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Sample records for ionic surfaces implications

  1. Stability of Secondary and Tertiary Structures of Virus-Like Particles Representing Noroviruses: Effects of pH, Ionic Strength, and Temperature and Implications for Adhesion to Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Samandoulgou, Idrissa; Hammami, Riadh; Morales Rayas, Rocio; Fliss, Ismail; Jean, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Loss of ordered molecular structure in proteins is known to increase their adhesion to surfaces. The aim of this work was to study the stability of norovirus secondary and tertiary structures and its implications for viral adhesion to fresh foods and agrifood surfaces. The pH, ionic strength, and temperature conditions studied correspond to those prevalent in the principal vehicles of viral transmission (vomit and feces) and in the food processing and handling environment (pasteurization and refrigeration). The structures of virus-like particles representing GI.1, GII.4, and feline calicivirus (FCV) were studied using circular dichroism and intrinsic UV fluorescence. The particles were remarkably stable under most of the conditions. However, heating to 65°C caused losses of β-strand structure, notably in GI.1 and FCV, while at 75°C the α-helix content of GII.4 and FCV decreased and tertiary structures unfolded in all three cases. Combining temperature with pH or ionic strength caused variable losses of structure depending on the particle type. Regardless of pH, heating to pasteurization temperatures or higher would be required to increase GII.4 and FCV adhesion, while either low or high temperatures would favor GI.1 adhesion. Regardless of temperature, increased ionic strength would increase GII.4 adhesion but would decrease GI.1 adhesion. FCV adsorption would be greater at refrigeration, pasteurization, or high temperature combined with a low salt concentration or at a higher NaCl concentration regardless of temperature. Norovirus adhesion mediated by hydrophobic interaction may depend on hydrophobic residues normally exposed on the capsid surface at pH 3, pH 8, physiological ionic strength, and low temperature, while at pasteurization temperatures it may rely more on buried hydrophobic residues exposed upon structural rearrangement. PMID:26296729

  2. Stability of Secondary and Tertiary Structures of Virus-Like Particles Representing Noroviruses: Effects of pH, Ionic Strength, and Temperature and Implications for Adhesion to Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Samandoulgou, Idrissa; Hammami, Riadh; Morales Rayas, Rocio; Fliss, Ismail; Jean, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Loss of ordered molecular structure in proteins is known to increase their adhesion to surfaces. The aim of this work was to study the stability of norovirus secondary and tertiary structures and its implications for viral adhesion to fresh foods and agrifood surfaces. The pH, ionic strength, and temperature conditions studied correspond to those prevalent in the principal vehicles of viral transmission (vomit and feces) and in the food processing and handling environment (pasteurization and refrigeration). The structures of virus-like particles representing GI.1, GII.4, and feline calicivirus (FCV) were studied using circular dichroism and intrinsic UV fluorescence. The particles were remarkably stable under most of the conditions. However, heating to 65°C caused losses of β-strand structure, notably in GI.1 and FCV, while at 75°C the α-helix content of GII.4 and FCV decreased and tertiary structures unfolded in all three cases. Combining temperature with pH or ionic strength caused variable losses of structure depending on the particle type. Regardless of pH, heating to pasteurization temperatures or higher would be required to increase GII.4 and FCV adhesion, while either low or high temperatures would favor GI.1 adhesion. Regardless of temperature, increased ionic strength would increase GII.4 adhesion but would decrease GI.1 adhesion. FCV adsorption would be greater at refrigeration, pasteurization, or high temperature combined with a low salt concentration or at a higher NaCl concentration regardless of temperature. Norovirus adhesion mediated by hydrophobic interaction may depend on hydrophobic residues normally exposed on the capsid surface at pH 3, pH 8, physiological ionic strength, and low temperature, while at pasteurization temperatures it may rely more on buried hydrophobic residues exposed upon structural rearrangement.

  3. Stability of Secondary and Tertiary Structures of Virus-Like Particles Representing Noroviruses: Effects of pH, Ionic Strength, and Temperature and Implications for Adhesion to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Samandoulgou, Idrissa; Hammami, Riadh; Morales Rayas, Rocio; Fliss, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Loss of ordered molecular structure in proteins is known to increase their adhesion to surfaces. The aim of this work was to study the stability of norovirus secondary and tertiary structures and its implications for viral adhesion to fresh foods and agrifood surfaces. The pH, ionic strength, and temperature conditions studied correspond to those prevalent in the principal vehicles of viral transmission (vomit and feces) and in the food processing and handling environment (pasteurization and refrigeration). The structures of virus-like particles representing GI.1, GII.4, and feline calicivirus (FCV) were studied using circular dichroism and intrinsic UV fluorescence. The particles were remarkably stable under most of the conditions. However, heating to 65°C caused losses of β-strand structure, notably in GI.1 and FCV, while at 75°C the α-helix content of GII.4 and FCV decreased and tertiary structures unfolded in all three cases. Combining temperature with pH or ionic strength caused variable losses of structure depending on the particle type. Regardless of pH, heating to pasteurization temperatures or higher would be required to increase GII.4 and FCV adhesion, while either low or high temperatures would favor GI.1 adhesion. Regardless of temperature, increased ionic strength would increase GII.4 adhesion but would decrease GI.1 adhesion. FCV adsorption would be greater at refrigeration, pasteurization, or high temperature combined with a low salt concentration or at a higher NaCl concentration regardless of temperature. Norovirus adhesion mediated by hydrophobic interaction may depend on hydrophobic residues normally exposed on the capsid surface at pH 3, pH 8, physiological ionic strength, and low temperature, while at pasteurization temperatures it may rely more on buried hydrophobic residues exposed upon structural rearrangement. PMID:26296729

  4. Ionic liquid nanotribology: stiction suppression and surface induced shear thinning.

    PubMed

    Asencio, Rubén Álvarez; Cranston, Emily D; Atkin, Rob; Rutland, Mark W

    2012-07-01

    The friction and adhesion between pairs of materials (silica, alumina, and polytetrafluoroethylene) have been studied and interpreted in terms of the long-ranged interactions present. In ambient laboratory air, the interactions are dominated by van der Waals attraction and strong adhesion leading to significant frictional forces. In the presence of the ionic liquid (IL) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) the van der Waals interaction is suppressed and the attractive/adhesive interactions which lead to "stiction" are removed, resulting in an at least a 10-fold reduction in the friction force at large applied loads. The friction coefficient for each system was determined; coefficients obtained in air were significantly larger than those obtained in the presence of EAN (which ranged between 0.1 and 0.25), and variation in the friction coefficients between systems was correlated with changes in surface roughness. As the viscosity of ILs can be relatively high, which has implications for the lubricating properties, the hydrodynamic forces between the surfaces have therefore also been studied. The linear increase in repulsive force with speed, expected from hydrodynamic interactions, is clearly observed, and these forces further inhibit the potential for stiction. Remarkably, the viscosity extracted from the data is dramatically reduced compared to the bulk value, indicative of a surface ordering effect which significantly reduces viscous losses.

  5. Ionic Liquids Can Permanently Modify Porous Silicon Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Shruti; Coombs, Sidney G; Wagle, Durgesh V; Bhawawet, Nakara; Baker, Gary A; Bright, Frank V

    2016-08-01

    To develop ionic liquid/porous silicon (IL/pSi) microarrays we have contact pin-printed 20 hydrophobic and hydrophilic ionic liquids onto as-prepared, hydrogen-passivated porous silicon (ap-pSi) and then determined the individual IL spot size, shape and associated pSi surface chemistry. The results reveal that the hydrophobic ionic liquids oxidize the ap-pSi slightly. In contrast, the hydrophilic ionic liquids lead to heavily oxidized pSi (i.e., ox-pSi). The strong oxidation arises from residual water within the hydrophilic ILs that is delivered from these ILs into the ap-pSi matrix causing oxidation. This phenomenon is less of an issue in the hydrophobic ILs because their water solubility is substantially lower.

  6. Ionic Liquids Can Permanently Modify Porous Silicon Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Shruti; Coombs, Sidney G; Wagle, Durgesh V; Bhawawet, Nakara; Baker, Gary A; Bright, Frank V

    2016-08-01

    To develop ionic liquid/porous silicon (IL/pSi) microarrays we have contact pin-printed 20 hydrophobic and hydrophilic ionic liquids onto as-prepared, hydrogen-passivated porous silicon (ap-pSi) and then determined the individual IL spot size, shape and associated pSi surface chemistry. The results reveal that the hydrophobic ionic liquids oxidize the ap-pSi slightly. In contrast, the hydrophilic ionic liquids lead to heavily oxidized pSi (i.e., ox-pSi). The strong oxidation arises from residual water within the hydrophilic ILs that is delivered from these ILs into the ap-pSi matrix causing oxidation. This phenomenon is less of an issue in the hydrophobic ILs because their water solubility is substantially lower. PMID:27405109

  7. Hopping conduction via ionic liquid induced silicon surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J.; Reich, K. V.; Sammon, M.; Shklovskii, B. I.; Goldman, A. M.

    2015-08-01

    In order to clarify the physics of the gating of solids by ionic liquids (ILs) we have gated lightly doped p -Si, which is so well studied that it can be called the "hydrogen atom of solid state physics" and can be used as a test bed for ionic liquids. We explore the case where the concentration of induced holes at the Si surface is below 1012cm-2 , hundreds of times smaller than record values. We find that in this case an excess negative ion binds a hole on the interface between the IL and Si becoming a surface acceptor. We study the surface conductance of holes hopping between such nearest neighbor acceptors. Analyzing the acceptor concentration dependence of this conductivity, we find that the localization length of a hole is in reasonable agreement with our direct variational calculation of its binding energy. The observed hopping conductivity resembles that of well studied Na+ implanted Si MOSFETs.

  8. Corrosion prevention of magnesium surfaces via surface conversion treatments using ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin

    2016-09-06

    A method for conversion coating a magnesium-containing surface, the method comprising contacting the magnesium-containing surface with an ionic liquid compound under conditions that result in decomposition of the ionic liquid compound to produce a conversion coated magnesium-containing surface having a substantially improved corrosion resistance relative to the magnesium-containing surface before said conversion coating. Also described are the resulting conversion-coated magnesium-containing surface, as well as mechanical components and devices containing the conversion-coated magnesium-containing surface.

  9. Microtubule ionic conduction and its implications for higher cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Travis J A; Tuszynski, Jack A; Priel, Avner; Freedman, Holly

    2010-06-01

    The neuronal cytoskeleton has been hypothesized to play a role in higher cognitive functions including learning, memory and consciousness. Experimental evidence suggests that both microtubules and actin filaments act as biological electrical wires that can transmit and amplify electric signals via the flow of condensed ion clouds. The potential transmission of electrical signals via the cytoskeleton is of extreme importance to the electrical activity of neurons in general. In this regard, the unique structure, geometry and electrostatics of microtubules are discussed with the expected impact on their specific functions within the neuron. Electric circuit models of ionic flow along microtubules are discussed in the context of experimental data, and the specific importance of both the tubulin C-terminal tail regions, and the nano-pore openings lining the microtubule wall is elucidated. Overall, these recent results suggest that ions, condensed around the surface of the major filaments of the cytoskeleton, flow along and through microtubules in the presence of potential differences, thus acting as transmission lines propagating intracellular signals in a given cell. The significance of this conductance to the functioning of the electrically active neuron, and to higher cognitive function is also discussed.

  10. Surface confined ionic liquid as a stationary phase for HPLC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qian; Baker, Gary A; Baker, Sheila N; Colon, Luis

    2006-01-01

    Trimethoxysilane ionosilane derivatives of room temperature ionic liquids based on alkylimidazolium bromides were synthesized for attachment to silica support material. The derivatives 1-methyl-3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl)imidazolium bromide and 1-butyl-3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl)imidazolium bromide were used to modify the surface of 3 {micro}m diameter silica particles to act as the stationary phase for HPLC. The modified particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopies. The surface modification procedure rendered particles with a surface coverage of 0.84 {micro}mol m{sup -2} for the alkylimidazolium bromide. The ionic liquid moiety was predominantly attached to the silica surface through two siloxane bonds of the ionosilane derivative (63%). Columns packed with the modified silica material were tested under HPLC conditions. Preliminary evaluation of the stationary phase for HPLC was performed using aromatic carboxylic acids as model compounds. The separation mechanism appears to involve multiple interactions including ion exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and other electrostatic interactions.

  11. Imidazolium-based ionic liquid surfaces for biosensing.

    PubMed

    Ratel, Mathieu; Provencher-Girard, Audrey; Zhao, Sandy Shuo; Breault-Turcot, Julien; Labrecque-Carbonneau, Jérémie; Branca, Mathieu; Pelletier, Joelle N; Schmitzer, Andreea R; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2013-06-18

    Ionic liquid self-assembled monolayers (SAM) were designed and applied for binding streptavidin, promoting affinity biosensing and enzyme activity on gold surfaces of sensors. The synthesis of 1-((+)-biotin)pentanamido)propyl)-3-(12-mercaptododecyl)-imidazolium bromide, a biotinylated ionic liquid (IL-biotin), which self-assembles on gold film, afforded streptavidin sensing with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The IL-biotin-SAM efficiently formed a full streptavidin monolayer. The synthesis of 1-(carboxymethyl)-3-(mercaptododecyl)-imidazoliumbromide, a carboxylated IL (IL-COOH), was used to immobilize anti-IgG to create an affinity biosensor. The IL-COOH demonstrated efficient detection of IgG in the nanomolar concentration range, similar to the alkylthiols SAM and PEG. In addition, the IL-COOH demonstrated low fouling in crude serum, to a level equivalent to PEG. The IL-COOH was further modified with N,N'-bis (carboxymethyl)-l-lysine hydrate to bind copper ions and then, chelate histidine-tagged biomolecules. Human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR) was chelated to the modified IL-COOH. By monitoring enzyme activity in situ on the SPR sensor, it was revealed that the IL-COOH SAM improved the activity of hDHFR by 24% in comparison to classical SAM. Thereby, IL-SAM has been synthesized and successfully applied to three important biosensing schemes, demonstrating the advantages of this new class of monolayers. PMID:23706008

  12. Photoresponsive Self-Assembly of Surface Active Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Wu, Aoli; Lu, Fei; Sun, Panpan; Gao, Xinpei; Shi, Lijuan; Zheng, Liqiang

    2016-08-16

    A novel photoresponsive surface active ionic liquid (SAIL) 1-(4-methyl azobenzene)-3-tetradecylimidazolium bromide ([C14mimAzo]Br) with azobenzene located in the headgroup was designed. Reversible vesicle formation and rupture can be finely controlled by photostimuli without any additives in the aqueous solution of the single-tailed ionic liquid. The photoisomerization of the azobenzene derivative was investigated by (1)H NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations further demonstrate that trans-[C14mimAzo]Br has less negative interaction energy, which is beneficial to aggregate formation in water. The incorporation of trans-azobenzene group increases the hydrophobicity of the headgroup and reduces the electrostatic repulsion by delocalization of charge, which are beneficial to the formation of vesicles. However, the bend of cis-azobenzene makes the cis-isomers have no ability to accumulate tightly, which induces the rupture of vesicles. Our work paves a convenient way to achieve controlled topologies and self-assembly of single SAIL. PMID:27445115

  13. Multiscale implications of stress-induced ionic polymer transducer sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangrilli, Ursula Therese

    Ionic Polymer Transducers (IPTs) can act as both actuators and sensors. As actuators, the energy density values are much better than PZT or PVDF materials. As sensors, IPTs are extraordinarily sensitive and have the potential to be used in any mode of deformation. However, application of IPT sensors is limited because of a lack of understanding of their fundamental physics. In this work, the main focus will be to explore and develop a better understanding of how IPTs function with respect to shear deformation. In turn, the results developed here will improve upon the state of understanding of IPT sensors in general and potentially expand meaningful application opportunities. Because IPT active response is a multiscale phenomenon, this study adopts a multiscale modeling framework. Of interest are the interplay among the polymeric backbone of the ionic polymer, the diluent present in the hydrophilic regions of the polymer and the interspersed electrode particulate. To begin, this work improves upon a past multiscale modeling framework for the polymer backbone based upon Rotational Isomeric State Theory such that the effects of material anisotropy may be considered. This is potentially significant in light of the polymer manufacturing process. These modeling results are then incorporated into a model of the diluent movement within the ionic transport regions of the IPT. The electrical current predictions are based upon streaming potential theories. Finally, this model incorporates viscoelastic behavior in order to develop a better understanding of the coupling of these two systems (the polymer and the diluent) and how this coupling influence affects the expected current output over time.

  14. Noncovalent interactions in halogenated ionic liquids: theoretical study and crystallographic implications.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiying; Lu, Yunxiang; Wu, Weihong; Liu, Yingtao; Peng, Changjun; Liu, Honglai; Zhu, Weiliang

    2013-03-28

    In recent years, several specific imidazolium-based ionic liquids with halogen substituents on the imidazole ring as well as on the alkyl chains have been reported. In this work, noncovalent interactions in four halogenated ionic liquids, i.e. 2-bromo-/iodo- and 4,5-dibromo-/diiodo-1,3-dimethylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonates, were systematically investigated using density functional theory calculations. The structural and energetic properties of the ion pairs for such ionic liquids have been fully examined and compared with the non-halogenated ones. It was found that C-X···O halogen bonds, C-H···O hydrogen bonds, and electrostatic interactions with the anion located over the imidazole ring in the ion pairs. In addition, the structures and energetics of two ion pairs for such ionic liquids were also explored to reproduce experimental observations. The halogen-bonded ring structures and the conformers with the concurrent C-H···O and C-X···O contacts were predicted, consistent with the X-ray crystal structures of corresponding organic salts. Finally, the implications of the observed structural and energetic features of ion pairs on the design of halogen-bonding ionic liquids were discussed. The results presented herein should provide useful information in the development of novel halogenated ionic liquids used for specific tasks ranging from organic synthesis to gas absorption.

  15. Fluorination effects on the thermodynamic, thermophysical and surface properties of ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Reis, P. M.; Carvalho, P. J.; Lopes-da-Silva, J. A.; Esperança, J. M. S. S.; Araújo, J. M. M.; Rebelo, L. P. N.; Freire, M. G.; Pereiro, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the thermal, thermodynamic, thermophysical and surface properties of eight ionic liquids with fluorinated alkyl side chain lengths equal or greater than four carbon atoms. Melting and decomposition temperatures were determined together with experimental densities, surface tensions, refractive indices, dynamic viscosities and ionic conductivities in a temperature interval ranging from 293.15 to 353.15 K. The surface properties of these fluorinated ionic liquids were discussed and several thermodynamic functions, as well as critical temperatures, were estimated. Coefficients of isobaric thermal expansion, molecular volumes and free volume effects were calculated from experimental values of density and refractive index and compared with previous data. Finally, Walden plots were used to evaluate the ionicity of the investigated ionic liquids.

  16. Fluorination effects on the thermodynamic, thermophysical and surface properties of ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Reis, P. M.; Carvalho, P. J.; Lopes-da-Silva, J. A.; Esperança, J. M. S. S.; Araújo, J. M. M.; Rebelo, L. P. N.; Freire, M. G.; Pereiro, A. B.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the thermal, thermodynamic, thermophysical and surface properties of eight ionic liquids with fluorinated alkyl side chain lengths equal or greater than four carbon atoms. Melting and decomposition temperatures were determined together with experimental densities, surface tensions, refractive indices, dynamic viscosities and ionic conductivities in a temperature interval ranging from 293.15 to 353.15 K. The surface properties of these fluorinated ionic liquids were discussed and several thermodynamic functions, as well as critical temperatures, were estimated. Coefficients of isobaric thermal expansion, molecular volumes and free volume effects were calculated from experimental values of density and refractive index and compared with previous data. Finally, Walden plots were used to evaluate the ionicity of the investigated ionic liquids. PMID:27642190

  17. Mesoporous and biocompatible surface active silica aerogel synthesis using choline formate ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Meera, Kamal Mohamed Seeni; Sankar, Rajavelu Murali; Jaisankar, Sellamuthu N; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, we report the preparation and characterization of mesoporous and biocompatible transparent silica aerogel by the sol-gel polymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate using ionic liquid. Choline cation based ionic liquid allows the silica framework to form in a non collapsing environment and controls the pore size of the gel. FT-IR spectra reveal the interaction of ionic liquid with surface -OH of the gel. DSC thermogram giving the evidence of confinement of ionic liquid within the silica matrix, which helps to avoid the shrinkage of the gel during the aging process. Nitrogen sorption measurements of gel prepared with ionic liquid exhibit a low surface area of 100.53 m2/g and high average pore size of 3.74 nm. MTT assay proves the biocompatibility and cell viability of the prepared gels. This new nanoporous silica material can be applied to immobilize biological molecules, which may retain their stability over a longer period.

  18. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  19. Probing the interaction of ionic liquids with graphene using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Surwade, Sumedh P.; Crespo, Marcos

    2015-12-17

    We report an in situ measurement of the interaction of an imidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquid with both pure silver and a graphene-over-silver electrode under an applied electrochemical potential. At a negative applied potential, overall signal intensity increased indicating enhanced ionic liquid concentration at both silver and graphene electrodes. Vibrational modes associated with the imidazolium ring exhibited greater intensity enhancements and larger peak shifts compared with the anion indicating that the cation adsorbs with the ring and alkyl chain parallel to the electrode surface for both silver and graphene. In contrast to the silver, the surface enhanced Raman spectra of the ionic liquid near graphene showed shifts in the cation peaks even at no applied potential because of the strong π–π interaction between the ionic liquid and the graphene. Furthermore, the intensity of the graphene peak decreased in the presence of ionic liquid possibly due to the interaction between the ionic liquid and graphene. In conclusion, these results illustrate the effectiveness of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to investigate electrolyte interactions with graphene at the liquid/electrode interface.

  20. Probing the interaction of ionic liquids with graphene using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Surwade, Sumedh P.; Crespo, Marcos

    2015-12-17

    We report an in situ measurement of the interaction of an imidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquid with both pure silver and a graphene-over-silver electrode under an applied electrochemical potential. At a negative applied potential, overall signal intensity increased indicating enhanced ionic liquid concentration at both silver and graphene electrodes. Vibrational modes associated with the imidazolium ring exhibited greater intensity enhancements and larger peak shifts compared with the anion indicating that the cation adsorbs with the ring and alkyl chain parallel to the electrode surface for both silver and graphene. In contrast to the silver, the surface enhanced Raman spectra ofmore » the ionic liquid near graphene showed shifts in the cation peaks even at no applied potential because of the strong π–π interaction between the ionic liquid and the graphene. Furthermore, the intensity of the graphene peak decreased in the presence of ionic liquid possibly due to the interaction between the ionic liquid and graphene. In conclusion, these results illustrate the effectiveness of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to investigate electrolyte interactions with graphene at the liquid/electrode interface.« less

  1. New Alkylether-Thiazolium Room-Temperature Ionic Liquid Lubricants: Surface Interactions and Tribological Performance.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Tulia; Sanes, José; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2016-07-20

    The use of newly synthesized alkylether-thiazolium ionic liquids as lubricants is described for the first time. Two ionic liquids composed of a thiazolium cation and a bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([Th][Tf2N]) or dicyanamide ([Th][(NC)2N]) anion have been studied, and their tribological behavior has been compared with that of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([Im][Tf2N]) in pin-on-disk tests using sapphire balls against AISI 52100 or AISI 316L steels. All ionic liquids show higher contact angles on AISI 316L steel than on AISI 52100, the lowest values found for ([Im][Tf2N]) on both steel surfaces. AISI 52100 shows similar friction coefficients for all lubricants, and negligible wear rates for the ionic liquids containing the bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide anion. Immersion tests show no corrosion of AISI 52100 in imidazolium or thiazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ionic liquids. AISI 316L shows similar friction coefficients for both bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ionic liquids, but the lowest wear rate is obtained for [Th][Tf2N]. An increase in friction coefficient and wear rate is observed for thiazolium dicyanamide. This increase is related to a tribocorrosion process due to decomposition of the thiazolium cation. XPS shows the formation of iron sulfide on the wear track on AISI 316L after lubrication with thiazolium dicyanamide. No tribocorrosion processes take place for the [Tf2N] ionic liquids.

  2. New Alkylether-Thiazolium Room-Temperature Ionic Liquid Lubricants: Surface Interactions and Tribological Performance.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Tulia; Sanes, José; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2016-07-20

    The use of newly synthesized alkylether-thiazolium ionic liquids as lubricants is described for the first time. Two ionic liquids composed of a thiazolium cation and a bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([Th][Tf2N]) or dicyanamide ([Th][(NC)2N]) anion have been studied, and their tribological behavior has been compared with that of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ([Im][Tf2N]) in pin-on-disk tests using sapphire balls against AISI 52100 or AISI 316L steels. All ionic liquids show higher contact angles on AISI 316L steel than on AISI 52100, the lowest values found for ([Im][Tf2N]) on both steel surfaces. AISI 52100 shows similar friction coefficients for all lubricants, and negligible wear rates for the ionic liquids containing the bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide anion. Immersion tests show no corrosion of AISI 52100 in imidazolium or thiazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ionic liquids. AISI 316L shows similar friction coefficients for both bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide ionic liquids, but the lowest wear rate is obtained for [Th][Tf2N]. An increase in friction coefficient and wear rate is observed for thiazolium dicyanamide. This increase is related to a tribocorrosion process due to decomposition of the thiazolium cation. XPS shows the formation of iron sulfide on the wear track on AISI 316L after lubrication with thiazolium dicyanamide. No tribocorrosion processes take place for the [Tf2N] ionic liquids. PMID:27348604

  3. Surface tension of electrolyte interfaces: ionic specificity within a field-theory approach.

    PubMed

    Markovich, Tomer; Andelman, David; Podgornik, Rudi

    2015-01-28

    We study the surface tension of ionic solutions at air/water and oil/water interfaces by using field-theoretical methods and including a finite proximal surface-region with ionic-specific interactions. The free energy is expanded to first-order in a loop expansion beyond the mean-field result. We calculate the excess surface tension and obtain analytical predictions that reunite the Onsager-Samaras pioneering result (which does not agree with experimental data), with the ionic specificity of the Hofmeister series. We derive analytically the surface-tension dependence on the ionic strength, ionic size, and ion-surface interaction, and show consequently that the Onsager-Samaras result is consistent with the one-loop correction beyond the mean-field result. Our theory fits well a wide range of salt concentrations for different monovalent ions using one fit parameter per electrolyte and reproduces the reverse Hofmeister series for anions at the air/water and oil/water interfaces.

  4. Ionic profiles close to dielectric discontinuities: Specific ion-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovich, Tomer; Andelman, David; Orland, Henri

    2016-10-01

    We study, by incorporating short-range ion-surface interactions, ionic profiles of electrolyte solutions close to a non-charged interface between two dielectric media. In order to account for important correlation effects close to the interface, the ionic profiles are calculated beyond mean-field theory, using the loop expansion of the free energy. We show that how it is possible to overcome the well-known deficiency of the regular loop expansion close to the dielectric jump and treat the non-linear boundary conditions within the framework of field theory. The ionic profiles are obtained analytically to one-loop order in the free energy, and their dependence on different ion-surface interactions is investigated. The Gibbs adsorption isotherm as well as the ionic profiles is used to calculate the surface tension, in agreement with the reverse Hofmeister series. Consequently, from the experimentally measured surface tension, one can extract a single adhesivity parameter, which can be used within our model to quantitatively predict hard to measure ionic profiles.

  5. Wire-to-Plate Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge and Induced Ionic Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Lijuan; Li, Ben; Ouyang, Jiting

    2016-06-01

    The electrical and mechanical characteristics of the wire-to-plate surface dielectric barrier discharge and the induced ionic wind are investigated experimentally. The different temporal behaviors in positive and negative half-cycles are studied by time-resolved images. It is shown that the discharge and the light emission are generally stronger in the positive half cycle. The discharge is inhomogeneous and propagates in streamer mode; however, in the negative half-cycle, the discharge appears visually uniformly and operates in the diffuse mode. The surface discharge can produce ionic wind about several m/s above the dielectric surface. There exists an optimal width of the grounded electrode to produce a larger plasma area or active wind region. Increasing of the applied voltage or normalized dielectric constant leads to a larger wind velocity. The performance of ionic wind on flow control is visualized by employing a smoke stream. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11175017 and 11475019)

  6. Ordering layers of [bmim][PF6] ionic liquid on graphite surfaces: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Maolin, Sha; Fuchun, Zhang; Guozhong, Wu; Haiping, Fang; Chunlei, Wang; Shimou, Chen; Yi, Zhang; Jun, Hu

    2008-04-01

    Microscopic structures of room temperature ionic liquid (IL) [bmim][PF6] on hydrophobic graphite surfaces have been studied in detail by molecular dynamics simulation. It is clearly shown that both the mass and electron densities of the surface adsorbed ionic liquid are oscillatory, and the first peak adjacent to the graphite surface is considerably higher than others, corresponding to a solidlike IL bottom layer of 6 angstroms thick. Three IL layers are indicated between the graphite surface and the inner bulk IL liquid. The individually simulated properties of single-, double-, and triple-IL layers on the graphite surface are very similar to those of the layers between the graphite surface and the bulk liquid, indicating an insignificant effect of vapor-IL interface on the ordered IL layers. The simulation also indicates that the imidazolium ring and butyl tail of the cation (bmim+) of the IL bottom layer lie flat on the graphite surface.

  7. Magadiite Templated High Surface Area Graphene-Type Carbons from Metal-Halide based Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Fulvio, Pasquale F; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Bauer, John C; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Arend, Nikolas

    2013-01-01

    Freestanding silicon films with a thickness ranging from 1 nm to several micrometers were prepared by Cat-CVD onto ionic liquid ([BMIM][BF4]) surfaces for the first time. The films, obtained without a solid substrate, can be facilely characterized by TEM and AFM to study the film formation and growth process.

  8. Accelerated CO2 transport on surface of AgO nanoparticles in ionic liquid BMIMBF4

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Dahye; Kang, Yong Soo; Kang, Sang Wook

    2015-01-01

    The AgO nanoparticles were utilized for a CO2 separation membrane. The AgO nanoparticles were successfully generated in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIMBF4) by favorable interaction between the surface of particles and the counteranion of BMIMBF4. The generated AgO nanoparticles were confirmed by TEM, and the average size was 20 nm. Coordinative interactions of dissociated AgO particles with BMIM+BF4− were investigated by FT-Raman spectroscopy. When the ionic liquid BMIMBF4 containing AgO nanoparticles was utilized as a CO2 separation membrane, the separation performance was largely enhanced. PMID:26549605

  9. Facilitating mismatch discrimination by surface-affixed PNA probes via ionic regulation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Srabani; Mishra, Sourav; Banerjee, Trambaki; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2013-03-12

    There has been a search for alternative nucleic acids that can be more effectively used in nucleic acid detection technologies compared to the DNA probes. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which contains a non-ionic peptidic backbone, offers such possibilities since it is nuclease-resistant, it binds to DNA with high affinity, and it can be readily self-assembled onto solid substrates, e.g., gold(111), with a molecular backbone orientation away from the substrate. Although application of PNA as a sensor probe has been exemplified, so far there is little or no account of the ionic modulation of single base mismatch discrimination capacity of surface-tethered PNA probes. Herein, we report "on-surface" melting temperatures of PNA-DNA duplexes formed on gold(111) surface, as obtained from fluorescence measurements. We show that surface-tethered PNA forms a stabler duplex than DNA, and is more effective in single base mismatch discrimination than DNA. Importantly, although PNA backbone is non-ionic, variation in the ionic components in hybridization buffer, i.e., varying concentration of monovalent sodium ion, and the nature of anion and the cation, exhibits clear effects on the mismatch discrimination capacity of PNA probes. In general, with decreasing cation concentration, PNA-DNA duplexes are stabilized and mismatch discrimination capacity of the PNA probes is enhanced. The stabilizing/destabilizing effects of anions are found to follow the Hofmeister series, emphasizing the importance of hydrophobic interaction between nucleobases for stability of the PNA-DNA duplexes. Interestingly, the nature of ionic dependence of "on-surface" mismatch detection ability of PNA probes differs significantly from the "solution" behavior of these probes.

  10. Functionalization of Oxide Surfaces through Reaction with 1,3-Dialkylimidazolium Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Schernich, Stefan; Laurin, Mathias; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Prince, Kevin C; Taccardi, Nicola; Matolín, Vladimír; Wasserscheid, Peter; Libuda, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Practical applications of ionic liquids (ILs) often involve IL/oxide interfaces, but little is known regarding their interfacial chemistry. The unusual physicochemical properties of ILs, including their exceptionally low vapor pressure, provide access to such interfaces using a surface science approach in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). We have applied synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES) to the study of a thin film of the ionic liquid [C6C1Im][Tf2N] prepared in situ in UHV on ordered stoichiometric CeO2(111) and partially reduced CeO2-x. On the partially reduced surface, we mostly observe decomposition of the anion. On the stoichiometric CeO2(111) surface, however, a layer of surface-anchored organic products with high thermal stability is formed upon reaction of the cation. The suggested acid-base reaction pathway may provide well-defined functionalized IL/solid interfaces on basic oxides.

  11. Study of surface-bonded dicationic ionic liquids as stationary phases for hydrophilic interaction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lizhen; Li, Hua; Shan, Yuanhong; Wang, Shuangyuan; Shi, Xianzhe; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2014-02-21

    In the present study, several geminal dicationic ionic liquids based on 1,4-bis(3-allylimidazolium)butane and 1,8-bis(3-allylimidazolium)octane in combination with different anions bromide and bis(trifluoromethanesulphonyl)imide were prepared and then bonded to the surface of 3-mercaptopropyl modified silica materials through the "thiol-ene" click chemistry as stationary phases for hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). Compared with their monocationic analogues, the dicationic ionic liquids stationary phases presented effective retention and good selectivity for typical hydrophilic compounds under HILIC mode with the column efficiency as high as 130,000 plates/m. Moreover, the influence of different alkyl chain spacer between dications and combined anions on the retention behavior and selectivity of the dicationic ionic liquids stationary phases under HILIC mode was displayed. The results indicated that the longer linkage chain would decrease the hydrophilicity and retention on the dicationic ionic liquid stationary phase, and while differently combined anions had no difference due to the exchangeability under the common HILIC mobile phase with buffer salt. Finally, the retention mechanism was investigated by evaluating the effect of chromatographic factors on retention, including the water content in the mobile phase, the mobile phase pH and buffer salt concentration. The results showed that the dicationic ionic liquids stationary phases presented a mixed-mode retention behavior with HILIC mechanism and anion exchange.

  12. The dependence of surface tension on surface properties of ionic surfactant solution and the effects of counter-ions therein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuangye; Morgner, Harald

    2014-11-14

    In the present paper, we aim to investigate the dependence of surface tension on the surface properties and reveal the counter-ion effects on the adsorption of ionic surfactants on the solution surface. The surface tension, surface excess and surface concentration (defined as the amount of surfactant adsorbed in the surface phase divided by the surface area) of two anionic surfactants, namely dodecyl sulfate sodium and dodecyl sulfate caesium, dissolved in non-aqueous polar solvent formamide have been separately measured at 6 °C through independent experiments. Then, the correlation of surface tension with surface concentration and that of surface tension with surface excess is inspected in detail. It was found that there is a linear relationship between the surface tension and the surface concentration for the pure solutions of each surfactant, but their surface tension and surface excess cannot be correlated linearly. It is striking that the same surface tension-surface concentration linearity holds for two different surfactants, although they have apparently distinct counter-ions. Based on this finding, it is derived that the surface tension is decided by surface concentration of the surface active ions. After analyzing the surface structure, it is concluded that the counter-ions affect the surface tension indirectly through modifying the adsorption amount of the surface active ions in the surface layer.

  13. Ionic liquids influence on the surface properties of electron beam irradiated wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, Catalin; Patachia, Silvia; Doroftei, Florica; Parparita, Elena; Vasile, Cornelia

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the influence of three imidazolium-based ionic liquids (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride) on the structure and surface properties of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) veneers submitted to electron beam irradiation with a dose of 50 kGy has been studied by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, as well as image, scanning electron microscopy/SEM/EDX, atomic force microscopy and contact angle analysis. The experimental results have proven that the studied ionic liquids determine a better preservation of the structural features of wood (cellulose crystallinity index and lignin concentration on the surface) as well as some of surface properties such as surface energy, roughness, color upon irradiation with electron beam, in comparison with the reference wood, but surface composition is changed by treatment with imidazolium-based ionic liquids mainly with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate. Also, under electron beam irradiation covalent bonding of the imidazolium moiety to wood determines a higher resistance to water penetration and spreading on the surface.

  14. Click grafting of seaweed polysaccharides onto PVC surfaces using an ionic liquid as solvent and catalyst.

    PubMed

    Bigot, Sandra; Louarn, Guy; Kébir, Nasreddine; Burel, Fabrice

    2013-11-01

    Seaweed antibacterial polysaccharides were grafted onto poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) surfaces using an original click chemistry pathway. PVC isothiocyanate surfaces (PVC-NCS) were first prepared by nucleophilic substitution of the chloride groups by isothiocyanate groups in DMSO/water medium. Then, unmodified Ulvan, Fucan, Laminarin or Zosterin was directly grafted onto the PVC-NCS surface using 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium phosphate, an ionic liquid, as solvent and catalyst. To attest the grafting effectiveness, the new PVC surfaces were well characterized by AFM, XPS and contact angle measurements.

  15. Influence of Nanosegregation on the Surface Tension of Fluorinated Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Luís, Andreia; Shimizu, Karina; Araújo, João M M; Carvalho, Pedro J; Lopes-da-Silva, José A; Canongia Lopes, José N; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N; Coutinho, João A P; Freire, Mara G; Pereiro, Ana B

    2016-06-21

    We have investigated, both theoretically and experimentally, the balance between the presence of alkyl and perfluoroalkyl side chains on the surface organization and surface tension of fluorinated ionic liquids (FILs). A series of ionic liquids (ILs) composed of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations ([CnC1im] with n = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, or 12) combined with the perfluorobutanesulfonate anion was used. The surface tensions of the investigated liquid salts are considerably lower than those reported for non-fluorinated ionic liquids. The most surprising and striking feature is the identification, for the first time, of a minimum at n = 8 in the surface tension versus the length of the IL cation alkyl side chain. Supported by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, it was found that this trend is a result of the competition between the two nonpolar domains (perfluorinated and aliphatic) pointing toward the gas-liquid interface, a phenomenon which occurs in ILs with perfluorinated anions. Furthermore, these ILs present the lowest surface entropy reported to date. PMID:27218210

  16. Surface structure determinations of crystalline ionic thin films grown on transition metal single crystal surfaces by low energy electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.G.

    2000-05-01

    The surface structures of NaCl(100), LiF(100) and alpha-MgCl2(0001) adsorbed on various metal single crystals have been determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Thin films of these salts were grown on metal substrates by exposing the heated metal surface to a molecular flux of salt emitted from a Knudsen cell. This method of investigating thin films of insulators (ionic salts) on a conducting substrate (metal) circumvents surface charging problems that plagued bulk studies, thereby allowing the use of electron-based techniques to characterize the surface.

  17. Effect of linear surface-charge non-uniformities on the electrokinetic ionic-current rectification in conical nanopores.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shizhi; Joo, Sang W; Ai, Ye; Cheney, Marcos A; Hou, Wensheng

    2009-01-15

    The electrokinetic ionic-current rectification in a conical nanopore with linearly varying surface-charge distributions is studied theoretically by using a continuum model composed of a coupled system of the Nernst-Planck equations for the ionic-concentration field and the Poisson equation for the electric potential in the electrolyte solution. The numerical analysis includes the electrochemistry inside reservoirs connected to the nanopore, neglected in previous studies, and more precise accounts of the ionic current are provided. The surface-charge distribution, especially near the tip of the nanopore, significantly affects the ionic enrichment and depletion, which, in turn, influence the resulting ionic current and the rectification. It is shown that non-uniform surface-charge distribution can reverse the direction, or sense, of the rectification. Further insights into the ionic-current rectification are provided by discussing the intriguing details of the electric potential and ionic-concentration fields, leading to the rectification. Rationale for future studies on ionic-current rectification, associated with other non-uniform surface-charge distributions and electroosmotic convection for example, is discussed.

  18. Neptunium (V) Adsorption to a Halophilic Bacterium Under High Ionic Strength Conditions: A Surface Complexation Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ams, David A

    2012-06-11

    Rationale for experimental design: Np(V) -- important as analog for Pu(V) and for HLW scenarios; High ionic strength -- relevant to salt-based repositories such as the WIPP; Halophilic microorganisms -- representative of high ionic strength environments. For the first time showed: Significant adsorbant to halophilic microorganisms over entire pH range under high ionic strength conditions; Strong influence of ionic strength with increasing adsorption with increasing ionic strength (in contrast to trends of previous low ionic strength studies); Effect of aqueous Np(V) and bacterial surface site speciation on adsorption; and Developed thermodynamic models that can be incorporated into geochemical speciation models to aid in the prediction of the fate and transport of Np(V) in more complex systems.

  19. Nanoscale lubrication of ionic surfaces controlled via a strong electric field.

    PubMed

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Kumar, Rajeev; Bocharova, Vera; Sumpter, Bobby G; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    Frictional forces arise whenever objects around us are set in motion. Controlling them in a rational manner means gaining leverage over mechanical energy losses and wear. This paper presents a way of manipulating nanoscale friction by means of in situ lubrication and interfacial electrochemistry. Water lubricant is directionally condensed from the vapor phase at a moving metal-ionic crystal interface by a strong confined electric field, thereby allowing friction to be tuned up or down via an applied bias. The electric potential polarity and ionic solid solubility are shown to strongly influence friction between the atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and salt surface. An increase in friction is associated with the AFM tip digging into the surface, whereas reducing friction does not influence its topography. No current flows during friction variation, which excludes Joule heating and associated electrical energy losses. The demonstrated novel effect can be of significant technological importance for controlling friction in nano- and micro-electromechanical systems. PMID:25623295

  20. Nanoscale Lubrication of Ionic Surfaces Controlled via a Strong Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Kumar, Rajeev; Bocharova, Vera; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-01-01

    Frictional forces arise whenever objects around us are set in motion. Controlling them in a rational manner means gaining leverage over mechanical energy losses and wear. This paper presents a way of manipulating nanoscale friction by means of in situ lubrication and interfacial electrochemistry. Water lubricant is directionally condensed from the vapor phase at a moving metal-ionic crystal interface by a strong confined electric field, thereby allowing friction to be tuned up or down via an applied bias. The electric potential polarity and ionic solid solubility are shown to strongly influence friction between the atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and salt surface. An increase in friction is associated with the AFM tip digging into the surface, whereas reducing friction does not influence its topography. No current flows during friction variation, which excludes Joule heating and associated electrical energy losses. The demonstrated novel effect can be of significant technological importance for controlling friction in nano- and micro-electromechanical systems. PMID:25623295

  1. Nanoscale lubrication of ionic surfaces controlled via a strong electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Bocharova, Vera; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Kumar, Rajeev

    2015-01-27

    Frictional forces arise whenever objects around us are set in motion. Controlling them in a rational manner means gaining leverage over mechanical energy losses and wear. This paper presents a way of manipulating nanoscale friction by means of in situ lubrication and interfacial electrochemistry. Water lubricant is directionally condensed from the vapor phase at a moving metal-ionic crystal interface by a strong confined electric field, thereby allowing friction to be tuned up or down via an applied bias. The electric potential polarity and ionic solid solubility are shown to strongly influence friction between the atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and salt surface. An increase in friction is associated with the AFM tip digging into the surface, whereas reducing friction does not influence its topography. No current flows during friction variation, which excludes Joule heating and associated electrical energy losses. Lastly, the demonstrated novel effect can be of significant technological importance for controlling friction in nano- and micro-electromechanical systems.

  2. Surface layering and melting in an ionic liquid studied by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity

    PubMed Central

    Mezger, Markus; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Reichert, Harald; Deutsch, Moshe

    2013-01-01

    The molecular-scale structure of the ionic liquid [C18mim]+[FAP]− near its free surface was studied by complementary methods. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant soft X-ray reflectivity revealed a depth-decaying near-surface layering. Element-specific interfacial profiles were extracted with submolecular resolution from energy-dependent soft X-ray reflectivity data. Temperature-dependent hard X-ray reflectivity, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, and infrared spectroscopy uncovered an intriguing melting mechanism for the layered region, where alkyl chain melting drove a negative thermal expansion of the surface layer spacing. PMID:23431181

  3. Immobilization of enzymes using non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs): Surface and enzyme effects.

    PubMed

    Ward, Keeran; Xi, Jingshu; Stuckey, David C

    2015-12-01

    The use of non-ionic colloidal liquid aphrons (CLAs) as a support for enzyme immobilisation was investigated. Formulation required the mixing of an aqueous-surfactant solution with a relatively non-polar solvent-surfactant solution, forming a solvent droplet surrounded by a thin stabilised aqueous film (soapy shell). Studies utilising anionic surfactants have showed increased retention, however, very little have been understood about the forces governing immobilisation. This study seeks to determine the effects of enzyme properties on CLA immobilisation by examining a non-ionic/non-polar solvent system comprised of two non-ionic surfactants, Tween 20 and 80, mineral oil and the enzymes lipase, aprotinin and α-chymotrypsin. From these results it was deduced that hydrophobic interactions strongly governed immobilisation. Confocal Scanning Laser Microscopy (CSLM) revealed that immobilisation was predominantly achieved by surface adsorption attributed to hydrophobic interactions between the enzyme and the CLA surface. Enzyme surface affinity was found to increase when added directly to the formulation (pre-manufacture addition), as opposed to the bulk continuous phase (post-manufacture addition), with α-chymotrypsin and aprotinin being the most perturbed, while lipase was relatively unaffected. The effect of zeta potential on immobilisation showed that enzymes adsorbed better closer to their pI, indicating that charge minimisation was necessary for immobilisation. Finally, the effect of increasing enzyme concentration in the aqueous phase resulted in an increase in adsorption for all enzymes due to cooperativity between protein molecules, with saturation occurring faster at higher adsorption rates.

  4. Crown ether stereoisomerism: Implications in metal ion extraction and ionic liquid design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Alan J.

    Since their discovery more than four decades ago, crown ethers (CEs) have been the subject of intense investigation in a number of fields. Although many of the structural features that govern the behavior of these compounds have been thoroughly explored, the effect of their stereochemistry has received relatively little attention. In the present work, crown ether stereochemistry is shown to have important implications in both the design of ternary (i.e., three-component) ionic liquids (TILs) and metal ion extraction. Specifically, as a first step toward the development of guidelines for the rational design of ternary ionic liquids employing crown ethers as the neutral extractant, a systematic examination of the effect of crown ether stereochemistry (employing dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) as a representative crown compound), along with ring size, the nature and number of donor atoms, and the presence of functional groups, on the thermal properties (i.e., melting point or glass transition; decomposition or evaporation) of these compounds was carried out. Stereochemistry was found to have no appreciable impact on the onset temperature for mass loss. Rather, molecular weight and aromaticity were found to be more influential. Stereochemistry was, however, found to significantly affect the melting point of a TIL prepared from it; while the metal-CE formation constant, which varies with stereoisomer was observed to determine the onset temperature for mass loss of the TIL. To explore the implications of crown ether stereoisomerism in metal ion extraction, the formation constants for alkaline earth cation complexes with the isomers of DCH18C6 and selected stereoisomers of di-tert-butylcyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) were measured. These values were found to vary inversely with the ligand strain (i.e., reorganizational) energy for the isomer, as determined by molecular mechanics calculations. Using this relationship (along with additional identification methods

  5. Potentiostatic control of ionic liquid surface film formation on ZE41 magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Efthimiadis, Jim; Neil, Wayne C; Bunter, Andrew; Howlett, Patrick C; Hinton, Bruce R W; MacFarlane, Douglas R; Forsyth, Maria

    2010-05-01

    The generation of potentially corrosion-resistant films on light metal alloys of magnesium have been investigated. Magnesium alloy, ZE41 [Mg-Zn-Rare Earth (RE)-Zr, nominal composition approximately 4 wt % Zn, approximately 1.7 wt % RE (Ce), approximately 0.6 wt % Zr, remaining balance, Mg], was exposed under potentiostatic control to the ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium diphenylphosphate, denoted [P(6,6,6,14)][DPP]. During exposure to this IL, a bias potential, shifted from open circuit, was applied to the ZE41 surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and chronoamperometry (CA) were used to monitor the evolution of film formation on the metal surface during exposure. The EIS data indicate that, of the four bias potentials examined, applying a potential of -200 mV versus OCP during the exposure period resulted in surface films of greatest resistance. Both EIS measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging indicate that these surfaces are substantially different to those formed without potential bias. Time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) elemental mapping of the films was utilized to ascertain the distribution of the ionic liquid cationic and anionic species relative to the microstructural surface features of ZE41 and indicated a more uniform distribution compared with the surface following exposure in the absence of a bias potential. Immersion of the treated ZE41 specimens in a chloride contaminated salt solution clearly indicated that the ionic liquid generated surface films offered significant protection against pitting corrosion, although the intermetallics were still insufficiently protected by the IL and hence favored intergranular corrosion processes.

  6. O(3P) atoms as a chemical probe of surface ordering in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Waring, Carla; Bagot, Paul A J; Slattery, John M; Costen, Matthew L; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2010-04-15

    The reactivity of photolytically generated, gas-phase, ground-state atomic oxygen, O((3)P), with the surfaces of a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([NTf(2)]) ionic liquids has been investigated. The liquids differ only in the length of the linear C(n)H(2n+1) alkyl side chain on the cation, with n = 2, 4, 5, 8, and 12. Laser-induced fluorescence was used to detect gas-phase OH v' = 0 radicals formed at the gas-liquid interface. The reactivity of the ionic liquids increases nonlinearly with n, in a way that cannot simply be explained by stoichiometry. We infer that the alkyl chains must be preferentially exposed at the interface to a degree that is dependent on chain length. A relatively sharp onset of surface segregation is apparent in the region of n = 4. The surface specificity of the method is confirmed through the nonthermal characteristics of both the translational and rotational distributions of the OH v' = 0. These reveal that the dynamics are dominated by a direct, impulsive scattering mechanism at the outer layers of the liquid. The OH v' = 0 yield is effectively independent of the bulk temperature of the longest-chain ionic liquid in the range 298-343 K, also consistent with a predominantly direct mechanism. These product attributes are broadly similar to those of the benchmark pure hydrocarbon liquid, squalane, but a more detailed analysis suggests that the interface may be microscopically smoother for the ionic liquids.

  7. Ionic strength and pH as control parameters for spontaneous surface oscillations.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, N M; Pimienta, V; Tadmouri, R; Miller, R; Vollhardt, D

    2012-05-01

    A system far from equilibrium, where the surfactant transfer from a small drop located in the aqueous bulk to the air-water interface results in spontaneous nonlinear oscillations of surface tension, is theoretically and experimentally considered. The oscillations in this system are the result of periodically arising and terminating Marangoni instability. The surfactant under consideration is octanoic acid, the dissociated form of which is much less surface-active than the protonated form. Numerical simulations show how the system behavior can be controlled by changes in pH and ionic strength of the aqueous phase. The results of numerical simulations are in good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Physically and chemically stable ionic liquid-infused textured surfaces showing excellent dynamic omniphobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Daniel F.; Urata, Chihiro; Masheder, Benjamin; Dunderdale, Gary J.; Hozumi, Atsushi; Yagihashi, Makoto

    2014-05-01

    A fluorinated and hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, effectively served as an advantageous lubricating liquid for the preparation of physically and chemically stable omniphobic surfaces based on slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces. Here, we used particulate microstructures as supports, prepared by the chemical vapor deposition of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane and subsequent surface modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane. Confirmed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the resulting IL-infused microtextured surfaces are smooth and not only water but also various low surface tension liquids can easily slide off at low substrate tilt angles of <5°, even after exposure to high temperature, vacuum, and UV irradiation.

  9. Molecular and ionic contamination monitoring for cleanroom air and wafer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Peng; Adams, Marty; Shive, Larry; Pirooz, Saeed

    1997-09-01

    Advances in the electronic industry toward large-scale integration of semiconductor devices have placed strict demands on the ability to measure and monitor ultratrace levels of impurities. Even though they have been found to have increasingly detrimental impacts on the performance and yield of semiconductor products, organic and non-metal ionic contaminants have not received the same attention as particles and metallics. Method developments for ultratrace measurements of molecular and ionic contamination are far behind the demands. This paper describes the use of different sampling and analytical techniques to assess and monitor molecular and ionic contaminants in cleanroom ambient air and on wafer surfaces. Thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry/nitrogen phosphorous detector is used for the identification and quantification of organic contaminants. Ammonium (NH4+) and inorganic anions are analyzed by using capillary electrophoresis with indirect UV detection methods. The identification and quantification of specific organic compounds, which outgas from cleanroom ULPA filters and wafer package boxes and tend to adsorb on silicon wafers, will be demonstrated. Ammonium and anion contamination for different wafer cleaning processes will be compared. The capabilities, applications, and limitations of these techniques will be discussed in further details.

  10. Life Sciences Implications of Lunar Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Steven P.; Norcross, Jason R.; Abercromby, Andrew F.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document preliminary, predicted, life sciences implications of expected operational concepts for lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA). Algorithms developed through simulation and testing in lunar analog environments were used to predict crew metabolic rates and ground reaction forces experienced during lunar EVA. Subsequently, the total metabolic energy consumption, the daily bone load stimulus, total oxygen needed, and other variables were calculated and provided to Human Research Program and Exploration Systems Mission Directorate stakeholders. To provide context to the modeling, the report includes an overview of some scenarios that have been considered. Concise descriptions of the analog testing and development of the algorithms are also provided. This document may be updated to remain current with evolving lunar or other planetary surface operations, assumptions and concepts, and to provide additional data and analyses collected during the ongoing analog research program.

  11. Thermodynamic Control of Two-Dimensional Molecular Ionic Nanostructures on Metal Surfaces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jeon, Seokmin; Doak, Peter W.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-07-26

    Bulk molecular ionic solids exhibit fascinating electronic properties, including electron correlations, phase transitions and superconducting ground states. In contrast, few of these phenomena have so far been observed in low-dimensional molecular structures, including thin films, nanoparticles and molecular blends, not in the least because most of such structures have so far been composed of nearly closed-shell molecules. It is therefore desirable to develop low-dimensional molecular structures of ionic molecules toward fundamental studies and potential applications. Here we present detailed analysis of monolayer-thick structures of the canonical TTF-TCNQ (tetrathiafulvalene 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) system grown on low-index gold and silver surfaces. The most distinctivemore » property of the epitaxial growth is the wide abundance of stable TTF/TCNQ ratios, in sharp contrast to the predominance of 1:1 ratio in the bulk. We propose the existence of the surface phase-diagram that controls the structures of TTF-TCNQ on the surfaces, and demonstrate phase-transitions that occur upon progressively increasing the density of TCNQ while keeping the surface coverage of TTF fixed. Based on direct observations, we propose the binding motif behind the stable phases and infer the dominant interactions that enable the existence of the rich spectrum of surface structures. Finally, we also show that the surface phase diagram will control the epitaxy beyond monolayer coverage. Multiplicity of stable surface structures, the corollary rich phase diagram and the corresponding phase-transitions present an interesting opportunity for low-dimensional molecular systems, particularly if some of the electronic properties of the bulk can be preserved or modified in the surface phases.« less

  12. Thermodynamic Control of Two-Dimensional Molecular Ionic Nanostructures on Metal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seokmin; Doak, Peter W; Sumpter, Bobby G; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-08-23

    Bulk molecular ionic solids exhibit fascinating electronic properties, including electron correlations, phase transitions, and superconducting ground states. In contrast, few of these phenomena have been observed in low-dimensional molecular structures, including thin films, nanoparticles, and molecular blends, not in the least because most of such structures have been composed of nearly closed-shell molecules. It is therefore desirable to develop low-dimensional ionic molecular structures that can capture potential applications. Here, we present detailed analysis of monolayer-thick structures of the canonical TTF-TCNQ (tetrathiafulvalene 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) system grown on low-index gold and silver surfaces. The most distinctive property of the epitaxial growth is the wide abundance of stable TTF/TCNQ ratios, in sharp contrast to the predominance of a 1:1 ratio in the bulk. We propose the existence of the surface phase diagram that controls the structures of TTF-TCNQ on the surfaces and demonstrate phase transitions that occur upon progressively increasing the density of TCNQ while keeping the surface coverage of TTF fixed. Based on direct observations, we propose the binding motif behind the stable phases and infer the dominant interactions that enable the existence of the rich spectrum of surface structures. Finally, we also show that the surface phase diagram will control the epitaxy beyond monolayer coverage. Multiplicity of stable surface structures, the corollary rich phase diagram, and the corresponding phase transitions present an interesting opportunity for low-dimensional molecular systems, particularly if some of the electronic properties of the bulk can be preserved or modified in the surface phases. PMID:27458890

  13. Probing the Structure of Ionic Liquid Surfaces by Rotationally and Electronically Inelastic Scattering of no

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemkiewicz, M. P.; Zutz, A.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTIL’s) are a highly diverse class of materials with many potential technological applications. They are candidates for use in advanced electrolytes, green solvents, and supported liquid membranes for CO_2 sequestration. We present studies where inelastic scattering of high or low velocity nitric oxide provides insight into the microscopic structure of these complex surfaces. As an open shell diatomic, jet-cooled NO [^2π1/2(J = 0.5)] features both molecular and electronic collision dynamics as seen by probing scattered rotational and spin-orbit distributions respectively. These studies show substantial variation in degree of rotational and electronic excitation as ionic liquid identity is varied. Also, surface heating is found to have a strong effect on scattered spin-orbit branching, possibly due to the dependence of surface structure on temperature. This is discussed in terms of a picture where the electronic degree of freedom may serve as a sensitive measure of the cationic versus anionic nature of the top few layers of this material.

  14. Surface characteristics determining the cell compatibility of ionically cross-linked alginate gels.

    PubMed

    Machida-Sano, Ikuko; Hirakawa, Makoto; Matsumoto, Hiroki; Kamada, Mitsuki; Ogawa, Sakito; Satoh, Nao; Namiki, Hideo

    2014-04-01

    In this study we investigated differences in the characteristics determining the suitability of five types of ion (Fe(3+), Al(3+), Ca(2+), Ba(2+) and Sr(2+))-cross-linked alginate films as culture substrates for cells. Human dermal fibroblasts were cultured on each alginate film to examine the cell affinity of the alginates. Since cell behavior on the surface of a material is dependent on the proteins adsorbed to it, we investigated the protein adsorption ability and surface features (wettability, morphology and charge) related to the protein adsorption abilities of alginate films. We observed that ferric, aluminum and barium ion-cross-linked alginate films supported better cell growth and adsorbed higher amounts of serum proteins than other types. Surface wettability analysis demonstrated that ferric and aluminum ion-cross-linked alginates had moderate hydrophilic surfaces, while other types showed highly hydrophilic surfaces. The roughness was exhibited only on barium ion-cross-linked alginate surface. Surface charge measurements revealed that alginate films had negatively charged surfaces, and showed little difference among the five types of gel. These results indicate that the critical factors of ionically cross-linked alginate films determining the protein adsorption ability required for their cell compatibility may be surface wettability and morphology. PMID:24496019

  15. Chemical and heating treatments of ionic monolayer-protected clusters (IMPCs) with different surface counter anions.

    PubMed

    Choo, Hosun; Isaacs, Steven R; Small, Adam; Parmley, Seth; Shon, Young-Seok

    2007-12-01

    This paper shows an in-depth study on the chemical and thermal responses of two ionic monolayer-protected gold clusters (Oct(4)N(+-)Br- and Oct(4)N(+-)O(3)SS-IMPCs). Two IMPCs displayed completely different phase-transfer behaviors when the solutions were in contact with the aqueous solution containing N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)glycine (tiopronin). Not Oct(4)N(+-)O(3)SS-IMPCs but Oct(4)N(+-)Br-IMPCs experienced a facile phase transfer from the organic layer to the aqueous layer, which was resulted from the displacement of ionic ligands by tiopronin monolayers on the gold nanoparticle surface. When the toluene solution containing Oct(4)N(+-)Br-IMPCs was treated with the aqueous solution containing NaCl salts, the UV-vis spectrum of the solution containing Oct(4)N(+-)Br-IMPCs undertook a fast spectral evolution caused by decomposition/agglomeration of IMPCs. In contrast, Oct(4)N(+-)O(3)SS-IMPCs exhibited much higher stability against the NaCl treatments. The Oct(4)N(+-)O(3)SS-IMPCs also displayed a superior thermal stability at relatively high temperature of approximately 110 degrees C. Core size evolutions of Oct(4)N(+-)O(3)SS-IMPCs without a fast decomposition or aggregation of clusters were also observed during solid-state heating treatments at approximately 150 and approximately 200 degrees C. These results support that the presence of different anions clearly affect the overall stability of ionic nanoparticles. The stronger binding property of thiosulfate anions compared to bromide anions with gold nanoparticle surfaces makes Oct(4)N(+-)O(3)SS-IMPCs chemically more inert and thermally more stable. PMID:17719060

  16. New insights into the fundamental chemical nature of ionic liquid film formation on magnesium alloy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Maria; Neil, Wayne C; Howlett, Patrick C; Macfarlane, Douglas R; Hinton, Bruce R W; Rocher, Nathalie; Kemp, Thomas F; Smith, Mark E

    2009-05-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) based on trihexyltetradecylphosphonium coupled with either diphenylphosphate or bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide have been shown to react with magnesium alloy surfaces, leading to the formation a surface film that can improve the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The morphology and microstructure of the magnesium surface seems critical in determining the nature of the interphase, with grain boundary phases and intermetallics within the grain, rich in zirconium and zinc, showing almost no interaction with the IL and thereby resulting in a heterogeneous surface film. This has been explained, on the basis of solid-state NMR evidence, as being due to the extremely low reactivity of the native oxide films on the intermetallics (ZrO2 and ZnO) with the IL as compared with the magnesium-rich matrix where a magnesium hydroxide and/or carbonate inorganic surface is likely. Solid-state NMR characterization of the ZE41 alloy surface treated with the IL based on (Tf)2N(-) indicates that this anion reacts to form a metal fluoride rich surface in addition to an organic component. The diphenylphosphate anion also seems to undergo an additional chemical process on the metal surface, indicating that film formation on the metal is not a simple chemical interaction between the components of the IL and the substrate but may involve electrochemical processes. PMID:20355890

  17. Straightforward approach to graft bioactive polysaccharides onto polyurethane surfaces using an ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigot, Sandra; Louarn, Guy; Kébir, Nasreddine; Burel, Fabrice

    2014-09-01

    Surface properties directly affect the performance of a material in a biological environment. In this study, the goal was to develop a simple procedure allowing the grafting of antibacterial polysaccharides onto biomedical grade polyurethanes (e.g. Tecothane®). Thus, a straightforward chemical pathway involving an isothiocyanate-alcohol reaction in an ionic liquid (IL) was developed. PU isothiocyanted surfaces (PU-NCS) were first prepared by reacting p-phenylene diisothiocyanate with the surface urethane groups. Then, unmodified bioactive seaweed polysaccharides were directly grafted onto the surface, in mild conditions. The selected IL, i.e. 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium phosphate, was of particular interest since this liquid worked as solvent for p-phenylene diisothiocyanate and the polysaccharides and as catalyst for the grafting reactions. Successful grafting of the different polysaccharides was attested by changes in the surface functional groups, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) showed that polysaccharide grafting, slightly increased the surface roughness from 1.9 to more than 7 nm. Contact angle with water decreased from 88° (for native PU) to around 75° after polysaccharide grafting, attesting a more hydrophilic surface. This procedure would be transposed to the grafting onto PU surfaces of any macromolecule of interest bearing hydroxyl, thiol or amine groups.

  18. Nanoscale lubrication of ionic surfaces controlled via a strong electric field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Bocharova, Vera; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Kumar, Rajeev

    2015-01-27

    Frictional forces arise whenever objects around us are set in motion. Controlling them in a rational manner means gaining leverage over mechanical energy losses and wear. This paper presents a way of manipulating nanoscale friction by means of in situ lubrication and interfacial electrochemistry. Water lubricant is directionally condensed from the vapor phase at a moving metal-ionic crystal interface by a strong confined electric field, thereby allowing friction to be tuned up or down via an applied bias. The electric potential polarity and ionic solid solubility are shown to strongly influence friction between the atomic force microscope (AFM) tip andmore » salt surface. An increase in friction is associated with the AFM tip digging into the surface, whereas reducing friction does not influence its topography. No current flows during friction variation, which excludes Joule heating and associated electrical energy losses. Lastly, the demonstrated novel effect can be of significant technological importance for controlling friction in nano- and micro-electromechanical systems.« less

  19. Self-assembling array of magnetoelectrostatic jets from the surface of a superparamagnetic ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    King, Lyon B; Meyer, Edmond; Hopkins, Mark A; Hawkett, Brian S; Jain, Nirmesh

    2014-12-01

    Electrospray is a versatile technology used, for example, to ionize biomolecules for mass spectrometry, create nanofibers and nanowires, and propel spacecraft in orbit. Traditionally, electrospray is achieved via microfabricated capillary needle electrodes that are used to create the fluid jets. Here we report on multiple parallel jetting instabilities realized through the application of simultaneous electric and magnetic fields to the surface of a superparamagnetic electrically conducting ionic liquid with no needle electrodes. The ionic liquid ferrofluid is synthesized by suspending magnetic nanoparticles in a room-temperature molten salt carrier liquid. Two ILFFs are reported: one based on ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and the other based on EMIM-NTf2. The ILFFs display an electrical conductivity of 0.63 S/m and a relative magnetic permeability as high as 10. When coincident electric and magnetic fields are applied to these liquids, the result is a self-assembling array of emitters that are composed entirely of the colloidal fluid. An analysis of the magnetic surface stress induced on the ILFF shows that the electric field required for transition to spray can be reduced by as much as 4.5 × 10(7) V/m compared to purely electrostatic spray. Ferrofluid mode studies in nonuniform magnetic fields show that it is feasible to realize arrays with up to 16 emitters/mm(2). PMID:25372842

  20. The behavior of internal surfaces of cleavage in ionic crystals under thermoelectric influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyev, Leonid; Zanina, Anna; Feodorov, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of internal surfaces of cleavage fracture in ionic crystals under complex thermoelectric effect was investigated. The experiment was carried out in case of normal and parallel orientation of the electric field lines to the investigated surface. Our basic research method lies in simultaneous influence of thermal and electric fields on the crystal. In case of normal orientation of electric field lines to the crack surface the formation of dislocation rosettes in temperature range of impurity conduction was observed. In the temperature range of intrinsic conduction authors detected the formation of single crystal outgrowths on the positively charged surface. The shape of rosettes and outgrowths depends on their relative location to the crack tip. When outgrowth reaches the opposite negatively charged surface it forms a bridge between cleavage shores. In these areas the restoration of continuity was observed. In case of parallel orientation of electric field lines to the surface authors observed the appearance of a new phase in the form of a jelly-like substance on the crack surface. The crack faces had a closing tendency due to the directed diffusion of cations to the crack edges.

