteristics, NOM and Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelko, M. B.; Stimson, J.; McLellan, N.; Tufenkji, N.

    2009-05-01

    It is widely accepted that riverbank filtration (RBF) can provide substantial reductions in the concentrations of both microbial and chemical contaminants while providing more consistent water quality to subsequent treatment processes. Factors such as experimental scale, subsurface heterogeneity, and variable flow paths and fluxes have made it difficult to relate laboratory outcomes to field performance. Field studies have been plagued with inadequate consideration of ground water flow, reliance on unproven "surrogate" parameters, non-detects at the extraction well, and limited sampling. As a result, a treatment-technique type of approach has been utilized to describe subsurface and operational conditions that result in effective RBF. While it is generally understood that parameters such as ionic strength, the presence of natural organic matter (NOM), and media size and shape characteristics affect pathogen transport in porous media, one major limiting factor in the development of regulatory credits and predictive models is the lack of understanding of the concurrent effects of such parameters. To provide guidance for assessing the efficacy of RBF processes, the present investigation is focused on evaluating the concurrent effects of these parameters on pathogen transport in RBF environments. This work details the complete outcomes of a factorial experimental investigation of the concurrent impacts of the four parameters: ionic strength, NOM concentration, grain size, and uniformity coefficient on pathogen and surrogate transport in porous media. Duplicate column studies have been conducted to evaluate the transport of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Salmonella typhimurium bacteria in saturated sandy environments; PR772 bacteriophage, and 4.5 μm and 1.5 μm microspheres are also being used as surrogates for pathogen transport. The strain of Salmonella was selected due to the direct link to human illness in the Grand River watershed. Preliminary results indicate that

  18. Effect of pressure and ionic strength on the self-association of Apo-A-I from the human high density lipoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Formisano, S; Brewer, H B; Osborne, J C

    1978-01-25

    The self-association of apo-A-I isolated from the human high density lipoprotein complex has been investigated by gel permeation chromatography and sedimentation equilibrium. The apparent weight average molecular weight (MWapp) versus Apo-A-I concentration profile was found to be sensitive to ionic strength and pressure; MWapp increased with increasing ionic strength and decreasing rotor speed. The data were consistent with a monomer-dimer-tetrameroctamer association shceme over all conditions investigated if a change in the partial specific volume of apo-A-I upon association of 5.5 x 10(-2) ml/g is postulated.

  19. Influence of ionic strength on the time course of force development and phosphate release by dogfish muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    West, Timothy G; Ferenczi, Michael A; Woledge, Roger C; Curtin, NA

    2005-01-01

    We measured the effects of ionic strength (IS), 200 (standard) and 400 mmol l−1 (high), on force and ATP hydrolysis during isometric contractions of permeabilized white fibres from dogfish myotomal muscle at their physiological temperature, 12°C. One goal was to test the validity of our kinetic scheme that accounts for energy release, work production and ATP hydrolysis. Fibres were activated by flash photolysis of the P3-1-(2 nitrophenyl) ethyl ester of ATP (NPE-caged ATP), and time-resolved phosphate (Pi) release was detected with the fluorescent protein MDCC-PBP, N-(2[1-maleimidyl]ethyl)-7-diethylamino-coumarin-3-carboxamide phosphate binding protein. High IS slowed the transition from rest to contraction, but as the fibres approached the isometric force plateau they showed little IS sensitivity. By 0.5 s of contraction, the force and the rate of Pi release at standard and high IS values were not significantly different. A five-step reaction mechanism was used to account for the observed time courses of force and Pi release in all conditions explored here. Only the rate constants for reactions of ATP, ADP and Pi with the contractile proteins varied with IS, thus suggesting that the actin–myosin interactions are largely non-ionic. Our reaction scheme also fits previous results for intact fibres. PMID:16037082

  20. Influence of ionic strength on the time course of force development and phosphate release by dogfish muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    West, Timothy G; Ferenczi, Michael A; Woledge, Roger C; Curtin, N A

    2005-09-15

    We measured the effects of ionic strength (IS), 200 (standard) and 400 mmol l(-1) (high), on force and ATP hydrolysis during isometric contractions of permeabilized white fibres from dogfish myotomal muscle at their physiological temperature, 12 degrees C. One goal was to test the validity of our kinetic scheme that accounts for energy release, work production and ATP hydrolysis. Fibres were activated by flash photolysis of the P(3)-1-(2 nitrophenyl) ethyl ester of ATP (NPE-caged ATP), and time-resolved phosphate (P(i)) release was detected with the fluorescent protein MDCC-PBP, N-(2[1-maleimidyl]ethyl)-7-diethylamino-coumarin-3-carboxamide phosphate binding protein. High IS slowed the transition from rest to contraction, but as the fibres approached the isometric force plateau they showed little IS sensitivity. By 0.5 s of contraction, the force and the rate of P(i) release at standard and high IS values were not significantly different. A five-step reaction mechanism was used to account for the observed time courses of force and P(i) release in all conditions explored here. Only the rate constants for reactions of ATP, ADP and P(i) with the contractile proteins varied with IS, thus suggesting that the actin-myosin interactions are largely non-ionic. Our reaction scheme also fits previous results for intact fibres.

  1. Respiratory complexes III and IV can each bind two molecules of cytochrome c at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Guerra-Castellano, Alejandra; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2015-02-13

    The transient interactions of respiratory cytochrome c with complexes III and IV is herein investigated by using heterologous proteins, namely human cytochrome c, the soluble domain of plant cytochrome c1 and bovine cytochrome c oxidase. The binding molecular mechanisms of the resulting cross-complexes have been analyzed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry. Our data reveal that the two cytochrome c-involving adducts possess a 2:1 stoichiometry - that is, two cytochrome c molecules per adduct - at low ionic strength. We conclude that such extra binding sites at the surfaces of complexes III and IV can facilitate the turnover and sliding of cytochrome c molecules and, therefore, the electron transfer within respiratory supercomplexes.

  2. Stability and mobility of cerium oxide nanoparticles in soils: effects of humic substances, pH and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yirui; Mu, Linlin; Li, Chunyan; Bai, Lingyun; Jacobson, Astrid; Darnault, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Among the large number of types of nanomaterials used in the field of nanotechnology, cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) are among the top five most commonly utilized by industry, agriculture and nanomedicine for their unique physico-chemical properties. They are used, for example, in the production of catalysts, as fuel additives, and as polishing agents. Therefore, the release and encounter of CeO2 NPs in the environment following their application, waste disposal, life-cycle and accidents is inevitable. It is critical to examine the behavior of CeO2 NPs released in the environment to assess the risk they pose to the environmental and public health. In particular, little is known about the fate and transport of CeO2 NPs in soils and groundwater. To assess the behavior of CeO2 NPs, it is important to investigate the factors that affect their stability and mobility. Humic substances are a major component of soils and have been shown to have the potential to impact the transport and retention of nanoparticles in soils. Consequently, our study characterizes the impacts of humic and fulvic acids on the stability and mobility of cerium oxides in model porous media under various pH and ionic strength conditions. Batch experiments conducted at various concentrations of humic and fulvic acids coupled with a wide range of pHs and ionic strengths were investigated. Selected parameters from these batch studies were then used as experimental conditions representative of environmental systems to perform column transport experiments to assess of the mobility of CeO2 NPs in saturated porous media, which is the first step in simulating their behavior in soil and groundwater systems.

  3. Anthrax lethal factor (LF) mediated block of the anthrax protective antigen (PA) ion channel: effect of ionic strength and voltage.

    PubMed

    Neumeyer, Tobias; Tonello, Fiorella; Dal Molin, Federica; Schiffler, Bettina; Orlik, Frank; Benz, Roland

    2006-03-07

    The anthrax toxin complex consists of three different molecules, protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF). The activated form of PA, PA(63), forms heptamers that insert at low pH in biological membranes forming ion channels and that are necessary to translocate EF and LF in the cell cytosol. LF and EF are intracellular active enzymes that inhibit the host immune system promoting bacterial outgrowth. Here, PA(63) was reconstituted into artificial lipid bilayer membranes and formed ion-permeable channels. The heptameric PA(63) channel contains a binding site for LF on the cis side of the channel. Full-size LF was found to block the PA(63) channel in a dose- and ionic-strength-dependent way with half-saturation constants in the nanomolar concentration range. The binding curves suggest a 1:1 relationship between (PA(63))(7) and bound LF that blocks the channel. The presence of a His(6) tag at the N-terminal end of LF strongly increases the affinity of LF toward the PA(63) channel, indicating that the interaction between LF and the PA(63) channel occurs at the N terminus of the enzyme. The LF-mediated block of the PA(63)-induced membrane conductance is highly asymmetric with respect to the sign of the applied transmembrane potential. The result suggested that the PA(63) heptamers contain a high-affinity binding site for LF inside domain 1 or the channel vestibule and that the binding is ionic-strength-dependent.

  4. Synaptotagmin-1 binds to PIP(2)-containing membrane but not to SNAREs at physiological ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongsoo; Seo, Jong Bae; Fraind, Alicia; Pérez-Lara, Angel; Yavuz, Halenur; Han, Kyungreem; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Kattan, Iman; Walla, Peter Jomo; Choi, MooYoung; Cafiso, David S; Koh, Duk-Su; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-10-01

    The Ca(2+) sensor synaptotagmin-1 is thought to trigger membrane fusion by binding to acidic membrane lipids and SNARE proteins. Previous work has shown that binding is mediated by electrostatic interactions that are sensitive to the ionic environment. However, the influence of divalent or polyvalent ions, at physiological concentrations, on synaptotagmin's binding to membranes or SNAREs has not been explored. Here we show that binding of rat synaptotagmin-1 to membranes containing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is regulated by charge shielding caused by the presence of divalent cations. Surprisingly, polyvalent ions such as ATP and Mg(2+) completely abrogate synaptotagmin-1 binding to SNAREs regardless of the presence of Ca(2+). Altogether, our data indicate that at physiological ion concentrations Ca(2+)-dependent synaptotagmin-1 binding is confined to PIP2-containing membrane patches in the plasma membrane, suggesting that membrane interaction of synaptotagmin-1 rather than SNARE binding triggers exocytosis of vesicles.

  5. Synaptotagmin-1 binds to PIP2-containing membrane but not to SNAREs at physiological ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yongsoo; Seo, Jong Bae; Fraind, Alicia; Pérez-Lara, Angel; Yavuz, Halenur; Han, Kyungreem; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Kattan, Iman; Walla, Peter Jomo; Choi, MooYoung; Cafiso, David S.; Koh, Duk-Su; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+-sensor synaptotagmin-1 is thought to trigger membrane fusion by binding to acidic membrane lipids and SNARE proteins. Previous work has shown that binding is mediated by electrostatic interactions that are sensitive to the ionic environment. However, the influence of divalent or polyvalent ions, at physiological concentrations, on synaptotagmin binding to membranes or SNAREs has not been explored. Here we show that binding of rat synaptotagmin-1 to membranes containing PIP2 is regulated by charge shielding caused by the presence of divalent cations. Surprisingly, polyvalent ions such as ATP and Mg2+ completely abrogate synaptotagmin-1 binding to SNAREs regardless of whether Ca2+ is present or not. Altogether, our data suggest that at physiological ion concentrations Ca2+-dependent synaptotagmin-1 binding is confined to PIP2-containing membrane patches in the plasma membrane, suggesting that membrane interaction of synaptotagmin-1 rather than SNARE binding triggers exocytosis of vesicles. PMID:26389740

  6. A study of the corrosion products of mild steel in high ionic strength brines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Moore, R C; Felmy, A R; Mason, M J; Kukkadapu, R K

    2001-01-01

    The corrosion layer on steel surfaces that formed after exposure to waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP) brines under anoxic conditions was characterized for chemical composition, thickness and phase composition. The chemical composition of the corrosion layer was determined both by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by chemical analysis of acid solutions used to remove the corrosion layer. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images indicated that the brine-corroded surface layer shows extensive granulation along the contours of the steel surface that is characteristic of sharp polishing marks. The corrosion layer seemed to be porous and could be dissolved and detached in dilute hydrochloric acid. The corrosion layer appears to be composed of iron oxides with some ionic substitutions from the brines. The 77 K Mössbauer spectrum recorded for iron powder leached under similar conditions indicated the corrosion layer was comprised principally of green rust.

  7. Assessing the influence of media composition and ionic strength on drug release from commercial immediate-release and enteric-coated aspirin tablets.

    PubMed

    Karkossa, Frank; Klein, Sandra

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this test series was to elucidate the importance of selecting the right media composition for a biopredictive in-vitro dissolution screening of enteric-coated dosage forms. Drug release from immediate-release (IR) and enteric-coated (EC) aspirin formulations was assessed in phosphate-based and bicarbonate-based media with different pH, electrolyte composition and ionic strength. Drug release from aspirin IR tablets was unaffected by media composition. In contrast, drug release from EC aspirin formulations was affected by buffer species and ionic strength. In all media, drug release increased with increasing ionic strength, but in bicarbonate-based buffers was delayed when compared with that in phosphate-based buffers. Interestingly, the cation species in the dissolution medium had also a clear impact on drug release. Drug release profiles obtained in Blank CarbSIF, a new medium simulating pH and average ionic composition of small intestinal fluid, were different from those obtained in all other buffer compositions studied. Results from this study in which the impact of various media parameters on drug release of EC aspirin formulations was systematically screened clearly show that when developing predictive dissolution tests, it is important to simulate the ionic composition of intraluminal fluids as closely as possible. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  8. MRS thermometry calibration at 3 T: effects of protein, ionic concentration and magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Babourina-Brooks, Ben; Simpson, Robert; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Machin, Graham; Peet, Andrew C; Davies, Nigel P

    2015-07-01

    MRS thermometry has been utilized to measure temperature changes in the brain, which may aid in the diagnosis of brain trauma and tumours. However, the temperature calibration of the technique has been shown to be sensitive to non-temperature-based factors, which may provide unique information on the tissue microenvironment if the mechanisms can be further understood. The focus of this study was to investigate the effects of varied protein content on the calibration of MRS thermometry at 3 T, which has not been thoroughly explored in the literature. The effects of ionic concentration and magnetic field strength were also considered. Temperature reference materials were controlled by water circulation and freezing organic fixed-point compounds (diphenyl ether and ethylene carbonate) stable to within 0.2 °C. The temperature was measured throughout the scan time with a fluoro-optic probe, with an uncertainty of 0.16 °C. The probe was calibrated at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) with traceability to the International Temperature Scale 1990 (ITS-90). MRS thermometry measures were based on single-voxel spectroscopy chemical shift differences between water and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Δ(H20-NAA), using a Philips Achieva 3 T scanner. Six different phantom solutions with varying protein or ionic concentration, simulating potential tissue differences, were investigated within a temperature range of 21-42 °C. Results were compared with a similar study performed at 1.5 T to observe the effect of field strengths. Temperature calibration curves were plotted to convert Δ(H20-NAA) to apparent temperature. The apparent temperature changed by -0.2 °C/% of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a trend of 0.5 °C/50 mM ionic concentration was observed. Differences in the calibration coefficients for the 10% BSA solution were seen in this study at 3 T compared with a study at 1.5 T. MRS thermometry may be utilized to measure temperature and the tissue

  9. Rootstock-mediated changes in xylem ionic and hormonal status are correlated with delayed leaf senescence, and increased leaf area and crop productivity in salinized tomato.

    PubMed

    Albacete, Alfonso; Martínez-Andújar, Cristina; Ghanem, Michel Edmond; Acosta, Manuel; Sánchez-Bravo, José; Asins, María J; Cuartero, Jesús; Lutts, Stanley; Dodd, Ian C; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco

    2009-07-01

    Tomato crop productivity under salinity can be improved by grafting cultivars onto salt-tolerant wild relatives, thus mediating the supply of root-derived ionic and hormonal factors that regulate leaf area and senescence. A tomato cultivar was grafted onto rootstocks from a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a Solanum lycopersicum x Solanum cheesmaniae cross and cultivated under moderate salinity (75 mM NaCl). Concentrations of Na(+), K(+) and several phytohormones [abscisic acid (ABA); the cytokinins (CKs) zeatin, Z; zeatin riboside, ZR; and the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC)] were analysed in leaf xylem sap in graft combinations of contrasting vigour. Scion leaf area correlated with photosystem II (PSII) efficiency (F(v)/F(m)) and determined fruit productivity. Xylem K(+) (but not Na(+)), K(+)/Na(+), the active CK Z, the ratio with its storage form Z/ZR and especially the ratio between CKs and ACC (Z/ACC and Z + ZR/ACC) were positively loaded into the first principal component (PC) determining both leaf growth and PSII efficiency. In contrast, the ratio ACC/ABA was negatively correlated with leaf biomass. Although the underlying physiological mechanisms by which rootstocks mediate leaf area or chlorophyll fluorescence (and thus influence tomato salt tolerance) seem complex, a putative potassium-CK interaction involved in regulating both processes merits further attention.

  10. A Simplified Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment to Evaluate the Effect of the Ionic Strength on the Equilibrium Concentration Quotient of the Bromcresol Green Dye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Hernan B.; Mirenda, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A modified laboratory experiment for undergraduate students is presented to evaluate the effects of the ionic strength, "I", on the equilibrium concentration quotient, K[subscript c], of the acid-base indicator bromcresol green (BCG). The two-step deprotonation of the acidic form of the dye (sultone form), as it is dissolved in water, yields…

  11. Adsorption of a Textile Dye on Commercial Activated Carbon: A Simple Experiment to Explore the Role of Surface Chemistry and Ionic Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Angela; Nunes, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an adsorption experiment is proposed using commercial activated carbon as adsorbent and a textile azo dye, Mordant Blue-9, as adsorbate. The surface chemistry of the activated carbon is changed through a simple oxidation treatment and the ionic strength of the dye solution is also modified, simulating distinct conditions of water…

  12. Impact of Environmental Conditions (pH, Ionic Strength, And Electrolyte Type) On The Surface Charge And Aggregation Of Silver Nanoparticles Suspensions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of capping agents and environmental conditions (pH, ionic strength, and background electrolytes) on surface charge and aggregation potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) suspensions were investigated. Capping agents are chemicals used in the synthesis of nanopartic...

  13. Positive and negative impacts of nonspecific sites during target location by a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein: origin of the optimal search at physiological ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Esadze, Alexandre; Kemme, Catherine A; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Iwahara, Junji

    2014-06-01

    The inducible transcription factor Egr-1, which recognizes a 9-bp target DNA sequence via three zinc-finger domains, rapidly activates particular genes upon cellular stimuli such as neuronal signals and vascular stresses. Here, using the stopped-flow fluorescence method, we measured the target search kinetics of the Egr-1 zinc-finger protein at various ionic strengths between 40 and 400 mM KCl and found the most efficient search at 150 mM KCl. We further investigated the kinetics of intersegment transfer, dissociation, and sliding of this protein on DNA at distinct concentrations of KCl. Our data suggest that Egr-1's kinetic properties are well suited for efficient scanning of chromosomal DNA in vivo. Based on a newly developed theory, we analyzed the origin of the optimal search efficiency at physiological ionic strength. Target association is accelerated by nonspecific binding to nearby sites and subsequent sliding to the target as well as by intersegment transfer. Although these effects are stronger at lower ionic strengths, such conditions also favor trapping of the protein at distant nonspecific sites, decelerating the target association. Our data demonstrate that Egr-1 achieves the optimal search at physiological ionic strength through a compromise between the positive and negative impacts of nonspecific interactions with DNA. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Adsorption of a Textile Dye on Commercial Activated Carbon: A Simple Experiment to Explore the Role of Surface Chemistry and Ionic Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Angela; Nunes, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an adsorption experiment is proposed using commercial activated carbon as adsorbent and a textile azo dye, Mordant Blue-9, as adsorbate. The surface chemistry of the activated carbon is changed through a simple oxidation treatment and the ionic strength of the dye solution is also modified, simulating distinct conditions of water…

  15. Positive and negative impacts of nonspecific sites during target location by a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein: origin of the optimal search at physiological ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Esadze, Alexandre; Kemme, Catherine A.; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Iwahara, Junji

    2014-01-01

    The inducible transcription factor Egr-1, which recognizes a 9-bp target DNA sequence via three zinc-finger domains, rapidly activates particular genes upon cellular stimuli such as neuronal signals and vascular stresses. Here, using the stopped-flow fluorescence method, we measured the target search kinetics of the Egr-1 zinc-finger protein at various ionic strengths between 40 and 400 mM KCl and found the most efficient search at 150 mM KCl. We further investigated the kinetics of intersegment transfer, dissociation, and sliding of this protein on DNA at distinct concentrations of KCl. Our data suggest that Egr-1's kinetic properties are well suited for efficient scanning of chromosomal DNA in vivo. Based on a newly developed theory, we analyzed the origin of the optimal search efficiency at physiological ionic strength. Target association is accelerated by nonspecific binding to nearby sites and subsequent sliding to the target as well as by intersegment transfer. Although these effects are stronger at lower ionic strengths, such conditions also favor trapping of the protein at distant nonspecific sites, decelerating the target association. Our data demonstrate that Egr-1 achieves the optimal search at physiological ionic strength through a compromise between the positive and negative impacts of nonspecific interactions with DNA. PMID:24838572

  16. Effect of ionic strength on the aggregation kinetics of the amidated amyloid beta peptide Aβ (1-40) in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Campos-Ramírez, Adriana; Márquez, Maripaz; Quintanar, Liliana; Rojas-Ochoa, Luis F

    2017-09-01

    In this work we study the effect of solution ionic strength on the structural evolution of amidated amyloid beta peptide Aβ (1-40) oligomers at the early stages of fibril formation. By light scattering, we follow the time evolution of the structure and short-time dynamics of peptide structures at low ionic strengths. Our results allow identifying initial oligomer structures as the effective building blocks in the amyloid fibrils formation and indicate that the oligomers growth pathway, from compact structures to flexible chain-like structures, becomes faster as the solution ionic strength is increased. Furthermore, we find no evidence of structural branching what suggests that elongation of amyloid fibrils is dominated by linear association. To describe our results we adapt a phenomenological model based on population balance equations and linear polymer growth, where the parameters required are obtained from the experiments. Model calculations are in good agreement with experimentally-obtained estimates for the radius of gyration of Aβ (1-40) oligomers, thus further supporting our findings. Additionally, we introduce a model for the effective interaction among initial Aβ structures that captures the dependence of the effective association rates on solution ionic strength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Transport and Retention of TiO2 Rutile Nanoparticles in Saturated Porous Media at Low-Ionic-Strength Conditions: Measurements and Mechanisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms governing the transport and retention kinetics of titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticle (NP) aggregates were investigated in saturated porous media. Experiments were carried out under a range of well-controlled ionic strength (from DI water up to 1 mM) and...

  18. Transport and Retention of TiO2 Rutile Nanoparticles in Saturated Porous Media: Influence of Solution pH, Ionic Strength, and the Presence of Humic Acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of solution pH, ionic strength, and varying concentrations of the Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) on the transport of titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticle aggregates (nTiO2) in saturated porous media was investigated through systematically examining the tra...

  19. Transport and Retention of TiO2 Rutile Nanoparticles in Saturated Porous Media: Influence of Solution pH, Ionic Strength, and the Presence of Humic Acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of solution pH, ionic strength, and varying concentrations of the Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) on the transport of titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticle aggregates (nTiO2) in saturated porous media was investigated through systematically examining the tra...

  20. Impact of Environmental Conditions (pH, Ionic Strength, And Electrolyte Type) On The Surface Charge And Aggregation Of Silver Nanoparticles Suspensions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of capping agents and environmental conditions (pH, ionic strength, and background electrolytes) on surface charge and aggregation potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) suspensions were investigated. Capping agents are chemicals used in the synthesis of nanopartic...

  1. Copper release kinetics from a long-term contaminated acid soil using a stirred flow chamber: effect of ionic strength and pH.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calviño, David; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Garrido-Rodríguez, Beatriz; Peña Rodríguez, Susana; Arias-Estévez, Manuel

    2012-02-01

    The effect of pH and ionic strength on copper release in a long-term Cu-polluted soil was studied using a stirred flow chamber. The presence of Ca(2+) and Na(+) was also evaluated. More copper was released as the ionic strength increased, and it was significantly higher in the presence of Ca(2+) than in the presence of Na(+). The maximum amount of Cu that could be released under experimental conditions increased logarithmically as the ionic strength increased, and the release rate parameters were not significantly correlated with ionic strength values. The maximum amount of Cu that could be released was similar for solutions with pH values between 5.5 and 8.5. For solutions with a pH value below 4.5, the amount of Cu released increased exponentially as the pH decreased. The release rate parameters and Cu release pattern were affected by pH, especially for more acidic solutions (pH values of 2.5 and 3.5).

  2. A Simplified Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment to Evaluate the Effect of the Ionic Strength on the Equilibrium Concentration Quotient of the Bromcresol Green Dye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Hernan B.; Mirenda, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A modified laboratory experiment for undergraduate students is presented to evaluate the effects of the ionic strength, "I", on the equilibrium concentration quotient, K[subscript c], of the acid-base indicator bromcresol green (BCG). The two-step deprotonation of the acidic form of the dye (sultone form), as it is dissolved in water, yields…

  3. Transport and Retention of TiO2 Rutile Nanoparticles in Saturated Porous Media at Low-Ionic-Strength Conditions: Measurements and Mechanisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms governing the transport and retention kinetics of titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticle (NP) aggregates were investigated in saturated porous media. Experiments were carried out under a range of well-controlled ionic strength (from DI water up to 1 mM) and...

  4. Effects of High-pH and High-Ionic-Strength Groundwater on Iodide, Pertechnetate, and Selenate Sorption to Hanford Sediments: Final Report for Subtask 3a

    SciTech Connect

    DI Kaplan; KE Parker; RD Orr

    1998-10-14

    As part of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste-Performance Assessment three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of the expected near-field chemistry on the sorption of iodide, selenate, and pertechnetate onto a sediment obtained from the Hanford Site. These experiments were performed in fiscal year 1998 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.' During these experiments, attention was directed at the identification of the chemical mechanisms controlling the sorption processes to provide technical defensibility for the selection of the distribution coefficients (IQ to be used in the remainder of the performance assessment. It was found, during the conduct of the experiments, that selenium and technetium I&s increased as ionic strength increased. The cause for this is most likely to be that the higher ionic strength caused the double layer around the particles to decrease, thereby permitting greater interaction with the mineral surfaces. Further, the pH level had an effect on the sorption of these anions. These are the first-ever experiments conducted with Hanford Site sediment in which the IQ were measured as a function of ionic strength and pH. Overall, the observed trends were consistent with more generalized geochemical principles. One of the most important contributions of these experiments was that they quantified the & changes induced by variations in ionic strength and pH that are expected to exist in the near field.

  5. Ultrafiltration by a compacted clay membrane-II. Sodium ion exclusion at various ionic strengths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanshaw, B.B.; Coplen, T.B.

    1973-01-01

    Several recent laboratory studies and field investigations have indicated that shales and compacted clay minerals behave as semipermeable membranes. One of the properties of semipermeable membranes is to retard or prevent the passage of charged ionic species through the membrane pores while allowing relatively free movement of uncharged species. This phenomenon is termed salt filtering, reverse osmosis, or ultrafiltration. This paper shows how one can proceed from the ion exchange capacity of clay minerals and, by means of Donnan membrane equilibrium concept and the Teorell-Meyer-Siever theory, develop a theory to explain why and to what extent ultrafiltration occurs when solutions of known concentration are forced to flow through a clay membrane. Reasonable agreement between theory and laboratory results were found. The concentration of the ultrafiltrate was always greater than predicted because of uncertainty in values of some parameters in the equations. Ultrafiltration phenomena may be responsible for the formation of some subsurface brines and mineral deposits. The effect should also be taken into consideration in any proposal for subsurface waste emplacement in an environment containing large quantities of clay minerals. ?? 1973.