  1. Controlled ionic condensation at the surface of a native extremophile membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contera, Sonia Antoranz; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Ryan, John F.

    2010-02-01

    At the nanoscale level biological membranes present a complex interface with the solvent. The functional dynamics and relative flexibility of membrane components together with the presence of specific ionic effects can combine to create exciting new phenomena that challenge traditional theories such as the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory or models interpreting the role of ions in terms of their ability to structure water (structure making/breaking). Here we investigate ionic effects at the surface of a highly charged extremophile membrane composed of a proton pump (bacteriorhodopsin) and archaeal lipids naturally assembled into a 2D crystal. Using amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) in solution, we obtained sub-molecular resolution images of ion-induced surface restructuring of the membrane. We demonstrate the presence of a stiff cationic layer condensed at its extracellular surface. This layer cannot be explained by traditional continuum theories. Dynamic force spectroscopy experiments suggest that it is produced by electrostatic correlation mediated by a Manning-type condensation of ions. In contrast, the cytoplasmic surface is dominated by short-range repulsive hydration forces. These findings are relevant to archaeal bioenergetics and halophilic adaptation. Importantly, they present experimental evidence of a natural system that locally controls its interactions with the surrounding medium and challenges our current understanding of biological interfaces.At the nanoscale level biological membranes present a complex interface with the solvent. The functional dynamics and relative flexibility of membrane components together with the presence of specific ionic effects can combine to create exciting new phenomena that challenge traditional theories such as the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory or models interpreting the role of ions in terms of their ability to structure water (structure making/breaking). Here we

  2. [Characterization of surface properties of 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid by inverse gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yali; Wang, Qiang; Deng, Lishuang; Zhang, Zhengfang; Tang, Jun

    2013-02-01

    The determination of the dispersive component of surface free energies (gamma(s)d) at different temperatures and Lewis acid-base parameters of 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ionic liquid ([AMIM]Cl) were investigated by means of inverse gas chromatography (IGC). Four n-alkanes, including n-hexane (C6), n-heptane (C7), n-octane (C8) and n-nonane (C9), were chosen as the apolar probes to characterize the dispersive component of the surface free energies at 343.15, 353.15, 363.15 and 373.15 K, respectively; and dichloromethane (DCM), trichloromethane (TCM), tetrahydrofuran (THF), ethyl acetate (EtAc), acetone (Acet) as the polar probes to estimate the Lewis acid-base parameters to judge the interactions between [AMIM] Cl and the solvents. The IGC characterizations encompassed the adsorption thermodynamic parameters to acid-base surface interactions, including the standard enthalpy (deltaHa(s)) and the free energy change of adsorption (deltaGa(s)) at different temperatures. The results showed that the Lewis acid parameter Ka of [AMIM] Cl was 0.34, and the base parameter Kb was 1.68, which indicated it was Lewis amphoteric with predominantly basic character. Furthermore, the free energy of adsorption deltaGa(s) was also figured out. It was found that the gamma(s)d of the [AMIM] Cl were 52.26, 50.82, 46.08 and 42.05 mJ/m2 at 343.15, 353.15, 363.15 and 373.15 K, respectively. The results are of great importance to the study of the surface properties and the application of ionic liquid.

  3. Clean surface processing of rubrene single crystal immersed in ionic liquid by using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Yasuyuki; Hara, Hisaya; Morino, Yusuke; Bando, Ken-ichi; Imanishi, Akihito; Fukui, Ken-ichi; Uemura, Takafumi; Takeya, Jun

    2014-06-30

    Surface processing of a rubrene single crystal immersed in ionic liquids is valuable for further development of low voltage transistors operated by an electric double layer. We performed a precise and clean surface processing based on the tip-induced dissolution of rubrene molecules at the ionic liquid/rubrene single crystal interfaces by using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy. Molecular resolution imaging revealed that the tip-induced dissolution proceeded via metastable low density states derived from the anisotropic intermolecular interactions within the crystal structure.

  4. Clean surface processing of rubrene single crystal immersed in ionic liquid by using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Yasuyuki; Hara, Hisaya; Morino, Yusuke; Bando, Ken-ichi; Imanishi, Akihito; Uemura, Takafumi; Takeya, Jun; Fukui, Ken-ichi

    2014-06-01

    Surface processing of a rubrene single crystal immersed in ionic liquids is valuable for further development of low voltage transistors operated by an electric double layer. We performed a precise and clean surface processing based on the tip-induced dissolution of rubrene molecules at the ionic liquid/rubrene single crystal interfaces by using frequency modulation atomic force microscopy. Molecular resolution imaging revealed that the tip-induced dissolution proceeded via metastable low density states derived from the anisotropic intermolecular interactions within the crystal structure.

  5. Surface Tensions of Ionic Liquids: Non-Regular Trend Along the Number of Cyano Groups

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Hugo F. D.; Carvalho, Pedro J.; Kurnia, Kiki A.; Lopes-da-Silva, José A.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) with cyano-functionalized anions are a set of fluids that are still poorly characterized despite their remarkably low viscosities and potential applications. Aiming at providing a comprehensive study on the influence of the number of –CN groups through the surface tension and surface organization of ILs, the surface tensions of imidazolium-based ILs with cyano-functionalized anions were determined at atmospheric pressure and in the (298.15 to 343.15) K temperature range. The ILs investigated are based on 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations (alkyl = ethyl, butyl and hexyl) combined with the [SCN]-, [N(CN)2]−, [C(CN)3]− and [B(CN)4]-anions. Although the well-known trend regarding the surface tension decrease with the increase of the size of the aliphatic moiety at the cation was observed, the order obtained for the anions is more intricate. For a common cation and at a given temperature, the surface tension decreases according to: [N(CN)2]- > [SCN]- > [C(CN)3]- > [B(CN)4]-. Therefore, the surface tension of this homologous series does not decrease with the increase of the number of –CN groups at the anion as has been previously shown by studies performed with a more limited matrix of ILs. A maximum in the surface tension and critical temperature was observed for [N(CN)2]-based ILs. Furthermore, a minimum in the surface entropy, indicative of a highly structured surface, was found for the same class of ILs. All these evidences seem to be a result of stronger hydrogen-bonding interactions occurring in [N(CN)2]-based ILs, when compared with the remaining CN-based counterparts, and as sustained by cation-anion interaction energies derived from the Conductor Like Screening Model for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS).

  6. Surface Tensions of Ionic Liquids: Non-Regular Trend Along the Number of Cyano Groups

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Hugo F. D.; Carvalho, Pedro J.; Kurnia, Kiki A.; Lopes-da-Silva, José A.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) with cyano-functionalized anions are a set of fluids that are still poorly characterized despite their remarkably low viscosities and potential applications. Aiming at providing a comprehensive study on the influence of the number of –CN groups through the surface tension and surface organization of ILs, the surface tensions of imidazolium-based ILs with cyano-functionalized anions were determined at atmospheric pressure and in the (298.15 to 343.15) K temperature range. The ILs investigated are based on 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations (alkyl = ethyl, butyl and hexyl) combined with the [SCN]-, [N(CN)2]−, [C(CN)3]− and [B(CN)4]-anions. Although the well-known trend regarding the surface tension decrease with the increase of the size of the aliphatic moiety at the cation was observed, the order obtained for the anions is more intricate. For a common cation and at a given temperature, the surface tension decreases according to: [N(CN)2]- > [SCN]- > [C(CN)3]- > [B(CN)4]-. Therefore, the surface tension of this homologous series does not decrease with the increase of the number of –CN groups at the anion as has been previously shown by studies performed with a more limited matrix of ILs. A maximum in the surface tension and critical temperature was observed for [N(CN)2]-based ILs. Furthermore, a minimum in the surface entropy, indicative of a highly structured surface, was found for the same class of ILs. All these evidences seem to be a result of stronger hydrogen-bonding interactions occurring in [N(CN)2]-based ILs, when compared with the remaining CN-based counterparts, and as sustained by cation-anion interaction energies derived from the Conductor Like Screening Model for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS). PMID:27642224

  7. Surface study of metal-containing ionic liquids by means of photoemission and absorption spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporali, Stefano; Pedio, Maddalena; Chiappe, Cinzia; Pomelli, Christian S.; Acres, Robert G.; Bardi, Ugo

    2016-06-01

    The vacuum/liquid interface of different ionic liquids obtained by dissolving bistriflimide salts of Ag, Al, Cu, Ni, and Zn in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bistriflimide ([bmim][Tf2N]) was investigated under vacuum using AR-XPS and NEXAFS. The XPS spectra show chemical shifts of the nitrogen of the bistriflimide anion as a function of the metal type, indicating different strength of the coordination bonds. In silver bearing ILs, silver ions were found to be only weakly coordinated. On the contrary, Ni, Cu, Zn, and especially Al exhibit large chemical shifts attributable to strong interaction with the bistriflimide ions. The outermost surface was enriched with or depleted of metal ions as a function of the nature of the metals. Nickel and zinc tend to slightly concentrate at the surface while copper, silver, and especially aluminum are depleted at the surface. We also observed that the aliphatic alkyl chains of the cations tend to protrude outside the surface in all systems studied. However, the presence of metals generally increases the amount of bistriflimide at the vacuum/liquid interface.

  8. Structural stability and polarisation of ionic liquid films on silica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Federici Canova, Filippo; Mizukami, Masashi; Imamura, Takako; Kurihara, Kazue; Shluger, Alexander L

    2015-07-21

    We used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effect of disorder of the hydroxylated amorphous silica surface on the structure of 8 nm IL films formed from two ionic liquids featuring the same cation 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium or [BMIM], paired with bis(trifluoromethanesulphonyl)amide [NTF2] and tetrafluoroborate [BF4] anions. Several silica surfaces were modelled to estimate the effect of their atomic-scale configuration on the solid-liquid interface and the results are compared to those simulated on the crystalline cristobalite surface. Using strongly polar surfaces, we could also evaluate the response of the ILs to the electric field externally controlled or generated by charged defects in the silica film. We found that the structure of the liquids becomes weaker away from the interface and more susceptible to electric field. Our simulations show that [BMIM][BF4] has a large intrinsic dipole originating at the interface, resilient to external fields, while the polarisation of [BMIM][NTF2] can be more easily controlled.

  9. Grafting of ionic liquids on stainless steel surface for antibacterial application.

    PubMed

    Pang, Li Qing; Zhong, Li Juan; Zhou, Hui Fang; Wu, Xue E; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2015-02-01

    Stainless steel (SS) is favored for many uses due to its excellent chemical resistance, thermal stability and mechanical properties. Biofilms can be formed on stainless steel and may lead to serious hygiene problems and economic losses in many areas, e.g. food processing, public infrastructure and healthcare. For the first time, our work endeavored to make SS having antibacterial properties, ionic liquids (ILs) were grafted on SS surface via silane treatment followed by thiol-ene click reaction. The chemical structure and composition of the ILs grafted stainless-steel coupon surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The antibacterial activity has been investigated, and the results showed that the ILs grafted SS surface exhibited significant antibacterial effects against Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Additionally, the results obtained here indicated that the ILs used here having bromide anion showed much better antibacterial activity against E. coli than the corresponding ILs with tetrafluoroborate and hexafluorophosphate as anions. These results obtained here can help to design novel and more efficient stainless steel having antibacterial surface.

  10. Contact angles and wettability of ionic liquids on polar and non-polar surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Matheus M; Kurnia, Kiki A; Sousa, Filipa L; Silva, Nuno J O; Lopes-da-Silva, José A; Coutinho, João A P; Freire, Mara G

    2015-12-21

    Many applications involving ionic liquids (ILs) require the knowledge of their interfacial behaviour, such as wettability and adhesion. In this context, herein, two approaches were combined aiming at understanding the impact of the IL chemical structures on their wettability on both polar and non-polar surfaces, namely: (i) the experimental determination of the contact angles of a broad range of ILs (covering a wide number of anions of variable polarity, cations, and cation alkyl side chain lengths) on polar and non-polar solid substrates (glass, Al-plate, and poly-(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE)); and (ii) the correlation of the experimental contact angles with the cation-anion pair interaction energies generated by the Conductor-like Screening Model for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS). The combined results reveal that the hydrogen-bond basicity of ILs, and thus the IL anion, plays a major role through their wettability on both polar and non-polar surfaces. The increase of the IL hydrogen-bond accepting ability leads to an improved wettability of more polar surfaces (lower contact angles) while the opposite trend is observed on non-polar surfaces. The cation nature and alkyl side chain lengths have however a smaller impact on the wetting ability of ILs. Linear correlations were found between the experimental contact angles and the cation-anion hydrogen-bonding and cation ring energies, estimated using COSMO-RS, suggesting that these features primarily control the wetting ability of ILs. Furthermore, two-descriptor correlations are proposed here to predict the contact angles of a wide variety of ILs on glass, Al-plate, and PTFE surfaces. A new extended list is provided for the contact angles of ILs on three surfaces, which can be used as a priori information to choose appropriate ILs before a given application.

  11. Surface Modification of Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Using Ionic Complementary Peptides to Minimize Nonspecific Protein Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoling; Xiao, Junzhu; Dang, Fuquan

    2015-06-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) has become a widely used material for microfluidic and biological applications. However, PDMS has unacceptably high levels of nonspecific protein adsorption, which significantly lowers the performance of PDMS-based microfluidic chips. Most existing methods to reduce protein fouling of PDMS are to make the surface more hydrophilic by surface oxidization, polymer grafting, and physisorbed coatings. These methods suffer from the relatively short-term stability, the multistep complex treatment procedure, or the insufficient adsorption reduction. Herein, we developed a novel and facile modification method based on self-assembled peptides with well-tailored amino acid composition and sequence, which can also interact strongly with the PDMS surface in the same way as proteins, for suppressing the nonspecific protein fouling and improving the biocompatibility of PDMS-based microfluidic chips. We first demonstrated that an ionic complementary peptide, EAR16-II with a sequence of [(Ala-Glu-Ala-Glu-Ala-Arg-Ala-Arg)2], can readily self-assemble into an amphipathic film predominantly composed of tightly packed β-sheets on the native hydrophobic and plasma-oxidized hydrophilic PDMS surfaces upon low concentrations of carbohydrates. The self-assembled EAR16-II amphipathic film exposed its hydrophobic side to the solution and thus rendered the PDMS surface hydrophobic with water contact angles (WCAs) of around 110.0°. However, the self-assembled EAR16-II amphipathic film exhibited excellent protein-repelling and blood compatibility properties comparable to or better than those obtained with previously reported methods. A schematic model has been proposed to explain the interactions of EAR16-II with the PDMS surface and the antifouling capability of EAR16-II coatings at a molecular level. The current work will pave the way to the development of novel coating materials to address the nonspecific protein adsorption on PDMS, thereby broadening the

  12. Electrostatics in ionic solution : work and energy, charge regulation, and in homogeneous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, N. J. H.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis concerns the electrostatic properties of charged objects that are immersed into an ionic solvent, for example water with dissolved salt. Typically, the ions inside such a solvent form layers of countercharge close to the charged objects, causing `screening' of the charges. By employing Density Functional Theory (DFT) one is able integrate out the degrees of freedom of the ions and find relations that describe the effective electrostatic properties of the charged objects. One finds that for a large parameter regime the electrostatic potential everywhere in the solvent should satisfy the well established Poisson-Boltzmann equation. We study the electrostatic capacity of porous electrodes in salt water, and derive a method to reversibly extract electric energy from salinity gradients that occur for example at an estuary where sea- and river water meet. However, in the main part of this thesis we consider charged colloidal particles, and study the effect of internal porosity as well as heterogeneities in the surface-charge density (patchy particles) on colloid-colloid interactions. In a far-field analysis we derive equations that describe these interactions for particles with nonvanishing multipole moments, for example `Janus' colloids with a strong dipole component. If such particles locally have a high surface charge density, then the nonlinear dependence of the counterion density on the local charge density leads to a generalisation of charge renormalisation from purely monopolar to dipolar, quadrupolar, etc., including `mode couplings'. In a more detailed approach, which turns out to be important for colloidal particles at smaller distances from each other, we consider the chemical processes that lead to surface charge, and specify a parameter regime in which charging can be described by a single `chargeability' parameter. As we show in this thesis, the phase diagrams we obtain within this regime have many similarities with a `constant surface potential

  13. Cation alkyl side chain length and symmetry effects on the surface tension of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hugo F D; Freire, Mara G; Fernandes, Ana M; Lopes-da-Silva, José A; Morgado, Pedro; Shimizu, Karina; Filipe, Eduardo J M; Lopes, José N Canongia; Santos, Luís M N B F; Coutinho, João A P

    2014-06-10

    Aiming at providing a comprehensive study of the influence of the cation symmetry and alkyl side chain length on the surface tension and surface organization of ionic liquids (ILs), this work addresses the experimental measurements of the surface tension of two extended series of ILs, namely R,R'-dialkylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([C(n)C(n)im][NTf2]) and R-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide ([C(n)C(1)im][NTf2]), and their dependence with temperature (from 298 to 343 K). For both series of ILs the surface tension decreases with an increase in the cation side alkyl chain length up to aliphatic chains no longer than hexyl, here labeled as critical alkyl chain length (CACL). For ILs with aliphatic moieties longer than CACL the surface tension displays an almost constant value up to [C12C12im][NTf2] or [C16C1im][NTf2]. These constant values further converge to the surface tension of long chain n-alkanes, indicating that, for sufficiently long alkyl side chains, the surface ordering is strongly dominated by the aliphatic tails present in the IL. The enthalpies and entropies of surface were also derived and the critical temperatures were estimated from the experimental data. The trend of the derived thermodynamic properties highlights the effect of the structural organization of the IL at the surface with visible trend shifts occurring at a well-defined CACL in both symmetric and asymmetric series of ILs. Finally, the structure of a long-alkyl side chain IL at the vacuum-liquid interface was also explored using Molecular Dynamics simulations. In general, it was found that for the symmetric series of ILs, at the outermost polar layers, more cations point one of their aliphatic tails outward and the other inward, relative to the surface, than cations pointing both tails outward. The number of the former, while being the preferred conformation, exceeds the latter by around 75%.

  14. Hopping Conduction and Metallic behavior in 2D Silicon Surface States induced by an Ionic Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, JJ

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are essentially molten salts with a melting point below room temperature. When used as the gate dielectric of a transistor, carrier densities on the order of 1015 cm-2 can be achieved. These record high carrier densities are significantly higher than the maximum carrier density achievable with oxide dielectrics. The physical mechanism for inducing carriers to such a high carrier density is not well understood. Some groups have reported that the induced carriers are a result of electrostatic and electrochemical processes. Other groups have suggested that carriers induced with an IL may be entirely due to electrochemical reactions. Here we report on IL gated Si at carrier densities from 1011 cm-2 to 1013 cm-2. The experiment was designed to preferentially induce electrostatic carriers over electrochemical reactions. At low carrier densities, sample surface conductivity follows nearest neighbor hopping conduction. This form of conduction has also been observed in experiments where surface conductivity was induced by implanting Na + near the oxide surface interface. A surprising result of this work was that in some samples a 2D metallic state could be created on the surface of Si. The transition to metallic behavior occurred just below 1013 cm-2. High quality Si transistors with oxide dielectric materials observe critical carrier densities around 1011 cm-2. The critical carrier density observed in IL gated Si is the highest density reported to date. At carrier densities higher than 1013 cm-2 it was observed that the sample conductivity decreased with increasing carrier density. The behavior was unexpected and not fully understood. Both metallic and non metallic samples show a similar reduction in conductivity that is not thought to be due to sample degradation by the IL. The reduction in the sample conductivity at high carrier densities is thought to be due to surface roughness scattering. Similar behavior has been observed in other IL gated

  15. Interaction of Ionic Liquids with Lipid Biomembrane: Implication from Supramolecular Assembly to Cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Benxin; Lan, Nan; Zhu, Y. Elaine

    2013-03-01

    An explosion in the research activities using ionic liquids (ILs) as new ``green'' chemicals in several chemical and biomedical processes has resulted in the urgent need to understand their impact in term of their transport and toxicity towards aquatic organisms. Though a few experimental toxicology studies have reported that some ionic liquids are toxic with increased hydrophobicity of ILs while others are not, our understanding of the molecular level mechanism of IL toxicity remains poorly understood. In this talk, we will discuss our recent study of the interaction of ionic liquids with model cell membranes. We have found that the ILs could induce morphological change of lipid bilayers when a critical concentration is exceeded, leading to the swelling and tube-like formation of lipid bilayers. The critical concentration shows a strong dependence on the length of hydrocarbon tails and hydrophobic counterions. By SAXS, Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and fluorescence microscopic measurement, we have confirmed that tube-like lipid complexes result from the insertion of ILs with long hydrocarbon chains to minimize the hydrophobic interaction with aqueous media. This finding could give insight to the modification and adoption of ILs for the engineering of micro-organisms.

  16. Preparation and characterization of ultrathin dual-layer ionic liquid lubrication film assembled on silica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jibin; Wang, Liping; Mo, Yufei; Xue, Qunji

    2011-02-15

    A novel ultrathin dual-layer film, which contained both bonded and mobile phases in ionic liquids (ILs) layer, was fabricated successfully on a silicon substrate modified by a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The formation and surface properties of the films were analyzed using ellipsometer, water contact angle meter, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, multi-functional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscope. Meanwhile, the adhesive and nanotribological behaviors of the films were evaluated by a homemade colloidal probe. A ball-on-plate tribometer was used to evaluate the microtribological performances of the films. Compared with the single-layer ILs film deposited directly on the silicon surface, the as-prepared dual-layer film shows the improved tribological properties, which is attributed to the special chemical structure and outstanding physical properties of the dual-layer film, i.e., the strong adhesion between bonded phase of ILs and silicon substrate via the chemical bonding with SAM, the interlinked hydrogen bonds among the molecules, and two-phase structure composed of steady bonded phase with load-carrying capacity and flowable mobile phase with self-replenishment property. PMID:21111428

  17. Genetic Modification of the Penicillin G Acylase Surface To Improve Its Reversible Immobilization on Ionic Exchangers▿

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Tamara; Grazú, Valeria; López-Gallego, Fernando; Hermoso, Juan A.; García, Jose L.; Manso, Isabel; Galán, Beatriz; González, Ramón; Fernández-Lafuente, Roberto; Guisán, José M.

    2007-01-01

    A new mutant of the industrial enzyme penicillin G acylase (PGA) from Escherichia coli has been designed to improve its reversible immobilization on anionic exchangers (DEAE- or polyethyleneimine [PEI]-coated agarose) by assembling eight new glutamic residues distributed homogeneously through the enzyme surface via site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant PGA is produced and processed in vivo as is the native enzyme. Moreover, it has a similar specific activity to and shows the same pH activity profile as native PGA; however, its isoelectric point decreased from 6.4 to 4.3. Although the new enzyme is adsorbed on both supports, the adsorption was even stronger when supports were coated with PEI, allowing us to improve the enzyme stability in organic cosolvents. The use of restrictive conditions during the enzyme adsorption on anionic exchangers (pH 5 and high ionic strength) permitted us to still further increase the strength of adsorption and the enzyme stability in the presence of organic solvents, suggesting that these conditions allow the penetration of the enzyme inside the polymeric beds, thus becoming fully covered with the polymer. After the enzyme inactivation, it can be desorbed to reuse the support. The possibility to improve the immobilization properties on an enzyme by site-directed mutagenesis of its surface opens a promising new scenario for enzyme engineering. PMID:17098917

  18. A step toward the development of high-temperature stable ionic liquid-in-oil microemulsions containing double-chain anionic surface active ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vishal Govind; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Surajit; Mandal, Sarthak; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2013-06-20

    Owing to their fascinating properties and wide range of potential applications, interest in nonaqueous microemulsions has escalated in the past decade. In the recent past, nonaqueous microemulsions containing ionic liquids (ILs) have been utilized in performing chemical reactions, preparation of nanomaterials, synthesis of nanostructured polymers, and drug delivery systems. The most promising fact about IL-in-oil microemulsions is their high thermal stability compared to that of aqueous microemulsions. Recently, surfactant-like properties of surface active ionic liquids (SAILs) have been used for preparation of microemulsions with high-temperature stability and temperature insensitivity. However, previously described methods present a limited possibility of developing IL-in-oil microemulsions with a wide range of thermal stability. With our previous work, we introduced a novel method of creating a huge number of IL-in-oil microemulsions (Rao, V. G.; Ghosh, S.; Ghatak, C.; Mandal, S.; Brahmachari, U.; Sarkar, N. J. Phys. Chem. B2012, 116, 2850-2855), composed of a SAIL as a surfactant, room-temperature ionic liquids as a polar phase, and benzene as a nonpolar phase. The use of benzene as a nonpolar solvent limits the application of the microemulsions to temperatures below 353 K. To overcome this limitation, we have synthesized N,N-dimethylethanolammonium 1,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (DAAOT), which was used as a surfactant. DAAOT in combination with isopropyl myristate (IPM, as an oil phase) and ILs (as a polar phase) produces a huge number of high-temperature stable IL-in-oil microemulsions. By far, this is the first report of a huge number of high-temperature stable IL-in-oil microemulsions. In particular, we demonstrate the wide range of thermal stability of [C6mim][TF2N]/DAAOT/IPM microemulsions by performing a phase behavior study, dynamic light scattering measurements, and (1)H NMR measurements and by using coumarin-480 (C-480) as a fluorescent probe

  19. Surface structured platinum electrodes for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide in imidazolium based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hanc-Scherer, Florin A; Montiel, Miguel A; Montiel, Vicente; Herrero, Enrique; Sánchez-Sánchez, Carlos M

    2015-10-01

    The direct CO2 electrochemical reduction on model platinum single crystal electrodes Pt(hkl) is studied in [C2mim(+)][NTf2(-)], a suitable room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) medium due to its moderate viscosity, high CO2 solubility and conductivity. Single crystal electrodes represent the most convenient type of surface structured electrodes for studying the impact of RTIL ion adsorption on relevant electrocatalytic reactions, such as surface sensitive electrochemical CO2 reduction. We propose here based on cyclic voltammetry and in situ electrolysis measurements, for the first time, the formation of a stable adduct [C2mimH-CO2(-)] by a radical-radical coupling after the simultaneous reduction of CO2 and [C2mim(+)]. It means between the CO2 radical anion and the radical formed from the reduction of the cation [C2mim(+)] before forming the corresponding electrogenerated carbene. This is confirmed by the voltammetric study of a model imidazolium-2-carboxylate compound formed following the carbene pathway. The formation of that stable adduct [C2mimH-CO2(-)] blocks CO2 reduction after a single electron transfer and inhibits CO2 and imidazolium dimerization reactions. However, the electrochemical reduction of CO2 under those conditions provokes the electrochemical cathodic degradation of the imidazolium based RTIL. This important limitation in CO2 recycling by direct electrochemical reduction is overcome by adding a strong acid, [H(+)][NTf2(-)], into solution. Then, protons become preferentially adsorbed on the electrode surface by displacing the imidazolium cations and inhibiting their electrochemical reduction. This fact allows the surface sensitive electro-synthesis of HCOOH from CO2 reduction in [C2mim(+)][NTf2(-)], with Pt(110) being the most active electrode studied.

  20. Surface structured platinum electrodes for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide in imidazolium based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hanc-Scherer, Florin A; Montiel, Miguel A; Montiel, Vicente; Herrero, Enrique; Sánchez-Sánchez, Carlos M

    2015-10-01

    The direct CO2 electrochemical reduction on model platinum single crystal electrodes Pt(hkl) is studied in [C2mim(+)][NTf2(-)], a suitable room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) medium due to its moderate viscosity, high CO2 solubility and conductivity. Single crystal electrodes represent the most convenient type of surface structured electrodes for studying the impact of RTIL ion adsorption on relevant electrocatalytic reactions, such as surface sensitive electrochemical CO2 reduction. We propose here based on cyclic voltammetry and in situ electrolysis measurements, for the first time, the formation of a stable adduct [C2mimH-CO2(-)] by a radical-radical coupling after the simultaneous reduction of CO2 and [C2mim(+)]. It means between the CO2 radical anion and the radical formed from the reduction of the cation [C2mim(+)] before forming the corresponding electrogenerated carbene. This is confirmed by the voltammetric study of a model imidazolium-2-carboxylate compound formed following the carbene pathway. The formation of that stable adduct [C2mimH-CO2(-)] blocks CO2 reduction after a single electron transfer and inhibits CO2 and imidazolium dimerization reactions. However, the electrochemical reduction of CO2 under those conditions provokes the electrochemical cathodic degradation of the imidazolium based RTIL. This important limitation in CO2 recycling by direct electrochemical reduction is overcome by adding a strong acid, [H(+)][NTf2(-)], into solution. Then, protons become preferentially adsorbed on the electrode surface by displacing the imidazolium cations and inhibiting their electrochemical reduction. This fact allows the surface sensitive electro-synthesis of HCOOH from CO2 reduction in [C2mim(+)][NTf2(-)], with Pt(110) being the most active electrode studied. PMID:26307480

  1. Effect of ionic and non-ionic polymer on the pH of lidocaine hydrochloride preparation assessed below and over human skin surface temperature.

    PubMed

    Musial, Witold; Kokol, Vanja; Voncina, Bojana

    2010-01-01

    Lidocaine is widely accepted local anesthetic, which is applied in the form of freely soluble hydrochloride salt. In this study we evaluated the pH of respective solutions of lidocaine hydrochloride with ionic polymer--polyacrylic acid or non-ionic polymer--methylcellulose, and compared to physiological skin conditions in the range between 22 degrees C and 41 degrees C. In microscopic observation of lidocaine hydrochloride preparations with polyacrylic acid the micro-sedimentation was revealed, however obtained mixture was opalescent, and homogenously dispersed in aqueous environment. The pH was maintained on the level not higher then 4,0 in the period of 12 hours for polyacrylic acid formulation, whereas in the case of preparation with methylcellulose, the pH increased from acceptable pH of ca. 4,5 to the level of above 6,0. The polyacrylic acid derivatives should be further studied as vehicles forming preparations with stable pH value during application on the skin, with more specific methods including pH microelectrodes, sufficient for assessments in small quantities of liquids of skin surface.

  2. Identification of helicity-dependent photocurrents from topological surface states in Bi2Se3 gated by ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Duan, Junxi; Tang, Ning; He, Xin; Yan, Yuan; Zhang, Shan; Qin, Xudong; Wang, Xinqiang; Yang, Xuelin; Xu, Fujun; Chen, Yonghai; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2014-05-08

    Dirac-like surface states on surfaces of topological insulators have a chiral spin structure with spin locked to momentum, which is interesting in physics and may also have important applications in spintronics. In this work, by measuring the tunable helicity-dependent photocurrent (HDP), we present an identification of the HDP from the Dirac-like surface states at room temperature. It turns out that the total HDP has two components, one from the Dirac-like surface states, and the other from the surface accumulation layer. These two components have opposite directions. The clear gate tuning of the electron density as well as the HDP signal indicates that the surface band bending and resulted surface accumulation are successfully modulated by the applied ionic liquid gate, which provides a promising way to the study of the Dirac-like surface states and also potential applications in spintronic devices.

  3. Preparation and evaluation of surface-bonded tricationic ionic liquid silica as stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lizhen; Shi, Xianzhe; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2015-05-29

    Two tricationic ionic liquids were prepared and then bonded onto the surface of supporting silica materials through "thiol-ene" click chemistry as new stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography. The obtained columns of tricationic ionic liquids were evaluated respectively in the reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) mode and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mode, and possess ideal column efficiency of 80,000 plates/m in the RPLC mode with naphthalene as the test solute. The tricationic ionic liquid stationary phases exhibit good hydrophobic and shape selectivity to hydrophobic compounds, and RPLC retention behavior with multiple interactions. In the HILIC mode, the retention and selectivity were evaluated through the efficient separation of nucleosides and bases as well as flavonoids, and the typical HILIC retention behavior was demonstrated by investigating retention changes of hydrophilic solutes with water volume fraction in mobile phase. The results show that the tricationic ionic liquid columns possess great prospect for applications in analysis of hydrophobic and hydrophilic samples. PMID:25890438

  4. Preparation and evaluation of surface-bonded tricationic ionic liquid silica as stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Lizhen; Shi, Xianzhe; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2015-05-29

    Two tricationic ionic liquids were prepared and then bonded onto the surface of supporting silica materials through "thiol-ene" click chemistry as new stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography. The obtained columns of tricationic ionic liquids were evaluated respectively in the reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) mode and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) mode, and possess ideal column efficiency of 80,000 plates/m in the RPLC mode with naphthalene as the test solute. The tricationic ionic liquid stationary phases exhibit good hydrophobic and shape selectivity to hydrophobic compounds, and RPLC retention behavior with multiple interactions. In the HILIC mode, the retention and selectivity were evaluated through the efficient separation of nucleosides and bases as well as flavonoids, and the typical HILIC retention behavior was demonstrated by investigating retention changes of hydrophilic solutes with water volume fraction in mobile phase. The results show that the tricationic ionic liquid columns possess great prospect for applications in analysis of hydrophobic and hydrophilic samples.

  5. Surface osteosarcoma: Clinical features and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, H.; Ben Maitigue, M.; Abid, L.; Nouri, N.; Abdelkader, A.; Bouaziz, M.; Mestiri, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surface osteosarcoma are rare variant of osteosarcoma that include parosteal osteosarcoma, periosteal osteosarcoma and high grade surface osteosarcoma. These lesions have different clinical presentation and biological behavior compared to conventional osteosarcoma, and hence need to be managed differently. Goal The aim of this study is to analyze the clinico-pathological features and outcome of a series of surface osteosarcoma in an attempt to define the adequate treatment of this rare entity. Patient and method It is a retrospective and bicentric study of 18 surface osteosarcoma that were seen at the KASSAB’s Institute and SAHLOUL Hospital from 2006 to 2013. The authors reviewed the clinical and radiologic features, histologic sections, treatments, and outcomes in this group of patients. Results Seven patients were male (38.9%) and 11 were female (61.1%) with mean age of 25 years (range from 16 to 55 years). Eleven lesions were in the femur and 7 in the tibia. We identified 11 parosteal osteosarcoma (six of them were dedifferentiated), 3 periosteal osteosarcoma and 4 high grade surface osteosarcoma. Six patients had neoadjuvant chemotherapy and all lesions had surgical resection. Margins were wide in 15 cases and intra lesional in 3 cases. Histological response to chemotherapy was poor in all cases. The mean follow up was 34.5 months. Six patients (33.3%) presented local recurrence and 8 patients (44.4%) presented lung metastases. Six patients (33.3%) died from the disease after a mean follow up of 12 months (6–30 months); all of them had high grade lesions. Conclusion Histological grade of malignancy is the main point to assess in surface osteosarcoma since it determines treatment and prognosis. Low grade lesions should be treated by wide resection, while high grade lesions need more aggressive surgical approach associated to post operative chemotherapy. PMID:26730360

  6. Effect of Ions and Ionic Strength on Surface Plasmon Absorption of Single Gold Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Baral, Susil; Green, Andrew J; Richardson, Hugh H

    2016-06-28

    The local temperature change from a single optically excited gold nanowire, lithographically prepared on Al0.94Ga0.06N embedded with Er(3+) ions, is measured in air, pure water, and various concentrations of aqueous solutions of ionic solutes of NaCl, Na2SO4, and MgSO4. The absorption cross section of the nanowire under pure water (2.25 × 10(-14) m(2)) and different solution ionic strength is measured from the slopes of temperature change versus laser intensity plots. Addition of charges into the solution decreases the amount of heat generated during optical excitation of the gold nanostructures because the absorption cross section of the gold nanowire is attenuated. A Langmuir-type behavior of the absorption cross section with ionic strength is observed that is identified with an increase in the occupancy of screened interfacial charges. The absorption cross section of the nanowire decreases with ionic strength until a saturation value of 9 × 10(-15) m(2), where saturation in the occupancy of screened interfacial charge occurs. Dynamic measurements of temperature for a single gold nanowire immersed in a microchannel flow cell show a sharp and fast temperature drop for the flow of ionic solution compared to the pure (deionized) water, suggesting that the technique can be developed as a sensor probe to detect the presence of ions in solution.

  7. Symmetrical charge-charge interactions in ionic solutions and implications for cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraggi, Eshel

    2013-03-01

    As is well known in electrolyte theory, electrostatic fields are attenuated by the presence of mobile charges in the solution. This seems to limit the possibility of an electrostatic repulsion model of biological interactions such as cell division. However, for a system of two charges in an ionic solution it is found that in the context of the symmetries of the system, the electrostatic repulsion between the two parts of a dividing cell are considerably increased as compared to the electrostatic repulsion between two bare charges in a dielectric. This increase in repulsion, directly resulting from interactions between the symmetrical parts of the solute system, was found to be dependent on the magnitude of the charges and the separation between them. It was also found that this increases reaches a steady state for separation greater than a solvent determined length scale related to the Debye length. These findings strongly suggest that electrostatic interactions can play a crucial part in the physical forces that are involved in biological interactions. Most fundamentally this work presents a general physical force by which one can mechanically understand cell division. Such understanding will lead to unforetold new ways in medicine, biology, chemistry, and physics. The continuous support of Natali Teszler is gratefully acknowledged

  8. Intravenous vs. left ventricular injection of ionic contrast material: hemodynamic implications for digital subtraction angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, G.B.; Ostrander, D.R.; Slutsky, R.A.; Shabetai, R.; Higgins, C.B.

    1983-03-01

    Because of the increased use of intravenous injection of contrast material for the evaluation of cardiac structure and function by digital subtraction techniques, a study was done to assess the hemodynamic effects of contrast material when used in this fashion in man. In 10 patients, with each serving as his own control, the effects of intravenous and intraventricular injections of sodium meglumine diatrizoate (Renografin 76) in the same dose were compared. There was no difference between these two methods with respect to changes in pulmonary wedge pressures, systemic pressures, and pulmonary vascular resistance. The elevation of mean pulmonary artery and right atrial pressure was greater after the intraventricular injection (p <0.05). The elevated cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance returned to control values somewhat more quickly after the intravenous injection (p<0.001 and p<0.05, respectively); and the increase in cardiac output was greater after the intravenous injection at 1 min (p<0.05), but less than after the intraventricular injection at 2 min (p<0.05). Despite the detection of these statistically significant differences, the magnitude and timing of these differences are too small to justify the notion that imaging by intravenous injections of standard ionic contrast media provides any substantial hemodynamic benefits or decreased risk to the patient.

  9. Electrochemical Deposition of Niobium onto the Surface of Copper Using a Novel Choline Chloride-Based Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wixtroma, Alex I.; Buhlera, Jessica E.; Reece, Charles E.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride-based solutions can be used to replace acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. In this study niobium metal was successfully deposited on the surface of copper substrate via electrochemical deposition using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. The niobium metal used for deposition on the Cu had been dissolved in the solution from electrochemical polishing of a solid niobium piece prior to the deposition. The visible coating on the surface of the Cu was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). This deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing.

  10. Ionic fluids in lubrication of aluminium-steel contacts. Surface and tribochemical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez Ballesta, Ana Eva

    Room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are high performance fluids with a wide thermal stability range. They are being studied as new lubricants in a variety of sliding contacts. One of their more interesting tribological applications is that of steel-aluminium lubrication. In this work we study the influence of the lateral alkyl chain length and of the anion on the lubricating ability of six imidazolium ILs, a pyridinium and a phosphonium derivative. For first time, these ILs have been studied as neat lubricants and as 1wt.% base oil additives in variable conditions of velocity, load and temperature in pin-on-disk tests for AISI 52100 steel-ASTM 2011 aluminium contacts. In this work we present the first study of ILs as lubricants under extreme temperature conditions. The tribological performance of ILs has been compared with that of a mineral oil and of a synthetic ester. Under these conditions, ILs show lower friction and wear values than conventional oils at all temperatures. As 1wt.% additives, the conditions of optimum lubrication and the transitions between regimes and lubrication mechanisms have been determined. We have also studied the performance of ILs as 1wt.% additives of the synthetic oil. A relationship between additive polarity and wear index has been established. If the more soluble phosphonium IL additive is used, no friction or wear reduction takes place due to competition between solvation and adsorption processes. Electronic microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopies have been used to study the wear mechanisms and tribochemical processes that take place in the contact. Finally, we have studied the performance of three aluminium alloys in corrosion and erosion-corrosion tests. In immersion tests with free-water ILs, the aluminium alloy 2011 shows a good resistance to corrosion, but dilution of 1-ethyl, 3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate in water produces the hydrolysis of the anion and the corrosion of

  11. Sodium bromide induced micelle to vesicle transitions of newly synthesized anionic surface active ionic liquids based on dodecylbenzenesulfonate.

    PubMed

    Rao, K Srinivasa; Gehlot, Praveen Singh; Gupta, Hariom; Drechsler, Markus; Kumar, Arvind

    2015-03-19

    Dodecylbenezenesulfonate-based anionic surface active ionic liquids (DBS-ILs) paired with onium cations, n-butyltrimethylammonium ([N1114]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([C4mim]), and N-butylpyridinium ([C4Py]) have been synthesized. DBS-ILs were found to be highly surface active having critical micelle concentration (CMC) lower than that of their conventional analogue sodium dodecylbenezenesulfonate ([Na][DBS]). The CMC values of DBS-ILs were determined from surface tension (ST) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DBS-ILs formed micelles predominantly in the aqueous medium, and unlike [Na]DBS, the micelles of DBS-ILs could be transformed into vesicles with the addition of sodium bromide (NaBr). Micelle to vesicle transitions (MVTs) were evidenced from dynamic light scattering (DLS), turbidity, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), and cryo-TEM techniques. Thermodynamics of aggregation was investigated from ITC which indicated that the aggregation process is primarily driven by the entropy factor. The formation of a vesicle upon addition of NaBr has been accounted to the increased electrostatic interactions between the less hydrated sulfonate headgroup and the more populated bigger sized counterions along with the favored cation-π or π-π interactions between them as evidenced from 2D-NOESY NMR experiments. The stimuli-responsive morphological transitions in the self-assembly of the reported anionic surface active ionic liquids (SAILs) will be useful for encapsulation and delivery of active (bio)molecules in the targeted biomedical applications.

  12. Electrochemical deposition of conducting polymer coatings on magnesium surfaces in ionic liquid

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiliang; Cui, Xinyan Tracy

    2012-01-01

    A conducting polymer based smart coating for magnesium (Mg) implants that can both improve the corrosion resistance of Mg and release drug in a controllable way is reported. As the ionic liquid is a highly conductive and stable solvent with a very wide electrochemical window, the conducting polymer coatings can be directly electrodeposited on the active metal Mg in ionic liquid at mild conditions, and Mg is considerably stable during the electrodeposition. The electrodeposited Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) coatings on Mg are uniform and can significantly improve the corrosion resistance of Mg. In addition, the PEDOT coatings can load the anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone during the electrodeposition which can be subsequently released upon electric stimulation. PMID:20832505

  13. Decay behavior of screened electrostatic surface forces in ionic liquids: the vital role of non-local electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Kjellander, Roland

    2016-07-28

    Screened electrostatic surface forces, also called double layer forces, between surfaces in ionic liquids can, depending on the circumstances, decay in an exponentially damped, oscillatory manner or in a plain exponential way (the latter as in dilute electrolyte solutions where ion-ion correlations are very weak). The occurrence of both of these behaviors in dense ionic liquids, where ion-ion correlations are very strong, is analyzed in the current work using exact statistical mechanics formulated in a manner that is physically transparent. A vital ingredient in understanding the decay behaviors is the fact that electrostatics in dense electrolytes have a non-local nature caused by the strong correlations. It is shown that the effects of non-locality can be elucidated by a remarkably simple, general expression for the decay parameter κ that replaces the classical expression for the inverse Debye length κDH of the Debye-Hückel (DH) and non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann approximations. This exact expression is valid for both the plain exponential and the oscillatory cases. It shows how strong correlations can give rise to plain exponential decay with a long decay length. Such a decay can arise from anion-cation associations of various kinds, for instance transient ion pairing or association caused by many-body correlations; ion pairing is a possibility but not a necessity for this to occur. Theoretical analysis is done for systems consisting of ions with an arbitrary shape and internal charge density and immersed planar walls with arbitrary internal charge distribution and any short-range ion-surface interaction. The screened electrostatic surface force between two walls is at large separations proportional to the product of effective surface charge densities of each wall. For the oscillatory case, each wall contributes with a phase shift to the oscillations of the interaction. PMID:27356099

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of the electrochemical interface between a graphite surface and the ionic liquid [BMIM][PF6].

    PubMed

    Kislenko, Sergey A; Samoylov, Igor S; Amirov, Ravil H

    2009-07-21

    The structure of the electrical double layer in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF6]) near a basal plane of graphite was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The calculations were performed both for an uncharged graphite surface and for positively and negatively charged ones. It is found that near an uncharged surface the ionic liquid structure differs from its bulk structure and represents a well-ordered region, extending over approximately 20 A from the surface. Three dense layers of ca 5 A thick are clearly observed at the interface, composed of negative ions and positively charged rings. It is established that in the first adsorption layer the imidazolium ring in the [BMIM]+ cation tends to be arranged in parallel to the graphite surface at a distance of 3.5 A. The [PF6]- anion is oriented in such a way that the phosphorus atom is at a distance of 4.1 A from the surface and triplets of fluorine atoms form two planes parallel to the graphite surface. Ions adsorbed at the uncharged surface are arranged in a highly defective 2D hexagonal lattice and the corresponding lattice spacing is approximately four times larger than that of the graphene substrate. The influence of the electrode potential on the distribution of electrolyte ions and their orientation has also been investigated. Increase in the electrode potential induces broadening of the angle distribution of adsorbed rings and a shift of the most probable tilt angle towards bigger values. It was shown that there are no adsorbed anions on the negatively charged surface (sigma = -8.2 microC cm(-2)), but the surface concentration of adsorbed cations on the positively charged surface (sigma = +8.2 microC cm(-2)) has a nonzero value. In addition, the influence of the surface charge (+/- sigma) on the volume charge density and electric potential profiles in an electrolyte was studied. The differences in the cation and anion structure result in the fact that the

  15. Influence of Water on the Interfacial Nanostructure and Wetting of [Rmim][NTf2] Ionic Liquids at Mica Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhantao; Li, Hua; Atkin, Rob; Priest, Craig

    2016-09-01

    The effect of water concentration on the interfacial nanostructure and wetting behavior of a family of ionic liquids (ILs), 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [Rmim][NTf2], at the surface of mica was investigated by contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM reveals that interfacial layers of ILs observed at the surface of mica for "dry" ILs are not present for water-saturated ILs. The interaction of the IL ions of [Rmim][NTf2] with water molecules through hydrogen bonding is suspected to disrupt IL ion layering and precursor film growth on mica. Without the IL precursor film, contact angle relaxation of "wet" ILs on mica is less significant and ambient vapor adsorption becomes more important in determining the macroscopic wetting behavior. PMID:27486675

  16. Influence of Water on the Interfacial Nanostructure and Wetting of [Rmim][NTf2] Ionic Liquids at Mica Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhantao; Li, Hua; Atkin, Rob; Priest, Craig

    2016-09-01

    The effect of water concentration on the interfacial nanostructure and wetting behavior of a family of ionic liquids (ILs), 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, [Rmim][NTf2], at the surface of mica was investigated by contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM reveals that interfacial layers of ILs observed at the surface of mica for "dry" ILs are not present for water-saturated ILs. The interaction of the IL ions of [Rmim][NTf2] with water molecules through hydrogen bonding is suspected to disrupt IL ion layering and precursor film growth on mica. Without the IL precursor film, contact angle relaxation of "wet" ILs on mica is less significant and ambient vapor adsorption becomes more important in determining the macroscopic wetting behavior.

  17. Non-ionic detergents facilitate non-specific binding of M13 bacteriophage to polystyrene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Abdulrahim R; Ball, Jonathan K; Tarr, Alexander W

    2015-09-01

    Phage-displayed random peptide libraries are widely used for identifying peptide interactions with proteins and other substrates. Selection of peptide ligands involves iterative rounds of affinity enrichment. The binding properties of the selected phage clones are routinely tested using immunoassay after propagation to high titre in a bacterial host and precipitation using polyethylene glycol (PEG) and high salt concentration. These immunoassays can suffer from low sensitivity and high background signals. Polysorbate 20 (Tween(®) 20) is a non-ionic detergent commonly used in immunoassay washing buffers to reduce non-specific binding, and is also used as a blocking reagent. We have observed that Tween 20 enhances non-specific M13 library phage binding in a peptide-independent manner. Other non-ionic detergents were also found to promote significant, dose-dependent non-specific phage binding in ELISA. This effect was not observed for assays using phage concentrated by ultracentrifugation, suggesting that interactions occur between detergents and the PEG-precipitated phage, irrespective of the displayed peptide motif. This artefact may impact on successful affinity selection of peptides from phage-display libraries. We propose alternative methods for screening phage libraries for identifying binding interactions with target ligands.

  18. Salt-free catanionic surface active ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium alkylsulfate: aggregation behavior in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jingjing; Han, Bing; Lin, Meijia; Cheng, Ni; Yu, Li; Liu, Min

    2013-12-15

    A series of salt-free catanionic surface active ionic liquids (SAILs), 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolim alkyl sulfates (denoted as [Cnmim][CmSO4], n=6, 8, 10; m=12 and n=4; m=10, 14) were synthesized by an ion exchange reaction and their surface properties in aqueous solution were examined systematically by surface tension, fluorescence and electrical conductivity measurements. As catanionic surfactants, these SAILs exhibit notably higher surface activity, compared to the cationic or anionic analogues. Increment in both cationic and anionic alkyl chain lengths for [Cnmim][CmSO4] can both improve the amphiphilic character remarkably. This can be ascribed to cooperative interactions as formation of catanionic pairs between alkyl-substituted imidazolium cations and alkyl sulfate anions. The negative micellization Gibbs free energy values prove that the micellization of all the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolim alkyl sulfates investigated is a spontaneous process. Any additional CH2 group makes the micellization process easier regardless if it is on a cation or an anion. When keeping the total carbon atom number constant, we find that the [Cnmim][CmSO4] molecules with greater asymmetric alkyl chains display superior surface activity. This work indicates that the self-assembly of these imidazolium-based salt-free catanionic SAILs can be tailored by adjusting the mismatch of alkyl chains. These SAILs are expected to have potential applications in the fields of colloidal and interface and nanomaterial synthesis.

  19. The radiation of surface wave energy: Implications for volcanic tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Denolle, M.; Lyons, J. J.; Nakahara, H.

    2015-12-01

    The seismic energy radiated by active volcanism is one common measurement of eruption size. For example, the magnitudes of individual earthquakes in volcano-tectonic (VT) swarms can be summed and expressed in terms of cumulative magnitude, energy, or moment release. However, discrepancies exist in current practice when treating the radiated energy of volcano seismicity dominated by surface waves. This has implications for volcanic tremor, since eruption tremor typically originates at shallow depth and is made up of surface waves. In the absence of a method to compute surface wave energy, estimates of eruption energy partitioning between acoustic and seismic waves typically assume seismic energy is composed of body waves. Furthermore, without the proper treatment of surface wave energy, it is unclear how much volcanic tremor contributes to the overall seismic energy budget during volcanic unrest. To address this issue, we derive, from first principles, the expression of surface wave radiated energy. In contrast with body waves, the surface wave energy equation is naturally expressed in the frequency domain instead of the time domain. We validate our result by reproducing an analytical solution for the radiated power of a vertical force source acting on a free surface. We further show that the surface wave energy equation leads to an explicit relationship between energy and the imaginary part of the surface wave Green's tensor at the source location, a fundamental property recognized within the field of seismic interferometry. With the new surface wave energy equation, we make clear connections to reduced displacement and propose an improved formula for the calculation of surface wave reduced displacement involving integration over the frequency band of tremor. As an alternative to reduced displacement, we show that reduced particle velocity squared is also a valid physical measure of tremor size, one based on seismic energy rate instead of seismic moment rate. These

  20. Effect of π-π+ stacking on the layering of ionic liquids confined to an amorphous carbon surface.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiao; Kozbial, Andrew; Rose, Franck; Li, Lei

    2015-04-01

    In the current paper, AFM studies were conducted on nanometer-thick ionic liquids (ILs) confined to an amorphous carbon (AC) surface, which is critical to the design of the next-generation media lubricant for hard disk drives (HDDs). The results indicated that the existence of the delocalized ring in the cation is critical to layering of ILs. Extended layering was observed only when there is imidazolium ring in the cation. When the imidazolium ring is replaced by an aliphatic moiety, "drop-on-layer" (dewetting) structure was observed. On the basis of the experimental results, we proposed that π-π+ stacking between sp(2) carbon in the AC and the imidazolium cation in the ILs is the key to the extended layering of ILs at the ILs/AC interface. PMID:25808335

  1. Ionic strength and composition affect the mobility of surface-modified Fe0 nanoparticles in water-saturated sand columns.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Navid; Kim, Hye-Jin; Phenrat, Tanapon; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Tilton, Robert D; Lowry, Gregory V

    2008-05-01

    The surfaces of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) used for groundwater remediation must be modified to be mobile in the subsurface for emplacement. Adsorbed polymers and surfactants can electrostatically, sterically, or electrosterically stabilize nanoparticle suspensions in water, but their efficacy will depend on groundwater ionic strength and cation type as well as physical and chemical heterogeneities of the aquifer material. Here, the effect of ionic strength and cation type on the mobility of bare, polymer-, and surfactant-modified NZVI is evaluated in water-saturated sand columns at low particle concentrations where filtration theory is applicable. NZVI surface modifiers include a high molecular weight (MW) (125 kg/mol) poly(methacrylic acid)-b-(methyl methacrylate)-b-(styrene sulfonate) triblock copolymer (PMAA-PMMA-PSS), polyaspartate which is a low MW (2-3 kg/mol) biopolymer, and the surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS, MW = 348.5 g/mol). Bare NZVI with an apparent zeta-potential of -30 +/- 3 mV was immobile. Polyaspartate-modified nanoiron (MRNIP) with an apparent zeta-potential of -39 +/- 1 mV was mobile at low ionic strengths (< 40 mM for Na+ and < 0.5 mM for Ca2+), and had a critical deposition concentration (CDC) of approximately 770 mM Na+ and approximately 4 mM for Ca2+. SDBS-modified NZVI with a similar apparent zeta-potential (-38.3 +/- 0.9 mV) showed similar behavior (CDC approximately 350 mM for Na+ and approximately 3.5 mM for Ca2+). Triblock copolymer-modified NZVI had the highest apparent zeta-potential (-50 +/- 1.2 mV), the greatest mobility in porous media, and a CDC of approximately 4 M for Na+ and approximately 100s of mM for Ca2+. The high mobility and CDC is attributed to the electrosteric stabilization afforded by the triblock copolymer but not the other modifiers which provide primarily electrostatic stabilization. Thus, electrosteric stabilization provides the best resistance to changing electrolyte conditions likely to

  2. Impact of Environmental Conditions (pH, Ionic Strength, And Electrolyte Type) On The Surface Charge And Aggregation Of Silver Nanoparticles Suspensions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of capping agents and environmental conditions (pH, ionic strength, and background electrolytes) on surface charge and aggregation potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) suspensions were investigated. Capping agents are chemicals used in the synthesis of nanopartic...

  3. Adsorption of a Textile Dye on Commercial Activated Carbon: A Simple Experiment to Explore the Role of Surface Chemistry and Ionic Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Angela; Nunes, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an adsorption experiment is proposed using commercial activated carbon as adsorbent and a textile azo dye, Mordant Blue-9, as adsorbate. The surface chemistry of the activated carbon is changed through a simple oxidation treatment and the ionic strength of the dye solution is also modified, simulating distinct conditions of water…

  4. A comprehensive physics-based model encompassing variable surface resistance and underlying physics of ionic polymer-metal composite actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Qi; Palmre, Viljar; Stalbaum, Tyler; Kim, Kwang J.

    2015-09-01

    The ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) is an emerging smart material in actuation and sensing applications, such as artificial muscles, underwater actuators, and advanced medical devices. However, the effect of the change in surface electrode properties on the actuating of IPMC has not been well studied. To address this problem, we theoretically predict and experimentally investigate the dynamic electro-mechanical response of the IPMC thin-strip actuator. A model of the IPMC actuator is proposed based on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations for ion transport and charge dynamics in the polymer membrane, while a physical model for the change of surface resistance of the electrodes of the IPMC due to deformation is also incorporated. By incorporating these two models, a complete, dynamic, physics-based model for IPMC actuators is presented. To verify the model, IPMC samples were prepared and experiments were conducted. The results show that the theoretical model can accurately predict the actuating performance of IPMC actuators over a range of dynamic conditions. Additionally, the charge dynamics inside the polymer during the oscillation of the IPMC is presented. It is also shown that the charge at the boundary mainly affects the induced stress of the IPMC. The current study is beneficial for the comprehensive understanding of the surface electrode effect on the performance of IPMC actuators.

  5. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces.

    PubMed

    Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong Q; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2013-05-01

    Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells.

  6. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. PMID:23497979

  7. High surface area electrodes in ionic polymer transducers: Numerical and experimental investigations of the electro-chemical behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar J.; Habchi, Wassim; Wallmersperger, Thomas; Akle, Etienne J.; Leo, Donald J.

    2011-04-01

    Ionomeric polymer transducer (IPT) is an electroactive polymer that has received considerable attention due to its ability to generate large bending strain (>5%) and moderate stress at low applied voltages (±2 V). Ionic polymer transducers consist of an ionomer, usually Nafion, sandwiched between two electrically conductive electrodes. A novel fabrication technique denoted as the direct assembly process (DAP) enabled controlled electrode architecture in ionic polymer transducers. A DAP built transducer consists of two high surface area electrodes made of electrically conducting particles uniformly distributed in an ionomer matrix sandwiching an ionomer membrane. The purpose of this paper is to investigate and simulate the effect of these high surface area particles on the electro-chemical response of an IPT. Theoretical investigations as well as experimental verifications are performed. The model used consists of a convection-diffusion equation describing the chemical field as well as a Poisson equation describing the electrical field. The two-dimensional model incorporates highly conductive particles randomly distributed in the electrode area. Traditionally, these kinds of electrodes were simulated with boundary conditions representing flat electrodes with a large dielectric permittivity at the polymer boundary. This model enables the design of electrodes with complicated geometrical patterns. In the experimental section, several transducers are fabricated using the DAP process on Nafion 117 membranes. The architecture of the high surface area electrodes in these samples is varied. The concentration of the high surface area RuO2 particles is varied from 30 vol% up to 60 vol% at a fixed thickness of 30 μm, while the overall thickness of the electrode is varied from 10 μm up to 40 μm at a fixed concentration of 45%. The flux and charge accumulation in the materials are measured experimentally and compared to the results of the numerical simulations. Trends of

  8. Low-energy reactive ion scattering as a probe of surface femtochemical reaction: H+ and H- formation on ionic compound surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souda, R.; Suzuki, T.; Kawanowa, H.; Asari, E.

    1999-01-01

    Capture and loss of valence electrons during low-energy (50-500 eV) proton scattering from some alkali-halide surfaces such as LiCl, NaCl, and KF have been investigated in comparison with those from the TiO2(110) and Cs-adsorbed Si(100) surfaces. The primary H+ ion survives neutralization when scattered from the highly ionized target species existing on the surface. For H- ion formation, a close atomic encounter with individual target ions is found to be important; the H- ion is formed more efficiently on the cationic site than on the anionic site despite the fact that the valence electron is spacially localized on the latter. This is because the charge state of scattered hydrogen is determined during a transient chemisorption state and amphoteric hydrogen tends to be coordinated negatively (positively) on the cationic site (the anionic site). The final charge state of scattered hydrogen is fixed at a certain bond-breaking distance (˜5.0 a.u.) from the surface where the well-defined atomic orbital of hydrogen evolves. The competing nonlocal resonance tunneling is suppressed at the ionic-compound surfaces due to the existence of a large band gap, so that hydrogen is scattered without losing the memory of such a transient chemisorption state.

  9. Aggregation Behavior of Imidazolium-Based Surface-Active Ionic Liquids with Photoresponsive Cinnamate Counterions in the Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yanhui; Zhao, Liuchen; Hu, Qiongzheng; Gao, Yan'an; Yu, Li

    2015-11-24

    Two imidazolium-based surface active ionic liquids (SAILs) with photoresponsive cinnamate aromatic counterions, viz. 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium cinnamate ([C12mim][CA]) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium para-hydroxy-cinnamate ([C12mim][PCA]), were newly synthesized, and their self-assembly behaviors in aqueous solutions were systematically explored. Results of surface tension and conductivity measurements show that both [C12mim][CA] and [C12mim][PCA] display a superior surface activity in aqueous solutions compared to the common imidazolium-based SAIL, 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (C12mimBr), which implies the incorporation of cinnamate aromatic counterions can promote the micellar formation. Furthermore, [C12mim][CA] shows higher surface activity due to the higher hydrophobicity of its counterion in comparison to [C12mim][PCA] that has a hydroxyl group. Both hexagonal liquid-crystalline phase (H1) and cubic liquid-crystalline phase (V2) were constructed in the [C12mim][CA] aqueous solutions. In contrast, the [C12mim][PCA]/H2O system only exhibits a single hexagonal liquid-crystalline phase (H1) in a broad concentration region. These lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) phases were comprehensively characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and rheometer. Investigation on the temperature-dependent self-assembly nanostructures demonstrates that the higher temperature leads to a looser arrangement. Under UV irradiation, trans-cis photoisomerization of the phenylalkene group results in inferior surface activity of the prepared SAILs in aqueous solution with higher cmc values. Moreover, UV light irradiation induces obvious change of the structural parameters without altering the LLC phases. This work is expected to enrich the investigations of phase behaviors formed in SAILs systems and receive particular attention due to their unique properties and potential applications in drug delivery, biochemistry, materials

  10. Ionic liquid assisted chemical strategy to TiO2 hollow nanocube assemblies with surface-fluorination and nitridation and high energy crystal facet exposure for enhanced photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengli; Liu, Baocang; Wang, Qin; Gao, Yuxi; Shi, Ying; Feng, Xue; An, Xiaoting; Liu, Lixia; Zhang, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Realization of anionic nonmetal doping and high energy crystal facet exposure in TiO2 photocatalysts has been proven to be an effective approach for significantly improving their photocatalytic performance. A facile strategy of ionic liquid assisted etching chemistry by simply hydrothermally etching hollow TiO2 spheres composed of TiO2 nanoparticles with an ionic liquid of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate without any other additives is developed to create highly active anatase TiO2 nanocubes and TiO2 nanocube assemblies. With this one-pot ionic liquid assisted etching process, the surface-fluorination and nitridation and high energy {001} crystal facets exposure can be readily realized simultaneously. Compared with the benchmark materials of P25 and TiO2 nanostructures with other hierarchical architectures of hollow spheres, flaky spheres, and spindles synthesized by hydrothermally etching hollow TiO2 spheres with nonionic liquid of NH4F, the TiO2 nanocubes and TiO2 nanocube assemblies used as efficient photocatalysts show super high photocatalytic activity for degradation of methylene blue, methyl orange, and rhodamine B, due to their surface-fluorination and nitridation and high energy crystal facet exposure. The ionic liquid assisted etching chemistry is facile and robust and may be a general strategy for synthesizing other metal oxides with high energy crystal facets and surface doping for improving photocatalytic activity. PMID:24881462

  11. System-dependent dispersion coefficients for the DFT-D3 treatment of adsorption processes on ionic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Stephan; Moellmann, Jonas; Reckien, Werner; Bredow, Thomas; Grimme, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    Dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations (DFT-D3) were performed for the adsorption of CO on MgO and C(2) H(2) on NaCl surfaces. An extension of our non-empirical scheme for the computation of atom-in-molecules dispersion coefficients is proposed. It is based on electrostatically embedded M(4)X(4) (M=Na, Mg) clusters that are used in TDDFT calculations of dynamic dipole polarizabilities. We find that the C(MM)(6) dispersion coefficients for bulk NaCl and MgO are reduced by factors of about 100 and 35 for Na and Mg, respectively, compared to the values of the free atoms. These are used in periodic DFT calculations with the revPBE semi-local density functional. As demonstrated by calculations of adsorption potential energy curves, the new C(6) coefficients lead to much more accurate energies (E(ads)) and molecule-surface distances than with previous DFT-D schemes. For NaCl/C(2) H(2) we obtained at the revPBE-D3(BJ) level a value of E(ads) =-7.4 kcal mol(-1) in good agreement with experimental data (-5.7 to -7.1 kcal mol(-1)). Dispersion-uncorrected DFT yields an unbound surface state. For the MgO/CO system, the computed revPBE-D3(BJ) value of E(ads) =-4.1 kcal mol(-1) is also in reasonable agreement with experimental results (-3.0 kcal mol(-1)) when thermal corrections are taken into account. Our new dispersion correction also improves computed lattice constants of the bulk systems significantly compared to plain DFT or previous DFT-D results. The extended DFT-D3 scheme also provides accurate non-covalent interactions for ionic systems without empirical adjustments and is suggested as a general tool in surface science.