  6. CENP-A Arrays Are More Condensed than Canonical Arrays at Low Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Geiss, Christian P.; Keramisanou, Dimitra; Sekulic, Nikolina; Scheffer, Margot P.; Black, Ben E.; Frangakis, Achilleas S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The centromeric histone H3 variant centromeric protein A (CENP-A), whose sequence is the least conserved among all histone variants, is responsible for specifying the location of the centromere. Here, we present a comprehensive study of CENP-A nucleosome arrays by cryo-electron tomography. We see that CENP-A arrays have different biophysical properties than canonical ones under low ionic conditions, as they are more condensed with a 20% smaller average nearest-neighbor distance and a 30% higher nucleosome density. We find that CENP-A nucleosomes have a predominantly crossed DNA entry/exit site that is narrowed on average by 8°, and they have a propensity to stack face to face. We therefore propose that CENP-A induces geometric constraints at the nucleosome DNA entry/exit site to bring neighboring nucleosomes into close proximity. This specific property of CENP-A may be responsible for generating a fundamental process that contributes to increased chromatin fiber compaction that is propagated under physiological conditions to form centromeric chromatin. PMID:24559990

  7. Effects of ionic strength on bacteriophage MS2 behavior and their implications for the assessment of virus retention by ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Furiga, Aurelie; Pierre, Gwenaelle; Glories, Marie; Aimar, Pierre; Roques, Christine; Causserand, Christel; Berge, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    Bacteriophage MS2 is widely used as a surrogate to estimate pathogenic virus elimination by membrane filtration processes used in water treatment. Given that this water technology may be conducted with different types of waters, we focused on investigating the effects of ionic strength on MS2 behavior. For this, MS2 was analyzed while suspended in solutions of various ionic strengths, first in a batch experiment and second during membrane ultrafiltration, and quantified using (i) quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), which detects the total number of viral genomes, (ii) qRT-PCR without the RNA extraction step, which reflects only particles with a broken capsid (free RNA), and (iii) the PFU method, which detects only infectious viruses. At the beginning of the batch experiments using solutions containing small amounts of salts, losses of MS2 infectivity (90%) and broken particles (20%) were observed; these proportions did not change during filtration. In contrast, in high-ionic-strength solutions, bacteriophage kept its biological activity under static conditions, but it quickly lost its infectivity during the filtration process. Increasing the ionic strength decreased both the inactivation and the capsid breakup in the feed suspension and increased the loss of infectivity in the filtration retentate, while the numbers of MS2 genomes were identical in both experiments. In conclusion, the effects of ionic strength on MS2 behavior may significantly distort the results of membrane filtration processes, and therefore, the combination of classical and molecular methods used here is useful for an effective validation of the retention efficiency of ultrafiltration membranes.

  8. Influence of solution ionic strength on the collision efficiency distribution and predicted transport distance of a Sphingomonas sp. flowing through porous media.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Alon; Brown, Derick G

    2007-11-01

    The effects of solution ionic strength on the collision efficiency (alpha) distribution of a Sphingomonas sp. were investigated using multiple sand columns of varying lengths and analyzing the bacteria clean-bed breakthrough concentrations using a distributed colloid filtration theory (D-CFT). Five different probability density functions (PDFs) were investigated and all accurately replicated the lab-scale experimental data, whereas a single alpha value could not. The alpha distribution shifted toward smaller values with decreasing ionic strength and the PDF parameters were strongly correlated to the Debye length, indicating that electrostatic interactions had a direct impact on the alpha distribution. The results indicate that while ionic strength has a large impact on bacterial transport distances for a concentration reduction of a few orders of magnitude, as occurs at the laboratory scale, due to the distributed nature of the collision efficiency, it has a minor effect on predicted transport distances required to achieve concentration reductions on the order of 10(6), which occurs at the field scale. Because of this, bacterial inactivation (e.g., death), rather than physically removing the bacteria from solution via filtration, is likely the key process impacting the transport of viable bacteria at the field scale. Overall, for systems with a distributed alpha, the results indicate that ionic strength has a strong influence on the transport of bacteria at the lab-scale (centimeters to one meter), both ionic strength and bacterial inactivation are important at the meso-scale (tens of meters), and inactivation becomes the dominant mechanism for reducing the transport of viable bacteria at the field scale (hundreds of meters).

  9. Effects of pH, dissolved oxygen, and ionic strength on the survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in organic acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Kreske, Audrey C; Bjornsdottir, Kristin; Breidt, Fred; Hassan, Hosni

    2008-12-01

    The ability of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to survive in acidified vegetable products is of concern because of previously documented outbreaks associated with fruit juices. A study was conducted to determine the survival of E. coli O157:H7 in organic acids at pH values typical of acidified vegetable products (pH 3.2 and 3.7) under different dissolved oxygen conditions (< or = 0.05 and 5 mg/liter) and a range of ionic strengths (0.086 to 1.14). All solutions contained 20 mM gluconic acid, which was used as a noninhibitory low pH buffer to compare the individual acid effect to that of pH alone on the survival of E. coli O157:H7. E. coli O157:H7 cells challenged in buffered solution with ca. 5-mg/liter dissolved oxygen (present in tap water) over a range of ionic strengths at pH 3.2 exhibited a decrease in survival over 6 h at 30 degrees C as the ionic strength was increased. Cells challenged in 40 mM protonated L-lactic and acetic acid solutions with ionic strength of 0.684 achieved a > 4.7-log CFU/ml reduction at pH 3.2. However, under oxygen-limiting conditions in an anaerobic chamber, with < or = 0.05-mg/ liter oxygen, E. coli O157:H7 cells showed < or = 1.55-log CFU/ml reduction regardless of pH, acid type, concentration, or ionic strength. Many acid and acidified foods are sold in hermetically sealed containers with oxygen-limiting conditions. Our results demonstrate that E. coli O157:H7 may survive better than previously expected from studies with acid solutions containing dissolved oxygen.

  10. The effects of starvation on the transport of Escherichia coli in saturated porous media are dependent on pH and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Walczak, Jacob J; Wang, Lixia; Bardy, Sonia L; Feriancikova, Lucia; Li, Jin; Xu, Shangping

    2012-02-01

    In this research, we investigate the effects of starvation on the transport of Escherichia coli K12 in saturated porous media. Particularly, we examine the relationship between the starvation effects and the pH and ionic strength of the electrolyte solutions used for cell starvation. E. coli K12 was cultured using either Luria-Bertani Miller (LB-Miller) broth, which contained 10 g/L of NaCl, or LB-Luria broth, which contained 0.5 g/L of NaCl. As both types of broths had similar pH (~7.2) they differed in ionic strengths. The bacterial cells were harvested at late-exponential phase and resuspended in buffered (pH=7.2) and non-buffered (pH=5.7) electrolyte solutions that had ionic strengths of 8.4mM or 168 mM, respectively. Column transport experiments were performed following 4, 25 and 52 h of cell starvation to evaluate the temporal changes in cell mobility. Our results showed that starvation led to a significant increase in the mobility of E. coli K12, particularly between 4 and 25 h, when both pH and ionic strength of the electrolyte solution were different from those of the growth media. The size, viability and surface properties (e.g., zeta potential, hydrophobicity, LPS sugar content, outer membrane protein profiles) of the bacterial cells were determined and related to the observed temporal variation patterns of cell mobility. We found that starvation in electrolyte solutions that had different pH and ionic strength from the growth media significantly lowered cell viability, which may be related to the temporal change in cell mobility under these specific conditions.

  11. Colloid Transport in Porous Medium: Impact of High Salinity Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, N.; Magal, E.; Yechieli, Y.; Yakirevich, A.

    2009-12-01

    We explored the transport of colloids suspended in natural saline solutions with a wide range of ionic strengths, up to Dead Sea brines. Migration of latex microspheres through saturated sand columns of different sizes was studied in lab experiments, and colloid transport was simulated with a mathematical model. We have found that latex microspheres were mobile even in the extremely saline brines of the Dead Sea (ionic strength = 100.9 M). At this high ionic strength, according to the common colloid transport theories, no energetic barrier to colloid attachment exists and colloid adsorption was expected to be a favorable process. Apparently, even in that high salinity, colloids adsorption is not complete and ~20% colloids are allowed to transport (through 30-cm long column). Colloid transport was found to be related to the solution salinity, as expected. After 2-3 pore volumes (PV) the relative concentration of colloids at the outlet of 30-cm long columns decreased as the solution ionic strength increased until some critical value (ionic strength greater than 10-1.8 M) and then remained constant as the solution salinity increased. To further explore the sorption of colloids on sand surfaces in Dead Sea brines, breakthrough curves (BTCs) were studied using 7-cm long columns, through which hundreds of PV were introduced. The observed BTCs exhibited a bi-modal shape that suggests different rates of colloid attachment. After initial breakthrough the relative concentration of colloids at the outlet rose to a value of 0.8 (after 1.5 PV), and it remained relatively constant until approximately 17 PV were flushed through the column. After a total flow of about 20 PV, the relative concentration reached a value of one. The colloid migration process was successfully modeled using the limited entrapment model (Pachepsky et al., 2006), assuming the colloid attachment rate is dependent on the concentration of attached colloids.

  12. Adsorption of divalent lead ions by zeolites and activated carbon: effects of pH, temperature, and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Payne, Kelly B; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M

    2004-01-01

    Lead alloy bullets used at the 2600 military small arm ranges and 9000 nonmilitary outdoor shooting ranges in the United States are a source of mobilized lead ions under conditions of low pH, significant changes in ionic strength, changes in the reduction oxidation potential (redox), and through binding metal ions to soil organic matter. Once mobile, these lead ions can contaminate adjacent soil and water. Batch adsorption kinetic and isotherm studies were conducted to compare and evaluate different types of adsorbents for lead ion removal from aqueous media. The effects on lead ion absorption from pH changes, competing ions, and temperature increases were also investigated. Adsorbent materials such as activated carbon and naturally occurring zeolites (clinoptilolite and chabazite) were selected because of their relative low cost and because the zeolites are potential point-of-use materials for mitigating wastewater runoff. Molecular sieves, Faujasite (13X) and Linde type A (5A) were selected because they provide a basis for comparison with previous studies and represent well-characterized materials. The relative rate for lead ion adsorption was: 13X > chabazite > clinoptilolite > 5A > activated carbon. Modeling lead ion adsorption by these adsorbents using the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm expressions determined the adsorbents' capacity for lead ion removal from aqueous media. 13X, 5A, and activated carbon best fit the Langmuir isotherm expression; chabazite and clinoptilolite best fit the Freundlich isotherm. Applications of chabazite would require pH values between 4 and 11, clinoptilolite between 3 and 11, while activated carbon would operate at a pH above 7. Ionic competition reduced lead ion removal by the zeolites, but enhanced activated carbon performance. Increasing temperature improved adsorption performance for the zeolites; activated carbon lead ion adsorption was temperature independent.

  13. Ion Exchange Distribution Coefficient Tests and Computer Modeling at High Ionic Strength Supporting Technetium Removal Resin Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Charles A.; Hamm, L. Larry; Smith, Frank G.; McCabe, Daniel J.

    2014-12-19

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for this facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW). Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and poured into canisters for disposition. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Due to the water solubility properties of pertechnetate and long half-life of 99Tc, effective management of 99Tc is important to the overall success of the Hanford River Protection Project mission. To achieve the full target WTP throughput, additional LAW immobilization capacity is needed, and options are being explored to immobilize the supplemental LAW portion of the tank waste. Removal of 99Tc, followed by off-site disposal, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for supplemental LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing 99Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. To enable an informed decision regarding the viability of technetium removal, further maturation of available technologies is being performed. This report contains results of experimental ion exchange distribution coefficient testing and computer modeling using the resin SuperLig® 639a to selectively remove perrhenate from high ionic strength simulated LAW. It is advantageous to operate at higher concentration in order to treat the waste

  14. Analysis of responsive characteristics of ionic-strength-sensitive hydrogel with consideration of effect of equilibrium constant by a chemo-electro-mechanical model.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Lai, Fukun; Luo, Rongmo

    2009-11-17

    A multiphysics model is presented in this paper for analysis of the influence of various equilibrium constants on the smart hydrogel responsive to the ionic strength of environmental solution, and termed the multieffect-coupling ionic-strength stimulus (MECis) model. The model is characterized by a set of partial differential governing equations by consideration of the mass and momentum conservations of the system and coupled chemical, electrical, and mechanical multienergy domains. The Nernst-Planck equations are derived by the mass conservation of the ionic species in both the interstitial fluid of the hydrogel and the surrounding solution. The binding reaction between the fixed charge groups of the hydrogel and the mobile ions in the solution is described by the fixed charge equation, which is based on the Langmuir monolayer theory. As an important effect for the binding reaction, the equilibrium constant is incorporated into the fixed charge equation. The kinetics of the hydrogel swelling/deswelling is illustrated by the mechanical equation, based on the law of momentum conservation for the solid polymeric networks matrix within the hydrogel. The MECis model is examined by comparison of the numerical simulations and experiments from open literature. The analysis of the influence of different equilibrium constants on the responsive characteristics of the ionic-strength-sensitive hydrogel is carried out with detailed discussion.

  15. An improved thermodynamic model for the complexation of trivalent actinides and lanthanide with oxalic acid valid to high ionic strength.

    DOE PAGES

    Xiong, Yongliang; Thakur, Punam; Borkowski, Marian

    2015-07-30

    The dissociation constants of oxalic acid (Ox), and the stability constants of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox2– have been determined at 25 °C, over a range of concentration varying from 0.1 to 6.60 m NaClO4 using potentiometric titration and extraction techniques, respectively. The experimental data support the formation of complexes, M(Ox)n3 – 2n, where (M = Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ and n = 1 and 2). The dissociation constant and the stability constant values measured as a function of NaClO4 concentration were used to estimate the Pitzer parameters for the respective interactions of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox.more » Furthermore, the stability constants data of Am3+ –Ox measured in NaClO4 and in NaCl solutions from the literature were simultaneously fitted in order to refine the existing actinide–oxalate complexation model that can be used universally in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The thermodynamic stability constant: log β0101 = 6.30 ± 0.06 and log β0102 = 10.84 ± 0.06 for Am3+ was obtained by simultaneously fitting data in NaCl and NaClO4 media. Additionally, log β0101 = 6.72 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.05 ± 0.09 for the Cm3+ and log β0101 = 6.67 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.15 ± 0.09 for the Eu3+ were calculated by extrapolation of data to zero ionic strength in NaClO4 medium only. For all stability constants, the Pitzer model gives an excellent representation of the data using interaction parameters β(0), β(1), and CΦ determined in this work. The thermodynamic model developed in this work will be useful in accurately modeling the potential solubility of trivalent actinides and early lanthanides to ionic strength of 6.60 m in low temperature environments in the presence of Ox. Furthermore, the work is also applicable to the accurate modeling transport of rare earth elements in various environments under the surface conditions.« less

  16. The apparently negatively cooperative phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin at low ionic strength is related to its filamentous state.

    PubMed

    Sellers, J R; Chock, P B; Adelstein, R S

    1983-12-10

    The correlation curve between phosphorylation and MgATPase activity suggests that the 20,000-dalton light chain of both heads of a smooth muscle myosin or heavy meromyosin (HMM) molecule must be phosphorylated before the MgATPase activity of either head can be activated by actin. The two heads of HMM appear to be phosphorylated randomly at equal rates, while those of myosin are phosphorylated in a negatively cooperative manner (Persechini, A., and Hartshorne, D.J. (1981) Science, 213, 1383-1385; Ikebe, M., Ogihara, S., and Tonomura, Y. (1982) J. Biochem. 91, 1809-1812). We have investigated the cause of this difference between HMM and myosin. We find that if myosin is first phosphorylated at high ionic strength (0.6 M KCl), where it is monomeric, and then assayed for MgATPase activity (in 0.05 M KCl), the data support a model where the two heads are phosphorylated randomly with equal rates (i.e. similarly to HMM). The correlation curves between MgATPase activity and dephosphorylation of fully phosphorylated myosin, both in a filamentous and monomeric state, are also best explained by a model where dephosphorylation of one head is sufficient to deactivate the entire molecule. With monomeric myosin, the dephosphorylation appears to occur randomly with equal rates, whereas with filamentous myosin the dephosphorylation appears to be negatively cooperative. The correlation between dephosphorylation of HMM and its MgATPase activity is more complex and is consistent with a positively cooperative dephosphorylation. Direct analyses of the time courses of phosphorylation of HMM and monomeric myosin show that a single exponential is sufficient to fit the data through greater than 90% of the reaction. However, when phosphorylation is carried out at low ionic strength (0.02 M KCl), where myosin is present as filaments, the time course consists of two exponential functions where the rate constant for the phosphorylation of one myosin head is 6-10 times greater than that for the

  17. Adsorption of Speckled Sugar bean protein isolate at oil-water interface: Effect of ionic strength and pH.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, Nazanin Fatemeh; Koocheki, Arash; Varidi, Mehdi; Kadkhodaee, Rassoul

    2017-02-01

    Speckled Sugar bean protein (0-4%) was used to stabilize sunflower oil in water emulsion (30% oil). To investigate the effect of other components on emulsion properties different salt concentrations (0-0.5M) and pH (3-7) were used. For this purpose, zeta potential, oil droplet size, adsorbed protein, non-adsorbed protein, viscosity, emulsifying capacity, emulsion stability and creaming rate were evaluated. Results showed that protein concentration was the most effective variable affected emulsions characteristics followed by protein-pH interaction as the second effective term. Salt somehow influenced emulsion properties but it had no negative effect on emulsifying capacity, emulsion stability or creaming rate. FTIR spectroscopy revealed that protein fractions with higher sheet secondary structure had better adsorption on oil droplets; while, fractions with helix subunit as the predominant secondary structure had the lowest adsorption capacity. At the end, emulsion properties were optimized based on the different independent and dependent variables. Results confirmed that Speckled Sugar bean protein was resistant to aggregation at high ionic strength. As a result, this protein could perform well as an emulsifier at different pH values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of human microtubule-associated-protein tau on the assembly structure of microtubules and its ionic strength dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. C.; Raviv, U.; Miller, H. P.; Gaylord, M. R.; Kiris, E.; Ventimiglia, D.; Needleman, D. J.; Chung, P. J.; Deek, J.; Lapointe, N.; Kim, M. W.; Wilson, L.; Feinstein, S. C.; Safinya, C. R.

    2010-03-01

    Microtubules (MTs), 25 nm protein nanotubes, are among the major filamentous elements of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton involved in intracellular trafficking, cell division and the establishment and maintenance of cell shape. Microtubule-associated-protein tau regulates tubulin assembly, MT dynamics and stability. Aberrant tau action has long been correlated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, and fronto-temporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) Using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and binding assay, we examine the effects of tau on the assembly structure of taxol-stabilized MTs. We find that tau regulates the distribution of protofilament numbers in MTs as reflected in the observed increase in the average radius of MTs with increasing the tau/tubulin molar ratio. Additionally, tau-MT interactions are mediated to a large extent via electrostatic interactions: the binding affinity of tau to MTs is ionic strength dependent. Supported by DOE-BES DE-FG02-06ER46314, NSF DMR-0803103, NIH NS35010, NIH NS13560. (Ref) M.C. Choi, S.C. Feinstein, and C.R. Safinya et al. Biophys. J. 97; 519 (2009).

  19. Ionic Strength-Controlled Mn (Hydr)oxide Nanoparticle Nucleation on Quartz: Effect of Aqueous Mn(OH)2.

    PubMed

    Jung, Haesung; Jun, Young-Shin

    2016-01-05

    The early formation of manganese (hydr)oxide nanoparticles at mineral-water interfaces is crucial in understanding how Mn oxides control the fate and transport of heavy metals and the cycling of nutrients. Using atomic force microscopy, we investigated the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Mn (hydr)oxide under varied ionic strengths (IS; 1-100 mM NaNO3). Experimental conditions (i.e., 0.1 mM Mn(2+) (aq) concentration and pH 10.1) were chosen to be relevant to Mn remediation sites. We found that IS controls Mn(OH)2 (aq) formation, and that the controlled Mn(OH)2 (aq) formation can affect the system's saturation and subsequent Mn(OH)2 (s) and further Mn3O4 (s) nanoparticle formation. In 100 mM IS system, nucleated Mn (hydr)oxide particles had more coverage on the quartz substrate than those in 1 mM and 10 mM IS systems. This high IS also resulted in low supersaturation ratio and thus favor heterogeneous nucleation, having better structural matching between nucleating Mn (hydr)oxides and quartz. The unique information obtained in this work improves our understanding of Mn (hydr)oxide formation in natural as well as engineered aqueous environments, such as groundwater contaminated by natural leachate and acid mine drainage remediation.

  20. Effects of ionic strength and sugars on the aggregation propensity of monoclonal antibodies: influence of colloidal and conformational stabilities.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shuntaro; Hasegawa, Jun; Kobayashi, Naoki; Tomitsuka, Toshiaki; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi

    2013-05-01

    To develop a general strategy for optimizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) formulations. Colloidal stabilities of four representative MAbs solutions were assessed based on the second virial coefficient (B 2) at 20°C and 40°C, and net charges at different NaCl concentrations, and/or in the presence of sugars. Conformational stabilities were evaluated from the unfolding temperatures. The aggregation propensities were determined at 40°C and after freeze-thawing. The electrostatic potential of antibody surfaces was simulated for the development of rational formulations. Similar B 2 values were obtained at 20°C and 40°C, implying little dependence on temperature. B 2 correlated quantitatively with aggregation propensities at 40°C. The net charge partly correlated with colloidal stability. Salts stabilized or destabilized MAbs, depending on repulsive or attractive interactions. Sugars improved the aggregation propensity under freeze-thaw stress through improved conformational stability. Uneven and even distributions of potential surfaces were attributed to attractive and strong repulsive electrostatic interactions. Assessment of colloidal stability at the lowest ionic strength is particularly effective for the development of formulations. If necessary, salts are added to enhance the colloidal stability. Sugars further improved aggregation propensities by enhancing conformational stability. These behaviors are rationally predictable according to the surface potentials of MAbs.

  1. ORGANIC-HIGH IONIC STRENGTH AQUEOUS SOLVENT SYSTEMS FOR SPIRAL COUNTER-CURRENT CHROMATOGRAPHY: GRAPHIC OPTIMIZATION OF PARTITION COEFFICIENT.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yun; Liu, Gang; Ma, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Ito, Yoichiro

    2013-01-10

    A new series of organic-high ionic strength aqueous two-phase solvents systems was designed for separation of highly polar compounds by spiral high-speed counter-current chromatography. A total of 21 solvent systems composed of 1-butanol-ethanol-saturated ammonium sulfate-water at various volume ratios are arranged according to an increasing order of polarity. Selection of the two-phase solvent system for a single compound or a multiple sample mixture can be achieved by two steps of partition coefficient measurements using a graphic method. The capability of the method is demonstrated by optimization of partition coefficient for seven highly polar samples including tartrazine (K=0.77), tryptophan (K=1.00), methyl green (K= 0.93), tyrosine (0.81), metanephrine (K=0.89), tyramine (K=0.98), and normetanephrine (K=0.96). Three sulfonic acid components in D&C Green No. 8 were successfully separated by HSCCC using the graphic selection of the two-phase solvent system.

  2. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces.

    PubMed

    Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong Q; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2013-05-01

    Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bridging interactions of proteins with silica nanoparticles: the influence of pH, ionic strength and protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Meissner, Jens; Klapp, Sabine H L; Findenegg, Gerhard H

    2014-02-07

    Charge-driven bridging of nanoparticles by macromolecules represents a promising route for engineering functional structures, but the strong electrostatic interactions involved when using conventional polyelectrolytes impart irreversible complexation and ill-defined structures. Recently it was found that the electrostatic interaction of silica nanoparticles with small globular proteins leads to aggregate structures that can be controlled by pH. Here we study the combined influence of pH and electrolyte concentration on the bridging aggregation of silica nanoparticles with lysozyme in dilute aqueous dispersions. We find that protein binding to the silica particles is determined by pH irrespective of the ionic strength. The hetero-aggregate structures formed by the silica particles with the protein were studied by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and the structure factor data were analyzed on the basis of a short-range square-well attractive pair potential (close to the sticky-hard-sphere limit). It is found that the electrolyte concentration has a strong influence on the stickiness near pH 5, where the weakly charged silica particles are bridged by the strongly charged protein. An even stronger influence of the electrolyte is found in the vicinity of the isoelectric point of the protein (pI = 10.7) and is attributed to shielding of the repulsion between the highly charged silica particles and hydrophobic interactions between the bridging protein molecules.

  4. Light scattering studies on solutions of charged rod-like fd-virus at very low ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Susanne F.; Maier, Erich E.; Weber, R.

    1989-01-01

    Light scattering experiments are reported on semidilute, aqueous solutions of rod-like fd-virus (length L=880 nm, molecular weight 16.4×106 dalton) near the overlap concentration c*=1 particle/length3. In solutions of very low ionic strength, a liquid-like structure with a significant intensity maximum of the elastically scattered light is observed. The structure is caused by the electrostatic interaction of the charged rods. It vanishes, when enough salt is added so that the interaction potential is screened on the interparticle distance. The scattering vector qmax of the maximum scales with the fd concentration as c1/2. The experimental values for qmaxL fit very well to Monto Carlo simulations if the concentration is scaled to c*. Dynamic light scattering of the fd solutions reflects the influence of the static structure factor in the same way as observed for interacting spherical macromolecules: The first cumulant of the field correlation function divided by the square of the scattering vector shows a behavior reciprocal to that of the static structure factor.

  5. Solvation of p-nitrophenol at a water/alkane interface: the role of ionic strength and salt identity.

    PubMed

    Beildeck, Carmen L; Liu, Milton J; Brindza, Michael R; Walker, Robert A

    2005-08-04

    Second harmonic generation (SHG), a surface specific, nonlinear optical spectroscopy, was used to study the interfacial solvation of a neutral surfactant, p-nitrophenol (PNP), adsorbed to the water/cyclohexane interface in the presence of simple salts at varying salt concentrations. The purpose of this work was to determine what relationship (if any) exists between interfacial polarity and bulk solution ionic strength. Data show an apparent red shift in SHG spectra with an increase in salt anion size from fluoride to chloride to bromide at 1 M salt concentrations. A spectral red shift of the PNP electronic excitation implies an increase in local polarity. Within experimental limits, however, these observed interfacial spectral shifts mimic shifts in absorbance spectra observed for PNP in bulk electrolyte solutions. Given the similarities between bulk and surface behavior, we conclude that observed shifts in SHG spectra may be attributed to effects similar to those found in bulk solution. Additionally, the surface adsorption of PNP to the water/cyclohexane interface was studied to determine the surface distribution of PNP and the conjugate base, p-nitrophenoxide (PNP(-)), for a 10 mM PNP solution. PNP adsorption is favored over PNP(-) adsorption by a factor of 10, giving rise to an equilibrium surface distribution that is an order of magnitude greater than that found in bulk solution. These findings indicate that the amount of PNP(-) at the surface in an aqueous solution of 10 mM PNP is negligible.

  6. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. PMID:23497979

  7. ORGANIC-HIGH IONIC STRENGTH AQUEOUS SOLVENT SYSTEMS FOR SPIRAL COUNTER-CURRENT CHROMATOGRAPHY: GRAPHIC OPTIMIZATION OF PARTITION COEFFICIENT

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yun; Liu, Gang; Ma, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Ito, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    A new series of organic-high ionic strength aqueous two-phase solvents systems was designed for separation of highly polar compounds by spiral high-speed counter-current chromatography. A total of 21 solvent systems composed of 1-butanol-ethanol-saturated ammonium sulfate-water at various volume ratios are arranged according to an increasing order of polarity. Selection of the two-phase solvent system for a single compound or a multiple sample mixture can be achieved by two steps of partition coefficient measurements using a graphic method. The capability of the method is demonstrated by optimization of partition coefficient for seven highly polar samples including tartrazine (K=0.77), tryptophan (K=1.00), methyl green (K= 0.93), tyrosine (0.81), metanephrine (K=0.89), tyramine (K=0.98), and normetanephrine (K=0.96). Three sulfonic acid components in D&C Green No. 8 were successfully separated by HSCCC using the graphic selection of the two-phase solvent system. PMID:23467197

  8. Influence of ionic strength on triplet-state natural organic matter loss by energy transfer and electron transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kimberly M; Pignatello, Joseph J; Mitch, William A

    2013-10-01

    Triplet state excited natural organic matter chromophores ((3)NOM*) are important reactive intermediates in indirect photochemical processes, yet the impact of salt concentrations relevant to estuarine and marine environments on (3)NOM* is poorly understood. The formation rates, pseudo-first-order loss rate constants, and steady-state concentration of (3)NOM* were monitored using the sorbate probe method in synthetic matrices with increasing ionic strength (IS) to seawater values using seawater halides or other salts. The steady-state concentration of (3)NOM* approximately doubled at seawater IS, regardless of the salt used, due to a decrease in the (3)NOM* decay rate constant. The electron transfer-mediated degradation of 2,4,6-trimethylphenol (TMP) by (3)NOM* was significantly slowed at higher IS. A model is proposed wherein high IS slows intra-organic matter electron transfer pathways, an important (3)NOM* loss pathway, leading to longer (3)NOM* lifetimes. Although IS did not appear to impact energy transfer pathways directly, the higher (3)NOM* steady-state concentrations promote energy transfer interactions. The observed decrease in decay rate constant, increase in steady-state concentration of (3)NOM* at high IS, and the inhibition of electron transfer pathways should be considered when determining the fate of organic pollutants in estuarine and marine environments.

  9. Structural and dynamical properties of aqueous suspensions of NaPSS (HPSS) at very low ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzill, S.; Luxemburger, R.; Deike, R.; Weber, R.

    1998-02-01

    Results on the structural and dynamical properties of aqueous solutions of NaPSS (HPSS) are reported. Most samples of previous measurements, including our own, are contaminated by the presence of (temporal) aggregates. The emphasis of this paper lies on investigations of well purified samples at very low ionic strength where interacting effects are maximum. As previously reported, this can be achieved by pumping the suspension through ion exchange resin by means of a tube-pump, using filters of 0.1 μm pore size. Information has been extracted from static and dynamic light scattering and viscosity measurements. A second maximum is observed in the scattering curves versus wavenumber for the first time. It is discussed on the basis of two current models describing the structure of charged macromolecules. The short time dynamics reflects the measured intensity. Detailed viscosity data in comparison of those of rodlike (TMV), slightly flexible so-called fd virus particles (length 880 nm) are used to confirm the interpretation of the light scattering results. The recently observed maximum in the reduced viscosity could be confirmed.

  10. Sorption of chlorimuron-ethyl on montmorillonite clays: effects of exchangeable cations, pH, and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenjie; Teng, Ying; Zhou, Qixing; Paschke, Albrecht; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2014-10-01

    Sorption interaction of chlorimuron-ethyl with montmorillonite clays was investigated under varied types of exchangeable cation, pH, and ionic strength conditions. Chlorimuron-ethyl sorption on bentonites exhibited pronounced cation dependency, and the sorption ability increased as the sequence Ca(2+)- < Na(+)- < Al(3+)- < Fe(3+)-bentonite, due to different sorption mechanisms, whereas the cation dependency was influenced by the clay type and much weaker for montmorillonites. The decrease of pH at the range of 4.0-6.0 prominently increased sorption of chlorimuron-ethyl on all cation-exchanged montmorillonite clays, and nearly a neglected sorption (about 2 %) can be observed at pH over 7.0. In the presence of CaCl2, sorption of chlorimuron-ethyl on Fe(3+)-bentonite was promoted because of complexion of Ca(2+) and the surface of Fe(3+)-bentonite. However, as the concentration of CaCl2 increased, chlorimuron-ethyl sorption on Ca(2+)- and Fe(3+)-exchanged bentonite decreased, suggesting that Ca bridging was not the prevailing mechanism for sorption of chlorimuron-ethyl on these clays. Furthermore, chlorimuron-ethyl sorption was relatively sensitive to pH, and the change of pH may obscure effect of other factors on the sorption, so it was quite necessary to control pH at a constant value when the effect of other factor was being studied.

  11. Release mechanism of doxazosin from carrageenan matrix tablets: Effect of ionic strength and addition of sodium dodecyl sulphate.

    PubMed

    Kos, Petra; Pavli, Matej; Baumgartner, Saša; Kogej, Ksenija

    2017-08-30

    The polyelectrolyte matrix tablets loaded with an oppositely charged drug exhibit complex drug-release mechanisms. In this study, the release mechanism of a cationic drug doxazosin mesylate (DM) from matrix tablets based on an anionic polyelectrolyte λ-carrageenan (λ-CARR) is investigated. The drug release rates from λ-CARR matrices are correlated with binding results based on potentiometric measurements using the DM ion-sensitive membrane electrode and with molecular characteristics of the DM-λ-CARR-complex particles through hydrodynamic size measurements. Experiments are performed in solutions with different ionic strength and with the addition of an anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). It is demonstrated that in addition to swelling and erosion of tablets, the release rates depend strongly on cooperative interactions between DM and λ-CARR. Addition of SDS at concentrations below its critical micelle concentration (CMC) slows down the DM release through hydrophobic binding of SDS to the DM-λ-CARR complex. On the contrary, at concentrations above the CMC SDS pulls DM from the complex by forming mixed micelles with it and thus accelerates the release. Results involving SDS show that the concentration of surfactants that are naturally present in gastrointestinal environment may have a great impact on the drug release process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Stability properties of surfactant-free thin films at different ionic strengths: measurements and modeling.

    PubMed

    Lech, Frederik J; Wierenga, Peter A; Gruppen, Harry; Meinders, Marcel B J

    2015-03-10

    Foam lamellae are the smallest structural elements in foam. Such lamellae can experimentally be studied by analysis of thin liquid films in glass cells. These thin liquid films usually have to be stabilized against rupture by surface active substances, such as proteins or low molecular weight surfactants. However, horizontal thin liquid films of pure water with a radius of 100 μm also show remarkable stability when created in closed Sheludko cells. To understand thin film stability of surfactant-free films, the drainage behavior and rupture times of films of water and NaCl solutions were determined. The drainage was modeled with an extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) model, which combines DLVO and hydrophobic contributions. Good correspondence between experiment and theory is observed, when hydrophobic interactions are included, with fitted values for surface potential (ψ(0,water)) of -60 ± 5 mV, hydrophobic strength (B(hb,water)) of 0.22 ± 0.02 mJ/m(2), and a range of the hydrophobic interaction (λ(hb, water)) of 15 ± 1 nm in thin liquid films. In addition, Vrij's rupture criterion was successfully applied to model the stability regions and rupture times of the films. The films of pure water are stable over long time scales (hours) and drain to a final thickness >40 nm if the concentration of electrolytes is low (resistivity 18.2 MQ). With increasing amounts of ions (NaCl) the thin films drain to <40 nm thickness and the rupture stability of the films is reduced from hours to seconds.

  13. Early osmotic, antioxidant, ionic, and redox responses to salinity in leaves and roots of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.).

    PubMed

    Ranjit, Singh Laxmi; Manish, Pandey; Penna, Suprasanna

    2016-01-01

    Salt-stress-induced alterations in osmotic, ionic, and redox responses were studied in the early period of treatment (30 min to 5 days) in seedlings of Brassica juncea L. Roots and shoots under mild (50 mM) and severe (250 mM) NaCl stress were analyzed for growth, oxidative stress, osmolyte accumulation, antioxidant defense, and redox state. Growth reduction was less pronounced in the early time period of salt stress while oxidative damage increased linearly and in a sustained manner under severe stress up to 6 h. An early and transient reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst, as evidenced by superoxide and hydrogen peroxide level was observed, followed by activation of enzymatic antioxidant system (GPX, SOD, CAT, and GR) in both root and shoot. The enzymatic activity was not affected much under mild stress particularly at early phase; however, severe stress induced a significant increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Root ascorbate was progressively accumulated, and its redox state maintained in the early time phase of treatment under mild stress while increase in root and shoot glutathione content was recorded under mild stress at 5 days when the active ascorbate pool decreased. While early period of salt stress showed significant Na(+) accumulation over control, plants subjected to mild stress measured less Na(+) accumulation up to 5 days compared to severely stressed plants. The results showed an early induction of differential responses to salt stress in roots and shoots of Brassica which include growth limitations, reduced relative water content, increased osmolytes, redox state, and antioxidant system, and a significant Na(+) increase. The results also indicate that roots and shoots may have distinct mechanisms of responses to salt stress.

  14. Effects of osmolality and ionic strength on the mechanism of Ca2+ release in skinned skeletal muscle fibres of the toad.

    PubMed

    Lamb, G D; Stephenson, D G; Stienen, G J

    1993-05-01

    1. The effects of increased osmolality and ionic strength on the mechanism of Ca2+ release were examined in mechanically skinned skeletal muscle fibres of the toad at 23 degrees C. Ca2+ release was induced by depolarizing the transverse tubular (T-) system by ionic substitution. 2. Increasing the osmolality of the 'myoplasmic' solution about four times (to 955 mosmol/kg), by addition of 700 mM sucrose to the standard potassium (K-)HDTA solution (HDTA: hexamethylenediamine-tetraacetate), only depressed the depolarization-induced response by about 46%. Much of this decrease could be attributed to a reduction in the Ca(2+)-sensitivity of the contractile proteins at this high osmolality. 3. Addition of > 400 mM sucrose itself often induced substantial Ca2+ release and a transient tension response. This 'spontaneous' release was (a) greatly enhanced when the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) had been heavily loaded with Ca2+, (b) little affected by inactivation of the voltage sensors by prolonged or permanent depolarization of the T-system and (c) blocked by Ruthenium Red (10 microM). 4. When both the osmolality and ionic strength were increased, by increasing the K-HDTA concentration, the depolarization-induced force was greatly reduced (to 35% at 818 mosmol/kg and 5% at 1095 mosmol/kg). Most of this reduction could be directly attributed to the substantially reduced maximum force and Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus. 5. The small amount of releasable Ca2+ remaining in the SR after a single depolarization in a high-HDTA solution with 1 mM EGTA (to chelate the released Ca2+), indicated that depolarization could still elicit massive Ca2+ release at high ionic strength and osmolality (at 1 mM free Mg2+). 6. In contrast, when the total Mg2+ and ATP concentrations were raised about threefold (free [Mg2+] increased 2.7-fold) along with the osmolality and ionic strength, the ability of depolarization to elicit Ca2+ release was greatly hindered. 7. Osmotic compression

  15. Effects of osmolality and ionic strength on the mechanism of Ca2+ release in skinned skeletal muscle fibres of the toad.

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, G D; Stephenson, D G; Stienen, G J

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of increased osmolality and ionic strength on the mechanism of Ca2+ release were examined in mechanically skinned skeletal muscle fibres of the toad at 23 degrees C. Ca2+ release was induced by depolarizing the transverse tubular (T-) system by ionic substitution. 2. Increasing the osmolality of the 'myoplasmic' solution about four times (to 955 mosmol/kg), by addition of 700 mM sucrose to the standard potassium (K-)HDTA solution (HDTA: hexamethylenediamine-tetraacetate), only depressed the depolarization-induced response by about 46%. Much of this decrease could be attributed to a reduction in the Ca(2+)-sensitivity of the contractile proteins at this high osmolality. 3. Addition of > 400 mM sucrose itself often induced substantial Ca2+ release and a transient tension response. This 'spontaneous' release was (a) greatly enhanced when the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) had been heavily loaded with Ca2+, (b) little affected by inactivation of the voltage sensors by prolonged or permanent depolarization of the T-system and (c) blocked by Ruthenium Red (10 microM). 4. When both the osmolality and ionic strength were increased, by increasing the K-HDTA concentration, the depolarization-induced force was greatly reduced (to 35% at 818 mosmol/kg and 5% at 1095 mosmol/kg). Most of this reduction could be directly attributed to the substantially reduced maximum force and Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus. 5. The small amount of releasable Ca2+ remaining in the SR after a single depolarization in a high-HDTA solution with 1 mM EGTA (to chelate the released Ca2+), indicated that depolarization could still elicit massive Ca2+ release at high ionic strength and osmolality (at 1 mM free Mg2+). 6. In contrast, when the total Mg2+ and ATP concentrations were raised about threefold (free [Mg2+] increased 2.7-fold) along with the osmolality and ionic strength, the ability of depolarization to elicit Ca2+ release was greatly hindered. 7. Osmotic compression

  16. Sunlight mediated diesel degradation under saline conditions using ionic silver coated sand via nanoreduction: use of impregnated form of thiourea modified chitosan membranes for ex situ application.

    PubMed

    Das, Devlina; Das, Nilanjana

    2014-08-15

    The present research investigates the use of ionic silver coated sand dust (ISSD) for the sunlight mediated degradation of diesel under saline conditions. Sand dust was used as a template for reduction of silver ions by effective removal of chloride ions. Diesel degradation was estimated in terms of degradation (%), chloride removal, volume reduction and nanoparticle synthesis, respectively. The process was optimized using a 7-level Box-Behnken design. Among several factors, time (B), Tween 80 (C), ISSD dosage (D) and silver(I) concentration (F) were found to be most significant. Maximum diesel degradation 99.8% was obtained in a period of 14 h which was analyzed by gas chromatography. XPS analysis confirmed silver reduction as the underlying phenomena. TEM analysis and albeit first approximation method confirmed that enhanced degradation occurred due to physical contact between diesel components and ISSD. First order kinetic model exhibited the best fit. Light microscopy results showed the various stages in diesel degradation by a reduction in bubble size. Ex situ application was carried out using ISSD impregnated thiourea modified chitosan/PVA membranes by surface floatation technique for the remediation of diesel contaminated sea water. Complete diesel degradation was noted after 48 h of sunlight exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The binding of cytochrome c peroxidase and ferricytochrome c. A spectrophotometric determination of the equilibrium association constant as a function of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Erman, J E; Vitello, L B

    1980-07-10

    Complex formation between cytochrome c peroxidase and ferricytochrome c perturbs the optical absorption spectrum in the Soret band by about 2%. This perturbation can be utilized as a measure of the complex formed in solution and permits the determination of the stoichiometry and the equilibrium association constant for this reaction. At pH 6, in cacodylate/KNO3 buffers, only a 1:1 complex between cytochrome c peroxidase and ferricytochrome c is detected. The equilibrium association constant for the complex has been determined as a function of ionic strength and varies between (6.0 +/- 3.6) x 10(6) M-1 and (2.2 +/- 1.9) x 10(6) M-1 over the ionic strength range 0.01 M to 0.20 M.

  18. Effect of surface chemistry, solution pH, and ionic strength on the removal of herbicides diuron and amitrole from water by an activated carbon fiber.

    PubMed

    Fontecha-Cámara, M A; López-Ramón, M V; Alvarez-Merino, M A; Moreno-Castilla, C

    2007-01-30

    A study was conducted on the effects of carbon surface chemistry, solution pH, and ionic strength on the removal of diuron and amitrole from aqueous solutions by adsorption on an as-received and oxidized activated carbon fiber. Results obtained were explained by the surface characteristics of the adsorbents and the characteristics of the herbicide molecules. Under the experimental conditions used, diuron uptake was much higher than that of amitrole, despite its larger molecular dimensions, due to the lesser water solubility, greater hydrophobicity, and larger dipolar moment of diuron compared with amitrole. Uptake variations associated with differences in carbon surface oxidation, solution pH, and ionic strength were explained by corresponding changes in electrostatic, hydrophobic, and van der Waals interactions.

  19. The Effect of Ionic Strength, Temperature, and Pressure on the Interaction Potential of Dense Protein Solutions: From Nonlinear Pressure Response to Protein Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Johannes; Schroer, Martin A.; Erlkamp, Mirko; Grobelny, Sebastian; Paulus, Michael; Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Wirkert, Florian J.; Tolan, Metin; Winter, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the intermolecular interaction potential, V(r), of proteins under the influence of temperature, pressure, and salt concentration is essential for understanding protein aggregation, crystallization, and protein phase behavior in general. Here, we report small-angle x-ray scattering studies on dense lysozyme solutions of high ionic strength as a function of temperature and pressure. We show that the interaction potential changes in a nonlinear fashion over a wide range of temperatures, salt, and protein concentrations. Neither temperature nor protein and salt concentration lead to marked changes in the pressure dependence of V(r), indicating that changes of the water structure dominate the pressure dependence of the intermolecular forces. Furthermore, by analysis of the temperature, pressure, and ionic strength dependence of the normalized second virial coefficient, b2, we show that the interaction can be fine-tuned by pressure, which can be used to optimize b2 values for controlled protein crystallization. PMID:22713580

  20. Biosorption removal of benzene and toluene by three dried macroalgae at different ionic strength and temperatures: Algae biochemical composition and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Flores-Chaparro, Carlos E; Chazaro Ruiz, Luis Felipe; Alfaro de la Torre, Ma Catalina; Huerta-Diaz, Miguel Angel; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene

    2017-05-15

    Release of low-molecular aromatic hydrocarbons (HC) into natural waters brings severe consequences to our environment. Unfortunately very limited information is available regarding the treatment of these pollutants. This work evaluated the use of brown, green and red macroalgae biomass as biosorbents of benzene and toluene, two of the most soluble HC. Raw seaweed biomasses were completely characterized, then evaluated under different temperatures and ionic strengths to assess their potential as biosorbents and to elucidate the biosorption mechanisms involved. Brown macroalgae registered the highest removal capacities for benzene and toluene (112 and 28 mg·g(-1), respectively), and these were not affected at ionic strength < 0.6 M. Langmuir and Sips isotherm equations well described biosorption data, and the pseudo-second order model provided the best fit to the kinetics rate. Hydrocarbons are adsorbed onto the diverse chemical components of the cell wall by London forces and hydrophobic interactions.

  1. Non-covalent assembly of poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/triethylamine microcapsules with ionic strength-responsiveness and auto-fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiying; Zheng, Honghao; Tong, Weijun; Gao, Changyou

    2017-06-15

    Ionic strength-responsive microcapsules with auto-fluorescence were fabricated by incubation of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH)-doped CaCO3 particles in triethylamine (Et3N), followed by core removal using HCl. Based on the combination of hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding, PAH and Et3N formed a complex with a molar ratio of 3:1 (repeating unit of PAH: Et3N). The as-prepared capsules showed extraordinary stability against 1M HCl, 1M NaOH and 6M urea solutions, and could swell or shrink reversibly in response to the ionic strength. Furthermore, the capsules possessed auto-fluorescence, allowing easily tracking of capsules during applications. Such interaction may be expanded to formation of stimuli-responsive multilayer films and other colloidal particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Detailed landfill leachate plume mapping using 2D and 3D electrical resistivity tomography - with correlation to ionic strength measured in screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, P. K.; Rønde, V. K.; Fiandaca, G.; Balbarini, N.; Auken, E.; Bjerg, P. L.; Christiansen, A. V.

    2017-03-01

    Leaching of organic and inorganic contamination from landfills is a serious environmental problem as surface water and aquifers are affected. In order to assess these risks and investigate the migration of leachate from the landfill, 2D and large scale 3D electrical resistivity tomography were used at a heavily contaminated landfill in Grindsted, Denmark. The inverted 2D profiles describe both the variations along the groundwater flow as well as the plume extension across the flow directions. The 3D inversion model shows the variability in the low resistivity anomaly pattern corresponding to differences in the ionic strength of the landfill leachate. Chemical data from boreholes agree well with the observations indicating a leachate plume which gradually sinks and increases in size while migrating from the landfill in the groundwater flow direction. Overall results show that the resistivity method has been very successful in delineating the landfill leachate plume and that good correlation exists between the resistivity model and leachate ionic strength.

  3. Sensitivity of modern climate to the presence, strength and salinity of Mediterranean-Atlantic exchange in a global general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, Ruza F.; Valdes, Paul J.; Gregoire, Lauren; Flecker, Rachel; Gutjahr, Marcus

    2014-02-01

    Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) is thought to be a key contributor to the strength and stability of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), but the future of Mediterranean-Atlantic water exchange is uncertain. It is chiefly dependent on the difference between Mediterranean and Atlantic temperature and salinity characteristics, and as a semi-enclosed basin, the Mediterranean is particularly vulnerable to future changes in climate and water usage. Certainly, there is strong geologic evidence that the Mediterranean underwent dramatic salinity and sea-level fluctuations in the past. Here, we use a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean General Circulation Model to examine the impact of changes in Mediterranean-Atlantic exchange on global ocean circulation and climate. Our results suggest that MOW strengthens and possibly stabilises the AMOC not through any contribution towards NADW formation, but by delivering relatively warm, saline water to southbound Atlantic currents below 800 m. However, we find almost no climate signal associated with changes in Mediterranean-Atlantic flow strength. Mediterranean salinity, on the other hand, controls MOW buoyancy in the Atlantic and therefore affects its interaction with the shallow-intermediate circulation patterns that govern surface climate. Changing Mediterranean salinity by a factor of two reorganises shallow North Atlantic circulation, resulting in regional climate anomalies in the North Atlantic, Labrador and Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Seas of ±4 °C or more. Although such major variations in salinity are believed to have occurred in the past, they are unlikely to occur in the near future. However, our work does suggest that changes in the Mediterranean's hydrological balance can impact global-scale climate.

  4. Mobilization of natural colloids from an iron oxide-coated sand aquifer--Effect of pH and ionic strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunn, Rebecca A.; Magelky, Robin D.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Elimelech, Menachem

    2002-01-01

    Field and laboratory column experiments were performed to assess the effect of elevated pH and reduced ionic strength on the mobilization of natural colloids in a ferric oxyhydroxide-coated aquifer sediment. The field experiments were conducted as natural gradient injections of groundwater amended by sodium hydroxide additions. The laboratory experiments were conducted in columns of undisturbed, oriented sediments and disturbed, disoriented sediments. In the field, the breakthrough of released colloids coincided with the pH pulse breakthrough and lagged the bromide tracer breakthrough. The breakthrough behavior suggested that the progress of the elevated pH front controlled the transport of the mobilized colloids. In the laboratory, about twice as much colloid release occurred in the disturbed sediments as in the undisturbed sediments. The field and laboratory experiments both showed that the total mass of colloid release increased with increasing pH until the concurrent increase in ionic strength limited release. A decrease in ionic strength did not mobilize significant amounts of colloids in the field. The amount of colloids released normalized to the mass of the sediments was similar for the field and the undisturbed laboratory experiments.

  5. [Verification of a decrease in the rigidity of the phage lambda DNA polymeric chain in low ionic strength aqueous solutions by testing the polymer-polymer interlink interactions].

    PubMed

    Arutiunian, A V; Ivanova, M A; Kurliand, D I; Kapshin, Iu S; Landa, S B; Poshekhonov, S T; Drobchenko, E A; Shevelev, I V

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the rigidity of the polymetric chain of phage lambda double-strand DNA have been studied by laser correlation spectroscopy. It was shown that, as the ionic strength increases, the effect of the screening of the hydrodynamic interaction of the links of the polymeric chain specific for polymeric coils arises in a DNA solution. It is assumed that the screening occurs when the threshold of the overlapping of DNA coils is achieved. The overlapping of coils is the result of a previously observed significant rise of DNA coil size from abnormally small DNA coils in low ionic strength buffers (about 10(-2) M Na+ or less) to maximum possible large coils in the 5SSC and 5SSC-like buffers. Further analysis of the far interlink interactions in linear lambda phage DNA coils in similar buffers at pH 7 and 4 confirms the earlier proposal about the role of H+ ions in the appearance of abnormally small DNA coils. The abnormal decrease in the DNA coil size in low ionic strength buffers is not a specific feature of lambda phage DNA only.

  6. Deposition of polyelectrolyte multilayer films made from chitosan and xanthan on biodegradable substrate: Effect of pH and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viraneva, A.; Marudova, M.; Sotirov, S.; Bodurov, I.; Pilicheva, B.; Uzunova, Y.; Exner, G.; Grancharova, Ts.; Vlaeva, I.; Yovcheva, T.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the effect of pH and ionic strength on the deposition of chitosan/xanthan multilayers on preliminary corona charged substrates from polylactic acid. The multilayer films were formed by alternative dipping the substrate into chitosan and xanthan polyelectrolyte solutions. For this purpose 0.1% chitosan solution and 0.05% xanthan solution in acetate buffers with pH 4; 4.5 and 5 and ionic strengths 0; 0.01; 0.1 and 1 mol/l were used. The film properties were investigated by FTIR, laser refractometry, XPS and AFM methods. It was found that the binding of the polyelectrolytes to the substrate was irreversible over the time of deposition. The investigated parameters were found to depend on both pH and ionic strength of the polyelectrolyte solutions. This behaviour was attributed to the changes in charge density of the polyelectrolytes and screening effect of the counterions.

  7. The Influence of High Drug Loading in Xanthan Tablets and Media with Different Physiological pH and Ionic Strength on Swelling and Release.

    PubMed

    Mikac, Urša; Sepe, Ana; Baumgartner, Saša; Kristl, Julijana

    2016-03-07

    The formation of a gel coat around xanthan (Xan) tablets, empty or loaded with pentoxifylline (PF), and its release in media differing in pH and ionic strength by NMR, MR imaging, and two release methods were studied. The T1 and T2 NMR relaxation times in gels depend predominantly on Xan concentration; the presence of PF has negligible influence on them. It is interesting that the matrix swelling is primarily regulated by Xan despite high drug loading (25%, 50%). The gastric pH and high ionic strength of the media do not influence the position of the penetration and swelling fronts but do affect the erosion front and gel thickness. The different release profiles obtained in mixing and nonmixing in vitro methods are the consequence of matrix hydration level and erosion at the surface. In water and in diluted acid medium with low ionic strength, the main release mechanism is erosion, whereas in other media (pH 1.2, μ ≥ 0.20 M), anomalous transport dominates as was found out by fitting of measured data with theoretical model. Besides the in vitro investigation that mimics gastric conditions, mathematical modeling makes the product development more successful.

  8. An improved thermodynamic model for the complexation of trivalent actinides and lanthanide with oxalic acid valid to high ionic strength.

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yongliang; Thakur, Punam; Borkowski, Marian

    2015-07-30

    The dissociation constants of oxalic acid (Ox), and the stability constants of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox2– have been determined at 25 °C, over a range of concentration varying from 0.1 to 6.60 m NaClO4 using potentiometric titration and extraction techniques, respectively. The experimental data support the formation of complexes, M(Ox)n3 – 2n, where (M = Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ and n = 1 and 2). The dissociation constant and the stability constant values measured as a function of NaClO4 concentration were used to estimate the Pitzer parameters for the respective interactions of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox. Furthermore, the stability constants data of Am3+ –Ox measured in NaClO4 and in NaCl solutions from the literature were simultaneously fitted in order to refine the existing actinide–oxalate complexation model that can be used universally in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The thermodynamic stability constant: log β0101 = 6.30 ± 0.06 and log β0102 = 10.84 ± 0.06 for Am3+ was obtained by simultaneously fitting data in NaCl and NaClO4 media. Additionally, log β0101 = 6.72 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.05 ± 0.09 for the Cm3+ and log β0101 = 6.67 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.15 ± 0.09 for the Eu3+ were calculated by extrapolation of data to zero ionic strength in NaClO4 medium only. For all stability constants, the Pitzer model gives an excellent representation of the data using interaction parameters β(0), β(1), and CΦ determined in this work. The thermodynamic model developed in this work will be useful in accurately modeling the potential solubility of trivalent

  9. Sorption of vanadium (V) onto natural soil colloids under various solution pH and ionic strength conditions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiuhua; Yu, Lin; Wang, Changzhao; Yin, Xianqiang; Mosa, Ahmed; Lv, Jialong; Sun, Huimin

    2017-02-01

    Batch sorption kinetics and isothermal characteristics of V(V) were investigated on three natural soil colloids (manual loessial soil colloid (MSC), aeolian sandy soil colloid (ASC), and cultivated loessial soil colloid (CSC)) under various solution pH and ionic strength (IS) conditions. Colloids were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). AFM micrographs showed CSC with an aggregated shape with larger particle diameter as compared with ASC and MSC. XRD spectra revealed the presence of different minerals in natural soil colloids including biotite, kaolinite, calcite and quartz, which might contribute to sorption process. The sorption ability decreased with increase of colloidal particle size. The sorption was mainly attributed to complexation by active carboxylate and alcohol groups of colloidal components. Sorption kinetics and isotherms of V(V) onto natural soil colloids were best fitted with Pseudo-second-order and Freundlich models. Langmuir model indicated that sorption capacity of MSC and ASC was comparable (285.7 and 238.1 mg g(-1)); however, CSC exhibited the lowest sorption capacity (41.5 mg g(-1)) due to its larger particle diameter and aggregated shape. The maximum V(V) sorption capacity reached plateau values at a solution pH ranged between 5.0 and 9.0 for MSC and ASC, and 6.0-8.0 for CSC. Sorption capacity of V(V) onto natural soil colloids decreased with increasing IS. Based on result of this study we can conclude that sorption of V(V) onto natural soil colloids is pH- and IS-dependent. These findings provide insights on the remediation of vanadium-contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of pH and ionic strength on sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin transport in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Gao, Bin; Li, Hui; Ma, Lena Q.