  12. Weak competing interactions control assembly of strongly bonded TCNQ ionic acceptor molecules on silver surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Changwon; Rojas, Geoffrey A.; Jeon, Seokmin; Kelly, Simon J.; Smith, Sean C.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Yoon, Mina; Maksymovych, Petro

    2014-09-01

    The energy scales of interactions that control molecular adsorption and assembly on surfaces can vary by several orders of magnitude, yet the importance of each contributing interaction is not apparent a priori. Tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) is an archetypal electron acceptor molecule and it is a key component of organic metals. On metal surfaces, this molecule also acts as an electron acceptor, producing negatively charged adsorbates. It is therefore rather intriguing to observe attractive molecular interactions in this system that were reported previously for copper and silver surfaces. Our experiments compared TCNQ adsorption on noble metal surfaces of Ag(100) and Ag(111). In both cases we found net attractive interactions down to the lowest coverage. However, the morphology of the assemblies was strikingly different, with two-dimensional islands on Ag(100) and one-dimensional chains on Ag(111) surfaces. This observation suggests that the registry effect governed by the molecular interaction with the underlying lattice potential is critical in determining the dimensionality of the molecular assembly. Using first-principles density functional calculations with a van der Waals correction scheme, we revealed that the strengths of major interactions (i.e., lattice potential corrugation, intermolecular attraction, and charge-transfer-induced repulsion) are all similar in energy. The van der Waals interactions, in particular, almost double the strength of attractive interactions, making the intermolecular potential comparable in strength to the diffusion potential and promoting self-assembly. However, it is the anisotropy of local intermolecular interactions that is primarily responsible for the difference in the topology of the molecular islands on Ag(100) and Ag(111) surfaces. We anticipate that the intermolecular potential will become more attractive and dominant over the diffusion potential with increasing molecular size, providing new design strategies for the

  13. Surface coating from phosphonate ionic liquid electrolyte for the enhancement of the tribological performance of magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Ana Eva; Rossi, Antonella; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Espinosa, Tulia; Arias-Pardilla, Joaquin; Martínez-Nicolás, Ginés; Bermúdez, María-Dolores

    2015-05-20

    A chronoamperometric method has been applied for the growth of a surface coating on AZ31B magnesium alloy, using the imidazolium alkylphosphonate room-temperature ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylphosphonate ([EMIM][EtPO3H]) as electrolyte. A surface coating layer is obtained after 4 h under a constant voltage bias of -0.8 V with respect to the standard electrode. The coating nucleation and growth process correlates well with a 3D progressive mechanism. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) analysis of [EMIM][EtPO3H] shows new P 2p and O 1s peaks after its use as electrolyte, as a consequence of reaction between the phosphonate anion and the magnesium substrate. Angle-resolved XPS (ARXPS) analysis of [EMIM][EtPO3H] did not show any change in the composition of the surface before and after chronoamperometry, since the sampling depth (1.5 nm at the highest emission angle) is larger than the cation and anion sizes (ca. 7 and 5 Å, respectively). Characterization of the coating was made by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focussed ion beam SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, XPS, and ARXPS. FIB-SEM shows that the coating presents a mean thickness of 374 (±36) nm and contains magnesium and aluminum phosphates. Linear reciprocating tribological tests under variable load show that the presence of the coating can reduce friction coefficients of the coated AZ31B against steel up to 32% and wear rates up to 90%, with respect to the uncoated alloy.

  14. Membrane interactions in nerve myelin. I. Determination of surface charge from effects of pH and ionic strength on period.

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, H.; Kirschner, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    We have used x-ray diffraction to study the interactions between myelin membranes in the sciatic nerve (PNS) and optic nerve (CNS) as a function of pH (2-10) and ionic strength (0-0.18). The period of myelin was found to change in a systematic manner with pH and ionic strength. PNS periods ranged from 165 to 250 A or more, while CNS periods ranged from 150 to 230 A. The native periods were observed only near physiological ionic strength at neutral or alkaline pH. The smallest periods were observed in the pH range 2.5-4 for PNS myelin and pH 2.5-5 for CNS myelin. The minimum period was also observed for PNS myelin after prolonged incubation in distilled water. At pH 4, within these acidic pH ranges, myelin period increased slightly with ionic strength; however, above these ranges, the period increased with pH and decreased with ionic strength. Electron density profiles calculated at different pH and ionic strength showed that the major structural alteration underlying the changes in period was in the width of the aqueous space at the extracellular apposition of membranes; the width of the cytoplasmic space was virtually constant. Assuming that the equilibrium myelin periods are determined by a balance of nonspecific forces/i.e., the electrostatic repulsion force and the van der Walls attractive force, as well as the short-range repulsion force (hydration force, or steric stabilization), then values in the period-dependency curve can be used to define the isoelectric pH and exclusion length of the membrane. The exclusion length, which is related to the minimum period at isoelectric pH, was used to calculate the electrostatic repulsion force given the other forces. The electrostatic repulsion was then used to calculate the surface potential, which in turn was used to calculate the surface charge density (at different pH and ionic strength). We found the negative surface charge increases with pH at constant ionic strength and with ionic strength at constant pH. We

  15. Surface Complexation of Actinides with Iron Oxides: Implications for Radionuclide Transport in Near-Surface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerden, J. L.; Kropf, A. J.; Tsai, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The surface complexation of actinides with iron oxides plays a key role in actinide transport and retardation in geosphere-biosphere systems. The development of accurate actinide transport models therefore requires a mechanistic understanding of surface complexation reactions (i.e. knowledge of chemical speciation at mineral/fluid interfaces). Iron oxides are particularly important actinide sorbents due to their pH dependent surface charges, relatively high surface areas and ubiquity in oxic and suboxic near-surface systems. In this paper we present results from field and laboratory investigations that elucidate the mechanisms involved in binding uranium and neptunium to iron oxide mineral substrates in near neutral groundwaters. The field study involved sampling and characterizing uranium-bearing groundwaters and solids from a saprolite aquifer overlying an unmined uranium deposit in the Virginia Piedmont. The groundwaters were analyzed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and ion chromatography and the aquifer solids were analyzed by electron microprobe. The laboratory study involved a series of batch sorption tests in which U(VI) and Np(V) were reacted with goethite, hematite and magnetite in simulated groundwaters. The pH, ionic strength, aging time, and sorbent/sorbate ratios were varied in these experiments. The oxidation state and coordination environment of neptunium in solutions and sorbents from the batch tests were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Results from this work indicate that, in oxidizing near-surface aquifers, the dissolved concentration of uranium may be limited to less than 30 parts per billion due to uptake by iron oxide mineral coatings and the precipitation of sparingly soluble U(VI) phosphate minerals. Results from the batch adsorption tests showed that, in near neutral groundwaters, a significant fraction of the uranium and neptunium adsorbed as strongly

  16. SURFACE COMPLEXATION OF ACTINIDES WITH IRON OXIDES: IMPLICATIONS FOR RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT IN NEAR-SURFACE AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jerden Jr.; A.J. Kropf; Y. Tsai

    2005-08-25

    The surface complexation of actinides with iron oxides plays a key role in actinide transport and retardation in geosphere-biosphere systems. The development of accurate actinide transport models therefore requires a mechanistic understanding of surface complexation reactions (i.e. knowledge of chemical speciation at mineral/fluid interfaces). Iron oxides are particularly important actinide sorbents due to their pH dependent surface charges, relatively high surface areas and ubiquity in oxic and suboxic near-surface systems. In this paper we present results from field and laboratory investigations that elucidate the mechanisms involved in binding uranium and neptunium to iron oxide mineral substrates in near neutral groundwaters. The field study involved sampling and characterizing uranium-bearing groundwaters and solids from a saprolite aquifer overlying an unmined uranium deposit in the Virginia Piedmont. The groundwaters were analyzed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and ion chromatography and the aquifer solids were analyzed by electron microprobe. The laboratory study involved a series of batch sorption tests in which U(VI) and Np(V) were reacted with goethite, hematite and magnetite in simulated groundwaters. The pH, ionic strength, aging time, and sorbent/sorbate ratios were varied in these experiments. The oxidation state and coordination environment of neptunium in solutions and sorbents from the batch tests were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Results from this work indicate that, in oxidizing near-surface aquifers, the dissolved concentration of uranium may be limited to less than 30 parts per billion due to uptake by iron oxide mineral coatings and the precipitation of sparingly soluble U(VI) phosphate minerals. Results from the batch adsorption tests showed that, in near neutral groundwaters, a significant fraction of the uranium and neptunium adsorbed as strongly

  17. Energetic atomic and ionic oxygen textured optical surfaces for blood glucose monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and the resulting product thereof comprising a solid light-conducting fiber with a point of attachment and having a textured surface site consisting a textured distal end prepared by being placed in a vacuum and then subjected to directed hyperthermal beams comprising oxygen ions or atoms. The textured distal end comprises cones or pillars that are spaced upon from each other by less than 1 micron and are extremely suitable to prevent cellular components of blood from entering the valleys between the cones or pillars so as to effectively separate the cellular components in the blood from interfering with optical sensing of the glucose concentration for diabetic patients.

  18. Extensive ionic partitioning in interfaces that membranous and biomimetic surfaces form with electrolytes: Antitheses of the gold-electrolyte interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilcott, Terry; Guo, Chuan; Coster, Hans

    2013-04-01

    Maxwell-Wagner modeling of electrical impedance measurements of tetradecane-electrolyte systems yielded three interfacial layers between the tetradecane layer and the bulk electrolytes of concentration ranging from 1-300 mM KCl whereas the gold-electrolyte system yielded only one layer. The conductivity and thickness for the surface layer were orders of magnitude different from that expected for the Gouy-Chapman layer and did not reflect dependencies of the Debye length on concentration. Conductivity values for the three layers were less than those of the bulk electrolyte but exhibited a dependency on concentration similar to that expected for the bulk. Thickness values for the layers indicate an interface extending ~106 Å into the bulk electrolyte, which contrasts with the gold-electrolyte interface that extended only 20-30 Å into the bulk. Maxwell-Wagner characterizations of both interfaces were consistent with spatial distributions of ionic partitioning arising from the Born energy as determined by the dielectric properties of the substrates and electrolyte. The distributions for the membranous and silicon interfaces were similar but the antitheses of that for the gold interface.

  19. Effects of surface roughening on the mass transport and mechanical properties of ionic polymer-metal composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Longfei; Asaka, Kinji; Zhu, Zicai; Wang, Yanjie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Dichen

    2014-06-01

    Ionic Polymer-Metal Composite (IPMC) has been well-documented of being a promising functional material in extensive applications. In its most popular and traditional manufacturing technique, roughening is a key process to ensure a satisfying performance. In this paper, based on a lately established multi-physical model, the effect of roughening process on the inner mass transportation and the electro-active output of IPMC were investigated. In the model, the electro-chemical field was monitored by Poisson equation and a properly simplified Nernst-Planck equation set, while the mechanical field was evaluated on the basis of volume strain effect. Furthermore, with Ramo-Shockley theorem, the out-circuit current and accumulated charge on the electrode were bridged with the inner cation distribution. Besides, nominal current and charge density as well as the curvature of the deformation were evaluated to characterize the performance of IPMC. The simulation was implemented by Finite Element Method with Comsol Multi-physics, based on two groups of geometrical models, those with various rough interface and those with different thickness. The results of how the roughening impact influences on the performance of IPMC were discussed progressively in three aspects, steady-state distribution of local potential and mass concentration, current response and charge accumulation, as well as the curvature of deformation. Detailed explanations for the performance improvement resulted from surface roughening were provided from the micro-distribution point of view, which can be further explored for the process optimization of IPMC.

  20. PdNP Decoration of Halloysite Lumen via Selective Grafting of Ionic Liquid onto the Aluminol Surfaces and Catalytic Application.

    PubMed

    Dedzo, Gustave K; Ngnie, Gaëlle; Detellier, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The synthesis of selectively deposited palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) inside tubular halloysite lumens is reported. This specific localization was directed by the selective modification of the aluminol surfaces of the clay mineral through stable Al-O-C bonds. An ionic liquid (1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium) was grafted onto halloysite following the guest displacement method (generally used for kaolinite) using halloysite-DMSO preintercalate. The characterization of this clay nanohybrid material (XRD, NMR, TGA) showed characteristics reminiscent of similar materials synthesized from kaolinite. The grafting on halloysite lumens was also effective without using the DMSO preintercalate. The presence of these new functionalities in halloysite directs the synthesis of uniform PdNPs with size ranging between 3 and 6 nm located exclusively in the lumens. This results from the selective adsorption of PdNPs precursors in functionalized lumens through an anion exchange mechanism followed by in situ reduction. In contrast, the unmodified clay mineral displayed nanoparticles both inside and outside the tubes. These catalysts showed significant catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). The most efficient catalysts were recycled up to three times without reducing significantly the catalytic activities.

  1. Determination of cmc of imidazolium based surface active ionic liquids through probe-less UV-vis spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Rather, Mudasir Ahmad; Rather, Ghulam Mohammad; Pandit, Sarwar Ahmad; Bhat, Sajad Ahmad; Bhat, Mohsin Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    In the first of its kind we herein report the results of our studies undertaken on the micellization behaviour of imidazolium based surface active ionic liquids (SAILs) to prove that their critical micelle concentration (cmc) can be estimated through ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy without using any external probe. Tensiometric and spectrophotometric investigations of a series of freshly prepared SAILs viz. 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([OMIM][Cl]), 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium dodecylsulphate ([OMIM][DS]), 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium benzoate ([OMIM][Bz]), 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium salicylate ([OMIM][Sc]), 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([OMIM][Ac]) are presented as a case study in support of the said claim. The cmcs estimated through spectrophotometric method were found to be close to the values estimated through tensiometry for the said SAILs. The cmcs for the investigated SAILS were found to vary in order of [OMIM][Cl]>[OMIM][Ac]>[OMIM][Bz]>[OMIM][Sc]>[OMIM][DS]. To the best of our knowledge the present communication will be the first report about the synthesis, characterization and micellization behaviour of [OMIM][Bz] and [OMIM][Sc].

  2. Layering and shear properties of an ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate, confined to nano-films between mica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Perkin, Susan; Albrecht, Tim; Klein, Jacob

    2010-02-14

    We report high-resolution measurements of the forces between two atomically smooth solid surfaces across a film of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ionic liquid, for film thickness down to a single ion diameter. For films thinner than approximately 2 nm oscillatory structural forces are observed as the surface separation decreases and pairs of ion layers are squeezed out of the film. Strikingly, measurements of the shear stress of the ionic liquid film reveal low friction coefficients which are 1-2 orders of magnitude smaller than for analogous films of non-polar molecular liquids, including standard hydrocarbon lubricants, up to ca. 1 MPa pressure. We attribute this to the geometric and charge characteristics of the ionic liquid: the irregular shapes of the ions lead to a low shear stress, while the strong coulombic interactions between the ions and the charged confining surfaces lead to a robust film which is maintained between the shearing surfaces when pressure is applied across the film. PMID:20119601

  3. Measurement of interaction forces between fibrinogen coated probes and mica surface with the atomic force microscope: The pH and ionic strength effect.

    PubMed

    Tsapikouni, Theodora S; Allen, Stephanie; Missirlis, Yannis F

    2008-01-01

    The study of protein-surface interactions is of great significance in the design of biomaterials and the evaluation of molecular processes in tissue engineering. The authors have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to directly measure the force of attraction/adhesion of fibrinogen coated tips to mica surfaces and reveal the effect of the surrounding solution pH and ionic strength on this interaction. Silica colloid spheres were attached to the AFM cantilevers and, after plasma deposition of poly(acrylic acid), fibrinogen molecules were covalently bound on them with the help of the cross-linker 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) in the presence of N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS). The measurements suggest that fibrinogen adsorption is controlled by the screening of electrostatic repulsion as the salt concentration increases from 15 to 150 mM, whereas at higher ionic strength (500 mM) the hydration forces and the compact molecular conformation become crucial, restricting adsorption. The protein attraction to the surface increases at the isoelectric point of fibrinogen (pH 5.8), compared with the physiological pH. At pH 3.5, apart from fibrinogen attraction to the surface, evidence of fibrinogen conformational changes is observed, as the pH and the ionic strength are set back and forth, and these changes may account for fibrinogen aggregation in the protein solution at this pH.

  4. Energetic Atomic and Ionic Oxygen Textured Optical Surfaces for Blood Glucose Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and the resulting product thereof comprising a solid light-conducting fiber with a point of attachment and having a textured surface site consisting of a textured distal end prepared by being placed in a vacuum and then subjected to directed hyperthermal beams comprising oxygen ions or atoms. The textured distal end comprises cones or pillars that are spaced upon from each other by less than 1 micron and are extremely suitable to prevent cellular components of blood from entering the valleys between the cones or pillars so as to effectively separate the cellular components in the blood from interfering with optical sensing of the glucose concentration for diabetic patients.

  5. The liquid surface of chiral ionic liquids as seen from molecular dynamics simulations combined with intrinsic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lísal, Martin

    2013-12-07

    We present molecular-level insight into the liquid/gas interface of two chiral room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) derived from 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([bmim][Br]); namely, (R)-1-butyl-3-(3-hydroxy-2-methylpropyl)imidazolium bromide (hydroxypropyl) and 1-butyl-3-[(1R)-nopyl]imidazolium bromide (nopyl). We use our currently developed force field which was validated against the experimental bulk density, heat of vaporization, and surface tension of [bmim][Br]. The force field for the RTILs adopts the Chemistry at Harvard Molecular Mechanics (CHARMM) parameters for the intramolecular and repulsion-dispersion interactions along with the reduced partial atomic charges based on ab initio calculations. The net charges of the ions are around ±0.8e, which mimic the anion to cation charge transfer and many-body effects. Molecular dynamics simulations in the slab geometry combined with the intrinsic interface analysis are employed to provide a detailed description of the RTIL/gas interface in terms of the structural and dynamic properties of the interfacial, sub-interfacial, and central layers at a temperature of 300 K. The focus is on the comparison of the liquid/gas interface for the chiral RTILs with the interface for parent [bmim][Br]. The structure of the interface is elucidated by evaluating the surface roughness, intrinsic atomic density profiles, and orientation ordering of the cations. The dynamics of the ions at the interfacial region is characterized by computing the survival probability, and normal and lateral self-diffusion coefficients in the layers.

  6. NMR, surface tension and conductance study to investigate host-guest inclusion complexes of three sequential ionic liquids with β-cyclodextrin in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Siti; Ekka, Deepak; Saha, Subhadeep; Roy, Mahendra Nath

    2016-08-01

    Host-guest inclusion complexes of three sequential cationic room temperature surface active ionic liquids, benzyltrialkylammonium chloride [(C6H5CH2)N(CnH2n+1)3Cl; where n = 1, 2, 4] with β-cyclodextrin in aqueous media have been studied using surface tension, conductance and NMR spectroscopy. All the studies have suggested that the hydrophobic benzyl group of ionic liquids is encapsulated inside into the cavity of β-cyclodextrin and played a crucial role in supporting the formation of inclusion complexes. The variation of the thermodynamic parameters with guest size, shape is used to draw inferences about contributions to the overall binding by means of the driving forces, viz., hydrophobic effect, steric hindrance, van der Waal force, and electrostatic force.

  7. Polypeptide nanogels with hydrophobic moieties in the cross-linked ionic cores: Synthesis, characterization and implications for anticancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Oh; Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Desale, Swapnil; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer nanogels have gained considerable attention as a potential platform for drug delivery applications. Here we describe the design and synthesis of novel polypeptide-based nanogels with hydrophobic moieties in the cross-linked ionic cores. Diblock copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-glutamic acid), hydrophobically modified with L-phenylalanine methyl ester moieties was used for controlled template synthesis of nanogels with small size (ca. 70 nm in diameter) and narrow particle size distribution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies using coumarin C153 indicated the existence of hydrophobic domains in the ionic cores of the nanogels. Stable doxorubicin-loaded nanogels were prepared at high drug capacity (30 w/w%). We show that nanogels are enzymatically-degradable leading to accelerated drug release under simulated lysosomal acidic pH. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the nanogel-based formulation of doxorubicin is well tolerated and exhibit an improved antitumor activity compared to a free doxorubicin in an ovarian tumor xenograft mouse model. Our results signify the point to a potential of these biodegradable nanogels as attractive carriers for delivery of chemotherapeutics. PMID:23998716

  8. Implications of the Differential Toxicological Effects of III-V Ionic and Particulate Materials for Hazard Assessment of Semiconductor Slurries.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen; Lin, Sijie; Chang, Chong Hyun; Ji, Zhaoxia; Sun, Bingbing; Wang, Xiang; Li, Ruibin; Pon, Nanetta; Xia, Tian; Nel, André E

    2015-12-22

    Because of tunable band gaps, high carrier mobility, and low-energy consumption rates, III-V materials are attractive for use in semiconductor wafers. However, these wafers require chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) for polishing, which leads to the generation of large quantities of hazardous waste including particulate and ionic III-V debris. Although the toxic effects of micron-sized III-V materials have been studied in vivo, no comprehensive assessment has been undertaken to elucidate the hazardous effects of submicron particulates and released III-V ionic components. Since III-V materials may contribute disproportionately to the hazard of CMP slurries, we obtained GaP, InP, GaAs, and InAs as micron- (0.2-3 μm) and nanoscale (<100 nm) particles for comparative studies of their cytotoxic potential in macrophage (THP-1) and lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cell lines. We found that nanosized III-V arsenides, including GaAs and InAs, could induce significantly more cytotoxicity over a 24-72 h observation period. In contrast, GaP and InP particulates of all sizes as well as ionic GaCl3 and InCl3 were substantially less hazardous. The principal mechanism of III-V arsenide nanoparticle toxicity is dissolution and shedding of toxic As(III) and, to a lesser extent, As(V) ions. GaAs dissolves in the cell culture medium as well as in acidifying intracellular compartments, while InAs dissolves (more slowly) inside cells. Chelation of released As by 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid interfered in GaAs toxicity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that III-V arsenides, GaAs and InAs nanoparticles, contribute in a major way to the toxicity of III-V materials that could appear in slurries. This finding is of importance for considering how to deal with the hazard potential of CMP slurries.

  9. 5-Methyl Salicylic Acid-Induced Thermo Responsive Reversible Transition in Surface Active Ionic Liquid Assemblies: A Spectroscopic Approach.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arpita; Dutta, Rupam; Banerjee, Pavel; Kundu, Sangita; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-07-19

    This article describes the formation of stable unilamellar vesicles involving surface active ionic liquid (SAIL), 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C16mimCl), and 5-methyl salicylic acid (5mS). Turbidity, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and viscosity measurements suggest that C16mimCl containing micellar aggregates are transformed to elongated micelle and finally into vesicular aggregates with the addition of 5mS. Besides, we have also investigated the photophysical aspects of a hydrophobic (coumarin 153, C153) and a hydrophilic molecule (rhodamine 6G (R6G) perchlorate) during 5mS-induced micelle to vesicle transition. The rotational motion of C153 becomes slower, whereas faster motion is observed for R6G during micelle to vesicle transition. Moreover, the fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements suggest that the translational diffusion of hydrophobic probe becomes slower in C16mimCl-5mS aggregates in comparison to C16mimCl micelle. However, a reverse trend in translational diffusion motion of hydrophilic molecule has been observed in C16mimCl-5mS aggregates. Moreover, we have also found that the C16mimCl-5mS containing vesicles are transformed into micelles upon enhanced temperature, and it is further confirmed by turbidity, DLS measurements that this transition is a reversible one. Finally, temperature-induced rotational motion of C153 and R6G has been monitored in C16mimCl-5mS aggregates to get a complete scenario regarding the temperature-induced vesicle to micelle transition. PMID:27345738

  10. Effects of ionic strength on the surface tension and nonequilibrium interfacial characteristics of poly(sodium styrenesulfonate)/dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ábrahám, Ágnes; Kardos, Attila; Mezei, Amália; Campbell, Richard A; Varga, Imre

    2014-05-01

    We rationalize the surface tension behavior and nonequilibrium interfacial characteristics of high molecular weight poly(sodium styrenesulfonate)/dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (NaPSS/DTAB) mixtures with respect to the ionic strength. Excellent agreement is achieved between experimental data and our recent empirical model [Langmuir 2013, 29, 11554], which is based on the lack of colloidal stability of bulk aggregates in the phase separation region and has no free fitting parameters. We show that the size of a surface tension peak positioned at the edge of the phase separation region can be suppressed by the addition of inert electrolyte, which lowers the critical micelle concentration in relation to the phase separation region. Such manipulation of the peak is possible for the 100 ppm NaPSS/DTAB system because there is a high free surfactant concentration in the phase separation region. The close agreement of our model with the experimental data of samples in the phase separation region with respect to the ionic strength indicates that the surface tension behavior can be rationalized in terms of comprehensive precipitation regardless of whether there is a peak or not. The time scale of precipitation for the investigated system is on the order of one month, which emphasizes the need to understand the dynamic changes in the state of bulk aggregation in order to rationalize the surface properties of strongly interacting mixtures; steady state surface properties measured in the interim period will represent samples far from equilibrium. We show also that the surface properties of samples of low ionic strength outside the equilibrium phase separation region can be extreme opposites depending on the sample history, which is attributed to the generation of trapped nonequilibrium states. This work highlights the need to validate the underlying nature of oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/surfactant systems prior to the interpretation of experimental data within an

  11. Surface structure determinations of crystalline ionic thin films grown on transition metal single crystal surfaces by low-energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Joel Glenn

    The surface structures of NaCl(100), LiF(100) and alpha-MgCl2 (0001) adsorbed on various metal single crystals have been determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Thin films of these salts were grown on metal substrates by exposing the heated metal surface to a molecular flux of salt emitted from a Knudsen cell. This method of investigating thin films of insulators (ionic salts) on a conducting substrate (metal) circumvents surface charging problems that plagued bulk studies, thereby allowing the use of electron-based techniques to characterize the surface. The surface layer of NaCl(100) was found to have a 0.12 +/- 0.03 A corrugation due to movement of the Na+ ions towards the bulk. Additional deviations from the bulk structure were not seen in the deeper atomic layers. In order to determine if the metal substrate had an influence on the films' growth characteristics, multilayer films of NaCl(100) were grown on Pd(100) and Pt(111). An tensor LEED (TLEED) analysis of the diffraction beam intensities from the NaCl(100)-(1 x 1) on Pd(100) and NaCl(100)-(1 x 1) on Pt(111) LEED patterns showed that the multilayer NaCl(100) film had the same structure on both substrates to a depth sampled by the electrons in the individual experimental energy ranges. Additionally, these two films exhibited the same adsorbate-substrate interaction on Pd(100) and Pt(111) as evidenced by the lone multilayer (zero order) desorption peak observed in the temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra of NaCl. The surface structure of LiF(100) was studied to correlate the surface corrugation of the alkali halide (100) surface to the ions' polarizability. The LiF surface is less polarizable than the NaCl surface. TLEED calculations determined that the LiF(100) surface had a 0.24 +/- 0.04 A corrugation with a 0.06 +/- 0.04 A corrugation of the second layer. Both corrugations were due to the cations moving deeper into the bulk. Unlike NaCl and LiF, MgCl2 adsorbed on Pd(111) and Pt

  12. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  13. p-Si(1 1 1):H/ionic liquid interface investigated through a combination of electrochemical measurements and reflection high energy electron diffraction surface analysis in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ko; Maruyama, Shingo; Matsumoto, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    A combination study of electrochemical measurements and reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) surface analysis experiments in a vacuum was first demonstrated to characterize a p-Si(1 1 1):H/ionic liquid interface. Mott-Schottky plot analysis was made to successfully not only evaluate the acceptor density and flat band potential of the p-Si(1 1 1):H, but also get some insight into its surface states. Furthermore, the electric double layer capacitance and specific adsorption properties at the IL/Si(1 1 1):H interface as well as the electrochemical interface stability will be discussed in this paper.

  14. Lubrication of starch in ionic liquid-water mixtures: Soluble carbohydrate polymers form a boundary film on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yakubov, Gleb E; Zhong, Lei; Li, Ming; Boehm, Michael W; Xie, Fengwei; Beattie, David A; Halley, Peter J; Stokes, Jason R

    2015-11-20

    Soluble starch polymers are shown to enhance the lubrication of ionic liquid-water solvent mixtures in low-pressure tribological contacts between hydrophobic substrates. A fraction of starch polymers become highly soluble in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc)-water solvents with ionic liquid fraction ≥60wt%. In 65wt% EMIMAc, a small amount of soluble starch (0.33wt%) reduces the boundary friction coefficient by up to a third in comparison to that of the solvent. This low-friction is associated with a nanometre thick film (ca. 2nm) formed from the amylose fraction of the starch. In addition, under conditions where there is a mixture of insoluble starch particles and solubilised starch polymers, it is found that the presence of dissolved amylose enhances the lubrication of starch suspensions between roughened substrates. These findings open up the possibility of utilising starch biopolymers, as well as other hydrocolloids, for enhancing the performance of ionic liquid lubricants.

  15. Lubrication of starch in ionic liquid-water mixtures: Soluble carbohydrate polymers form a boundary film on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yakubov, Gleb E; Zhong, Lei; Li, Ming; Boehm, Michael W; Xie, Fengwei; Beattie, David A; Halley, Peter J; Stokes, Jason R

    2015-11-20

    Soluble starch polymers are shown to enhance the lubrication of ionic liquid-water solvent mixtures in low-pressure tribological contacts between hydrophobic substrates. A fraction of starch polymers become highly soluble in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc)-water solvents with ionic liquid fraction ≥60wt%. In 65wt% EMIMAc, a small amount of soluble starch (0.33wt%) reduces the boundary friction coefficient by up to a third in comparison to that of the solvent. This low-friction is associated with a nanometre thick film (ca. 2nm) formed from the amylose fraction of the starch. In addition, under conditions where there is a mixture of insoluble starch particles and solubilised starch polymers, it is found that the presence of dissolved amylose enhances the lubrication of starch suspensions between roughened substrates. These findings open up the possibility of utilising starch biopolymers, as well as other hydrocolloids, for enhancing the performance of ionic liquid lubricants. PMID:26344308

  16. Cigarette Smoke Toxins Deposited on Surfaces: Implications for Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Green, Manuela; Adhami, Neema; Frankos, Michael; Valdez, Mathew; Goodwin, Benjamin; Lyubovitsky, Julia; Dhall, Sandeep; Garcia, Monika; Egiebor, Ivie; Martinez, Bethanne; Green, Harry W.; Havel, Christopher; Yu, Lisa; Liles, Sandy; Matt, Georg; Destaillats, Hugo; Sleiman, Mohammed; Gundel, Laura A.; Benowitz, Neal; Jacob, Peyton; Hovell, Melbourne; Winickoff, Jonathan P.; Curras-Collazo, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking remains a significant health threat for smokers and nonsmokers alike. Secondhand smoke (SHS) is intrinsically more toxic than directly inhaled smoke. Recently, a new threat has been discovered – Thirdhand smoke (THS) – the accumulation of SHS on surfaces that ages with time, becoming progressively more toxic. THS is a potential health threat to children, spouses of smokers and workers in environments where smoking is or has been allowed. The goal of this study is to investigate the effects of THS on liver, lung, skin healing, and behavior, using an animal model exposed to THS under conditions that mimic exposure of humans. THS-exposed mice show alterations in multiple organ systems and excrete levels of NNAL (a tobacco-specific carcinogen biomarker) similar to those found in children exposed to SHS (and consequently to THS). In liver, THS leads to increased lipid levels and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a precursor to cirrhosis and cancer and a potential contributor to cardiovascular disease. In lung, THS stimulates excess collagen production and high levels of inflammatory cytokines, suggesting propensity for fibrosis with implications for inflammation-induced diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. In wounded skin, healing in THS-exposed mice has many characteristics of the poor healing of surgical incisions observed in human smokers. Lastly, behavioral tests show that THS-exposed mice become hyperactive. The latter data, combined with emerging associated behavioral problems in children exposed to SHS/THS, suggest that, with prolonged exposure, they may be at significant risk for developing more severe neurological disorders. These results provide a basis for studies on the toxic effects of THS in humans and inform potential regulatory policies to prevent involuntary exposure to THS. PMID:24489722

  17. Long-range electrostatic screening in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, Matthew A; Dobbs, Howard A; Valtiner, Markus; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-06-16

    Electrolyte solutions with high concentrations of ions are prevalent in biological systems and energy storage technologies. Nevertheless, the high interaction free energy and long-range nature of electrostatic interactions makes the development of a general conceptual picture of concentrated electrolytes a significant challenge. In this work, we study ionic liquids, single-component liquids composed solely of ions, in an attempt to provide a novel perspective on electrostatic screening in very high concentration (nonideal) electrolytes. We use temperature-dependent surface force measurements to demonstrate that the long-range, exponentially decaying diffuse double-layer forces observed across ionic liquids exhibit a pronounced temperature dependence: Increasing the temperature decreases the measured exponential (Debye) decay length, implying an increase in the thermally driven effective free-ion concentration in the bulk ionic liquids. We use our quantitative results to propose a general model of long-range electrostatic screening in ionic liquids, where thermally activated charge fluctuations, either free ions or correlated domains (quasiparticles), take on the role of ions in traditional dilute electrolyte solutions. This picture represents a crucial step toward resolving several inconsistencies surrounding electrostatic screening and charge transport in ionic liquids that have impeded progress within the interdisciplinary ionic liquids community. More broadly, our work provides a previously unidentified way of envisioning highly concentrated electrolytes, with implications for diverse areas of inquiry, ranging from designing electrochemical devices to rationalizing electrostatic interactions in biological systems.

  18. Long-range electrostatic screening in ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Gebbie, Matthew A.; Dobbs, Howard A.; Valtiner, Markus; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    Electrolyte solutions with high concentrations of ions are prevalent in biological systems and energy storage technologies. Nevertheless, the high interaction free energy and long-range nature of electrostatic interactions makes the development of a general conceptual picture of concentrated electrolytes a significant challenge. In this work, we study ionic liquids, single-component liquids composed solely of ions, in an attempt to provide a novel perspective on electrostatic screening in very high concentration (nonideal) electrolytes. We use temperature-dependent surface force measurements to demonstrate that the long-range, exponentially decaying diffuse double-layer forces observed across ionic liquids exhibit a pronounced temperature dependence: Increasing the temperature decreases the measured exponential (Debye) decay length, implying an increase in the thermally driven effective free-ion concentration in the bulk ionic liquids. We use our quantitative results to propose a general model of long-range electrostatic screening in ionic liquids, where thermally activated charge fluctuations, either free ions or correlated domains (quasiparticles), take on the role of ions in traditional dilute electrolyte solutions. This picture represents a crucial step toward resolving several inconsistencies surrounding electrostatic screening and charge transport in ionic liquids that have impeded progress within the interdisciplinary ionic liquids community. More broadly, our work provides a previously unidentified way of envisioning highly concentrated electrolytes, with implications for diverse areas of inquiry, ranging from designing electrochemical devices to rationalizing electrostatic interactions in biological systems. PMID:26040001

  19. Hydrophobic and Ionic-Interactions in Bulk and Confined Water with Implications for Collapse and Folding of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitheeswaran, S.; Chen, Jie; Thirumalai, D.

    2011-10-01

    Water and water-mediated interactions determine the thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding, protein aggregation and self-assembly in confined spaces. To obtain insights into the role of water in the context of folding problems, we describe computer simulations of a few related model systems. The dynamics of collapse of eicosane shows that upon expulsion of water the linear hydrocarbon chain adopts an ordered helical hairpin structure with 1.5 turns. The structure of dimer of eicosane molecules has two well ordered helical hairpins that are stacked perpendicular to each other. As a prelude to studying folding in confined spaces we used simulations to understand changes in hydrophobic and ionic interactions in nano-sized water droplets. Solvation of hydrophobic and charged species change drastically in nano-scale water droplets. Hydrophobic species are localized at the boundary. The tendency of ions to be at the boundary where water density is low increases as the charge density decreases. The interactions between hydrophobic, polar, and charged residue are also profoundly altered in confined spaces. Using the results of computer simulations and accounting for loss of chain entropy upon confinement we argue and then demonstrate, using simulations in explicit water, that ordered states of generic amphiphilic peptide sequences should be stabilized in cylindrical nanopores.

  20. Inelastic and Reactive Scattering Dynamics of Hyperthermal Oxygen Atoms on Ionic Liquid Surfaces: [emim][NTf2] and [C12mim][NTf2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bohan; Zhang, Jianming; Minton, Timothy K.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.; Slattery, John M.; Yockel, Scott; Schatz, George C.

    2011-05-01

    Collisions of hyperthermal oxygen atoms, with an average translational energy of 520 kJ mol-1, on continuously refreshed ionic liquids, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([emim][NTf2]) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([C12mim][NTf2]), were studied with the use of a beam-surface scattering technique. Time-of-flight and angular distributions of inelastically scattered O and reactively scattered OH and H2O were collected for various angles of incidence with the use of a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. For both O and OH, two distinct scattering processes were identified, which can be empirically categorized as thermal and non-thermal. Non-thermal scattering is more probable for both O and OH products. The observation of OH confirms that at least some reactive sites, presumably alkyl groups, must be exposed at the surface. The ionic liquid with the longer alkyl chain, [C12mim][NTf2], is substantially more reactive than the liquid with the shorter alkyl chain, [emim][NTf2], and proportionately much more so than would be predicted simply from stoichiometry based on the number of abstractable hydrogen atoms. Molecular dynamics models of these surfaces shed light on this change in reactivity. The scattering behavior of O is distinctly different from that of OH. However, no such differences between inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics have been seen in previous work on pure hydrocarbon liquids, in particular the benchmark, partially branched hydrocarbon, squalane (C30H62). The comparison between inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics indicates that inelastic scattering from the ionic liquid surfaces takes place predominantly at non-reactive sites that are effectively stiffer than the reactive alkyl chains, with a higher proportion of collisions sampling such sites for [emim][NTf2] than for [C12mim][NTf2].

  1. Allylic ionic liquid electrolyte-assisted electrochemical surface passivation of LiCoO2 for advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Junyoung; Yim, Taeeun; Park, Jang Hoon; Ryu, Ji Heon; Lee, Sang Young; Kim, Young Gyu; Oh, Seung M.

    2014-01-01

    Room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) electrolytes have attracted much attention for use in advanced, safe lithium-ion batteries (LIB) owing to their nonvolatility, high conductivity, and great thermal stability. However, LIBs containing RTIL-electrolytes exhibit poor cyclability because electrochemical side reactions cause problematic surface failures of the cathode. Here, we demonstrate that a thin, homogeneous surface film, which is electrochemically generated on LiCoO2 from an RTIL-electrolyte containing an unsaturated substituent on the cation (1-allyl-1-methylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, AMPip-TFSI), can avert undesired side reactions. The derived surface film comprised of a high amount of organic species from the RTIL cations homogenously covered LiCoO2 with a <25 nm layer and helped suppress unfavorable thermal reactions as well as electrochemical side reactions. The superior performance of the cell containing the AMPip-TFSI electrolyte was further elucidated by surface, electrochemical, and thermal analyses. PMID:25168309

  2. Effect of ionic strength on surface-selective patch binding-induced phase separation and coacervation in similarly charged gelatin-agar molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Boral, Shilpi; Bohidar, H B

    2010-09-23

    Coacervate is defined as a polymer-rich dense phase, which remains in thermodynamic equilibrium with its low concentrated phase called the supernatant. The effect of ionic strength (I = 0-0.1 M NaCl) on the mechanism of surface patch binding-induced protein-polysaccharide interaction leading to complex coacervation, between agar (a polyanionic polysaccharide) and gelatin B (a polyampholyte protein), both having similar net charge, at a particular mixing ratio, [gelatin]/[agar] = 1, was studied at various temperatures (20-40 °C). The coacervation transition was probed by turbidity and zeta-potential measurements. The intermolecular association had the signature of surface-selective binding, and a model calculation could explain the potential energy of interactions operative in such processes. The thermo-mechanical features of the coacervates were found to be strongly dependent on ionic strength, which has been interpreted as originating from formation of salt-bridges between the biopolymers. The microstructure of the coacervate materials was analyzed using rheology and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques, which probed the heterogeneity prevailing in the system that had characteristic length in the range 1.3-2.0 nm, and the same data yielded the correlation length of concentration fluctuations, which was estimated to lay in the range 2.4-4 nm. It is concluded that the coacervation transition driven by surface-selective binding is not influenced by the ionic strength of the solution, but the mobile ions participate in the structural organization of the interacting polyions in the coacervate.

  3. Surface roughness of minerals and implications for dissolution studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbeek, Chris

    1992-04-01

    Large, naturally weathered mineral fragments are often ground and sieved to obtain samples for dissolution studies. If the fragments are ground to much smaller dimensions, the samples are normally assumed to contain one type of (fresh) surface only. A model has been developed to test the validity of this assumption. The model describes the surface roughness factor of ground mineral material as a function of grain size and can be used to: (1) estimate the roughness factors of the freshly created and the naturally weathered surfaces; (2) estimate the ratio of fresh to total surface area for the ground samples, both for geometric and for actual surfaces; and (3) check the internal consistency of surface area measurements. Literature data were evaluated for intensively ground size fractions of nine different naturally weathered feldspars. Roughness factors of freshly created surfaces ranged from 2.5-11. Roughness factors of naturally weathered surfaces ranged from 130-2600, which is much higher than is generally recognized for feldspars. Comparison with surface roughness estimates from Scanning Electron Microscopy strongly suggests that etch pit formation plays a minor role in the increase in actual surface area during natural weathering. Instead, virtually all increase in surface area must be attributed to the formation of internal surface structures like micropores. The model also showed that for these ground samples, the assumption of one type of (fresh) surface is approximately correct for the geometric surfaces. For the actual (BET) surfaces, ratios of fresh to total surface area varied over almost the entire range from 0 to 1. This demonstrates that, even after intensive grinding, samples from large, naturally weathered mineral fragments can still contain substantial proportions of weathered BET surface area. Thus, previous dissolution studies in terms of fresh BET surface only may have been misinterpreted.

  4. Leaching of metal(loid)s from a construction material: influence of the particle size, specific surface area and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Schmukat, A; Duester, L; Ecker, D; Schmid, H; Heil, C; Heininger, P; Ternes, T A

    2012-08-15

    Construction materials are tested worldwide for a potential release of dangerous substances to prevent adverse effects on humans and biota. It is crucial to identify and understand the processes which are decisive for the release of hazardous substances. The current study compares the results of different test methods. Taking copper slag as model material, the influence of material particle size, eluant composition and ionic strength was tested. Ionic strength and salinity significantly influenced the release of metal(loid)s in the water phase. Furthermore, it was elucidated that colloids can cause methodological artefacts. The available specific surface area exhibited a positive correlation with the release of hazardous substances. The specific surface areas of materials were determined by the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller model (BET) and four other methods. The aluminium foil method showed the best results with regard to the statistical uncertainty, compared to a 3D laser scanning method. With help of the roughness factor λ it is possible to compare the results from surface area measurements with different material particle sizes (0-250 mm). This comparability offers the potential to match the release of metal(loid)s from laboratory studies with field applications and catchment area calculations/modelling, based on the release per m(2). PMID:22683212

  5. Synthesis of poly(ionic liquids) both in solution and on surface of silica nanoparticles as novel quasi-solid state electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Heyi

    conductivity than PIL homopolymer. Among them, polyGBIMTFSI-co-polyME 3MO-1/1 showed the highest ionic conductivity (around 1.2 x 10 -4 S/cm at 25 °C), which was more than 1 order of magnitude higher than PIL homopolymer (9.3 x 10-6 S/cm at 25 °C). We also synthesized PILs on the surface of silica nanoparticles via surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A gel electrolyte was formed by dispersing the PIL/silica nanocomposites in 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide and heating for 1 h. The gel electrolyte was used as a quasi-solid state electrolyte in DSSC and a 0.37 % conversion efficiency was achieved.

  6. Peculiarity of the liquid/vapour interface of an ionic liquid: study of surface tension and viscoelasticity of liquid BMImPF6 at various temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halka, V.; Tsekov, R.; Freyland, W.

    2005-03-01

    We have measured the surface tension and the capillary wave spectra at the liquid/vapour interface of the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate at various temperatures up to 400 K. From the weak temperature dependence of the surface tension a low value of the surface excess entropy of 3.5 × 10-5 J K-1 m-2 results which is consistent with a strongly aligned surface layer of imidazolium cations previously predicted by MD-calculations. The capillary wave spectra recorded at different wave numbers in the range 170 cm-1q 500 cm-1 exhibit strong deviations from the behaviour expected for the free surface of simple liquids. With an extended dispersion relation including the contributions of surface dipole moment density and shear surface excess viscosity - the spectra have been analyzed. It is found that - is negligibly small, whereas substantially influences the capillary wave spectra. The electrostatic potential across the interface, which corresponds to the measured dipole moment densities, qualitatively agrees with simulation calculations. The distinct temperature dependence of suggests that with increasing temperature an order-disorder transformation occurs in the surface layer.

  7. Surface structure of [XMIm]Tf2N ultrathin ionic liquid films probed by metastable He atoms and photoelectron spectroscopies (UPS and XPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krischok, S.; Ulbrich, A.; Ikari, T.; Kempter, V.; Marschewski, M.; Höfft, O.

    2014-12-01

    The metastable induced electron spectroscopy (MIES), in combination with photoelectron spectroscopies, is a powerful tool to analyze the molecular arrangement at surfaces due to its high surface sensitivity. In this contribution MIES is applied to analyze structural changes at the surface of [EMIm]Tf2N and [OMIm]Tf2N films on two different substrates, Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) and Au(111), as a function of the film thickness, starting from submonolayer coverage up to multilayers. The discussion is based on previous MIES studies of the vacuum-liquid interface of ionic liquids with imidazolium cations and on available DFT calculations. The presented data indicate that - in contrast to multilayers where the surface is dominated by the alkyl chains of the imidazolium cations - the structure of the first adlayer of [XMIm]Tf2N molecules on solid surfaces depends on the strength of their interaction with the surface resulting in alkyl chains aligned parallel or oblique to the substrate surface.

  8. Efficient metal-free oxygen reduction in alkaline medium on high-surface-area mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbons made from ionic liquids and nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Fellinger, Tim-Patrick; Antonietti, Markus

    2011-01-19

    Mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon materials with high surface areas up to 1500 m(2) g(-1) were conveniently made by the carbonization of nucleobases dissolved in an all-organic ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide). Using hard templating with silica nanoparticles, this process yields high-surface-area nitrogen-doped carbon materials with nitrogen contents as high as 12 wt %, narrow mesopore size distribution of ca. 12 nm diameter, and local graphitic carbon structure. It is demonstrated that the resulting nitrogen-doped carbons show very high catalytic activity, even in the metal-free case in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for fuel cells. Specifically, the as-prepared materials exhibit a low onset voltage for ORR in alkaline medium and a high methanol tolerance, compared with those of commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst. We regard this as a first step toward an all-sustainable fuel cell, avoiding noble metals. PMID:21155583

  9. Synthesis, COSMO-RS analysis and optical properties of surface modified ZnS quantum dots using ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, Robina; Muhammad, Nawshad; Gonfa, Girma; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Muhammed, Mamoun

    2015-10-01

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized using the microwave assisted ionic liquid (MAIL) route. Three ionic liquids (ILs), namely, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF4]), trihexyl(tetradecyl) phosphonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) amide ([P6,6,6,14][TSFA]) and trihexyl(tetradecyl) phosphonium chloride ([P6,6,6,14][Cl]) were used in this study. The size and structure of the QDs were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern, respectively. The synthesized QDs were of wurtzite crystalline structure with size less than 5 nm. The QDs were more uniformly distributed while using the phosponium based ILs as a reaction medium during synthesis. The optical properties were investigated by UV-vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) emission spectroscopy. The optical properties of QDs showed the quantum confinement effect in their absorption and the effect of cation and anion structural moiety was observed on their bandedge emission. The QDs emission intensity was measured higher for [P6,6,6,14][Cl] due to their better dispersion as well as high charge density of Cl anion. The capability of the ILs in stabilizing the QDs was interpreted by density functional theory (DFT) computations. The obtained results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction.

  10. The influence of pore size and surface area of activated carbons on the performance of ionic liquid based supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Pohlmann, Sebastian; Lobato, Belén; Centeno, Teresa A; Balducci, Andrea

    2013-10-28

    This study analyses and compares the behaviour of 5 commercial porous carbons in the ionic liquid N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYR14TFSI) and its mixture with propylene carbonate (PC) as electrolytes. The results of this investigation show that the existence of a distribution of pore sizes and/or constrictions at the entrance of the pores leads to significant changes in the specific capacitance of the investigated materials. The use of PYR14TFSI as an electrolyte has a positive effect on the EDLC energy storage, but its high viscosity limits the power density. The mixture 50 : 50 wt% propylene carbonate-PYR14TFSI provides high operative voltage as well as low viscosity and thus notably enhances EDLC operation. PMID:24019082

  11. Effect of room temperature surface active ionic liquids on aggregated nanostructures of γ-Cyclodextrins: A picosecond fluorescence spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Surajit; Kundu, Niloy; Banik, Debasis; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2014-05-01

    In this Letter we report on controllable transition of aggregated γ-Cyclodextrins (γ-CDs) nanostructures by tuning the concentration of a long chain ionic liquid, 1-dodecyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (C12mimCl) added to the aqueous solution of γ-CDs. The gradual increase in concentration of C12mimCl first results in the breaking of γ-CDs aggregates by the formation of inclusion complexes with C12mimCl and then self-organizes into a new supramolecular aggregate. This spontaneous transition from one nanostructure to another has been established by spectroscopic and microscopic studies. It is worth to mention that addition of 1-octyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (C8mimCl) does not lead to any such transition.

  12. The Effect of Microporous Polymeric Support Modification on Surface and Gas Transport Properties of Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Akhmetshina, Alsu A.; Davletbaeva, Ilsiya M.; Grebenschikova, Ekaterina S.; Sazanova, Tatyana S.; Petukhov, Anton N.; Atlaskin, Artem A.; Razov, Evgeny N.; Zaripov, Ilnaz I.; Martins, Carla F.; Neves, Luísa A.; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V.

    2015-01-01

    Microporous polymers based on anionic macroinitiator and toluene 2,4-diisocyanate were used as a support for 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([emim][Tf2N]) immobilization. The polymeric support was modified by using silica particles associated in oligomeric media, and the influence of the modifier used on the polymeric structure was studied. The supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) were tested for He, N2, NH3, H2S, and CO2 gas separation and ideal selectivities were calculated. The high values of ideal selectivity for ammonia-based systems with permanent gases were observed on polymer matrixes immobilized with [bmim][PF6] and [emim][Tf2N]. The modification of SILMs by nanosize silica particles leads to an increase of NH3 separation relatively to CO2 or H2S. PMID:26729177

  13. Metallic 2D Surface State of Silicon by Ionic Liquid gating and observation of Reentrant Insulating behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J. J.; Goldman, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Metal insulator transitions are usually observed in high mobility and low carrier density 2D electron systems. There are several open questions regarding the metallic state including its existence in the limit of zero temperature. The current experimental focus is on the production of higher mobility samples to push the critical carrier density to even lower values, which will increase the effects of the Coulomb interaction. Here we report an unexpected result, the observation of the onset of a metallic state at high carrier densities in silicon gated with the ionic liquid DEME-TFSI. In addition we have observed a return to the insulating state as the carrier density was further increased. This reentrant insulting behavior is an effect that was recently predicted. Supported in part by NSF/DMR-1263316. Part of this work was carried out at the Minnesota Nanocenter.

  14. The Effect of Microporous Polymeric Support Modification on Surface and Gas Transport Properties of Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Akhmetshina, Alsu A; Davletbaeva, Ilsiya M; Grebenschikova, Ekaterina S; Sazanova, Tatyana S; Petukhov, Anton N; Atlaskin, Artem A; Razov, Evgeny N; Zaripov, Ilnaz I; Martins, Carla F; Neves, Luísa A; Vorotyntsev, Ilya V

    2015-12-30

    Microporous polymers based on anionic macroinitiator and toluene 2,4-diisocyanate were used as a support for 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF₆]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([emim][Tf₂N]) immobilization. The polymeric support was modified by using silica particles associated in oligomeric media, and the influence of the modifier used on the polymeric structure was studied. The supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs) were tested for He, N₂, NH₃, H₂S, and CO₂ gas separation and ideal selectivities were calculated. The high values of ideal selectivity for ammonia-based systems with permanent gases were observed on polymer matrixes immobilized with [bmim][PF₆] and [emim][Tf₂N]. The modification of SILMs by nanosize silica particles leads to an increase of NH₃ separation relatively to CO₂ or H₂S.

  15. Multi-scale surface-groundwater interactions: Processes and Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, A. I.; Harvey, J. W.; Worman, A.; Cardenas, M. B.; Schumer, R.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Tank, J. L.; Stonedahl, S. H.

    2009-05-01

    Site-based investigations of stream-subsurface interactions normally focus on a limited range of spatial scales - typically either very shallow subsurface flows in the hyporheic zone, or much larger scale surface- groundwater interactions - but subsurface flows are linked across this entire continuum. Broad, multi-scale surface-groundwater interactions produce complex patterns in porewater flows, and interfacial fluxes do not average in a simple fashion because of the competitive effects of flows induced at different scales. For example, reach-scale stream-groundwater interactions produce sequences of gaining and losing reaches that can either suppress or enhance local-scale hyporheic exchange. Many individual topographic features also produce long power-law tails in surface residence time distributions, and the duration of these tails is greatly extended by interactions over a wide range of spatial scales. Simultaneous sediment transport and landscape evolution further complicates the analysis of porewater flow dynamics in rivers. Finally, inhomogeneity in important biogeochemical processes, particularly microbial processes that are stimulated near the sediment- water interface, leads to a great degree of non-linearity in chemical transformation rates in stream channels. This high degree of complexity in fluvial systems requires that careful approaches be used to extend local observations of hyporheic exchange and associated nutrient, carbon, and contaminant transformations to larger spatial scales. It is important to recognize that conventional advection-dispersion models are not expected to apply, and instead anomalous transport models must be used. Unfortunately, no generally applicable model is available for stream-groundwater interactions at the present time. Alternative approaches for modeling conservative and reactive transport will be discussed, and a strategy articulated for coping with the complexity of coupled surface-subsurface dynamics in fluvial

  16. Constraints on surface evapotranspiration: implications for modeling and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentine, P.

    2015-12-01

    The continental hydrological cycle and especially evapotranspiration are constrained by additional factors such as the energy availability and the carbon cycle. As a results trying to understand and predict the surface hydrologic cycle in isolation might be highly unreliable. We present two examples were constraints induced by 1) radiation control through cloud albedo feedback and 2) carbon control on the surface water use efficiency are essential to correctly predict the seasonal hydrologic cycle. In the first example we show that correctly modeling diurnal and seasonal convection and the associated cloud-albedo feedback (through land-atmosphere and convection-large-scale circulation feedbacks) is essential to correctly model the surface hydrologic cycle in the Amazon, and to correct biases observed in all general circulation models. This calls for improved modeling of convection to correctly predict the tropical continental hydrologic cycle.In the second example we show that typical drought index based only on energy want water availability misses vegetation physiological and carbon feedback and cannot correctly represent the seasonal cycle of soil moisture stress. The typical Palmer Drought Stress Index is shown to be incapable of rejecting water stress in the future. This calls for new drought assessment metrics that may include vegetation and carbon feedback.

  17. Enhanced super-hydrophobic and switching behavior of ZnO nanostructured surfaces prepared by simple solution--immersion successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction process.

    PubMed

    Suresh Kumar, P; Sundaramurthy, J; Mangalaraj, D; Nataraj, D; Rajarathnam, D; Srinivasan, M P

    2011-11-01

    A simple and cost-effective successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method was adopted to fabricate hydrophobic ZnO nanostructured surfaces on transparent indium-tin oxide (ITO), glass and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. ZnO films deposited on different substrates show hierarchical structures like spindle, flower and spherical shape with diameters ranging from 30 to 300 nm. The photo-induced switching behaviors of ZnO film surfaces between hydrophobic and hydrophilic states were examined by water contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. ZnO nanostructured films had contact angles of ~140° and 160°±2 on glass and PET substrates, respectively, exhibiting hydrophobic behavior without any surface modification or treatment. Upon exposure to ultraviolet (UV) illumination, the films showed hydrophilic behavior (contact angle: 15°±2), which upon low thermal stimuli revert back to its original hydrophobic nature. Such reversible and repeatable switching behaviors were observed upon cyclical exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These biomimetic ZnO surfaces exhibit good anti-reflective properties with lower reflectance of 9% for PET substrates. Thus, the present work is significant in terms of its potential application in switching devices, solar coatings and self-cleaning smart windows.

  18. Nanoparticles in ionic liquids: interactions and organization.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiqi; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2015-07-28

    Ionic liquids (ILs), defined as low-melting organic salts, are a novel class of compounds with unique properties and a combinatorially great chemical diversity. Ionic liquids are utilized as synthesis and dispersion media for nanoparticles as well as for surface functionalization. Ionic liquid and nanoparticle hybrid systems are governed by a combined effect of several intermolecular interactions between their constituents. For each interaction, including van der Waals, electrostatic, structural, solvophobic, steric, and hydrogen bonding, the characterization and quantitative calculation methods together with factors affecting these interactions are reviewed here. Various self-organized structures based on nanoparticles in ionic liquids are generated as a result of a balance of these intermolecular interactions. These structures, including colloidal glasses and gels, lyotropic liquid crystals, nanoparticle-stabilized ionic liquid-containing emulsions, ionic liquid surface-functionalized nanoparticles, and nanoscale ionic materials, possess properties of both ionic liquids and nanoparticles, which render them useful as novel materials especially in electrochemical and catalysis applications. This review of the interactions within nanoparticle dispersions in ionic liquids and of the structure of nanoparticle and ionic liquid hybrids provides guidance on the rational design of novel ionic liquid-based materials, enabling applications in broad areas.

  19. Ternary Complexation on Bacterial Surfaces: Implications for Subsurface Anion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, L. C.; Higginbottom, C. M.; Fowle, D. A.

    2002-12-01

    The physical, chemical, and biological controls on contaminant mobilities in aquatic ecosystems must be determined to establish the threat that contamination poses to the environment. Quantitative models of contaminant mobilities are required as a prerequisite to guide remediation efforts and to prioritize the potential hazard to the ecosystem of each contaminated site. It is well established that mineral surface adsorption is an important control on contaminant mobilities, and many studies have utilized thermodynamics to quantify metal/organic adsorption in order to yield predictive models of contaminant transport. However, these models of contaminant transport may not be representative of the reactions which control contaminant mobilities as most mineral surfaces are coated with organic acids, bacteria, and extracellular polymers. Numerous laboratory studies have demonstrated that bacterial cell walls have a high affinity for binding metal cations, and field studies indicate that a significant proportion of bacteria cells and associated extracellular matrices are coated with small scale hydrous metal oxides. The small size of bacteria, and in many cases the nanoscale of their associated mineral phases, suggests these bacteria-mineral composites may represent a large proportion of surface area exposed to fluid flow. Therefore, due to the affinity of bacterial cell walls for cations and biominerals, bacteria may also have a significant impact on anionic contaminant mobility in many natural systems. The extent of metal-bacteria adsorption reactions varies drastically as a function of pH and solution chemistry. Current adsorption models have focused on the interactions of positively charged metal cations with bacterial surfaces, however in many oxidizing environments metals such as Cr exist as anions or anionic complexes. We have studied the ability of non-metabolizing cells of the bacterial species Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella putrifaciens to adsorb aqueous Cr

  20. Identifying the ionically bound cell wall and intracellular glycoside hydrolases in late growth stage Arabidopsis stems: Implications for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Hui; Brunecky, Roman; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Ding, Shi -You; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Yang, Shihui; Tucker, Melvin P.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-05-13

    Identifying the cell wall-ionically bound glycoside hydrolases (GHs) in Arabidopsis stems is important for understanding the regulation of cell wall integrity. For cell wall proteomics studies, the preparation of clean cell wall fractions is a challenge since cell walls constitute an open compartment, which is more likely to contain a mixture of intracellular and extracellular proteins due to cell leakage at the late growth stage. Here, for this study, we utilize a CaCl2-extraction procedure to isolate non-structural proteins from Arabidopsis whole stems, followed by the in-solution and in-gel digestion methods coupled with Nano-LC-MS/MS, bioinformatics and literature analyses. This has led to the identification of 75 proteins identified using the in-solution method and 236 proteins identified by the in-gel method, among which about 10% of proteins predicted to be secreted. Together, eight cell wall proteins, namely AT1G75040, AT5G26000, AT3G57260, AT4G21650, AT3G52960, AT3G49120, AT5G49360, and AT3G14067, were identified by the in-solution method; among them, three were the GHs (AT5G26000, myrosinase 1, GH1; AT3G57260, β-1,3-glucanase 2, GH17; AT5G49360, bifunctional XYL 1/α-L-arabinofuranosidase, GH3). Moreover, four more GHs: AT4G30270 (xyloglucan endotransferase, GH16), AT1G68560 (bifunctional α-l-arabinofuranosidase/XYL, GH31), AT1G12240 (invertase, GH32) and AT2G28470 (β-galactosidase 8, GH35), were identified by the in-gel solution method only. Notably, more than half of above identified GHs are xylan- or hemicellulose-modifying enzymes, and will likely have an impact on cellulose accessibility, which is a critical factor for downstream enzymatic hydrolysis of plant tissues for biofuels production. Finally, the implications of these cell wall proteins identified at the late growth stage for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops are discussed.

  1. Identifying the ionically bound cell wall and intracellular glycoside hydrolases in late growth stage Arabidopsis stems: Implications for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wei, Hui; Brunecky, Roman; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Ding, Shi -You; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Yang, Shihui; Tucker, Melvin P.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-05-13

    Identifying the cell wall-ionically bound glycoside hydrolases (GHs) in Arabidopsis stems is important for understanding the regulation of cell wall integrity. For cell wall proteomics studies, the preparation of clean cell wall fractions is a challenge since cell walls constitute an open compartment, which is more likely to contain a mixture of intracellular and extracellular proteins due to cell leakage at the late growth stage. Here, for this study, we utilize a CaCl2-extraction procedure to isolate non-structural proteins from Arabidopsis whole stems, followed by the in-solution and in-gel digestion methods coupled with Nano-LC-MS/MS, bioinformatics and literature analyses. This has ledmore » to the identification of 75 proteins identified using the in-solution method and 236 proteins identified by the in-gel method, among which about 10% of proteins predicted to be secreted. Together, eight cell wall proteins, namely AT1G75040, AT5G26000, AT3G57260, AT4G21650, AT3G52960, AT3G49120, AT5G49360, and AT3G14067, were identified by the in-solution method; among them, three were the GHs (AT5G26000, myrosinase 1, GH1; AT3G57260, β-1,3-glucanase 2, GH17; AT5G49360, bifunctional XYL 1/α-L-arabinofuranosidase, GH3). Moreover, four more GHs: AT4G30270 (xyloglucan endotransferase, GH16), AT1G68560 (bifunctional α-l-arabinofuranosidase/XYL, GH31), AT1G12240 (invertase, GH32) and AT2G28470 (β-galactosidase 8, GH35), were identified by the in-gel solution method only. Notably, more than half of above identified GHs are xylan- or hemicellulose-modifying enzymes, and will likely have an impact on cellulose accessibility, which is a critical factor for downstream enzymatic hydrolysis of plant tissues for biofuels production. Finally, the implications of these cell wall proteins identified at the late growth stage for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops are discussed.« less

  2. Identifying the ionically bound cell wall and intracellular glycoside hydrolases in late growth stage Arabidopsis stems: implications for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hui; Brunecky, Roman; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Ding, Shi-You; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Yang, Shihui; Tucker, Melvin P.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the cell wall-ionically bound glycoside hydrolases (GHs) in Arabidopsis stems is important for understanding the regulation of cell wall integrity. For cell wall proteomics studies, the preparation of clean cell wall fractions is a challenge since cell walls constitute an open compartment, which is more likely to contain a mixture of intracellular and extracellular proteins due to cell leakage at the late growth stage. Here, we utilize a CaCl2-extraction procedure to isolate non-structural proteins from Arabidopsis whole stems, followed by the in-solution and in-gel digestion methods coupled with Nano-LC-MS/MS, bioinformatics and literature analyses. This has led to the identification of 75 proteins identified using the in-solution method and 236 proteins identified by the in-gel method, among which about 10% of proteins predicted to be secreted. Together, eight cell wall proteins, namely AT1G75040, AT5G26000, AT3G57260, AT4G21650, AT3G52960, AT3G49120, AT5G49360, and AT3G14067, were identified by the in-solution method; among them, three were the GHs (AT5G26000, myrosinase 1, GH1; AT3G57260, β-1,3-glucanase 2, GH17; AT5G49360, bifunctional XYL 1/α-L-arabinofuranosidase, GH3). Moreover, four more GHs: AT4G30270 (xyloglucan endotransferase, GH16), AT1G68560 (bifunctional α-l-arabinofuranosidase/XYL, GH31), AT1G12240 (invertase, GH32) and AT2G28470 (β-galactosidase 8, GH35), were identified by the in-gel solution method only. Notably, more than half of above identified GHs are xylan- or hemicellulose-modifying enzymes, and will likely have an impact on cellulose accessibility, which is a critical factor for downstream enzymatic hydrolysis of plant tissues for biofuels production. The implications of these cell wall proteins identified at the late growth stage for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops are discussed. PMID:26029221

  3. The ultraviolet reflectance of Enceladus: Implications for surface composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Hansen, Candice J.; Holsclaw, Greg M.