    2011-09-01

    Many antibiotics regarded as emerging contaminants have been frequently detected in soils and groundwater; however, their transport behaviors in soils remain largely unknown. This study examined the transport of two antibiotics, sulfamethoxazole (SMZ) and ciprofloxacin (CIP), in saturated porous media. Laboratory columns packed with quartz sand was used to test the effects of solution pH and ionic strength (IS) on their retention and transport. The results showed that these two antibiotics behaved differently in the saturated sand columns. In general, SMZ manifested a much higher mobility than CIP for all experimental conditions tested. Almost all SMZ transported through the columns within one pore volume in deionized water (i.e., pH = 5.6, IS = 0), but no CIP was detected in the effluents under the same condition after extended column flushing. Perturbations in solution pH (5.6 and 9.5) and IS (0 and 0.1 M) showed no effect on SMZ transport in the saturated columns. When pH increased to 9.5, however, ~ 93% of CIP was eluted from the sand columns. Increase of IS from 0 to 0.1 M also slightly changed the distribution of adsorbed CIP within the sand column at pH 5.6, but still no CIP was detected in the effluents. A mathematical model based on advection-dispersion equation coupled with equilibrium and kinetic reactions successfully simulated the transport of the antibiotics in water-saturated porous media with R2 = 0.99.

  11. Enzymatic properties and effect of ionic strength on periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774.

    PubMed

    Bursakov, S A; Carneiro, C; Almendra, M J; Duarte, R O; Caldeira, J; Moura, I; Moura, J J

    1997-10-29

    Some sulfate reducing bacteria can induce nitrate reductase when grown on nitrate containing media being involved in dissimilatory reduction of nitrate, an important step of the nitrogen cycle. Previously, it was reported the purification of the first soluble nitrate reductase from a sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 (S.A. Bursakov, M.-Y. Liu, W.J. Payne, J. LeGall, I. Moura, and J.J.G. Moura (1995) Anaerobe 1, 55-60). The present work provides further information about this monomeric periplasmic nitrate reductase (Dd NAP). It has a molecular mass of 74 kDa, 18.6 U specific activity, KM (nitrate) = 32 microM and a pHopt in the range 8-9.5. Dd NAP has peculiar properties relatively to ionic strength and cation/anion activity responses. It is shown that monovalent cations (potassium and sodium) stimulate NAP activity and divalent (magnesium and calcium) inhibited it. Sulfate anion also acts as an activator in KPB buffer. NAP native form is protected by phosphate anion from cyanide inactivation. In the presence of phosphate, cyanide even stimulates NAP activity (up to 15 mM). This effect was used in the purification procedure to differentiate between nitrate and nitrite reductase activities, since the later is effectively blocked by cyanide. Ferricyanide has an inhibitory effect at concentrations higher than 1 mM. The N-terminal amino acid sequence has a cysteine motive C-X2-C-X3-C that is most probably involved in the coordination of the [4Fe-4S] center detected by EPR spectroscopy. The active site of the enzyme consists in a molybdopterin, which is capable for the activation of apo-nit-1 nitrate reductase of Neurospora crassa. The oxidized product of the pterin cofactor obtained by acidic hidrolysis of native NAP with sulfuric acid was identified by HPLC chromatography and characterized as a molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (MGD).

  12. Translational recognition of the 5'-terminal 7-methylguanosine of globin messenger RNA as a function of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Chu, L Y; Rhoads, R E

    1978-06-13

    The translation of rabbit globin mRNA in cell-free systems derived from either wheat germ or rabbit reticulocyte was studied in the presence of various analogues of the methylated 5' terminus (cap) as a function of ionic strength. Inhibition by these analogues was strongly enhanced by increasing concentrations of KCl, K(OAc), Na(OAc), or NH4(OAc). At appropriate concentrations of K(OAc), both cell-free systems were equally sensitive to inhibition by m7GTP. At 50 mM K(OAc), the reticulocyte system was not sensitive to m7GMP or m7GTP, but at higher concentrations up to 200 mM K(OAc), both nucleotides caused strong inhibition. The compound in m7G5'ppp5'Am was inhibitory at all concentrations of K(OAc) ranging from 50 to 200 mM, although more strongly so at the higher concentrations. Over the same range of nucleotide concentrations, the compounds GMP, GTP, and G5'ppp5'Am were not inhibitors. The mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis of the translation product was that of globin at all K(OAc) concentrations in the presence of m7GTP. Globin mRNA from which the terminal m7GTP group had been removed by chemical treatment (periodate-cyclohexylamine-alkaline phosphatase) or enzymatic treatment (tobacco acid pyrophosphatase-alkaline phosphatase) was translated less efficiently than untreated globin mRNA at higher K(OAc) concentrations, but retained appreciable activity at low K(OAc) concentrations.

  13. Effect of ionic strength on ligand exchange kinetics between a mononuclear ferric citrate complex and siderophore desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Fujii, Manabu; Masago, Yoshifumi; Waite, T. David; Omura, Tatsuo

    2015-04-01

    The effect of ionic strength (I) on the ligand exchange reaction between a mononuclear ferric citrate complex and the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFB), was examined in the NaCl concentration range of 0.01-0.5 M, particularly focusing on the kinetics and mechanism of ligand exchange under environmentally relevant conditions. Overall ligand exchange rate constants were determined by spectrophotometrically measuring the time course of ferrioxamine B formation at a water temperature of 25 °C, pH 8.0, and citrate/Fe molar ratios of 500-5000. The overall ligand exchange rate decreased by 2-11-fold (depending on the citrate/Fe molar ratios) as I increased from approximately 0.01 to 0.5 M. In particular, a relatively large decrease was observed at lower I (<0.1 M). A ligand exchange model describing the effect of I on the ligand exchange rate via disjunctive and adjunctive pathways was developed by considering the pseudo-equilibration of ferric citrate complexes and subsequent ferrioxamine formation on the basis of the Eigen-Wilkins metal-ligand complexation theory. The model and experimental data consistently suggest that the adjunctive pathway (i.e., direct association of DFB with ferric mono- and di-citrate complexes following dissociation of citrate from the parent complexes) dominates in ferrioxamine formation under the experimental conditions used. The model also predicts that the higher rate of ligand exchange at lower I is associated with the decrease in the ferric dicitrate complex stability because of the relatively high electrical repulsion between ferric monocitrate and free citrate at lower I (note that the reactivity of ferric dicitrate with DFB is smaller than that for the monocitrate complex). Overall, the findings of this study contribute to the understanding of the potential effect of I on ligand exchange kinetics in natural waters and provide fundamental knowledge on iron transformation and bioavailability.

  14. Use of TOUGHREACT to Simulate Effects of Fluid Chemistry onInjectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with High Ionic StrengthFluids

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Zhang, Guoxiang; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-02-09

    Recent studies suggest that mineral dissolution/precipitation and clay swelling effects could have a major impact on the performance of hot dry rock (HDR) and hot fractured rock (HFR) reservoirs. A major concern is achieving and maintaining adequate injectivity, while avoiding the development of preferential short-circuiting flow paths. A Pitzer ionic interaction model has been introduced into the publicly available TOUGHREACT code for solving non-isothermal multi-phase reactive geochemical transport problems under conditions of high ionic strength, expected in typical HDR and HFR systems. To explore chemically-induced effects of fluid circulation in these systems, we examine ways in which the chemical composition of reinjected waters can be modified to improve reservoir performance. We performed a number of coupled thermo-hydrologic-chemical simulations in which the fractured medium was represented by a one-dimensional MINC model (multiple interacting continua). Results obtained with the Pitzer activity coefficient model were compared with those using an extended Debye-Hueckel equation. Our simulations show that non-ideal activity effects can be significant even at modest ionic strength, and can have major impacts on permeability evolution in injection-production systems. Alteration of injection water chemistry, for example by dilution with fresh water, can greatly alter precipitation and dissolution effects, and can offer a powerful tool for operating hot dry rock and hot fractured rock reservoirs in a sustainable manner.

  15. Deposition and release kinetics of nano-TiO2 in saturated porous media: effects of solution ionic strength and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Godinez, Itzel G; Darnault, Christophe J G; Khodadoust, Amid P; Bogdan, Dorin

    2013-03-01

    The aggregation, transport and deposition kinetics (i.e. attachment and release) of TiO(2) nanoparticles (nano-TiO(2)) were investigated as a function of ionic strength and the presence of anionic (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, SDBS) and non-ionic (Triton X-100) surfactants in 100% critical micelle concentration (CMC). The electrolyte concentration of the suspensions dictated the kinetic stability of nano-TiO(2) thus influencing the transport and retention of the nanoaggregates in the saturated porous medium. With increasing ionic strength, the interaction between approaching nano-TiO(2) and nano-TiO(2) already deposited onto collectors surfaces seemed to be more favorable than the interaction between approaching nano-TiO(2) and bare collectors surfaces. The abrupt and gradual reduction in electrolyte concentration during the flushing cycles of the column experiments induced the release of previously deposited nano-TiO(2) suggesting attachment of nano-TiO(2) through secondary energy minimum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Change of electrostatic potential of mean force between two curved surfaces due to different salt composition, ion valence and size under certain ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2016-02-01

    Change of an electrostatic potential of mean force (EPMF) between two cylindrical rod surfaces with salt composition, ion valence, and ion size at a constant ionic strength of 0.3 M is studied by a classical density functional theory (CDFT) in a primitive model electrolyte solution. Several novel observations are made: (i) strength of a so-called like charge attraction (LCA) reduces in an invariable manner with the salt solution changing from single 2:1 electrolyte to mixture of 2:1 and 1:1 type electrolytes of varying concentration ratios; the change is even over entire range of the composition variation under low surface charge strength, and tends to be insensitive to the composition variation in the presence of the divalent counter-ion, and more and more drastic at a critical point the divalent counter-ion disappears, respectively, as the surface charge strength becomes big enough. (ii) Both monovalent counter-ion and co-ion diameters have only a marginal effect on both the LCA strength and equilibrium distance, and the former "abnormally" affects less than the latter. (iii) Depending on the surface charge strength considered, the divalent counter-ion diameter influences the LCA strength in solution comprised of 2:1 type and 1:1 type electrolytes, monotonously or non-monotonously. All of these findings provide forceful support for a recently proposed hydrogen-bonding style mechanism explaining the LCA.

  17. The effect of humic acid on the aggregation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles under different pH and ionic strengths.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Miao; Wang, Hongtao; Keller, Arturo A; Wang, Tao; Li, Fengting

    2014-07-15

    With the increasingly widespread use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), the particles' environmental impacts have attracted concern, making it necessary to understand the fate and transport of TiO2 NPs in aqueous media. In this study, we investigated TiO2 NP aggregation caused by the effects of humic acid (HA), ionic strength (IS) and different pH using dynamic light scattering (DLS) to monitor the size distribution of the TiO2 NPs continuously. It was determined that HA can influence the stability of TiO2 NPs through charge neutralization, steric hindrance and bridging effects. In the absence of IS, aggregation was promoted by adding HA only when the pH (pH=4) is less than the point of zero charge for the TiO2 NPs (pHPZC≈6) because HA reduces the zeta potential of the TiO2 NPs via charge neutralization. At pH=4 and when the concentration of HA is 94.5 μg/L, the zeta potential of TiO2 NPs is close to zero, and they reach an aggregation maximum. A higher concentration of HA results in more negatively charged TiO2 NP surfaces, which hinder their aggregation. When the pH is 5.8, HA enhances the negative zeta potential of the TiO2 NPs and increases their stability via electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance. When the pH (pH=8) is greater than pHpzc, the zeta potential of the TiO2 NPs is high (~40 mV), and it barely changes with increasing HA concentration. Thus, the TiO2 NPs are notably stable, and their size does not grow at pH8. The increase in the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of TiO2 NPs indicated that there is steric hindrance after the addition of HA. HA can enhance the coagulation of TiO2 NPs, primarily due to bridging effect. These findings are useful in understanding the size change of TiO2 NPs, as well as the removal of TiO2 NPs and HA from aqueous media.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of Parallel Telomeric DNA Quadruplexes at Different Ionic Strengths: Evaluation of Water and Ion Models.

    PubMed

    Rebič, Matúš; Laaksonen, Aatto; Šponer, Jiří; Uličný, Jozef; Mocci, Francesca

    2016-08-04

    Most molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of DNA quadruplexes have been performed under minimal salt conditions using the Åqvist potential parameters for the cation with the TIP3P water model. Recently, this combination of parameters has been reported to be problematic for the stability of quadruplex DNA, especially caused by the ion interactions inside or near the quadruplex channel. Here, we verify how the choice of ion parameters and water model can affect the quadruplex structural stability and the interactions with the ions outside the channel. We have performed a series of MD simulations of the human full-parallel telomeric quadruplex by neutralizing its negative charge with K(+) ions. Three combinations of different cation potential parameters and water models have been used: (a) Åqvist ion parameters, TIP3P water model; (b) Joung and Cheatham ion parameters, TIP3P water model; and (c) Joung and Cheatham ion parameters, TIP4Pew water model. For the combinations (b) and (c), the effect of the ionic strength has been evaluated by adding increasing amounts of KCl salt (50, 100, and 200 mM). Two independent simulations using the Åqvist parameters with the TIP3P model show that this combination is clearly less suited for the studied quadruplex with K(+) as counterions. In both simulations, one ion escapes from the channel, followed by significant deformation of the structure, leading to deviating conformation compared to that in the reference crystallographic data. For the other combinations of ion and water potentials, no tendency is observed for the channel ions to escape from the quadruplex channel. In addition, the internal mobility of the three loops, torsion angles, and counterion affinity have been investigated at varied salt concentrations. In summary, the selection of ion and water models is crucial as it can affect both the structure and dynamics as well as the interactions of the quadruplex with its counterions. The results obtained with the TIP4Pew

  19. Determination of the second virial coefficient of bovine serum albumin under varying pH and ionic strength by composition-gradient multi-angle static light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingfang; Acosta, Diana M; Whitney, Jon R; Podgornik, Rudolf; Steinmetz, Nicole F; French, Roger H; Parsegian, V Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Composition-gradient multi-angle static light scattering (CG-MALS) is an emerging technique for the determination of intermolecular interactions via the second virial coefficient B22. With CG-MALS, detailed studies of the second virial coefficient can be carried out more accurately and effectively than with traditional methods. In addition, automated mixing, delivery and measurement enable high speed, continuous, fluctuation-free sample delivery and accurate results. Using CG-MALS we measure the second virial coefficient of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solutions at various values of pH and ionic strength of a univalent salt (NaCl). The systematic variation of the second virial coefficient as a function of pH and NaCl strength reveals the net charge change and the isoelectric point of BSA under different solution conditions. The magnitude of the second virial coefficient decreases to 1.13 x 10(-5) ml*mol/g(2) near the isoelectric point of pH 4.6 and 25 mM NaCl. These results illuminate the role of fundamental long-range electrostatic and van der Waals forces in protein-protein interactions, specifically their dependence on pH and ionic strength.

  20. Transport and abatement of fluorescent silica nanoparticle (SiO2 NP) in granular filtration: effect of porous media and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Chao; Shadman, Farhang; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2017-03-01

    The extensive production and application of engineered silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs) will inevitably lead to their release into the environment. Granular media filtration, a widely used process in water and wastewater treatment plants, has the potential for NP abatement. In this work, laboratory-scale column experiments were performed to study the transport and retention of SiO2 NPs on three widely used porous materials, i.e., sand, anthracite, and granular activated carbon (GAC). Synthetic fluorescent core-shell SiO2 NPs (83 nm) were used to facilitate NP detection. Sand showed very low capacity for SiO2 filtration as this material had a surface with limited surface area and a high concentration of negative charge. Also, we found that the stability and transport of SiO2 NP were strongly dependent on the ionic strength of the solution. Increasing ionic strength led to NP agglomeration and facilitated SiO2 NP retention, while low ionic strength resulted in release of captured NPs from the sand bed. Compared to sand, anthracite and GAC showed higher affinity for SiO2 NP capture. The superior capacity of GAC was primarily due to its porous structure and high surface area. A process model was developed to simulate NP capture in the packed bed columns and determine fundamental filtration parameters. This model provided an excellent fit to the experimental data. Taken together, the results obtained indicate that GAC is an interesting material for SiO2 NP filtration.

  1. An in situ FTIR-ATR study of polyacrylate adsorbed onto hematite at high pH and high ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Luke J; Fawell, Phillip D; van Bronswijk, Wilhelm

    2004-05-11

    FTIR-ATR was used to examine in situ the interaction of polyacrylate and hematite at pH 13. Static light scattering and mobility measurements were used to assess solution polyacrylate dimensions and hematite surface charge, respectively. Polyacrylate adsorption occurred only with the addition of electrolyte (e.g., NaCl), and it was found that excess cations, up to approximately 1 M, facilitated adsorption, above which the effect was found to plateau. At pH 13 and at low ionic strength, adsorption of polyacrylate onto hematite is facilitated by cations in solution shielding both the negative acrylate functionality of the polymer and the negative hematite surface. The shielding of the hematite surface continues to increase with increasing salt concentration up to a measured 3 M. Similarly, the shielding of the polymer increased with electrolyte concentration up to approximately 1 M salt, beyond which no further increase in shielding was observed. At this concentration the polymer assumes a finite minimum size in solution that ultimately limits the amount adsorbed. The dimension of the polymer in solution was found to be independent of monovalent cation type. Thus, at high pH and high ionic strength adsorption is determined by the degree of hematite surface charge reduction. The cation-hematite surface interaction was found to be specific, with lithium leading to greater polyacrylate adsorption than sodium, which was followed by cesium. The stronger affinity of lithium for the hematite surface over sodium and cesium is indicative of the inverse lyotropic adsorption series and has been rationalized in the past by the "structure-making-structure-breaking" model. These results provide a useful insight into the likely adsorption mechanism for polyacrylate flocculants at high pH and ionic strength onto residues in the Bayer processing of bauxite.

  2. Effects of background electrolytes and ionic strength on enrichment of Cd(II) ions with magnetic graphene oxide-supported sulfanilic acid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin-jiang; Liu, Yun-guo; Zeng, Guang-ming; You, Shao-hong; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xi; Guo, Yi-ming; Tan, Xiao-fei; Guo, Fang-ying

    2014-12-01

    To elucidate the influence mechanisms of background electrolytes and ionic strength on Cd(II) removal, the adsorption of Cd(II) onto magnetic graphene oxide-supported sulfanilic acid (MGO-SA) in aqueous solutions containing different types and concentrations of background electrolytes was studied. The results indicate that Cd(II) adsorption was strongly dependent on pH and could be strongly affected by background electrolytes and ionic strength. The Cd(II) removal was decreased with the presence of background electrolyte cations (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), and Ni(2+)), and the divalent cations exerted more obvious influences on the Cd(II) uptake than the monovalent cations at pH 6. Both Cl(-) and NO3(-) had negative effects on Cd(II) adsorption because they can form water-soluble metal-anion complexes with Cd(II) ions. The presence of 0.01molL(-1) Na3PO4 reduced the removal percentage of Cd(II) at pH<5 but extremely enhanced the Cd(II) removal when the pH>5. The Cd(II) adsorption was sensitive to changes in the concentration of NaCl, NaNO3, NaClO4, and Na3PO4. Besides, the adsorption isotherm of Cd(II) onto MGO-SA could be well described by the Freundlich model and was also influenced by the type of background electrolyte ions and the ionic strength.

  3. Speciation of phytate ion in aqueous solution. Protonation constants and copper(II) interactions in NaNO3aq at different ionic strengths.

    PubMed

    Crea, Pasquale; De Stefano, Concetta; Milea, Demetrio; Porcino, Nunziatina; Sammartano, Silvio

    2007-07-01

    The acid base behavior of phytate has been studied (at t=25 degrees C by potentiometry, ISE-H+ glass electrode) in NaNO3aq at different ionic strengths (0.1 < or = I/mol L(-1) < or = 1.0). The interactions with copper(II) were investigated in the same experimental conditions in different metal to ligand (Phy) ratios (1:1 < or = Cu2+ :Phy < or = 4:1), by using both ISE-H+ and ISE-Cu2+ electrodes. Phytate acid base behavior in sodium nitrate is very similar to that in sodium chloride, previously investigated. In the experimental conditions adopted, the formation of three CuiHjPhy(12-2i-j)- species is observed: the mononuclear CuH4Phy6- and CuH5Phy5-, and the dinuclear Cu2H5Phy3-. Analysis of complex formation constants at different ionic strengths reveals that both ISE-H+ and ISE-Cu2+ electrodes gave, within the experimental error, analogous values. Dependence of complex formation constants on ionic strength was modeled by EDH (Extended Debye-Hückel) and SIT (Specific ion Interaction Theory) equations. The sequestering ability of phytate toward copper(II) has been evaluated by the calculation of pL50 (the total ligand concentration, as -log CL, able to bind 50% of metal cation), an empirical parameter already proposed for an objective "quantification" of this ability. A thorough analysis of literature data on phytate-copper(II) complexes has been performed.

  4. Spectrophotometric determination of acidity constants of salicylaldoxime in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C and ionic strength of 0.5 M controlled with NaCl.

    PubMed

    Tshuma, Joel; Alarcón-Angeles, Georgina; Palacios-Beas, Elia; Vargas-García, Roberto; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto

    2007-04-01

    The equilibrium constants of salicylaldoxime in water at 25 degrees C, 0.5 M of ionic strength with NaCl and concentration of 1x10(-4) M were determined spectrophotometrically. The spectral data were processed using SQUAD program. The salicylaldoxime in acid medium has the value of pKa1=1.224+/-0.027. In alkaline medium the salicylaldoxime has the values of pKa2=8.551+/-0.024 and pKa3=11.728+/-0.016.

  5. Effect of oxidation state and ionic strength on sorption of actinides (Th, U, Np, Am) to geologic media [Abstract and References Only

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy M.; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2015-10-30

    The degree of conservatism in the estimated sorption partition coefficients (Kds) used in a performance assessment model is being evaluated based on a complementary batch and column method. The main focus of this work is to investigate the role of ionic strength, solution chemistry, and oxidation state (III-VI) in actinide sorption to dolomite rock. Based on redox conditions and solution chemistry expected at the WIPP, possible actinide species include Pu(III), Pu(IV), U(IV), U(VI), Np(IV), Np(V), Am(III), and Th(IV).

  6. Effect of Solution Ionic Strength on the pKa of the Nitroxide pH EPR Probe 2,2,3,4,5,5-Hexamethylimidazolidin-1-oxyl.

    PubMed

    Margita, Kaleigh; Voinov, Maxim A; Smirnov, Alex I

    2017-02-17

    Spin probe and spin labeling Electron Paramagnetic Resonance methods are indispensable research tools for solving a wide range of bioanalytical problems-from measuring microviscosity and polarity of phase-separated liquids to oxygen concentrations in tissues. One of the emerging uses of spin probes are the studies of proton transfer-related and surface electrostatic phenomena. The latter Electron Paramagnetic Resonance methods rely on molecular probes containing an additional functionality capable of reversible ionization (protonation, in particular) in the immediate proximity to an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance-active reporter group, such as (N-O(•)) for nitroxides. The consequent formation of protonated and nonprotonated nitroxide species with different magnetic parameters (A iso, g iso) could be readily distinguished by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. Bioanalytical Electron Paramagnetic Resonance studies employing pH-sensitive paramagnetic probes typically involve determination of the equilibrium constant (pK a) between the protonated and nonprotonated forms of the nitroxide. However, any chemical equilibrium involving charged species, such as ionization of acids and bases, and so the reversible protonation of the nitroxide, is known to be affected by an ionic strength of the solution. Currently, only scarce data for the effect of the solution ionic strength on the experimental pK a's of the ionizable nitroxides can be found in the literature. Here we have carried out a series of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance titration experiments for aqueous solutions of 2,2,3,4,5,5-hexamethylimidazolidin-1-oxyl (HMI) nitroxide known for one of the largest differences in the isotropic nitrogen hyperfine coupling constant A iso between the protonated and nonprotonated forms. Electrolyte concentration was varied over an exceptionally large range (i.e., from 0.05 to 5.0 M) to elucidate the effect of ionic strength on the ionization constant of this pH-sensitive Electron

  7. Spectrophotometric determination of acidity constants of salicylaldoxime in aqueous solution at 25 °C and ionic strength of 0.5 M controlled with NaCl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tshuma, Joel; Alarcón-Ángeles, Georgina; Palacios-Beas, Elia; Vargas-García, Roberto; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto

    2007-04-01

    The equilibrium constants of salicylaldoxime in water at 25 °C, 0.5 M of ionic strength with NaCl and concentration of 1 × 10 -4 M were determined spectrophotometrically. The spectral data were processed using SQUAD program. The salicylaldoxime in acid medium has the value of p Ka1 = 1.224 ± 0.027. In alkaline medium the salicylaldoxime has the values of p Ka2 = 8.551 ± 0.024 and p Ka3 = 11.728 ± 0.016.

  8. Smart Macroporous IPN Hydrogels Responsive to pH, Temperature, and Ionic Strength: Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation of Controlled Release of Drugs.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Ecaterina Stela; Cocarta, Ana Irina

    2016-05-18

    Fast responsive macroporous interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) hydrogels were fabricated in this work by a sequential strategy, as follows: the first network, consisting of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEM) cross-linked with N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BAAm), was prepared at -18 °C, the second network consisting of poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) cross-linked with BAAm, being also generated by cryogelation technique. Both single network cryogels (SNC) and IPN cryogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and water uptake. The presence of weak polycation PDMAEM endows the SNCs and the IPNs cryogels with sensitivity at numerous external stimuli such as pH, temperature, ionic strength, electric field, among which the first three were investigated in this work. It was found that the initial concentration of monomers in both networks was the key factor in tailoring the properties of IPN cryogels such as swelling kinetics, equilibrium water content (EWC), phase transition temperature and the response at ionic strength. The pore size increased after the formation of the second network, the swelling kinetics in pure water being comparable with that of the SNC, phase transition temperature being situated in the range 35-36 °C for IPN cryogels. The water uptake at equilibrium (WUeq) abruptly increased at pH < 3.0 in the case of SNCs, whereas the response of IPN cryogels at the decrease of pH from 6.0 to 1.0 was strongly dependent on the gel structure, the values of WUeq being lower at a higher concentration of DMAEM in the first network, the monomer concentration in the second network being about 10 wt %. The pH response was very much diminished when the monomer concentration was high in both networks (15 wt % in the first network, and 21 wt % in the second network). The increase of the ionic strength from 0 up to 0.3 M NaCl led to the decrease of the WUeq, for all cryogels, the level of dehydration

  9. Dynamic bending rigidity of a 200-bp DNA in 4 mM ionic strength: a transient polarization grating study.

    PubMed Central

    Naimushin, A N; Fujimoto, B S; Schurr, J M

    2000-01-01

    DNA may exhibit three different kinds of bends: 1) permanent bends; 2) slowly relaxing bends due to fluctuations in a prevailing equilibrium between differently curved secondary conformations; and 3) rapidly relaxing dynamic bends within a single potential-of-mean-force basin. The dynamic bending rigidity (kappa(d)), or equivalently the dynamic persistence length, P(d) = kappa(d)/k(B)T, governs the rapidly relaxing bends, which are responsible for the flexural dynamics of DNA on a short time scale, t < or = 10(-5) s. However, all three kinds of bends contribute to the total equilibrium persistence length, P(tot), according to 1/P(tot) congruent with 1/P(pb) + 1/P(sr) + 1/P(d), where P(pb) is the contribution of the permanent bends and P(sr) is the contribution of the slowly relaxing bends. Both P(d) and P(tot) are determined for the same 200-bp DNA in 4 mM ionic strength by measuring its optical anisotropy, r(t), from 0 to 10 micros. Time-resolved fluorescence polarization anisotropy (FPA) measurements yield r(t) for DNA/ethidium complexes (1 dye/200 bp) from 0 to 120 ns. A new transient polarization grating (TPG) experiment provides r(t) for DNA/methylene blue complexes (1 dye/100 bp) over a much longer time span, from 20 ns to 10 micros. Accurate data in the very tail of the decay enable a model-independent determination of the relaxation time (tau(R)) of the end-over-end tumbling motion, from which P(tot) = 500 A is estimated. The FPA data are used to obtain the best-fit pairs of P(d) and torsion elastic constant (alpha) values that fit those data equally well, and which are used to eliminate alpha as an independent variable. When the relevant theory is fitted to the entire TPG signal (S(t)), the end-over-end rotational diffusion coefficient is fixed at its measured value and alpha is eliminated in favor of P(d). Neither a true minimum in chi-squared nor a satisfactory fit could be obtained for P(d) anywhere in the range 500-5000 A, unless an adjustable

  10. Effect of phosphate-buffered saline on push-out bond strength of a new bioceramic sealer to root canal dentin

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Hoseini, Atefeh; Gorjestani, Hedayat; Raoof, Maryam; Assadian, Hadi; Shamshiri, Ahmad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare push-out bond strength of a new bioceramic endodontic sealer, EndoSequence BC sealer (Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA), used with gutta-percha in the presence or absence of phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) within the root canals. Materials and Methods: Forty single-rooted human teeth were prepared and randomly divided into four groups. Samples in groups 1 and 2 were dried, but those in groups 3 and 4 were moistened with PBS before obturation. All root canals were obturated with gutta-percha/EndoSequence BC sealer. The specimens were stored in PBS for 7 days in groups 1 and 3 and for 2 months in groups 2 and 4. Push-out bond strength values and failure modes were evaluated. The data on push-out bond strength were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results: The mean value for the bond strength of the obturation material in moistened canals was significantly higher than that in dried ones at 1 week (P = 0.00). Contrarily, there was no significant difference between dried and moistened root canals at 2 months (P = 0.61). In dried canals, bond strength increased significantly with time but in moistened ones, the difference was not significant. Inspection of the specimens revealed the bond failure to be mainly cohesive for all groups. Conclusion: The presence of PBS within the root canals increased the bond strength of EndoSequence BC sealer/gutta-percha at 1 week. However, no difference was found between the bond strength of EndoSequence BC sealer/gutta-percha in the presence or absence of PBS in the root canals at 2 months. PMID:23559925

  11. The effect of Ca2+ ions and ionic strength on Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. SG-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese(IV) oxides, believed to form primarily through microbial activities, are extremely important mineral phases in marine environments where they scavenge a variety of trace elements and thereby control their distributions. The presence of various ions common in seawater are known to influence Mn oxide mineralogy yet little is known about the effect of these ions on the kinetics of bacterial Mn(II) oxidation and Mn oxide formation. We examined factors affecting bacterial Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. strain SG-1 in natural and artificial seawater of varying ionic conditions. Ca2+ concentration dramatically affected Mn(II) oxidation, while Mg2+, Sr2+, K+, Na+ and NO3- ions had no effect. The rate of Mn(II) oxidation at 10 mM Ca2+ (seawater composition) was four or five times that without Ca2+. The relationship between Ca2+ content and oxidation rate demonstrates that the equilibrium constant is small (on the order of 0.1) and the binding coefficient is 0.5. The pH optimum for Mn(II) oxidation changed depending on the amount of Ca2+ present, suggesting that Ca2+ exerts a direct effect on the enzyme perhaps as a stabilizing bridge between polypeptide components. We also examined the effect of varying concentrations of NaCl or KNO3 (0-2000 mM) on the kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation in solutions containing 10 mM Ca2+. Mn(II) oxidation was unaffected by changes in ionic strength (I) below 0.2, but it was inhibited by increasing salt concentrations above this value. Our results suggest that the critical coagulation concentration is around 200 mM of salt (I = ca. 0.2), and that the ionic strength of seawater (I > 0.2) accelerates the precipitation of Mn oxides around the spores. Under these conditions, the aggregation of Mn oxides reduces the supply of dissolved O2 and/or Mn2+ and inhibits the Mn(II) → Mn(III) step controlling the enzymatic oxidation of Mn(II). Our results suggest that the hardness and ionic strength of the aquatic environment

  12. Light-induced changes in H+ binding to the purple membrane. Effect of pH, light, temperature, and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Renthal, R

    1981-11-25

    Under continuous illumination, isolated planar sheets of purple membrane from Halobacterium halobium acidify the surroundings at alkaline pH. This light-induced change in H+ binding to the purple membrane (delta h) was studied by differential titration under varying conditions of pH, temperature, ionic strength, salt composition, light intensity, and wavelength. A maximum acidification was found between pH 9 and 10, with delta h less at neutral or more alkaline pH, consistent with a previously proposed three-state model. The light intensity and wavelength dependence also support this model. The temperature dependence of delta h, interpreted in terms of the three-state model, is anomalous. The apparent enthalpy of proton dissociation (delta H0) is -6 kcal/mol, a value of opposite sign to the expected delta H0 for a group of pK = 10. The apparent activation energy (Ea) for proton uptake is 14 kcal/mol in 15 mM NaCl and 18 kcal/mol in 3 M KCl, 5 to 10 times too large for a diffusion-limited proton transfer reaction from water. However, both delta H0 and Ea are consistent with conformational changes linked to light-independent proton dissociation and pump-dependent proton uptake. An increase in ionic strength increases delta h. This effect is shown to be quantitatively explained by a high negative electrostatic surface potential, which accumulates protons in a diffuse electrical double layer.