    2010-04-01

    The reflectance of Saturn's moon Enceladus has been measured at far ultraviolet (FUV) wavelengths (115-190 nm) by Cassini's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS). At visible and near infrared (VNIR) wavelengths Enceladus' reflectance spectrum is very bright, consistent with a surface composed primarily of H 2O ice. At FUV wavelengths, however, Enceladus is surprisingly dark - darker than would be expected for pure water ice. Previous analyses have focused on the VNIR spectrum, comparing it to pure water ice (Cruikshank, D.P., Owen, T.C., Dalle Ore, C., Geballe, T.R., Roush, T.L., de Bergh, C., Sandford, S.A., Poulet, F., Benedix, G.K., Emery, J.P. [2005] Icarus, 175, 268-283) or pure water ice plus a small amount of NH 3 (Emery, J.P., Burr, D.M., Cruikshank, D.P., Brown, R.H., Dalton, J.B. [2005] Astron. Astrophys., 435, 353-362) or NH 3 hydrate (Verbiscer, A.J., Peterson, D.E., Skrutskie, M.F., Cushing, M., Helfenstein, P., Nelson, M.J., Smith, J.D., Wilson, J.C. [2006] Icarus, 182, 211-223). We compare Enceladus' FUV spectrum to existing laboratory measurements of the reflectance spectra of candidate species, and to spectral models. We find that the low FUV reflectance of Enceladus can be explained by the presence of a small amount of NH 3 and a small amount of a tholin in addition to H 2O ice on the surface. The presence of these three species (H 2O, NH 3, and a tholin) appears to satisfy not only the low FUV reflectance and spectral shape, but also the middle-ultraviolet to visible wavelength brightness and spectral shape. We expect that ammonia in the Enceladus plume is transported across the surface to provide a global coating.

  4. Ocean Surface Circulation with Implication for Marine Debris Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Jan; Maximenko, Nikolai; Niiler, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Modern, multi-instrumental Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) includes satellites and in situ observations, monitoring the ocean state at the highest accuracy and resolution ever. By combining data of satellite altimetry, surface drifters, wind and gravity, ocean currents can be assessed globally and at research quality. The map of the mean surface currents shows a complex pattern of oceanic fronts and gyres. Distinct are the convergences of Ekman currents in subtropical gyres that, through the Sverdrup mechanism, are feeding anticyclonic circulation in the gyres. Drifter trajectories can also be utilized to simulate the evolution of the marine debris. Main problem is the inhomogeneous drifter data density, both due to convergence/divergence of the ocean currents and due to the drifter deployment scheme. A model constructed from statistics of the drifters exchange between small bins corrects this bias and was run from the uniform initial condition to study the fate of debris in the ocean. In addition to such actively studied debris accumulation areas as the Great Garbage Patch in the North Pacific, a new so far unrecognized, the world-strongest convergence is discovered in the South Pacific from the model solution. The same model reveals a complex pattern of convergence/divergence on the cold/warm flanks of major oceanic fronts. This pattern is studied in the framework of nonlinear interaction between Ekman drift and geostrophic baroclinic fronts outcropping at the sea surface. Results are generalized to assess the dynamics of internal Ekman layer distributed along the thermocline and controlling the secondary circulation at the fronts.

  5. Catalytic peptide hydrolysis by mineral surface: Implications for prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall-Bowman, Karina; Ohara, Shohei; Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Hazen, Robert M.; Cleaves, H. James

    2010-10-01

    The abiotic polymerization of amino acids may have been important for the origin of life, as peptides may have been components of the first self-replicating systems. Though amino acid concentrations in the primitive oceans may have been too dilute for significant oligomerization to occur, mineral surface adsorption may have provided a concentration mechanism. As unactivated amino acid polymerization is thermodynamically unfavorable and kinetically slow in aqueous solution, we studied mainly the reverse reaction of polymer degradation to measure the impact of mineral surface catalysis on peptide bonds. Aqueous glycine (G), diglycine (GG), diketopiperazine (DKP), and triglycine (GGG) were reacted with minerals (calcite, hematite, montmorillonite, pyrite, rutile, or amorphous silica) in the presence of 0.05 M, pH 8.1, KHCO 3 buffer and 0.1 M NaCl as background electrolyte in a thermostatted oven at 25, 50 or 70 °C. Below 70 °C, reaction kinetics were too sluggish to detect catalytic activity over amenable laboratory time-scales. Minerals were not found to have measurable effects on the degradation or elongation of G, GG or DKP at 70 °C in solution. At 70 °C pyrite was the most catalytic mineral with detectible effects on the degradation of GGG, although several others also displayed catalytic behavior. GGG degraded ˜1.5-4 times faster in the presence of pyrite than in control reactions, depending on the ratio of solution concentration to mineral surface area. The rate of pyrite catalysis of GGG hydrolysis was found to be saturable, suggesting the presence of discrete catalytic sites on the mineral surface. The mineral-catalyzed degradation of GGG appears to occur via a GGG → DKP + G mechanism, rather than via GGG → GG + G, as in solution-phase reactions. These results are compatible with many previous findings and suggest that minerals may have assisted in peptide synthesis in certain geological settings, specifically by speeding the approach to equilibrium

  6. Connexin-47 and connexin-32 in gap junctions of oligodendrocyte somata, myelin sheaths, paranodal loops and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures: implications for ionic homeostasis and potassium siphoning.

    PubMed

    Kamasawa, N; Sik, A; Morita, M; Yasumura, T; Davidson, K G V; Nagy, J I; Rash, J E

    2005-01-01

    The subcellular distributions and co-associations of the gap junction-forming proteins connexin 47 and connexin 32 were investigated in oligodendrocytes of adult mouse and rat CNS. By confocal immunofluorescence light microscopy, abundant connexin 47 was co-localized with astrocytic connexin 43 on oligodendrocyte somata, and along myelinated fibers, whereas connexin 32 without connexin 47 was co-localized with contactin-associated protein (caspr) in paranodes. By thin-section transmission electron microscopy, connexin 47 immunolabeling was on the oligodendrocyte side of gap junctions between oligodendrocyte somata and astrocytes. By freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling, large gap junctions between oligodendrocyte somata and astrocyte processes contained much more connexin 47 than connexin 32. Along surfaces of internodal myelin, connexin 47 was several times as abundant as connexin 32, and in the smallest gap junctions, often occurred without connexin 32. In contrast, connexin 32 was localized without connexin 47 in newly-described autologous gap junctions in Schmidt-Lanterman incisures and between paranodal loops bordering nodes of Ranvier. Thus, connexin 47 in adult rodent CNS is the most abundant connexin in most heterologous oligodendrocyte-to-astrocyte gap junctions, whereas connexin 32 is the predominant if not sole connexin in autologous ("reflexive") oligodendrocyte gap junctions. These results clarify the locations and connexin compositions of heterologous and autologous oligodendrocyte gap junctions, identify autologous gap junctions at paranodes as potential sites for modulating paranodal electrical properties, and reveal connexin 47-containing and connexin 32-containing gap junctions as conduits for long-distance intracellular and intercellular movement of ions and associated osmotic water. The autologous gap junctions may regulate paranodal electrical properties during saltatory conduction. Acting in series and in parallel, autologous and

  7. Secondary craters on Europa and implications for cratered surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bierhaus, Edward B; Chapman, Clark R; Merline, William J

    2005-10-20

    For several decades, most planetary researchers have regarded the impact crater populations on solid-surfaced planets and smaller bodies as predominantly reflecting the direct ('primary') impacts of asteroids and comets. Estimates of the relative and absolute ages of geological units on these objects have been based on this assumption. Here we present an analysis of the comparatively sparse crater population on Jupiter's icy moon Europa and suggest that this assumption is incorrect for small craters. We find that 'secondaries' (craters formed by material ejected from large primary impact craters) comprise about 95 per cent of the small craters (diameters less than 1 km) on Europa. We therefore conclude that large primary impacts into a solid surface (for example, ice or rock) produce far more secondaries than previously believed, implying that the small crater populations on the Moon, Mars and other large bodies must be dominated by secondaries. Moreover, our results indicate that there have been few small comets (less than 100 m diameter) passing through the jovian system in recent times, consistent with dynamical simulations.

  8. Secondary craters on Europa and implications for cratered surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bierhaus, Edward B; Chapman, Clark R; Merline, William J

    2005-10-20

    For several decades, most planetary researchers have regarded the impact crater populations on solid-surfaced planets and smaller bodies as predominantly reflecting the direct ('primary') impacts of asteroids and comets. Estimates of the relative and absolute ages of geological units on these objects have been based on this assumption. Here we present an analysis of the comparatively sparse crater population on Jupiter's icy moon Europa and suggest that this assumption is incorrect for small craters. We find that 'secondaries' (craters formed by material ejected from large primary impact craters) comprise about 95 per cent of the small craters (diameters less than 1 km) on Europa. We therefore conclude that large primary impacts into a solid surface (for example, ice or rock) produce far more secondaries than previously believed, implying that the small crater populations on the Moon, Mars and other large bodies must be dominated by secondaries. Moreover, our results indicate that there have been few small comets (less than 100 m diameter) passing through the jovian system in recent times, consistent with dynamical simulations. PMID:16237437

  9. Drainage pits in cohesionless materials: implications for surface of Phobos.

    PubMed

    Horstman, K C; Melosh, H J

    1989-09-10

    Viking orbiter images show grooves and chains of pits crossing the surface of Phobos, many of which converge toward the large crater Stickney or its antipode. Although it has been proposed that the pits and grooves are chains of secondary craters, their morphology and geometric relations suggest that they are the surface traces of fractures in the underlying solid body of Phobos. Several models have been proposed to explain the pits, of which the most plausible are gas venting and drainage of regolith into open fractures. the latter mechanism is best supported by the image data and is the mechanism studied in this investigation. Drainage pits and fissures are modeled experimentally by using two rigid substrate plates placed edge to edge and covered by uniform thicknesses of dry fragmental debris (simulated regolith). Fracture extension is simulated by drawing the plates apart, allowing drainage of regolith into the newly created void. A typical drainage experiment begins with a shallow depression on the surface of the regolith, above the open fissure. Increased drainage causes local drainage pits to form; continued drainage causes the pits to coalesce, forming a cuspate groove. The resulting experimental patterns of pits and grooves have pronounced similarities to those observed on Phobos. Characteristics such as lack of raised rims, linearity of grooves and chains of pits, uniform spacing of pits, and progression from discrete pits to cuspate grooves are the same in the experiments and on Phobos. In contrast, gas-venting pits occur in irregular chains and have raised rims. These experiments thus indicate that the Phobos grooves and pits formed as drainage structures. The pit spacing in an experiment is measured at the time that the maximum number of pits forms, prior to groove development. The average pit spacing is compared to the regolith thickness for each material. Regression line fits indicate that the average spacing of drainage pits in unconsolidated

  10. Drainage pits in cohesionless materials: implications for surface of Phobos.

    PubMed

    Horstman, K C; Melosh, H J

    1989-09-10

    Viking orbiter images show grooves and chains of pits crossing the surface of Phobos, many of which converge toward the large crater Stickney or its antipode. Although it has been proposed that the pits and grooves are chains of secondary craters, their morphology and geometric relations suggest that they are the surface traces of fractures in the underlying solid body of Phobos. Several models have been proposed to explain the pits, of which the most plausible are gas venting and drainage of regolith into open fractures. the latter mechanism is best supported by the image data and is the mechanism studied in this investigation. Drainage pits and fissures are modeled experimentally by using two rigid substrate plates placed edge to edge and covered by uniform thicknesses of dry fragmental debris (simulated regolith). Fracture extension is simulated by drawing the plates apart, allowing drainage of regolith into the newly created void. A typical drainage experiment begins with a shallow depression on the surface of the regolith, above the open fissure. Increased drainage causes local drainage pits to form; continued drainage causes the pits to coalesce, forming a cuspate groove. The resulting experimental patterns of pits and grooves have pronounced similarities to those observed on Phobos. Characteristics such as lack of raised rims, linearity of grooves and chains of pits, uniform spacing of pits, and progression from discrete pits to cuspate grooves are the same in the experiments and on Phobos. In contrast, gas-venting pits occur in irregular chains and have raised rims. These experiments thus indicate that the Phobos grooves and pits formed as drainage structures. The pit spacing in an experiment is measured at the time that the maximum number of pits forms, prior to groove development. The average pit spacing is compared to the regolith thickness for each material. Regression line fits indicate that the average spacing of drainage pits in unconsolidated

  11. Ionic effect investigation of a potentiometric sensor for urea and surface morphology observation of entrapped urease/polypyrrole matrix.

    PubMed

    Syu, Mei-Jywan; Chang, Yu-Sung

    2009-04-15

    Potentio-dynamic polymerization of buffered urease and pyrrole monomer onto carbon papers was conducted to fabricate an immobilized urease electrode for measuring the urea concentration. To use carbon paper as the substrate for the electro-growth of polypyrrole matrix not only created sufficient adhesion of the conducting polymer layer but also provided superior entrapment of urease enzymes. The potentiometric response corresponding to ammonia, the product formed from the urease catalyzed urea reaction, was employed for the urea concentration measurement. Scanning electron microscopic photographs showed that the polypyrrole matrix deposited on the carbon papers appeared to be of a cylindrical nanotube shape. The charge density applied in the polymerization was found to affect the potentiometric response while the potential-scanning rate showed minor influence. The composite electrodes had high sensitivity in urea detection, showing a response linear to the logarithm of the urea concentration in the range of 10(-3) to 10 mM. The detection of urea solution prepared in water and buffer was also compared. Ionic effect on the sensing of urea solution was investigated. By comparing the data reported in literature, the urease/polypyrrole/carbon paper electrode developed in this work showed superior long-term stability and reusability. The detection of urea in serum was also well performed.

  12. Thermal anomaly on Mimas surface: Implications on its regolith structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, C.; Lucas, A.

    2015-10-01

    Thanks to the Cassini CIRS infrared spectrometer,Howett et al. [1] have discovered a large scale thermal anomaly on the surface of Saturn satellite Mimas. This anomaly translates into a dichotomy in thermal inertia between leading and trailing faces of this synchronous icy satellite: the leading face (region R2) exhibits a high thermal inertia,Γ =66 ± 23 J/m 2/K/s 1/2, compared to the trailing one(region R1), where Γ < 16 J/m2/K/s1/2. The pattern appears to be well correlated with a color anomaly (Schenk et al. [2]) in visible light, also observed on other Saturn moons. It maybe due to the alter ation of their leading face by a focused bombardment of highly energetic electrons.This is thought to increase the contact between regolith grains by gluing them, improving thus the thermal conductivity or decrea sing porosity.

  13. Determination of the enthalpy of vaporization and prediction of surface tension for ionic liquid 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium propionate [C(n)mim][Pro](n = 4, 5, 6).

    PubMed

    Tong, Jing; Yang, Hong-Xu; Liu, Ru-Jing; Li, Chi; Xia, Li-Xin; Yang, Jia-Zhen

    2014-11-13

    With the use of isothermogravimetrical analysis, the enthalpies of vaporization, Δ(g)lH(o)m(T(av)), at the average temperature, T(av) = 445.65 K, for the ionic liquids (ILs) 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium propionate [C(n)mim][Pro](n = 4, 5, 6) were determined. Using Verevkin's method, the difference of heat capacities between the vapor phase and the liquid phase, Δ(g)lC(p)(o)m, for [C(n)mim][Pro](n = 2, 3, 4, 5, 6), were calculated based on the statistical thermodynamics. Therefore, with the use of Δ(g)lC(p)(o)m, the values of Δ(g)lH(o)m(T(av)) were transformed into Δ(g)lH(o)m(298), 126.8, 130.3, and 136.5 for [C(n)mim][Pro](n = 4, 5, 6), respectively. In terms of the new scale of polarity for ILs, the order of the polarity of [C(n)mim][Pro](n = 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) was predicted, that is, the polarity decreases with increasing methylene. A new model of the relationship between the surface tension and the enthalpy of vaporization for aprotic ILs was put forward and used to predict the surface tension for [C(n)mim][Pro](n = 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) and others. The predicted surface tension for the ILs is in good agreement with the experimental one.

  14. Ionic Conductivity of Mesostructured Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thin Films with Cubic Pore Symmetry—On the Influence of Water on the Surface Oxygen Ion Transport.

    PubMed

    Elm, Matthias T; Hofmann, Jonas D; Suchomski, Christian; Janek, Jürgen; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2015-06-10

    Thermally stable, ordered mesoporous thin films of 8 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were prepared by solution-phase coassembly of chloride salt precursors with an amphiphilic diblock copolymer using an evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The resulting material is of high quality and exhibits a well-defined three-dimensional network of pores averaging 24 nm in diameter after annealing at 600 °C for several hours. The wall structure is polycrystalline, with grains in the size range of 7 to 10 nm. Using impedance spectroscopy, the total electrical conductivity was measured between 200 and 500 °C under ambient atmosphere as well as in dry atmosphere for oxygen partial pressures ranging from 1 to 10(-4) bar. Similar to bulk YSZ, a constant ionic conductivity is observed over the whole oxygen partial pressure range investigated. In dry atmosphere, the sol-gel derived films have a much higher conductivity, with different activation energies for low and high temperatures. Overall, the results indicate a strong influence of the surface on the transport properties in cubic fluorite-type YSZ with high surface-to-volume ratio. A qualitative defect model which includes surface effects (annihilation of oxygen vacancies as a result of water adsorption) is proposed to explain the behavior and sensitivity of the conductivity to variations in the surrounding atmosphere. PMID:25984884

  15. Ionic Conductivity of Mesostructured Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thin Films with Cubic Pore Symmetry—On the Influence of Water on the Surface Oxygen Ion Transport.

    PubMed

    Elm, Matthias T; Hofmann, Jonas D; Suchomski, Christian; Janek, Jürgen; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2015-06-10

    Thermally stable, ordered mesoporous thin films of 8 mol % yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were prepared by solution-phase coassembly of chloride salt precursors with an amphiphilic diblock copolymer using an evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The resulting material is of high quality and exhibits a well-defined three-dimensional network of pores averaging 24 nm in diameter after annealing at 600 °C for several hours. The wall structure is polycrystalline, with grains in the size range of 7 to 10 nm. Using impedance spectroscopy, the total electrical conductivity was measured between 200 and 500 °C under ambient atmosphere as well as in dry atmosphere for oxygen partial pressures ranging from 1 to 10(-4) bar. Similar to bulk YSZ, a constant ionic conductivity is observed over the whole oxygen partial pressure range investigated. In dry atmosphere, the sol-gel derived films have a much higher conductivity, with different activation energies for low and high temperatures. Overall, the results indicate a strong influence of the surface on the transport properties in cubic fluorite-type YSZ with high surface-to-volume ratio. A qualitative defect model which includes surface effects (annihilation of oxygen vacancies as a result of water adsorption) is proposed to explain the behavior and sensitivity of the conductivity to variations in the surrounding atmosphere.

  16. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microemulsions composed of tripled-chain surface active ionic liquids, RTILs, and biological solvent: an excitation wavelength dependence study.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Chiranjib; Kundu, Niloy; Ghosh, Surajit; Mandal, Sarthak; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2013-08-15

    In this article we have reported the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study in our earlier characterized surface active ionic liquids (SAILs)-containing microemulsion, i.e., N-methyl-N-propylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([P13][Tf2N])/[CTA][AOT]/isopropyl myristate ([IPM]) and N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([N3111][Tf2N])/[CTA][AOT]/[IPM] microemulsions (Banerjee, C.; Mandal, S.; Ghosh, S.; Kuchlyan, J.; Kundu, N.; Sarkar, N. J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 3927-3934). The occurrence of effective FRET from the donor, coumarin-153 (C-153) to the acceptor rhodamine 6G (R6G) is evident from the decrease in the steady state fluorescence intensity of the donor with addition of acceptor and subsequent increase in the fluorescence intensity of the acceptor in the presence of donor. The excitation wavelength dependent FRET from C-153 to R6G has also been performed to assess the dynamic heterogeneity of these confined systems. In time-resolved experiments, the significant rise time of the acceptor in the presence of the donor further confirms the occurrence of FRET. The multiple donor-acceptor (D-A) distances, for various microemulsions, obtained from the rise times of the acceptor emission in the presence of a donor can be rationalized from the varying distribution of the donor, C-153, in the different regions of the microemulsion. Time-resolved measurement reveals that with increasing excitation wavelength from 408 to 440 nm, the contribution of the faster rise component of FRET increases significantly due to the close proximity of the C-153 and R6G in the polar region of the microemulsion where occurrence of FRET is very high. Moreover, we have also studied the FRET with variation of R (R = [room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs)]/[surfactant]) and shown that the effect of excitation wavelength on FRET is similar irrespective of R values.

  17. Surface structure of imidazolium-based ionic liquids: Quantitative comparison between simulations and high-resolution RBS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kaoru; Nakanishi, Shunto; Lísal, Martin; Kimura, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Elemental depth profiles of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([CnMIM][TFSI], n = 4, 6, 8) are measured using high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS). The profiles are compared with the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both MD simulations and HRBS measurements show that the depth profiles deviate from the uniform stoichiometric composition in the surface region, showing preferential orientations of ions at the surface. The MD simulations qualitatively reproduce the observed HRBS profiles but the agreement is not satisfactory. The observed discrepancy is ascribed to the capillary waves. By taking account of the surface roughness induced by the capillary waves, the agreement becomes almost perfect.

  18. SORPTION OF CU AND ZN TO KAOLINITE AND IRON OXIDE: EFFECTS OF HUMIC ACID AND IONIC STRENGTH AND IMPLICATIONS FOR STORMWATER RUNOFF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heavy metals are common pollutants in wet weather flows and urban waterways. Changes in ionic strength, whether from mixing with saline waters, road salt, or from the large osmotic adjustment needed for the Microtox toxicity assay, affect the aqueous chemistry of stormwater runof...

  19. Facile Fabrication of a Silver Nanoparticle Immersed, Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Imposed Paper Platform through Successive Ionic Layer Absorption and Reaction for On-Site Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wansun; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Park, Hun-Kuk; Choi, Samjin

    2015-12-23

    We introduce a novel, facile, rapid, low-cost, highly reproducible, and power-free synthesizable fabrication method of paper-based silver nanoparticle (AgNP) immersed surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platform, known as the successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The rough and porous properties of the paper led to direct synthesis of AgNPs on the surface as well as in the paper due to capillary effects, resulting in improved plasmon coupling with interparticles and interlayers. The proposed SERS platform showed an enhancement factor of 1.1 × 10(9), high reproducibility (relative standard deviation of 4.2%), and 10(-12) M rhodamine B highly sensitive detection limit by optimizing the SILAR conditions including the concentration of the reactive solution (20/20 mM/mM AgNO3/NaBH4) and the number of SILAR cycles (six). The applicability of the SERS platform was evaluated using two samples including human cervical fluid for clinical diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, associated with cervical cancer, and a malachite green (MG) solution for fungicide and parasiticide in aquaculture, associated with human carcinogenesis. The AgNP-immersed SERS-functionalized platform using the SILAR technique allowed for high chemical structure sensitivity without additional tagging or chemical modification, making it a good alternative for early clinical diagnosis of HPV infection and detection of MG-activated human carcinogenesis.

  20. Facile Fabrication of a Silver Nanoparticle Immersed, Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Imposed Paper Platform through Successive Ionic Layer Absorption and Reaction for On-Site Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wansun; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Park, Hun-Kuk; Choi, Samjin

    2015-12-23

    We introduce a novel, facile, rapid, low-cost, highly reproducible, and power-free synthesizable fabrication method of paper-based silver nanoparticle (AgNP) immersed surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platform, known as the successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The rough and porous properties of the paper led to direct synthesis of AgNPs on the surface as well as in the paper due to capillary effects, resulting in improved plasmon coupling with interparticles and interlayers. The proposed SERS platform showed an enhancement factor of 1.1 × 10(9), high reproducibility (relative standard deviation of 4.2%), and 10(-12) M rhodamine B highly sensitive detection limit by optimizing the SILAR conditions including the concentration of the reactive solution (20/20 mM/mM AgNO3/NaBH4) and the number of SILAR cycles (six). The applicability of the SERS platform was evaluated using two samples including human cervical fluid for clinical diagnosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, associated with cervical cancer, and a malachite green (MG) solution for fungicide and parasiticide in aquaculture, associated with human carcinogenesis. The AgNP-immersed SERS-functionalized platform using the SILAR technique allowed for high chemical structure sensitivity without additional tagging or chemical modification, making it a good alternative for early clinical diagnosis of HPV infection and detection of MG-activated human carcinogenesis. PMID:26619139

  1. Charging Properties of Cassiterite (alpha-SnO2) Surfaces in NaCl and RbCl Ionic Media.

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenqvist, Jorgen K; Machesky, Michael L.; Vlcek, Lukas; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-09-01

    The acid-base properties of cassiterite ({alpha}-SnO{sub 2}) surfaces at 10-50 C were studied using potentiometric titrations of powder suspensions in aqueous NaCl and RbCl media. The proton sorption isotherms exhibited common intersection points in the pH range of 4.0-4.5 under all conditions, and the magnitude of charging was similar but not identical in NaCl and RbCl. The hydrogen bonding configuration at the oxide-water interface, obtained from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was analyzed in detail, and the results were explicitly incorporated in calculations of protonation constants for the reactive surface sites using the revised MUSIC model. The calculations indicated that the terminal SnOH{sub 2} group is more acidic than the bridging Sn{sub 2}OH group, with protonation constants (log K{sub H}) of 3.60 and 5.13 at 25 C, respectively. This is contrary to the situation on the isostructural {alpha}-TiO{sub 2} (rutile), apparently because of the difference in electronegativity between Ti and Sn. MD simulations and speciation calculations indicated considerable differences in the speciation of Na{sup +} and Rb{sup +}, despite the similarities in overall charging. Adsorbed sodium ions are almost exclusively found in bidentate surface complexes, whereas adsorbed rubidium ions form comparable numbers of bidentate and tetradentate complexes. Also, the distribution of adsorbed Na{sup +} between the different complexes shows a considerable dependence on the surface charge density (pH), whereas the distribution of adsorbed Rb{sup +} is almost independent of pH. A surface complexation model (SCM) capable of accurately describing both the measured surface charge and the MD-predicted speciation of adsorbed Na{sup +}/Rb{sup +} was formulated. According to the SCM, the deprotonated terminal group (SnOH{sup -0.40}) and the protonated bridging group (Sn{sub 2}OH{sup +0.36}) dominate the surface speciation over the entire pH range of this study (2.7-10). The

  2. Charging Properties of Cassiterite (alpha-SnO2) surfaces in NaCl and RbCl Ionic Media.

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenqvist, Jorgen K; Machesky, Michael L.; Vlcek, Lukas; Wesolowski, David J

    2009-09-01

    The acid-base properties of cassiterite (alpha-SnO2) surfaces at 10-50 degrees C were studied using potentiometric titrations of powder suspensions in aqueous NaCl and RbCl media. The proton sorption isotherms exhibited common intersection points in the pH range of 4.0-4.5 under all conditions, and the magnitude of charging was similar but not identical in NaCl and RbCl. The hydrogen bonding configuration at the oxide-water interface, obtained from classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was analyzed in detail, and the results were explicitly incorporated in calculations of protonation constants for the reactive surface sites using the revised MUSIC model. The calculations indicated that the terminal SnOH2 group is more acidic than the bridging Sn2OH group, with protonation constants (log KH) of 3.60 and 5.13 at 25 degrees C, respectively. This is contrary to the situation on the isostructural alpha-TiO2 (rutile), apparently because of the difference in electronegativity between Ti and Sn. MD simulations and speciation calculations indicated considerable differences in the speciation of Na+ and Rb+, despite the similarities in overall charging. Adsorbed sodium ions are almost exclusively found in bidentate surface complexes, whereas adsorbed rubidium ions form comparable numbers of bidentate and tetradentate complexes. Also, the distribution of adsorbed Na+ between the different complexes shows a considerable dependence on the surface charge density (pH), whereas the distribution of adsorbed Rb+ is almost independent of pH. A surface complexation model (SCM) capable of accurately describing both the measured surface charge and the MD-predicted speciation of adsorbed Na+/Rb+ was formulated. According to the SCM, the deprotonated terminal group (SnOH(-0.40)) and the protonated bridging group (Sn2OH+0.36) dominate the surface speciation over the entire pH range of this study (2.7-10). The complexation of medium cations increases significantly with increasing

  3. Mean-field description of ionic size effects with nonuniform ionic sizes: a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shenggao; Wang, Zhongming; Li, Bo

    2011-08-01

    Ionic size effects are significant in many biological systems. Mean-field descriptions of such effects can be efficient but also challenging. When ionic sizes are different, explicit formulas in such descriptions are not available for the dependence of the ionic concentrations on the electrostatic potential, that is, there is no explicit Boltzmann-type distributions. This work begins with a variational formulation of the continuum electrostatics of an ionic solution with such nonuniform ionic sizes as well as multiple ionic valences. An augmented Lagrange multiplier method is then developed and implemented to numerically solve the underlying constrained optimization problem. The method is shown to be accurate and efficient, and is applied to ionic systems with nonuniform ionic sizes such as the sodium chloride solution. Extensive numerical tests demonstrate that the mean-field model and numerical method capture qualitatively some significant ionic size effects, particularly those for multivalent ionic solutions, such as the stratification of multivalent counterions near a charged surface. The ionic valence-to-volume ratio is found to be the key physical parameter in the stratification of concentrations. All these are not well described by the classical Poisson-Boltzmann theory, or the generalized Poisson-Boltzmann theory that treats uniform ionic sizes. Finally, various issues such as the close packing, limitation of the continuum model, and generalization of this work to molecular solvation are discussed. PMID:21929014

  4. Analysis of passive surface-wave noise in surface microseismic data and its implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forghani-Arani, F.; Willis, M.; Haines, S.; Batzle, M.; Davidson, M.

    2011-01-01

    Tight gas reservoirs are projected to be a major portion of future energy resources. Because of their low permeability, hydraulic fracturing of these reservoirs is required to improve the permeability and reservoir productivity. Passive seismic monitoring is one of the few tools that can be used to characterize the changes in the reservoir due to hydraulic fracturing. Although the majority of the studies monitoring hydraulic fracturing exploit down hole microseismic data, surface microseismic monitoring is receiving increased attention because it is potentially much less expensive to acquire. Due to a broader receiver aperture and spatial coverage, surface microseismic data may be more advantageous than down hole microseismic data. The effectiveness of this monitoring technique, however, is strongly dependent on the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. Cultural and ambient noise can mask parts of the waveform that carry information about the subsurface, thereby decreasing the effectiveness of surface microseismic analysis in identifying and locating the microseismic events. Hence, time and spatially varying suppression of the surface-wave noise ground roll is a critical step in surface microseismic monitoring. Here, we study a surface passive dataset that was acquired over a Barnett Shale Formation reservoir during two weeks of hydraulic fracturing, in order to characterize and suppress the surface noise in this data. We apply techniques to identify the characteristics of the passive ground roll. Exploiting those characteristics, we can apply effective noise suppression techniques to the passive data. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  5. Frost grain size metamorphism - Implications for remote sensing of planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. N.; Fanale, F. P.; Zent, A. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effective grain size of a material on a planetary surface affects the strength of absorption features observed in the reflectance of a particulate surface. In the case of a planetary surface containing volatile ices, the absorption characteristics can change in connection with processes leading to a change in the grain size of the material. The present investigation is concerned with an evaluation regarding the occurrence of such processes and the implications for remote sensing applications. It is found that quantitative modeling of the kinetics of grain growth and destruction by thermal and nonthermal processes can provide a means to reconcile apparent optical paths in the volatile portions of planetary surfaces with the physical history of those surfaces. Attention is also given to conditions in the case of the Pluto/Triton system, Uranus and Saturnian satellites, and the Galilean system.

  6. Entropy of segregation of isovalent impurity cations at the surface of an ionic crystal: MgO(100)Ca 2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masri, P.; Tasker, P. W.; Hoare, J. P.; Harding, J. H.

    1986-08-01

    We present a calculation of the vibrational entropy of segregation for calcium ions concentrating at a (100) surface of magnesium oxide. The surface containing a 50% coverage of impurity was relaxed to static equilibrium. The lattice dynamics of a slab was then used to calculate the vibrational entropy within an harmonic approximation. The vibrational entropy of dissolved calcium in the bulk of magnesia was evaluated by lattice dynamics using the large crystallite method. Thermodynamic relations show the near equivalence of calculated free energies at constant pressure, constant volume and constant area and so the entropy correction to the previously calculated enthalpy is given by the difference in the slab and bulk calculations. This is only -0.24 k and hence only contributes ≈ 0.03 eV at 1000 K.

  7. The Association of Cryptosporidium parvum With Suspended Sediments: Implications for Transport in Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, K. E.; Packman, A. I.; Atwill, E. R.; Harter, T.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding the transport and fate of microorganisms in surface waters is of vital concern in protecting the integrity and safety of municipal water supply systems. The human pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum is a particular public health interest, as it is ubiquitous in the surface waters of the United States, it can persist for long periods in the environment, and it is difficult to disinfect in water treatment plants. Due to its small size (5 um), low specific gravity (1.05 g/cm3), and negative surface charge, C. parvum oocysts are generally considered to move through watersheds from their source to drinking water reservoirs with little attenuation. However, the transport of the oocysts in surface waters may be mediated by interactions with suspended sediments. Batch experiments were conducted to determine the extent of C. parvum oocyst attachment to several inorganic and organic sediments under varying water chemical conditions, and settling column experiments were performed to demonstrate how these associations influence the effective settling velocity of C. parvum oocysts. Results from these experiments showed that C. parvum oocysts do associate with inorganic and organic sediments and often settle at the rate of the suspended sediment. The size and surface charge of the host suspended sediment influenced the extent of oocyst attachment as oocysts preferentially associated with particles greater than 3 um, and fewer oocysts associated with particles having a highly negative surface charge. Background water chemical conditions including ionic strength, ion composition, and pH did not have a significant effect on oocyst attachment to suspended sediments.

  8. Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 147 Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo) (Web, free access)   IUPAC Ionic Liquids Database, ILThermo, is a free web research tool that allows users worldwide to access an up-to-date data collection from the publications on experimental investigations of thermodynamic, and transport properties of ionic liquids as well as binary and ternary mixtures containing ionic liquids.

  9. Process optimization of deposition conditions of PbS thin films grown by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, Ersin; Yücel, Yasin; Beleli, Buse

    2015-07-01

    In this study, lead sulfide (PbS) thin films were synthesized by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method with different pH, dipping time and dipping cycles. Response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were successfully used to optimize the PbS films deposition parameters and understand the significance and interaction of the factors affecting the film quality. 5-level-3-factor central composite design was employed to evaluate the effects of the deposition parameters (pH, dipping time and dipping cycles) on the response (the optical band gap of the films). Data obtained from RSM were subjected to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analyzed using a second order polynomial equation. The optimal conditions for the PbS films deposition have been found to be: pH of 9.1, dipping time of 10 s and dipping cycles of 10 cycles. The predicted band gap of PbS film was 2.13 eV under the optimal conditions. Verification experiment (2.24 eV) confirmed the validity of the predicted model. The film structures were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Morphological properties of the films were studied with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The optical properties of the films were investigated using a UV-visible spectrophotometer.

  10. Surface Adsorption and Micelle Formation of Polyoxyethylene-type Nonionic Surfactants in Mixtures of Water and Hydrophilic Imidazolium-type Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Misono, Takeshi; Okada, Kohei; Sakai, Kenichi; Abe, Masahiko; Sakai, Hideki

    2016-06-01

    The interfacial properties of polyoxyethylene alkyl ether-type nonionic surfactants (CnEm) were studied in a hydrophilic room-temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bmimBF4), in the presence of water. These properties were assessed using static surface tension, pyrene fluorescence, and dynamic light scattering measurements. The interfacial properties were strongly dependent on the solution composition. Increased water concentration lowered the critical micelle concentration (cmc). The cmc was also affected by the lengths of both the alkyl and polyoxyethylene chains, but a greater impact was observed for the alkyl chain length. These results indicate that micellization occurs as a result of solvophobic interaction between surfactant molecules in the water/bmimBF4 mixed solutions, similar to aqueous surfactant systems. The cloud point phenomenon was observed for CnEm with a relatively low hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) value, and the relationship between the cloud point and water/bmimBF4 composition exhibited a convex upward curve. Furthermore, the mixing of bmimBF4 with water increased the surfactant solubility for water-rich compositions, suggesting that bmimBF4 acts as a chaotropic salt.

  11. Identification of ionic chloroacetanilide-herbicide metabolites in surface water and groundwater by HPLC/MS using negative ion spray

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrer, I.; Thurman, E.M.; Barcelo, D.

    1997-01-01

    Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was combined with high-performance liquid chromatography/high-flow pneumatically assisted electrospray mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESP/MS) for the trace analysis of oxanilic and sulfonic acids of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor. The isolation procedure separated the chloroacetanilide metabolites from the parent herbicides during the elution from C18 cartridges using ethyl acetate for parent compounds, followed by methanol for the anionic metabolites. The metabolites were separated chromatographically using reversed-phase HPLC and analyzed by negative-ion MS using electrospray ionization in selected ion mode. Quantitation limits were 0.01 ??g/L for both the oxanilic and sulfonic acids based on a 100-mL water sample. This combination of methods represents an important advance in environmental analysis of chloroacetanilide-herbicide metabolites in surface water and groundwater for two reasons. First, anionic chloroacetanilide metabolites are a major class of degradation products that are readily leached to groundwater in agricultural areas. Second, anionic metabolites, which are not able to be analyzed by conventional methods such as liquid extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, are effectively analyzed by SPE and high-flow pneumatically assisted electrospray mass spectrometry. This paper reports the first HPLC/MS identification of these metabolites in surface water and groundwater.

  12. Model for oxygen recombination on silicon-dioxide surfaces. II - Implications toward reentry heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jumper, E. J.; Seward, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the model for recombination of oxygen on a silicon-dioxide surface presented in detail in a previous paper. New data supporting the model is also presented. The ramifications of the model toward the production of excited molecular oxygen is examined as it pertains to surface heating. A reentry simulation is given and compared to STS-2 reentry data, and conclusions are drawn as to the implications of the recombination model toward reentry heating. A possible buffering of the heating above a critical temperature associated with the physics of the model is also discussed.

  13. Ionic Surfactant Binding to pH-Responsive Polyelectrolyte Brush-Grafted Nanoparticles in Suspension and on Charged Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Riley, John K; An, Junxue; Tilton, Robert D

    2015-12-29

    The interactions between silica nanoparticles grafted with a brush of cationic poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (SiO2-g-PDMAEMA) and anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is investigated by dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy. SiO2-g-PDMAEMA exhibits pH-dependent charge and size properties which enable the SDS binding to be probed over a range of electrostatic conditions and brush conformations. SDS monomers bind irreversibly to SiO2-g-PDMAEMA at low surfactant concentrations (∼10(-4) M) while exhibiting a pH-dependent threshold above which cooperative, partially reversible SDS binding occurs. At pH 5, SDS binding induces collapse of the highly charged and swollen brush as observed in the bulk by DLS and on surfaces by QCM-D. Similar experiments at pH 9 suggest that SDS binds to the periphery of the weakly charged and deswollen brush and produces SiO2-g-PDMAEMA/SDS complexes with a net negative charge. SiO2-g-PDMAEMA brush collapse and charge neutralization is further confirmed by colloidal probe AFM measurements, where reduced electrosteric repulsions and bridging adhesion are attributed to effects of the bound SDS. Additionally, sequential adsorption schemes with SDS and SiO2-g-PDMAEMA are used to enhance deposition relative to SiO2-g-PDMAEMA direct adsorption on silica. This work shows that the polyelectrolyte brush configuration responds in a more dramatic fashion to SDS than to pH-induced changes in ionization, and this can be exploited to manipulate the structure of adsorbed layers and the corresponding forces of compression and friction between opposing surfaces.

  14. How does the surface charge of ionic surfactant and cholesterol forming vesicles control rotational and translational motion of rhodamine 6G perchlorate (R6G ClO₄)?

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Surajit; Roy, Arpita; Banik, Debasis; Kundu, Niloy; Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Dhir, Anjali; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2015-03-01

    The rotational dynamics and translational diffusion of a hydrophilic organic molecule, rhodamine 6G perchlorate (R6G ClO4) in small unilamellar vesicles formed by two different ionic surfactants, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), with cholesterol have been investigated using fluorescence spectroscopic methods. Moreover, in this article the formation of vesicle using anionic surfactant, SDS at different cholesterol-to-surfactant molar ratio (expressed by Q value (Q = [cholesterol]/[surfactant])) has also been reported. Visual observation, dynamic light scattering (DLS) study, turbidity measurement, steady state fluorescence anisotropy (r0) measurement, and eventually microscopic images reveal the formation of small unilamellar vesicles in aqueous solution. Also, in this study, an attempt has been made to observe whether the cationic probe molecule, rhodamine 6G (R6G) experiences similar or different microenvironment in cholesterol-SDS and cholesterol-CTAB assemblies with increase in cholesterol concentration. The influence of cholesterol on rotational and translational diffusion of R6G molecules has been investigated by monitoring UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy, and finally fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measurements. In cholesterol-SDS assemblies, due to the strong electrostatic attractive interaction between the negatively charged surface of vesicle and cationic R6G molecules, the rotational and diffusion motion of R6G becomes slower. However, in cholesterol-CTAB aggregates, the enhanced hydrophobicity and electrostatic repulsion induces the migration of R6G from vesicle bilayer to aqueous phase. The experimental observations suggest that the surface charge of vesicles has a stronger influence than the hydrophobicity of the vesicle bilayer on the rotational and diffusion motion of R6G molecules.

  15. Chemical interactions between the present-day Martian atmosphere and surface minerals: Implications for sample return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prinn, Ronald; Fegley, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    Thermochemical and photochemical reactions between surface minerals and present-day atmospheric constituents are predicted to produce microscopic effects on the surface of mineral grains. Relevant reactions hypothesized in the literature include conversions of silicates and volcanic glasses to clay minerals, conversion of ferrous to ferric compounds, and formation of carbonates, nitrates, and sulfates. These types of surface-atmosphere weathering of minerals, biological potential of the surface environment, and atmospheric stability in both present and past Martian epochs. It is emphasized that the product of these reactions will be observable and interpretable on the microscopic surface layers of Martian surface rocks using modern techniques with obvious implications for sample return from Mars. Macroscopic products of chemical weathering reactions in past Martian epochs are also expected in Martian surface materials. These products are expected not only as a result of reactions similar to those proceeding today but also due to aqueous reactions in past epochs in which liquid water was putatively present. It may prove very difficult or impossible, however, to determine definitively from the relic macroscopic product alone either the exact weathering process which led to its formation of the identity of its weathering parent mineral. The enormous advantages of studying the Martian chemical weathering by investigating the microscopic products of present-day chemical reactions on sample surfaces are very apparent.

  16. Chemical composition of surface films on glass windows and implications for atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Buuan; Diamond, Miriam L.; Simpson, André J.; Makar, Paul A.; Truong, Jennifer; Hernandez-Martinez, Nadia A.

    Atmospherically derived surface films that cover impervious surfaces in cities, have areas comparable to that of atmospheric particulate matter (PM). The films compete with PM for sorption of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds and alter the functionality of urban surfaces. The determination of surface-film composition is therefore vital to understanding their role in mediating chemical fate and transport within cities. Here, we show the composition of urban surface films collected from windows in downtown Toronto (Ontario, Canada) to be comprised of ˜94% inorganic compounds of which 8% are sulfate, 7% nitrate and 18% metals. Approximately 5% of the urban film mass is organic carbon, with ˜35% of the organic carbon mass corresponding to carbohydrates, ˜35% aliphatics, ˜20% aromatics and ˜10% carbonyls. The composition of surface films differs significantly from that of PM, suggesting differential accumulation, depositional degradation, and/or processes within films differing from those affecting PM. A rigid polymeric component comprising a small fraction of the organic carbon was also found, which may suggest direct deposition from environmental sources, or possible secondary in situ reactions within the film. Here, we suggest a potential mechanism for the oxidation of surface films to form organic polymers via radical initiation processes. Thus, the composition of surface films has important implications for chemical fate of contaminants within cities and presents a significant aspect of contaminant uptake that has not been considered in many air-quality models.

  17. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, F.; Orosei, R.; Seu, R.; Coradini, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Brown, R. H.; Cassini Vims; Radar Teams

    2010-04-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR data on Titan's surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. The use of data sets from different instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft has the potential to deepen our understanding of the nature of the surface. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This evidence, evaluated for the first time through a multivariate

  18. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Federico; Orosei, Roberto; Seu, Roberto; Coradini, Angioletta; Lunine, Jonathan; Filacchione, Gianrico; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Cerroni, Priscilla; Brown, Robert

    2010-05-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR data on Titan's surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. The use of data sets from different instruments onboard the Cassini spacecraft has the potential to deepen our understanding of the nature of the surface. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This evidence, evaluated for the first time through a multivariate

  19. Hot surface ionic line emission and cold K-inner shell emission from petawatt-laser irradiated Cu foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Theobald, W; Akli, K; Clarke, R; Delettrez, J A; Freeman, R R; Glenzer, S; Green, J; Gregori, G; Heathcote, R; Izumi, N; King, J A; Koch, J A; Kuba, J; Lancaster, K; MacKinnon, A J; Key, M; Mileham, C; Myatt, J; Neely, D; Norreys, P A; Park, H; Pasely, J; Patel, P; Regan, S P; Sawada, H; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R; Stephens, R B; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Zhang, B; Sangster, T C

    2005-12-13

    A hot, T{sub e} {approx} 2- to 3-keV surface plasma was observed in the interaction of a 0.7-ps petawatt laser beam with solid copper-foil targets at intensities >10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Copper K-shell spectra were measured in the range of 8 to 9 keV using a single-photon-counting x-ray CCD camera. In addition to K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell lines, the emission contained the Cu He{sub {alpha}} and Ly{sub {alpha}} lines, allowing the temperature to be inferred. These lines have not been observed previously with ultrafast laser pulses. For intensities less than 3 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, only the K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell emissions are detected. Measurements of the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield as a function of the laser intensity are in agreement with a model that includes refluxing and confinement of the suprathermal electrons in the target volume.

  20. Experimental and DFT studies on the aggregation behavior of imidazolium-based surface-active ionic liquids with aromatic counterions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenwen; Wang, Tao; Cheng, Ni; Hu, Qiongzheng; Bi, Yanhui; Gong, Yanjun; Yu, Li

    2015-02-01

    Two imidazolium-based surface-active ionic liquids with aromatic counterions, namely, 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium salicylate (C12mimSal) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate (C12mimHNC), were synthesized, and their aggregate behavior in aqueous solutions was systematically explored. Surface tension and conductivity measurements indicate that both C12mimSal and C12mimHNC show superior surface activity compared to the common imidazolium-based SAIL with the same hydrocarbon chain length, 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (C12mimBr). This result demonstrates that the incorporation of aromatic counterions favors the formation of micelles. C12mimHNC displays a higher surface activity than C12mimSal, resulting from the different hydrophobicities of the counterions. In comparison with C12mimBr, C12mimSal not only can form hexagonal liquid-crystalline phase (H1) in aqueous solution, but also exhibits a broad region of cubic liquid-crystalline phase (V2) at higher concentration. As for the C12mimHNC/H2O system, a lamellar liquid-crystalline (L(α)) phase was observed. These lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) were characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Structural parameters calculated from SAXS patterns suggest that a higher concentration of the SAIL leads to a denser arrangement whereas a higher temperature results in the opposite effect. The rheological results manifest that the formed H1 phase in the C12mimSal/H2O system exhibits an impressive viscoelastic behavior, indicated by a modulus (G' and G″) that is 1 order of magnitude higher than that of C12mimBr. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that C12mimSal has a more negative interaction energy with a water molecule and the Sal(-) counterion presents a stronger electronegativity than the HNC(-) counterion. The specific phase behavior of the C12mimSal/H2O and C12mimHNC/H2O systems can be attributed to the strong synergic

  1. A sol-gel derived pH-responsive bovine serum albumin molecularly imprinted poly(ionic liquids) on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingming; Pi, Jiangyan; Wang, Xiaojie; Huang, Rong; Du, Yamei; Yu, Xiaoyang; Tan, Wenfeng; Liu, Fan; Shea, Kenneth J

    2016-08-17

    A pH-responsive surface molecularly imprinted poly(ionic liquids) (MIPILs) was prepared on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by a sol-gel technique. The material was synthesized using a 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane modified multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT-APTES) as the substrate, bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the template molecule, an alkoxy-functionalized IL 1-(3-trimethoxysilyl propyl)-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ([TMSPMIM]Cl) as both the functional monomer and the sol-gel catalyst, and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) as the crosslinking agent. The molecular interaction between BSA and [TMSPMIM]Cl was quantitatively evaluated by UV-vis spectroscopy prior to polymerization so as to identify an optimal template/monomer ratio and the most suitable pH value for the preparation of the MWCNTs@BSA-MIPILs. This strategy was found to be effective to overcome the problems of trial-and-error protocol in molecular imprinting. The optimum synthesis conditions were as follows: template/monomer ratio 7:20, crosslinking agent content 2.0-2.5 mL, temperature 4 °C and pH 8.9 Tris-HCl buffer. The influence of incubation pH on adsorption was also studied. The result showed that the imprinting effect and selectivity improved significantly with increasing incubation pH from 7.7 to 9.9. This is mainly because the non-specific binding from electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interactions decreased greatly with the increase of pH value, which made the specific binding affinity from shape selectivity strengthened instead. The polymers synthesized under the optimal conditions were then characterized by BET surface area measurement, FTIR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adsorption capacity, imprinting effect, selective recognition and reusability were also evaluated. The as-prepared MWCNTs@BSA-MIPILs were also found to have a number of advantages including high surface area (134.2 m(2) g(-1)), high adsorption capacity (55.52

  2. Correlations between VIMS and RADAR data over the surface of Titan: Implications for Titan's surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, F.; Orosei, R.; Seu, R.; Coradini, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Flamini, E.; Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Lopes, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present new results combining the VIMS and RADAR medium resolution data on Titan’s surface. In RADAR data we consider two geophysical quantities: the normalized backscatter cross-section obtained from the scatterometer measurement, corrected for the incidence angle, and the calibrated antenna temperature determined from the radiometer measurement, as found in publicly available data products. In VIMS data, combining spatial and spectral information, we have selected some atmospheric windows in the spectral range between 2 and 5 μm, providing the best optical depth to measure surface reflectance. The two RADAR parameters are combined with VIMS data, with estimated errors, to produce an aggregate data set, that we process using multivariate classification methods to identify homogeneous taxonomic units in the multivariate space of the samples. Such units in fact reveal compositional trends in the surface, that are likely related to different abundances of simple ices and/or hydrocarbons. Our analysis relies on the G-mode method, which has been successfully used in the past for the classification of such diverse data sets as lunar rock samples, asteroids and planetary surfaces. Due to the large number of data of Titan, the classification work proceeds in several steps. In a previous work (Tosi et al., 2010), we analyzed the data acquired in Titan flybys: T3, T4, T8, T13 and T16, covering mostly the major bright and dark features seen around the equator, combined with VIMS infrared data, in order to validate the classification method. Now we focus on flybys: T23, T25, T28, T30, and T43, covering also regions of Titan located at higher latitudes, and partly including the polar regions. The obtained results are generally in agreement with previous work devoted both to the analysis of the scatterometry data through physical models and to the correlation between SAR and radiometry data at a high resolution scale. This classification can be expanded and refined as new

  3. Interactions between glycine derivatives and mineral surfaces: Implications for the origins of life on planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall-Bowman, K. J.; Cleaves, H. J.; Sverjensky, D. A.; Hazen, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    Various mechanisms could have delivered amino acids to the prebiotic Earth (Miller and Orgel 1974). The polymerization of amino acids may have been important for the origin of life, as peptides may have been components for the first self-replicating systems (Kauffman 1971; Yao et al 1998). Though amino acid concentrations in the primitive oceans were likely too dilute for significant oligomerization to occur (Cleaves et al 2009), mineral surface adsorption may have concentrated these biomolecules (Bernal 1951; Lambert 2008). Few studies have examined the catalytic effects of mineral surfaces on aqueous peptide oligomerization or degradation. As unactivated amino acid polymerization is thermodynamically unfavorable and kinetically slow in aqueous solution, we studied the reverse reaction of polymer degradation to measure potential mineral catalysis. Glycine (G) derivatives glycylglycine (GG), diketopiperazine (DKP), and glycylglycylglycine (GGG) were reacted with different minerals (calcite, hematite, montmorillonite, rutile, amorphous silica, and pyrite) in the presence of 0.05 M pH 8.1 KHCO3 buffer and 0.1 M NaCl as background electrolyte. Experiments were performed by reacting the aqueous amino acid derivative-mineral mixtures in a thermostatted oven (modified to accommodate a mechanical rotator) at 25°, 50° or 70°C. Samples were removed after 30, 60, 90, and 140 hours. Samples were then analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography to quantify the products. Besides mineral catalysis, it was determined that degradation of GGG proceeds principally via a GGG → DKP + G mechanism, rather than via GGG → GG + G. Below 70°C kinetics were generally too sluggish to detect catalytic activity over reasonable laboratory time-scales at this pH. At 70°C, pyrite was the only mineral with detectible catalytic effects on the degradation of GGG. GGG degraded ~ 1.5 - 4 x faster in the presence of pyrite than in control reactions, depending on the ratio of solution

  4. Direct Mapping of Ionic Transport in a Si Anode on the Nanoscale: Time Domain Electrochemical Strain Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Eliseev, Eugene; Tselev, Alexander; Dudney, Nancy J; Morozovska, Anna N; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2011-01-01

    Local Li-ion transport in amorphous silicon is studied on the nanometer scale using time domain electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). A strong variability of ionic transport controlled by the anode surface morphology is observed. The observed relaxing and nonrelaxing response components are discussed in terms of local and global ionic transport mechanisms, thus establishing the signal formation mechanisms in ESM. This behavior is further correlated with local conductivity measurements. The implications of these studies for Si-anode batteries are discussed. The universal presence of concentrationstrain coupling suggests that ESM and associated time and voltage spectroscopies can be applied to a broad range of electrochemical systems ranging from batteries to fuel cells.

  5. Quantized friction across ionic liquid thin films.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alexander M; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Welton, Tom; Perkin, Susan

    2013-10-01

    Ionic liquids - salts in the liquid state under ambient conditions - are of great interest as precision lubricants. Ionic liquids form layered structures at surfaces, yet it is not clear how this nano-structure relates to their lubrication properties. We measured the friction force between atomically smooth solid surfaces across ionic liquid films of controlled thickness in terms of the number of ion layers. Multiple friction-load regimes emerge, each corresponding to a different number of ion layers in the film. In contrast to molecular liquids, the friction coefficients differ for each layer due to their varying composition. PMID:23942943

  6. Ionic contamination detection. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovich, M.G.

    1994-04-01

    The effectiveness of Meter A and B for detecting ionic contamination was evaluated and compared on the following types of samples: (1) copper panels, (2) printed wiring boards with through-hold components (lCs), (3) printed wiring boards with surface-mounted components, and (4) mixed-technology printed wiring boards (both through-hole and surface-mount components). The extraction efficiency of the two meters was calculated

  7. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  8. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition. PMID:27175515

  9. Ionic liquid lubrication at electrified interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingling; Huang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolei

    2016-06-01

    The lubrication performances of ionic liquids at electrified interfaces have been investigated by using a reciprocating sliding tribometer. Experimental results indicated that the lubricity of the confined ionic liquids was markedly affected by the application of external electric field and strong interface electric field strength could result in high friction. The influence was more pronounced for the ionic liquid with a shorter alkyl side chain in particular. The main reason of the friction increment might be ascribed to the electrically influenced surface adsorption where the charged ions were structured to form robust and ordered layers.

  10. The effects of non-ionic polymeric surfactants on the cleaning of biofouled hydrogel materials.

    PubMed

    Guan, Allan; Li, Zhenyu; Phillips, K Scott

    2015-01-01

    Block co-polymer surfactants have been used for cleaning hydrogel medical devices that contact the body (e.g., contact lenses) because of their biocompatibility. This work examined the relationship between concentration and detergency of two non-ionic polymeric surfactants (Pluronic F127 and Triton X-100) for cleaning protein soil, with anionic surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium laureth sulfate) as positive controls. Surface plasmon resonance was used to quantify removal of simulated tear soil from self-assembled monolayer surfaces, and a microplate format was used to study the removal of fluorescently labeled soil proteins from contact lenses. While detergency increased as a function of concentration for anionic surfactants, it decreased with concentration for the two polymeric surfactants. The fact that the protein detergency of some non-ionic polymeric surfactants did not increase with concentration above the critical micelle concentration could have implications for optimizing the tradeoff between detergency and biocompatibility. PMID:26469384

  11. Thermally induced stresses in boulders on airless body surfaces: Implications for breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, Jamie; Byrne, Shane

    2016-10-01

    granular disintegration. These two mechanisms likely work together to hasten disaggregation of the near-surface.We will present results for boulder stresses on the Moon and other airless bodies, and discuss implications for breakdown on these surfaces.

  12. Adhesion and friction force coupling of gecko setal arrays: implications for structured adhesive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Boxin; Pesika, Noshir; Rosenberg, Kenny; Tian, Yu; Zeng, Hongbo; McGuiggan, Patricia; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2008-02-19

    The extraordinary climbing ability of geckos is partially attributed to the fine structure of their toe pads, which contain arrays consisting of thousands of micrometer-sized stalks (setae) that are in turn terminated by millions of fingerlike pads (spatulae) having nanoscale dimensions. Using a surface forces apparatus (SFA), we have investigated the dynamic sliding characteristics of setal arrays subjected to various loading, unloading, and shearing conditions at different angles. Setal arrays were glued onto silica substrates and, once installed into the SFA, brought toward a polymeric substrate surface and then sheared. Lateral shearing of the arrays was initiated along both the "gripping" and "releasing" directions of the setae on the foot pads. We find that the anisotropic microstructure of the setal arrays gives rise to quite different adhesive and tribological properties when sliding along these two directions, depending also on the angle that the setae subtend with respect to the surface. Thus, dragging the setal arrays along the gripping direction leads to strong adhesion and friction forces (as required during contact and attachment), whereas when shearing along the releasing direction, both forces fall to almost zero (as desired during rapid detachment). The results and analysis provide new insights into the biomechanics of adhesion and friction forces in animals, the coupling between these two forces, and the specialized structures that allow them to optimize these forces along different directions during movement. Our results also have practical implications and criteria for designing reversible and responsive adhesives and articulated robotic mechanisms.

  13. New and revised 14C dates for Hawaiian surface lava flows: Paleomagnetic and geomagnetic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pressline, N.; Trusdell, F.A.; Gubbins, David

    2009-01-01

    Radiocarbon dates have been obtained for 30 charcoal samples corresponding to 27 surface lava flows from the Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii. The submitted charcoal was a mixture of fresh and archived material. Preparation and analysis was undertaken at the NERC Radiocarbon Laboratory in Glasgow, Scotland, and the associated SUERC Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility. The resulting dates range from 390 years B.P. to 12,910 years B.P. with corresponding error bars an order of magnitude smaller than previously obtained using the gas-counting method. The new and revised 14C data set can aid hazard and risk assessment on the island. The data presented here also have implications for geomagnetic modelling, which at present is limited by large dating errors. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Facet personality and surface-level diversity as team mental model antecedents: implications for implicit coordination.

    PubMed

    Fisher, David M; Bell, Suzanne T; Dierdorff, Erich C; Belohlav, James A

    2012-07-01

    Team mental models (TMMs) have received much attention as important drivers of effective team processes and performance. Less is known about the factors that give rise to these shared cognitive structures. We examined potential antecedents of TMMs, with a specific focus on team composition variables, including various facets of personality and surface-level diversity. Further, we examined implicit coordination as an important outcome of TMMs. Results suggest that team composition in terms of the cooperation facet of agreeableness and racial diversity were significantly related to team-focused TMM similarity. TMM similarity was also positively predictive of implicit coordination, which mediated the relationship between TMM similarity and team performance. Post hoc analyses revealed a significant interaction between the trust facet of agreeableness and racial diversity in predicting TMM similarity. Results are discussed in terms of facilitating the emergence of TMMs and corresponding implications for team-related human resource practices.

  15. Photodesorption of NO from a metal surface: quantum dynamical implications of a two-mode model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfrank, Peter; Boendgen, Gisela; Finger, Karin; Pesce, Lorenzo

    2000-01-01

    Open-system density matrix theory is used to study the dissipative quantum dynamics of photoinduced, hot-electron mediated desorption of NO from Pt(111). Two electronic states are considered and both the DIET (Desorption Induced by Electronic Transitions) and DIMET (Desorption Induced by Multiple Electronic Transitions) limits addressed. Besides the center-of-mass motion of the molecule perpendicular to the surface plane, the vibrational motion of the NO molecule is accounted for. In a first, methodological part the interrelations between various "direct" and "jumping wave packet" methods to solve the underlying open-system Liouville-von Neumann equations of motion, are emphasized. In a second, applied part we investigate (i) the relevance of the popular "negative ion resonance" model, (ii) the role of coordinate-dependent electronic relaxation, and (iii) the implications of multiple-electronic excitations.

  16. High-Surface-Area CO2 Sponge: High Performance CO2 Scrubbing Based on Hollow Fiber-Supported Designer Ionic Liquid Sponges

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    IMPACCT Project: The team from ORNL and Georgia Tech is developing a new technology that will act like a sponge, integrating a new, alcohol-based ionic liquid into hollow fibers (magnified image, right) to capture CO2 from the exhaust produced by coal-fired power plants. Ionic liquids, or salts that exist in liquid form, are promising materials for carbon capture and storage, but their tendency to thicken when combined with CO2 limits their efficiency and poses a challenge for their development as a cost-effective alternative to current-generation solutions. Adding alcohol to the mix limits this tendency to thicken in the presence of CO2 but can also make the liquid more likely to evaporate, which would add significantly to the cost of CO2 capture. To solve this problem, ORNL is developing new classes of ionic liquids with high capacity for absorbing CO2. ORNL’s sponge would reduce the cost associated with the energy that would need to be diverted from power plants to capture CO2 and release it for storage.

  17. Tidal Distortion of Titan: Implications for Surface Features and Tidal Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohl, F.; Hussmann, H.; Coustenis, A.; Knapmeyer, M.; Lange, C.; Solomonidou, A.; Stephan, K.; Wagner, F. W.

    2012-04-01

    Titan is unique due to its similarity to the Earth and terrestrial planets in spite of the satellite's ice-rich bulk composition. Gravitational field data acquired by the Cassini spacecraft suggest that Titan's interior is composed of a mixture of rock and ice and is only partly differentiated. Titan is tidally locked with respect to Saturn and thereby subject to periodic tidal forcing of its interior and surface. Based on interior structure models and assumptions on rheological properties of planetary materials (i.e. ice, rock, water-ammonia ocean), we compute the elastic body tide Love numbers h2, k2, and l2 in order to describe Titan's tidal response. Key parameters, e.g., tidally-induced changes of local gravity, tilt relative to the direction of gravity, and areal strain are then given by linear combinations of h2, k2, and l2. We find peak-to-peak amplitudes of tidally-induced surface displacement and tilt variation on the order of up to a few tens of metres and a few arc seconds, respectively. Based on the obtained variations of tidal parameters, we will address possible implications for morphotectonic surface features and compositional heterogeneity on Titan. In addition, we will address possible measurements of global tidal distortion by using a network of several small landed stations. Each of those would have to carry an instrument suite to monitor tidally-induced changes of local gravity, tilt relative to the direction of gravity, and areal strain at the surface of Titan. Furthermore, tidal stresses are expected to induce significant seismic activity comparable to tidally-induced quakes on the Moon, and possibly along with seismicity induced by localized cryovolcanic activity.

  18. Unravelling the secrets of Cs controlled secondary ion formation: Evidence of the dominance of site specific surface chemistry, alloying and ionic bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmaack, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    implantation can be evaluated as a function of Cs coverage. The summarised results imply that secondary ions are commonly not formed by charge transfer between an escaping atom and the electronic system of the sample but are already emitted as ions. The probability of ion formation appears to be controlled by the local ionic character of the alkali-target atom bonds, i.e., by the difference in electronegativity between the involved elements as well as by the electron affinity and the ionisation potential of the departing atom. This idea is supported by the finding that Si- yields exhibit the same very strong dependence on Cs coverage as Si+ and O- yields on the oxygen fraction in oxygen loaded Si. Most challenging to theoreticians is the finding that the ionisation probability is independent of the emission velocity of sputtered ions. This phenomenon cannot be rationalised along established routes of thinking. Different concepts need to be explored. An old, somewhat exotic idea takes account of the heavy perturbation created for a very short period of time at the site of ion emission (dynamic randomisation). Molecular dynamics simulations are desirable to clarify the issue. Ultimately it may be possible to describe all phenomena of enhanced or suppressed secondary ion formation, produced either by surface loading with alkali atoms or by enforced surface oxidation, on the basis of a single universal model. There is plenty of room for exciting new studies.

  19. Unravelling the secrets of Cs controlled secondary ion formation: Evidence of the dominance of site specific surface chemistry, alloying and ionic bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmaack, Klaus

    2013-03-01

    implantation can be evaluated as a function of Cs coverage.The summarised results imply that secondary ions are commonly not formed by charge transfer between an escaping atom and the electronic system of the sample but are already emitted as ions. The probability of ion formation appears to be controlled by the local ionic character of the alkali-target atom bonds, i.e., by the difference in electronegativity between the involved elements as well as by the electron affinity and the ionisation potential of the departing atom. This idea is supported by the finding that Si- yields exhibit the same very strong dependence on Cs coverage as Si+ and O- yields on the oxygen fraction in oxygen loaded Si. Most challenging to theoreticians is the finding that the ionisation probability is independent of the emission velocity of sputtered ions. This phenomenon cannot be rationalised along established routes of thinking. Different concepts need to be explored. An old, somewhat exotic idea takes account of the heavy perturbation created for a very short period of time at the site of ion emission (dynamic randomisation). Molecular dynamics simulations are desirable to clarify the issue. Ultimately it may be possible to describe all phenomena of enhanced or suppressed secondary ion formation, produced either by surface loading with alkali atoms or by enforced surface oxidation, on the basis of a single universal model. There is plenty of room for exciting new studies.