  13. Modulation of the metarhodopsin I/metarhodopsin II equilibrium of bovine rhodopsin by ionic strength--evidence for a surface-charge effect.

    PubMed

    Delange, F; Merkx, M; Bovee-Geurts, P H; Pistorius, A M; Degrip, W J

    1997-01-15

    The effects of ionic strength on formation and decay of metarhodopsin II (MII), the active photointermediate of bovine rhodopsin, were studied in the native membrane environment by means of ultraviolet/ visible and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. By increasing the concentration of KCl in the range from hypotonic to 4 M, the apparent pKa of the metarhodopsin I(MI)/MII equilibrium is shifted by approximately pH three, in favor of the MII intermediate. In addition, the apparent rate of MII formation is enhanced by an increase in ionic strength (about twofold in the presence of 2 M KCl). MIII decay is independent of the salt concentration. Attenuated-total-reflectance/FTIR data show that the high-salt conditions have no effect on the rigidity of the membrane matrix and do not induce structural changes in the intermediates themselves. Different salts were tested for their ability to shift the MI/MII equilibrium; however, no clear ion dependence was observed. We interpret these results as an indication for direct involvement of the cytosolic surface charge in the regulation of the photochemical activity of bovine rhodopsin.

  14. Solubility and modeling acid-base properties of adrenaline in NaCl aqueous solutions at different ionic strengths and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bretti, Clemente; Cigala, Rosalia Maria; Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Vianelli, Giuseppina

    2015-10-12

    Solubility and acid-base properties of adrenaline were studied in NaCl aqueous solutions at different ionic strengths (0ionic strength was modeled by means of the Debye-Hückel type equation and of the SIT (Specific ion Interaction Theory) approach. The specific interaction parameters of the ion pairs were also reported. For the protonation constants, the following thermodynamic values at infinite dilution were obtained: T=298.15 K, logK1(H0)=10.674±0.018 and logK2(H0)=8.954±0.022; T=310.15K, logK1(H0)=10.355±0.018 and logK2(H0)=8.749±0.030. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of pH, soil humic/fulvic acid, ionic strength, foreign ions and addition sequences on adsorption of Pb(II) onto GMZ bentonite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suowei; Hu, Jun; Li, Jiaxing; Dong, Yunhui

    2009-08-15

    This work contributed to the adsorption of Pb(II) onto GMZ bentonite in the absence and presence of soil humic acid (HA)/fulvic acid (FA) using a batch technique. The influences of pH from 2 to 12, ionic strengths from 0.004M to 0.05M NaNO(3), soil HA/FA concentrations from 1.6 mg/L to 20mg/L, foreign cations (Li+, Na+, K+), anions (Cl(-), NO(3)(-)), and addition sequences on the adsorption of Pb(II) onto GMZ bentonite were tested. The adsorption isotherms of Pb(II) were determined at pH 3.6+/-0.1 and simulated with the Langmuir, Freundlich, and D-R adsorption models, respectively. The results demonstrated that the adsorption of Pb(II) onto GMZ bentonite increased with increasing pH from 2 to 6. HA was shown to enhance Pb(II) adsorption at low pH, but to reduce Pb(II) adsorption at high pH, whereas FA was shown to decrease Pb(II) adsorption at pH from 2 to 11. The results also demonstrated that the adsorption was strongly dependent on ionic strength and slightly dependent on the concentration of HA/FA. The adsorption of Pb(II) onto GMZ bentonite was dependent on foreign ions in solution. The addition sequences of bentonite/Pb(II)/HA had no effect on the adsorption of Pb(II).

  16. Porcine gastric mucin (PGM) at the water/poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) interface: influence of pH and ionic strength on its conformation, adsorption, and aqueous lubrication properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seunghwan; Müller, Markus; Rezwan, Kurosch; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2005-08-30

    We have investigated the influence of pH and ionic strength on the conformation of porcine gastric mucin (PGM) in bulk aqueous solution, its adsorption behavior onto poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces, and its lubricating behavior upon the self-mated sliding contact of a PDMS tribopair by means of circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy (OWLS), and pin-on-disk tribometry, respectively. In a low-concentration regime (1 mg/mL), where the formation of a mucus-gel is generally excluded, PGM is still observed to exhibit effective aqueous lubricating properties under specific conditions of acidic pH and low ionic strength. This behavior was closely correlated with specific conformations in the bulk solution as well as specific adsorption behavior at the water/PDMS interface. The lubrication mechanism of the self-mated sliding contact of PDMS by means of surface modification with PGM is discussed in terms of isoviscous-elastic/soft-elastohydrodynamic lubrication (soft-EHL).

  17. Activity of endogenous muscle proteases from 4 Australian underutilized fish species as affected by ionic strength, pH, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zeinab; Donkor, Osaana N; Street, Wayne A; Vasiljevic, Todor

    2013-12-01

    Storage conditions may influence the hydrolytic activity of endogenous muscle enzymes postmortem, rate of autolysis of myofibrillar proteins, and biological properties of hydrolyzed end products. This study investigated the effect of ionic strength, pH, and temperature on the activity of endogenous calpain-like, cathepsins B and B+L measured in crude extract obtained from deepwater flathead, silver warehou, ribaldo, and ribbonfish muscles. Activity of calpain-like enzymes in 3 examined species was significantly higher at pH 6.5 than pH 6.0 or 5.5. Raising the reaction temperature increased (P < 0.05) calpain-like activity in ribaldo. Endogenous activity of cathepsin B in ribbonfish and silver warehou declined significantly with increasing ionic strength at pH 6.5 to 6.0. The obtained results will further expand our understanding of the impact that postmortem storage conditions have on the activity of endogenous fish proteases with respect to quality and bioactivity of fish proteins and potentially diversify utilization of underutilized fish species. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. An Aqueous Thermodynamic Model for the Complexation of Sodium and Strontium with Organic Chelates valid to High Ionic Strength. I. Ethylenedinitrilotetraacetic acid (EDTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Mason, Marvin J.

    2003-04-01

    An aqueous thermodynamic model is developed, which accurately describes the effects of Na+ complexation, ionic strength, carbonate concentration, and temperature on the complexation of Sr2+ by ethylenedinitrilotetraacetic acid (EDTA) under basic conditions. The model is developed from the analysis of literature data on apparent equilibrium constants, enthalpies, and heat capacities; as well as on an extensive set of solubility data on SrCO3(c) in the presence of EDTA obtained as part of this study. The solubility data for SrCO3(c) were obtained in solutions ranging in Na2CO3 concentration from 0.01m to 1.8m, in NaNO3 concentration from 0 to 5m, and at temperatures extending to 75?C. The final aqueous thermodynamic model is based upon the equations of Pitzer and requires the inclusion of a NaEDTA3- species. An accurate model for the ionic strength dependence of the ion-interaction coefficients for the SrEDTA2- and NaEDTA3- aqueous species allows the extrapolation of standard state equilibrium constants for these species which are significantly different from the 0.1m reference state values available in the literature. The final model is tested by application to chemical systems containing competing metal ions (i.e., Ca2+) to further verify the proposed model and indicate the applicability of the model parameters to chemical systems containing other divalent metal-EDTA complexes.

  19. Forces of interactions between bare and polymer-coated iron and silica: effect of pH, ionic strength, and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Pensini, Erica; Sleep, Brent E; Yip, Christopher M; O'Carroll, Denis

    2012-12-18

    The interactions between a silica substrate and iron particles were investigated using atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy (AFM). The micrometer- and nanosized iron particles employed were either bare or coated with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), a polymer utilized to stabilize iron particle suspensions. The effect of water chemistry on the forces of interaction was probed by varying ionic strength (with 100 mM NaCl and 100 mM CaCl₂) or pH (4, 5.5, and 8) or by introducing 10 mg/L of humic acids (HA). When particles were uncoated, the forces upon approach between silica and iron were attractive at pH 4 and 5.5 and in 100 mM CaCl₂ at pH 8, but they were negligible in 100 mM NaCl buffered to pH 8 and repulsive in water buffered to pH 8 and in HA solutions. HA produced electrosteric repulsion between iron particles and silica, likely due to its sorption to iron particles. HA sorption to silica was excluded on the basis of experiments conducted with a quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Repulsion with CMC-coated iron was attributed to electrosteric forces, which were damped at high ionic strength. An extended DLVO model and a modified version of Ohshima's theory were successfully utilized to model AFM data.

  20. Effect of the interfacial tension and ionic strength on the thermodynamic barrier associated to the benzocaine insertion into a cell membrane.

    PubMed

    López Cascales, J J; Oliveira Costa, S D

    2013-02-01

    The insertion of local anaesthetics into a cell membrane is a key aspect for explaining their activity at a molecular level. It has been described how the potency and response time of local anaesthetics is improved (for clinical applications) when they are dissolved in a solution of sodium bicarbonate. With the aim of gaining insight into the physico-chemical principles that govern the action mechanism of these drugs at a molecular level, simulations of benzocaine in binary lipid bilayers formed by DPPC/DPPS were carried out for different ionic strengths of the aqueous solution. From these molecular dynamic simulations, we observed how the thermodynamic barrier associated with benzocaine insertion into the lipid bilayers diminished exponentially as the fraction of DPPS in the bilayer increased, especially when the ionic strength of the aqueous solution increased. In line with these results, we also observed how this thermodynamic barrier diminished exponentially with the phospholipid/water interfacial tension. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of pH and ionic strength modifications on thermal denaturation of the 11S globulin of sunflower (Helianthus annuus).

    PubMed

    Molina, María Isabel; Petruccelli, Silvana; Añón, María Cristina

    2004-09-22

    Helianthinin, the main storage protein of sunflowers, has low water solubility and does not form a gel when heated; this behavior is different from other 11S globulins and limits its food applications. To understand this particular behavior, changes on helianthinin association-dissociation state induced by modifications in pH and ionic strength were analyzed. The influence of these different medium conditions on its thermal stability and tendency to form aggregates was also studied. Helianthinin behavior at different pH values and ionic strengths is similar to other 11S globulins except that it remains in a trimeric form at pH 11. Helianthinin thermal stability is higher than other 11S globulins but is lower than oat 11S globulin. Alkaline pH produces a 10 degrees C decrease of its denaturation temperature and also of the cooperativity of denaturation process, but it does not affect the denaturation activation energy. The decrease in thermal stability with the pH increase is also manifested by its tendency to form aggregates by SH/SS interchange reactions. When thermal treatments at alkaline pH are performed, all helianthinin subunits form aggregates, characterized by a higher proportion of beta-polypeptides than alpha-polypeptides, which is an indication that aggregation is accompanied by dissociation. Treatments at 80 degrees C are sufficient to induce aggregation but not to produce denaturation, and in these conditions hexameric forms remain after the treatment.

  2. Sorption properties of Th(IV) on the raw diatomite--effects of contact time, pH, ionic strength and temperature.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Guodong; Hu, Jun; Wang, Xiangke

    2008-10-01

    Diatomite has a number of unique physicochemical properties and has diversified industrial uses. Natural diatomite has been tested as a potential sorbent for the removal of Th(IV) from aqueous solutions. The results indicate that sorption of Th(IV) is strongly dependent on ionic strength at pH<3, and is independent of ionic strength at pH>3. Outer-sphere complexation or ion exchange may be the main sorption mechanism of Th(IV) to diatomite at low pH values, whereas the sorption of Th(IV) at pH>3 is mainly dominated by inner-sphere complexation or precipitation. The competition for Th(IV) between aqueous or surface adsorbed anions (e.g., herein ClO(4)(-), NO(3)(-) and Cl(-)) and surface functional groups of diatomite is important for Th(IV) sorption. The thermodynamic data (DeltaH(0), DeltaS(0), DeltaG(0)) are calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms. The results suggest that sorption process of Th(IV) on diatomite is spontaneous and endothermic.

  3. Ionic strength and composition govern the elasticity of biological membranes. A study of model DMPC bilayers by force- and transmission IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Šegota, Suzana; Vojta, Danijela; Pletikapić, Galja; Baranović, Goran

    2015-02-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the ion mixture effect of seawater (SW), particularly the contribution of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) as dominant divalent cations, on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-posphocholine (DMPC) bilayers. The changed character of the main transition at 24 °C from sharp to gradual in films and the 1 °C shift of the main transition temperature in dispersions reflect the interactions of lipid headgroups with the ions in SW. Force spectroscopy was used to quantify the nanomechanical hardness of a DMPC supported lipid bilayer (SLB). Considering the electrostatic and ion binding equilibrium contributions while systematically probing the SLB in various salt solutions, we showed that ionic strength had a decisive influence on its nanomechanics. The mechanical hardness of DMPC SLBs in the liquid crystalline phase linearly increases with the increasing fraction of all ion-bound lipids in a series of monovalent salt solutions. It also linearly increases in the gel phase but almost three times faster (the corresponding slopes are 4.9 nN/100 mM and 13.32 nN/100 mM, respectively). We also showed that in the presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) the bilayer mechanical hardness was unproportionally increased, and that was accompanied with the decrease of Na(+) ion and increase of Cl(-) ion bound lipids. The underlying process is a cooperative and competitive ion binding in both the gel and the liquid crystalline phase. Bilayer hardness thus turned out to be very sensitive to ionic strength as well as to ionic composition of the surrounding medium. In particular, the indicated correlation helped us to emphasize the colligative properties of SW as a naturally occurring complex ion mixture.

  4. Effects of ionic strength and sulfate upon thermal aggregation of grape chitinases and thaumatin-like proteins in a model system.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Matteo; Sauvage, Francois-Xavier; Waters, Elizabeth J; Vernhet, Aude

    2011-03-23

    Consumers expect white wines to be clear. During the storage of wines, grape proteins can aggregate to form haze. These proteins, particularly chitinases and thaumatin-like proteins (TL-proteins), need to be removed, and this is done through adsorption by bentonite, an effective but inefficient wine-processing step. Alternative processes are sought, but, for them to be successful, an in-depth understanding of the causes of protein hazing is required. This study investigated the role played by ionic strength (I) and sulfate toward the aggregation of TL-proteins and chitinases upon heating. Purified proteins were dissolved in model wine and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The effect of I on protein aggregation was investigated within the range from 2 to 500 mM/L. For chitinases, aggregation occurred during heating with I values of 100 and 500 mM/L, depending on the isoform. This aggregation immediately led to the formation of large particles (3 μm, visible haze after cooling). TL-protein aggregation was observed only with I of 500 mM/L; it mainly developed during cooling and led to the formation of finite aggregates (400 nm) that remained invisible. With sulfate in the medium chitinases formed visible haze immediately when heat was applied, whereas TL-proteins aggregated during cooling but not into particles large enough to be visible to the naked eye. The data show that the aggregation mechanisms of TL-proteins and chitinases are different and are influenced by the ionic strength and ionic content of the model wine. Under the conditions used in this study, chitinases were more prone to precipitate and form haze than TL-proteins.

  5. Characterization and antifungal activity of gazyumaru (Ficus microcarpa) latex chitinases: both the chitin-binding and the antifungal activities of class I chitinase are reinforced with increasing ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Taira, Toki; Ohdomari, Atsuko; Nakama, Naoya; Shimoji, Makiko; Ishihara, Masanobu

    2005-04-01

    Three chitinases, designated gazyumaru latex chitinase (GLx Chi)-A, -B, and -C, were purified from the latex of gazyumaru (Ficus microcarpa). GLx Chi-A,-B, and -C are an acidic class III (33 kDa, pI 4.0), a basic class I (32 kDa, pI 9.3), and a basic class II chitinase (27 kDa, pI > 10) respectively. GLx Chi-A did not exhibit any antifungal activity. At low ionic strength, GLx Chi-C exhibited strong antifungal activity, to a similar extent as GLx Chi-B. The antifungal activity of GLx Chi-C became weaker with increasing ionic strength, whereas that of GLx Chi-B became slightly stronger. GLx Chi-B and -C bound to the fungal cell-walls at low ionic strength, and then GLx Chi-C was dissociated from them by an escalation of ionic strength, but this was not the case for GLx Chi-B. The chitin-binding activity of GLx Chi-B was enhanced by increasing ionic strength. These results suggest that the chitin-binding domain of basic class I chitinase binds to the chitin in fungal cell walls by hydrophobic interaction and assists the antifungal action of the chitinase.

  6. Salt-tolerant rootstock increases yield of pepper under salinity through maintenance of photosynthetic performance and sinks strength.

    PubMed

    Penella, Consuelo; Landi, Marco; Guidi, Lucia; Nebauer, Sergio G; Pellegrini, Elisa; San Bautista, Alberto; Remorini, Damiano; Nali, Cristina; López-Galarza, Salvador; Calatayud, Angeles

    2016-04-01

    The performance of a salt-tolerant pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) accession (A25) utilized as a rootstock was assessed in two experiments. In a first field experiment under natural salinity conditions, we observed a larger amount of marketable fruit (+75%) and lower Blossom-end Root incidence (-31%) in commercial pepper cultivar Adige (A) grafted onto A25 (A/A25) when compared with ungrafted plants. In order to understand this behavior a second greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine growth, mineral partitioning, gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters, antioxidant systems and proline content in A and A/A25 plants under salinity conditions (80 mM NaCl for 14 days). Salt stress induced significantly stunted growth of A plants (-40.6% of leaf dry weight) compared to the control conditions, while no alterations were observed in A/A25 at the end of the experiment. Accumulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) in leaves and roots was similar in either grafted or ungrafted plants. Despite the activation of protective mechanisms (increment of superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase activity and non-photochemical quenching), A plants showed severely reduced photosynthetic CO2 assimilation (-45.6% of AN390) and substantial buildup of malondialdehyde (MDA) by-product, suggesting the inability to counteract salt-triggered damage. In contrast, A/A25 plants, which had a constitutive enhanced root apparatus, were able to maintain the shoot and root growth under salinity conditions by supporting the maintained photosynthetic performance. No increases in catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities were observed in response to salinity, and MDA levels increased only slightly; indicating that alleviation of oxidative stress did not occur in A/A25 plants. In these plants the increased proline levels could protect enzymatic stability from salt-triggered damage, preserving the photosynthetic performance. The results could indicate that salt stress was vanished by

  7. Drug release from E chemistry hypromellose tablets using the Bio-Dis USP type III apparatus: An evaluation of the effect of systematic agitation and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Asare-Addo, Kofi; Supuk, Enes; Mahdi, Mohammed H; Adebisi, Adeola O; Nep, Elijah; Conway, Barbara R; Kaialy, Waseem; Al-Hamidi, Hiba; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of systematic agitation, increasing ionic strength and gel strength on drug release from a gel-forming matrix (HPMC E10M, E4M and E50LV) using USP type III Bio-Dis apparatus with theophylline as a model drug. The triboelectric charging; particle sizing, water content, true density and SEM of all the hypromellose grades, theophylline and formulated blends were characterised. The results showed that balanced inter-particulate forces exist between drug particles and the excipient surface and this enabled optimum charge to mass ratio to be measured. Agitation and ionic strength affected drug release from E50LV and E4M tablet matrices in comparison to the E10M tablet matrices. Drug release increased substantially when water was used as the dissolution media relative to media at pH 1.2 (containing 0.4M NaCl). The results showed all f2 values for the E10M tablet matrices were above 50 suggesting the drug release from these tablet matrices to be similar. Rheological data also explained the different drug release behaviour with the stress required to yield/erode being 1Pa, 150Pa, and 320Pa, for the E50LV, E4M and E10M respectively. The stiffness of the gel was also found to be varied from 2.5Pa, 176.2Pa and 408.3Pa for the E50LV, E4M and E10M respectively. The lower G' value can be explained by a softer gel being formed after tablet introduction into the dissolution media thereby indicating faster drug release.

  8. Colloid transport in porous media: impact of hyper-saline solutions.

    PubMed

    Magal, Einat; Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Walker, Sharon L; Yakirevich, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    The transport of colloids suspended in natural saline solutions with a wide range of ionic strengths, up to that of Dead Sea brines (10(0.9) M) was explored. Migration of microspheres through saturated sand columns of different sizes was studied in laboratory experiments and simulated with mathematical models. Colloid transport was found to be related to the solution salinity as expected. The relative concentration of colloids at the columns outlet decreased (after 2-3 pore volumes) as the solution ionic strength increased until a critical value was reached (ionic strength > 10(-1.8) M) and then remained constant above this level of salinity. The colloids were found to be mobile even in the extremely saline brines of the Dead Sea. At such high ionic strength no energetic barrier to colloid attachment was presumed to exist and colloid deposition was expected to be a favorable process. However, even at these salinity levels, colloid attachment was not complete and the transport of ∼ 30% of the colloids through the 30-cm long columns was detected. To further explore the deposition of colloids on sand surfaces in Dead Sea brines, transport was studied using 7-cm long columns through which hundreds of pore volumes were introduced. The resulting breakthrough curves exhibited a bimodal shape whereby the relative concentration (C/C(0)) of colloids at the outlet rose to a value of 0.8, and it remained relatively constant (for the ∼ 18 pore volumes during which the colloid suspension was flushed through the column) and then the relative concentration increased to a value of one. The bimodal nature of the breakthrough suggests different rates of colloid attachment. Colloid transport processes were successfully modeled using the limited entrapment model, which assumes that the colloid attachment rate is dependent on the concentration of the attached colloids. Application of this model provided confirmation of the colloid aggregation and their accelerated attachment during

  9. Development of a robust ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction against high concentration of salt for preconcentration of trace metals in saline aqueous samples: application to the determination of Pb and Cd.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2010-06-11

    A new ionic liquid-based dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method was developed for preconcentration and determination of compounds in aqueous samples containing very high salt concentrations. This method can solve the problems associated with the limited application of the conventional IL-based DLLME in these samples. This is believed to arise from dissolving of the ionic liquids in aqueous samples with high salt content. In this method, the robustness of microextraction system against high salt concentration (up to 40%, w/v) is increased by introducing a common ion of the ionic liquid into the sample solution. The proposed method was applied satisfactorily to the preconcentration of lead and cadmium in saline samples. After preconcentration, the settled IL-phase was dissolved in 100 microL ethanol and aspirated into the flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS) using a home-made microsample introduction system. Several variables affecting the microextraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions and preconcentration of only 10 mL of sample, the enhancement factors of 273 and 311 and the detection limits of 0.6 microg L(-1) and 0.03 microg L(-1) were obtained for lead and cadmium, respectively. Validation of the method was performed by both an analysis of a certified reference material (CRM) and comparison of results with those obtained by ISO standard method.

  10. Humic Acid Effects on the Transport of Colloidal Particles in Unsaturated Porous Media: Humic Acid Dosage, pH, and Ionic Strength Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, V. L.; Gao, B.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    Soil colloids and biocolloids can facilitate contaminant transport within the soil profile through the complexation of pollutants previously thought to have limited mobility. Dissolved organic substances are qualitatively known to alter the behavior of colloids and surface chemistry of soil particles in aquatic environments when adsorbed to their surfaces. Specifically, it has been observed that even small amounts of adsorbed humic acids result in a pronounced increase in colloid mobility in saturated porous systems, presumably by a combination of electrostatic and steric stabilization. However, the degree to which adsorbed humic acids stabilize colloidal suspension is highly sensitive to the system's solution chemistry; mainly in terms of pH, ionic strength, and metal ions present. The objective of this study is to expound quantitatively on the role that combined stabilizing and destabilizing solution chemistry components have on humic acid-colloid transport in unsaturated media by isolating experimentally some underlying mechanisms that regulate colloid transport in realistic aquatic systems. We hypothesize that in chemically heterogeneous porous media, with ionic strength values above 0 and pH ranges from 4 to 9, the effect of humic acid on colloid suspensions cannot be simply characterized by increased stability and mobility. That a critical salt concentration must exists for a given humic acid concentration and pH, above which the network of humic acid collapses by forming coordination complexes with other suspended or adsorbed humic acids, thus increasing greatly the retention of colloids in the porous medium by sweep flocculation. In addition, capillary forces in unsaturated media may contribute further to overcome repulsive forces that prevent flocculation of humic acid-colloid complexes. The experimental work in this study will include: jar tests to determine critical solution concentration combinations for desired coagulation/flocculation rates, column

  11. Modeling cesium retention onto Na-, K- and Ca-smectite: Effects of ionic strength, exchange and competing cations on the determination of selectivity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missana, Tiziana; Benedicto, Ana; García-Gutiérrez, Miguel; Alonso, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Cesium (137Cs) retention onto three homoionic smectites (Na-, K- and Ca-smectite), obtained from natural Spanish FEBEX bentonite, was studied. Special emphasis was given to the analysis of non-linear sorption behaviour and the dependence of selectivity on the ionic strength. A very large set of experimental sorption data was generated from sorption tests under a wide range of pHs (2-11), ionic strengths (10-3 to 100 M), and radionuclide concentrations (10-10 to 10-3 M). The aqueous phase, in contact with the clay, was analysed to quantify the effects of the presence of trace aqueous ions on Cs retention. For all the exchanged clays, Cs sorption was non-linear and a two-site exchange model approach was adopted to interpret and model sorption data. Highly selective sites for Cs sorption (Type 1 sites, T1), resembling those present in micaceous materials, with very low capacity but controlling uptake of Cs at low concentration, were observed. The logarithm value of selectivity coefficients determined for Cs+ in respect to Na+, K+ and Ca2+ in these sites is: LogNaCsK(T1)=7.59±0.15,LogKCsK(T1)=5.15±0.15 and LogCaCsK(T1)=14.41±0.17, respectively. The exchange sites at the surface of smectite sheets (planar sites), with a capacity approximately equivalent to the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the clay, constitute the second type of sorption sites (Type 2 sites, T2). The logarithm of the selectivity coefficients determined for Cs+ with respect to Na+, K+ and Ca2+ is: LogNaCsK(T2)=1.68±0.15,LogKCsK(T2)=1.16±0.15LogCaCsK(T2)=3.02± 0.15, respectively. The analysis of the dependence of sorption values on the ionic strength clearly indicated that for a correct interpretation of data, competition effects of trace ions in solution must be always accounted for. Data obtained in this work and performed analyses are basic to explain the behaviour of raw FEBEX bentonite, and other smectite-based clay materials, under more complex experimental conditions.