  20. Adsorption of CO on oxide and water ice surfaces - Implications for the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leu, M.-T.; Blamont, J. E.; Anbar, A. D.; Keyser, L. F.; Sander, S. P.

    1992-01-01

    The adsorption of carbon monoxide (CO) on water ice and on the oxides Fe2O3, Fe3O4, Al2O3, SiO2, CaO, MgO, and TiO2 (rutile and anatase) has been investigated in a flow reactor. A mass spectrometer was employed as a detector to monitor the temporal concentrations of CO. Adsorption coefficients as large as 1 x 10 exp -4 were measured for CO on TiO2 solids in helium at 196 K. The fractional surface coverage for CO on TiO2 solids in helium was also determined to be approximately 10 percent at 196 K. The upper limits of the fractional surface coverage for the other oxides (Fe2O3, Fe3O4, Al2O3, SiO2, CaO, and MgO) and water ice were also measured to be less than 1 percent. The implications for the stability of CO2 in the Martian atmosphere and the 'CO hole' observed by the Phobos/ISM experiment are discussed.

  1. Visualization of droplet departure on a superhydrophobic surface and implications to heat transfer enhancement during dropwise condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, C.; Rykaczewski, K.; Fedorov, A. G.; Joshi, Y.

    2010-07-01

    Droplet departure frequency is investigated using environmental scanning electron microscopy with implications to enhancing the rate of dropwise condensation on superhydrophobic surfaces. Superhydrophobic surfaces, formed by cupric hydroxide nanostructures, allow the condensate to depart from a surface with a tilt angle of 30° from the horizontal. The resulting decrease in drop departure size shifts the drop size distribution to smaller radii, which may enhance the heat transfer rate during dropwise condensation. The heat transfer enhancement is estimated by modifying the Rose and Le Fevre drop distribution function to account for a smaller maximum droplet size on a superhydrophobic surface.

  2. Noble metal ionic catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hegde, M S; Madras, Giridhar; Patil, K C

    2009-06-16

    Because of growing environmental concerns and increasingly stringent regulations governing auto emissions, new more efficient exhaust catalysts are needed to reduce the amount of pollutants released from internal combustion engines. To accomplish this goal, the major pollutants in exhaust-CO, NO(x), and unburned hydrocarbons-need to be fully converted to CO(2), N(2), and H(2)O. Most exhaust catalysts contain nanocrystalline noble metals (Pt, Pd, Rh) dispersed on oxide supports such as Al(2)O(3) or SiO(2) promoted by CeO(2). However, in conventional catalysts, only the surface atoms of the noble metal particles serve as adsorption sites, and even in 4-6 nm metal particles, only 1/4 to 1/5 of the total noble metal atoms are utilized for catalytic conversion. The complete dispersion of noble metals can be achieved only as ions within an oxide support. In this Account, we describe a novel solution to this dispersion problem: a new solution combustion method for synthesizing dispersed noble metal ionic catalysts. We have synthesized nanocrystalline, single-phase Ce(1-x)M(x)O(2-delta) and Ce(1-x-y)Ti(y)M(x)O(2-delta) (M = Pt, Pd, Rh; x = 0.01-0.02, delta approximately x, y = 0.15-0.25) oxides in fluorite structure. In these oxide catalysts, Pt(2+), Pd(2+), or Rh(3+) ions are substituted only to the extent of 1-2% of Ce(4+) ion. Lower-valent noble metal ion substitution in CeO(2) creates oxygen vacancies. Reducing molecules (CO, H(2), NH(3)) are adsorbed onto electron-deficient noble metal ions, while oxidizing (O(2), NO) molecules are absorbed onto electron-rich oxide ion vacancy sites. The rates of CO and hydrocarbon oxidation and NO(x) reduction (with >80% N(2) selectivity) are 15-30 times higher in the presence of these ionic catalysts than when the same amount of noble metal loaded on an oxide support is used. Catalysts with palladium ion dispersed in CeO(2) or Ce(1-x)Ti(x)O(2) were far superior to Pt or Rh ionic catalysts. Therefore, we have demonstrated that the

  3. Quantized ionic conductance in nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Zwolak, Michael; Lagerqvist, Johan; Di Ventra, Massimilliano

    2009-01-01

    Ionic transport in nanopores is a fundamentally and technologically important problem in view of its ubiquitous occurrence in biological processes and its impact on DNA sequencing applications. Using microscopic calculations, we show that ion transport may exhibit strong non-liDearities as a function of the pore radius reminiscent of the conductance quantization steps as a function of the transverse cross section of quantum point contacts. In the present case, however, conductance steps originate from the break up of the hydration layers that form around ions in aqueous solution. Once in the pore, the water molecules form wavelike structures due to multiple scattering at the surface of the pore walls and interference with the radial waves around the ion. We discuss these effects as well as the conditions under which the step-like features in the ionic conductance should be experimentally observable.

  4. The flexible structure of the K24S28 region of Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein (LRAP) bound to apatites as a function of surface type, calcium, mutation, and ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Junxia; Burton, Sarah D.; Xu, Yimin; Buchko, Garry W.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-07-11

    Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein (LRAP) is a member of the amelogenin family of biomineralization proteins, proteins which play a critical role in enamel formation. Recent studies have revealed the structure and orientation of the N- and C-terminus of LRAP bound to hydroxyapatite (HAP), a surface used as an analog of enamel. The structure of one region, K24 to S28, was found to be sensitive to phosphorylation of S16, the only naturally observed site of serine phosphorylation in LRAP, suggesting that the residues from K24 to S28 may sit at a key region of structural flexibility and play a role in the protein’s function. In this work, we investigated the sensitivity of the structure and orientation of this region when bound to HAP as a function of several factors which may vary during enamel formation to influence structure: the ionic strength (0.05 M, 0.15 M, 0.2 M), the calcium concentration (0.07 mM and 0.4 mM), and the surface to which it is binding (HAP and carbonated apatite (CAP), a more direct mimic of enamel). A naturally occurring mutation found in amelogenin (T21I), was also investigated. The structure in the K24S28 region of the protein was found to be sensitive to these conditions, with the CAP surface and excess Ca2+ (8:1 [Ca2+]:[LRAP-K24S28(+P)]) resulting in a much tighter helix, while low ionic strength relaxed the helical structure. Higher ionic strength and the point mutation did not result in any structural change in this region. The distance of the backbone of K24 from the surface was most sensitive to excess Ca2+ and in the T21I-mutation. Collectively, these data suggest that the protein is able to accommodate structural changes while maintaining its interaction with the surface, and provides further evidence of the structural sensitivity of the K24 to S28 region, a sensitivity that may contribute to function in biomineralization. This research was supported by NIH-NIDCR Grant DE-015347. The research was performed at the Pacific Northwest

  5. Growth kinetics of step edges on celestite (0 0 1) surfaces as a function of temperature, saturation state, ionic strength, and aqueous strontium:sulfate ratio: An in-situ atomic force microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N.; Gooijer, Yiscka; Higgins, Steven R.

    2016-02-01

    Step velocities on the celestite (0 0 1) surface have been measured as a function of temperature (23-45 °C), saturation state (S = 1.1-2.2), ionic strength (I = 0.01, 0.06, and 0.1 M), and aqueous strontium:sulfate ratio (r = 0.01-100) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Celestite growth hillocks were flanked by [0 1 0]-aligned step edges, which are polar, and step edges vicinal to <1 2 0>, which are non-polar. [0 1 0] step velocities increased with temperature and saturation state, however step velocities did not vary significantly with ionic strength. Step velocities were non-linear with saturation state, suggesting a change in mechanism at high S as compared with low S. At constant S, the step velocities were maximized at r = 1 and decreased significantly at extreme r, demonstrating the governing role of solute stoichiometry. We successfully fit the step velocity data as a function of r using the Stack and Grantham (2010) nucleation and propagation model. Based on the results as a function of ionic strength and r, the mechanism at low S is likely ion-by-ion attachment to the step with an activation energy of 75 (±10) kJ mol-1. At high S the mechanism is a combination of the one at low S and possibly attachment of a neutral species such as an ion pair with an activation energy of 43 (±9) kJ mol-1.

  6. Growth kinetics of step edges on celestite (0 0 1) surfaces as a function of temperature, saturation state, ionic strength, and aqueous strontium:sulface ratio: An in-situ atomic force microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N.; Gooijer, Yiscka; Higgins, Steven R.

    2015-12-12

    Step velocities on the celestite (0 0 1) surface have been measured as a function of temperature (23–45 °C), saturation state (S = 1.1–2.2), ionic strength (I = 0.01, 0.06, and 0.1 M), and aqueous strontium:sulfate ratio (r = 0.01–100) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Celestite growth hillocks were flanked by [0 1 0]-aligned step edges, which are polar, and step edges vicinal to <1 2 0>, which are non-polar. [0 1 0] step velocities increased with temperature and saturation state, however step velocities did not vary significantly with ionic strength. Step velocities were non-linear with saturation state, suggesting a change in mechanism at high S as compared with low S. At constant S, the step velocities were maximized at r = 1 and decreased significantly at extreme r, demonstrating the governing role of solute stoichiometry. We successfully fit the step velocity data as a function of r using the Stack and Grantham (2010) nucleation and propagation model. Based on the results as a function of ionic strength and r, the mechanism at low S is likely ion-by-ion attachment to the step with an activation energy of 75 (±10) kJ mol–1. In conclusion, at high S the mechanism is a combination of the one at low S and possibly attachment of a neutral species such as an ion pair with an activation energy of 43 (±9) kJ mol–1.

  7. Electron-transfer reactions of cobalt(III) complexes. 1. The kinetic investigation of the reduction of various surfactant cobalt(III) complexes by iron(II) in surface active ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi; Sakthinathan, Subramanian

    2015-05-15

    The kinetics of outer sphere electron transfer reaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complex ions, cis-[Co(en)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (1), cis-[Co(dp)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (2), cis-[Co(trien)(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (3), cis-[Co(bpy)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (4) and cis-[Co(phen)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (5) (en: ethylenediamine, dp: diaminopropane, trien : triethylenetetramine, bpy: 2,2'-bipyridyl, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline and C12H25NH2 : dodecylamine) have been interrogated by Fe(2+) ion in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumbromide) medium at different temperatures (298, 303, 308, 313, 318 and 323K) by the spectrophotometry method under pseudo first order conditions using an excess of the reductant. Experimentally the reactions were found to be of second order and the electron transfer as outer sphere. The second order rate constant for the electron transfer reaction in ionic liquids was found to increase with increase in the concentration of all these surfactant cobalt(III) complexes. Among these complexes (from en to phen ligand), complex containing the phenanthroline ligand rate is higher compared to other complexes. By assuming the outer sphere mechanism, the results have been explained based on the presence of aggregated structures containing cobalt(III) complexes at the surface of ionic liquids formed by the surfactant cobalt(III) complexes in the reaction medium. The activation parameters (enthalpy of activation ΔH(‡) and entropy of activation ΔS(‡)) of the reaction have been calculated which substantiate the kinetics of the reaction.

  8. Electron-transfer reactions of cobalt(III) complexes. 1. The kinetic investigation of the reduction of various surfactant cobalt(III) complexes by iron(II) in surface active ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi; Sakthinathan, Subramanian

    2015-05-01

    The kinetics of outer sphere electron transfer reaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complex ions, cis-[Co(en)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (1), cis-[Co(dp)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (2), cis-[Co(trien)(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (3), cis-[Co(bpy)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (4) and cis-[Co(phen)2(C12H25NH2)2]3+ (5) (en: ethylenediamine, dp: diaminopropane, trien : triethylenetetramine, bpy: 2,2‧-bipyridyl, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline and C12H25NH2 : dodecylamine) have been interrogated by Fe2+ ion in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumbromide) medium at different temperatures (298, 303, 308, 313, 318 and 323 K) by the spectrophotometry method under pseudo first order conditions using an excess of the reductant. Experimentally the reactions were found to be of second order and the electron transfer as outer sphere. The second order rate constant for the electron transfer reaction in ionic liquids was found to increase with increase in the concentration of all these surfactant cobalt(III) complexes. Among these complexes (from en to phen ligand), complex containing the phenanthroline ligand rate is higher compared to other complexes. By assuming the outer sphere mechanism, the results have been explained based on the presence of aggregated structures containing cobalt(III) complexes at the surface of ionic liquids formed by the surfactant cobalt(III) complexes in the reaction medium. The activation parameters (enthalpy of activation ΔH‡ and entropy of activation ΔS‡) of the reaction have been calculated which substantiate the kinetics of the reaction.

  9. Growth kinetics of step edges on celestite (0 0 1) surfaces as a function of temperature, saturation state, ionic strength, and aqueous strontium:sulface ratio: An in-situ atomic force microscopy study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bracco, Jacquelyn N.; Gooijer, Yiscka; Higgins, Steven R.

    2015-12-12

    Step velocities on the celestite (0 0 1) surface have been measured as a function of temperature (23–45 °C), saturation state (S = 1.1–2.2), ionic strength (I = 0.01, 0.06, and 0.1 M), and aqueous strontium:sulfate ratio (r = 0.01–100) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Celestite growth hillocks were flanked by [0 1 0]-aligned step edges, which are polar, and step edges vicinal to <1 2 0>, which are non-polar. [0 1 0] step velocities increased with temperature and saturation state, however step velocities did not vary significantly with ionic strength. Step velocities were non-linear with saturation state, suggesting amore » change in mechanism at high S as compared with low S. At constant S, the step velocities were maximized at r = 1 and decreased significantly at extreme r, demonstrating the governing role of solute stoichiometry. We successfully fit the step velocity data as a function of r using the Stack and Grantham (2010) nucleation and propagation model. Based on the results as a function of ionic strength and r, the mechanism at low S is likely ion-by-ion attachment to the step with an activation energy of 75 (±10) kJ mol–1. In conclusion, at high S the mechanism is a combination of the one at low S and possibly attachment of a neutral species such as an ion pair with an activation energy of 43 (±9) kJ mol–1.« less

  10. Electron-transfer reactions of cobalt(III) complexes. 1. The kinetic investigation of the reduction of various surfactant cobalt(III) complexes by iron(II) in surface active ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Senthil Murugan, Krishnan; Thangamuniyandi, Pilavadi; Sakthinathan, Subramanian

    2015-05-15

    The kinetics of outer sphere electron transfer reaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complex ions, cis-[Co(en)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (1), cis-[Co(dp)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (2), cis-[Co(trien)(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (3), cis-[Co(bpy)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (4) and cis-[Co(phen)2(C12H25NH2)2](3+) (5) (en: ethylenediamine, dp: diaminopropane, trien : triethylenetetramine, bpy: 2,2'-bipyridyl, phen: 1,10-phenanthroline and C12H25NH2 : dodecylamine) have been interrogated by Fe(2+) ion in ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumbromide) medium at different temperatures (298, 303, 308, 313, 318 and 323K) by the spectrophotometry method under pseudo first order conditions using an excess of the reductant. Experimentally the reactions were found to be of second order and the electron transfer as outer sphere. The second order rate constant for the electron transfer reaction in ionic liquids was found to increase with increase in the concentration of all these surfactant cobalt(III) complexes. Among these complexes (from en to phen ligand), complex containing the phenanthroline ligand rate is higher compared to other complexes. By assuming the outer sphere mechanism, the results have been explained based on the presence of aggregated structures containing cobalt(III) complexes at the surface of ionic liquids formed by the surfactant cobalt(III) complexes in the reaction medium. The activation parameters (enthalpy of activation ΔH(‡) and entropy of activation ΔS(‡)) of the reaction have been calculated which substantiate the kinetics of the reaction. PMID:25721780

  11. Optimization of Ionic Liquid Based Simultaneous Ultrasonic- and Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Rutin and Quercetin from Leaves of Velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti) by Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunjian; Lu, Zhicheng; He, Xin; Li, Zhao; Shi, Kunming; Yang, Lei; Fu, Yujie; Zu, Yuangang

    2014-01-01

    An ionic liquids based simultaneous ultrasonic and microwave assisted extraction (ILs-UMAE) method has been proposed for the extraction of rutin (RU), quercetin (QU), from velvetleaf leaves. The influential parameters of the ILs-UMAE were optimized by the single factor and the central composite design (CCD) experiments. A 2.00 M 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C4mim]Br) was used as the experimental ionic liquid, extraction temperature 60°C, extraction time 12 min, liquid-solid ratio 32 mL/g, microwave power of 534 W, and a fixed ultrasonic power of 50 W. Compared to conventional heating reflux extraction (HRE), the RU and QU extraction yields obtained by ILs-UMAE were, respectively, 5.49 mg/g and 0.27 mg/g, which increased, respectively, 2.01-fold and 2.34-fold with the recoveries that were in the range of 97.62–102.36% for RU and 97.33–102.21% for QU with RSDs lower than 3.2% under the optimized UMAE conditions. In addition, the shorter extraction time was used in ILs-UMAE, compared with HRE. Therefore, ILs-UMAE was a rapid and an efficient method for the extraction of RU and QU from the leaves of velvetleaf. PMID:25243207

  12. The effects of steam on the surface properties of palygorskite: Implications for palygorskite-water interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, Abhy

    decreased by 40-50% after steam treatment. The reduced affinity for water and EGME may represent a reduced affinity for polar molecules in general. These results, particularly the XPS spectra and the observed large changes in rheological properties, suggest that steam altered the H + ion environment and/or concentration on palygorskite's surface. Exposing palygorskite to steam may have significant implications for its industrial applications, adversely affecting some applications and enhancing others.

  13. Diverse policy implications for future ozone and surface UV in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, A. H.; Daniel, J. S.; Portmann, R. W.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Young, P. J.; Fahey, D. W.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2016-06-01

    Due to the success of the Montreal Protocol in limiting emissions of ozone-depleting substances, concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane will control the evolution of total column and stratospheric ozone by the latter half of the 21st century. As the world proceeds down the path of reducing climate forcing set forth by the 2015 Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP 21), a broad range of ozone changes are possible depending on future policies enacted. While decreases in tropical stratospheric ozone will likely persist regardless of the future emissions scenario, extratropical ozone could either remain weakly depleted or even increase well above historical levels, with diverse implication for ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The ozone layer’s dependence on future emissions of these gases creates a complex policy decision space for protecting humans and ecosystems, which includes unexpected options such as accepting nitrous oxide emissions in order to maintain historical column ozone and surface UV levels.

  14. Estimating dermal transfer of copper particles from the surfaces of pressure-treated lumber and implications for exposure.

    PubMed

    Platten, William E; Sylvest, Nicholas; Warren, Casey; Arambewela, Mahendranath; Harmon, Steve; Bradham, Karen; Rogers, Kim; Thomas, Treye; Luxton, Todd Peter

    2016-04-01

    Lumber pressure-treated with micronized copper was examined for the release of copper and copper micro/nanoparticles using a surface wipe method to simulate dermal transfer. In 2003, the wood industry began replacing CCA treated lumber products for residential use with copper based formulations. Micronized copper (nano to micron sized particles) has become the preferred treatment formulation. There is a lack of information on the release of copper, the fate of the particles during dermal contact, and the copper exposure level to children from hand-to-mouth transfer. For the current study, three treated lumber products, two micronized copper and one ionic copper, were purchased from commercial retailers. The boards were left to weather outdoors for approximately 1year. Over the year time period, hand wipe samples were collected periodically to determine copper transfer from the wood surfaces. The two micronized formulations and the ionic formulation released similar levels of total copper. The amount of copper released was high initially, but decreased to a constant level (~1.5mgm(-2)) after the first month of outdoor exposure. Copper particles were identified on the sampling cloths during the first two months of the experiment, after which the levels of copper were insufficient to collect interpretable data. After 1month, the particles exhibited minimal changes in shape and size. At the end of 2-months, significant deterioration of the particles was evident. Based on the wipe sample data, a playground visit may result in a potential exposure to 2.58mg of copper, which is near or exceeds the daily tolerable upper intake limits for children under the age of 8, if completely ingested through hand-to-mouth transfer. While nanoparticles were found, there is not enough information to estimate the exposure from the released particles due to a lack of published literature on copper carbonate.

  15. Effect of the pH and the ionic strength on overloaded band profiles of weak bases onto neutral and charged surface hybrid stationary phases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-03-22

    This work reports on the effects of the solution pH and its ionic strength on the overloaded band profiles and the parameters of the adsorption isotherms of nortriptylinium hydrochloride on the bridge ethylene hybrid (BEH) and the charged surface hybrid (CSH) C18-bonded columns. The mobile phases used were mixtures of acetonitrile and water buffered with hydrogenophosphate, formate, acetate, and dihydrogenophosphate buffers. The results show that the adsorption behavior of this protonated base onto the BEH-C18 column depends barely on the mobile phase pH and is slightly affected by its ionic strength. From both physical and statistical viewpoints, the Linear-Langmuir model is the most relevant adsorption isotherm. According to the inverse method of chromatography, this model is consistent with weak dispersive interactions taking place onto the C18-bonded chains and some strong ion-dipole interactions with residual silanols. In contrast, adsorption on the CSH-C18 column depends on the applied W(S)pH, e.g., on the degree of ionization of the amine groups tethered to the CSH surface. For W(S)pH<3, the electrostatically modified Langmuir model (EML) is acceptable because analyte molecules cannot access and interact with any active sites due to the electrostatic repulsion by the positively charged adsorbent surface. At W(S)pH>7.0, the Linear-bi-Langmuir model describes best the weak adsorption of the protonated base molecules onto the C18 chains and their strong adsorption onto the residual silanols and neutral amine groups. PMID:23415137

  16. Widespread Surface Weathering on Early Mars: possible implication on the Past Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loizeau, Damien; Carter, John; Mangold, Nicolas; Poulet, François; Rossi, Angelo P.; Allemand, Pascal; Lozac'h, Loïc; Quantin, Cathy; Bibring, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    The recent discovery of widespread hydrous clays on Mars with OMEGA/Mars Express and CRISM/MRO indicates that diverse and widespread aqueous environments existed on Mars, from the surface to kilometric depths [1, 2]. The study of the past habitability and past climates of the planet requires assessing the importance of sustained surface water vs. subsurface water in its aqueous history. Vertical sequences of Al-rich clays on top of Fe/Mg-rich clays in the top tens of meters of the surface are identified on Mars [3-6] (see figure 1) and interpreted as possible weathering profiles, similar to cases of pedogenesis on Earth (e.g. [7, 8]). A global study of these clay sequences has recently been published by Carter et al. [9]. This following work presents detailed geological analysis, performed for each identified candidate, in order to constrain their age and origin. With the increasing availability of CTX and HiRISE stereoimages, we investigate the thickness of the altered sequences, the age of the altered units and the different geological contexts to further understand the weathering process(es), and their possible implication on the past climate. The types of geologic settings where the interpreted weathering profiles are observed are much varied: from basin floor to plateaus, in apparent massive rocks to finely layered rocks. Besides, the number and variety of sequences is/was likely larger. However, in term of chronology, the alteration seems to have stopped in a relatively limited period of time for the studied cases, between 3.8 and 3.6 Ga. This would point to a formation due to a global process that enabled liquid water at the surface and pedogenesis in various regions, on various terrains, from late Noachian to early Hesperian. This global process would imply regular, widely distributed ice or precipitations in large regions of Mars at that time. If weathering occurred before that time, during the early or middle Noachian, the sequences may have been erased

  17. The Implications of the Moon-Forming Impact for Terrestrial Oxidation State and Surface Water Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, J.; Wood, B. J.; van Hinsberg, V.

    2014-12-01

    The fraction of the Moon made from Earth at the time of the moon-forming impact and the amount of impactor it contains are major questions concerning the origin of the Earth-Moon system. Earth's mantle and the Moon are distinctive in their FeO contents and some trace element ratios (e.g. Nb/Ta) but identical in their isotopes of O, Si, W, Ti and Cr. The latter observation implies that they are made from exactly the same material but the former implies the opposite. Due to the pressure-dependence and redox-sensitive nature of W partitioning between metallic core and silicate mantle, the identical W isotopic ratios of both bodies is hard to reconcile. One possible solution is that the impactor and the proto-Earth were not only of similar composition but also essentially the same size - a rather unlikely coincidence. An alternative scenario which we have modeled chemically and isotopically is that the proto-Earth, with a higher mantle FeO content than present, was struck by an early-formed, highly-reduced impactor. The core of the impactor merged with that of Earth, as depicted in most simulations. The moon, containing a similar proportion of impactor material to that of the Earth (<15%), can be viewed as a 'snap-shot' of proto-Earth's mantle. This produced a Moon identical to the Earth's mantle in isotopic composition, but with elevated mantle Nb/Ta and FeO contents. Evidence of FeO-rich domains in Archaean mantle (Francis, Lithos v.71, 2003) would be consistent with an FeO-rich terrestrial protomantle. Changes in mantle FeO content have implications for the stability of liquid H2O at the surface. More FeO-rich mantles (e.g Mars) generate basalts which are more susceptible to serpentinisation and hence to the consumption of surface water. Thus we can argue that the impactor delivered volatiles to the Earth and the ability to retain water in surface reservoirs.

  18. Ionically-mediated electromechanical hysteresis in transition metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yunseok; Morozovska, Anna N; Kumar, Amit; Jesse, Stephen; Eliseev, Eugene A; Alibart, Fabien; Strukov, Dmitri; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2012-08-28

    Nanoscale electromechanical activity, remanent polarization states, and hysteresis loops in paraelectric TiO(2) and SrTiO(3) thin films are observed using scanning probe microscopy. The coupling between the ionic dynamics and incipient ferroelectricity in these materials is analyzed using extended Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire (LGD) theory. The possible origins of electromechanical coupling including ionic dynamics, surface-charge induced electrostriction, and ionically induced ferroelectricity are identified. For the latter, the ionic contribution can change the sign of first order LGD expansion coefficient, rendering material effectively ferroelectric. The lifetime of these ionically induced ferroelectric states is then controlled by the transport time of the mobile ionic species and well above that of polarization switching. These studies provide possible explanation for ferroelectric-like behavior in centrosymmetric transition metal oxides.

  19. Employing ionic liquids to deposit cellulose on PET fibers.

    PubMed

    Textor, Torsten; Derksen, Leonie; Gutmann, Jochen S

    2016-08-01

    Several ionic liquids are excellent solvents for cellulose. Starting from that finishing of PET fabrics with cellulose dissolved in ionic liquids like 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium acetate, diethylphosphate and chloride, or the chloride of butyl-methyl imidazolium has been investigated. Finishing has been carried out from solutions of different concentrations, using microcrystalline cellulose or cotton and by employing different cross-linkers. Viscosity of solutions has been investigated for different ionic liquids, concentrations, cellulose sources, linkers and temperatures. Since ionic liquids exhibit no vapor pressure, simple pad-dry-cure processes are excluded. Before drying the ionic liquid has to be removed by a rinsing step. Accordingly rinsing with fresh ionic liquid followed by water or the direct rinsing with water have been tested. The amount of cellulose deposited has been investigated by gravimetry, zinc chloride iodine test as well as reactive dyeing. Results concerning wettability, water up-take, surface resistance, wear-resistance or washing stability are presented.

  20. Applications of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Patel, Divia Dinesh; Lee, Jong-Min

    2012-06-01

    Ionic liquids have recently gained popularity in the scientific community owing to their special properties and characteristics. One of the reasons why ionic liquids have been termed "green solvents" is due to their negligible vapour pressure. Their use in electrochemical, biological and metal extraction applications is discussed. Wide research has been carried out for their use in batteries, solar panels, fuel cells, drug deliveries and biomass pretreatments. This work aims to consolidate the various findings from previous works in these areas.

  1. Applications of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Patel, Divia Dinesh; Lee, Jong-Min

    2012-06-01

    Ionic liquids have recently gained popularity in the scientific community owing to their special properties and characteristics. One of the reasons why ionic liquids have been termed "green solvents" is due to their negligible vapour pressure. Their use in electrochemical, biological and metal extraction applications is discussed. Wide research has been carried out for their use in batteries, solar panels, fuel cells, drug deliveries and biomass pretreatments. This work aims to consolidate the various findings from previous works in these areas. PMID:22711528

  2. Measured and modeled albedos of sea-ice surfaces with implications for Snowball Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carns, Regina C.

    surface to emulate the light from an overcast sky. We created a crust of hydrohalite and used this "albedo dome" method to measure albedo of the crust as it developed and dissolved. Using these measurements along with a radiative transfer code, we inferred the complex refractive index for hydrohalite and developed a parameterization for the albedo of hydrohalite crusts of any thickness. These results have implications for Earthlike exoplanets with sizable oceans, which would also be susceptible to ice-albedo feedback. The formation of hydrohalite in sub-eutectic sea ice and the development of a lag deposit in cold, dry conditions could intensify the positive feedback that leads to Snowball conditions. This work shows that the albedo of hydrohalite is much higher than that of snow in the near-infrared, which could make the formation of hydrohalite crusts particularly important to the climates of planets that orbit M-dwarf stars, which output a large fraction of their energy in the near-infrared.

  3. Ionic liquids in refinery desulfurization: comparison between biphasic and supported ionic liquid phase suspension processes.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Esther; Haumann, Marco; Jess, Andreas; Seeberger, Andreas; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The desulfurization of fuel compounds in the presence of ionic liquids is reported. For this purpose, the desulfurization efficiency of a variety of imidazolium phosphate ionic liquids has been tested. Dibenzothiophene/dodecane and butylmercaptan/decane mixtures were used as model systems. Single-stage extractions reduced the sulfur content from 500 ppm to 200 ppm. In multistage extractions the sulfur content could be lowered to less than 10 ppm within seven stages. Regeneration of the ionic liquid was achieved by distillation or re-extraction procedures. Supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) materials, obtained by dispersing the ionic liquid as a thin film on highly porous silica, exhibited a significantly higher extraction performance owing to their larger surface areas, reducing the sulfur content to less than 100 ppm in one stage. Multistage extraction with these SILP materials reduced the sulfur level to 50 ppm in the second stage. The SILP technology offers very efficient utilization of ionic liquids and circumvents mass transport limitations because of the small film thickness and large surface area, and allows application of the simple packed-bed column extraction technique. PMID:19798713

  4. The bounding-surfaces record of a barrier spit from Huangqihai Lake, North China: implications for coastal barrier boundary hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Xin; Yu, Xinghe; Clift, Peter D.; Wang, Tianyi; Tan, Chengpeng; Jin, Lina

    2016-09-01

    Ground-penetrating radar and trenching studies of a barrier spit on the north shore of Huangqihai Lake were made, that reveal important implications for the coastal washover barrier boundary hierarchy and interpretations of this depositional record. A four-fold hierarchy bounding-surface model, representing different levels of impact and genesis, is defined. Each level of the hierarchy is enclosed by a distinct kind of surface characterized by different ground-penetrating radar reflection features, sedimentary characteristics (color, grain size, sorting, rounding and sedimentary structures) and origin. We suggest that this hierarchical model can be applied to any coastal washover barrier deposits.

  5. Ionic electrostatic excitations along biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2011-02-01

    A theoretical analysis of ionic electrostatic excitations of a charged biological membrane is presented within the framework of the fluid theory for surface ions inside and outside the cell, in conjunction with the Poisson's equation. General expressions of dispersion relations are obtained for electrostatic oscillations of intrinsic cellular with different shapes and symmetries.

  6. Effects of surface roughening of Nafion 117 on the mechanical and physicochemical properties of ionic polymer–metal composite (IPMC) actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanjie; Zhu, Zicai; Liu, Jiayu; Chang, Longfei; Chen, Hualing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the surface of a Nafion membrane was roughened by the sandblasting method, mainly considering the change of sandblasting time and powder size. The roughened surfaces were characterized in terms of their topography from the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and SEM. The key surface parameters, such as Sa (the arithmetical mean deviation of the specified surface profile), SSA (the surface area ratio before and after roughening) and the area measurement on the histogram from the CLSM images, were extracted and evaluated from the roughened membranes. Also, the detailed change in surface and interfacial electrodes were measured and discussed together with the surface resistance, equivalent modulus, capacitance and performances of IPMC actuators based on the roughened membranes. The results show that a suitable sandblasting condition, resulting in the decrease in the bending stiffness and the increase in the interface area closely related to the capacitance, can effectively increase the electromechanical responses of IPMCs. Although the surface roughening by sandblasting caused a considerable lowering of mechanical strength, it was very effective for enlarging the interfacial area between Nafion membrane and the electrode layers, and for forming a penetrated electrode structure, which facilitated improvement of the surface resistance and capacitance characteristics of IPMCs. In this work, a quantitative relationship was built between the topography of Nafion membrane surface and electromechanical performance of IPMCs by means of sandblasting.

  7. Effects of surface roughening of Nafion 117 on the mechanical and physicochemical properties of ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanjie; Zhu, Zicai; Liu, Jiayu; Chang, Longfei; Chen, Hualing

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the surface of a Nafion membrane was roughened by the sandblasting method, mainly considering the change of sandblasting time and powder size. The roughened surfaces were characterized in terms of their topography from the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and SEM. The key surface parameters, such as Sa (the arithmetical mean deviation of the specified surface profile), SSA (the surface area ratio before and after roughening) and the area measurement on the histogram from the CLSM images, were extracted and evaluated from the roughened membranes. Also, the detailed change in surface and interfacial electrodes were measured and discussed together with the surface resistance, equivalent modulus, capacitance and performances of IPMC actuators based on the roughened membranes. The results show that a suitable sandblasting condition, resulting in the decrease in the bending stiffness and the increase in the interface area closely related to the capacitance, can effectively increase the electromechanical responses of IPMCs. Although the surface roughening by sandblasting caused a considerable lowering of mechanical strength, it was very effective for enlarging the interfacial area between Nafion membrane and the electrode layers, and for forming a penetrated electrode structure, which facilitated improvement of the surface resistance and capacitance characteristics of IPMCs. In this work, a quantitative relationship was built between the topography of Nafion membrane surface and electromechanical performance of IPMCs by means of sandblasting.

  8. Micro-porous surfaces in controlled drug delivery systems: design and evaluation of diltiazem hydrochloride controlled porosity osmotic pump using non-ionic surfactants as pore-former.

    PubMed

    Adibkia, Khosro; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Shokri, Mohammad Hosein; Arami, Zahra; Arash, Zeinab; Shokri, Javad

    2014-06-01

    The major problem associated with conventional drug delivery systems is unpredictable plasma concentrations. The aim of this study was to design a controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP) of diltiazem hydrochloride to deliver the drug in a controlled manner. CPOP tablets were prepared by incorporation of drug in the core and subsequent coating with cellulose acetate as semi-permeable membrane. Non-ionic surfactants were applied as pore-formers as well. The effect of pore-formers concentration on the in vitro release of diltiazem was also studied. The formulations were compared based on four comparative parameters, namely, total drug released after 24 h (D24 h), lag-time (tL), squared correlation coefficient of zero order equation (RSQzero) and mean percent deviation from zero order kinetic (MPDzero). Results of scanning electron microscopy studies exhibited formation of pores in the membrane from where the drug release occurred. It was revealed that drug release rate was directly proportional to the concentration of the pore-formers. The value of D24 h in the formulations containing Tween 80 (10%) and Brij 35 (5%) were found to be more than 94.9%, and drug release followed zero order kinetic (RSQzero > 0.99 and MPDzero < 8%) with acceptable tL (lower than 1 h).

  9. Effect of ionic strength, serum albumin and other macromolecules on the maintenance of motility and the surface of mammalian spermatozoa in a simple medium.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R A; Dott, H M; Foster, G C

    1978-01-01

    The seminal plasma in sperm suspensions from boar, bull, rabbit, ram and stallion was replaced with simple defined media as completely as possible by a combination of centrifugation through Ficoll and dilution. After this process, motility declined and the cells showed a tendency to agglutinate and/or stick to glass. Varying the ionic strength of the medium had little effect upon these parameters but sperm motility was preserved better in the presence of serum albumin. When a number of purified proteins and other macromolecules were tested individually in this way for their motility-preserving ability, bovine or human serum albumin was consistently the most effective. Defatting the albumin or altering its nature by mild reduction, oxidation or alkylation had little detectable effect on its motility-preserving ability; the protein did not appear to be acting as a chelator of metal ions, for it could not be replaced by EDTA. The response of the spermatozoa to replacemrnt of seminal plasma varied between species: bull spermatozoa were particularly sensitive and serum albumin had little effect upon their subsequent motility.

  10. On the implications of the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission for hydrologic science and applications (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    The SWOT mission will provide surface water elevation and extent information with unprecedented accuracy and spatial resolution globally. All of the implications of thedata that SWOT will produce for the hydrologic science and applications communities are not yet apparent. The SWOT data will, however, certainly offer groundbreaking opportunities for estimation of two key terms in the land surface water budget: surface water storage (in almost all water bodies with surface area exceeding about 1 km2) and derived discharge for many of the world’s large rivers (widths greater than roughly 100-250 m). Among just a few of the science questions that the observations should allow us to address are a) what are the dynamics of floods and overbank flows in large rivers? b) what is the contribution of long-term, seasonal, and interannual storage in reservoirs, lakes, and wetlands to sea level? c) what is the magnitude of surface water storage changes at seasonal to decadal time scales and continental spatial scales relative to soil moisture and groundwater? d) what will be the implications of SWOT-based estimates of reservoir storage and storage change to the management of transboundary rivers? These quite likely are among just a few of the questions that SWOT will help elucidate. Others no doubt will arise from creative analyses of SWOT data in combination with data from other missions I conclude with a discussion of mechanisms that will help foster a community to investigate these and other questions, and the implications of a SWOT data policy.

  11. Unravelling nanoconfined films of ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Alpha A.; Vella, Dominic; Goriely, Alain; Perkin, Susan

    2014-09-07

    The confinement of an ionic liquid between charged solid surfaces is treated using an exactly solvable 1D Coulomb gas model. The theory highlights the importance of two dimensionless parameters: the fugacity of the ionic liquid, and the electrostatic interaction energy of ions at closest approach, in determining how the disjoining pressure exerted on the walls depends on the geometrical confinement. Our theory reveals that thermodynamic fluctuations play a vital role in the “squeezing out” of charged layers as the confinement is increased. The model shows good qualitative agreement with previous experimental data, with all parameters independently estimated without fitting.

  12. Surface Electrical Conductivity Prediction by Soil Moisture and Electromagnetic Mapping Techniques: Implication for Landmine Detection Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsube, J.; McNairn, H.; Keating, P. K.; Das, Y.; Dyke, L.; Best, M. E.; Singhroy, V.; Connell-Madore, S.; Hunter, J.; Klassen, R.; Dilabio, R.; Moore, A.

    2004-05-01

    Electrical conductivity (EC) can be a source of significant signal interference in landmine detection, implying that there is a necessity for soil EC prediction in order to carry out safe demining operations in landmine affected countries in the world. A fundamental study on soil EC mechanisms and their relationship to moisture content has been carried out in order to increase the soil EC prediction accuracy when using data from various sensors, such as remote sensing, airborne and surficial electromagnetic (EM) methods. Results indicate that soil moisture consists of free water filling pore spaces and bound water which forms adsorbed water layers on the grain surfaces. The response of these two water phases to drying rates and EC are very different, to the extent that a moist clay poor soil may have low EC but a dry clay rich soil may have higher EC. This is a result of not only the bound water layers being a significant source of EC, but of the capillary component of the free water reacting differently to the different grain-sizes of the soil. The capillary water forms important electrical conductive bridges between the adsorbed water layers on the grains that constitute the soil. This implies that information on soil texture, mineralogy and their distribution are required for accurate EC prediction. Whereas information on these soil characteristics may be acquired by remote sensing and soil maps, soil moisture content is likely to vary from the time of data acquisition to that of demining operations, implying methods to predict these changes are required. In addition, soil type inhomogeniety, such as vertical and horizontal variation can also be a source of inaccuracies in moisture and EC predictions. However, these investigations also indicate that a wide band electrical frequency signal may have the possibility of providing information on, not only metallic mineral content, but on pore space, clay mineral type and water content. In addition, applications of

  13. Mantle viscosity stratification and flow geometry - Implications for surface motions on earth and Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, W. S.

    1993-02-01

    For a fixed heat flow, the surface flow velocity of a convecting layer is not strongly sensitive to the variation of viscosity as a function of depth. Thus, the inferred absence of a low viscosity asthenosphere on Venus can not account for the limited surface motions there. The surface velocity is dependent on the convective geometry. Cartesian geometry convection can produce large surface velocities if the high viscosity surface layer is broken in places by weak zones. On the other hand, a high viscosity surface layer may inhibit the development of large surface velocities in axisymmetric convection.

  14. Selective Ionic Transport Pathways in Phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Nie, Anmin; Cheng, Yingchun; Ning, Shoucong; Foroozan, Tara; Yasaei, Poya; Li, Wen; Song, Boao; Yuan, Yifei; Chen, Lin; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Mashayek, Farzad; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2016-04-13

    Despite many theoretical predictions indicating exceptionally low energy barriers of ionic transport in phosphorene, the ionic transport pathways in this two-dimensional (2D) material has not been experimentally demonstrated. Here, using in situ aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and density functional theory, we studied sodium ion transport in phosphorene. Our high-resolution TEM imaging complemented by electron energy loss spectroscopy demonstrates a precise description of anisotropic sodium ions migration along the [100] direction in phosphorene. This work also provides new insight into the effect of surface and the edge sites on the transport properties of phosphorene. According to our observation, the sodium ion transport is preferred in zigzag edge rather than the armchair edge. The use of this highly selective ionic transport property may endow phosphorene with new functionalities for novel chemical device applications.

  15. Selective Ionic Transport Pathways in Phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Nie, Anmin; Cheng, Yingchun; Ning, Shoucong; Foroozan, Tara; Yasaei, Poya; Li, Wen; Song, Boao; Yuan, Yifei; Chen, Lin; Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Mashayek, Farzad; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2016-04-13

    Despite many theoretical predictions indicating exceptionally low energy barriers of ionic transport in phosphorene, the ionic transport pathways in this two-dimensional (2D) material has not been experimentally demonstrated. Here, using in situ aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and density functional theory, we studied sodium ion transport in phosphorene. Our high-resolution TEM imaging complemented by electron energy loss spectroscopy demonstrates a precise description of anisotropic sodium ions migration along the [100] direction in phosphorene. This work also provides new insight into the effect of surface and the edge sites on the transport properties of phosphorene. According to our observation, the sodium ion transport is preferred in zigzag edge rather than the armchair edge. The use of this highly selective ionic transport property may endow phosphorene with new functionalities for novel chemical device applications. PMID:26986876

  16. Water Contaminant Mitigation in Ionic Liquid Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, David; Ziemer, John

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate system and operational requirements are needed in order to ensure mission success without unnecessary cost. Purity requirements applied to thruster propellants may flow down to materials and operations as well as the propellant preparation itself. Colloid electrospray thrusters function by applying a large potential to a room temperature liquid propellant (such as an ionic liquid), inducing formation of a Taylor cone. Ions and droplets are ejected from the Taylor cone and accelerated through a strong electric field. Electrospray thrusters are highly efficient, precise, scaleable, and demonstrate low thrust noise. Ionic liquid propellants have excellent properties for use as electrospray propellants, but can be hampered by impurities, owing to their solvent capabilities. Of foremost concern is the water content, which can result from exposure to atmosphere. Even hydrophobic ionic liquids have been shown to absorb water from the air. In order to mitigate the risks of bubble formation in feed systems caused by water content of the ionic liquid propellant, physical properties of the ionic liquid EMI-Im are analyzed. The effects of surface tension, material wetting, physisorption, and geometric details of the flow manifold and electrospray emitters are explored. Results are compared to laboratory test data.

  17. Variability in surface-subsurface hydrologic interactions and implications for nutrient retention in an arid-land stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dent, C. Lisa; Grimm, Nancy B.; Martí, EugèNia; Edmonds, Jennifer W.; Henry, Julia Curro; Welter, Jill R.

    2007-12-01

    Hydrologic interactions among biogeochemically active stream subsystems affect material export downstream. We combined a conservative tracer addition with measurements of water table elevation and nutrient concentrations of surface and subsurface water to examine hydrologic interactions among surface and subsurface subsystems and their implications for stream biogeochemistry. We injected bromide (Br-) into a 400-m reach of Sycamore Creek, a losing stream in central Arizona, for 15 d and monitored changes in concentration in three subsystems: surface, parafluvial, and riparian zones. Additionally, we collected water samples from these subsystems for nutrient analyses. Water flowed from surface to subsurface zones as expected in this losing stream, but a significant amount of subsurface water (17% of surface discharge in the reach) returned to the surface. Within the parafluvial subsystem, median transport time (Tmed) in two gravel bars differed substantially (from 2 to 30 h and from 6 to >300 h, respectively, for upper and lower bars), and varied significantly with depth in the lower bar (mean (±SE) Tmed = 190 ± 20 h at 30 cm compared to 101 ± 18 h at 110 cm). Flow paths from the surface to parafluvial and riparian zones, and subsequently back to the surface stream, differ from patterns in mesic areas, where water moves laterally and vertically towards the surface stream. Estimates of nutrient retention for the stream reach varied four fold in response to simulated changes in lateral subsurface connections and the configuration of subsystems. Thus at this scale, accurate nutrient budgets require an understanding of surface-subsurface connections and hydrologic parameters.

  18. Determination of the zeta potential of porous substrates by droplet deflection. I. The influence of ionic strength and pH value of an aqueous electrolyte in contact with a borosilicate surface.

    PubMed

    Barz, Dominik P J; Vogel, Michael J; Steen, Paul H

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a new method to determine the zeta potential of porous substrates in contact with a liquid. Electroosmosis, arising near the solid/liquid boundaries within a fully saturated porous substrate, pumps against the capillary pressure arising from the surface tension of a droplet placed in series with the pump. The method is based on measuring the liquid/gas interface deflection due to the imposed electric potential difference. The distinguishing features of our technique are accuracy, speed, and reliability, accomplished with a straightforward and cost-effective setup. In this particular setup, a bistable configuration of two opposing droplets is used. The energy barrier between the stable states defines the range of capillary resistance and can be tuned by the total droplet volume. The electroosmotic pump is placed between the droplets. The large surface area-to-volume ratio of the porous substrate enables the pumping strength to exceed the capillary resistance even for droplets small enough that their shapes are negligibly influenced by gravity. Using a relatively simple model for the flow within the porous substrate, the zeta potential resulting from the substrate-liquid combination is determined. Extensive measurements of a borosilicate substrate in contact with different aqueous electrolytes are made. The results of the measurements clarify the influence of the ionic strength and pH value on the zeta potential and yield an empirical relationship important to engineering approaches.

  19. Ionic liquids in chemical engineering.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sebastian; Haumann, Marco; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The development of engineering applications with ionic liquids stretches back to the mid-1990s when the first examples of continuous catalytic processes using ionic liquids and the first studies of ionic liquid-based extractions were published. Ever since, the use of ionic liquids has seen tremendous progress in many fields of chemistry and engineering, and the first commercial applications have been reported. The main driver for ionic liquid engineering applications is to make practical use of their unique property profiles, which are the result of a complex interplay of coulombic, hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. Remarkably, many ionic liquid properties can be tuned in a wide range by structural modifications at their cation and anion. This review highlights specific examples of ionic liquid applications in catalysis and in separation technologies. Additionally, the application of ionic liquids as working fluids in process machines is introduced.

  20. Cratering experiments into curved surfaces and their implication for craters on small satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Akira; Kadono, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Akiko

    1993-10-01

    The effect of curvature on the shape of large craters on the surfaces of small satellites is here investigated in view of experimental impact craters on cylindrical, spherical, and plane surface mortar targets. Generally, increasing target surface curvature flattens crater cross-section and increases crater diameter and ejecta mass. Crater shape is noted to change rapidly as crater radius becomes comparable to the target surface curvature radius. A large crater on Phobos is compared with these cross-sectional shapes.

  1. Surface-attached cells, biofilms and biocide susceptibility: implications for hospital cleaning and disinfection.

    PubMed

    Otter, J A; Vickery, K; Walker, J T; deLancey Pulcini, E; Stoodley, P; Goldenberg, S D; Salkeld, J A G; Chewins, J; Yezli, S; Edgeworth, J D

    2015-01-01

    Microbes tend to attach to available surfaces and readily form biofilms, which is problematic in healthcare settings. Biofilms are traditionally associated with wet or damp surfaces such as indwelling medical devices and tubing on medical equipment. However, microbes can survive for extended periods in a desiccated state on dry hospital surfaces, and biofilms have recently been discovered on dry hospital surfaces. Microbes attached to surfaces and in biofilms are less susceptible to biocides, antibiotics and physical stress. Thus, surface attachment and/or biofilm formation may explain how vegetative bacteria can survive on surfaces for weeks to months (or more), interfere with attempts to recover microbes through environmental sampling, and provide a mixed bacterial population for the horizontal transfer of resistance genes. The capacity of existing detergent formulations and disinfectants to disrupt biofilms may have an important and previously unrecognized role in determining their effectiveness in the field, which should be reflected in testing standards. There is a need for further research to elucidate the nature and physiology of microbes on dry hospital surfaces, specifically the prevalence and composition of biofilms. This will inform new approaches to hospital cleaning and disinfection, including novel surfaces that reduce microbial attachment and improve microbial detachment, and methods to augment the activity of biocides against surface-attached microbes such as bacteriophages and antimicrobial peptides. Future strategies to address environmental contamination on hospital surfaces should consider the presence of microbes attached to surfaces, including biofilms.

  2. Chemistry of Frozen NaCl and MgSO4 Brines - Implications for Surface Expression of Europa's Ocean Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. V.; Hodyss, R. P.; Choukroun, M.; Vu, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The composition of Europa's subsurface ocean is a critical determinant of its habitability, but current analysis of the ocean composition is limited to its expression on the Europan surface. While there is observational evidence indicating that ocean materials make their way to the surface, our understanding of the chemical processes that can alter this material under Europan surface conditions is limited. We present experimental data on the chemistry of mixed solutions of NaCl and MgSO4 as they are frozen to 100 K, replicating the conditions that may occur when subsurface ocean fluids are emplaced onto Europa's surface. Confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to study the formation of salts during the freezing process, and the interaction of ions in the frozen brines. Our data indicate that mixed aqueous solutions of NaCl and MgSO4 form Na2SO4 and MgCl2 preferentially when frozen, rather than making NaCl and MgSO4 precipitates. The detection of epsomite (MgSO4Ÿ•7H2O) on Europa's surface may therefore imply an ocean composition relatively low in sodium, unless radiolytic chemistry converts MgCl2 to MgSO4 as suggested by Hand and Brown 2013 (ApJ 145 110). These results have important implications for the interpretation of remote sensing data of Europa's surface.

  3. Communication: Salt-induced water orientation at a surface of non-ionic surfactant in relation to a mechanism of Hofmeister effect

    SciTech Connect

    Hishida, Mafumi; Kaneko, Yohei; Okuno, Masanari; Yamamura, Yasuhisa; Ishibashi, Taka-aki; Saito, Kazuya

    2015-05-07

    The behavior of water molecules at the surface of nonionic surfactant (monomyristolein) and effects of monovalent ions on the behavior are investigated using the heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy. It is found that water molecules at the surface are oriented with their hydrogen atoms pointing to the bulk, and that the degree of orientation depends on the anion strongly but weakly on the cation. With measured surface potentials in those saline solutions, it is concluded that the heterogeneous distribution of anions and cations in combination with the nonionic surfactant causes the water orientation. This heterogeneous distribution well explains the contrasting order of anions and cations with respect to the ion size in the Hofmeister series.

  4. Direct Mapping of Ionic Transport in a Si Anode on the Nanoscale: Time Domain Electrochemical Strain Spectroscopy Study

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Eliseev, Eugene; Tselev, Alexander; Dudney, Nancy J.; Morozovska, Anna N.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2011-12-27

    Local Li-ion transport in amorphous silicon is studied on the nanometer scale using time domain electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). A strong variability of ionic transport controlled by the anode surface morphology is observed. The observed relaxing and nonrelaxing response components are discussed in terms of local and global ionic transport mechanisms, thus establishing the signal formation mechanisms in ESM. This behavior is further correlated with local conductivity measurements. The implications of these studies for Si-anode batteries are discussed. The universal presence of concentration–strain coupling suggests that ESM and associated time and voltage spectroscopies can be applied to a broad range of electrochemical systems ranging from batteries to fuel cells.

  5. Direct mapping of ionic transport in Si-anode on the nanoscale: time domain electrochemical strain spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Eliseev, E. A.; Tselev, Alexander; Dudney, Nancy J; Morozovska, A. N.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2011-01-01

    Local Li-ion transport in amorphous silicon is studied on the nanometer scale using time domain electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM). A strong variability of ionic transport controlled by the anode surface morphology is observed. The observed relaxing and nonrelaxing response components are discussed in terms of local and global ionic transport mechanisms, thus establishing the signal formation mechanisms in ESM. This behavior is further correlated with local conductivity measurements. The implications of these studies for Si-anode batteries are discussed. The universal presence of concentration-strain coupling suggests that ESM and associated time and voltage spectroscopies can be applied to a broad range of electrochemical systems ranging from batteries to fuel cells.

  6. Surface charging of thick porous water ice layers in ion sputtering experiments: implications for the surfaces of icy moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, André; Vorburger, Audrey; Pommerol, Antoine; Wurz, Peter; Jost, Bernhard; Poch, Olivier; Brouet, Yann; Tulej, Marek; Thomas, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    We use a laboratory facility to study the sputtering properties of centimeter-thick porous water ice subjected to the bombardment of ions and electrons to better constrain exosphere models of the icy moons of Jupiter. Our ice samples are as similar as possible to the expected surface properties of Europa. Surface charging of these samples may distort any experimental results for ion sputtering. In this preparatory study we therefore focus on the electric properties of ice at different temperatures, in particular the time scales for charging and discharging when subjected to a beam of ions. Regarding the ion sputtering yield, our experiments yield similar results as previous experiments where thin dense ice layers were sputtered off a micro-balance. However, our experiments also allow us to derive an electric conductivity of porous ice. The results imply that electron precipitation and sputtering play a non-negligible role for certain plasma conditions at the icy moons of Jupiter.

  7. Ionic Liquids in Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Wahl, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a great interest was drawn toward ionic liquids (ILs) in analytical separation techniques. ILs possess many properties making them excellent additives in capillary electrophoresis (CE) background electrolytes (BGE). The most important property is the charge of the dissolved ions in BGE enabling the cations to interact with deprotonated silanol groups on the capillary surface and thereby modifying the electroosmotic flow (EOF). Ionic and/or proton donor-acceptor interactions between analyte and IL are possible interactions facilitating new kinds of separation mechanisms in CE. Further advantages of ILs are the high conductivity, the environmentally friendliness, and the good solubility for organic and inorganic compounds. The most commonly used ILs in capillary electrophoresis are dialkylimidazolium-based ILs, whereas for enantioseparation a lot of innovative chiral cations and anions were investigated.ILs are reported to be additives to a normal CE background electrolyte or the sole electrolyte in CE, nonaqueous CE (NACE), micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC), and in enantioseparation. An overview of applications and separation mechanisms reported in the literature is given here, in addition to the enantioseparation of pseudoephedrine using tetrabutylammonium chloride (TBAC) as IL additive to an ammonium formate buffer containing β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). PMID:27645735

  8. Fun with Ionic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logerwell, Mollianne G.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2007-01-01

    Ionic bonding is a fundamental topic in high school chemistry, yet it continues to be a concept that students struggle to understand. Even if they understand atomic structure and ion formation, it can be difficult for students to visualize how ions fit together to form compounds. This article describes several engaging activities that help…

  9. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic liqand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  10. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin

    2011-11-01

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic ligand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  11. Effects of Film Elasticity and Surface Forces on the Stability of Foams and Lamellae Films in the Presence of Non-ionic Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liguang; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the basic factors affecting the stability of the foam films produced in the presence of nonionic surfactants such as n-pentanol, n-octanol, methyl isobutyl carbinol (MIBC), and polypropylene glycol (PPG). We used a model developed by Wang and Yoon (Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 282-283, 84-91 (2006)) to calculate the Gibbs elasticity of the lamellae films. In addition, we used the thin film pressure balance (TFPB) technique to measure film thicknesses. The results were used to determine the disjoining pressures in the thin lamellae (foam) films formed between air bubbles, which are relevant forces governing the final drainage stage of foam films before reaching either equilibrium or rupture. The film elasticity and surface forces data were then compared with the foam stabilities measured in the present work in the presence of the various surfactants. It was found that foam stabilities are controlled both by film elasticity and by surface forces, the relative contributions of each changing with surfactant type and concentration. In general, surface forces play a more important role at relatively low surfactant concentrations, while elasticity plays a more important role at higher concentrations. At the surfactant additions usually employed in the mining industry, MIBC stabilizes foams by increasing disjoining pressures, while PPG-400 stabilizes foams by increasing film elasticity.

  12. Reaching Europa's Surface: Erosion of the Viscous Lid by Compositional Plumes with Implications for Ocean-Surface Material Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allu Peddinti, D.; McNamara, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    The source of the intriguing surface chemistry of the icy moon, Europa has been widely debated. Of primary interest is the process of surface-ice-shell-ocean exchange of trace chemistry. Of particular astrobiological interest is the possible endogenic origin of the surface chemistry. The viscous lid atop the ice-shell poses a physical barrier for such a material exchange to occur. We have performed a computational study of thermochemical convection models to test the weakening of this viscous lid by warmer plumes of lower compositional density rising in the ice-shell. We modeled a two-phase convecting ice-ocean system with a low viscosity proxy fluid approximation for the liquid ocean. On achieving a stable convecting system, the newly frozen ice at the base of the warm ice plumes at the shell-ocean boundary is tracked and mapped as it is advected upwards by the rising plumes. The newly formed ice is prescribed a lower intrinsic density than the ambient ice to mimic the scenario where compositional contrasts in the ice-shell could exist. We then study how the rising compositional plumes incorporated with the low intrinsic density new ice can erode the stagnant lid at the top of the ice-shell. Several values of density contrast have been modeled to study any variability in their extent of erosion of the lid. The models show that in a convecting ice-ocean system, it is possible for less dense newly formed ice to incorporate into the convecting ice plumes and erode the lid over time. The results suggest that if oceanic trace chemistry were to be incorporated into the newly frozen ice at the ice-ocean interface, it could be possible for it to reach the surface by continual erosion of the viscous ice lid at the top of the shell. This presents a plausible scenario for surface detection of an endogenic chemical signature that could be a potential biosignature of subsurface life in Europa.

  13. The Development of Surface Roughness and Implications for Cellular Attachment in Biomedical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce; Miller, Sharon; deGroh, Kim; Chan, Amy; Sahota, Mandeep

    2001-01-01

    The application of a microscopic surface texture produced by ion beam sputter texturing to the surfaces of polymer implants has been shown to result in significant increases in cellular attachment compared to smooth surface implants in animal studies. A collaborative program between NASA Glenn Research Center and the Cleveland Clinic Foundation has been established to evaluate the potential for improving osteoblast attachment to surfaces that have been microscopically roughened by atomic oxygen texturing. The range of surface textures that are feasible depends upon both the texturing process and the duration of treatment. To determine whether surface texture saturates or continues to increase with treatment duration, an effort was conducted to examine the development of surface textures produced by various physical and chemical erosion processes. Both experimental tests and computational modeling were performed to explore the growth of surface texture with treatment time. Surface texturing by means of abrasive grit blasting of glass, stainless steel, and polymethylmethacry I ate surfaces was examined to measure the growth in roughness with grit blasting duration by surface profilometry measurements. Laboratory tests and computational modeling was also conducted to examine the development of texture on Aclar(R) (chlorotfifluoroethylene) and Kapton(R) polyimide, respectively. For the atomic oxygen texturing tests of Aclar(R), atomic force microscopy was used to measure the development of texture with atomic oxygen fluence. The results of all the testing and computational modeling support the premise that development of surface roughness obeys Poisson statistics. The results indicate that surface roughness does not saturate but increases as the square root of the treatment time.

  14. Surface defects on ZnO nanowires: implications for design of sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Michelle J. S.; Wong, Kester W. J.; Yarovsky, Irene

    2012-08-01

    Surface defects are commonly believed to be fundamentally important to gas-sensor performance. We examine the effect of gas coverage and ethanol orientation on its adsorption on the stoichiometric and oxygen deficient (1 0\\bar {1}0) nanowire surface. Our density functional theory calculations show that ethanol adsorbs in multiple stable configurations at coverages between 1/4 and 1 ML, highlighting the ability of ZnO to detect ethanol. Ethanol prefers to bind to a surface Zn via the adsorbate oxygen atom and, if a surface oxygen atom is in close proximity, the molecule is further stabilized by formation of a hydrogen bond between the hydrogen of the hydroxyl group and the surface oxygen. Two primary adsorption configurations were identified and have different binding strengths that could be distinguished experimentally by the magnitude of their OH stretching frequency. Our findings show that ethanol adsorbed on the oxygen deficient ZnO(1 0\\bar {1}0) surface has a reduced binding strength. This is due to either the lack of a hydrogen bond (due to a deficiency in surface oxygen) or to surface reconstruction that occurs on the defect surface that weakens the hydrogen bond interaction. This reduced binding on the oxygen deficient surface is in contrast to the defect enhanced gas-sensor interaction for other gases. Despite this difference, ethanol still acts as a reducing gas, donating electrons to the surface and decreasing the band gap. We show that multiple adsorbed ethanol molecules prefer to be orientated parallel to each other to facilitate the hydrogen bonding to the defect-free surface for enhanced interaction.

  15. Observed screen (air) and GCM surface/screen temperatures: Implications for outgoing longwave fluxes at the surface

    SciTech Connect

    Garratt, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    There is direct evidence that excess net radiation calculated in general circulation models at continental surfaces (of about 11-17 W m{sup -2} (20%-27%) on an annual basis) is not only due to overestimates in annual incoming shortwave fluxes of 9-18 W m{sup -2} (6%-9%), but also to underestimates in outgoing longwave fluxes. THe bias in the outgoing longwave flux is deduced from a comparison of screen-air temperature observations, available as a global climatology of mean monthly values, and model-calculated surface and screen-air temperatures. An underestimate in the screen temperature computed in general circulation models over continents, of about 3 K on an annual basis, implies an underestimate in the outgoing longwave flux, averaged in six models under study, of 11-15 W m{sup -2} (3%-4%). For a set of 22 inland stations studied previously, the residual bias on an annual basis (the residual is the net radiation minus incoming shortwave plus outgoing longwave) varies between 18 and -23 W m{sup -2} for the models considered. Additional biases in one or both of the reflected shortwave and incoming longwave components cannot be ruled out. 13 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Quantitative assessment of interfacial interactions with rough membrane surface and its implications for membrane selection and fabrication in a MBR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianrong; Mei, Rongwu; Shen, Liguo; Ding, Linxian; He, Yiming; Lin, Hongjun; Hong, Huachang

    2015-03-01

    The interfacial interactions between a foulant particle and rough membrane surface in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) were quantitatively assessed by using a new-developed method. It was found that the profile of total interaction versus separation distance was complicated. There were an energy barrier and two negative energy ranges in the profile. Further analysis showed that roughness scale significantly affected the strength and properties of interfacial interactions. It was revealed that there existed a critical range of roughness scale within which the total energy in the separation distance ranged from 0 to several nanometers was continually repulsive. Decrease in foulant size would increase the strength of specific interaction energy, but did not change the existence of a critical roughness scale range. These findings suggested the possibility to "tailor" membrane surface morphology for membrane fouling mitigation, and thus gave significant implications for membrane selection and fabrication in MBRs. PMID:25553567

  17. Ceres: Predictions for near-surface water ice stability and implications for plume generating processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titus, Timothy N.

    2015-04-01

    This paper will constrain the possible sources and processes for the formation of recently observed H2O vapor plumes above the surface of the dwarf planet Ceres. Two hypotheses have been proposed: (1) cryovolcanism where the water source is the mantle and the heating source is still unknown or (2) comet-like sublimation where near-surface water ice is vaporized by seasonally increasing solar insolation. We test hypothesis 2, comet-like near-surface sublimation, by using a thermal model to examine the stability of water ice in the near surface. For a reasonable range of physical parameters (thermal inertia, surface roughness, and slopes), we find that water ice is only stable at latitudes higher than ~40-60°. These results indicate that either (a) the physical properties of Ceres are unlike our expectations or (b) an alternative to comet-like sublimation, such as the cryovolcanism hypothesis, must be invoked.

  18. Ceres: predictions for near-surface water ice stability and implications for plume generating processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Titus, Timothy N.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will constrain the possible sources and processes for the formation of recently observed H2O vapor plumes above the surface of the dwarf planet Ceres. Two hypotheses have been proposed: (1) cryovolcanism where the water source is the mantle and the heating source is still unknown or (2) comet-like sublimation where near-surface water ice is vaporized by seasonally increasing solar insolation. We test hypothesis #2, comet-like near-surface sublimation, by using a thermal model to examine the stability of water-ice in the near surface. For a reasonable range of physical parameters (thermal inertia, surface roughness, slopes), we find that water ice is only stable at latitudes higher than ~40-60 degrees. These results indicate that either (a) the physical properties of Ceres are unlike our expectations or (b) an alternative to comet-like sublimation, such as the cryovolcanism hypothesis, must be invoked.

  19. On the concept of ionicity in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, Douglas R; Forsyth, Maria; Izgorodina, Ekaterina I; Abbott, Andrew P; Annat, Gary; Fraser, Kevin

    2009-07-01

    Ionic liquids are liquids comprised totally of ions. However, not all of the ions present appear to be available to participate in conduction processes, to a degree that is dependent on the nature of the ionic liquid and its structure. There is much interest in quantifying and understanding this 'degree of ionicity' phenomenon. In this paper we present transport data for a range of ionic liquids and evaluate the data firstly in terms of the Walden plot as an approximate and readily accessible approach to estimating ionicity. An adjusted Walden plot that makes explicit allowance for differences in ion sizes is shown to be an improvement to this approach for the series of ionic liquids described. In some cases, where diffusion measurements are possible, it is feasible to directly quantify ionicity via the Nernst-Einstein equation, confirming the validity of the adjusted Walden plot approach. Some of the ionic liquids studied exhibit ionicity values very close to ideal; this is discussed in terms of a model of a highly associated liquid in which the ion correlations have similar impact on both the diffusive and conductive motions. Ionicity, as defined, is thus a useful measure of adherence to the Nernst-Einstein equation, but is not necessarily a measure of ion availability in the chemical sense. PMID:19562126

  20. Non-Debye relaxation in the dielectric response of nematic liquid crystals: Surface and memory effects in the adsorption-desorption process of ionic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, J. L.; Santoro, P. A.; Zola, R. S.; Lenzi, E. K.; Evangelista, L. R.; Ciuchi, F.; Mazzulla, A.; Scaramuzza, N.