  12. Deposition and Release Behaviour of ZnO Nanoparticles in Saturated Quartz Sand: Role of Biofilm, Ionic Strength, and pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gukhwa; Han, Yosep; Kim, Donghyun; Bradford, Scott A.; Lee, Byoungcheun; Eom, Igchun; Kim, Pil Je; Choi, Siyoung Q.; Lee, Youngsoo; Kim, Hyunjung

    2015-04-01

    The influence of biofilm, ionic strength, and pH on the deposition and release behavior of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) was systematically investigated in well-controlled saturated sand column. The results for the initial transport of the ZnO-NPs at pH 9 showed significant retention at the inlet of the column with hyper-exponential retention profiles regardless of solution ionic strength investigated (0.1 and 10 mM) and Pseudomonas putida biofilm coating; however, the increase in solution ionic strength and the presence of biofilm onto quartz sand tended to increase the retention of ZnO-NPs. The trend was likely attributed to more favorable NPs-NPs interaction and greater surface roughness, respectively. The results were well supported by the DLVO interaction energy profiles and Electron Microscopic observations. For the release tests, particle free solution at pH 6 was continuously injected into the column with the ZnO-NPs retained during the initial transport tests. The results for breakthrough curves and time-lapsed retention profiles showed that reducing solution pH led to the release of large amount of the initially retained ZnO-NPs, and the release rate was observed to be greater for bare silica than biofilm-coated sand. The release of ZnO-NPs was likely attributed to the dissolution of Zn2+ due to the change of pH. The proposed mechanism was further verified by conducting additional column tests at higher pHs (pH 9 and 10), which showed significantly reduced release of ZnO-NPs, and even nearly no release at pH 10. The findings from this study suggests that there exists high potential of complete transport of ZnO-NPs into groundwater in that the pH of various soil environments typically ranges from 5 to 9. This work was supported by the National Institute of Environmental Research, Ministry of Environment and the Energy Efficiency & Resources Core Technology Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP), granted

  13. Influence of fluoridation on the strength of superplastic Zn-21Al-2Cu alloy deformed in a saline medium

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde-Torres, J.; Torres-Villasenor, G.; Sandoval-Jimenez, A.

    1999-04-09

    The interest in Zi-Al-Cu alloys has intensified in recent years because they possess the highest known yield strengths among the entire series of Zn-Al superplastic alloys. The superplastic materials are generally fine-grained materials and the deformation is associated with the grain boundary processes. Because of this, the superplastic alloys are exposed to a potential danger of intergranular stress corrosion cracking under susceptible service conditions. Consequently, the study of enhancing the strength and increasing the corrosion resistance of the material at room temperature is an important research area. Fluorine passivation technology of metal surfaces (fluoridation) has been proved to be very effective in the protection of several metals such as austenitic stainless steel and aluminum. In the present investigation the superplastic Zn-Al-Cu alloy has been studied to evaluate the effects of fluoridation and the stress corrosion damage.

  14. Inhibition of potato polyphenol oxidase by anions and activity in various carboxylate buffers (pH 4.8) at constant ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Malkin, B D; Thickman, K R; Markworth, C J; Wilcox, D E; Kull, F J

    2001-01-01

    The activity of potato polyphenol oxidase (tyrosinase) toward DL-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (K(M) 5.39 mM) was studied using a variety of carboxylate buffers at a common pH and ionic strength. Enzyme activity, greatest in citrate and least in oxalate, correlated with increasing carboxyl concentration and molecular mass. The lower activity in oxalate was attributed to more effective chelation of a copper(II) form of the enzyme by the oxalate dianion. Sodium halide salts inhibited the enzyme. Although there was little difference in inhibition between sodium and potassium salts, the degree and type of inhibition was anion dependent; K(is), values for NaCl and KCl, (competitive inhibitors) were 1.82 and 1.62 mM, whereas Na(2) SO(4) and K(2) SO(4) (mixed inhibitors) had K(is) and K(ii) values in the 250 to 450 mM range.

  15. Chloride salt type/ionic strength and refrigeration effects on antioxidant enzymes and lipid oxidation in cattle, camel and chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Gheisari, Hamid Reza; Motamedi, Hossien

    2010-10-01

    The effects of NaCl and KCl at varying ionic strengths on catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities and lipid oxidation in ground Longissimus dorsi (LD) of cattle and camel and breast muscle of chicken during refrigerated storage were studied. NaCl and KCl significantly increased 2-thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide values. TBARS and peroxide values increased and GSH-Px activity decreased during 4 day storage in the 4 degrees C, but catalase activity was stable. Salt type had no consistent effect on GSH-Px and catalase activities. Chicken samples had lower enzyme activities and TBARS content than cattle and camel. Their peroxide values were lower than camel samples. Camel meat showed higher catalase activity and TBARS content than cattle meat. Results indicated that negative correlation between lipid oxidation and GSH-Px activity and the accelerated lipid oxidation in salted meat may be partly related to a decrease in GSH-Px activity.

  16. Effect of pH, ionic strength, dissolved organic carbon, time, and particle size on metals release from mine drainage impacted streambed sediments.

    PubMed

    Butler, Barbara A

    2009-03-01

    Acid-mine drainage (AMD) input to a stream typically results in the stream having a reduced pH, increased concentrations of metals and salts, and decreased biological productivity. Removal and/or treatment of these AMD sources is desired to return the impacted stream(s) to initial conditions, or at least to conditions suitable for restoration of the aquatic ecosystem. Some expected changes in the water chemistry of the stream following removal of AMD input include an increase in pH, a decrease in ionic strength, and an increase in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations from increased biological activity in the absence of toxic metals concentrations. These changes in water chemistry may cause the existing contaminated bed sediments to become a source of metals to the stream water. Streambed sediments, collected from North Fork Clear Creek (NFCC), Colorado, currently impacted by AMD, were assessed for the effects of pH, ionic strength, DOC concentration, time, and particle size on metals release using a factorial design. The design included two levels for each chemical parameter (ionic strength = 40 and 80% lower than ambient; pH = 6 and 8; and DOC = 1 and 3 mg/l higher than ambient), ten sampling times (from zero to 48 h), and two size fractions of sediments (63 microm < or = x < 2 mm and < 63 microm). Greater concentrations of metals were released from the smaller sized sediments compared with the larger, with the exception of Cu. A mild acid digestion (0.6M HCl) evaluated the amount of each metal that could be removed easily from each of the sediment size fractions. Release of all metals over all time points, treatments, and from both sediment sizes was less than 1% of the extractable concentrations, with the exception of Mn, which ranged from 4 to 7% from the smaller sized sediment. Greater percentages of the 0.6M HCl-extractable concentrations of Cu, Fe, and Zn were released from the larger sized sediment, while this was true for release of Cd and Mn from

  17. Ionic strength- and temperature-induced K(Ca) shifts in the uncoating reaction of rotavirus strains RF and SA11: correlation with membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sandra; Lorrot, Mathie; El Azher, Mounia Alaoui; Vasseur, Monique

    2002-01-01

    The hydrodynamic diameters of native rotavirus particles, bovine RF and simian SA11 strains, were determined by quasielastic light scattering. By using this method and agarose gel electrophoresis, the Ca(2+) dissociation constant, K(Ca), governing the transition from triple-layer particles (TLPs) to double-layer particles (DLPs), was shown to increase, at constant pH, as the temperature and/or the ionic strength of the incubation medium increased. We report the novel observation that, under physiological conditions, K(Ca) values for both RF and SA11 rotaviruses were well above the intracytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentrations of various cells, which may explain why TLP uncoating takes place within vesicles (possibly endosomes) during the entry process. A correlation between TLP uncoating and cell membrane permeabilization was found, as shown by the release of carboxyfluorescein (CF) from CF-loaded intestinal brush-border membrane vesicles. Conditions stabilizing the virion in the TLP form inhibited CF release, whereas conditions favoring the TLP-to-DLP transformation activated this process. We conclude that membrane permeabilization must be preceded by the loss of the outer-capsid proteins from trypsinized TLP and that physiological ionic strength is required for permeabilization to take place. Finally, the paper develops an alternative explanation for the mechanism of rotavirus entry, compatible with the Ca(2+)-dependent endocytic pathway. We propose that there must be an iterative process involving tight coupling in time between the lowering of endosomal Ca(2+) concentration, virion decapsidation, and membrane permeabilization, which would cause the transcriptionally active DLPs to enter the cytoplasm of cells.

  18. Fluorescence anisotropy decay of ethidium bound to nucleosome core particles. 1. Rotational diffusion indicates an extended structure at low ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.; Libertini, L.J.; Small, E.W. )

    1991-05-28

    The fluorescence decay of ethidium intercalated into the DNA of nucleosome core particles increases in average lifetime from about 22 ns in H{sub 2}O to about 39 ns in D{sub 2}O. This increase, combined with the acquisiton of large amounts of data, allows measurement of anisotropy decays out to more than 350 ns. The overall slow rotational motions of the core particle may thereby be more clearly distinguished from the faster torsional motions of the DNA. In 10 mM NaCl at 20{degrees}C, the authors recover a long correlation time of 198 ns in D{sub 2}O (159 ns when corrected to a viscosity of 1.002 cP), in agreement with the value of 164 ns obtained in H{sub 2}O. These values are consistent with hydrodynamic calculations based on the expected size and shape of the hydrated particle. To support their conclusion that this long correlation time derives from Brownian rotational diffusion, they show that the value is directly proportional to the viscosity and inversely proportional to the temperature. No significant changes in the rotational correlation time are observed between 1 and 500 mM ionic strength. Below 1 mM, the particle undergoes the low-salt transition as measured by steady-state tyrosine fluorescence anisotropy. However, they observe little change in shape until the ionic strength is decreased below {approximately}0.2 mM, where the correlation time increases nearly 2-fold, indicating that the particle has opened up into an extended form. They have previously shown that the transition becomes nonreversible below 0.2 mM salt.

  19. Zn2+ and Sr2+ Adsorption at the TiO2 (110)-Electrolyte Interface: Influence of Ionic Strength, Coverage, and Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,Z.; Fenter, P.; Cheng, L.; Sturchio, N.; Bedzyk, M.; Machesky, M.; Anovitz, L.; Wesolowski, D.

    2006-01-01

    The X-ray standing wave technique was used to probe the sensitivity of Zn{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} ion adsorption to changes in both the adsorbed ion coverage and the background electrolyte species and concentrations at the rutile ({alpha}-TiO{sub 2}) (110)-aqueous interface. Measurements were made with various background electrolytes (NaCl, NaTr, RbCl, NaBr) at concentrations as high as 1 m. The results demonstrate that Zn{sub 2+} and Sr{sub 2+} reside primarily in the condensed layer and that the ion heights above the Ti-O surface plane are insensitive to ionic strength and the choice of background electrolyte (with <0.1 Angstroms changes over the full compositional range). The lack of any specific anion coadsorption upon probing with Br{sup -}, coupled with the insensitivity of Zn{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} cation heights to changes in the background electrolyte, implies that anions do not play a significant role in the adsorption of these divalent metal ions to the rutile (110) surface. Absolute ion coverage measurements for Zn{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} show a maximum Stern-layer coverage of {approx}0.5 monolayer, with no significant variation in height as a function of Stern-layer coverage. These observations are discussed in the context of Gouy-Chapman-Stern models of the electrical double layer developed from macroscopic sorption and pH-titration studies of rutile powder suspensions. Direct comparison between these experimental observations and the MUltiSIte Complexation (MUSIC) model predictions of cation surface coverage as a function of ionic strength revealed good agreement between measured and predicted surface coverages with no adjustable parameters.

  20. Lack of ionic strength effect in the recombination of hydrated electrons: (e -) aq + (e -) aq → 2(OH -) + H 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, K. H.; Bartels, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    We report measurements of the rate constant for bimolecular reaction between hydrated electrons in the presence of added inert salt. At 23°C, the rate constant is 6.0 × 10 9 M -1 s -1, virtually independent of added LiClO 4 up to 0.06 M concentration, where the Bronsted-Bjerrum equation would predict a 50% rate enhancement. However, the diffusion rate of ions is reduced by the additional friction from the ionic atmosphere. We demonstrate that for this peculiar diffusion-limited reaction the two effects counterbalance, producing almost no change in the reaction rate. Based on the large reaction distance and activation energy, it appears that a solvent-separated singlet pair of electrons is stable relative to kT.

  1. Effect of pH on the rheological and structural properties of gels of water-washed chicken-breast muscle at physiological ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y; Hultin, H O

    2001-08-01

    Adjustment of pH from 6.4 to neutrality improved gelling ability and water-holding capacity of twice water-washed, minced chicken-breast muscle significantly at physiological ionic strength, at which the majority of the myofibrillar proteins, including myosin, are not soluble. A strain value of 2.2 was obtained at neutral pH. Myofibrils were the main components of the gel network at both pH 6.4 and 7.0; however, the myofibrillar distribution varied with the pH value. At pH 6.4, myofibrils formed a network of localized aggregates leaving large voids between, whereas at neutral pH, an evenly distributed network of myofibrils was formed. In addition, at neutral pH, a network of fine strands was found within the network of myofibrils. The network was much less developed at pH 6.4. The thin and thick filaments within each myofibrillar structure were disorganized at both pH values. The intramyofibrillar spaces were larger at neutral pH than at pH 6.4. It was proposed that adjustment of pH to neutrality increased electrostatic repulsion leading to a more even distribution of the myofibrillar proteins, a key factor responsible for the improved gel strength and water-holding capacity.

  2. Effects of waterborne copper delivered under two different exposure and salinity regimes on osmotic and ionic regulation in the mudflat fiddler crab, Minuca rapax (Ocypodidae, Brachyura).

    PubMed

    Capparelli, Mariana V; McNamara, John C; Grosell, Martin

    2017-09-01

    The effects of exposure to copper (Cu) on tissue Cu accumulation, on hemolymph osmotic, Na(+) and Cl(-) regulation, and on gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and carbonic anhydrase (CA) activities were evaluated in the fiddler crab Minuca rapax. Waterborne copper was delivered to the crabs at one of three salinities (seawater at 25‰ salinity [S] = isosmotic control; distilled water [<0.1‰ S] = hypo-osmotic medium; or 60‰ S = hyper-osmotic seawater) either for 5 days in a 0.5-cm water film containing 0, 50, 150, 250 or 500µg Cu/L with free access to a dry surface, or in crabs fully submerged for 5h at 0, 250 or 500µg Cu/L. In the crabs with free access to a dry surface, the highest Cu concentrations were found in the hemolymph and hepatopancreas with some accumulation in the gills; accumulation in the hemolymph and gills was enhanced in low salinity but was salinity independent in the hepatopancreas. Osmotic regulation was unaffected by Cu exposure; however Na(+) and Cl(-) hypo- regulation was impaired by Cu in 25 and 60‰ S. Gill NKA activity was stimulated 2-fold at 50µg Cu/L and markedly inhibited at 150µg Cu/L and above in 0 and 25‰ S. Gill CA was inhibited in <0.1‰ S but stimulated in 25 and 60‰ S; an inverse concentration-CA activity response was seen above 150µg Cu/L for all salinities. In the submerged crabs, Cu accumulated in all tissues in 60‰ S; however, there was no clear-cut Cu concentration-accumulation relationship evident in any tissue for either exposure regime, likely owing to the crabs' ability to regulate Cu. Copper exposure diminished osmotic, [Na(+)] and [Cl(-)] hypo-regulatory ability, especially in higher salinities. Gill NKA activity was markedly inhibited by Cu overall, and particularly above 250µg Cu/L in <0.1‰ S. Gill CA activity was inhibited in 25‰ S but inconsistently affected in 0 and 60‰ S. These findings show that Minuca rapax is affected both physiologically and biochemically by Cu contamination, although to

  3. Capacitive Deionization of High-Salinity Solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Sharma, Ketki; Gabitto, Jorge; Mayes, Richard T.; ...

    2014-12-22

    Desalination of high salinity solutions has been studied using a novel experimental technique and a theoretical model. Neutron imaging has been employed to visualize lithium ions in mesoporous carbon materials, which are used as electrodes in capacitive deionization for water desalination. Experiments were conducted with a flow-through capacitive deionization cell designed for neutron imaging and with lithium chloride (6LiCl) as the electrolyte. Sequences of neutron images have been obtained at a relatively high concentration of lithium chloride (6LiCl) solution to provide information on the transport of ions within the electrodes. A new model that computes the individual ionic concentration profilesmore » inside mesoporous carbon electrodes has been used to simulate the capacitive deionization process. Modifications have also been introduced into the simulation model to calculate results at high electrolyte concentrations. Experimental data and simulation results provide insight into why capacitive deionization is not effective for desalination of high ionic-strength solutions. The combination of experimental information, obtained through neutron imaging, with the theoretical model will help in the design of capacitive deionization devices, which can improve the process for high ionic-strength solutions.« less

  4. Capacitive Deionization of High-Salinity Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Ketki; Gabitto, Jorge; Mayes, Richard T.; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Walker, Lakeisha M.H.; Dai, Sheng; Tsouris, Costas

    2014-12-22

    Desalination of high salinity solutions has been studied using a novel experimental technique and a theoretical model. Neutron imaging has been employed to visualize lithium ions in mesoporous carbon materials, which are used as electrodes in capacitive deionization for water desalination. Experiments were conducted with a flow-through capacitive deionization cell designed for neutron imaging and with lithium chloride (6LiCl) as the electrolyte. Sequences of neutron images have been obtained at a relatively high concentration of lithium chloride (6LiCl) solution to provide information on the transport of ions within the electrodes. A new model that computes the individual ionic concentration profiles inside mesoporous carbon electrodes has been used to simulate the capacitive deionization process. Modifications have also been introduced into the simulation model to calculate results at high electrolyte concentrations. Experimental data and simulation results provide insight into why capacitive deionization is not effective for desalination of high ionic-strength solutions. The combination of experimental information, obtained through neutron imaging, with the theoretical model will help in the design of capacitive deionization devices, which can improve the process for high ionic-strength solutions.

  5. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds.

  6. High Ionic Strength Depresses Muscle Contractility by Decreasing both Force per Cross-bridge and the Number of Strongly Attached Cross-bridges

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Bahadir, Anzel; Kawai, Masataka

    2015-01-01

    An increase in ionic strength (IS) lowers Ca2+ activated tension in muscle fibres, however, its molecular mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we used single rabbit psoas fibres to perform sinusoidal analyses. During Ca2+ activation, the effects of ligands (ATP, Pi, and ADP) at IS ranging 150 mM – 300 mM were studied on three rate constants to characterize elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle. The IS effects were studied because a change in IS modifies the inter- and intra-molecular interactions, hence they may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of force generation. Both the ATP binding affinity (K1) and the ADP binding affinity (K0) increased to 2-3x, and the Pi binding affinity (K5) decreased to 1/2, when IS was raised from 150 mM to 300 mM. The effect on ATP/ADP can be explained by stereospecific and hydrophobic interaction, and the effect on Pi can be explained by the electrostatic interaction with myosin. The increase in IS increased cross-bridge detachment steps (k2 and k−4), indicating that electrostatic repulsion promotes these steps. However, IS did not affect attachment steps (k−2 and k4). Consequently, the equilibrium constant of the detachment step (K2) increased by ~100%, and the force generation step (K4) decreased by ~30%. These effects together diminished the number of force-generating cross-bridges by 11%. Force/cross-bridge (T56) decreased by 26%, which correlates well with a decrease in the Debye length that limits the ionic atmosphere where ionic interactions take place. We conclude that the major effect of IS is a decrease in force/cross-bridge, but a decrease in the number of force generating cross-bridge also takes place. The stiffness during rigor induction did not change with IS, demonstrating that in-series compliance is not much affected by IS. PMID:25836331

  7. Salinization and Saline Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengosh, A.

    2003-12-01

    One of the most conspicuous phenomena of water-quality degradation, particularly in arid and semi-arid zones, is salinization of water and soil resources. Salinization is a long-term phenomenon, and during the last century many aquifers and river basins have become unsuitable for human consumption owing to high levels of salinity. Future exploitation of thousands of wells in the Middle East and in many other water-scarce regions in the world depends, to a large extent, on the degree and rate of salinization. Moreover, every year a large fraction of agricultural land is salinized and becomes unusable.Salinization is a global environmental phenomenon that affects many different aspects of our life (Williams, 2001a, b): changing the chemical composition of natural water resources (lakes, rivers, and groundwater), degrading the quality of water supply to the domestic and agriculture sectors, contribution to loss of biodiversity, taxonomic replacement by halotolerant species ( Williams, 2001a, b), loss of fertile soil, collapse of agricultural and fishery industries, changing of local climatic conditions, and creating severe health problems (e.g., the Aral Basin). The damage due to salinity in the Colorado River Basin alone, for example, ranges between 500 and 750 million per year and could exceed 1 billion per year if the salinity in the Imperial Dam increases from 700 mg L-1 to 900 mg L-1 (Bureau of Reclamation, 2003, USA). In Australia, accelerating soil salinization has become a massive environmental and economic disaster. Western Australia is "losing an area equal to one football oval an hour" due to spreading salinity ( Murphy, 1999). The annual cost for dryland salinity in Australia is estimated as AU700 million for lost land and AU$130 million for lost production ( Williams et al., 2002). In short, the salinization process has become pervasive.Salinity in water is usually defined by the chloride content (mg L-1) or total dissolved solids content (TDS, mg L-1or g

  8. Why continuum electrostatics theories cannot explain biological structure, polyelectrolytes or ionic strength effects in ion-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kim D

    2012-06-01

    Continuum electrostatics models for ions in water provide apparent long range electrostatic explanations for the forces on ions. However the electro-chemical free energy of solvation of ions resides largely in the first two water layers, which control the interfacial behavior of the ions and require explicit modeling to capture their distinctive behaviors. The resulting short range forces produce such surprising charge density-dependent behaviors as ion adsorption onto nonpolar surfaces, like charge aggregation of ions, and substantial ion pairing preferences, which arise largely from the affinity of specific ions for individual water molecules. Specific ion effects controlled by the local water affinity of the ion show a diagnostic change of sign between strongly hydrated Na(+) and weakly hydrated K(+) and between strongly hydrated F(-) and weakly hydrated Cl(-), in both cases marking the strength of water-water interactions in bulk solution, a critical benchmark missing from continuum electrostatics models. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A scale of metal ion binding strengths correlating with ionic charge, Pauling electronegativity, toxicity, and other physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Kinraide, Thomas B; Yermiyahu, Uri

    2007-09-01

    Equilibrium constants for binding to plant plasma membranes have been reported for several metal ions, based upon adsorption studies and zeta-potential measurements. LogK values for the ions are these: Al(3+), 4.30; La(3+), 3.34; Cu(2+), 2.60; Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), 1.48; Na(+) and K(+), 0 M(-1). These values correlate well with logK values for ion binding to many organic and inorganic ligands. LogK values for metal ion binding to 12 ligands were normalized and averaged to produce a scale for the binding of 49 ions. The scale correlates well with the values presented above (R(2)=0.998) and with ion binding to cell walls and other biomass. The scale is closely related to the charge (Z) and Pauling electronegativity (PE) of 48 ions (all but Hg(2+)); R(2)=0.969 for the equation (Scale values)=-1.68+Z(1.22+0.444PE). Minimum rhizotoxicity of metal ions appears to be determined by binding strengths: log a(PM,M)=1.60-2.41exp[0.238(Scale values)] determines the value of ion activities at the plasma membrane surface (a(PM,M)) that will ensure inhibition of root elongation. Additional toxicity appears to be related to softness, accounting for the great toxicity of Ag(+), for example. These binding-strength values correlate with additional physiological effects and are suitable for the computation of cell-surface electrical potentials.

  10. Effective Forces Between Diamagnetic and Paramagnetic Ions in D 2 O at Low and Moderate Ionic Strengths: An NMR Relaxation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacco, A.; Belorizky, E.; Jeannin, M.; Gorecki, W.; Fries, P. H.

    1997-09-01

    The dynamical behaviour of several pairs of dissociated, attractive and repulsive, ions is investigated in aqueous solutions for ionic strengths up to 1 mol l^{-1}. The experimental information is provided by the NMR longitudinal relaxation rates of the protons on the diamagnetic ions. The ionic solutions were chosen so that the main relaxation mechanism of these protons is due to the time fluctuations of their dipolar magnetic coupling with the electronic spins on the paramagnetic ions. This coupling strongly depends on the ion-ion potential of mean force (PMF) and on the ion self-diffusion coefficients. The interionic spatial correlations and the associated PMF are derived from a new approximation of the integral equations of the statistical mechanics of liquids. This formalism, which treats all the ions as discrete particles, rests on the infinite dilution PMF of the various ion pairs. It mixes a Born-Oppenheimer theory at infinite dilution with a sort of McMillan-Mayer approximation to take the ionic concentration into account. It goes beyond the Debye-Hückel screening theory, in which a continuous screening charge distribution approximates the effects of the discrete surrounding ions. It is related to the concept of the local dielectric constants which replace the usual macroscopic dielectric constant and depend on the interionic distances. The self-diffusion coefficients of the diamagnetic ions were measured by the NMR pulsed magnetic field gradient (PMFG) techniques applied to the resonant protons. In paramagnetic solutions, where several protonated species coexist, special caution is required and this is discussed in detail. For all the investigated solutions the theory well accounts for the observed variation of the NMR relaxation as a function of the ion charges, of the ionic strength and of the NMR proton resonance frequency. The relaxation results predicted by the new approximation of the ion-ion PMF are compared with those derived from the simple

  11. Incubating Isolated Mouse EDL Muscles with Creatine Improves Force Production and Twitch Kinetics in Fatigue Due to Reduction in Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Head, Stewart I.; Greenaway, Bronwen; Chan, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background Creatine supplementation can improve performance during high intensity exercise in humans and improve muscle strength in certain myopathies. In this present study, we investigated the direct effects of acute creatine incubation on isolated mouse fast-twitch EDL muscles, and examined how these effects change with fatigue. Methods and Results The extensor digitorum longus muscle from mice aged 12–14 weeks was isolated and stimulated with field electrodes to measure force characteristics in 3 different states: (i) before fatigue; (ii) immediately after a fatigue protocol; and (iii) after recovery. These served as the control measurements for the muscle. The muscle was then incubated in a creatine solution and washed. The measurement of force characteristics in the 3 different states was then repeated. In un-fatigued muscle, creatine incubation increased the maximal tetanic force. In fatigued muscle, creatine treatment increased the force produced at all frequencies of stimulation. Incubation also increased the rate of twitch relaxation and twitch contraction in fatigued muscle. During repetitive fatiguing stimulation, creatine-treated muscles took 55.1±9.5% longer than control muscles to lose half of their original force. Measurement of weight changes showed that creatine incubation increased EDL muscle mass by 7%. Conclusion Acute creatine application improves force production in isolated fast-twitch EDL muscle, and these improvements are particularly apparent when the muscle is fatigued. One likely mechanism for this improvement is an increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile proteins as a result of ionic strength decreases following creatine incubation. PMID:21850234

  12. Effect of ionic strength and cationic DNA affinity binders on the DNA sequence selective alkylation of guanine N7-positions by nitrogen mustards

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.A.; Forrow, S.M.; Souhami, R.L. )

    1990-03-27

    Large variations in alkylation intensities exist among guanines in a DNA sequence following treatment with chemotherapeutic alkylating agents such as nitrogen mustards, and the substituent attached to the reactive group can impose a distinct sequence preference for reaction. In order to understand further the structural and electrostatic factors which determine the sequence selectivity of alkylation reactions, the effect of increase ionic strength, the intercalator ethidium bromide, AT-specific minor groove binders distamycin A and netropsin, and the polyamine spermine on guanine N7-alkylation by L-phenylalanine mustard (L-Pam), uracil mustard (UM), and quinacrine mustard (QM) was investigated with a modification of the guanine-specific chemical cleavage technique for DNA sequencing. The result differed with both the nitrogen mustard and the cationic agent used. The effect, which resulted in both enhancement and suppression of alkylation sites, was most striking in the case of netropsin and distamycin A, which differed from each other. DNA footprinting indicated that selective binding to AT sequences in the minor groove of DNA can have long-range effects on the alkylation pattern of DNA in the major groove.