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that the presence of ions in insulating materials such as nematic liquid crystals may be responsible for the dielectric spectroscopy behavior observed experimentally. It is shown that, at low frequencies, an essentially non-Debye relaxation process takes place due to surface effects. This is accomplished by investigating the effects of the adsorption-desorption process on the electrical response of an electrolytic cell when the generation and recombination of ions is present. The adsorption-desorption is governed by a non-usual kinetic equation in order to incorporate memory effects related to a non-Debye relaxation and the roughness of the surface. The analysis is carried out by searching for solutions to the drift-diffusion equation that satisfy the Poisson equation relating the effective electric field to the net charge density. We also discuss the effect of the mobility of the ions, i.e., situations with equal and different diffusion coefficients for positive and negative ions, on the impedance and obtain an exact expression for the admittance. The model is compared with experimental results measured for the impedance of a nematic liquid crystal sample and a very good agreement is obtained.

  1. Theoretical study of the acid-base properties of the montmorillonite/electrolyte interface: influence of the surface heterogeneity and ionic strength on the potentiometric titration curves.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki, Piotr; Thomas, Fabien

    2006-10-15

    The parallel shape of the potentiometric titration curves for montmorillonite suspension is explained using the surface complexation model and taking into account the surface heterogeneity. The homogeneous models give accurate predictions only if they assume unphysically large values of the equilibrium constants for the exchange process occurring on the basal plane. However, the assumption that the basal plane is energetically heterogeneous allows to fit the experimental data (reported by Avena and De Pauli [M. Avena, C.P. De Pauli, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 202 (1998) 195-204]) for reasonable values of exchange equilibrium constant equal to 1.26 (suggested by Fletcher and Sposito [P. Fletcher, G. Sposito, Clay Miner. 24 (1989) 375-391]). Moreover, we observed the typical behavior of point of zero net proton charge (pznpc) as a function of logarithm of the electrolyte concentration (log[C]). We showed that the slope of the linear dependence, pznpc=f(log[C]), is proportional to the number of isomorphic substitutions in the crystal phase, which was also observed in the experimental studies.

  2. Insolation and Resulting Surface Temperatures of Study Regions on the Moon and Implications for Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Karin E.; Hiesinger, Harald

    2010-05-01

    The imaging spectrometer MERTIS (Mercury Radiometer and Thermal Infrared Spectrometer) is part of the payload of ESA's BepiColombo mission, which is scheduled for launch in 2014 (Hiesinger et al., 2010). The instrument consists of an IR-spectrometer and radiometer, which observe the surface in the wavelength range of 7-14 and 7-40µm, respectively. The four scientific objectives are to a) study Mercury's surface composition, b) identify rock-forming minerals, c) globally map the surface mineralogy and d) study surface temperature and thermal inertia (Hiesinger et al., 2010; Helbert et al., 2005). Previous studies of the lunar surface have shown that thermal emission contributes to the observed signal from the surface and can influence the spectral characteristics, e.g. the depth of absorption bands (e.g. Clark, 2009; Pieters et al., 2009; Sunshine et al., 2009). Therefore accurate knowledge of the solar insolation and resulting thermal variations is needed. In order to calculate insolation and surface temperatures, we use a numerical model which has been described by Bauch et al. (2009). Surface temperatures are depending on the surface and subsurface bulk thermophysical properties, such as bulk density, heat capacity, thermal conductivity, emissivity, and albedo. Topography also influences surface temperatures, as it changes the angle of solar incidence, but also leads to shadowed areas, e.g. the floors of polar craters. The model solves the one-dimensional heat transfer equation, based on a depth and temperature dependent thermal inertia. The surface boundary condition is based on the energy balance relation; the energy entering a surface equals the energy leaving the surface. In addition to the direct solar insolation, reflectance and scattering from adjacent surface regions also influence the surface temperatures. In preparation of the MERTIS experiment, we performed detailed thermal models of the lunar surface, which we extrapolated to Mercury. For our

  3. Frictional adhesion of patterned surfaces and implications for gecko and biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongbo; Pesika, Noshir; Tian, Yu; Zhao, Boxin; Chen, Yunfei; Tirrell, Matthew; Turner, Kimberly L; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2009-07-01

    Geckos and smaller animals such as flies, beetles, and spiders have extraordinary climbing abilities: They can firmly attach and rapidly detach from almost any kind of surface. In the case of geckos, this ability is attributed to the surface topography of their attachment pads, which are covered with fine columnar structures (setae). Inspired by this biological system, various kinds of regularly structured or "patterned" surfaces are being fabricated for use as responsive adhesives or in robotic systems. In this study, we theoretically analyze the correlated adhesion and friction (frictional adhesion) of patterned surfaces against smooth (unstructured) surfaces by applying well-established theories of van der Waals forces, together with the classic Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) theory of contact (or adhesion) mechanics, to recent theories of adhesion-controlled friction. Our results, when considered with recent experiments, suggest criteria for simultaneously optimizing the adhesion and friction of patterned surfaces. We show that both the van der Waals adhesion and the friction forces of flexible, tilted, and optimally spaced setal stalks or (synthetic) pillars are high enough to support not only a large gecko on rough surfaces of ceilings (adhesion) and walls (friction) but also a human being if the foot or toe pads-effectively the area of the hands-have a total area estimated at approximately 230 cm2.

  4. Mesoscale studies of ionic closed membranes with polyhedral geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Large crystalline molecular shells buckle spontaneously into icosahedra while multicomponent shells buckle into various polyhedra. Continuum elastic theory explains the buckling of closed shells with one elastic component into icosahedra. A generalized elastic model, on the other hand, describes the spontaneous buckling of inhomogeneous shells into regular and irregular polyhedra. By co-assembling water-insoluble anionic (-1) amphiphiles with cationic (3+) amphiphiles, we realized ionic vesicles. Results revealed that surface crystalline domains and the unusual shell shapes observed arise from the competition of ionic correlations with charge-regulation. We explain here the mechanism by which these ionic membranes generate a mechanically heterogeneous vesicle.

  5. Improvement of SOFC electrodes using mixed ionic-electronic conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Y.; Hishinuma, M.

    1996-12-31

    Since the electrode reaction of SOFC is limited to the proximity of a triple phase boundary (TPB), the local current density at the electrode and electrolyte interface is larger than mean current density, which causes large ohmic and electrode polarization. This paper describes an application of mixed ionic-electronic conductors to reduce such polarization by means of (1) enhancing ionic conductivity of the electrolyte surface layer by coating a high ionic conductors, and (2) reducing the local current density by increasing the electrochemically active sites.

  6. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  7. Resurfacing events on Venus: Implications on plume dynamics and surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, C.; Fahl, A.; Hansen, U.

    2010-01-01

    Global resurfacing events explain the relatively young and uniformly aged surface of Venus. In numerical models featuring these events a variety of plume classes occur ranging from strong, stable to smaller, wind-driven upwellings. We investigate this plume dynamics in a 3D Cartesian geometry paying special attention to the surface topography. While the stable upwellings of the stagnant-lid phase correlate with an elevation of the surface, the wind-driven upwellings of the resurfacing phase do not necessarily correlate with a positive topography signal. We rather observe that a thick plate can dominate the topography above upwellings.

  8. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOEpatents

    Susman, Sherman; Volin, Kenneth J.

    1984-01-01

    An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  9. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOEpatents

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.

    Described is an ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  10. Surface albedo changes with time on Titan's possible cryovolcanic sites: Cassini/VIMS processing and geophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonidou, A.; Coustenis, A.; Hirtzig, M.; Bratsolis, E.; Drossart, P.; Bampasidis, G.; Kyriakopoulos, K.; Le Mouélic, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Stephan, K.; Jaumann, R.; Sohl, F.; Wagner, F. W.; Hussmann, H.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R. H.; Stamatelopoulou-Seymour, K.; Moussas, X.

    2013-09-01

    We present a study on Titan's possibly cryovolcanic and varying regions as suggested from previous studies [e.g. 1;2;7]. These regions, which are potentially subject to change over time in brightness and are located close to the equator, are Tui Regio, Hotei Regio, and Sotra Patera. We apply two methods on Cassini/VIMS data in order to retrieve their surface properties and monitor any temporal variations. First, we apply a statistical method, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) [3;4] where we manage to isolate regions of distinct and diverse chemical composition called 'Region of interest - RoI'. Then, we focus on retrieving the spectral differences (with respect to the Huygens landing site albedo) among the RoIs by applying a radiative transfer code (RT) [5;3]. Hence, we are able to view the dynamical range and evaluate the differences in surface albedo within the RoIs of the three regions. In addition, using this double procedure, we study the temporal surface variations of the three regions witnessing albedo changes with time for Tui Regio from 2005-2009 (darkening) and Sotra Patera from 2005-2006 (brightening) at all wavelengths [3]. The surface albedo variations and the presence of volcanic-like features within the regions in addition to a recent study [6] that calculates Titan's tidal response are significant indications for the connection of the interior with the cryovolcanic candidate features with implications for the satellite's astrobiological potential.

  11. Stabilization of MgAl2O4 spinel surfaces via doping

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hasan, Md. M.; Dholabhai, Pratik P.; Castro, Ricardo H. R.; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2016-02-06

    Here, the surface structure of complex oxides plays a vital role in processes such as sintering, thin film growth, and catalysis, as well as being a critical factor determining the stability of nanoparticles. We report atomistic calculations of the low-index stoichiometric magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) surfaces, each with two different chemical terminations. High temperature annealing was used to explore the potential energy landscape and provide more stable surface structures. We find that the lowest energy surface is {100} while the highest energy surface is {111}. The surfaces were subsequently doped with three trivalent dopants (Y3+, Gd3+, La3+) and one tetravalentmore » dopant (Zr4+) and both the surface segregation energies of the dopants and surface energies of the doped surface were determined. All of the dopants reduce the surface energy of spinel, though this reduction in energy depends on both the size and valence of the dopant. Dopants with larger ionic radius tend to segregate to the surface more strongly and reduce the surface energy to a greater extent. Furthermore, the ionic valence of the dopants seems to have a stronger influence on the segregation than does ionic size. For both undoped and doped spinel, the predicted crystal shape is dominated by {100} surfaces, but the relative fraction of the various surfaces changes with doping due to the unequal changes in energy, which has implications on equilibrium nanoparticle shapes and therefore on applications sensitive to surface properties.« less

  12. Stabilization of MgAl2O4 spinel surfaces via doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. M.; Dholabhai, Pratik P.; Castro, Ricardo H. R.; Uberuaga, Blas P.

    2016-07-01

    Surface structure of complex oxides plays a vital role in processes such as sintering, thin film growth, and catalysis, as well as being a critical factor determining the stability of nanoparticles. Here, we report atomistic calculations of the low-index stoichiometric magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) surfaces, each with two different chemical terminations. High temperature annealing was used to explore the potential energy landscape and provide more stable surface structures. We find that the lowest energy surface is {100} while the highest energy surface is {111}. The surfaces were subsequently doped with three trivalent dopants (Y3+, Gd3+, La3+) and one tetravalent dopant (Zr4+) and both the surface segregation energies of the dopants and surface energies of the doped surface were determined. All of the dopants reduce the surface energy of spinel, though this reduction in energy depends on both the size and valence of the dopant. Dopants with larger ionic radius tend to segregate to the surface more strongly and reduce the surface energy to a greater extent. Furthermore, the ionic valence of the dopants seems to have a stronger influence on the segregation than does ionic size. For both undoped and doped spinel, the predicted crystal shape is dominated by {100} surfaces, but the relative fraction of the various surfaces changes with doping due to the unequal changes in energy, which has implications on equilibrium nanoparticle shapes and therefore on applications sensitive to surface properties.

  13. Thermodynamic estimation: Ionic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, Leslie

    2013-10-15

    Thermodynamics establishes equilibrium relations among thermodynamic parameters (“properties”) and delineates the effects of variation of the thermodynamic functions (typically temperature and pressure) on those parameters. However, classical thermodynamics does not provide values for the necessary thermodynamic properties, which must be established by extra-thermodynamic means such as experiment, theoretical calculation, or empirical estimation. While many values may be found in the numerous collected tables in the literature, these are necessarily incomplete because either the experimental measurements have not been made or the materials may be hypothetical. The current paper presents a number of simple and relible estimation methods for thermodynamic properties, principally for ionic materials. The results may also be used as a check for obvious errors in published values. The estimation methods described are typically based on addition of properties of individual ions, or sums of properties of neutral ion groups (such as “double” salts, in the Simple Salt Approximation), or based upon correlations such as with formula unit volumes (Volume-Based Thermodynamics). - Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic properties of ionic materials may be readily estimated by summation of the properties of individual ions, by summation of the properties of ‘double salts’, and by correlation with formula volume. Such estimates may fill gaps in the literature, and may also be used as checks of published values. This simplicity arises from exploitation of the fact that repulsive energy terms are of short range and very similar across materials, while coulombic interactions provide a very large component of the attractive energy in ionic systems. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Estimation methods for thermodynamic properties of ionic materials are introduced. • Methods are based on summation of single ions, multiple salts, and correlations. • Heat capacity, entropy

  14. 3-Methylpiperidinium ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Belhocine, Tayeb; Forsyth, Stewart A; Gunaratne, H Q Nimal; Nieuwenhuyzen, Mark; Nockemann, Peter; Puga, Alberto V; Seddon, Kenneth R; Srinivasan, Geetha; Whiston, Keith

    2015-04-28

    A wide range of room temperature ionic liquids based on the 3-methylpiperdinium cation core were produced from 3-methylpiperidine, which is a derivative of DYTEK® A amine. First, reaction with 1-bromoalkanes or 1-bromoalkoxyalkanes generated the corresponding tertiary amines (Rmβpip, R = alkyl or alkoxyalkyl); further quaternisation reactions with the appropriate methylating agents yielded the quaternary [Rmmβpip]X salts (X(-) = I(-), [CF3CO2](-) or [OTf](-); Tf = -SO2CF3), and [Rmmβpip][NTf2] were prepared by anion metathesis from the corresponding iodides. All [NTf2](-) salts are liquids at room temperature. [Rmmβpip]X (X(-) = I(-), [CF3CO2](-) or [OTf](-)) are low-melting solids when R = alkyl, but room temperature liquids upon introduction of ether functionalities on R. Neither of the 3-methylpiperdinium ionic liquids showed any signs of crystallisation, even well below 0 °C. Some related non-C-substituted piperidinium and pyrrolidinium analogues were prepared and studied for comparison. Crystal structures of 1-hexyl-1,3-dimethylpiperidinium tetraphenylborate, 1-butyl-3-methylpiperidinium bromide, 1-(2-methoxyethyl)-1-methylpiperidinium chloride and 1-(2-methoxyethyl)-1-methylpyrrolidinium bromide are reported. Extensive structural and physical data are collected and compared to literature data, with special emphasis on the systematic study of the cation ring size and/or asymmetry effects on density, viscosity and ionic conductivity, allowing general trends to be outlined. Cyclic voltammetry shows that 3-methylpiperidinium ionic liquids, similarly to azepanium, piperidinium or pyrrolidinium counterparts, are extremely electrochemically stable; the portfolio of useful alternatives for safe and high-performing electrolytes is thus greatly extended. PMID:25669485

  15. Cyclic phosphonium ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Mukhlall, Joshua A; Romeo, Alicia R; Gohdo, Masao; Ramati, Sharon; Berman, Marc; Suarez, Sophia N

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ionic liquids (ILs) incorporating cyclic phosphonium cations are a novel category of materials. We report here on the synthesis and characterization of four new cyclic phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ILs with aliphatic and aromatic pendant groups. In addition to the syntheses of these novel materials, we report on a comparison of their properties with their ammonium congeners. These exemplars are slightly less conductive and have slightly smaller self-diffusion coefficients than their cyclic ammonium congeners. PMID:24605146

  16. Lidar-derived Correlations Between Lower-tropospheric Column and Surface Ozone: Implications for Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Langford, A. O.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Kirgis, G.; Choukulkar, A.; Brewer, A.; Banta, R. M.; Weickmann, A. M.; Sandberg, S.; Olson, E.

    2015-12-01

    One of the data products that will be provided by the TEMPO satellite mission is 0-2 km ozone column concentration. To make inferences about surface air quality from this data product, the relationship between lower-tropospheric column and surface ozone concentrations and their diurnal, seasonal, and spatial variations have to be well understood. To characterize these relationships, we have used ozone profile observations obtained with NOAA's truck-based, scanning TOPAZ ozone lidar from several recent field campaigns including Discover-AQ Houston and Colorado, the Uintah Basin Wintertime Ozone Study (UBWOS), and the Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS). The TOPAZ lidar is ideally suited for this kind of study because it provides ozone profiles from about 15 m above ground level (AGL) up to 3 km AGL at high spatial and temporal resolution. We have used the lidar observations closest to the ground as a proxy for surface ozone and compared them to the 0-2 km AGL average column ozone concentrations measured with the lidar. Results from the Discover-AQ Colorado campaign show that in the afternoon, when the boundary layer (BL) was deep and well mixed, ozone column and surface concentrations agreed quite well. However, during the morning hours, ozone column concentrations were significantly higher than those at the surface, because ozone was depleted in a shallow surface layer due to titration and deposition, whereas ozone levels in the residual layer aloft remained moderately high. The analysis of column and surface ozone correlations using ozone lidar observations from the Discover-AQ Houston, UBWOS and LVOS campaigns is currently underway. The results from these studies will provide additional insights into the relationship between column and surface ozone, in particular their variation as a function of measurement location and season, and their dependence on BL processes such as mixed layer height evolution, land-sea breeze circulation, and terrain-induced flows.

  17. Infiltration on sloping surfaces: Laboratory experimental evidence and implications for infiltration modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, Renato; Saltalippi, Carla; Flammini, Alessia; Cifrodelli, Marco; Corradini, Corrado; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2015-04-01

    Infiltration on sloping surfaces occupies an important role in our understanding of surface and subsurface hydrology. Previous studies have provided conflicting results about the role of slope on infiltration. Here, our main objective is to highlight, by well-controlled experiments, the slope role in the absence of the conflicting contributions generated by other physical processes observed in previous studies under natural or laboratory conditions. The experimental program was designed to resolve some of the confounding factors such as lower impermeable boundary condition, range of rainfall rates relative to soil saturated hydraulic conductivity, surface sealing, and erosion of top soil. The experimental apparatus consists of a box containing a natural bare soil with slope angle γ chosen between 0° and 10°, two sensors of surface and deep flow, one probe for moisture content and an artificial rainfall generator. The primary experimental results suggest that under steady conditions and rainfall rate, r, greater than saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ks, the deep flow, Qd, decreases with increasing slope angle, γ, up to a value leading to Qd(γ = 1°)/Qd(γ = 10°) equal to ≈4 which is in contrast with the results provided in a few earlier papers. Furthermore, in sloping bare soils surface runoff is produced even for r < Ks. Finally, we discuss the link between Qd(γ) and the shear stress at the soil surface as a guideline in the determination of an effective saturated hydraulic conductivity to be incorporated in the existing horizontal infiltration models.

  18. Implications of Adhesion Studies for Dust Mitigation on Thermal Control Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Berkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments measuring the adhesion forces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (10 (exp -10) torr) between a synthetic volcanic glass and commonly used space exploration materials have recently been described. The glass has a chemistry and surface structure typical of the lunar regolith. It was found that Van der Waals forces between the glass and common spacecraft materials was negligible. Charge transfer between the materials was induced by mechanically striking the spacecraft material pin against the glass plate. No measurable adhesion occurred when striking the highly conducting materials, however, on striking insulating dielectric materials the adhesion increased dramatically. This indicates that electrostatic forces dominate over Van der Waals forces under these conditions. The presence of small amounts of surface contaminants was found to lower adhesive forces by at least two orders of magnitude, and perhaps more. Both particle and space exploration material surfaces will be cleaned by the interaction with the solar wind and other energetic processes and stay clean because of the extremely high vacuum (10 (exp -12) torr) so the atomically clean adhesion values are probably the relevant ones for the lunar surface environment. These results are used to interpret the results of dust mitigation technology experiments utilizing textured surfaces, work function matching surfaces and brushing. They have also been used to reinterpret the results of the Apollo 14 Thermal Degradation Samples experiment.

  19. Adhesion energy between mica surfaces: Implications for the frictional coefficient under dry and wet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    frictional strength of faults is a critical factor that contributes to continuous fault slip and earthquake occurrence. Frictional strength can be reduced by the presence of sheet-structured clay minerals. In this study, two important factors influencing the frictional coefficient of minerals were quantitatively analyzed by a newly developed computational method based on a combination of first-principles study and thermodynamics. One factor that helps reduce the frictional coefficient is the low adhesion energy between the layers under dry conditions. Potassium ions on mica surfaces are easily exchanged with sodium ions when brought into contact with highly concentrated sodium-halide solutions. We found that the surface ion exchange with sodium ions reduces the adhesion energy, indicating that the frictional coefficient can be reduced under dry conditions. Another factor is the lubrication caused by adsorbed water films on mineral surfaces under wet conditions. Potassium and sodium ions on mica surfaces have a strong affinity for water molecules. In order to remove the adsorbed water molecules confined between mica surfaces, a differential compressive stress of the order of tens of gigapascals was necessary at room temperature. These water molecules inhibit direct contact between mineral surfaces and reduce the frictional coefficient. Our results imply that the frictional coefficient can be modified through contact with fluids depending on their salt composition. The low adhesion energy between fault-forming minerals and the presence of an adsorbed water film is a possible reason for the low frictional coefficient observed at continuous fault slip zones.

  20. VOC and HAP recovery using ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Michael R. Milota : Kaichang Li

    2007-05-29

    During the manufacture of wood composites, paper, and to a lesser extent, lumber, large amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as terpenes, formaldehyde, and methanol are emitted to air. Some of these compounds are hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The air pollutants produced in the forest products industry are difficult to manage because the concentrations are very low. Presently, regenerative thermal oxidizers (RTOs and RCOs) are commonly used for the destruction of VOCs and HAPs. RTOs consume large amounts of natural gas to heat air and moisture. The combustion of natural gas generates increased CO2 and NOx, which have negative implications for global warming and air quality. The aforementioned problems are addressed by an absorption system containing a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as an absorbent. RTILs are salts, but are in liquid states at room temperature. RTILs, an emerging technology, are receiving much attention as replacements for organic solvents in industrial processes with significant cost and environmental benefits. Some of these processes include organic synthesis, extraction, and metal deposition. RTILs would be excellent absorbents for exhausts from wood products facilities because of their unique properties: no measurable vapor pressure, high solubility of wide range of organic compounds, thermal stability to 200°C (almost 400°F), and immisciblity with water. Room temperature ionic liquids were tested as possible absorbents. Four were imidizolium-based and were eight phosphonium-based. The imidizolium-based ionic liquids proved to be unstable at the conditions tested and in the presence of water. The phosphonium-based ionic liquids were stable. Most were good absorbents; however, cleaning the contaminates from the ionic liquids was problematic. This was overcome with a higher temperature (120°C) than originally proposed and a very low pressure (1 kPa. Absorption trials were conducted with tetradecy

  1. Ionic Strength Modulation of the Free Energy Landscape of Aβ40 Peptide Fibril Formation.

    PubMed

    Abelein, Axel; Jarvet, Jüri; Barth, Andreas; Gräslund, Astrid; Danielsson, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Protein misfolding and formation of cross-β structured amyloid fibrils are linked to many neurodegenerative disorders. Although recently developed quantitative approaches have started to reveal the molecular nature of self-assembly and fibril formation of proteins and peptides, it is yet unclear how these self-organization events are precisely modulated by microenvironmental factors, which are known to strongly affect the macroscopic aggregation properties. Here, we characterize the explicit effect of ionic strength on the microscopic aggregation rates of amyloid β peptide (Aβ40) self-association, implicated in Alzheimer's disease. We found that physiological ionic strength accelerates Aβ40 aggregation kinetics by promoting surface-catalyzed secondary nucleation reactions. This promoted catalytic effect can be assigned to shielding of electrostatic repulsion between monomers on the fibril surface or between the fibril surface itself and monomeric peptides. Furthermore, we observe the formation of two different β-structured states with similar but distinct spectroscopic features, which can be assigned to an off-pathway immature state (Fβ*) and a mature stable state (Fβ), where salt favors formation of the Fβ fibril morphology. Addition of salt to preformed Fβ* accelerates transition to Fβ, underlining the dynamic nature of Aβ40 fibrils in solution. On the basis of these results we suggest a model where salt decreases the free-energy barrier for Aβ40 folding to the Fβ state, favoring the buildup of the mature fibril morphology while omitting competing, energetically less favorable structural states. PMID:27171340

  2. Is the boundary layer of an ionic liquid equally lubricating at higher temperature?

    PubMed

    Hjalmarsson, Nicklas; Atkin, Rob; Rutland, Mark W

    2016-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to study the effect of temperature on normal forces and friction for the room temperature ionic liquid (IL) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), confined between mica and a silica colloid probe at 25 °C, 50 °C, and 80 °C. Force curves revealed a strong fluid dynamic influence at room temperature, which was greatly reduced at elevated temperatures due to the reduced liquid viscosity. A fluid dynamic analysis reveals that bulk viscosity is manifested at large separation but that EAN displays a nonzero slip, indicating a region of different viscosity near the surface. At high temperatures, the reduction in fluid dynamic force reveals step-like force curves, similar to those found at room temperature using much lower scan rates. The ionic liquid boundary layer remains adsorbed to the solid surface even at high temperature, which provides a mechanism for lubrication when fluid dynamic lubrication is strongly reduced. The friction data reveals a decrease in absolute friction force with increasing temperature, which is associated with increased thermal motion and reduced viscosity of the near surface layers but, consistent with the normal force data, boundary layer lubrication was unaffected. The implications for ILs as lubricants are discussed in terms of the behaviour of this well characterised system. PMID:26976694

  3. Ionic liquid based multifunctional double network gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kumkum; Higashihara, Tomoya; Arafune, Hiroyuki; Kamijo, Toshio; Morinaga, Takashi; Sato, Takaya; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2015-04-01

    Gels are a promising class of soft and wet materials with diverse application in tissue engineering and bio-medical purpose. In order to accelerate the development of gels, it is required to synthesize multi-functional gels of high mechanical strength, ultra low surface friction and suitable elastic modulus with a variety of methods and new materials. Among many types of gel ionic gel made from ionic liquids (ILs) could be used for diverse applications in electrochemical devices and in the field of tribology. IL, a promising materials for lubrication, is a salt with a melting point lower than 100 °C. As a lubricant, ILs are characterized by an extremely low vapor pressure, high thermal stability and high ion conductivity. In this work a novel approach of making double network DN ionic gel using IL has been made utilizing photo polymerization process. A hydrophobic monomer Methyl methacrylate (MMA) has been used as a first network and a hydrophobic IL monomer, N,N-diethyl-N-(2-mthacryloylethyl)-N-methylammonium bistrifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (DEMM-TFSI) has been used as a second network using photo initiator benzophenon and crosslinker triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). The resulting DN ionic gel shows transparency, flexibility, high thermal stability, good mechanical toughness and low friction coefficient value which can be a potential candidate as a gel slider in different mechanical devices and can open a new area in the field of gel tribology.

  4. Polymer-supported ionic-liquid-like phases (SILLPs): transferring ionic liquid properties to polymeric matrices.

    PubMed

    Sans, Victor; Karbass, Naima; Burguete, M Isabel; Compañ, Vicente; García-Verdugo, Eduardo; Luis, Santiago V; Pawlak, Milena

    2011-02-01

    The physico-chemical properties of polymers with ionic-liquid-like moieties covalently bound to their surfaces (SILLPs) have been studied by thermal and spectroscopic techniques, as well as by direct impedance and dielectric measurements, and compared to those of the corresponding bulk ionic liquids. The effective transfer of properties from ionic liquids in solution to the supported species has thereby been demonstrated. The effects of the chemical nature of these tunable "solid solvents" on their macroscopic swelling and microwave heating, as well as the stabilities and activities of different catalytic moieties immobilized on the SILLPs, have been studied. Finally, the experimental effect observed in microwave heating can be directly correlated with the values of tan δ derived from dielectric measurements.

  5. Surface Rupture of the 2005 Kashmir, Pakistan, Earthquake and its Active Tectonic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, H.; Nakata, T.; Tsutsumi, H.; Kondo, H.; Sugito, N.; Awata, Y.; Akhtar, S. S.; Majid, A.; Khattak, W.; Awan, A. A.; Yeats, R. S.

    2006-12-01

    The 8th October 2005 Kashmir earthquake of Mw 7.6 struck the westernmost area of the Indian-Eurasian collision zone, resulting in the worst earthquake disaster ever recorded along the frontal Himalaya. Although none of the historical Himalayan earthquakes is reported to have produced primary surface rupture, our field mapping reveals that the 2005 earthquake accompanied a NW-trending ~70-km-long distinctive surface rupture with maximum and mean vertical separations of ~7 m and ~3 m, respectively. Typical surface expression of faulting is a NE-side-up fault scarp or warp with surface shortening features at its base and tension cracks on its crest. Bulging and back-tilting are also observed on the upthrown side at many places. The surface rupture is subdivided into three geometrical segments separated by small steps. Location of the hypocenter suggests that the rupture was initiated at a deep portion of the northern-central segment boundary and bilaterally propagated to eventually break three segments. Mapped surface rupture trace clearly shows that neither the Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) nor the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) is responsible for the earthquake, but a geomorphologically-evident active fault within the Sub-Himalaya, the Balakot-Garhi fault, is a causative fault, although a part of the Balakot-Garhi fault appears to coincide with the surface trace of the MBT. Cumulative vertical separation of the most extensively recognized fluvial terrace surface is 7-8 times larger than the 2005 separation, implying occurrence of 7-8 similar earthquakes after the surface abandonment. If this deeply-incised fill surface is related to sediment yield increase due to the last major glaciation around 20 ka, the rupture interval and vertical slip rate of the Balakot-Garhi fault are estimated to be on the order of ~3000 years and ~1 mm/yr, respectively. By using the seismologically determined fault dip of ~30 degrees, horizontal shortening rate across the fault is then

  6. An ionic electro-active actuator made with graphene film electrode, chitosan and ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingsong; Yu, Min; Yang, Xu; Kim, Kwang Jin; Dai, Zhendong

    2015-06-01

    A newly developed ionic electro-active actuator composed of an ionic electrolyte layer sandwiched between two graphene film layers was investigated. Scanning electronic microscopy observation and x-ray diffraction analysis showed that the graphene sheets in the film stacked in a nearly face-to-face fashion but did not restack back to graphite, and the resulting graphene film with low sheet resistance (10 Ω sq-1) adheres well to the electrolyte membrane. Contact angle measurement showed the surface energy (37.98 mJ m-2) of the ionic electrolyte polymer is 2.67 times higher than that (14.2 mJ m-2) of the Nafion membrane, contributing to the good adhesion between the graphene film electrode and the electrolyte membrane. An electric double-layer is formed at the interface between the graphene film electrode and the ionic electrolyte membrane under the input potential, resulting in a higher capacitance of 27.6 mF cm-2. We report that this ionic actuator exhibits adequate bending strain, ranging from 0.032 to 0.1% (305 to 945 μm) as functions of voltage.

  7. Atomic-scale surface roughness of rutile and implications for organic molecule adsorption.

    PubMed

    Livi, Kenneth J T; Schaffer, Bernhard; Azzolini, David; Seabourne, Che R; Hardcastle, Trevor P; Scott, Andrew J; Hazen, Robert M; Erlebacher, Jonah D; Brydson, Rik; Sverjensky, Dimitri A

    2013-06-11

    Crystal surfaces provide physical interfaces between the geosphere and biosphere. It follows that the arrangement of atoms at the surfaces of crystals profoundly influences biological components at many levels, from cells through biopolymers to single organic molecules. Many studies have focused on the crystal-molecule interface in water using large, flat single crystals. However, little is known about atomic-scale surface structures of the nanometer- to micrometer-sized crystals of simple metal oxides typically used in batch adsorption experiments under conditions relevant to biogeochemistry and the origins of life. Here, we present atomic-resolution microscopy data with unprecedented detail of the circumferences of nanosized rutile (α-TiO2) crystals previously used in studies of the adsorption of protons, cations, and amino acids. The data suggest that one-third of the {110} faces, the largest faces on individual crystals, consist of steps at the atomic scale. The steps have the orientation to provide undercoordinated Ti atoms of the type and abundance for adsorption of amino acids as inferred from previous surface complexation modeling of batch adsorption data. A remarkably uniform pattern of step proportions emerges: the step proportions are independent of surface roughness and reflect their relative surface energies. Consequently, the external morphology of rutile nanometer- to micrometer-sized crystals imaged at the coarse scale of scanning electron microscope images is not an accurate indicator of the atomic smoothness or of the proportions of the steps present. Overall, our data strongly suggest that amino acids attach at these steps on the {110} surfaces of rutile. PMID:23675906

  8. Biological implications of the hydrodynamics of swimming at or near the surface and in shallow water.

    PubMed

    Blake, R W

    2009-03-01

    The origins and effects of wave drag at and near the surface and in shallow water are discussed in terms of the dispersive waves generated by streamlined technical bodies of revolution and by semi-aquatic and aquatic animals with a view to bearing on issues regarding the design and function of autonomous surface and underwater vehicles. A simple two-dimensional model based on energy flux, allowing assessment of drag and its associated wave amplitude, is applied to surface swimming in Lesser Scaup ducks and is in good agreement with measured values. It is argued that hydrodynamic limitations to swimming at speeds associated with the critical Froude number ( approximately 0.5) and hull speed do not necessarily set biological limitations as most behaviours occur well below the hull speed. From a comparative standpoint, the need for studies on the hull displacement of different forms is emphasized. For forms in surface proximity, drag is a function of both Froude and Reynolds numbers. Whilst the depth dependence of wave drag is not particularly sensitive to Reynolds number, its magnitude is, with smaller and slower forms subject to relatively less drag augmentation than larger, faster forms that generate additional resistance due to ventilation and spray. A quasi-steady approach to the hydrodynamics of swimming in shallow water identifies substantial drag increases relative to the deeply submerged case at Froude numbers of about 0.9 that could limit the performance of semi-aquatic and aquatic animals and autonomous vehicles. A comparative assessment of fast-starting trout and upside down catfish shows that the energy losses of fast-starting fish are likely to be less for fish in surface proximity in deep water than for those in shallow water. Further work on unsteady swimming in both circumstances is encouraged. Finally, perspectives are offered as to how autonomous surface and underwater vehicles in surface proximity and shallow water could function to avoid

  9. Role of Surface Roughness on Reversible Primary Minimum Interactions: Implications for Colloid Attachment and Detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A.

    2015-04-01

    An understanding of and ability to predict the fate and transport of colloids in porous media are of great importance in many environmental and industrial applications. In this study, the extended-DLVO theory accounting for nanosale surface roughness was employed to calculate interaction energy parameters such as the magnitude of primary energy minimum (Φ_(10 min)), the height of energy barrier against primary minimum attachment (∆Φ_a), and the height of energy barrier against detachment from the primary minimum (∆Φ_d). Packed-bed column and batch experiments were also conducted to examine effects of solution chemistry and flow velocity on the attachment and detachment processes of colloids. Theoretical analysis was employed to qualitatively explain the experimental observations of colloid attachment and detachment processes in porous media. It was demonstrated that the density and height of nanoscale roughness on the solid surfaces of porous media significantly influenced the interaction energy parameters and would subsequently affect the colloid attachment and detachment processes. Specifically, theoretical analysis indicated that the values of ∆Φa and ∆Φd notably decreased when nanoscale surface roughness was considered in the calculations. It was predicted that, under bulk unfavourable conditions at low to moderate solution IS, colloid attachment in the primary minimum may occur in some localised locations on the solid surface. However, nanoscale surface roughness yields a much weaker primary minimum interaction compared with that of smooth surfaces. The detachment of the colloids attached in the primary minimum was found to increase with decreasing IS and increasing pH due to the impact of nanoscale roughness of the solid surfaces on the values of ∆Φ_a. The results suggest that changes in chemical conditions caused the disappearance of the detachment energy barrier for only a fraction of the attached colloids in the primary minimum.

  10. Variability of the temporal bone surface's topography: implications for otologic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoeur, Jérémy; Noble, Jack H.; Balachandran, Ramya; Labadie, Robert F.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2012-02-01

    Otologic surgery is performed for a variety of reasons including treatment of recurrent ear infections, alleviation of dizziness, and restoration of hearing loss. A typical ear surgery consists of a tympanomastoidectomy in which both the middle ear is explored via a tympanic membrane flap and the bone behind the ear is removed via mastoidectomy to treat disease and/or provide additional access. The mastoid dissection is performed using a high-speed drill to excavate bone based on a pre-operative CT scan. Intraoperatively, the surface of the mastoid component of the temporal bone provides visual feedback allowing the surgeon to guide their dissection. Dissection begins in "safe areas" which, based on surface topography, are believed to be correlated with greatest distance from surface to vital anatomy thus decreasing the chance of injury to the brain, large blood vessels (e.g. the internal jugular vein and internal carotid artery), the inner ear, and the facial nerve. "Safe areas" have been identified based on surgical experience with no identifiable studies showing correlation of the surface with subsurface anatomy. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether such a correlation exists. Through a three-step registration process, we defined a correspondence between each of twenty five clinically-applicable temporal bone CT scans of patients and an atlas and explored displacement and angular differences of surface topography and depth of critical structures from the surface of the skull. The results of this study reflect current knowledge of osteogenesis and anatomy. Based on two features (distance and angular difference), two regions (suprahelical and posterior) of the temporal bone show the least variability between surface and subsurface anatomy.

  11. Spatial and temporal distribution of cyanobacterial soil crusts in the Kalahari: Implications for soil surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, A. D.; Dougill, A. J.

    2007-03-01

    Localised patterns of erosion and deposition in vegetated semi-arid rangelands have been shown to influence ecological change and biogeochemical cycles. In the flat, vegetated Kalahari rangelands of Southern Africa the factors regulating erodibility of the fine sand soils and the erosivity of wind regimes require further investigation. This paper reports on the spatial and temporal patterns of cyanobacterial soil crust cover from ten sites at five sampling locations in the semi-arid Kalahari and discusses the likely impact on factors regulating surface erodibility and erosivity. Cyanobacterial soil crust cover on Kalahari Sand varied between 11% and 95% of the ground surface and was higher than previously reported. Cover was inversely related to grazing with the lowest crust cover found close to boreholes and the highest in the Game Reserve and Wildlife Management Zone. In grazed areas, crusts form under the protective canopies of the thorny shrub Acacia mellifera. Fenced plot data showed that crusts recover quickly from disturbance, with a near complete surface crust cover forming within 15 months of disturbance. Crust development is restricted by burial by wind blown sediment and by raindrop impact. Crusts had significantly greater organic matter and total nitrogen compared to unconsolidated surfaces. Crusts also significantly increased the compressive strength of the surface (and thus decreased erodibility) and changed the surface roughness. Establishing exactly how these changes affect aeolian erosion requires further process-based studies. The proportion of shear velocity acting on the surface in this complex mixed bush-grass-crust environment will be the key to understanding how crusts affect erodibility.

  12. Surface properties of bacillus subtilis determined by acid/base titrations, and the implications for metal adsorption in fluid-rock systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fein, J.B.; Davis, T.A.

    1996-10-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in low temperature aqueous systems, but quantifying their effects on aqueous mass transport remains a problem. Numerous studies have qualitatively examined the metal binding capacity of bacterial cell walls. However, quantitative thermodynamic modeling of metal-bacteria-mineral systems requires a detailed knowledge of the surface properties of the bacterial functional groups. In this study, we have conducted acid/base titrations of suspensions of B. subtilis, a common subsurface species whose surface properties are largely controlled by carboxyl groups. Titrations were conducted between pH 2 and 11 at several ionic strengths. The data are analyzed using a constant capacitance model to account for the surface electric field effects on the acidity constant. The pK{sub a} value that best fits the titration data is 3.9 {plus_minus} 0.3. This result represents the first step toward quantifying bacteria-metal and mineral-bacteria-metal interactions using equilibrium thermodynamics.

  13. Transmission windows in Titan's lower troposphere: Implications for IR spectrometers aboard future aerial and surface missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, George D.; Corlies, Paul M.; Wray, James J.; Hofgartner, Jason D.; Hörst, Sarah M.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Liuzzo, Lucas R.; Buffo, Jacob J.

    2015-11-01

    Titan's thick atmosphere contains a 1.5 - 5.7% methane mole fraction. Methane's possession of fundamental, overtone, and combination bands across much of the near and mid IR results in significant absorption in the atmosphere across this spectral region. The consequence is spectral windowing, such that Titan's surface can only be observed at a handful of methane transmission windows. The narrow width of these windows for observations from the top of the atmosphere (ToA) make only multispectral imaging of the surface possible. This limits the information that can be gleaned about the surface composition, which remains largely unknown. From ToA, there is effectively zero transmission at most wavelengths between the windows, so that improvements to the detectors or telescopes of IR spectrometers aboard orbital or flyby missions would not result in any appreciable widening of the windows. Only decreasing the methane column through which observations are made, with a future mission operating near or on the surface, would result in any widening of the windows. We present a new line-by-line radiative transfer model to quantify the window widths for an IR spectrometer aboard an aerial or surface mission to Titan. We take spectral line parameters from the HITRAN database (Rothmann et al. 2013) for methane and six trace gases, include N2-N2 and N2-H2 collision-induced absorptions as measured by McKellar 1989, and the haze extinction measured in situ by Huygens DISR. The number of vertical layers in the model is chosen to correspond with the high cadence of measurements of the physical conditions of Titan's atmosphere by Huygens HASI. We find that the transmission windows do not widen appreciably for an aerial mission operating at altitudes on the order of kilometers above the surface. For surface missions observing at distances of order 10 m, the windows widen considerably to encompass regions where absorptions from hydrated minerals, sulfates, and pentane and higher order

  14. Mars - Near-infrared spectral reflectance of surface regions and compositional implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, T. B.; Clark, R. N.; Singer, R. B.

    1982-04-01

    Both morphological and compositional information are needed to define and characterize surface geologic units on Mars. A description is presented of new, near-infrared spectra (0.65 to 2.50 micrometers) for 11 regions on the Martian surface observed in 1978. The high photometric quality of these data combined with increased near-infrared spectral coverage provide new information about the spectral behavior and, therefore, the composition and physical nature of Martian surface materials. The spectral reflectances were obtained with the aid of a 2.2-m telescope located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. A cooled (to 77 K) circular variable filter spectrometer with an InSb detector was used to measure alternatively Mars and the standard star Beta Geminorum. Attention is given to general spectral characteristics, the dark region composition, spectral evidence for water, and the 2.3 micrometer absorption.

  15. Nitric acid photolysis on surfaces in low-NOx environments: Significant atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xianliang; Gao, Honglian; He, Yi; Huang, Gu; Bertman, Steven B.; Civerolo, Kevin; Schwab, James

    2003-12-01

    Nitric acid (HNO3) is the dominant end product of NOx (= NO + NO2) oxidation in the troposphere, and its dry deposition is considered to be a major removal pathway for the atmospheric reactive nitrogen. Here we present both field and laboratory results to demonstrate that HNO3 deposited on ground and vegetation surfaces may undergo effective photolysis to form HONO and NOx, 1-2 orders of magnitude faster than in the gas phase and aqueous phase. With this enhanced rate, HNO3 photolysis on surfaces may significantly impact the chemistry of the overlying atmospheric boundary layer in remote low-NOx regions via the emission of HONO as a radical precursor and the recycling of HNO3 deposited on ground surfaces back to NOx.

  16. Surface emission from neutron stars and implications for the physics of their interiors.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Feryal

    2013-01-01

    Neutron stars are associated with diverse physical phenomena that take place in conditions characterized by ultrahigh densities as well as intense gravitational, magnetic and radiation fields. Understanding the properties and interactions of matter in these regimes remains one of the challenges in compact object astrophysics. Photons emitted from the surfaces of neutron stars provide direct probes of their structure, composition and magnetic fields. In this review, I discuss in detail the physics that governs the properties of emission from the surfaces of neutron stars and their various observational manifestations. I present the constraints on neutron star radii, core and crust composition, and magnetic field strength and topology obtained from studies of their broadband spectra, evolution of thermal luminosity, and the profiles of pulsations that originate on their surfaces.

  17. Beryllium in the Galactic halo - Surface abundances from standard, diffusive, and rotational stellar evolution, and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    1990-01-01

    The recently observed upper limits to the beryllium abundances in population II stars are much lower than population I detections. This difference reflects an intrinsic difference in the initial abundances and is not caused by different degrees of depletion driven by stellar evolution processes from similar initial abundances. Evolutionary sequences of models from the early premain sequence to beyond the turnoff that correspond to halo dwarfs with Fe/H abundances of -1.3, -2.3, and -3.3 are constructed, and standard, diffusive, and rotational mechanisms are used to estimate a maximal possible beryllium depletion. Halo star models in the T(eff) range 6000 to 5000 K might be rotationally depleted by a factor of 1.5-2, and the total depletion should be no more than (conservatively) a factor of 3. Implications for cosmology, cosmic-ray theory, and Galactic chemical evolution are discussed.

  18. Implications of increased surface melt under global warming scenarios: Greenland ice-sheet simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parizek, B. R.; Alley, R. B.

    2003-04-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet represents ~10% (by volume) of the cryosphere and ~7 meters of sea-level equivalence. Citing the inherent stability offered by the long glaciological timescales involved in classical ice-sheet dynamics, the elevation of the bedrock on which the ice sheet is perched, and the extremely cold inland surface temperatures, numerical studies on the future of this ice sheet under various global-warming scenarios have all but dismissed the potential for substantial dynamic changes in the next millennium. Unlike for the setting of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, there were simply no foreseen mechanisms for rapid switches in Greenland's prevailing ice-flow regime. Recently, field observations near the Swiss Camp in west-central Greenland may have offered the essential link between surface temperatures and ice dynamics at and below the equilibrium line that may require the ice sheet to ``listen'' to climate far more closely than previously envisioned by model parameterizations. Zwally et al. (2002) documented correlation between increased ice velocity and increased surface melt (as parameterized by positive degree days (PDD)). They argued that surface water is piped directly to the bed with little delay, causing increased basal-water pressures and basal-sliding velocities. Using the PSU/UofC thermomechanical flowline model, numerous simulations are being conducted to test a wide variety of parameter spaces that link surface melt with a new sliding law under several global warming scenarios. Initial comparisons to the EISMINT Level 3 global-warming benchmark illustrate an enhanced sensitivity of the ice sheet to surface warming resulting in higher ablation rates, thinning of the margin, and a reduction in ice volume that all lead to a positive contribution to global sea-level rise.

  19. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of North American Surface Ozone Concentrations: Implications for Dry Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. W.; Jones, D. B.; Jiang, Z.; Henze, D. K.; Paulot, F.

    2013-12-01

    The distribution of ozone near the surface reflects a balance of photochemical production and loss and deposition at the surface, modulated by transported from the free troposphere. Using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model, we assess the potential impact of uncertainties in key reactions on surface ozone concentration in the eastern United States. Comparison of the model with observations from the AQS, CASTNET, and NADP networks reveal that the model overestimates ozone in the northeastern US, which cannot be accounted for by discrepancies in precursor emissions in the model, nor by corrections to free tropospheric ozone. Using the GEOS-Chem 4-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation system, we conduct an inversion analysis of the surface observations to optimize chemical reaction rates and deposition rates. We use the nested version of GEOS-Chem to carry out the inversion at a resolution of 0.5 x 0.67 deg over North America. We find that the simulated ozone distribution is most sensitive to dry deposition and that the inversion analysis suggests that an increase of up to a factor of 2.4 in dry deposition velocities is needed to reduce the modeled ozone bias. The a posteriori bias in surface ozone in the eastern United States was 6.0 ppb compared to the a priori bias of 17.5 ppb. The inversion analysis, however, is sensitivity to the boundary layer mixing scheme employed in the model and we examine the impact of possible biases in surface ozone, associated with the treatment of boundary layer mixing, on the inversion results.

  20. Cell surface reactivity of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002: Implications for metal sorption from seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuxia; Alessi, D. S.; Owttrim, G. W.; Petrash, D. A.; Mloszewska, A. M.; Lalonde, S. V.; Martinez, R. E.; Zhou, Qixing; Konhauser, K. O.

    2015-11-01

    The past two decades have seen a significant advancement in our understanding of bacterial surface chemistry and the ability of microbes to bind metals from aqueous solutions. Much of this work has been aimed at benthic, mat-forming species in an effort to model the mechanisms by which microbes may exert control over metal contaminant transport in soils and groundwater. However, there is a distinct paucity of information pertaining to the surface chemistry of marine planktonic species, and their ability to bind trace metals from the ocean's photic zone. To this end, the surface properties of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 were studied as this genus is one of the dominant marine phytoplankton, and as such, contributes significantly to metal cycling in the ocean's photic zone. Zeta potential measurement indicates that the cell surfaces display a net negative charge. This was supported by potentiometric titration and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses demonstrating that the cells are dominated by surface proton releasing ligands, including carboxyl, phosphoryl and amino functional groups, with a total ligand density of 34.18 ± 1.62 mmol/g (dry biomass). Cd adsorption experiments further reveal that carboxyl groups play a primary role in metal adsorption, with 1.0 g of dry biomass binding an equivalent of 7.05 × 10-5 M of Cd from solution at pH = 8. To put this value into context, in 1 L of seawater, and with an open-ocean population of Synechococcus of 105 cells/mL in the photic zone, approximately 10 nmol of Cd could potentially be adsorbed by the cyanobacteria; an amount equivalent to seawater Cd concentrations. Although we have only focused on one microbial species and one metal cation, and we have not considered trace element assimilation, our results highlight the potential role of surface sorption by phytoplankton in the cycling of metals in the ocean.

  1. Subsurface Emission Effects in AMSR-E Measurements: Implications for Land Surface Microwave Emissivity Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galantowicz, John F.; Moncet, Jean-Luc; Liang, Pan; Lipton, Alan E.; Uymin, Gennady; Prigent, Catherine; Grassotti, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of land surface microwave emission time series shows that the characteristic diurnal signature associated with subsurface emission in sandy deserts carry over to arid and semi-arid region worldwide. Prior work found that diurnal variation of Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) brightness temperatures in deserts was small relative to International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project land surface temperature (LST) variation and that the difference varied with surface type and was largest in sand sea regions. Here we find more widespread subsurface emission effects in Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) measurements. The AMSR-E orbit has equator crossing times near 01:30 and 13 :30 local time, resulting in sampling when near-surface temperature gradients are likely to be large and amplifying the influence of emission depth on effective emitting temperature relative to other factors. AMSR-E measurements are also temporally coincident with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LST measurements, eliminating time lag as a source of LST uncertainty and reducing LST errors due to undetected clouds. This paper presents monthly global emissivity and emission depth index retrievals for 2003 at 11, 19, 37, and 89 GHz from AMSR-E, MODIS, and SSM/I time series data. Retrieval model fit error, stability, self-consistency, and land surface modeling results provide evidence for the validity of the subsurface emission hypothesis and the retrieval approach. An analysis of emission depth index, emissivity, precipitation, and vegetation index seasonal trends in northern and southern Africa suggests that changes in the emission depth index may be tied to changes in land surface moisture and vegetation conditions

  2. Variant colony surface antigenic phenotypes within mycoplasma strain populations: implications for species identification and strain standardization.

    PubMed Central

    Rosengarten, R; Yogev, D

    1996-01-01

    Immunobinding assays with mycoplasma colonies on agar plates (immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase techniques) or with imprints of colonies transferred to solid supports (colony immunoblotting) are widely used as standard diagnostic tests for serological species identification of mycoplasma isolates. However, in light of the high rate of variability of surface antigens in many mycoplasmas, diagnostic data obtained with these techniques require a more critical evaluation. In this report, we demonstrate with some examples that mycoplasma surface variability based on alterations in expression, in size, and in surface presentation of integral and peripheral membrane proteins may lead to misinterpretation of colony immunostaining reactions obtained by using specific monoclonal antibodies as well as conventional diagnostic hyperimmune sera. To more easily identify phenotypically mixed isolates or samples which contain more than one species, we have introduced some minor modifications of the colony immunoblot technique which provide sharp signals of positive as well as negative reactions and enable identification of cryptic epitopes. It is further demonstrated that because of the variability in colony surface antigenic phenotype, mycoplasma strains, including well-established reference and other prototype strains which are used under the same designation in many laboratories, can differ markedly in their antigen profiles and their potentially virulence-related surface properties, since they are usually purified by filter cloning and often propagated by subcultivation of randomly selected agar-grown subpopulations. We conclude from this study that because of this surface variability, the establishment of criteria for standardization of mycoplasma strains and diagnostic antisera is urgently required in order to obtain reproducible results in different laboratories. PMID:8748292

  3. Response of meteoric δ18O to surface uplift — Implications for Cenozoic Andean Plateau growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insel, Nadja; Poulsen, Christopher J.; Ehlers, Todd A.; Sturm, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    The timing and magnitude of surface uplift provide important constraints on geodynamic models of orogen formation. Oxygen isotope (δ18O) and mass-47 isotopolog (Δ47) compositions from terrestrial carbonate sediments have been used with modern isotope and temperature lapse rates to infer past surface elevations of the Andes. However, these paleoaltimetry interpretations are contentious because variations in the oxygen isotope composition in meteoric water (δ18Op) are caused by changes in elevation (orographic) and regional climate. Here, we use a limited-domain isotope-tracking general circulation model to simulate changes in δ18Op and isotopic lapse rates in response to Andean surface uplift, and to re-evaluate δ18O and Δ47 changes in late Miocene carbonates previously associated with rapid Andean growth. Results indicate that Andean surface uplift leads to changes in low-level atmospheric circulation and an increase in precipitation along the eastern Andean flank which influences isotopic source and amount effects. Simulated changes in Andean δ18Op are not systematic with an increase in surface elevation, but are instead a function of orographic thresholds that abruptly change regional climate. A δ18Op decrease of > 5‰ over the central Andes and an increase in isotopic lapse rates (up to 0.8‰ km- 1) coincide with Andean surface uplift from 75 to 100% of modern elevation. These changes in the isotopic signature could account for the entire 3-4‰ δ18O depletion in late Miocene carbonate nodules, and suggest an Andean paleoelevation of ~ 3000 m (75% of modern elevations) before 10 Ma.

  4. Tailoring biomaterial surface properties to modulate host-implant interactions: implication in cardiovascular and bone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pacelli, Settimio; Manoharan, Vijayan; Desalvo, Anna; Lomis, Nikita; Jodha, Kartikeya Singh

    2016-01-01

    Host body response to a foreign medical device plays a critical role in defining its fate post implantation. It is thus important to control host-material interactions by designing innovative implant surfaces. In the recent years, biochemical and topographical features have been explored as main target to produce this new type of bioinert or bioresponsive implants. The review discusses specific biofunctional materials and strategies to achieve a precise control over implant surface properties and presents possible solutions to develop next generation of implants, particularly in the fields of bone and cardiovascular therapy. PMID:27630769

  5. Tailoring biomaterial surface properties to modulate host-implant interactions: implication in cardiovascular and bone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pacelli, Settimio; Manoharan, Vijayan; Desalvo, Anna; Lomis, Nikita; Jodha, Kartikeya Singh

    2016-01-01

    Host body response to a foreign medical device plays a critical role in defining its fate post implantation. It is thus important to control host-material interactions by designing innovative implant surfaces. In the recent years, biochemical and topographical features have been explored as main target to produce this new type of bioinert or bioresponsive implants. The review discusses specific biofunctional materials and strategies to achieve a precise control over implant surface properties and presents possible solutions to develop next generation of implants, particularly in the fields of bone and cardiovascular therapy.

  6. Evidence for a basalt-free surface on Mercury and implications for internal heat.

    PubMed

    Jeanloz, R; Mitchell, D L; Sprague, A L; de Pater, I

    1995-06-01

    Microwave and mid-infrared observations reveal that Mercury's surface contains less FeO + TiO2 and at least as much feldspar as the lunar highlands. The results are compatible with the high albedo (brightness) of Mercury's surface at visible wavelengths in suggesting a rock and soil composition that is devoid of basalt, the primary differentiate of terrestrial mantles. The occurrence of a basalt-free, highly differentiated crust is in accord with recent models of the planet's thermal evolution and suggests that Mercury has retained a hot interior as a result of a combination of inefficient mantle convection and minimal volcanic heat loss. PMID:7770770

  7. Evidence for a basalt-free surface on Mercury and implications for internal heat.

    PubMed

    Jeanloz, R; Mitchell, D L; Sprague, A L; de Pater, I

    1995-06-01

    Microwave and mid-infrared observations reveal that Mercury's surface contains less FeO + TiO2 and at least as much feldspar as the lunar highlands. The results are compatible with the high albedo (brightness) of Mercury's surface at visible wavelengths in suggesting a rock and soil composition that is devoid of basalt, the primary differentiate of terrestrial mantles. The occurrence of a basalt-free, highly differentiated crust is in accord with recent models of the planet's thermal evolution and suggests that Mercury has retained a hot interior as a result of a combination of inefficient mantle convection and minimal volcanic heat loss.

  8. A much warmer Earth surface for most of geologic time: implications to biotic weathering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartzman, D. W.; McMenamin, M.

    1993-01-01

    The authors present two scenarios for the temperature history of Earth. One scenario is conventional, the other relies on a warmer history. Both scenarios include surface cooling determined by the evolution of the biosphere and are similar until the Proterozoic period. The warmer scenario requires a higher plant/lichen terrestrial biota to increase weathering intensity. Justification for a warmer surface includes period temperatures from the oxygen isotope record of coexisting phosphates and cherts, an upper limit of 58 degrees C from primary gypsum precipitation, and the lack of fractionation of sulfur isotopes between sulfide and sulfates in Archean sediments.

  9. Fast Conversion of Ionic Liquids and Poly(Ionic Liquid)s into Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbons in Air

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yongjun; Ambrogi, Martina; Han, Baohang; Yuan, Jiayin

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquids and poly(ionic liquid)s have been successfully converted into nitrogen-doped porous carbons with tunable surface area up to 1200 m2/g at high temperatures in air. Compared to conventional carbonization process conducted under inert gas to produce nitrogen-doped carbons, the new production method was completed in a rather shorter time without noble gas protection. PMID:27070588

  10. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Glenn C.

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  11. Temperature Dependence of Cryogenic Ammonia-Water Ice Mixtures and Implications for Icy Satellite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, J. B., III; Curchin, J. M.; Clark, R. N.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared spectra of ammonia-water ice mixtures reveal temperature-dependent absorption bands due to ammonia. These features, at 1.04, 2.0, and 2.25 microns, may shed light on the surface compositions of the Galilean and Saturnian satellites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. GROUNDWATER-SURFACE WATER EXCHANGE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR LARGE RIVER RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Movement of river water into and out of high-porosity alluvial deposits can have an important influence on surface water quality and aquatic habitat. In our study of a 60-km reach of the Willamette River in Oregon, USA, we: 1) used tracers to estimate the rate of exchange betw...

  13. The role of the surface on microglia function: implications for central nervous system tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Liliana R.; Rocha, Daniela N.; Ambrosio, Luigi; Pêgo, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    In tissue engineering, it is well accepted that a scaffold surface has a decisive impact on cell behaviour. Here we focused on microglia—the resident immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS)—and on their response to poly(trimethylene carbonate-co-ε-caprolactone) (P(TMC-CL)) fibrous and flat surfaces obtained by electrospinning and solvent cast, respectively. This study aims to provide cues for the design of instructive surfaces that can contribute to the challenging process of CNS regeneration. Cell morphology was evidently affected by the substrate, mirroring the surface main features. Cells cultured on flat substrates presented a round shape, while cells with elongated processes were observed on the electrospun fibres. A higher concentration of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α was detected in culture media from microglia on fibres. Still, astrogliosis is not exacerbated when astrocytes are cultured in the presence of microglia-conditioned media obtained from cultures in contact with either substrate. Furthermore, a significant percentage of microglia was found to participate in the process of myelin phagocytosis, with the formation of multinucleated giant cells being observed only on films. Altogether, the results presented suggest that microglia in contact with the tested substrates may contribute to the regeneration process, putting forward P(TMC-CL) substrates as supporting matrices for nerve regeneration. PMID:25540243

  14. Ionic Grease Lubricants: Protic [Triethanolamine][Oleic Acid] and Aprotic [Choline][Oleic Acid].

    PubMed

    Mu, Liwen; Shi, Yijun; Ji, Tuo; Chen, Long; Yuan, Ruixia; Wang, Huaiyuan; Zhu, Jiahua

    2016-02-01

    Ionic liquid lubricants or lubricant additives have been studied intensively over past decades. However, ionic grease serving as lubricant has rarely been investigated so far. In this work, novel protic [triethanolamine][oleic acid] and aprotic [choline][oleic acid] ionic greases are successfully synthesized. These ionic greases can be directly used as lubricants without adding thickeners or other additives. Their distinct thermal and rheological properties are investigated and are well-correlated to their tribological properties. It is revealed that aprotic ionic grease shows superior temperature- and pressure-tolerant lubrication properties over those of protic ionic grease. The lubrication mechanism is studied, and it reveals that strong physical adsorption of ionic grease onto friction surface plays a dominating role for promoted lubrication instead of tribo-chemical film formation.

  15. Multiscale controls on water surface roughness and implications for remote sensing of rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overstreet, B. T.; Legleiter, C. J.; Harrison, L.; Pitcher, L. H.; Ryan, J.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Smith, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing has emerged as a viable and efficient tool for studying river systems and facilitating their rehabilitation. While many remote sensing applications utilize spectral information from the substrate and water column, light reflected from the water surface is often a significant component of the total at-sensor radiance. As water surface roughness (WSR) increases, a greater proportion of surface facets become oriented so as to reflect, rather than transmit, light. As a result, WSR exerts a primary control on the amount of surface reflected light measured by a remote sensor. WSR in rivers is a function of flow hydraulics, channel form, slope, bed roughness, and wind. While the relative influence of each of these components on WSR changes with scale, understanding these relationships could lead to methods for obtaining hydraulic information from image-derived metrics of WSR (i.e., surface reflectance). We collected field data on flow depth and velocity using an acoustic Doppler current profiler and simultaneously measured WSR using a custom built ultrasonic distance sensor on a diverse set of rivers ranging from a 15 m wide supraglacial river on the Greenland Ice Sheet to 100 m wide gravel-bed rivers in Wyoming and Oregon. Simultaneous multi- and hyperspectral image data sets indicate that image-derived surface reflectance is strongly correlated with WSR. Temporally distributed point measurements of flow depth, velocity, and WSR on the supraglacial river capture a threefold range in discharge (6 m3/s to 17 m3/s) and indicate that flow velocity is a primary control on WSR in smaller channels, even in the absence of sediment-induced bed roughness. Spatially distributed field measurements from large gravel-bed rivers suggests that spatial variability of WSR in the thalweg corresponds with geomorphic facies while WSR along the channel margins is more significantly influenced by grain size, relative submergence, and bank geometry. These findings suggest that

  16. Nickel Alloy Primary Water Bulk Surface and SCC Corrosion Film Analytical Characterization and SCC Mechanistic Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, D.; Lewis, N.; Hanson, M.; Rice, S.; Sanders, P.

    2007-04-18

    Alloy 600 corrosion coupon tests were performed: (1) to quantify the temperature dependency of general corrosion and (2) to characterize the composition and structure of bulk surface corrosion films for comparison with ongoing primary water SCC (PWSCC) crack tip corrosion film analyses. Results suggest that the thermal activation energy of Alloy 600 corrosion is consistent with the thermal activation energy of nickel alloy PWSCC. Analytical investigations of the structure and composition of Alloy 600 bulk surface corrosion oxides revealed a duplex (inner and outer) oxide layer structure. The outer layer is discontinuous and comprised of relatively large (1 to 3 {micro}m) nickel ferrite crystals and smaller ({approx}0.1 {micro}m) chromium containing nickel ferrite crystals. The inner layer consists of a relatively continuous chromite spinel (major phase) and chromia (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} minor phase) which formed through non-selective oxidation. Chromia and dealloyed Alloy 600 (highly Ni enriched metal) were only observed at 337 C (640 F) and only along the boundaries of deformation induced fine grains and subcells. Specimens having deformation free surfaces exhibited continuous uniform inner chromite spinel oxide layers. Specimens with machining induced surface deformation produced non-uniform inner layer oxides (chromite spinel, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and unoxidized material). PWSCC crack tip oxides, in contrast, were fine grain (no duplex structure) and consisted of both chromium rich spinels and ''NiO'' structure oxides. Generally, nickel rich oxides were more abundant under more oxidized conditions (reduced coolant hydrogen) and spinel rich crack tip oxides were favored under more reducing conditions (increased coolant hydrogen). Bulk surface corrosion film thickness did not correlate with observed SCC growth rates. These results suggest that corrosion is not the rate controlling step of PWSCC but rather that PWSCC and corrosion have a common rate controlling sub

  17. Saturn's Titan: Surface change, ammonia, and implications for atmospheric and tectonic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, R.M.; Kamp, L.W.; Matson, D.L.; Irwin, P.G.J.; Baines, K.H.; Boryta, M.D.; Leader, F.E.; Jaumann, R.; Smythe, W.D.; Sotin, C.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Pearl, J.C.; Hapke, B.W.; Lunine, J.; Combes, M.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Formisano, V.; Filacchione, G.; Langevin, R.Y.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.

    2009-01-01

    Titan is known to have a young surface. Here we present evidence from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer that it is currently geologically active. We report that changes in the near-infrared reflectance of a 73,000 km2 area on Titan (latitude 26° S, longitude 78° W) occurred between July 2004 and March of 2006. The reflectance of the area increased by a factor of two between July 2004 and March–April 2005; it then returned to the July 2004 level by November 2005. By late December 2005 the reflectance had surged upward again, establishing a new maximum. Thereafter, it trended downward for the next three months. Detailed spectrophotometric analyses suggest these changes happen at or very near the surface. The spectral differences between the region and its surroundings rule out changes in the distribution of the ices of reasonably expected materials such as H2O, CO2, and CH4 as possible causes. Remarkably, the change is spectrally consistent with the deposition and removal of NH3 frost over a water ice substrate. NH3 has been proposed as a constituent of Titan's interior and has never been reported on the surface. The detection of NH3 frost on the surface might possibly be explained by episodic effusive events occur which bring juvenile ammonia from the interior to the surface. If so, its decomposition would feed nitrogen to the atmosphere now and in the future. The lateral extent of the region exceeds that of active areas on the Earth (Hawaii) or Io (Loki).

  18. Can environmental conditions trigger cyanobacterial surfaces and following carbonate formation: implication for biomineralization and biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, C.; Dittrich, M.; Zhu, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we will give an overview what kind of the factors may trigger carbonate formations at the cell surfaces under a variety of environmental conditions. As examples, we will present the results from our recent studies on formation of calcium carbonates, dolomites and bio-cements. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the Synechococcuscell envelope are recognized key players in the nucleation of carbonates in marine and freshwater environments. Yet, little is known about a nutrient contents control over the molecular composition of Synechococcus cell envelope, and consequently, biomineralization. In the first study, we investigated how a variation of the phosphorus (P) in the growth media can lead to changes in the surface reactivity of the cells and impact their ability to form carbonates. The objective of the second study is to gain insights into the spatial distribution of cyanobacterial EPS and dolomite from different sediment layers of Khor Al-Adaid sabkha (Qatar). Here, we characterized microbial mats on molecular level in respect of organic and inorganic components using in-situ 2D Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) were used. Additionally, 2D chemical maps of sediment layers documented spectral characterizations of minerals and organic matter of microbial origins at high spatial resolution. Finally, we will show the results from the experiments with auto-phototrophic cyanobacteria Gloeocapsa PCC73106, which habitat on the monument surfaces, towards its application for bio-concrete, a product of microbial carbonate precipitation. We studied the biomineralization in biofilm forming Gloeocapsa PCC73106 on the concrete surface as a pre-requirement for microbial carbonate precipitation. Biomineralization on the concrete surface by live cells and killed cells were compared with that under the abiotic condition. Our experiments allow us to conclude that environmental conditions play a significant role in the control of

  19. Ecological Filtering and Plant Traits Variation Across Quarry Geomorphological Surfaces: Implication for Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilardelli, Federica; Sgorbati, Sergio; Armiraglio, Stefano; Citterio, Sandra; Gentili, Rodolfo

    2015-05-01

    Revegetation patterns after quarry abandonment have been widely studied from several ecological points of view, but a trait-based approach is still lacking. The aim of this study was to characterise the plant species assemblages and the associated functional traits filtered on different geomorphological surfaces in abandoned limestone quarry areas: artificial cliffs, embankments, and platforms. We then verified if species with certain traits were better able to overcome the dispersal and environmental filters necessary for establishment. To this aim, we analyzed 113 vegetation plots and collected data on 25 morphological, ecological, and dispersal traits to detect species adaptaions across these man-made environments. As a case study, we investigated the extraction basin of Botticino (Lombardy, Italy), the second largest in Italy. The results obtained by SIMPER and CCA analyses showed that rockiness, stoniness, slope, elevation, and time of surfaces are the main filters that varied across quarries and affected plant assemblages at the macro-scale level. Across the three geomorphological surfaces (meso-scale) of quarries, more specific abiotic filters selecting species were found. In turn, traits differentiation according to the three main geomorphological surfaces of quarry emphasized that further filters acting at the micro-scale imply differences in dispersal mechanisms and resource availability. This work highlighted the utility to study species assemblages and environmental filters to address quarry restoration according to the type of geomorphological surface. The investigation of some traits (chorological form, life forms, seed dispersal,s and plant height) can furnish some interesting indications for practice individuating further abiotic filters acting at the micro-scale.

  20. Ecological filtering and plant traits variation across quarry geomorphological surfaces: implication for restoration.

    PubMed

    Gilardelli, Federica; Sgorbati, Sergio; Armiraglio, Stefano; Citterio, Sandra; Gentili, Rodolfo

    2015-05-01

    Revegetation patterns after quarry abandonment have been widely studied from several ecological points of view, but a trait-based approach is still lacking. The aim of this study was to characterise the plant species assemblages and the associated functional traits filtered on different geomorphological surfaces in abandoned limestone quarry areas: artificial cliffs, embankments, and platforms. We then verified if species with certain traits were better able to overcome the dispersal and environmental filters necessary for establishment. To this aim, we analyzed 113 vegetation plots and collected data on 25 morphological, ecological, and dispersal traits to detect species adaptaions across these man-made environments. As a case study, we investigated the extraction basin of Botticino (Lombardy, Italy), the second largest in Italy. The results obtained by SIMPER and CCA analyses showed that rockiness, stoniness, slope, elevation, and time of surfaces are the main filters that varied across quarries and affected plant assemblages at the macro-scale level. Across the three geomorphological surfaces (meso-scale) of quarries, more specific abiotic filters selecting species were found. In turn, traits differentiation according to the three main geomorphological surfaces of quarry emphasized that further filters acting at the micro-scale imply differences in dispersal mechanisms and resource availability. This work highlighted the utility to study species assemblages and environmental filters to address quarry restoration according to the type of geomorphological surface. The investigation of some traits (chorological form, life forms, seed dispersal,s and plant height) can furnish some interesting indications for practice individuating further abiotic filters acting at the micro-scale.

  1. The footprint of Alaskan tundra fires during the past half-century: implications for surface properties and radiative forcing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocha, Adrian V.; Loranty, Michael M.; Higuera, Phil E.; Mack, Michelle C.; Hu, Feng Sheng; Jones, Benjamin M.; Breen, Amy L.; Rastetter, Edward B.; Goetz, Scott J.; Shaver, Gus R.

    2012-01-01

    Recent large and frequent fires above the Alaskan arctic circle have forced a reassessment of the ecological and climatological importance of fire in arctic tundra ecosystems. Here we provide a general overview of the occurrence, distribution, and ecological and climate implications of Alaskan tundra fires over the past half-century using spatially explicit climate, fire, vegetation and remote sensing datasets for Alaska. Our analyses highlight the importance of vegetation biomass and environmental conditions in regulating tundra burning, and demonstrate that most tundra ecosystems are susceptible to burn, providing the environmental conditions are right. Over the past two decades, fire perimeters above the arctic circle have increased in size and importance, especially on the North Slope, indicating that future wildfire projections should account for fire regime changes in these regions. Remote sensing data and a literature review of thaw depths indicate that tundra fires have both positive and negative implications for climatic feedbacks including a decadal increase in albedo radiative forcing immediately after a fire, a stimulation of surface greenness and a persistent long-term (>10 year) increase in thaw depth. In order to address the future impact of tundra fires on climate, a better understanding of the control of tundra fire occurrence as well as the long-term impacts on ecosystem carbon cycling will be required.

  2. Seasonal changes in Titan's weather patterns and the evolution and implications of accompanying surface changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtle, Elizabeth; McEwen, Alfred

    2012-07-01

    Post-equinox changes in Titan's atmospheric circulation brought clouds and extensive methane rain to low latitudes [1,2]. Observations by Cassini ISS over the ensuing ~1.5 yr revealed surface changes to be short-lived; few rain-darkened areas persisted through 2011. In an unsaturated permeable medium, infiltration rates are >20 mm/week [3], so persistence of surface liquids over several months suggests that either an impermeable layer or the local methane table lies close to the surface. Evaporation rates >1 mm/week are predicted at low latitudes [4] and 20 mm/week has been documented at Titan's poles [5], thus areas where darkening persisted must be saturated ground at the level of a methane table or have had ponded liquid 2.5-50 cm deep. Several smaller areas of surface brightening were also observed, a phenomenon that is less well understood. Cassini VIMS spectra of these regions do not match clouds or other surface units [6]. Interpretations include cleaning by runoff [2] or deposition of a fine-grained volatile solid as the result of evaporative cooling of the surface [6]. In general, brightening has persisted longer than darkening, but these areas are also reverting to their original appearance, possibly due to evaporation/sublimation of the bright material or re-deposition of darker hydrocarbons by aeolian transport or precipitation from the atmosphere. Cassini and Earth-based observers monitor Titan frequently, but few clouds have been observed since Fall 2010, which may indicate that enough methane was removed from the atmosphere and the lapse rate stabilized sufficiently that activity will not resume until the onset of convection at mid-northern latitudes later in northern spring. A similar lapse followed a 2004 outburst of south-polar clouds [7], which also appeared to produce significant rainfall [8]. [1] Turtle et al., GRL 38, L03203, doi:10.1029/2010GL046266, 2011. [2] Turtle et al., Science 331, 10.1126/science.1201063. 2011. [3] Hayes et al., GRL 35

  3. Modelling interstellar physics and chemistry: implications for surface and solid-state processes.

    PubMed

    Williams, David; Viti, Serena

    2013-07-13

    We discuss several types of regions in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and other galaxies in which the chemistry appears to be influenced or dominated by surface and solid-state processes occurring on or in interstellar dust grains. For some of these processes, for example, the formation of H₂ molecules, detailed experimental and theoretical approaches have provided excellent fundamental data for incorporation into astrochemical models. In other cases, there is an astrochemical requirement for much more laboratory and computational study, and we highlight these needs in our description. Nevertheless, in spite of the limitations of the data, it is possible to infer from astrochemical modelling that surface and solid-state processes play a crucial role in astronomical chemistry from early epochs of the Universe up to the present day.

  4. Spatial Arrangment of Organic Compounds on a Model Mineral Surface: Implications for Soil Organic Matter Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Petridis, Loukas; Ambaye, Haile Arena; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Kilbey, S. Michael; Lokitz, Bradley S; Lauter, Valeria; Mayes, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of the mineral organic carbon interface may influence the extent of stabilization of organic carbon compounds in soils, which is important for global climate futures. The nanoscale structure of a model interface was examined here by depositing films of organic carbon compounds of contrasting chemical character, hydrophilic glucose and amphiphilic stearic acid, onto a soil mineral analogue (Al2O3). Neutron reflectometry, a technique which provides depth-sensitive insight into the organization of the thin films, indicates that glucose molecules reside in a layer between Al2O3 and stearic acid, a result that was verified by water contact angle measurements. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal the thermodynamic driving force behind glucose partitioning on the mineral interface: The entropic penalty of confining the less mobile glucose on the mineral surface is lower than for stearic acid. The fundamental information obtained here helps rationalize how complex arrangements of organic carbon on soil mineral surfaces may arise

  5. Modelling interstellar physics and chemistry: implications for surface and solid-state processes.

    PubMed

    Williams, David; Viti, Serena

    2013-07-13

    We discuss several types of regions in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and other galaxies in which the chemistry appears to be influenced or dominated by surface and solid-state processes occurring on or in interstellar dust grains. For some of these processes, for example, the formation of H₂ molecules, detailed experimental and theoretical approaches have provided excellent fundamental data for incorporation into astrochemical models. In other cases, there is an astrochemical requirement for much more laboratory and computational study, and we highlight these needs in our description. Nevertheless, in spite of the limitations of the data, it is possible to infer from astrochemical modelling that surface and solid-state processes play a crucial role in astronomical chemistry from early epochs of the Universe up to the present day. PMID:23734052

  6. Crystal fractionation in the SNC meteorites: Implications for surface units on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1987-01-01

    Almost all rock types in the SNC meteorites are cumulates, products of magma differentiation by crystal fractionation (addition or removal of crystals). If the SNC meteorites are from the surface of Mars or near sub-surface, then most of the igneous units on Mars are differentiated. Basaltic units probably experienced minor to moderate differentiation, but ultrabasic units probably experienced extreme differentiation. Products of this differentiation may include Fe-rich gabbro, pyroxenite, peridotite (and thus serpentine), and possibly massive sulfides. The SNC meteorites include ten lithologies (three in EETA79001), eight of which are crystal cumulates. The other lithologies, EETA79001 A and B are subophitic basalts. The cumulate lithologies ALHA77005 and EETA79001 C were not fully described or discussed.

  7. Monthly summaries of merchant ship surface marine observations and implications for climate variability studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Réjean; Lin, Charles A.

    1992-02-01

    We compute the interannual fluctuations of the surface heat budget of the North Atlantic using the trimmed monthly summaries of the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere DataSet (COADS) for the period 1950 1979. The presence of long-period trends in the heat budget imply large variations of the northward cross-equatorial heat transport over the years. To assess the reliability of these variations, we compare the COADS climate signal to that derived from the ocean weather stations (OWSs) of the North Atlantic. The sea surface temperature, air temperature and sea level pressure show good correlation between the anomaly time series derived from the merchant ship monthly summaries of COADS, and those derived from OWS monthly summaries, except for northernmost locations during winter. In contrast, the sensible and latent heat parameters, which require simultaneous measurements of various variables, have merchant ships and ocean weather stations anomaly time series that are poorly correlated. Only in heavily travelled latitudes and during winter, when the air-sea heat exchange anomalies are large, are the merchant ship measurements able to reproduce the interannual fluctuations of the heat fluxes. The long-period trends in the surface heat budget of North Atlantic equatorward of 40° N implied by COADS thus appear unrepresentative of true climate trends. The COADS trends result from a gradual increase in the magnitude of the reported winds over the years due probably to variations in the ratio of measured to estimated winds, as well as from long period fluctuations in the near surface vertical temperature and humidity gradients.

  8. Plasma sterilization of poly lactic acid ultrasound contrast agents: surface modification and implications for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Hsu, Jennifer; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2009-11-01

    Poly lactic acid (PLA) ultrasound contrast agents (CA) have been developed previously in our laboratory for ultrasound (US) imaging, as well as surface coated with doxorubicin to create a potential targeted platform of chemotherapeutic delivery using focused US. However, we have previously found it impossible to sterilize these agents while at the same time maintaining their acoustic properties, a task that would probably require fabrication within a clean facility. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of using plasma to sterilize these CA while maintaining maximum echogenicity, a step that would greatly facilitate in vivo investigations. Effects of plasma exposure time (1, 3 and 6 min) and intensity (low-10 mA, 6.8 W; medium-15 mA, 10.5 W; and high-25 mA, 18 W) on the CAs' acoustic properties, surface morphology, zeta potential, capacity to carry chemotherapeutics and overall sterility are described. Both increases in plasma intensity and exposure time increased CA zeta potential and also significantly increased drug payload. High-intensity plasma exposure for 3 min was found to be an optimal sterilization protocol for maximal (100%) preservation of CA echogenicity. Plasma exposure resulted in sterile samples and maintained original CA enhancement of 20 dB and acoustic half-life over 75 min, while increasing CA zeta potential by 11 mV and doxorubicin loading efficiency by 10%. This study not only shows how a highly temperature- and pressure-sensitive agent can be sterilized using plasma, but also that surface modification can be used to increase surface binding of the drug. PMID:19766380

  9. Low-high temperature behaviour of olivine: implication for Mercury surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestola, Fabrizio; Ferrari, Sabrina; Massironi, Matteo; Cremonese, Gabriele; Visona, Dario; Bruno, Marco; Fioretti, Anna Maria; Redhammer, Gunther J.

    Under variable temperature conditions minerals may significantly change their crystal struc-ture (e.g. change of the atomic positions) and consequently their spectral signatures. This could limits our capability of inferring compositions and rheological properties of geological materials from remote sensing acquisition of extraterrestrial surfaces. When (a) the temper-ature conditions are not well constrained and (b) the properties of the material as a function of temperature are not characterized there is actually a high probability of misinterpreting the acquired data. In particular, MESSENGER (NASA) and Bepi-Colombo (ESA) missions will record spectral images of the Mercury surface, which experiences extreme temperature varia-tions (T between 85 and 700 K) due to its long rotational period, small heliocentric distance and eccentric orbit. Within such a wide range of temperatures the minerals constituting the surface of Mercury could undergo marked structural changes due to processes which are totally reversible (thermal expansion, polymorphic phase transformations) but would strongly affect the resulting spectral signatures. This could make the spectral interpretation very complex and could potentially lead to erroneous geological interpretations. In this work we investigated the low-high temperature evolution of the crystal structure of a natural olivine (solid solution between forsterite and fayalite end-members) extracted from a meteorite. Olivine is in fact one of the hypothesized constituents of Mercury crust. In order to determine its thermal expansion and possible phase transformations X-ray diffraction data will be collected on olivine between 80 and 700 K, the temperature range of the Mercury surface. This work wants to be the starting point in understanding which kind of change we could expect in the spectral signatures.

  10. Carbon and steel surfaces modified by Leptothrix discophora SP-6: characterization and implications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Lu, Yuzhuo; Yang, Xinghong; Shi, Xianming

    2007-12-01

    Leptothrix discophora SP-6, a type of manganese(Mn)-oxidizing bacteria, has been known to accumulate Mn oxides from the aqueous environment and thus play a key role in microbiologically influenced corrosion by increasing the electrochemical potential of steel and other metals. Similarly, this bacterium was found to modify the surface of glassy carbon in aqueous solution and increase its potential (i.e., ennoblement). In the latter case, biomineralized Mn oxides can be used as cathodic reactants for a new generation of microbial fuel cells featuring a biocathode. In this preliminary study, factors affecting the biofilm formation and biomineralization processes were examined. The inflow of air into the culture medium was found essential to sustain the ennoblement of substrate electrodes. The OCP and FESEM/EDS data indicated that a smoother initial substrate surface generally led to better ennoblement. Polarizing the carbon electrode at +500 mV(SCE) for 15 min was found to facilitate the ennoblement on carbon electrodes, and so did coating it with a poly(L-lysine) layer. Independent of substrate material, initial surface roughness, and pretreatment, there were three parameters in the EIS equivalent circuit that correlated well with the OCP indicating the level of ennoblement by L. discophora SP-6, i.e., electrolyte resistance, double-layer capacitance, and low-frequencies capacitance. These fascinating findings merit further investigation as they may shed light on the fundamental bacteria/substrate interactions and help advance the knowledge base needed forthe engineering applications. PMID:18186327

  11. Solar Wind Sputtering of Lunar Surface Materials: Role and Some Possible Implications of Potential Sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Meyer, F.; Reinhold, c.

    2010-01-01

    Solar-wind induced sputtering of the lunar surface includes, in principle, both kinetic and potential sputtering. The role of the latter mechanism, however, in many focused studies has not been properly ascertained due partly to lack of data but can also be attributed to the assertion that the contribution of solar-wind heavy ions to the total sputtering is quite low due to their low number density compared to solar-wind protons. Limited laboratory measurements show marked enhancements in the sputter yields of slow-moving, highly-charged ions impacting oxides. Lunar surface sputtering yields are important as they affect, e.g., estimates of the compositional changes in the lunar surface, its erosion rate, as well as its contribution to the exosphere as well as estimates of hydrogen and water contents. Since the typical range of solar-wind ions at 1 keV/amu is comparable to the thickness of the amorphous rim found on lunar soil grains, i.e. few 10s nm, lunar simulant samples JSC-1A AGGL are specifically enhanced to have such rims in addition to the other known characteristics of the actual lunar soil particles. However, most, if not all laboratory studies of potential sputtering were carried out in single crystal targets, quite different from the rim s amorphous structure. The effect of this structural difference on the extent of potential sputtering has not, to our knowledge, been investigated to date.

  12. Thermal convection in a rotating spherical body with free surface: Implications for Saturn's moon Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchta, Milan; Čadek, O.; Tobie, G.

    2012-10-01

    We present a new numerical tool to simulate thermal cooling and spin evolution of a rotating body with freely deformable surface and complex rheology. While the long-term mechanical properties of the body are mimicked by visco-plastic rheology including different creep mechanisms, its despinning is controlled by Andrá de visco-elastic model. Variabledensity approximation (sticky air) and implicit description of the surface are combined in order to track the surface evolution. We use this tool to investigate the shape of Saturn's moon Iapetus, whose topography shows enigmatic remnant features from the moon's early history when the spin rate and temperature were significantly higher than at present. Our model is characterized by three parameters: the initial temperature (ranging from 230 to 270 K), the initial rotational period (8-15 hours), and the grain size of ice (0.01-100 mm) defining the relative role of diffusion creep in total deformation. For these three parameters, we systematically explore the model space and show for which combinations of parameters the body can be effectively despun while maintaining its strongly flattened shape. Our results indicate that the despinning of Iapetus could not occur without interaction with an external body.

  13. Amorphization of quartz by friction: Implication to silica-gel lubrication of fault surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yu; Muto, Jun; Nagahama, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Ichiko; Miura, Takashi; Arakawa, Ichiro

    2012-11-01

    To understand physico-chemical processes at real contacts (asperities) on fault surfaces, we conducted pin-on-disk friction experiments at room temperature, using single crystalline quartz disks and quartz pins. Velocity weakening from friction coefficient μ ˜ 0.6 to 0.4 was observed under apparent normal stresses of 8-19 (18 > 19), when the slip rate was increased from 0.003 to 2.6 m/s. Frictional surfaces revealed ductile deformation of wear materials. The Raman spectra of frictional tracks showed blue shifts and broadening of quartz main bands, and appearance of new peaks at 490-520 and 610 cm-1. All these features are indicative of pressure- and strain-induced amorphization of quartz. The mapping analyses of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy at room dry conditions suggest selective hydration of wear materials. It is possible that the strained Si-O-Si bridges in amorphous silica preferentially react with water to form silica-gel. In natural fault systems, amorphous materials would be produced at real fault contacts and accumulate over the fault surfaces with displacements. Subsequent hydration would lead to significant reduction of fault strength during slip.

  14. Carbon and steel surfaces modified by Leptothrix discophora SP-6: characterization and implications.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Lu, Yuzhuo; Yang, Xinghong; Shi, Xianming

    2007-12-01

    Leptothrix discophora SP-6, a type of manganese(Mn)-oxidizing bacteria, has been known to accumulate Mn oxides from the aqueous environment and thus play a key role in microbiologically influenced corrosion by increasing the electrochemical potential of steel and other metals. Similarly, this bacterium was found to modify the surface of glassy carbon in aqueous solution and increase its potential (i.e., ennoblement). In the latter case, biomineralized Mn oxides can be used as cathodic reactants for a new generation of microbial fuel cells featuring a biocathode. In this preliminary study, factors affecting the biofilm formation and biomineralization processes were examined. The inflow of air into the culture medium was found essential to sustain the ennoblement of substrate electrodes. The OCP and FESEM/EDS data indicated that a smoother initial substrate surface generally led to better ennoblement. Polarizing the carbon electrode at +500 mV(SCE) for 15 min was found to facilitate the ennoblement on carbon electrodes, and so did coating it with a poly(L-lysine) layer. Independent of substrate material, initial surface roughness, and pretreatment, there were three parameters in the EIS equivalent circuit that correlated well with the OCP indicating the level of ennoblement by L. discophora SP-6, i.e., electrolyte resistance, double-layer capacitance, and low-frequencies capacitance. These fascinating findings merit further investigation as they may shed light on the fundamental bacteria/substrate interactions and help advance the knowledge base needed forthe engineering applications.

  15. Identification of polymer surface adsorbed proteins implicated in pluripotent human embryonic stem cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Moamen; Rao, Wei; Smith, James G W; Anderson, Daniel G; Langer, Robert; Young, Lorraine E; Barrett, David A; Davies, Martyn C; Denning, Chris; Alexander, Morgan R

    2016-08-16

    Improved biomaterials are required for application in regenerative medicine, biosensing, and as medical devices. The response of cells to the chemistry of polymers cultured in media is generally regarded as being dominated by proteins adsorbed to the surface. Here we use mass spectrometry to identify proteins adsorbed from a complex mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) conditioned medium found to support pluripotent human embryonic stem cell (hESC) expansion on a plasma etched tissue culture polystyrene surface. A total of 71 proteins were identified, of which 14 uniquely correlated with the surface on which pluripotent stem cell expansion was achieved. We have developed a microarray combinatorial protein spotting approach to test the potential of these 14 proteins to support expansion of a hESC cell line (HUES-7) and a human induced pluripotent stem cell line (ReBl-PAT) on a novel polymer (N-(4-Hydroxyphenyl) methacrylamide). These proteins were spotted to form a primary array yielding several protein mixture 'hits' that enhanced cell attachment to the polymer. A second array was generated to test the function of a refined set of protein mixtures. We found that a combination of heat shock protein 90 and heat shock protein-1 encourage elevated adherence of pluripotent stem cells at a level comparable to fibronectin pre-treatment. PMID:27466628

  16. Surface mine planning and design implications and theory of a visual environmental quality predictive model

    SciTech Connect

    Burley, J.B.

    1999-07-01

    Surface mine planners and designers are searching for scientifically based tools to assist in the pre-mine planning and post-mine development or surface mine sites. In this study, the author presents a science based visual and environmental quality predictive model useful in preparing and assessing landscape treatments for surface mine sites. The equation explains 67 percent of respondent preference, with an overall p-value for the equation >0.0001 and a p-value >0.05 for each regressor. Regressors employed in the equation include an environmental quality index, foreground vegetation, distant nonvegetation, people, vehicles, utilities, foreground flowers, foreground erosion, wildlife, landscape openness, landscape mystery, and noosphericness (a measure of human disturbance). The equation can be explained with an Intrusion/Neutral Modifier/Temporal Enhancement Theory which suggests that human intrusions upon other humans results in landscape of low preference and which also suggests that landscape containing natural and special temporal features such as wildlife and flowers can enhance the value of a landscape scene. This research supports the importance of visual barriers such as berms and vegetation screens during mining operations and supports public perceptions concerning many types of industrial activities. In addition, the equation can be applied to study post-mining landscape development plans to maximize the efficiency and effectiveness of landscape treatments.

  17. Geomorphic adjustment to hydrologic modifications along a meandering river: Implications for surface flooding on a floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Brandon L.; Keim, Richard F.; Johnson, Erin L.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Marre, Saraline; King, Sammy L.

    2016-09-01

    Responses of large regulated rivers to contemporary changes in base level are not well understood. We used field measurements and historical analysis of air photos and topographic maps to identify geomorphic trends of the lower White River, Arkansas, USA, in the 70 years following base-level lowering at its confluence with the Mississippi River and concurrent with flood control by dams. Incision was identified below a knickpoint area upstream of St. Charles, AR, and increases over the lowermost ~90 km of the study site to ~2 m near the confluence with the Mississippi River. Mean bankfull width increased by 30 m (21%) from 1930 to 2010. Bank widening appears to be the result of flow regulation above the incision knickpoint and concomitant with incision below the knickpoint. Hydraulic modeling indicated that geomorphic adjustments likely reduced flooding by 58% during frequent floods in the incised, lowermost floodplain affected by backwater flooding from the Mississippi River and by 22% above the knickpoint area. Dominance of backwater flooding in the incised reach indicates that incision is more important than flood control on the lower White River in altering flooding and also suggests that the Mississippi River may be the dominant control in shaping the lower floodplain. Overall, results highlight the complex geomorphic adjustment in large river-floodplain systems in response to anthropogenic modifications and their implications, including reduced river-floodplain connectivity.

  18. Surface exploration of a room-temperature ionic liquid-chitin composite film decorated with electrochemically deposited PdFeNi trimetallic alloy nanoparticles by pattern recognition: an elegant approach to developing a novel biotin biosensor.

    PubMed

    Gholivand, Mohammad-Bagher; Jalalvand, Ali R; Goicoechea, Hector C; Paimard, Giti; Skov, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel biosensing system for the determination of biotin (BTN) based on electrodeposition of palladium-iron-nickel (PdFeNi) trimetallic alloy nanoparticles (NPs) onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL)-chitin (Ch) composite film (PdFeNi/ChRTIL/GCE) is established. NPs have a wide range of applications in science and technology and their sizes are often measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or X-ray diffraction. Here, we used a pattern recognition method (digital image processing, DIP) for measuring particle size distributions (PSDs) from scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images in the presence of an uneven background. Different depositions were performed by varying the number of cyclic potential scans (N) during electroreduction step. It was observed that the physicochemical properties of the deposits were correlated to the performance of the PdFeNi/ChRTIL/GCE with respect to BTN assay. The best results were obtained for eight electrodeposition cyclic scans, where small-sized particles (19.54 ± 6.27 nm) with high density (682 particles µm(-2)) were obtained. Under optimized conditions, a linear range from 2.0 to 44.0 × 10(-9) mol L(-1) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.6 × 10(-9) mol L(-1) were obtained. The PdFeNi/ChRTIL nanocomposite showed excellent compatibility, enhanced electron transfer kinetics, large electroactive surface area, and was highly sensitive, selective, and stable toward BTN determination. Finally, the PdFeNi/ChRTIL/GCE was satisfactorily applied to the determination of BTN in infant milk powder, liver, and egg yolk samples. PMID:25281100

  19. Surface exploration of a room-temperature ionic liquid-chitin composite film decorated with electrochemically deposited PdFeNi trimetallic alloy nanoparticles by pattern recognition: an elegant approach to developing a novel biotin biosensor.

    PubMed

    Gholivand, Mohammad-Bagher; Jalalvand, Ali R; Goicoechea, Hector C; Paimard, Giti; Skov, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a novel biosensing system for the determination of biotin (BTN) based on electrodeposition of palladium-iron-nickel (PdFeNi) trimetallic alloy nanoparticles (NPs) onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL)-chitin (Ch) composite film (PdFeNi/ChRTIL/GCE) is established. NPs have a wide range of applications in science and technology and their sizes are often measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or X-ray diffraction. Here, we used a pattern recognition method (digital image processing, DIP) for measuring particle size distributions (PSDs) from scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images in the presence of an uneven background. Different depositions were performed by varying the number of cyclic potential scans (N) during electroreduction step. It was observed that the physicochemical properties of the deposits were correlated to the performance of the PdFeNi/ChRTIL/GCE with respect to BTN assay. The best results were obtained for eight electrodeposition cyclic scans, where small-sized particles (19.54 ± 6.27 nm) with high density (682 particles µm(-2)) were obtained. Under optimized conditions, a linear range from 2.0 to 44.0 × 10(-9) mol L(-1) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.6 × 10(-9) mol L(-1) were obtained. The PdFeNi/ChRTIL nanocomposite showed excellent compatibility, enhanced electron transfer kinetics, large electroactive surface area, and was highly sensitive, selective, and stable toward BTN determination. Finally, the PdFeNi/ChRTIL/GCE was satisfactorily applied to the determination of BTN in infant milk powder, liver, and egg yolk samples.

  20. Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah. Implications for Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Tanana, Heather; Holt, Rebecca

    2011-12-01

    Unconventional fuel development will require scarce water resources. In an environment characterized by scarcity, and where most water resources are fully allocated, prospective development will require minimizing water use and seeking to use water resources in the most efficient manner. Conjunctive use of surface and groundwater provides just such an opportunity. Conjunctive use includes two main practices: First, integrating surface water diversions and groundwater withdrawals to maximize efficiency and minimize impacts on other resource users and ecological processes. Second, conjunctive use includes capturing surplus or unused surface water and injecting or infiltrating that water into groundwater aquifers in order to increase recharge rates. Conjunctive management holds promise as a means of addressing some of the West's most intractable problems. Conjunctive management can firm up water supplies by more effectively capturing spring runoff and surplus water, and by integrating its use with groundwater withdrawals; surface and groundwater use can be further integrated with managed aquifer recharge projects. Such integration can maximize water storage and availability, while simultaneously minimizing evaporative loss, reservoir sedimentation, and surface use impacts. Any of these impacts, if left unresolved, could derail commercial-scale unconventional fuel development. Unconventional fuel developers could therefore benefit from incorporating conjunctive use into their development plans. Despite its advantages, conjunctive use is not a panacea. Conjunctive use means using resources in harmony to maximize and stabilize long-term supplies it does not mean maximizing the use of two separate but interrelated resources for unsustainable short-term gains and it cannot resolve all problems or provide water where no unappropriated water exists. Moreover, conjunctive use may pose risks to ecological values forgone when water that would otherwise remain in a stream is

  1. Influence of single-walled carbon nanotubes (< 0.001 wt %) and/or zwitter-ionic phospholipid (SOPC) surface layer on the behaviour of the gradient flexoelectric and surface induced polarization domains arising in a homeotropic E7 (a mixture of 5CB, 7CB, 8OCB and 5CT) nematic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinov, H. P.; Pavlič, J. I.; Marinov, Y. G.; Petrov, A. G.; Sridevi, S.; Rafailov, P. M.; Dettlaff-Weglikowska, U.

    2010-11-01

    The influence has been studied of single-walled carbon nanotubes with a concentration between 0.0001 and 0.001 wt % and a dried zwitter-ionic phospholipid (SOPC: l-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) layer of thickness, smaller than 0.5 μm, deposited only on a half of one of the two glass plates, on the behaviour of the gradient flexoelectric and surface polarization induced domains arising in a homeotropic nematic E7 (a mixture of 5CB, 7CB, 8OCB and 5CT) layer. We have observed for the first time different polar on/off formation of the surface polarization induced domains in the region of the liquid crystal cell without surface deposited lipid SOPC layer. On the other hand, the SOPC layer strongly decreases the gradient of the electric field thus leading to less-pronounced flexoelectric domains. However, the SOPC layer does not influence the creation of surface polarization induced domains and of injection induced domains arising at voltages above 4V. Appropriate dynamic light transmitted curves have been recorded and typical microphotographs have been taken.

  2. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  3. Nanoporous membranes with electrochemically switchable, chemically stabilized ionic selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Leo J.; Wheeler, David R.; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2015-10-01

    Nanopore size, shape, and surface charge all play important roles in regulating ionic transport through nanoporous membranes. The ability to control these parameters in situ provides a means to create ion transport systems tunable in real time. Here, we present a new strategy to address this challenge, utilizing three unique electrochemically switchable chemistries to manipulate the terminal functional group and control the resulting surface charge throughout ensembles of gold plated nanopores in ion-tracked polycarbonate membranes 3 cm2 in area. We demonstrate the diazonium mediated surface functionalization with (1) nitrophenyl chemistry, (2) quinone chemistry, and (3) previously unreported trimethyl lock chemistry. Unlike other works, these chemistries are chemically stabilized, eliminating the need for a continuously applied gate voltage to maintain a given state and retain ionic selectivity. The effect of surface functionalization and nanopore geometry on selective ion transport through these functionalized membranes is characterized in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride at pH = 5.7. The nitrophenyl surface allows for ionic selectivity to be irreversibly switched in situ from cation-selective to anion-selective upon reduction to an aminophenyl surface. The quinone-terminated surface enables reversible changes between no ionic selectivity and a slight cationic selectivity. Alternatively, the trimethyl lock allows ionic selectivity to be reversibly switched by up to a factor of 8, approaching ideal selectivity, as a carboxylic acid group is electrochemically revealed or hidden. By varying the pore shape from cylindrical to conical, it is demonstrated that a controllable directionality can be imparted to the ionic selectivity. Combining control of nanopore geometry with stable, switchable chemistries facilitates superior control of molecular transport across the membrane, enabling tunable ion transport systems.Nanopore size, shape, and surface charge all play

  4. Nanoporous membranes with electrochemically switchable, chemically stabilized ionic selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Leo J.; Wheeler, David R.; Spoerke, Erik D.

    2015-10-01

    Nanopore size, shape, and surface charge all play important roles in regulating ionic transport through nanoporous membranes. The ability to control these parameters in situ provides a means to create ion transport systems tunable in real time. Here, we present a new strategy to address this challenge, utilizing three unique electrochemically switchable chemistries to manipulate the terminal functional group and control the resulting surface charge throughout ensembles of gold plated nanopores in ion-tracked polycarbonate membranes 3 cm2 in area. We demonstrate the diazonium mediated surface functionalization with (1) nitrophenyl chemistry, (2) quinone chemistry, and (3) previously unreported trimethyl lock chemistry. Unlike other works, these chemistries are chemically stabilized, eliminating the need for a continuously applied gate voltage to maintain a given state and retain ionic selectivity. The effect of surface functionalization and nanopore geometry on selective ion transport through these functionalized membranes is characterized in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride at pH = 5.7. The nitrophenyl surface allows for ionic selectivity to be irreversibly switched in situ from cation-selective to anion-selective upon reduction to an aminophenyl surface. The quinone-terminated surface enables reversible changes between no ionic selectivity and a slight cationic selectivity. Alternatively, the trimethyl lock allows ionic selectivity to be reversibly switched by up to a factor of 8, approaching ideal selectivity, as a carboxylic acid group is electrochemically revealed or hidden. By varying the pore shape from cylindrical to conical, it is demonstrated that a controllable directionality can be imparted to the ionic selectivity. Combining control of nanopore geometry with stable, switchable chemistries facilitates superior control of molecular transport across the membrane, enabling tunable ion transport systems.Nanopore size, shape, and surface charge all play

  5. Energy Crops and their Implications on Soil Carbon Sequestration, Surface Energy and Water Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Barman, R.; Jain, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    The quest to meet growing energy demand with low greenhouse gas emissions has increased attention on the potential of existing and advanced biomass energy crops. Potential energy crops include row crops such as corn, and perennial grasses such as switchgrass. However, a massive expansion of bioenergy crops raises many questions such as: how and where to grow energy crops; and what will be the impacts of growing large scale biofuel crops on the terrestrial hydrological cycle, the surface energy budget, soil carbon sequestration and the concurrent effects on the climate system. An integrated modeling system is being developed with in the framework of a land surface model, the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM), and being applied to address these questions.This framework accounts for the biophysical, physiological and biogeochemical systems governing important processes that regulate crop growth including water, energy and nutrient cycles within the soil-plant-atmosphere system. One row crop (Corn) and two energy crops (Switchgrass and Miscanthus) are studied in current framework. Dynamic phenology processes and parameters for simulating each crop have been developed using observed data from a north to south gradient of field trial sites. This study will specifically focus on the agricultural regions in the US and in Europe. The potential productivity of these three crops will be assessed in terms of carbon sequestration, surface energy and water balance and their spatial variability. This study will help to quantify the importance of various environmental aspects towards modeling bioenergy crops and to better understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of bioenergy crop yields.

  6. Implications of atmospheric conditions for analysis of surface temperature variability derived from landscape-scale thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerle, Albin; Meier, Fred; Heinl, Michael; Egger, Angelika; Leitinger, Georg

    2016-08-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) cameras perfectly bridge the gap between (i) on-site measurements of land surface temperature (LST) providing high temporal resolution at the cost of low spatial coverage and (ii) remotely sensed data from satellites that provide high spatial coverage at relatively low spatio-temporal resolution. While LST data from satellite (LSTsat) and airborne platforms are routinely corrected for atmospheric effects, such corrections are barely applied for LST from ground-based TIR imagery (using TIR cameras; LSTcam). We show the consequences of neglecting atmospheric effects on LSTcam of different vegetated surfaces at landscape scale. We compare LST measured from different platforms, focusing on the comparison of LST data from on-site radiometry (LSTosr) and LSTcam using a commercially available TIR camera in the region of Bozen/Bolzano (Italy). Given a digital elevation model and measured vertical air temperature profiles, we developed a multiple linear regression model to correct LSTcam data for atmospheric influences. We could show the distinct effect of atmospheric conditions and related radiative processes along the measurement path on LSTcam, proving the necessity to correct LSTcam data on landscape scale, despite their relatively low measurement distances compared to remotely sensed data. Corrected LSTcam data revealed the dampening effect of the atmosphere, especially at high temperature differences between the atmosphere and the vegetated surface. Not correcting for these effects leads to erroneous LST estimates, in particular to an underestimation of the heterogeneity in LST, both in time and space. In the most pronounced case, we found a temperature range extension of almost 10 K.

  7. Spatiotemporal dynamics of surface water networks across a global biodiversity hotspot—implications for conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulbure, Mirela G.; Kininmonth, Stuart; Broich, Mark

    2014-11-01

    The concept of habitat networks represents an important tool for landscape conservation and management at regional scales. Previous studies simulated degradation of temporally fixed networks but few quantified the change in network connectivity from disintegration of key features that undergo naturally occurring spatiotemporal dynamics. This is particularly of concern for aquatic systems, which typically show high natural spatiotemporal variability. Here we focused on the Swan Coastal Plain, a bioregion that encompasses a global biodiversity hotspot in Australia with over 1500 water bodies of high biodiversity. Using graph theory, we conducted a temporal analysis of water body connectivity over 13 years of variable climate. We derived large networks of surface water bodies using Landsat data (1999-2011). We generated an ensemble of 278 potential networks at three dispersal distances approximating the maximum dispersal distance of different water dependent organisms. We assessed network connectivity through several network topology metrics and quantified the resilience of the network topology during wet and dry phases. We identified ‘stepping stone’ water bodies across time and compared our networks with theoretical network models with known properties. Results showed a highly dynamic seasonal pattern of variability in network topology metrics. A decline in connectivity over the 13 years was noted with potential negative consequences for species with limited dispersal capacity. The networks described here resemble theoretical scale-free models, also known as ‘rich get richer’ algorithm. The ‘stepping stone’ water bodies are located in the area around the Peel-Harvey Estuary, a Ramsar listed site, and some are located in a national park. Our results describe a powerful approach that can be implemented when assessing the connectivity for a particular organism with known dispersal distance. The approach of identifying the surface water bodies that act as

  8. Effects of Varying Surface Inclines and Suit Pressure: Implications on Space Suit Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clowers, Kurt; Clark, Timothy; Harvill, Lauren; Morency, Richard; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2008-01-01

    Suited human performance studies in reduced gravity environments to date include limited observations from Apollo Lunar surface Extravehicular Activities (EVA) and from previous studies conducted in partial gravity simulation environments. The Constellation Program EVA Systems Project office has initiated tests to develop design requirements for the next generation Lunar EVA suit. Theses studies were conducted in the Space Vehicle Mock-Up Facility (SVMF) at Johnson Space Center from which the results provided recommendations for suit weight, mass, center of gravity, pressure, and suit kinematic constraints that optimize human performance in partial gravity environments.

  9. Seasonal changes in Titan's weather patterns and the evolution and implications of accompanying surface changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtle, E. P.; Perry, J.; McEwen, A. S.; Barbara, J. M.; Del Genio, A. D.; West, R. A.; Barnes, J. W.; Hayes, A.; Lorenz, R. D.; Lunine, J. I.; Stofan, E. R.; Schaller, E. L.; Lopes, R. M.; Ray, T. L.

    2012-12-01

    Post-equinox changes in Titan's atmospheric circulation brought clouds and extensive methane rain to Titan's low latitudes [1,2]. Observations by Cassini ISS over the ~2 years since the storm revealed most of the changes to be short-lived; only a few darkened patches persisted through Fall 2011. In an unsaturated permeable medium, infiltration rates exceed 20 mm/week [3], so persistence of surface liquids over several months suggests either a shallow impermeable layer or that the local methane table lies close to the surface. Evaporation rates greater than 1 mm/week are predicted in equatorial regions [4] and rates of 20 mm/week have been documented at Titan's poles [5], thus areas where darkening persisted must be saturated ground at the level of a methane table or have had liquid ponded to depths of 2.5-50 cm. Several smaller areas of surface brightening were also observed, a phenomenon that is less well understood. Cassini VIMS spectra of these regions do not match those of clouds or other surface units [6, 7]. Interpretations include cleaning by runoff [2] or deposition of a fine-grained volatile solid as the result of evaporative cooling [6, 7]. In general, brightening has persisted longer than darkening, but these areas are also reverting to their original appearance, which could constrain rates of evaporation/sublimation of the bright material or re-deposition of darker hydrocarbons by aeolian transport or precipitation from the atmosphere. Cassini and Earth-based observers monitor Titan frequently (typically at least a few times per month), but few clouds have been observed since Fall 2010, which may indicate that enough methane was removed from the atmosphere and the lapse rate stabilized sufficiently that activity will not resume until the onset of convection at mid-northern latitudes later in northern spring. A similar lapse followed a 2004 outburst of south-polar clouds [8], which also appeared to produce significant rainfall [9]. [1] Turtle et al., GRL

  10. Evolution of Titan's equinoctial weather patterns and accompanying surface changes and implications thereof

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turtle, E. P.; Perry, J. E.; Barnes, J. W.; McEwen, A. S.; Barbara, J. M.; Del Genio, A. D.; Hayes, A. G.; West, R. A.; Lorenz, R. D.; Schaller, E. L.; Lunine, J. I.; Ray, T. L.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Stofan, E. R.

    2012-04-01

    Post-equinox changes in Titan's atmospheric circulation brought clouds and extensive methane rain to Titan's low latitudes [1,2]. Observations by Cassini ISS over the ~1.5 years since the storm revealed most of the changes to be short-lived; only a few darkened patches persisted through Fall 2011. In an unsaturated permeable medium, infiltration rates are >20 mm/week [3], so persistence of surface liquids over several months suggests either a shallow impermeable layer or that the local methane table lies close to the surface. Evaporation rates >1 mm/week are predicted in equatorial regions [4] and rates of 20 mm/week have been documented at the poles [5], thus areas where darkening persisted must be saturated ground at the level of a methane table or have had liquid ponded to depths of 2.5-50 cm. Several smaller areas of surface brightening were also observed, a phenomenon that is less well understood. Cassini VIMS spectra of these regions do not match those of clouds or other surface units [6, 7]. Interpretations include cleaning by runoff [2] or deposition of fresh methane ice [6, 7]. In general, brightening has persisted longer than darkening, but these areas are also reverting to their original appearance, which could constrain the rate of re-deposition of darker hydrocarbon materials by aeolian transport or possibly precipitation of aerosols from the atmosphere. Although we monitor Titan frequently (at least a few times per month), little cloud activity has been observed since Fall 2010. This lack of clouds may indicate that the outbreak removed enough methane from the atmosphere and the lapse rate stabilized sufficiently that activity will not resume until the onset of convection at mid-northern latitudes later in northern spring. A similar lapse followed a large outbreak of south-polar clouds in Fall 2004 [8], which also appeared to produce significant rainfall [9]. References: [1] Turtle et al., GRL 38, L03203, doi: 10.1029/2010GL046266, 2011. [2] Turtle et

  11. Surface roughness effect on ultracold neutron interaction with a wall and implications for computer simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Steyerl, A.; Malik, S. S.; Desai, A. M.; Kaufman, C.

    2010-05-15

    We review the diffuse scattering and the loss coefficient in ultracold neutron reflection from slightly rough surfaces, report a surprising reduction in loss coefficient due to roughness, and discuss the possibility of transition from quantum treatment to ray optics. The results are used in a computer simulation of neutron storage in a recent neutron lifetime experiment that reported a large discrepancy of neutron lifetime with the current particle data value. Our partial reanalysis suggests the possibility of systematic effects that were not included in this publication.

  12. Plot-scale field experiment of surface hydrologic processes with EOS implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Macari, Emir J.; Costes, Nicholas C.

    1992-01-01

    Plot-scale hydrologic field studies were initiated at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to a) investigate the spatial and temporal variability of surface and subsurface hydrologic processes, particularly as affected by vegetation, and b) develop experimental techniques and associated instrumentation methodology to study hydrologic processes at increasingly large spatial scales. About 150 instruments, most of which are remotely operated, have been installed at the field site to monitor ground atmospheric conditions, precipitation, interception, soil-water status, and energy flux. This paper describes the nature of the field experiment, instrumentation and sampling rationale, and presents preliminary findings.

  13. Electropolymerization of polypyrrole by bipolar electrochemistry in an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Kong, Shuwei; Fontaine, Olivier; Roche, Jérôme; Bouffier, Laurent; Kuhn, Alexander; Zigah, Dodzi

    2014-03-25

    Bipolar electrochemistry has been recently explored for the modification of conducting micro- and nanoobjects with various surface layers. So far, it has been assumed that such processes should be carried out in low-conductivity electrolytes in order to be efficient. We report here the first bipolar electrochemistry experiment carried out in an ionic liquid, which by definition shows a relatively high conductivity. Pyrrole has been electropolymerized on a bipolar electrode, either in ionic liquid or in acetonitrile. The resulting polymer films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by contact profilometry. We demonstrate that the films obtained in an ionic liquid are thinner and smoother than the films synthesized in acetonitrile. Furthermore, a well-defined band of polypyrrole can be obtained in ionic liquid, in contrast to acetonitrile for which the polypyrrole film is present on the whole anodic part of the bipolar electrode.

  14. Surface energetics and protein-protein interactions: analysis and mechanistic implications

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Claudio; Morra, Giulia; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the molecular level is a fundamental task in the design of new drugs, the prediction of protein function and the clarification of the mechanisms of (dis)regulation of biochemical pathways. In this study, we use a novel computational approach to investigate the energetics of aminoacid networks located on the surface of proteins, isolated and in complex with their respective partners. Interestingly, the analysis of individual proteins identifies patches of surface residues that, when mapped on the structure of their respective complexes, reveal regions of residue-pair couplings that extend across the binding interfaces, forming continuous motifs. An enhanced effect is visible across the proteins of the dataset forming larger quaternary assemblies. The method indicates the presence of energetic signatures in the isolated proteins that are retained in the bound form, which we hypothesize to determine binding orientation upon complex formation. We propose our method, BLUEPRINT, as a complement to different approaches ranging from the ab-initio characterization of PPIs, to protein-protein docking algorithms, for the physico-chemical and functional investigation of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27050828

  15. pH-dependent mineral release and surface properties of cornstraw biochar: agronomic implications.

    PubMed

    Silber, A; Levkovitch, I; Graber, E R

    2010-12-15

    Surface charge and pH-dependent nutrient release properties of cornstraw biochar were examined to elucidate its potential agronomic benefits. Kinetics of element release was characterized by rapid H(+) consumption and rapid, pH-dependent P, Ca, and Mg release, followed by zero-order H(+) consumption and mineral dissolution reactions. Initial K release was not pH-dependent, nor was it followed by a zero-order reaction at any pH. Rapid and constant rate P releases were significant, having the potential to substitute substantial proportions of P fertilizer. K releases were also significant and may replace conventional K fertilizers, however, not long-term plant demand. The cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the biochar leached with a mild acidic solution increased linearly from 179 to 888 mmol(c) (kg C)(-1) over a pH range of 4-8, while the anion exchange capacity of 154 mmol(c) (kg C)(-1) was constant over the same pH range. Since native soil organic constituents have much higher CEC values (average 2800 mmol(c) (kg C)(-1) at pH 7), improved soil fertility as a result of enhanced cation retention by the biochar probably will be favorable only in sandy and low organic matter soils, unless surface oxidation during aging significantly increases its CEC. PMID:21090742

  16. Rosette-shaped calcite structures at surfaces: mechanistic implications for CaCO3 crystallization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung Ho; Choi, Insung S

    2010-07-01

    Biomineralization is believed to be achieved by the intimate cooperation of soluble macromolecules and an insoluble matrix at the specific inorganic-organic interface. It has been reported that positively charged matrices play an important role in controlling the structure of CaCO(3) at surfaces, although detailed mechanisms remain unclear. In this work, we studied the transformation from amorphous CaCO(3) to calcite crystals on surfaces by using thin films of poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and its quaternized form. The positively charged PDMAEMA film was found to possess unique properties for CaCO(3) crystallization: individually separated, single calcite crystals were formed on the PDMAEMA film in the absence of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA), while circularly fused calcite crystals were formed in the presence of PAA. The circularly fused (rosette-shaped) calcite crystals could be changed from a completely packed rosette to a ring-shaped, hollow structure by tuning the crystallization conditions. A number of factors, such as reaction time, amount of (NH(4))(2)CO(3), concentration of PAA, and charge of matrix-films, were varied systematically, and we now propose a mechanism based on these observations.

  17. Chemical abundances in low surface brightness galaxies: Implications for their evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaugh, S. S.; Bothun, G. D.

    1993-01-01

    Low Surface Brightness (LSB) galaxies are an important but often neglected part of the galaxy content of the universe. Their importance stems both from the selection effects which cause them to be under-represented in galaxy catalogs, and from what they can tell us about the physical processes of galaxy evolution that has resulted in something other than the traditional Hubble sequence of spirals. An important constraint for any evolutionary model is the present day chemical abundances of LSB disks. Towards this end, spectra for a sample of 75 H 2 regions distributed in 20 LSB disks galaxies were obtained. Structurally, this sample is defined as having B(0) fainter than 23.0 mag arcsec(sup -2) and scale lengths that cluster either around 3 kpc or 10 kpc. In fact, structurally, these galaxies are very similar to the high surface brightness spirals which define the Hubble sequence. Thus, our sample galaxies are not dwarf galaxies but instead have masses comparable to or in excess of the Milky Way. The basic results from these observations are summarized.

  18. Interaction of wrestling shoe and competition surface: effects on coefficient of friction with implications for injury.

    PubMed

    Newton, Robert; Doan, Brandon; Meese, Michael; Conroy, Brian; Black, Kevin; Sebstianelli, Wayne; Kramer, William

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a significant difference in the co-efficient of friction (Fc) between old versus new wrestling shoes and mats and to investigate the effect of perspiration. Fc was measured by dragging a weighted shoe over a wrestling mat surface and measuring the vertical and horizontal forces produced. Three different shoe conditions were assessed over two mat types for both wet and dry conditions for a total of 12 conditions. To simulate the wet condition, saline solution was smeared over the surface of the mat. There was a significant effect of shoe, mat, and wet/dry conditions. In addition, significant interactions of shoe by mat, shoe by dry/wet, and mat by dry/wet were observed. Overall, Fc was 36% higher for the new wrestling mat compared to the old wrestling mat. Application of the saline solution reduced Fc by 14% compared to the dry condition. Comparison of the mean Fc for all three shoe types revealed the Fc for the older design shoe was 23% to 28% lower than the brand new shoe and the worn newer design, respectively. A high Fc, such as in the new mat/new shoe combination, has the potential to increase the risk of knee and ankle injuries by fixing the foot more securely to the ground. PMID:14658373

  19. Rayed craters on Dione: Implication for the dominant surface alteration process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Naoyuki; Miyamoto, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    From recently-acquired, high-resolution images obtained by the Cassini spacecraft, we examine the patterns and spatial distributions of rayed craters on Dione. We identify 29 rayed craters with diameters larger than 2 km on Dione's surface. The density of rayed craters and theoretical cratering rates indicate that the retention time for rays on Dione can be approximately 1-50 My. Such a short retention time is interpreted to be due to bombardment of plasma and E-ring particles, as well as implantation of dark particles (presumably the same dark material found on Hyperion, Iapetus, and other saturnian satellites). We also find that when the ray system of Creusa crater was formed, it extended over most of the surface of Dione. Later, the ray system deposited on the trailing hemisphere might have been partially erased, mostly due to implantation of dark particles, which may have also removed other bright ray systems in that region. The pattern of Creusa's ray system implies that the implantation of the dark material occurred more recent than both the age of Creusa crater and the typical retention time for rays on Dione.

  20. Characterizing heavy metal build-up on urban road surfaces: implication for stormwater reuse.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Liu, Liang; Li, Dunzhu; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-05-15

    Stormwater reuse is increasingly popular in the worldwide. In terms of urban road stormwater, it commonly contains toxic pollutants such as heavy metals, which could undermine the reuse safety. The research study investigated heavy metal build-up characteristics on urban roads in a typical megacity of South China. The research outcomes show the high variability in heavy metal build-up loads among different urban road sites. The degree of traffic congestion and road surface roughness was found to exert a more significant influence on heavy metal build-up rather than traffic volume. Due to relatively higher heavy metal loads, stormwater from roads with more congested traffic conditions or rougher surfaces might be suitable for low-water-quality required activities while the stormwater from by-pass road sections could be appropriate for relatively high-water-quality required purposes since the stormwater could be relatively less polluted. Based on the research outcomes, a decision-making process for heavy metals based urban road stormwater reuse was proposed. The new finding highlights the importance to undertaking a "fit-for-purpose" road stormwater reuse strategy. Additionally, the research results can also contribute to enhancing stormwater reuse safety. PMID:25687783

  1. Surface temperatures of the Mid-Pliocene North Atlantic Ocean: Implications for future climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Robinson, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mid-Pliocene is the most recent interval in the Earth's history to have experienced warming of the magnitude predicted for the second half of the twenty-first century and is, therefore, a possible analogue for future climate conditions. With continents basically in their current positions and atmospheric CO2 similar to early twenty-first century values, the cause of Mid-Pliocene warmth remains elusive. Understanding the behaviour of the North Atlantic Ocean during the Mid-Pliocene is integral to evaluating future climate scenarios owing to its role in deep water formation and its sensitivity to climate change. Under the framework of the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) sea surface reconstruction, we synthesize Mid-Pliocene North Atlantic studies by PRISM members and others, describing each region of the North Atlantic in terms of palaeoceanography. We then relate Mid-Pliocene sea surface conditions to expectations of future warming. The results of the data and climate model comparisons suggest that the North Atlantic is more sensitive to climate change than is suggested by climate model simulations, raising the concern that estimates of future climate change are conservative. ?? 2008 The Royal Society.

  2. Surface Crystallization of Cloud Droplets: Implications for Climate Change and Ozone Depletion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Djikaev, Y. S.; Reiss, H.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The process of supercooled liquid water crystallization into ice is still not well understood. Current experimental data on homogeneous freezing rates of ice nucleation in supercooled water droplets show considerable scatter. For example, at -33 C, the reported freezing nucleation rates vary by as much as 5 orders of magnitude, which is well outside the range of measurement uncertainties. Until now, experimental data on the freezing of supercooled water has been analyzed under the assumption that nucleation of ice took place in the interior volume of a water droplet. Here, the same data is reanalyzed assuming that the nucleation occurred "pseudoheterogeneously" at the air (or oil)-liquid water interface of the droplet. Our analysis suggest that the scatter in the nucleation data can be explained by two main factors. First, the current assumption that nucleation occurs solely inside the volume of a water droplet is incorrect. Second, because the nucleation process most likely occurs on the surface, the rates of nuclei formation could differ vastly when oil or air interfaces are involved. Our results suggest that ice freezing in clouds may initiate on droplet surfaces and such a process can allow for low amounts of liquid water (approx. 0.002 g per cubic meters) to remain supercooled down to -40 C as observed in the atmosphere.

  3. Characterizing heavy metal build-up on urban road surfaces: implication for stormwater reuse.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Liu, Liang; Li, Dunzhu; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-05-15

    Stormwater reuse is increasingly popular in the worldwide. In terms of urban road stormwater, it commonly contains toxic pollutants such as heavy metals, which could undermine the reuse safety. The research study investigated heavy metal build-up characteristics on urban roads in a typical megacity of South China. The research outcomes show the high variability in heavy metal build-up loads among different urban road sites. The degree of traffic congestion and road surface roughness was found to exert a more significant influence on heavy metal build-up rather than traffic volume. Due to relatively higher heavy metal loads, stormwater from roads with more congested traffic conditions or rougher surfaces might be suitable for low-water-quality required activities while the stormwater from by-pass road sections could be appropriate for relatively high-water-quality required purposes since the stormwater could be relatively less polluted. Based on the research outcomes, a decision-making process for heavy metals based urban road stormwater reuse was proposed. The new finding highlights the importance to undertaking a "fit-for-purpose" road stormwater reuse strategy. Additionally, the research results can also contribute to enhancing stormwater reuse safety.

  4. Mantle dynamics and the atmospheres of Mars and Venus: implications for surface conditions and interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmann, C.; Tackley, P.

    2012-04-01

    We propose to investigate the interaction between the mantle and the atmosphere of terrestrial planets, in order to study whereas such coupling could be the cause of the divergent evolution of planets in our solar system. Therefore, we build a coupled model taking into account mantle dynamics, volatile exchanges and atmospheric processes. We focus on Mars and Venus and consider the evolution of CO2 and H2O in the atmosphere. The first main mechanism we consider is the volcanic source of volatiles. Therefore we need to model the mantle dynamics by adapting the highly advanced StagYY code (developed by P. Tackley, 2008) for Mars and Venus. When possible, we compare those results to published modeling (Breuer and Spohn, 2006; Grott et al., 2011) and observation. Atmospheric escape is considered as the main volatile loss flux. Early loss is thermal, caused by hydrodynamic escape. After the first few hundred million years, the main atmospheric escape flux is caused by non-thermal mechanisms. We model their evolution by comparing recent numerical study and ASPERA (Analyzer of Space Plasma and EneRgetic Atoms) measurements. We combine these models to calculate the state of the atmosphere of Venus and Mars. This lets us estimate the surface temperature of those planets either from a Mars Global Circulation Model (e.g. Forget at al., 1999), or with a gray radiative-convective atmosphere model, for Venus. In the case of Mars, we show that the present-day atmosphere of Mars is likely to be constituted by a large part (more than 50%) of volcanic gases emitted since 4 billion years ago, which corresponds to a mean age of 1.9 to 2.3 Gyr. The variations of CO2 pressure over this period seem relatively low (50 mbar at most). This seems in line with the assumption that the heavy loss of volatiles occurred before 500 Myr. Surface temperature variations are likely to be small (several Kelvin) and would not be responsible for periods of flowing liquid surface water by themselves

  5. Martian planetwide crater distributions: Implications for geologic history and surface processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.; Condit, C.D.; West, R.A.; Herman, B.M.; Kreidler, T.J.

    1974-01-01

    Population-density maps of craters in three size ranges (0.6 to 1.2 km, 4 to 10 km, and >20 km in diameter) were compiled for most of Mars from Mariner 9 imagery. These data provide: historical records of the eolian processes (0.6 to 1.2 km craters); stratigraphic, relative, and absolute timescales (4 to 10 km craters); and a history of the early postaccretional evolution of the uplands (> 20 km craters). Based on the distribution of large craters (>20 km diameters), Mars is divisible into two general classes of terrain, densely cratered and very lightly cratered-a division remarkably like the uplands-maria dichotomy of the moon. It is probable that this bimodal character in the density distribution of large craters arose from an abrupt transition in the impact flux rate from an early intense period associated with the tailing off of accretion to an extended quiescent epoch, not from a void in geological activity during much of Mars' history. Radio-isotope studies of Apollo lunar samples show that this transition occurred on the moon in a short time. The intermediate-sized craters (4 to 10 km diameter) and the small-sized craters (0.6 to 1.2 km diameter) appear to be genetically related. The smaller ones are apparently secondary impact craters generated by the former. Most of the craters in the larger of these two size classes appear fresh and uneroded, although many are partly buried by dust mantles. Poleward of the 40?? parallels the small fresh craters are notably absent owing to these mantles. The density of small craters is highest in an irregular band centered at 20??S. This band coincides closely with (1) the zone of permanent low-albedo markings; (2) the "wind equator" (the latitude of zero net north or south transport at the surface); and (3) a band that includes a majority of the small dendritic channels. Situated in the southermost part of the equatorial unmantled terrain which extends from about 40??N to 40??S, this band is apparently devoid of even a

  6. Surface-induced assembly of apolipoprotein A-I: Implications for symmetry-driven non-cooperative clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winford, Sidney; Tobin, Moriah; Gross, Eitan

    2012-03-01

    In condensed matter physics the geometry of a crystal is determined by the mechanism of condensation. In biology, the link between clustering mechanisms and the shape of a protein crystal is not well defined. To gain more insight into the problem, we studied clustering of apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) on a solid surface using AFM. The amyloidogenic protein apo A-I is the main protein component of high density lipoprotein and thus reduces the risk of atherosclerosis. We found that apo A-I clustered to form nano-scale, symmetrical clusters on mica. Statistical analysis of size distribution for several thousand clusters suggested that the clustering reaction followed a non-cooperative kinetic scheme characterized by a single equilibrium constant of 0.92·106 M-1 and a change in free energy (ΔG) of -0.03 kJ mole-1/residue. This is close to ΔG of-0.04 kJ mole-1/residue for apo A-I binding to phospholipid membrane; and 30-fold smaller than ΔG for β-amyloid formation by apo A-I. The high symmetry of the clusters is consistent with an isotropic diffusion coefficient of protein monomers on the surface of the substrate. This previously unrecognized link between protein clustering mechanism and the symmetry of the growth pattern may have important implications in medicine, pharmaceutics and polymer science.