  13. Thermodynamics of the interactions of m-AMSA and o-AMSA with nucleic acids: influence of ionic strength and DNA base composition.

    PubMed Central

    Wadkins, R M; Graves, D E

    1989-01-01

    The equilibrium binding of the antitumor agent m-AMSA and its biologically inactive analog o-AMSA to native and synthetic DNAs are compared over a wide range of ionic strengths and temperatures. Although o-AMSA binds DNA with a higher affinity than m-AMSA it is not effective as an antitumor agent. Both m-AMSA and o-AMSA bind DNA in an intercalative manner. Indepth investigations into the thermodynamic parameters of these interactions reveal the interaction of m-AMSA with DNA to be an enthalpy driven process. In contrast, the structurally similar but biologically inactive o-AMSA binds DNA through an entropy driven process. The differences in thermodynamic mechanisms of binding between the two isomers reveal that the electronic and/or steric factors resulting from the position of the methoxy substituent group on the anilino ring directs the DNA binding properties of these compounds and ultimately the biological effectiveness as an antitumor agent. PMID:2602146

  14. Modeling the diffusion of Na+ in compacted water-saturated Na-bentonite as a function of pore water ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A.C.M.

    2008-08-15

    Assessments of bentonite barrier performance in waste management scenarios require an accurate description of the diffusion of water and solutes through the barrier. A two-compartment macropore/nanopore model (on which smectite interlayer nanopores are treated as a distinct compartment of the overall pore space) was applied to describe the diffusion of {sup 22}Na{sup +} in compacted, water-saturated Na-bentonites and then compared with the well-known surface diffusion model. The two-compartment model successfully predicted the observed weak ionic strength dependence of the apparent diffusion coefficient (D{sub a}) of Na{sup +}, whereas the surface diffusion model did not, thus confirming previous research indicating the strong influence of interlayer nanopores on the properties of smectite clay barriers. Since bentonite mechanical properties and pore water chemistry have been described successfully with two-compartment models, the results in the present study represent an important contribution toward the construction of a comprehensive two-compartment model of compacted bentonite barriers.

  15. Dependence of DNA Persistence Length on Ionic Strength of Solutions with Monovalent and Divalent Salts: A Joint Theory-Experiment Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Annaël; Tardin, Catherine; Salome, Laurence; Rousseau, Philippe; Destainville, Nicolas; Manghi, Manoel

    2016-02-01

    Using high-throughput Tethered Particle Motion single molecule experiments, the double-stranded DNA persistence length, $L_p$, is measured in solutions with Na$^+$ and Mg$^{2+}$ ions of various ionic strengths, $I$. Several theoretical equations for $L_p(I)$ are fitted to the experimental data, but no decisive theory is found which fits all the $L_p$ values for the two ion valencies. Properly extracted from the particle trajectory using simulations, $L_p$ varies from 30~nm to 55~nm, and is compared to previous experimental results. For the Na$^+$ only case, $L_p$ is an increasing concave function of $I^{-1}$, well fitted by Manning's electrostatic stretching approach, but not by classical Odjik-Skolnick-Fixman theories with or without counter-ion condensation. With added Mg$^{2+}$ ions, $L_p$ shows a marked decrease at low $I$, interpreted as an ion-ion correlation effect, with an almost linear law in $I^{-1}$, fitted by a proposed variational approach.

  16. Spectroscopic and viscometric elucidation of the interaction between a potential chloride channel blocker and calf-thymus DNA: the effect of medium ionic strength on the binding mode.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Aniruddha; Ghosh, Soumen; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2015-01-07

    The present study demonstrates a detailed characterization of the binding interaction of a potential chloride channel blocker 9-methyl anthroate (9-MA) with calf-thymus DNA. The modulated photophysical properties of the emissive molecule within the microheterogeneous bio-assembly have been spectroscopically exploited to monitor the drug-DNA binding interaction. Experimental results based on fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy aided with DNA-melting, viscometric and circular dichroism studies unambiguously establish the binding mode between the drug and DNA to be principally intercalative. Concomitantly, a discernible dependence of the mode of binding between the concerned moieties on the ionic strength of the medium is noteworthy. A dip-and-rise characteristic of the rotational relaxation profile of the drug within the DNA environment has been argued to be originating from a substantial difference in the lifetime as well as amplitude of the free and DNA bound drug molecule. In view of the prospective biological applications of the drug, the issue of facile dissociation of the intercalated drug from the DNA helix via a simple detergent-sequestration technique has also been unveiled. The utility of the present work resides in exploring the potential applicability of the fluorescence properties of 9-MA for studying its interactions with other relevant biological or biomimicking targets.

  17. Stabilization and Control of Rheological Properties of Fe2O3/Al(OH)(3)-rich Colloidal Slurries Under High Ionic Strength and pH

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jaehun; Poloski, Adam P.; Hansen, E. K.

    2010-08-01

    Controlling the stability and rheological properties of colloidal slurries has been an important but challenging issue for various applications such as cosmetics, ceramic processing, and nuclear waste treatment. For example, at the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford and Savannah River sites, operation of the waste treatment facilities with increased solids loading affects waste processing rates but impacts the rheological properties. We investigated various rheological modifiers on a Fe2O3-rich nuclear waste simulant, characterized by high ionic strength and pH, in order to reduce rheological properties of the colloidal slurry. Rheological modifiers change particle interactions in colloidal slurries; they mainly alter the electrostatic and steric interactions between particles, leading to a change in rheological properties. Weak acid type rheological modifiers strengthen electrostatic repulsion whereas nonionic/polymer surfactant type rheological modifiers introduce a steric repulsion. Using rheological analysis, it was found that citric acid and polyacrylic acid are good rheological modifiers for the simulant tested, effectively reducing yield stresses by as much as 70%. Further analysis supports that addition of such rheological modifiers increases the stability of the slurry. Binding cations in bulk solution and adsorption on the surface of the particles are identified as a reasonable working mechanism for citric acid and polyacrylic acid.

  18. An evaluation of in-situ measurements of water temperature, specific conductance, and pH in low ionic strength streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ranalli, A.J.

    1998-01-01

    Survey for continuous measurement of water temperature, specific conductance, and pH in four low ionic strength streams in the Catskill Mountains of New York was evaluated through a calculation of their bias, precision, and accuracy and by comparison with laboratory measurements of specific conductance and pH on samples collected concurrently. Results indicate that the mini-monitor measurements of specific conductance and pH in an acidic stream (acid-neutralizing capacity always less than 0) agreed with laboratory measurements well enough that the minimonitors can be used to supplement laboratory measurements (mean difference in pH was 0.02 pH unit and mean difference in specific conductance was 0.72 ??S cm-1. This mean difference was 0.32 ??S cm-1 if the minimonitor data were adjusted by the bias). In less acidic streams (two streams in which the acid-neutralizing capacity was always greater than 0 and one in which the acid-neutralizing capacity was greater than 0 except during high flows), there was poor agreement between laboratory and minimonitor measurements of specific conductance at high flows and pH at all flows. The water-temperature probes measured with sufficiently small bias (-0.1 ??C) and adequate precision (??0.70 ??C) for use with most applications.

  19. Alginate and whey protein based-multilayered particles: production, characterisation and resistance to pH, ionic strength and artificial gastric/intestinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Gislaine Ferreira; Prata, Ana Silvia; Grosso, Carlos Raimundo Ferreira

    2017-04-09

    Multiple layers of whey protein and sodium alginate were assembled onto gelled alginate microparticles using electrostatic interaction. An experimental design was employed to evaluate the effect of the concentration of both hydrocolloids on the amount of protein that was adsorbed. In the first layer, a higher protein adsorption 32.5% w/w was obtained at pH 3.75. In the multilayered particle, the protein adsorbed reached 64.9% w/w. An analysis of protein solubilisation verified that 22% w/w was solubilised at an acidic pH (pH 2.0). The protein solubilisation increased with ionic strength, reaching 19.5% w/w in the highest NaCl concentration evaluated (200 mM). The particles were partially resistant to gastric conditions, with 30.5% w/w of total nitrogen protein solubilisation occurring after 2 h at pH 2.0; however, they did not resist the artificial intestine conditions, reaching 86.0% w/w of total nitrogen protein solubilisation after 5 h.

  20. Mitochondrial function after liver preservation in high or low ionic-strength solutions: a comparison between UW-based and sucrose-based solution.

    PubMed

    Somov, A Y; Semenchenko, O A; Green, C J; Petrenko, A Y; Fuller, B J

    2009-01-01

    In this study we evaluated mitochondrial function after liver cold storage and normothermic reperfusion. The preservation solutions were: modified University of Wisconsin (mod UW) and sucrose-based solution (SBS). After cold preservation liver was re-perfused for 1 hour in vitro with Krebs-Ringer buffer at 37 degree C. Samples of tissue were taken for ATP determination. Mitochondrial respiratory parameters, succinate oxidase complex activity, mitochondrial H+- ATPase and intramitochondrial potassium concentration were assayed. It was shown, that brief (1 hour) cold storage and subsequent normothermic reperfusion revealed no difference in liver ATP content between mod UW and SBS groups but resulted in a gradual decrease of 50 percent after 24-hour storage and reperfusion. Mitochondrial potassium ion concentration increased by 40 percent after 1-hour cold storage in the mod UW as compared to control (P value less than 0.05) and SBS. After brief cold storage ADP and uncoupler-stimulated respiration increased by 120 percent in SBS group, unlike mod UW, when succinate was used as substrate, and was more pronounced after 24 hour. Succinate oxidase complex activity did not change over either cold storage or warm reperfusion. Mitochondrial H+-ATPase activities in SBS and mod UW did not differ and both were inhibited after 24-hour cold storage. Our data demonstrate that low ionic strength preservation solution can substantially modulate mitochondrial energy turnover due to substrate oxidation increase. Many of the changes in mitochondrial function follow brief exposure to low temperatures.

  1. Patterning gold nanoparticles in liquid environment with high ionic strength for local fabrication of up to 100 μm long metallic interconnections.

    PubMed

    Grüter, Robert R; Dielacher, Bernd; Hirt, Luca; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-05-01

    Metallic interconnections were fabricated in situ using the FluidFM as scanning probe lithography tool. In contrast to other SPL tools, the closed fluidic circuit of the FluidFM enables a pressure-controlled deposition of metallic nanoparticles in liquid environment. Taking advantage of the salt concentration of the liquid environment (i.e. the ionic strength) to tailor the resulting particle density in the deposited layer, a protocol was established for direct patterning of conductive interconnecting structures. The FluidFM microchannel was filled with an aqueous solution of negatively charged gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to be delivered onto a glass surface coated with a polycation favoring electrostatic adhesion. The deposited structures were analyzed both topographically and electrically to optimize the external parameters such as contact time, salt concentration of the liquid environment and size of the AuNPs. Using this optimized protocol we succeeded in the local fabrication of conductive metallic wires between two prefabricated macroelectrodes in liquid environment. In a subsequent step, the conductivity of the deposited structure was improved by gold annealing.

  2. Complexation study of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ions with several organic ligands in aqueous solutions of high ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, M.; Lis, S.; Choppin, G.R.

    1995-09-01

    The acid dissociation constants, pK{sub a}, and the stability constants for NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} have been measured for certain organic ligands [acetate, {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyrate, lactate, ascorbate, oxalate, citrate, EDTA, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 1, 10-phenanthroline, and thenoyltrifluoroacetone] in 5 m (NaCl) ionic strength solution. The pK{sub a} values were determined by potentiometry or spectrometry. These methods, as well as solvent extraction with {sup 233}U and {sup 237}Np radiotracers, were used to measure the stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 complexes of dioxo cations. These constants were used to estimate the concentrations required to result in 10 % competition with hydrolysis in the 5 m NaCl solution. Such estimates are of value in assessing the solubility from radioactive waste of AnO{sub 2}{sup +} and AnO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in brine solutions in contact with nuclear waste in a salt-bed repository.

  3. Influence of ionic strength changes on the structure of pre-adsorbed salivary films. A response of a natural multi-component layer.

    PubMed

    Macakova, Lubica; Yakubov, Gleb E; Plunkett, Mark A; Stokes, Jason R

    2010-05-01

    Salivary films coating oral surfaces are critically important for oral health. This study focuses on determining the underlying nature of this adsorbed film and how it responds to departures from physiological conditions due to changes in ionic strength. Under physiological conditions, it is found that pre-adsorbed in vitro salivary film on hydrophobic surfaces is present as a highly hydrated viscoelastic layer. We follow the evolution of this film in terms of its effective thickness, hydration and viscoelastic properties, as well as adsorbed mass of proteins, using complementary surface characterisation methods: a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) and a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring (QCM-D). Our results support a heterogeneous model for the structure of the salivary film with an inner dense anchoring layer and an outer highly extended hydrated layer. Further swelling of the film was observed upon decreasing the salt concentration down to 1mM NaCl. However, upon exposure to deionised water, a collapse of the film occurs that was associated with the loss of water contained within the adsorbed layer. We suggest that the collapse in deionised water is driven by an onset of electrostatic attraction between different parts of the multi-component salivary film. It is anticipated that such changes could also occur when the oral cavity is exposed to food, beverage, oral care and pharmaceutical formulations where drastic changes to the structural integrity of the film is likely to have implications on oral health, sensory perception and product performance.

  4. Modeling and sensitivity analysis on the transport of aluminum oxide nanoparticles in saturated sand: effects of ionic strength, flow rate, and nanoparticle concentration.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Tanzina; Millwater, Harry; Shipley, Heather J

    2014-11-15

    Aluminum oxide nanoparticles have been widely used in various consumer products and there are growing concerns regarding their exposure in the environment. This study deals with the modeling, sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification of one-dimensional transport of nano-sized (~82 nm) aluminum oxide particles in saturated sand. The transport of aluminum oxide nanoparticles was modeled using a two-kinetic-site model with a blocking function. The modeling was done at different ionic strengths, flow rates, and nanoparticle concentrations. The two sites representing fast and slow attachments along with a blocking term yielded good agreement with the experimental results from the column studies of aluminum oxide nanoparticles. The same model was used to simulate breakthrough curves under different conditions using experimental data and calculated 95% confidence bounds of the generated breakthroughs. The sensitivity analysis results showed that slow attachment was the most sensitive parameter for high influent concentrations (e.g. 150 mg/L Al2O3) and the maximum solid phase retention capacity (related to blocking function) was the most sensitive parameter for low concentrations (e.g. 50 mg/L Al2O3).

  5. An Aqueous Thermodynamic Model for the Complexation of Sodium and Strontium with Organic Chelators valid to High Ionic Strength. II. N-(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenedinitrilotriacetic acid (HEDTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Mason, Marvin J.; Qafoku, Odeta

    2003-04-01

    This is the second paper in a two part series on the development of aqueous thermodynamic models for the complexation of Na+ and Sr2+ with organic chelators. In this paper the development of an aqueous thermodynamic model describing the effects of ionic strength, carbonate concentration, and temperature on the complexation of Sr2+ by HEDTA under basic conditions is presented. The thermodynamic model describing the Na+ interactions with the HEDTA3- chelate relies solely on the use of Pitzer ion-interaction parameters. The exclusive use of Pitzer ion-interaction parameters differs significantly from our previous model for EDTA, which required the introduction of a NaEDTA3- ion pair. Estimation of the Pitzer ion-interaction parameters for HEDTA3- and SrHEDTA- with Na+ allows the extrapolation of a standard state equilibrium constant for the SrHEDTA- species which is one order of magnitude greater than the 0.1M reference state value available in the literature. The overall model is developed from data available in the literature on apparent equilibrium constants for HEDTA protonation, the solubility of salts in concentrated HEDTA solutions, and from new data on the solubility of SrCO3(c) obtained as part of this study. The predictions of the final thermodynamic model for the Na-Sr-OH-CO3-NO3-HEDTA-H2O system are tested by application to chemical systems containing competing metal ions (i.e., Ca2+).

  6. Temperature and ionic strength dependence of the subunit interactions in vertebrate skeletal myosin. A comparison of the interaction between the alkali light and heavy chains of mammalian and avian myosin.

    PubMed

    Zaager, S; Burke, M

    1988-09-25

    The stability of the interaction of A1 in myosin and subfragment 1 isolated from fast-twitch mammalian and avian muscles with respect to temperature and ionic strength has been examined. This was done by determining the extent of exchange of the endogenous free A1 light chain into these proteins from the two species. Whereas the extent of exchange at 37 degrees C into mammalian S1, occurring after 60 min, is about 80% of the theoretically expected amount at physiological ionic conditions, the level of exchange observed with the avian S1 is significantly lower. However, close to the theoretical limit is observed for the avian S1 when exchange is done at 43 degrees C which is close to average avian body temperature. A similar dependence with temperature is observed in the case of exchanges into avian myosin. In the case of mammalian myosin, 50% of the theoretical exchange is observed at 37 degrees C under physiological ionic strength, whereas the level of exchange observed under these conditions with the avian protein is much lower in agreement with recent observations (Waller, G. S., and Lowey, S. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 14368-14373; Pastra-Landis, S. C., and Lowey, S. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 14811-14816). If, however, the exchanges are done at 43 degrees C in physiological ionic strength, significant extents of exchange can be observed in avian myosin. These results suggest that at physiological ionic and temperature conditions relevant for the source of myosin and S1 being investigated, the alkali light chains are in dynamic equilibrium between free and heavy chain associated states. Therefore, the failure to observe alkali light chain exchange in avian myosin at 37 degrees C appears to be related to the higher temperature stability of its interaction with the heavy chain.

  7. Effects of salinity on leaf breakdown: Dryland salinity versus salinity from a coalmine.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Felix G; Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Schäfer, Ralf B; Thompson, Kristie; Kefford, Ben J

    2016-08-01

    Salinization of freshwater ecosystems as a result of human activities represents a global threat for ecosystems' integrity. Whether different sources of salinity with their differing ionic compositions lead to variable effects in ecosystem functioning is unknown. Therefore, the present study assessed the impact of dryland- (50μS/cm to 11,000μS/cm) and coalmine-induced (100μS/cm to 2400μS/cm) salinization on the leaf litter breakdown, with focus on microorganisms as main decomposer, in two catchments in New South Wales, Australia. The breakdown of Eucalyptus camaldulensis leaves decreased with increasing salinity by up to a factor of three. Coalmine salinity, which is characterised by a higher share of bicarbonates, had a slightly but consistently higher breakdown rate at a given salinity relative to dryland salinity, which is characterised by ionic proportions similar to sea water. Complementary laboratory experiments supported the stimulatory impact of sodium bicarbonates on leaf breakdown when compared to sodium chloride or artificial sea salt. Furthermore, microbial inoculum from a high salinity site (11,000μS/cm) yielded lower leaf breakdown at lower salinity relative to inoculum from a low salinity site (50μS/cm). Conversely, inoculum from the high salinity site was less sensitive towards increasing salinity levels relative to inoculum from the low salinity site. The effects of the different inoculum were the same regardless of salt source (sodium bicarbonate, sodium chloride and artificial sea salt). Finally, the microorganism-mediated leaf litter breakdown was most efficient at intermediate salinity levels (≈500μS/cm). The present study thus points to severe implications of increasing salinity intensities on the ecosystem function of leaf litter breakdown, while the underlying processes need further scrutiny.

  8. Effects of salinity and drought on growth, ionic relations, compatible solutes and activation of antioxidant systems in oleander (Nerium oleander L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh; Al Hassan, Mohamad; Naranjo, Miguel A; Agrawal, Veena; Boscaiu, Monica; Vicente, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Nerium oleander is an ornamental species of high aesthetic value, grown in arid and semi-arid regions because of its drought tolerance, which is also considered as relatively resistant to salt; yet the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying oleander's stress tolerance remain largely unknown. To investigate these mechanisms, one-year-old oleander seedlings were exposed to 15 and 30 days of treatment with increasing salt concentrations, up to 800 mM NaCl, and to complete withholding of irrigation; growth parameters and biochemical markers characteristic of conserved stress-response pathways were then determined in stressed and control plants. Strong water deficit and salt stress both caused inhibition of growth, degradation of photosynthetic pigments, a slight (but statistically significant) increase in the leaf levels of specific osmolytes, and induction of oxidative stress-as indicated by the accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), a reliable oxidative stress marker-accompanied by increases in the levels of total phenolic compounds and antioxidant flavonoids and in the specific activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR). High salinity, in addition, induced accumulation of Na+ and Cl- in roots and leaves and the activation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. Apart from anatomical adaptations that protect oleander from leaf dehydration at moderate levels of stress, our results indicate that tolerance of this species to salinity and water deficit is based on the constitutive accumulation in leaves of high concentrations of soluble carbohydrates and, to a lesser extent, of glycine betaine, and in the activation of the aforementioned antioxidant systems. Moreover, regarding specifically salt stress, mechanisms efficiently blocking transport of toxic ions from the roots to the aerial parts of the plant appear to contribute to a large extent to tolerance in Nerium oleander.

  9. The influence of ionic strength on carbonate-based spectroscopic barometry for aqueous fluids: an in-situ Raman study on Na2CO3-NaCl solutions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia; Wang, Shixia; Zheng, Haifei

    2016-01-01

    The Raman wavenumber of the symmetric stretching vibration of carbonate ion (ν1-CO32−) was measured in three aqueous solutions containing 2.0 mol·L−1 Na2CO3 and 0.20, 0.42, or 0.92 mol·L−1 NaCl, respectively, from 122 to 1538 MPa at 22 °C using a moissanite anvil cell. The ν1 Raman signal linearly shifted to higher wavenumbers with increasing pressure. Most importantly, the slope of ν1-CO32− Raman frequency shift (∂ν1/∂P)I was independent of NaCl concentration. Moreover, elevated ionic strength was found to shift the apparent outline of the carbonate peak toward low wavenumbers, possibly by increasing the proportion of the contact ion pair NaCO3−. Further investigations revealed no cross-interaction between the pressure effect and the ionic strength effect on the Raman spectra, possibly because the distribution of different ion-pair species in the carbonate equilibrium was largely pressure-independent. These results suggested that the ionic strength should be incorporated as an additional constraint for measuring the internal pressure of various solution-based systems. Combining the ν1-CO32− Raman frequency slope with the pressure herein with the values for the temperature or the ionic strength dependencies determined from previous studies, we developed an empirical equation that can be used to estimate the pressure of carbonate-bearing aqueous solutions. PMID:27982064

  10. The influence of ionic strength on carbonate-based spectroscopic barometry for aqueous fluids: an in-situ Raman study on Na2CO3-NaCl solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia; Wang, Shixia; Zheng, Haifei

    2016-12-01

    The Raman wavenumber of the symmetric stretching vibration of carbonate ion (ν1-CO32-) was measured in three aqueous solutions containing 2.0 mol·L-1 Na2CO3 and 0.20, 0.42, or 0.92 mol·L-1 NaCl, respectively, from 122 to 1538 MPa at 22 °C using a moissanite anvil cell. The ν1 Raman signal linearly shifted to higher wavenumbers with increasing pressure. Most importantly, the slope of ν1-CO32- Raman frequency shift (∂ν1/∂P)I was independent of NaCl concentration. Moreover, elevated ionic strength was found to shift the apparent outline of the carbonate peak toward low wavenumbers, possibly by increasing the proportion of the contact ion pair NaCO3-. Further investigations revealed no cross-interaction between the pressure effect and the ionic strength effect on the Raman spectra, possibly because the distribution of different ion-pair species in the carbonate equilibrium was largely pressure-independent. These results suggested that the ionic strength should be incorporated as an additional constraint for measuring the internal pressure of various solution-based systems. Combining the ν1-CO32- Raman frequency slope with the pressure herein with the values for the temperature or the ionic strength dependencies determined from previous studies, we developed an empirical equation that can be used to estimate the pressure of carbonate-bearing aqueous solutions.

  11. Oxygen isotope systematics in the aragonite-CO2-H2O-NaCl system up to 0.7 mol/kg ionic strength at 25 °C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, Sang-Tae; Gebbinck, Christa Klein; Mucci, Alfonso; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the oxygen isotope systematics in the aragonite-CO2-H2O-NaCl system, witherite (BaCO3) was precipitated quasi-instantaneously and quantitatively from Na-Cl-Ba-CO2 solutions of seawater-like ionic strength (I = 0.7 mol/kg) at two pH values (~7.9 and ~10.6) at 25 °C. The oxygen isotope composition of the witherite and the dissolved inorganic carbon speciation in the starting solution were used to estimate the oxygen isotope fractionations between HCO3¯ and H2O as well as between CO3 2 and H2O. Given the analytical error on the oxygen isotope composition of the witherite and uncertainties of the parent solution pH and speciation, oxygen isotope fractionation between NaHCO3° and HCO3¯, as well as between NaCO3¯ and CO3 2, is negligible under the experimental conditions investigated. The influence of dissolved NaCl concentration on the oxygen isotope fractionation in the aragonite-CO2-H2O-NaCl system also was investigated at 25 °C. Aragonite was precipitated from Na-Cl-Ca-Mg-(B)-CO2 solutions of seawater-like ionic strength using passive CO2 degassing or constant addition methods. Based upon our new experimental observations and published experimental data from lower ionic strength solutions by Kim et al. (2007b), the equilibrium aragonite-water oxygen isotope fractionation factor is independent of the ionic strength of the parent solution up to 0.7 mol/kg. Hence, our study also suggests that the aragonite precipitation mechanism is not affected by the presence of sodium and chloride ions in the parent solution over the range of concentrations investigated.

  12. Ionic strength and pH effect on the Fe(III)-imidazolate bond in the heme pocket of horseradish peroxidase: an EPR and UV-visible combined approach.

    PubMed

    Laurenti, E; Suriano, G; Ghibaudi, E M; Ferrari, R P

    2000-10-01

    The effects of chloride, dihydrogenphosphate and ionic strength on the spectroscopic properties of horseradish peroxidase in aqueous solution at pH=3.0 were investigated. A red-shift (lambda=408 nm) of the Soret band was observed in the presence of 40 mM chloride; 500 mM dihydrogenphosphate or chloride brought about a blue shift of the same band (lambda=370 nm). The EPR spectrum of the native enzyme at pH 3.0 was characterized by the presence of two additional absorption bands in the region around g=6, with respect to pH 6.5. Chloride addition resulted in the loss of these features and in a lower rhombicity of the signal. A unique EPR band at g=6.0 was obtained as a result of the interaction between HRP and dihydrogenphosphate, both in the absence and presence of 40 mM Cl-. We suggest that a synergistic effect of low pH, Cl- and ionic strength is responsible for dramatic modifications of the enzyme conformation consistent with the Fe(II)-His170 bond cleavage. Dihydrogenphosphate as well as high chloride concentrations are shown to display an unspecific effect, related to ionic strength. A mechanistic explanation for the acid transition of HRP, previously observed by Smulevich et al. [Biochemistry 36 (1997) 640] and interpreted as a pure pH effect, is proposed.

  13. The effect of ionic strength on the adsorption of H{sup +}, Cd{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, and Cu{sup 2+} by Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis: A surface complexation model

    SciTech Connect

    Daughney, C.J.; Fein, J.B.

    1998-02-01

    To quantify metal adsorption onto bacterial surfaces, recent studies have applied surface complexation theory to model the specific chemical and electrostatic interactions occurring at the solution-cell wall interface. However, to date, the effect of ionic strength on these interactions has not been investigated. In this study, the authors perform acid-base titrations of suspensions containing Bacillus subtilis or Bacillus licheniformis in 0.01 or 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3}, and they evaluate the constant capacitance and basic Stern double-layer models for their ability to describe ionic-strength-dependent behavior. The constant capacitance model provides the best description of the experimental data. The constant capacitance model parameters vary between independently grown bacterial cultures, possibly due to cell wall variation arising from genetic exchange during reproduction. The authors perform metal-B. subtilis and metal-B. licheniformis adsorption experiments using Cd, Pb, and Cu, and they solve for stability constants describing metal adsorption onto distinct functional groups on the bacterial cell walls. They find that these stability constants vary substantially but systematically between the two bacterial species at the two different ionic strengths.

  14. In situ solvent formation microextraction based on ionic liquids: a novel sample preparation technique for determination of inorganic species in saline solutions.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Majid; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2009-02-23

    In this research, a novel microextraction technique based on ionic liquids (ILs) termed in situ solvent formation microextraction (ISFME) is developed. In this method, small amount of sodium hexafluorophosphate (NaPF(6), as an ion-pairing agent) was added to the sample solution containing very small amount of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Hmim][BF(4)], as hydrophilic IL). A cloudy solution was formed as a result of formation of fine droplets of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate [Hmim][PF(6)]. After centrifuging, the fine droplets of the extractant phase settled to the bottom of the conical-bottom glass centrifuge tube. ISFME is a simple and rapid method for extraction and preconcentration of metal ions from water samples and can be applied for the sample solutions containing very high concentrations of salt. Furthermore, this technique is much safer in comparison with the organic solvent extraction. Reliability of the introduced methodology was evaluated by analyzing water reference material. ISFME was successfully applied to determining mercury (II) in several real water samples. Michler thioketone (TMK) was chosen as a complexing agent. Analysis was carried out using spectrophotometric detection method. Type and amount of IL, temperature and the other parameters were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.7 ng mL(-1) and the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) was 1.94% for 40 ng mL(-1) mercury.

  15. Solubility of B-Nb2O5 and the Hydrolysis of Niobium(V) in Aqueous Solution as a Function of Temperature and Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Peiffert, C; Nguyen-Trung, Chinh {nmn}; Palmer, Donald; Laval, J. P.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    B-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} was recrystallized from commercially available oxide, and XRD analyses indicated that it is stable in contact with solutions over the pH range 0 to 9, whereas solid polyniobates such as Na{sub 8}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 19} 13H{sub 2}O(s) appear to predominate at pH > 9. Solubilities of the crystalline B-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} were determined in five NaClO{sub 4} solutions (0.1 {le} Im/mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} {le} 1.0) over a wide pH range at (25.0 {+-} 0.1) C and at 0.1 MPa. A limited number of measurements were also made at Im = 6.0 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}, whereas at Im = 1.0 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} the full range of pH was also covered at (10, 50 and 70) C. The pH of these solutions was fixed using either HClO{sub 4} (pH {le} 4) or NaOH (pH {ge} 10) and determined by mass balance, whereas the pH on the molality scale was measured in buffer mixtures of acetic acid + acetate (4 {le} pH {le} 6), Bis-Tris (pH {approx} 7), Tris (pH {approx} 8) and boric acid + borate (pH {approx} 9). Treatment of the solubility results indicated the presence of four species, Nb(OH){sub n}{sup 5-n} (where n = 4-7), so that the molal solubility quotients were determined according to: 0.5Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}(cr) + 0.5(2n-5)H{sub 2}O(l){sup {center_dot}-} Nb(OH){sub n}{sup 5-n} + (n-5)H{sup +} (n = 4-7) and were fitted empirically as a function of ionic strength and temperature, including the appropriate Debye-Hueckel term. A Specific Interaction Theory (SIT) approach was also attempted. The former approach yielded the following values of log 10 K{sub sn} (infinite dilution) at 25 C: -(7.4 {+-} 0.2) for n = 4; -(9.1 {+-} 0.1) for n = 5; -(14.1 {+-} 0.3) for n = 6; and -(23.9 {+-} 0.6) for n = 7. Given the experimental uncertainties (2{sigma}), it is interesting to note that the effect of ionic strength only exceeded the combined uncertainties significantly in the case of log 10 K{sub s6} to I{sub m} = 1.0 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1}, such that these values may be of use by

  16. Humic Substances-dependent Aggregation and Transport of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Porous Media at Different pHs and Ionic Strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, L.; Jacobson, A. R.; Darnault, C. J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) are commonly used in several fields and industries, such as chemical and pharmaceutical, due to both their physical and chemical properties. For example, they are employed in the manufacturing of catalysts, as fuel additives, and as polishing agents. The release and exposure to CeO2 NPs can occur during their fabrication, application, and waste disposal, as well as through their life-cycle and accidents. Therefore, the assessment of the dynamic nature of CeO2 NPs stability and mobilty in the environment is of paramount importance to establish the environmental and public health risks associated with their inevitable release in the environment. Humic substances are a key element of soils and have been revealed to possibly affect the fate and transport of nanoparticles in soils. Consequently, our present research aims at investigating the influence that different pHs, monovalent and divalent cations, Suwannee River humic acid, and Suwanee River fulvic acid have on the aggregation, transport, and deposition of CeO2 NPs. Batch studies performed with different concentrations of humic and fulvic acids associated with a wide spectrum of pHs and ionic strengths were examined. Key variables from these batch studies were then examined to simulate experimental conditions commonly encountered in the soil-water system to conduct column transport experiments in order to establish the fate and transport of CeO2 NPs in saturated porous media, which is a critical phase in characterizing the behavior of CeO2 NPs in subsurface environmental systems.

  17. Influence of pH and ionic strength on electrostatic properties of ferredoxin, FNR, and hydrogenase and the rate constants of their interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonova, A. N.; Khrushchev, S. S.; Kovalenko, I. B.; Riznichenko, G. Yu; Rubin, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein transfers electrons from photosystem I (PSI) to ferredoxin:NADP+-reductase (FNR) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as other metabolic pathways. In some photosynthetic organisms including cyanobacteria and green unicellular algae under anaerobic conditions Fd transfers electrons not only to FNR but also to hydrogenase—an enzyme which catalyzes reduction of atomic hydrogen to H2. One of the questions posed by this competitive relationship between proteins is which characteristics of thylakoid stroma media allow switching of the electron flow between the linear path PSI-Fd-FNR-NADP+ and the path PSI-Fd-hydrogenase-H2. The study was conducted using direct multiparticle simulation approach. In this method protein molecules are considered as individual objects that experience Brownian motion and electrostatic interaction with the surrounding media and each other. Using the model we studied the effects of pH and ionic strength (I) upon complex formation between ferredoxin and FNR and ferredoxin and hydrogenase. We showed that the rate constant of Fd-FNR complex formation is constant in a wide range of physiologically significant pH values. Therefore it can be argued that regulation of FNR activity doesn’t involve pH changes in stroma. On the other hand, in the model rate constant of Fd-hydrogenase interaction dramatically depends upon pH: in the range 7-9 it increases threefold. It may seem that because hydrogenase reduces protons it should be more active when pH is acidic. Apparently, regulation of hydrogenase’s affinity to both her reaction partners (H+ and Fd) is carried out by changes in its electrostatic properties. In the dark, the protein is inactive and in the light it is activated and starts to interact with both Fd and H+. Therefore, we can conclude that in chloroplasts the rate of hydrogen production is regulated by pH through the changes in the affinity between hydrogenase and ferredoxin.

  18. Charge heterogeneity profiling of monoclonal antibodies using low ionic strength ion-exchange chromatography and well-controlled pH gradients on monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Mohammad; Nordborg, Anna; Gaspar, Andras; Lacher, Nathan A; Wang, Qian; He, Xiaoping Z; Haddad, Paul R; Hilder, Emily F

    2013-11-22

    In this work, the suitability of employing shallow pH gradients generated using single component buffer systems as eluents through cation-exchange (CEX) monolithic columns is demonstrated for the high-resolution separation of monoclonal antibody (mAb) charge variants in three different biopharmaceuticals. A useful selection of small molecule buffer species is described that can be used within very narrow pH ranges (typically 1 pH unit) defined by their buffer capacity for producing controlled and smooth pH profiles when used together with porous polymer monoliths. Using very low ionic strength eluents also enabled direct coupling with electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. The results obtained by the developed pH gradient approach for the separation of closely related antibody species appear to be consistent with those obtained by imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (iCE) in terms of both resolution and separation profile. Both determinants of resolution, i.e., peak compression and peak separation contribute to the gains in resolution, evidently through the Donnan potential effect, which is increased by decreasing the eluent concentration, and also through the way electrostatic charges are distributed on the protein surface. Retention mechanisms based on the trends observed in retention of proteins at pH values higher than the electrophoretic pI are also discussed using applicable theories. Employing monolithic ion-exchangers is shown to enable fast method development, short analysis time, and high sample throughput owing to the accelerated mass transport of the monolithic media. The possibility of short analysis time, typically less than 15 min, and high sample throughput is extremely useful in the assessment of charge-based changes to the mAb products, such as during manufacturing or storage.

  19. Cost-effective screening methods for various single gene defects in single cells using high magnesium and total ionic strength and restriction enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Y H

    2000-12-01

    A reliable cost-effective protocol for the diagnosis of various defective genes in single blastomeres from preimplantation embryos has been established. Single cells were lysed in alkali buffer followed by neutralization and addition of a solution containing a high concentration of sulfhydryl reducing agents and MgCl(2) in relatively high ionic strength (0.45) (solution M) with or without restriction enzyme(s). The reaction mixture was incubated at 37 degrees C for 15 min followed by heat denaturation at 95 degrees C for 10 min. Respective polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mixture was then added to amplify each designated DNA region. The treatment of neutralized single cell lysate with adequate restriction enzyme(s) which do not cleave the target DNA sequences but shortens the genomic template DNA strands. This may facilitate primer-template annealing. The subsequent heat denaturation of the cell lysate in solution M indeed gave better signals of amplified DNA fragments on polyacrylamide gels. Defects in Tay Sachs exons 11 and 12, CF-DeltaF508 and CF-N1303K, and genomic sequences of ZFX/ZFY were successfully detected on gels after one-step PCR amplification, especially those cell lysates treated with restriction enzymes. In conclusion, a cost-effective one-step PCR method for amplifying various specific genomic regions containing a single gene defect in single cells has been established. This protocol may be applied to genetic screening for many single defective genes of biopsied single blastomeres from preimplantation in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryos.

  20. Transport and Retention of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots in Saturated Sand: Effects of Organic Ligands, pH and Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyan; Snee, Preston; Darnault, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    The presence of nanomaterials in soil, water, and air systems following their life cycle or accidents and their effects on the environment and public health are inevitable. Ability to forecast the public health and ecological impacts of these nanomaterials encountered in the environment is limited. Therefore, it is critical to be able to predict the fate and transport on nanomaterials in the environment, in particular the subsurface, in order to conduct risk assessments. To assess the transport and retention of nanomaterials in the subsurface environment, we selected quantum dots (QDs). QDs are metal and semiconductor based nanomaterials that are essential to nanoscience and nanotechnology. Understanding the parameters that effect the transport and retention of QDs in the soil water environment is critical. Natural organic ligands are commonly found in soils and impact the soil physico-chemical processes through multifaceted reactions with metal ions present in soil solution and ligand exchange reactions on soil surfaces. Therefore, ligands may modify the surface properties of QDs and effect their stability, transport and retention in the subsurface environment. In this research, size, surface charge, and stability of CdSe/ZnS QDs in water solutions are monitored in batch experiments. The influence of organic ligands (acetate, oxalate, and citrate) on the stability of QDs at different pHs (1.5, 3.5, 5, 7 and 9) and ionic strengths (0.05 and 0.1 M) conditions were examined. The stability and aggregation phenomena of QDs were studied using UV-vis and DLS methods. Parameters from batch studies were selected to establish chemical conditions to be used in transport experiments to produce breakthrough curves and retention profiles in order to characterize the fate and transport of QDs in saturated sand. These transport experiments are essential to understand the mobility and retention processes in porous media where QD interactions with surfaces of heterogeneous

  1. Stability and Mobility of CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots in Soils: Effects of Organic Ligands, pH and Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Darnault, C. J. G.; Snee, P. T.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are the key enablers in the domain of nanoscience and have found many applications due to their physico-chemical and optical properties. For example, they are used in solar cells, lighting technologies, and biomedical imaging. Their presence in the environment following their application and life-cycle is inevitable. Therefore, it is critical to understand their behavior in the soil water system to assess the risks they may pose to natural systems and to public health. Assessing the factors that impact the stability and mobility of QDs in the soil water system is important. Natural organic ligands occur in subsurface environments and alter chemical processes in soils through complex reactions with metal ions in solution and ligand exchange reactions on soil surfaces. Consequently, the presence of ligands may alter the surface properties of QDs and impact their stability and mobility in saturated porous media. In this study, characteristics and stability of CdSe/ZnS QDs in water solutions are tested in batch experiments. The impacts of organic ligands (acetate, oxalate, and citrate) on the stability of QDs under various pH (5, 7 and 9) and ionic strength (0.05 and 0.1 M) conditions were investigated. The stability and aggregation kinetics of QDs were examined using UV-vis and DLS methods. Selected parameters from batch experiments were then used as study conditions to perform column transport experiments to generate breakthrough curves and retention profiles to assess the fate and transport of QDs in saturated porous media, which is the first phase in simulating their behavior in the subsurface.

  2. Effects of pH, ionic strength, dissolved organic matter, and flow rate on the co-transport of MS2 bacteriophages with kaolinite in gravel aquifer media.

    PubMed

    Walshe, Gillian E; Pang, Liping; Flury, Markus; Close, Murray E; Flintoft, Mark

    2010-02-01

    Viruses are often associated with colloids in wastewater and could be transported with colloids into groundwater from land disposal of human and animal effluent and sludge, causing contamination of groundwater. To investigate the role of colloids in the transport of viruses in groundwater, experiments were conducted using a 2m long column packed with heterogeneous gravel aquifer media. Bacteriophage MS2 was used as the model virus and kaolinite as the model colloid. Experimental data were analyzed using Temporal Moment Analysis and Filtration Theory. In the absence of kaolinite colloid, MS2 phage traveled slightly faster than the conservative tracer bromide (Br), with little differences observed between unfiltered and filtered MS2 phage (0.22 microm as the operational cut-off for colloid-free virus). In the presence of kaolinite colloids, MS2 phage breakthrough occurred concurrently with that of the colloidal particles and the time taken to reach the peak virus concentration was reduced, suggesting a colloid-facilitated virus transport in terms of peak-concentration time and velocity. Meanwhile mass recovery and magnitude of concentrations of the phages were significantly reduced, indicating colloid-assisted virus attenuation in terms of concentrations and mass. Decreasing the pH or increasing the ionic strength increased the level of virus attachment to the aquifer media and colloids, and virus transport became more retarded, resulting in lower peak-concentration, lower mass recovery, longer peak-concentration time, and greater apparent collision efficiency. Increasing the concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) or flow rate resulted in faster virus transport velocity, higher peak-concentrations and mass recoveries, and lower apparent collision efficiencies. The dual-role of colloids in transport viruses has important implications for risk analysis and remediation of virus-contaminated sites. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The influence of agitation sequence and ionic strength on in vitro drug release from hypromellose (E4M and K4M) ER matrices--the use of the USP III apparatus.

    PubMed

    Asare-Addo, Kofi; Kaialy, Waseem; Levina, Marina; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali; Ghori, Mohammed U; Supuk, Enes; Laity, Peter R; Conway, Barbara R; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2013-04-01

    Theophylline extended release (ER) matrices containing hypromellose (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) E4M and K4M were evaluated in media with a pH range of 1.2-7.5, using an automated USP type III, Bio-Dis dissolution apparatus. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of systematic agitation, ionic strength and pH on the release of theophylline from the gel forming hydrophilic polymeric matrices with different methoxyl substitution levels. Tribo-electric charging of hypromellose, theophylline and their formulated blends containing E4M and K4M grades has been characterised, along with quantitative observations of flow, compression behaviour and particle morphology. Agitations were studied at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 dips per minute (dpm) and also in the ascending and descending order in the dissolution vials. The ionic concentration strength of the media was also varied over a range of 0-0.4M to simulate the gastrointestinal fed and fasted states and various physiological pH conditions. To study the effect of ionic strength on the hydrophilic matrices, agitation was set at 20 dpm. The charge results on individual components imply that the positively charged particles have coupled with the negatively charged particles to form a stable ordered mixture which is believed to result in a more homogeneous and stable system. The particle shape analysis showed the HPMC K4M polymer to have a more irregular morphology and a rougher surface texture in comparison to the HPMC E4M polymer, possibly a contributory factor to the gelation process. The results showed gelation occurred quicker for the K4M tablet matrices. Drug release increased with increased agitation. This was more pronounced for the E4M tablet matrices. The ionic strength also had more of an effect on the drug release from the E4M matrices. The experiments highlighted the resilience of the K4M matrices in comparison with the E4M matrices. The results thus show that despite similar viscosities of

  4. A comparative study of the effect of hydrogen peroxide versus normal saline on the strength of the bone-cement interface.

    PubMed

    Guerin, S R; MacNiochaill, R; O'Reilly, P; O'Byrne, J; Kelly, D J

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide has been used for decades as an effervescent haemostatic agent in arthroplasty. Recently it has been shown to adversely affect the material properties of PMMA. We aim to assess whether any such deleterious effects are demonstrated in an experimental model which mimics the clinical use of hydrogen peroxide. Matched pairs of cancellous bone samples were treated with a swab soaked in either saline or a 3% solution of hydrogen peroxide, prior to manufacture of cement-bone constructs using Palacos or Simplex cement. Thirty pairs were then compared by subjecting them to a torsional shear force until failure and a further thirty pairs were tested to failure in tension. There was no significant difference between the mean torques to failure for the Palacos-peroxide group versus the Palacos-saline group, or the Simplex-peroxide versus the Simplex-saline group (p=0.31 and 0.71 respectively). Similarly there was no significant difference between the mean tension loads to failure for the Palacos-peroxide group versus the Palacos-saline group, and the Simplex-peroxide versus the Simplex-saline group (p=0.79 and 0.23 respectively). We conclude that the use of hydrogen peroxide as an effervescent haemostatic agent has no detrimental effect on the mechanical integrity of the bone-cement interface when compared to normal saline.

  5. Final Report (BMWi Project No.: 02 E 10971): Joint project: Retention of radionuclides relevant for final disposal in natural clay rock and saline systems - Subproject 2: Geochemical behavior and transport of radionuclides in saline systems in the prese

    SciTech Connect

    Schmeide, Katja; Fritsch, Katharina; Lippold, Holger; Poetsch, Maria; Kulenkampff, Johannes; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna; Jordan, Norbert; Joseph, Claudia; Moll, Henry; Cherkouk, Andrea; Bader, Miriam

    2016-02-29

    The objective of this project was to study the influence of increased salinities on interaction processes in the system radionuclide – organics – clay – aquifer. For this, complexation, redox, sorption, and diffusion studies were performed under variation of the ionic strength (up to 4 mol kg-1) and the background electrolyte (NaCl, CaCl2, MgCl2).

  6. Reactions of trivacant Wells-Dawson heteropolytungstates. Ionic strength and Jahn-Teller effects on formation in multi-iron complexes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Travis M; Zhang, Xuan; Hardcastle, Kenneth I; Hill, Craig L

    2002-05-06

    Reaction of alpha-P(2)W(15)O(56)(12-) and Fe(III) in a saturated NaCl solution produces a trisubstituted Wells-Dawson structure with three low-valent metals, alpha-(Fe(III)Cl)(2)(Fe(III)OH(2))P(2)W(15)O(59)(11-) (1). Dissolution of this species into 1 M NaBr (Br(-) is non-coordinating) gives the triaquated species alpha-(Fe(III)OH(2))(3)P(2)W(15)O(59)(9-) (2). Ionic strength values of 1 M or greater are necessary to avoid decomposition of 1 or 2 to the conventional sandwich-type complex, alpha beta beta alpha-(Fe(III)OH(2))(2)Fe(III)(2)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)(12-) (3). If the pH is greater than 5, a new triferric sandwich, alpha alpha beta alpha-(NaOH(2))(Fe(III)OH(2))Fe(III)(2)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)(14-) (4), forms rather than 3. Like the previously reported Wells-Dawson-derived sandwich-type structures with three metals in the central unit ([TM(II)Fe(III)(2)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(P(2)TM(II)(2)W(13)O(52))],(16-) TM = Cu, Co), this complex has a central alpha-junction and a central beta-junction. Thermal studies suggest that 4 is more stable than 3 over a wide range of temperatures and pH values. The intrinsic Jahn-Teller distortion of d-electron-containing metal ions incorporated into the external sites of the central multi-metal unit impacts the stoichiometry of their incorporation (with a consequent change in the inter-POM-unit connectivity, where POM = polyoxometalate). Reaction of non-distorting Ni(II) with the diferric lacunary sandwich-type POM alpha alpha alpha alpha-(NaOH(2))(2)Fe(III)(2)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)(16-) (5) produces alpha beta beta alpha-(Ni(II)OH(2))(2)Fe(III)(2)(P(2)W(15)O(56))(2)(14-) (6), a Wells-Dawson sandwich-type structure with two Ni(II) and two Fe(III) in the central unit. All structures are characterized by (31)P NMR, IR, UV-vis, magnetic susceptibility, and X-ray crystallography. Complexes 4 and 6 are highly selective and effective catalysts for the H(2)O(2)-based epoxidation of alkenes.

  7. Challenges in Coupling Acidity and Salinity Transport in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    McNeece, Colin J; Hesse, Marc A

    2017-09-26

    Salinity is an increasingly prescient issue in reactive transport, from low salinity water flooding to fracking brine leakage. Of primary concern is the effect of salinity on surface chemistry. Transport and batch experiments show a strong coupling of salinity and acidity through chemical interactions at the mineral-liquid interface. This coupling is ascribed to the combined effects of ionic strength on electrostatic behavior of the interface and competitive sorption between protons and other cations for binding sites on the surface. The effect of these mechanisms is well studied in batch settings and readily describes observed behavior. In contrast, the transport literature is sparse, primarily applied to synthetic materials, and offers only qualitative agreement with observations. To address, this gap in knowledge, we conduct a suite of column flood experiments through silica sand, systematically varying salinity and acidity conditions. Experiments are compared to a reactive transport model incorporating the proposed coupling mechanisms. The results highlight the difficulty in applying such models to realistic media under both basic and acidic conditions with a single set of parameters. The analysis and experimental results show the observed error is the result of electrostatic assumptions within the surface chemistry model and provide a strong constraint on further model development.

  8. Indicators: Salinity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Salinity is the dissolved salt content of a body of water. Excess salinity, due to evaporation, water withdrawal, wastewater discharge, and other sources, is a chemical sterssor that can be toxic for aquatic environments.

  9. Effect of solution pH and ionic strength on the stability of poly(acrylic acid)-encapsulated multiwalled carbon nanotubes aqueous dispersion and its application for NADH sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aihua; Watanabe, Takashi; Honma, Itaru; Wang, Jin; Zhou, Haoshen

    2006-12-15

    The optimal conditions to prepare water-soluble, stable poly(acrylic acid)-wrapped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PAA-MWNTs) complex is presented. PAA-MWNTs shows high stability within weak acid to weak basic pH condition. The complex also shows good endurance to moderate ionic strengths in the buffer solution. The PAA-MWNTs complex film-covered electrode demonstrates stable, excellent electrocatalytic activity to oxidize NADH, which makes it possible to prepare NADH sensor at a low potential of approximately 0.13 V (versus Ag/AgCl) with the linear range of 4-100 microM by differential pulse voltammetry.

  10. Effect of thermal treatment, ionic strength, and pH on the short-term and long-term coalescence stability of beta-lactoglobulin emulsions.

    PubMed

    Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai D; Sidzhakova, Doroteya; Campbell, Bruce

    2006-07-04

    We present experimental results about the effects of thermal treatment, ionic strength, and pH on the protein adsorption and coalescence stability of freshly prepared (2 h after emulsification) and 6-day-stored emulsions, stabilized by the globular protein beta-lactoglobulin (BLG). In all emulsions studied, the volume fraction of the dispersed soybean oil is 30% and the mean drop diameter is d(32) approximately 40 microm. The protein concentration, C(BLG), is varied between 0.02 and 0.1 wt %, the electrolyte concentration, C(EL), between 1.5 mM and 1 M, and pH between 4.0 and 7.0. The emulsion heating is performed at 85 degrees C, which is above the denaturing temperature of BLG. The results show that, at C(BLG) > or = 0.04 wt %, C(EL) > or = 150 mM, and pH > or = 6.2, the heating leads to higher protein adsorption and to irreversible attachment of the adsorbed molecules, which results in enhanced steric repulsion between the protein adsorption multilayers and to higher emulsion stability. At low electrolyte concentration, C(EL) < or = 10 mM, the emulsion stability is determined by electrostatic interactions and is not affected significantly by the emulsion heating. The latter result is explained by electrostatic repulsion between the adsorbed protein molecules, which keeps them separated from each other and thus precludes the formation of disulfide covalent bonds in the protein adsorption layer. The coalescence stability of heated and nonheated emulsions is practically the same and does not depend on C(EL), when pH is around the isoelectric point (IEP) of the protein molecules. This is explained with the adsorption of uncharged BLG molecules, in compact conformation, which stores the reactive sulfhydryl groups hidden inside the molecule interior, thus preventing the formation of covalent intermolecular bonds upon heating. We studied also the effect of storage time on the stability of heated and nonheated emulsions. The stability of nonheated emulsions (C(BLG) = 0

  11. Influence of pH and ionic strength (NaCl/Na2SO4) on the reaction HO Cl/ClO- + NO2-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcellos da Rosa, M.; Zetzsch, C.

    2003-04-01

    Equilibria such as HOCl + NO_2^- leftrightarrow ClNO_2 + OH^- and ClNO_2 + H_2O leftrightarrow NO_3^- + 2H^+ + Cl^- play an important role in halogen activation in the troposphere. We studied the oxidation of NO_2^- by HOCl/ClO^- in aqueous phase by stopped-flow measurements at different ionic strengths (bidestilled water, 0.1M NaCl, 1.0M NaCl and 1.0M Na_2SO^4) at various pH values (4.0, 5.5, 6.2 and 10.0) at 293K. The experiments were performed using a SX.18MV Applied Photophysics spectrophotometer, observing the exponential decay of HOCl/ClO^- at λ = 290nm between 10ms and 100s. HOCl (pK_a= 7.50) was obtained by bubbling N_2 with 1% Cl_2 through bidestilled water. The pH of the aqueous solutions of HOCl was determined by a pH meter (CG820, Schott) with a glass electrode N6180 (calibrated with standard buffer solutions at pH = 3.0, 4.0, 7.0 and 10.0), and the pH values were adjusted by dropwise addition of HClO_4 or NaOH. The concentrations of HOCl (ɛHOCl (230nm) = 100M-1cm-1) ([HOCl] = 1.3mM - 10mM) and ClO- (ɛClO- (292nm) = 350 M-1cm-1) ([ClO^-] = 1.3mM - 5mM) were determined by UV spectrometry (Kontron UVIKON 860) at a resolution of 2 nm in 1 cm cells at various pH values. The concentration range of NO_2^- was between 5mM and 50mM. The following second-order rate constant kII were obtained at 293K at various pH values (in units of M-1s-1) in H_2O: pH 4.0, (5.6±0.3)\\cdot 10^3; pH 5.5, (5.0±0.4)\\cdot 10^3; pH 10.0, 3.9±0.4; in 0.1M NaCl: pH 5.5, (4.3±0.4)\\cdot 10^3; pH 10.0, 2.6±0.4; in 1.0M NaCl: pH 5.5, (4.0±0.3); pH 10.0, 0.7±0.2 and in 1.0M Na_2SO_4: pH 5.5, (3.0±0.3)\\cdot 10^3; pH 10.0, 1.9±0.4. There is a strong effect of the pH on the reaction HOCl/ClO^- + NO_2^-, as reflected in the ratio kII_a(pH 5.5, HOCl)/kII_b(pH 10.0, ClO^-): in H_2O (kII_a ˜ 1200 \\cdot kII_b), in 0.1M NaCl (kII_a ˜ 1900 \\cdot kII_b), in 1.0M NaCl (kII_a ˜ 5700 \\cdot kII_b) and in 1.0 M Na_2SO_4 (kII_a ˜ 1500 \\cdot kII_b). A mechanism for the oxidation of NO

  12. Different Binding Modes of Cu and Pb vs. Cd, Ni, and Zn with the Trihydroxamate Siderophore Desferrioxamine B at Seawater Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Kailee J; Schijf, Johan; Christenson, Emily A.

    2015-03-03

    The solution speciation in