  7. Implications from Near-Shoemaker Imaging of Eros for Small-Scale Structure and Surface Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    What we know about asteroids has always been bifurcated by the enormous gap between astronomical studies of small, distant bodies, and the close-up laboratory measurements of hand-sample sized meteorites. The gulf has been narrowed somewhat by improvements in Earth-based astronomical techniques (e.g. Hubble Space Telescope, radar, adaptive optics) and especially by spacecraft fly-bys of asteroids. But the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR)-Shoemaker mission has gone considerably more in the direction of bridging the gap. Any consideration of intelligent sample-return from an asteroid must be based on the best possible knowledge of the asteroid at the spatial scales pertinent to operations at the asteroid and of the sample/s. Otherwise, we are in danger of succumbing to the 'Martian Horror Story' that Bruce Murray, in the 1960's, envisioned might impair our exploration of the surface of the red planet if we tried to land on it without first bolstering the information content of our database about Mars, especially at high resolutions. NEAR-Shoemaker is helping to bridge that gap in the case of Eros. The best resolution obtained by the Galileo spacecraft on Ida was 25 m/pixel. As of this writing, NEAR has already obtained images with resolutions at least five times better (information content 25 times better) and vastly better images may be available at the time of this Workshop from the late October low flyby. Already, we are seeing that the Martian horror story looks tame compared with Eros. Everywhere we have landed on Mars, the surface has been covered with rocks and boulders, with much higher spatial coverage than seen anywhere on the lunar surface. We have, in fact, been rather lucky that none of our Martian landers have tipped over so far, and there were justified fears in the early aftermath of last year's failure of Mars Polar Lander that it had suffered from inadequate high-resolution characterization of polar regions on Mars (the failure is now known to

  8. Global climate impacts of bioenergy from forests: implications from biogenic CO2 fluxes and surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, Francesco; Bright, Ryan; Strømman, Anders

    2013-04-01

    Production of biomass for bioenergy can alter biogeochemical and biogeophysical mechanisms, thus affecting local and global climate. Recent scientific developments mainly embraced impacts from land use changes resulting from area-expanded biomass production, with several extensive insights available. Comparably less attention, however, is given to the assessment of direct land surface-atmosphere climate impacts of bioenergy systems under rotation such as in plantations and forested ecosystems, whereby land use disturbances are only temporary. In this work, we assess bioenergy systems representative of various biomass species (spruce, pine, aspen, etc.) and climatic regions (US, Canada, Norway, etc.), for both stationary and vehicle applications. In addition to conventional greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through life cycle activities (harvest, transport, processing, etc.), we evaluate the contributions to global warming of temporary effects resulting from the perturbation in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration caused by the timing of biogenic CO2 fluxes and in surface reflectivity (albedo). Biogenic CO2 fluxes on site after harvest are directly measured through Net Ecosystem Productivity (NEP) chronosequences from flux towers established at the interface between the forest canopy and the atmosphere and are inclusive of all CO2 exchanges occurring in the forest (e.g., sequestration of CO2 in growing trees, emissions from soil respiration and decomposition of dead organic materials). These primary data based on empirical measurements provide an accurate representation of the forest carbon sink behavior over time, and they are used in the elaboration of high-resolution IRFs for biogenic CO2 emissions. Chronosequence of albedo values from clear-cut to pre-harvest levels are gathered from satellite data (MODIS black-sky shortwave broadband, Collection 5, MCD43A). Following the cause-effect chain from emissions to damages, through radiative forcing and changes

  9. Drainage pits in cohesionless materials - Implications for the surface of PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstman, K. C.; Melosh, H. J.

    1989-09-01

    The origin of the pits and grooves on the surface of Phobos visible on the Viking orbital images of Phobos is investigated using a model of the mechanism of venting and drainage of regolith into open fractures, which is the mechanism that is best supported by image data. In this model, drainage pits and fissures are modeled experimentally by considering two rigid substrate plates placed edge to edge and covered by uniform thicknesses of dry fragmental debris (simulated regolith); fracture extension is simulated by drawing the plates apart, allowing the regolith to drain into the newly created void. The resulting experimental patterns of pits and grooves were found to have pronounced similarities with those observed on Phobos, displaying many characteristics, such as the lack of raised rims, the linearity of grooves and chains of pits, a uniform spacing of pits, and the progression from discrete pits to cuspate grooves, which are the same as those observed on Phobos.

  10. Rotational dynamics of water molecules near biological surfaces with implications for nuclear quadrupole relaxation.

    PubMed

    Braun, Daniel; Schmollngruber, Michael; Steinhauser, Othmar

    2016-09-21

    Based on Molecular Dynamics simulations of two different systems, the protein ubiquitin dissolved in water and an AOT reverse micelle, we present a broad analysis of the single particle rotational dynamics of water. A comprehensive connection to NQR, which is a prominent experimental method in this field, is developed, based on a reformulation of its theoretical framework. Interpretation of experimental NQR results requires a model which usually assumes that the NQR experiences retardation only in the first hydration shell. Indeed, the present study shows that this first-shell model is correct. Moreover, previous experimental retardation factors are quantitatively reproduced. All of this is seemingly contradicted by results of other methods, e.g., dielectric spectroscopy, responsible for a long-standing debate in this field. Our detailed analysis shows that NQR omits important information contained in overall water dynamics, most notably, the retardation of the water dipole axis in the electric field exerted by a biological surface. PMID:27546227

  11. Earthing: health implications of reconnecting the human body to the Earth's surface electrons.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Gaétan; Sinatra, Stephen T; Oschman, James L; Sokal, Karol; Sokal, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    Environmental medicine generally addresses environmental factors with a negative impact on human health. However, emerging scientific research has revealed a surprisingly positive and overlooked environmental factor on health: direct physical contact with the vast supply of electrons on the surface of the Earth. Modern lifestyle separates humans from such contact. The research suggests that this disconnect may be a major contributor to physiological dysfunction and unwellness. Reconnection with the Earth's electrons has been found to promote intriguing physiological changes and subjective reports of well-being. Earthing (or grounding) refers to the discovery of benefits-including better sleep and reduced pain-from walking barefoot outside or sitting, working, or sleeping indoors connected to conductive systems that transfer the Earth's electrons from the ground into the body. This paper reviews the earthing research and the potential of earthing as a simple and easily accessed global modality of significant clinical importance. PMID:22291721

  12. Radioactive elements on Mercury's surface from MESSENGER: implications for the planet's formation and evolution.

    PubMed

    Peplowski, Patrick N; Evans, Larry G; Hauck, Steven A; McCoy, Timothy J; Boynton, William V; Gillis-Davis, Jeffery J; Ebel, Denton S; Goldsten, John O; Hamara, David K; Lawrence, David J; McNutt, Ralph L; Nittler, Larry R; Solomon, Sean C; Rhodes, Edgar A; Sprague, Ann L; Starr, Richard D; Stockstill-Cahill, Karen R

    2011-09-30

    The MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer measured the average surface abundances of the radioactive elements potassium (K, 1150 ± 220 parts per million), thorium (Th, 220 ± 60 parts per billion), and uranium (U, 90 ± 20 parts per billion) in Mercury's northern hemisphere. The abundance of the moderately volatile element K, relative to Th and U, is inconsistent with physical models for the formation of Mercury requiring extreme heating of the planet or its precursor materials, and supports formation from volatile-containing material comparable to chondritic meteorites. Abundances of K, Th, and U indicate that internal heat production has declined substantially since Mercury's formation, consistent with widespread volcanism shortly after the end of late heavy bombardment 3.8 billion years ago and limited, isolated volcanic activity since. PMID:21960624

  13. Rotational dynamics of water molecules near biological surfaces with implications for nuclear quadrupole relaxation.

    PubMed

    Braun, Daniel; Schmollngruber, Michael; Steinhauser, Othmar

    2016-09-21

    Based on Molecular Dynamics simulations of two different systems, the protein ubiquitin dissolved in water and an AOT reverse micelle, we present a broad analysis of the single particle rotational dynamics of water. A comprehensive connection to NQR, which is a prominent experimental method in this field, is developed, based on a reformulation of its theoretical framework. Interpretation of experimental NQR results requires a model which usually assumes that the NQR experiences retardation only in the first hydration shell. Indeed, the present study shows that this first-shell model is correct. Moreover, previous experimental retardation factors are quantitatively reproduced. All of this is seemingly contradicted by results of other methods, e.g., dielectric spectroscopy, responsible for a long-standing debate in this field. Our detailed analysis shows that NQR omits important information contained in overall water dynamics, most notably, the retardation of the water dipole axis in the electric field exerted by a biological surface.

  14. Reflectance spectra for sodium and potassium doped ammonia frosts - Implications for Io's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, M. D. A.; Pipkin, F. M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports measurements of the reflection spectra of sodium- and potassium-doped ammonia frosts as a function of alkali metal concentration for the wavelength range 0.35-2.5 microns. The purpose of the measurements was to determine whether or not the reflection spectra for such a solid was compatible with the spectra albedo of Io. The data show that, with a sufficiently large alkali metal concentration, the reflection spectra of the doped ammonia frosts do not display the characteristic ammonia features at 2.0 and 2.25 micron. The high reflectance of the more concentrated samples and the character of the observed reflection spectrum make it difficult to rule out sodium-doped ammonia frost as a surface constituent on Io on the basis of existing data.

  15. Earthing: Health Implications of Reconnecting the Human Body to the Earth's Surface Electrons

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Gaétan; Sinatra, Stephen T.; Oschman, James L.; Sokal, Karol; Sokal, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    Environmental medicine generally addresses environmental factors with a negative impact on human health. However, emerging scientific research has revealed a surprisingly positive and overlooked environmental factor on health: direct physical contact with the vast supply of electrons on the surface of the Earth. Modern lifestyle separates humans from such contact. The research suggests that this disconnect may be a major contributor to physiological dysfunction and unwellness. Reconnection with the Earth's electrons has been found to promote intriguing physiological changes and subjective reports of well-being. Earthing (or grounding) refers to the discovery of benefits—including better sleep and reduced pain—from walking barefoot outside or sitting, working, or sleeping indoors connected to conductive systems that transfer the Earth's electrons from the ground into the body. This paper reviews the earthing research and the potential of earthing as a simple and easily accessed global modality of significant clinical importance. PMID:22291721

  16. Small-scale martian polygonal terrain: Implications for liquid surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seibert, N.M.; Kargel, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Images from the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) through August 1999 were analyzed for the global distribution of small-scale polygonal terrain not clearly resolved in Viking Orbiter imagery. With very few exceptions, small-scale polygonal terrain occurs at middle to high latitudes of the northern and southern hemisphere in Hesperian-age geologic units. The largest concentration of this terrain occurs in the Utopia basin in close association with scalloped depressions (interpreted as thermokarst) and appears to represent an Amazonia event. The morphology and occurence of small polygonal terrain suggest they are either mud desiccation cracks or ice-wedge polygons. Because the small-scale polygons in Utopia and Argyre Planitiae are associated with other cold-climate permafrost or glacial features, an ice-wedge model is preferred for these areas. Both cracking mechanisms work most effectively in water- or ice-rich finegrained material and may imply the seasonal or episodic existence of liquid water at the surface.

  17. Thermal evolution of a differentiated Ganymede and implications for surface features

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, R.L.; Stevenson, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodynamic models are developed for the processes which controlled the evolution of the surface Ganymede, an icy Jovian satellite assumed to have a rock-rich core surrounded by a water-ice mantle. Account is taken of a heat pulse which would have arisen from a Rayleigh-Taylor instability at a deep-seated liquid-solid water interface, rapid fracturing from global stresses imposed by warm ice diapiric upwelling, impacts by large meteorites, and resurfacing by ice flows (rather than core formation). Comparisons are made with existing models for the evolution of Callisto, and the difficulties in defining a mechanism which produced the groove terrain of Ganymede are discussed. 100 references.

  18. Hole surface trapping in CdSe nanocrystals: dynamics, rate fluctuations, and implications for blinking.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Campos, Francisco M; Califano, Marco

    2012-09-12

    Carrier trapping is one of the main sources of performance degradation in nanocrystal-based devices. Yet the dynamics of this process is still unclear. We present a comprehensive investigation into the efficiency of hole transfer to a variety of trap sites located on the surface of the core or the shell or at the core/shell interface in CdSe nanocrystals with both organic and inorganic passivation, using the atomistic semiempirical pseudopotential approach. We separate the contribution of coupling strength and energetics in different systems and trap configurations, obtaining useful general guidelines for trapping rate engineering. We find that trapping can be extremely efficient in core-only systems, with trapping times orders of magnitude faster than radiative recombination. The presence of an inorganic shell can instead bring the trapping rates well below the typical radiative recombination rates observed in these systems. PMID:22849432

  19. Adsorption of HO(x) on aerosol surfaces - Implications for the atmosphere of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Leu, M.-T.; Nair, H. A.; Yung, Y. L.

    1993-01-01

    The potential impact of heterogeneous chemistry on the abundance and distribution of HO(x) in the Martian atmosphere is investigated using observational data on dust and ice aerosol distributions combined with an updated photochemical model. Critical parameters include the altitude distributions of aerosols and the surface loss coefficients of HO2 on dust and ice in the lower atmosphere and of H on ice above 40 km. Results of calculations indicate that adsorption of HO2 on dust, or ice near 30 km, can deplete OH abundances in the lower atmosphere by 10 percent or more and that the adsorption of H on ice at 50 km can result in even larger OH depletions (this effect is localized to altitudes greater than 40 km, where CO oxidation is relatively unimportant).

  20. Earthing: health implications of reconnecting the human body to the Earth's surface electrons.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Gaétan; Sinatra, Stephen T; Oschman, James L; Sokal, Karol; Sokal, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    Environmental medicine generally addresses environmental factors with a negative impact on human health. However, emerging scientific research has revealed a surprisingly positive and overlooked environmental factor on health: direct physical contact with the vast supply of electrons on the surface of the Earth. Modern lifestyle separates humans from such contact. The research suggests that this disconnect may be a major contributor to physiological dysfunction and unwellness. Reconnection with the Earth's electrons has been found to promote intriguing physiological changes and subjective reports of well-being. Earthing (or grounding) refers to the discovery of benefits-including better sleep and reduced pain-from walking barefoot outside or sitting, working, or sleeping indoors connected to conductive systems that transfer the Earth's electrons from the ground into the body. This paper reviews the earthing research and the potential of earthing as a simple and easily accessed global modality of significant clinical importance.

  1. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A on metal surfaces: implications for cross-contamination.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Sandra A; Michels, Harold T; Keevil, C William

    2006-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important re-emerging pathogen which is commonly found in the environment. Many outbreaks have been associated with the contamination of food produce, often linked to cross-contamination from surfaces or equipment to prepared foodstuffs. In the present study a number of copper-base metal alloys have been used to assess the survival times of L. monocytogenes on different materials, in comparison with stainless steel. High concentrations (10(7)) of bacteria were placed on metal coupons cut from each alloy. After defined incubation times, coupons were placed in tubes containing phosphate buffered saline and vortexed to remove the cells. Aliquots were then plated onto tryptone blood agar plates and the number of colony forming units counted. The high concentration of bacteria was used to represent a "worst-case" scenario. The results indicate that survival is greatly reduced on a copper-base alloy compared to stainless steel. Viable cells could be detected on stainless steel after 24 h incubation at room temperature. On copper, brass, aluminium bronze and silicon bronze, no viable bacteria could be detected after 60 min incubation, indicating a 5 log reduction (the detection limit of the procedure was 100 bacteria). No cells could be detected from copper nickel and copper nickel zinc alloys, after 90 min incubation. The viability stain, 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC), confirmed these results, with actively respiring bacteria being clearly labelled on stainless steel after 24 h. The results suggest that careful choice of surface material could reduce the potential risk of cross-contamination in industrial, commercial and domestic environments. PMID:16876278

  2. Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Devleena; Kumar, T. Satish; Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V.

    2011-03-15

    The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} < 1), indicating a lack of association of iodine with the surficial organic matter and the possibility of interaction between the seeping hydrocarbons and soil iodine. Further, the distribution pattern of iodine compares well with two surface geochemical indicators: the adsorbed light gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane) and the propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

  3. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A on metal surfaces: implications for cross-contamination.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Sandra A; Michels, Harold T; Keevil, C William

    2006-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important re-emerging pathogen which is commonly found in the environment. Many outbreaks have been associated with the contamination of food produce, often linked to cross-contamination from surfaces or equipment to prepared foodstuffs. In the present study a number of copper-base metal alloys have been used to assess the survival times of L. monocytogenes on different materials, in comparison with stainless steel. High concentrations (10(7)) of bacteria were placed on metal coupons cut from each alloy. After defined incubation times, coupons were placed in tubes containing phosphate buffered saline and vortexed to remove the cells. Aliquots were then plated onto tryptone blood agar plates and the number of colony forming units counted. The high concentration of bacteria was used to represent a "worst-case" scenario. The results indicate that survival is greatly reduced on a copper-base alloy compared to stainless steel. Viable cells could be detected on stainless steel after 24 h incubation at room temperature. On copper, brass, aluminium bronze and silicon bronze, no viable bacteria could be detected after 60 min incubation, indicating a 5 log reduction (the detection limit of the procedure was 100 bacteria). No cells could be detected from copper nickel and copper nickel zinc alloys, after 90 min incubation. The viability stain, 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC), confirmed these results, with actively respiring bacteria being clearly labelled on stainless steel after 24 h. The results suggest that careful choice of surface material could reduce the potential risk of cross-contamination in industrial, commercial and domestic environments.

  4. Retrodicting the Cenozoic evolution of the mantle: Implications for dynamic surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glišović, Petar; Forte, Alessandro; Rowley, David; Simmons, Nathan; Grand, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    Seismic tomography is the essential starting ingredient for constructing realistic models of the mantle convective flow and for successfully predicting a wide range of convection-related surface observables. However, the lack of knowledge of the initial thermal state of the mantle in the geological past is still an outstanding problem in mantle convection. The resolution of this problem requires models of 3-D mantle evolution that yield maximum consistency with a wide suite of geophysical constraints. Quantifying the robustness of the reconstructed thermal evolution is another major concern. We have carried out mantle dynamic simulations (Glišović & Forte, EPSL 2014) using a pseudo-spectral solution for compressible-flow thermal convection in 3-D spectral geometry that directly incorporate: 1) joint seismic-geodynamic inversions of mantle density structure with constraints provided by mineral physics data (Simmons et al., GJI 2009); and 2) constraints on mantle viscosity inferred by inversion of a suite of convection-related and glacial isostatic adjustment data sets (Mitrovica & Forte, EPSL 2004) characterised by Earth-like Rayleigh numbers. These time-reversed convection simulations reveal how the buoyancy associated with hot, active upwellings is a major driver of the mantle-wide convective circulation and the changes in dynamic topography at the Earth's surface. These simulations reveal, for example, a stable and long-lived superplume under the East Pacific Rise (centred under the Easter and Pitcairn hotspots) that was previously identified by Rowley et al. (AGU 2011, Nature in review) on the basis of plate kinematic data. We also present 65 Myr reconstructions of the Reunion plume that gave rise to the Deccan Traps.

  5. Role of wavelength and pulse duration in laser ablation: implications to beam delivery, surface modifications, and diagnostic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    1999-05-01

    The basic interaction mechanism of pulsed laser ablation of tissue reveals a complexity of parameters, such as the optical properties of the tissue and the technical characteristics of the laser beam. The role of the laser wavelength, the pulse duration, the energy fluence, etc. as well as the implications on the beam delivery means, the ablated surface modifications and the diagnostic techniques employed are under investigation. For example, it was experimentally verified that when using mid-infrared lasers with pulse durations in the ns range, the photothermal mechanism involved exhibits strong absorption restricting the residual thermal damage to a relatively small zone. On the other hand the ablation of tissue with ultrashort, picosecond and femtosecond, visible and near-infrared laser pulses has been investigated as an alternative, as the energy threshold for ablation biological tissue, depends approximately on the square root of the pulse duration. However the pulse length shortening creates problems to the fibers or the waveguides ends, due to the very high laser power densities involved. Conventional and advanced microscopy, scanning electron microscopy--SEM and atomic force microscopy--AFM, were used to study the surface and ends alterations of the delivery system involved and the surface alterations of the soft or the hard tissue target in pulsed laser ablation. Finally differentiation between the normal and the pathological tissue was achieved by employing the laser induced fluorescence--LIF diagnostic technique in a long term effort to develop a computer aided system, which will facilitate the automated, real-time characterization of healthy or atherosclerotic plaques in a less invasive laser ablation clinical procedure.

  6. Complex source mechanisms of mining-induced seismic events - implications for surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlecka-Sikora, B.; Cesca, S.; Lasocki, S.; Rudzinski, L.; Lizurek, L.; Wiejacz, P.; Urban, P.; kozlowska, M.

    2012-04-01

    The seismicity of Legnica-Głogów Copper District (LGCD) is induced by mining activities in three mines: Lubin, Rudna and Polkowice-Sieroszowice. Ground motion caused by strong tremors might affect local infrastructure. "Żelazny Most" tailings pond, the biggest structure of this type in Europe, is here under special concern. Due to surface objects protection, Rudna Mine has been running ground motion monitoring for several years. From June 2010 to June 2011 unusually strong and extensive surface impact has been observed for 6 mining tremors induced in one of Rudna mining sections. The observed peak ground acceleration (PGA) for both horizontal and vertical component were in or even beyond 99% confidence interval for prediction. The aim of this paper is analyze the reason of such unusual ground motion. On the basis of registrations from Rudna Mine mining seismological network and records from Polish Seismological Network held by the Institute of Geophysics Polish Academy of Sciences (IGF PAN), the source mechanisms of these 6 tremors were calculated using a time domain moment tensor inversion. Furthermore, a kinematic analysis of the seismic source was performed, in order to determine the rupture planes orientations and rupture directions. These results showed that in case of the investigated tremors, point source models and shear fault mechanisms, which are most often assumed in mining seismology, are invalid. All analyzed events indicate extended sources with non-shear mechanism. The rapture planes have small dip angles and the rupture starts at the tremors hypocenter and propagates in the direction opposite to the plane dip. The tensional component plays here also big role. These source mechanisms well explain such observed strong ground motion, and calculated synthetic PGA values well correlates with observed ones. The relationship between mining tremors were also under investigation. All subsequent tremors occurred in the area of increased stress due to

  7. Surface Velocities of Himalayan Glaciers: Implications for Glacial Erosion Potential During Climatic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherler, D.; Bookhagen, B.; Strecker, M. R.

    2007-12-01

    Mountain glaciers in the high elevations (> 3.5 km) of the Himalaya are very efficient erosion agents. Glacier size and thus the area affected by glacial erosion are controlled by climatic conditions. Understanding the impact of climate change and variability on glacial budgets and erosion requires knowledge of the erosive potential of glaciers, which is inferred to scale with ice flux. Here, we use ASTER satellite imagery in combination with the orthorectification and correlation tool COSI-Corr to derive horizontal surface velocities of glaciers from several regions across the Himalayan-Karakoram domain. Our results show that glaciers in the Eastern and Central Himalaya, where precipitation is mainly supplied by the Indian Summer Monsoon, are relatively slow, with velocities usually below 50-60 m/a. In contrast, glaciers in the Western Himalaya and Karakoram, receive a significant amount of precipitation during the winter months and are considerably faster with velocities often exceeding 80-100 m/a. This discrepancy is visible among glaciers of different size and orientation although local slope and catchment area effects may cause velocity excursions. A relatively sharp gradient appears to exist in the catchment area of the Sutlej River in the NW Himalaya of India at approximately 79°E. To the east, glaciers in the Garhwal Himalaya - among them Gangotri glacier, the largest in the Indian Himalaya - have mean velocities of around 20-40 m/a, whereas glaciers in the much drier Lahul region to the west attain mean velocities of around 30-60 m/a. Importantly, the Sutlej River valley marks a climatic transition zone from an annual summer-rainfall maximum (more than 75% of annual rainfall during the summer) to the east to a winter-rainfall maximum (more than 60% of annual rainfall during the winter) to the west. These observations corroborate the notion of a significant climatic boundary in this part of the Himalaya, which may have shifted west- and northward during

  8. Surface Elevation Changes in West Antarctica from Satellite Altimetry: Mass Balance Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, H. Jay; Brenner, Anita C.; Cornejo, Helen; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Time-series of surface elevation change, which are constructed from 7-years (1992-1999) of ERS-1 and 2 satellite radar altimeter data of Antarctica, show significant seasonal, inter-annual, and long-term changes. Elevation time-series are created from altimeter crossovers among 90-day data periods on a 50 km grid to 81.5 degrees S and fit with a multivariate linear/sinusoidal function to give the average rate of elevation change (dH/dt) and account for seasonal changes. On the major Ronne, Filchner, and Ronne ice shelves, the dH/dt are small or near zero. In contrast, the ice shelves of the Antarctic Peninsula and along the West Antarctic coast appear to be thinning significantly, with a 23 +/- 3 cm a(exp -1) surface elevation decrease on the Larsen ice shelf and a 65 +/- 4 cm a(exp -1) decrease on the Dotson ice shelf. Significant elevation decreases are obtained over most of the drainage basins of the Pine Island and Thwaites glaciers. Significant increases are obtained over most of the other grounded ice in Marie Byrd Land, the Antarctic Peninsula, and Coates Land. Over the sector from 85 degrees W to 115 degrees W, which includes the Pine Island and Thwaites basins, the average elevation is significantly decreasing by 8.1 cm a(exp -1). The corresponding ice thickness change is about -11 cm a(exp -1), with a corresponding mass loss of 82 Gt a(exp -1), and a 0.22 mm a(exp -1) contribution to global sea level rise. In terms of elevation change, the decrease in the Pine Island-Thwaites sector is largely balanced by the increase in the Marie Byrd Land, but only balanced by about 1/4 in terms of ice thickness change and contribution to sea level rise. The overall average elevation change for the grounded ice is + 1.2 cm a(exp -1). Using an average bedrock uplift of 2.5 cm a(exp -1), implies an average ice thickness decrease of 1.3 cm a(exp -1), a mass loss of 22 Gt a(exp -1), and a 0.06 mm a(exp -1) contribution to global sea level rise.

  9. High resolution VIMS images of Titan's surface: implications for its composition, internal structure and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotin, C.; Le Mouelic, S.; Le Corre, L.; Barnes, J.; Brown, R. H.; Jaumann, R.; Buratti, B.; Baines, K.; Clark, R.; Nicholson, P.; Soderblom, L.

    2008-12-01

    With a field of view of 0.5 mrad per pixel, the VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) onboard the Cassini spacecraft can acquire images with a resolution of 500 m per pixel at closest approach during a typical Titan flyby. This resolution is comparable to the resolution of the radar instrument and allows comparisons between the radar images and optical images in the six infrared windows where the surface can be observed. Such opportunities were not set up for the nominal tour before Saturn insertion. The opportunity was offered during the TA flyby [Sotin et al., Nature, 2005] and the results lead the Cassini program to give VIMS the prime observations during closest approach at the T24 and T38 flybys. Two different implementations were experienced. During the T24 flyby (01/29/2007), we used a push-broom mode allowing VIMS to image a long path before pointing to a specific site at the limit between the light and dark terrains. This observation allowed us to see the dunes and to infer some information on their composition [Barnes et al., Icarus, 2008], to image channels and to infer information of erosion processes of the bright equatorial regions [Jaumann et al., Icarus, in press] and to observe the strong correlation between radar images and the VIMS images over a bright area interpreted as a flow feature [Lopes et al., Icarus, 2007]. During the T38 flyby over Ontario Lacus (12/05/2007), it was decided to point to the lake and get different images which provide us with a set of observations obtained with different emergence angles. This observation allowed us to infer the liquid nature of the lake and the composition of the lake [Brown et al., Nature, 2008]. In addition, this mode gives good information on the atmospheric component and will help us remove that component to get better spectra of Titan's surface. During the extended mission, two observations are forecasted at the beginning and at the end of the Cassini Equinox Mission. The first one will

  10. MEAN-FIELD THEORY AND COMPUTATION OF ELECTROSTATICS WITH IONIC CONCENTRATION DEPENDENT DIELECTRICS *

    PubMed Central

    LI, BO; WEN, JIAYI; ZHOU, SHENGGAO

    2015-01-01

    We construct a mean-field variational model to study how the dependence of dielectric coefficient (i.e., relative permittivity) on local ionic concentrations affects the electrostatic interaction in an ionic solution near a charged surface. The electrostatic free-energy functional of ionic concentrations, which is the key object in our model, consists mainly of the electrostatic potential energy and the ionic ideal-gas entropy. The electrostatic potential is determined by Poisson’s equation in which the dielectric coefficient depends on the sum of concentrations of individual ionic species. This dependence is assumed to be qualitatively the same as that on the salt concentration for which experimental data are available and analytical forms can be obtained by the data fitting. We derive the first and second variations of the free-energy functional, obtain the generalized Boltzmann distributions, and show that the free-energy functional is in general nonconvex. To validate our mathematical analysis, we numerically minimize our electrostatic free-energy functional for a radially symmetric charged system. Our extensive computations reveal several features that are significantly different from a system modeled with a dielectric coefficient independent of ionic concentration. These include the non-monotonicity of ionic concentrations, the ionic depletion near a charged surface that has been previously predicted by a one-dimensional model, and the enhancement of such depletion due to the increase of surface charges or bulk ionic concentrations. PMID:26877718

  11. Plasmonic Purcell factor and coupling efficiency to surface plasmons. Implications for addressing and controlling optical nanosources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas des Francs, G.; Barthes, J.; Bouhelier, A.; Weeber, J. C.; Dereux, A.; Cuche, A.; Girard, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Purcell factor F p is a key quantity in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) that quantifies the coupling rate between a dipolar emitter and a cavity mode. Its simple form {F}{{p}}\\propto Q/V unravels the possible strategies to enhance and control light–matter interaction. Practically, efficient light–matter interaction is achieved thanks to either (i) high quality factor Q at the basis of cQED or (ii) low modal volume V at the basis of nanophotonics and plasmonics. In the last decade, strong efforts have been done to derive a plasmonic Purcell factor in order to transpose cQED concepts to the nanocale, in a scale-law approach. In this work, we discuss the plasmonic Purcell factor for both delocalized (SPP) and localized (LSP) surface-plasmon-polaritons and briefly summarize the expected applications for nanophotonics. On the basis of the SPP resonance shape (Lorentzian or Fano profile), we derive closed form expression for the coupling rate to delocalized plasmons. The quality factor factor and modal confinement of both SPP and LSP are quantified, demonstrating their strongly subwavelength behavior.

  12. Implication of methodological uncertainties for mid-Holocene sea surface temperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessler, I.; Harrison, S. P.; Kucera, M.; Waelbroeck, C.; Chen, M.-T.; Anderson, C.; de Vernal, A.; Fréchette, B.; Cloke-Hayes, A.; Leduc, G.; Londeix, L.

    2014-12-01

    We present and examine a multi-sensor global compilation of mid-Holocene (MH) sea surface temperatures (SST), based on Mg/Ca and alkenone palaeothermometry and reconstructions obtained using planktonic foraminifera and organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst census counts. We assess the uncertainties originating from using different methodologies and evaluate the potential of MH SST reconstructions as a benchmark for climate-model simulations. The comparison between different analytical approaches (time frame, baseline climate) shows the choice of time window for the MH has a negligible effect on the reconstructed SST pattern, but the choice of baseline climate affects both the magnitude and spatial pattern of the reconstructed SSTs. Comparison of the SST reconstructions made using different sensors shows significant discrepancies at a regional scale, with uncertainties often exceeding the reconstructed SST anomaly. Apparent patterns in SST may largely be a reflection of the use of different sensors in different regions. Overall, the uncertainties associated with the SST reconstructions are generally larger than the MH anomalies. Thus, the SST data currently available cannot serve as a target for benchmarking model simulations. Further evaluations of potential subsurface and/or seasonal artifacts that may contribute to obscure the MH SST reconstructions are urgently needed to provide reliable benchmarks for model evaluations.

  13. Implication of methodological uncertainties for Mid-Holocene sea surface temperature reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessler, I.; Harrison, S. P.; Kucera, M.; Waelbroeck, C.; Chen, M.-T.; Andersson, C.; de Vernal, A.; Fréchette, B.; Cloke-Hayes, A.; Leduc, G.; Londeix, L.

    2014-04-01

    We present and examine a~multi-sensor global compilation of Mid-Holocene (MH) sea surface temperatures (SSTs), based on Mg/Ca and alkenone palaeothermometry and reconstructions obtained using planktonic foraminifera and organic-walled dinoflagellate cyst census counts. We assess the uncertainties originating from using different methodologies and evaluate the potential of MH SST reconstructions as a benchmark for climate-model simulations. The comparison between different analytical approaches (time frame, baseline climate) shows the choice of time window for the MH has a negligible effect on the reconstructed SST pattern, but the choice of baseline climate affects both the magnitude and spatial pattern of the reconstructed SSTs. Comparison of the SST reconstructions made using different sensors shows significant discrepancies at a regional scale, with uncertainties often exceeding the reconstructed SST anomaly. Apparent patterns in SST may largely be a reflection of the use of different sensors in different regions. Overall, the uncertainties associated with the SST reconstructions are generally larger than the MH anomalies. Thus, the SST data currently available cannot serve as a target for benchmarking model simulations.

  14. The characteristics and interpretability of land surface change and implications for project design

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sohl, Terry L.; Gallant, Alisa L.; Loveland, Thomas R.

    2004-01-01

    The need for comprehensive, accurate information on land-cover change has never been greater. While remotely sensed imagery affords the opportunity to provide information on land-cover change over large geographic expanses at a relatively low cost, the characteristics of land-surface change bring into question the suitability of many commonly used methodologies. Algorithm-based methodologies to detect change generally cannot provide the same level of accuracy as the analyses done by human interpreters. Results from the Land Cover Trends project, a cooperative venture that includes the U.S. Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration, have shown that land-cover conversion is a relatively rare event, occurs locally in small patches, varies geographically and temporally, and is spectrally ambiguous. Based on these characteristics of change and the type of information required, manual interpretation was selected as the primary means of detecting change in the Land Cover Trends project. Mixtures of algorithm-based detection and manual interpretation may often prove to be the most feasible and appropriate design for change-detection applications. Serious examination of the expected characteristics and measurability of change must be considered during the design and implementation phase of any change analysis project.

  15. Temperature dependence of Fe/++/ crystal field spectra - Implications to mineralogical mapping of planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, C.-M.; Singer, R. B.; Parkin, K. M.; Burns, R. G.; Osborne, M.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported of Fe(++) crystal field spectral measurements for olivines and pyroxenes up to 400 C. The results are correlated with crystal structure data at elevated temperatures, and the validity of remote-sensed identifications of minerals on hot surfaces of the moon and Mercury is assessed. Two techniques were used to obtain spectra of minerals at elevated temperatures using a spectrophotometer. One employed a diamond cell assembly or a specially designed sample holder to measure polarized absorption spectra of heated single crystals. For the other technique, a sample holder was designed to attach to a diffuse reflectance accessory to produce reflectance spectra of heated powdered samples. Polarized absorption spectra of forsterite at 20-400 C are shown in a graph. Other graphs show the temperature dependence of Fe(++) crystal field bands in olivines, the diffuse reflectance spectra of olivine at 40-400 C, the polarization absorption spectra of orthopyroxene at 30-400 C, the diffuse reflectance spectra of pigeonite at 40-400 C, and unpolarized absorption spectra of lunar pyroxene from Apollo 15 rock 15058.

  16. Plasmonic Purcell factor and coupling efficiency to surface plasmons. Implications for addressing and controlling optical nanosources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas des Francs, G.; Barthes, J.; Bouhelier, A.; Weeber, J. C.; Dereux, A.; Cuche, A.; Girard, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Purcell factor F p is a key quantity in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) that quantifies the coupling rate between a dipolar emitter and a cavity mode. Its simple form {F}{{p}}\\propto Q/V unravels the possible strategies to enhance and control light-matter interaction. Practically, efficient light-matter interaction is achieved thanks to either (i) high quality factor Q at the basis of cQED or (ii) low modal volume V at the basis of nanophotonics and plasmonics. In the last decade, strong efforts have been done to derive a plasmonic Purcell factor in order to transpose cQED concepts to the nanocale, in a scale-law approach. In this work, we discuss the plasmonic Purcell factor for both delocalized (SPP) and localized (LSP) surface-plasmon-polaritons and briefly summarize the expected applications for nanophotonics. On the basis of the SPP resonance shape (Lorentzian or Fano profile), we derive closed form expression for the coupling rate to delocalized plasmons. The quality factor factor and modal confinement of both SPP and LSP are quantified, demonstrating their strongly subwavelength behavior.

  17. Survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis on spacecraft surfaces under simulated martian environments: . implications for the forward contamination of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Kern, Roger G.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2003-10-01

    Experiments were conducted in a Mars simulation chamber (MSC) to characterize the survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis under high UV irradiation and simulated martian conditions. The MSC was used to create Mars surface environments in which pressure (8.5 mb), temperature (-80, -40, -10, or +23 °C), gas composition (Earth-normal N 2/O 2 mix, pure N 2, pure CO 2, or a Mars gas mix), and UV-VIS-NIR fluence rates (200-1200 nm) were maintained within tight limits. The Mars gas mix was composed of CO 2 (95.3%), N 2 (2.7%), Ar (1.7%), O 2 (0.2%), and water vapor (0.03%). Experiments were conducted to measure the effects of pressure, gas composition, and temperature alone or in combination with Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR light environments. Endospores of B. subtilis, were deposited on aluminum coupons as monolayers in which the average density applied to coupons was 2.47×10 6 bacteria per sample. Populations of B. subtilis placed on aluminum coupons and subjected to an Earth-normal temperature (23 °C), pressure (1013 mb), and gas mix (normal N 2/O 2 ratio) but illuminated with a Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR spectrum were reduced by over 99.9% after 30 sec exposure to Mars-normal UV fluence rates. However, it required at least 15 min of Mars-normal UV exposure to reduce bacterial populations on aluminum coupons to non-recoverable levels. These results were duplicated when bacteria were exposed to Mars-normal environments of temperature (-10 °C), pressure (8.5 mb), gas composition (pure CO 2), and UV fluence rates. In other experiments, results indicated that the gas composition of the atmosphere and the temperature of the bacterial monolayers at the time of Mars UV exposure had no effects on the survival of bacterial endospores. But Mars-normal pressures (8.5 mb) were found to reduce survival by approximately 20-35% compared to Earth-normal pressures (1013 mb). The primary implications of these results are (a) that greater than 99.9% of bacterial populations on sun

  18. Electrodeposition in Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinqin; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Suojiang; Lu, Xingmei; Zhang, Xiangping

    2016-02-01

    Due to their attractive physico-chemical properties, ionic liquids (ILs) are increasingly used as deposition electrolytes. This review summarizes recent advances in electrodeposition in ILs and focuses on its similarities and differences with that in aqueous solutions. The electrodeposition in ILs is divided into direct and template-assisted deposition. We detail the direct deposition of metals, alloys and semiconductors in five types of ILs, including halometallate ILs, air- and water-stable ILs, deep eutectic solvents (DESs), ILs with metal-containing cations, and protic ILs. Template-assisted deposition of nanostructures and macroporous structures in ILs is also presented. The effects of modulating factors such as deposition conditions (current density, current density mode, deposition time, temperature) and electrolyte components (cation, anion, metal salts, additives, water content) on the morphology, compositions, microstructures and properties of the prepared materials are highlighted.

  19. Ionic Strength Is a Barrier to the Habitability of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Powell, Mark G.; Hallsworth, John E.; Cousins, Claire R.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic availability of water (water activity) strictly limits microbial propagation on Earth, particularly in hypersaline environments. A considerable body of evidence indicates the existence of hypersaline surface waters throughout the history of Mars; therefore it is assumed that, as on Earth, water activity is a major limiting factor for martian habitability. However, the differing geological histories of Earth and Mars have driven variations in their respective aqueous geochemistry, with as-yet-unknown implications for habitability. Using a microbial community enrichment approach, we investigated microbial habitability for a suite of simulated martian brines. While the habitability of some martian brines was consistent with predictions made from water activity, others were uninhabitable even when the water activity was biologically permissive. We demonstrate experimentally that high ionic strength, driven to extremes on Mars by the ubiquitous occurrence of multivalent ions, renders these environments uninhabitable despite the presence of biologically available water. These findings show how the respective geological histories of Earth and Mars, which have produced differences in the planets' dominant water chemistries, have resulted in different physicochemical extremes which define the boundary space for microbial habitability.

  20. Seismic imaging of the upper mantle beneath the northern Central Andean Plateau: Implications for surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, K. M.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Wagner, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Extending over 1,800 km along the active South American Cordilleran margin, the Central Andean Plateau (CAP) as defined by the 3 km elevation contour is second only to the Tibetan Plateau in geographic extent. The uplift history of the 4 km high Plateau remains uncertain with paleoelevation studies along the CAP suggesting a complex, non-uniform uplift history. As part of the Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography (CAUGHT) project, we use surface waves measured from ambient noise and two-plane wave tomography to image the S-wave velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle to investigate the upper mantle component of plateau uplift. We observe three main features in our S-wave velocity model including (1), a high velocity slab (2), a low velocity anomaly above the slab where the slab changes dip from near horizontal to a normal dip, and (3), a high-velocity feature in the mantle above the slab that extends along the length of the Altiplano from the base of the Moho to a depth of ~120 km with the highest velocities observed under Lake Titicaca. A strong spatial correlation exists between the lateral extent of this high-velocity feature beneath the Altiplano and the lower elevations of the Altiplano basin suggesting a potential relationship. Non-uniqueness in our seismic models preclude uniquely constraining this feature as an uppermost mantle feature bellow the Moho or as a connected eastward dipping feature extending up to 300 km in the mantle as seen in deeper mantle tomography studies. Determining if the high velocity feature represents a small lithospheric root or a delaminating lithospheric root extending ~300 km into the mantle requires more integration of observations, but either interpretation shows a strong geodynamic connection with the uppermost mantle and the current topography of the northern CAP.

  1. Ground state of Ho atoms on Pt(111) metal surfaces: Implications for magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbowiak, M.; Rudowicz, C.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the ground state of Ho atoms adsorbed on the Pt(111) surface, for which conflicting results exist. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations yielded the Ho ground state as | Jz=±8 > . Interpretation of x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectra and the magnetization curves indicated the ground state as | Jz=±6 > . Superposition model is employed to predict the crystal-field (CF) parameters based on the structural data for the system Ho/Pt(111) obtained from the DFT modeling. Simultaneous diagonalization of the free-ion (HFI) and the trigonal CF Hamiltonian (HCF) within the whole configuration 4 f10 of H o3 + ion was performed. The role of the trigonal CF terms, neglected in the pure uniaxial CF model used previously for interpretation of experimental spectra, is found significant, whereas the sixth-rank CF terms may be neglected in agreement with the DFT predictions. The results provide substantial support for the experimental designation of the | Jz=±6 > ground state, albeit with subtle difference due to admixture of other | Jz> states, but run against the DFT-based designation of the | Jz=±8 > ground state. A subtle splitting of the ground energy level with the state (predominantly), | Jz=±6 > is predicted. This paper provides better insight into the single-ion magnetic behavior of the Ho/Pt(111) system by helping to resolve the controversy concerning the Ho ground state. Experimental techniques with greater resolution powers are suggested for direct confirmation of this splitting and C3 v symmetry experienced by the Ho atom.

  2. The Evolution and Development of the Lunar Regolith and Implications for Lunar Surface Operations and Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David

    2009-01-01

    The lunar regolith consists of about 90% submillimeter particles traditionally termed lunar soil. The remainder consists of larger particles ranging up to boulder size rocks. At the lower size end, soil particles in the 10s of nanometer sizes are present in all soil samples. Lunar regolith overlies bedrock which consists of either lava flows in mare regions or impact-produced megaregolith in highland regions. Lunar regolith has been produced over billions of years by a combination of breaking and communition of bedrock by meteorite bombardment coupled with a variety of complex space weathering processes including solar wind implantation, solar flare and cosmic ray bombardment with attendant radiation damage, melting, vaporization, and vapor condensation driven by impact, and gardening and turnover of the resultant soil. Lunar regolith is poorly sorted compared to most terrestrial soils, and has interesting engineering properties including strong grain adhesion, over-compacted soil density, an abundance of agglutinates with sharp corners, and a variety of properties related to soil maturity. The NASA program has supported a variety of engineering test research projects, the production of bricks by solar or microwave sintering, the production of concrete, the in situ sintering and glazing of regolith by microwave, and the extraction of useful resources such as oxygen, hydrogen, iron, aluminum, silicon and other products. Future requirements for a lunar surface base or outpost will include construction of protective berms, construction of paved roadways, construction of shelters, movement and emplacement of regolith for radiation shielding and thermal control, and extraction of useful products. One early need is for light weight but powerful digging, trenching, and regolith-moving equipment.

  3. Succinimidyl Ester Surface Chemistry: Implications of the Competition between Aminolysis and Hydrolysis on Covalent Protein Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    N-Hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester terminal groups are commonly used to covalently couple amine-containing biomolecules (e.g., proteins and peptides) to surfaces via amide linkages. This one-step aminolysis is often performed in buffered aqueous solutions near physiological pH (pH 6 to pH 9). Under these conditions, the hydrolysis of the ester group competes with the amidization process, potentially degrading the efficiency of the coupling chemistry. The work herein examines the efficiency of covalent protein immobilization in borate buffer (50 mM, pH 8.50) using the thiolate monolayer formed by the chemisorption of dithiobis (succinimidyl propionate) (DSP) on gold films. The structure and reactivity of these adlayers are assessed via infrared spectroscopy (IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical reductive desorption, and contact angle measurements. The hydrolysis of the DSP-based monolayer is proposed to follow a reaction mechanism with an initial nucleation step, in contrast to a simple pseudo first-order reaction rate law for the entire reaction, indicating a strong dependence of the interfacial reaction on the packing and presence of defects in the adlayer. This interpretation is used in the subsequent analysis of IR-ERS kinetic plots which give a heterogeneous aminolysis rate constant, ka, that is over 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of the heterogeneous hydrolysis rate constant, kh. More importantly, a projection of these heterogeneous kinetic rates to protein immobilization suggests that under coupling conditions in which low protein concentrations and buffers of near physiological pH are used, proteins are more likely physically adsorbed rather than covalently linked. This result is paramount for biosensors that use NHS chemistry for protein immobilization due to effects that may arise from noncovalently linked proteins. PMID:25317495

  4. UV-laser ablation of ionic liquid matrices.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Nils; Thrun, Alexander; Muskat, Tassilo; Grotemeyer, Jürgen

    2009-12-01

    Ionic liquid matrices are a new class of matrices used in MALDI mass spectrometry. The ablation process of several ionic liquid matrices was studied by determining the velocity distribution of ablated neutral matrix molecules. This was done by a postionization approach, where the neutrals were ionized in the ablation plume by a second laser pulse. It was found that a second, time-delayed ablation event occurs consisting completely of neutral molecules. To explain this, the reflected-shockwave model is used, which assumes that the shockwave emerging from the laser ablation is reflected at the sample holder surface. When the shockwave arrives at the sample surface it causes a second ablation.

  5. Contrasting optical properties of surface waters across the Fram Strait and its potential biological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Alexey K.; Granskog, Mats A.; Stedmon, Colin A.; Ivanov, Boris V.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Falk-Petersen, Stig

    2015-03-01

    Underwater light regime is controlled by distribution and optical properties of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and particulate matter. The Fram Strait is a region where two contrasting water masses are found. Polar water in the East Greenland Current (EGC) and Atlantic water in the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) differ with regards to temperature, salinity and optical properties. We present data on absorption properties of CDOM and particles across the Fram Strait (along 79° N), comparing Polar and Atlantic surface waters in September 2009 and 2010. CDOM absorption of Polar water in the EGC was significantly higher (more than 3-fold) compared to Atlantic water in the WSC, with values of absorption coefficient, aCDOM(350), m- 1 of 0.565 ± 0.100 (in 2009) and 0.458 ± 0.117 (in 2010), and 0.138 ± 0.036 (in 2009) and 0.153 ± 0.039 (in 2010), respectively. An opposite pattern was observed for particle absorption with higher absorption found in the eastern part of the Fram Strait. Average values of particle absorption (aP(440), m- 1) were 0.016 ± 0.013 (in 2009) and 0.014 ± 0.011 (in 2010), and 0.047 ± 0.012 (in 2009) and 0.016 ± 0.014 (in 2010), respectively for Polar and Atlantic water. Thus absorption of light in eastern part of the Fram Strait is dominated by particles - predominantly phytoplankton, and the absorption of light in the western part of the strait is dominated by CDOM, with predominantly terrigenous origin. As a result the balance between the importance of CDOM and particulates to the total absorption budget in the upper 0-10 m shifts across Fram Strait. Under water spectral irradiance profiles were generated using ECOLIGHT 5.4.1 and the results indicate that the shift in composition between dissolved and particulate material does not influence substantially the penetration of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm), but does result in notable differences in ultraviolet (UV) light penetration, with higher attenuation in the

  6. Present-Day Surface Changes on Mars: Implications for Recent Climate Variability and Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Dundas, C. M.; Diniega, S.; Byrne, S.; Bridges, N. T.; Hansen, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    With the high-resolution and repeat-image capability of MRO/HiRISE, we have been documenting present-day surface activity. This activity includes seasonal defrosting (spots, fans, etc.), changes in polar deposits, new impacts, migrating sand dunes, enlargement of gullies, and a variety of slope flows. What does this tell us about possible environmental change and habitability? Perhaps the key result is that previous suggestions of recent climate change on Mars may have been somewhat exaggerated. One such suggestion is that the enlargement of pits in the south polar residual cap indicates present-day global warming. However, recent models of continuous sublimation and redeposition of the CO2 predict a suite of landforms that have been observed to exist today (Byrne, 2009, AREPS 37, 535). Another suggestion is that mid-latitude gullies formed by melting snow or shallow ice after a recent period of high obliquity, but HiRISE observations have shown rapid and widespread gully activity in the present climate (Diniega et al., 2010, Geology 38, 1047; Dundas et al., 2012, Icarus 220, 124; Dundas et al., this conference). Likewise, suggestions that Mars needed a significantly higher atmospheric density to explain the presence of well-preserved sand dunes have been countered by observations of widespread current activity (Bridges et al., 2012, Geology 40, 31; Bridges et al., 2012, Nature 485, 339). These observations do not rule out significantly different past climate conditions but do suggest that their effects were less pronounced, at least in recent times. There are features that do not appear active today; one example is the transverse aeolian ridges. Also, the mid-latitude icy lobate flows and ice-rich mantles have not shown current activity, appear to have partially sublimated, and are likely remnants of recent past climates. Ground ice excavated by new craters is observed closer to the equator than predicted for the present atmospheric water vapor content, but

  7. The topography of Ceres and implications for the formation of linear surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczkowski, D.; Otto, K.; Ruesch, O.; Scully, J. E. C.; Williams, D. A.; Mest, S. C.; Schenk, P.; Jaumann, R.; Nathues, A.; Preusker, F.; Park, R. S.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft began orbiting the dwarf planet Ceres in April 2015. Framing Camera data from the Approach (1.3 km/px) and Survey (415 m/px) orbits include digital terrain models derived from processing stereo images. These models have supported various scientific studies of the surface. The eastern hemisphere of Ceres is topographically higher than the western hemisphere. Some of linear structures on Ceres (which include grooves, pit crater chains, fractures and troughs) appear to be radial to the large basins Urvara and Yalode, and most likely formed due to impact processes. However, set of regional linear structures (RLS) that do not have any obvious relationship to impact craters are found on the eastern hemisphere topographic high region. Many of the longer RLS are comprised of smaller structures that have linked together, suggestive of en echelon fractures. Polygonal craters, theorized to form when pervasive subsurface fracturing affects crater formation [1], are widespread on Ceres [2], and those proximal to the RLS have straight crater rims aligned with the grooves and troughs, suggesting that the RLS are fracture systems. A cross-section of one RLS is displayed in FC images of the Occator crater wall. Comparing these images to the digital terrain models show 1) that the structure dips ~60º and 2) there is downward motion on the hanging wall, implying normal faulting. The digital terrain models also reveal the presence of numerous positive relief features with sub-circular shapes. These dome-like features have been tentatively interpreted as volcanic/magmatic features [3]; other possibilities include salt domes. Analog models of domal uplift in areas of regional extension [4] predict patterns of linear structures similar to those observed in the RLS near Occator. Utilizing topography data provided by the Ceres digital terrain models, we assess the relationship between the RLS and nearby domes and topographic high regions to determine the mechanism

  8. Osmotic Pressure in Ionic Microgel Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Alan R.; Tang, Qiyun

    2015-03-01

    Microgels are microscopic gel particles, typically 10-1000 nm in size, that are swollen by a solvent. Hollow microgels (microcapsules) can encapsulate cargo, such as dye molecules or drugs, in their solvent-filled cavities. Their sensitive response to environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pH) and influence on flow properties suit microgels to widespread applications in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and consumer care industries. When dispersed in water, polyelectrolyte gels become charged through dissociation of counterions. The electrostatic contribution to the osmotic pressure inside and outside of ionic microgels influences particle swelling and bulk materials properties, including thermodynamic, structural, optical, and rheological properties. Within the primitive and cell models of polyelectrolyte solutions, we derive an exact statistical mechanical formula for the contribution of mobile microions to the osmotic pressure within ionic microgels. Using Poisson-Boltzmann theory, we validate this result by explicitly calculating ion distributions across the surface of an ionic microgel and the electrostatic contribution to the osmotic pressure. Within a coarse-grained one-component model, we further chart the limits of the cell model for salty dispersions. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1106331.

  9. Employing ionic liquids to deposit cellulose on PET fibers.

    PubMed

    Textor, Torsten; Derksen, Leonie; Gutmann, Jochen S

    2016-08-01

    Several ionic liquids are excellent solvents for cellulose. Starting from that finishing of PET fabrics with cellulose dissolved in ionic liquids like 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium acetate, diethylphosphate and chloride, or the chloride of butyl-methyl imidazolium has been investigated. Finishing has been carried out from solutions of different concentrations, using microcrystalline cellulose or cotton and by employing different cross-linkers. Viscosity of solutions has been investigated for different ionic liquids, concentrations, cellulose sources, linkers and temperatures. Since ionic liquids exhibit no vapor pressure, simple pad-dry-cure processes are excluded. Before drying the ionic liquid has to be removed by a rinsing step. Accordingly rinsing with fresh ionic liquid followed by water or the direct rinsing with water have been tested. The amount of cellulose deposited has been investigated by gravimetry, zinc chloride iodine test as well as reactive dyeing. Results concerning wettability, water up-take, surface resistance, wear-resistance or washing stability are presented. PMID:27112860

  10. Thermal boundary conductance of hydrophilic and hydrophobic ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyake, Takafumi; Sakata, Masanori; Yada, Susumu; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-03-01

    A solid/liquid interface plays a critical role for understanding mechanisms of biological and physical science. Moreover, carrier density of the surface is dramatically enhanced by electric double layer with ionic liquid, salt in the liquid state. Here, we have measured the thermal boundary conductance (TBC) across an interface of gold thin film and ionic liquid by using time-domain thermoreflectance technique. Following the prior researches, we have identified the TBC of two interfaces. One is gold and hydrophilic ionic liquid, N,N-Diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl) ammonium tetrafluoroborate (DEME-BF4), which is a hydrophilic ionic liquid, and the other is N,N-Diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl) ammonium bis (trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (DEME-TFSI), which is a hydrophobic ionic liquid. We found that the TBC between gold and DEME-TFIS (19 MWm-2K-1) is surprisingly lower than the interface between gold and DEME-BF4 (45 MWm-2K-1). With these data, the importance of the wetting angle and ion concentration for the thermal transport at the solid/ionic liquid interface is discussed. Part of this work is financially supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) and Japan Science and Technology Agency. The author is financially supported by JSPS Fellowship.

  11. Effect of the environmental humidity on the bulk, interfacial and nanoconfined properties of an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Jurado, L Andres; Kim, Hojun; Rossi, Antonella; Arcifa, Andrea; Schuh, Jonathon K; Spencer, Nicholas D; Leal, Cecilia; Ewoldt, Randy H; Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M

    2016-08-10

    With reference to our previous surface-force study on 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate ([HMIM] EtSO4) using an extended surface forces apparatus, which showed an ordered structure within the nanoconfined dry ionic liquid (IL) between mica surfaces that extended up to ∼60 nm from the surface, this work focuses on the influence of the environmental humidity on the bulk, interfacial and nanoconfined structure of [HMIM] EtSO4. Infrared spectroscopy and rheometry reflect the changes in chemical and physical properties of the bulk IL due to the uptake of water when exposed to ambient humidity, while wide-angle X-ray scattering shows a mild swelling of the bulk nanostructure, and the AFM sharp tip reveals an additional surface layer at the mica-IL interface. When the water-containing [HMIM] EtSO4 is nanoconfined between two mica surfaces, no long-range order is detected, in contrast to the results obtained for the dry IL, which demonstrates that the presence of water can prevent the liquid-to-solid transformation of this IL. A combination of techniques and the calculated Bjerrum length indicate that water molecules weaken interionic electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions, which lessens ion-ion correlations. Our work shows that the solid-like behavior of the nanoconfined IL strongly depends on the presence of absorbed water and hence, it has implications with regard to the correct interpretation of laboratory studies and their extension to real applications in lubrication. PMID:27430333

  12. Shifting ice regimes of Arctic thermokarst lakes and implications for permafrost and surface-water dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arp, C. D.; Jones, B.; Urban, F. E.; Grosse, G.; Whitman, M.

    2011-12-01

    Thermokarst lakes cover >20% of the landscape throughout much of the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of northern Alaska with shallow lakes freezing solid (grounded ice) and deeper lakes maintaining perennial liquid water (floating ice). Thus, lake depth relative to maximum ice thickness represents an important threshold that impacts permafrost, aquatic habitat, and potentially geomorphic and hydrologic behavior. We studied coupled hydrogeomorphic processes of 13 lakes in the Teshekpuk Lake Special Area (TLSA) representing a depth gradient across this threshold of maximum ice thickness by analyzing remotely sensed imagery, water quality surveys, and climatic data over a 35-year period. Shoreline erosion rates due to permafrost degradation ranged from <0.2 m/yr in very shallow lakes (0.4 m) up to 1.8 m/yr in the deepest lakes (2.6 m) and appear to be partly linked to variation in mean annual lake temperature (MALT). This pattern of thermokarst expansion masked detection of lake hydrologic change using remotely sensed imagery except for the shallowest lakes with stable shorelines. Changes in the surface area of these shallow lakes tracked interannual variation in precipitation minus evaporation (P-E) with periods of full and nearly dry basins. Our analysis suggests that grounded-ice lakes are ice-free on average 37 days longer than floating-ice lakes resulting in a longer period of evaporative loss and more frequent negative P-E. These results suggest divergent hydrogeomorphic responses to a changing Arctic climate depending on the threshold created by water depth relative to maximum ice thickness in ACP lakes. With respect to these findings there is particular interest in ACP lakes of depths encompassing the range of interannual variation in maximum ice thickness because these lakes will most readily show a shift of ice regimes with either a change in water balance or ice growth. For instance, a positive summer P-E and slow winter ice growth can result in a higher

  13. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  14. High Current Ionic Diode Using Homogeneously Charged Asymmetric Nanochannel Network Membrane.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunpyo; Wang, Cong; Chang, Gyu Tae; Park, Jungyul

    2016-04-13

    A high current ionic diode is achieved using an asymmetric nanochannel network membrane (NCNM) constructed by soft lithography and in situ self-assembly of nanoparticles with uniform surface charge. The asymmetric NCNM exhibits high rectified currents without losing a rectification ratio because of its ionic selectivity gradient and differentiated electrical conductance. Asymmetric ionic transport is analyzed with diode-like I-V curves and visualized via fluorescent dyes, which is closely correlated with ionic selectivity and ion distribution according to variation of NCNM geometries.

  15. Near-stream soil water groundwater coupling in the headwaters of the Afon Hafren, Wales: Implications for surface water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haria, Atul H.; Shand, Paul

    2006-12-01

    SummaryHard-rock acid headwater catchments typically exhibit a rapid streamflow response and concomitant rapid mobilisation of soil-derived solutes, such as aluminium, into the aquatic environment during storm events. The rapid stream responses are paradoxically associated with pre-event water dominating the storm hydrograph, however the sources and mechanisms by which 'old' water enters the stream channel and interacts with the soil horizons are still poorly understood. To investigate these processes a detailed and novel field study was established in the riparian zone and lower hillslopes of the Hafren catchment at Plynlimon, mid-Wales. This study showed that shallow bedrock groundwaters discharge into the stream channel. Pressure wave propagation in response to recharge further upslope caused a rapid displacement of shallow groundwaters up into the soils in the near-stream hillslope. A lateral fast flow horizon transported water down slope as interflow at the soil-bedrock interface such that the upper soil horizons remained largely unsaturated. Only where there was a discontinuity in the lateral fast flow horizon was water forced up as an ephemeral spring discharge at the soil surface. At this site, the major zone of soil water-groundwater coupling was in a narrow (20-25 m) strip next to the stream channel. The zone of soil water-groundwater interaction next to the stream channel is likely to depend on the nature of the lateral flow pathways and the hillslope characteristic. This study has shown the importance of the near-stream environment as a locus for soil waters that are bedrock groundwater derived; these groundwaters dominate processes in the deepest soil horizons from where soil components such as aluminium are sourced. Understanding these physical processes is fundamental for understanding upland catchment functioning and has important implications for solute transport modelling and for the sustainable management of surface water systems and stream

  16. Strong sea surface cooling in the eastern equatorial Pacific and implications for Galápagos Penguin conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnauskas, K. B.; Jenouvrier, S.; Brown, C. W.; Murtugudde, R.

    2015-08-01

    The Galápagos is a flourishing yet fragile ecosystem whose health is particularly sensitive to regional and global climate variations. The distribution of several species, including the Galápagos Penguin, is intimately tied to upwelling of cold, nutrient-rich water along the western shores of the archipelago. Here we show, using reliable, high-resolution sea surface temperature observations, that the Galápagos cold pool has been intensifying and expanding northward since 1982. The linear cooling trend of 0.8°C/33 yr is likely the result of long-term changes in equatorial ocean circulation previously identified. Moreover, the northward expansion of the cold pool is dynamically consistent with a slackening of the cross-equatorial component of the regional trade winds—leading to an equatorward shift of the mean position of the Equatorial Undercurrent. The implied change in strength and distribution of upwelling has important implications for ongoing and future conservation measures in the Galápagos.

  17. Mixed ionic-electronic conductor-based radiation detectors and methods of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Adam; Beck, Patrick R; Graff, Robert T; Nelson, Art; Nikolic, Rebecca J; Payne, Stephen A; Voss, Lars; Kim, Hadong

    2015-04-07

    A method of fabricating a mixed ionic-electronic conductor (e.g. TlBr)-based radiation detector having halide-treated surfaces and associated methods of fabrication, which controls polarization of the mixed ionic-electronic MIEC material to improve stability and operational lifetime.

  18. Chiral discrimination by ionic liquids: impact of ionic solutes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher J; Hopkins, Todd A

    2015-04-01

    Chiral ionic liquids hold promise in many asymmetric applications. This study explores the impact of ionic solutes on the chiral discrimination of five amino acid methyl ester-based ionic liquids, including L- and D-alanine methyl ester, L-proline methyl ester, L-leucine methyl ester, and L-valine methyl ester cations combined with bis(trifluoromethanesulfonimide) anion. Circularly polarized luminescence spectroscopy was used to study the chiral discrimination by measuring the racemization equilibrium of a dissymmetric europium complex, Eu(dpa)3(3-) (where dpa = 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylate). The chiral discrimination measured was dependent on the concentration of Eu(dpa)3(3-) and this concentration-dependence was different in each of the ionic liquids. Ionic liquids with L-leucine methyl ester and L-valine methyl ester even switched enantiomeric preference based on the solute concentration. Changing the cation of the Eu(dpa)3(3-) salt from tetrabutylammonium to tetramethylammonium ion also affected the chiral discrimination demonstrated by the ionic liquids.

  19. Thermophysical properties of phosphonium-based ionic liquids

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Arijit; Lopes-da-Silva, José A.; Freire, Mara G.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Carvalho, Pedro J.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental data for density, viscosity, refractive index and surface tension of four phosphonium-based ionic liquids were measured in the temperature range between (288.15 and 353.15) K and at atmospheric pressure. The ionic liquids considered include tri(isobutyl) methylphosphonium tosylate, [Pi(444)1][Tos], tri(butyl)methylphosphonium methylsulfate, [P4441][CH3SO4], tri(butyl)ethylphosphonium diethylphosphate, [P4442][(C2H5O)2PO2], and tetraoctylphosphonium bromide, [P8888][Br]. Additionally, derivative properties, such as the isobaric thermal expansion coefficient, the surface thermodynamic properties and the critical temperatures for the investigated ionic liquids were also estimated and are presented and discussed. Group contribution methods were evaluated and fitted to the density, viscosity and refractive index experimental data. PMID:26435574

  20. Screening of ionic cores in partially ionized plasmas within linear response

    SciTech Connect

    Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Wuensch, K.; Gregori, G.

    2010-06-15

    We employ a pseudopotential approach to investigate the screening of ionic cores in partially ionized plasmas. Here, the effect of the tightly bound electrons is condensed into an effective potential between the (free) valence electrons and the ionic cores. Even for weak electron-ion coupling, the corresponding screening clouds show strong modifications from the Debye result for elements heavier than helium. Modifications of the theoretically predicted x-ray scattering signal and implications on measurements are discussed.

  1. Screening of ionic cores in partially ionized plasmas within linear response.

    PubMed

    Gericke, D O; Vorberger, J; Wünsch, K; Gregori, G

    2010-06-01

    We employ a pseudopotential approach to investigate the screening of ionic cores in partially ionized plasmas. Here, the effect of the tightly bound electrons is condensed into an effective potential between the (free) valence electrons and the ionic cores. Even for weak electron-ion coupling, the corresponding screening clouds show strong modifications from the Debye result for elements heavier than helium. Modifications of the theoretically predicted x-ray scattering signal and implications on measurements are discussed.

  2. Ionic Liquid Crystals: Versatile Materials.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Karel; Lava, Kathleen; Bielawski, Christopher W; Binnemans, Koen

    2016-04-27

    This Review covers the recent developments (2005-2015) in the design, synthesis, characterization, and application of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals. It was designed to give a comprehensive overview of the "state-of-the-art" in the field. The discussion is focused on low molar mass and dendrimeric thermotropic ionic mesogens, as well as selected metal-containing compounds (metallomesogens), but some references to polymeric and/or lyotropic ionic liquid crystals and particularly to ionic liquids will also be provided. Although zwitterionic and mesoionic mesogens are also treated to some extent, emphasis will be directed toward liquid-crystalline materials consisting of organic cations and organic/inorganic anions that are not covalently bound but interact via electrostatic and other noncovalent interactions.

  3. Seasonal cycles in radium and barium within a subterranean estuary: Implications for groundwater derived chemical fluxes to surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonneea, Meagan Eagle; Mulligan, Ann E.; Charette, Matthew A.

    2013-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is an important source of water and dissolved materials to the ocean. One of the primary tracers of this process is the quartet of radium isotopes (223Ra, 224Ra, 226Ra and 228Ra), whereby excess activities in surface waters can often be attributed to an input supplied via SGD. This approach requires the radium end member activity to be well constrained, however, natural variability in groundwater radium may span several orders of magnitude. Therefore, this variability is usually the main driver of uncertainties in volumetric SGD estimates. To investigate the physical and biogeochemical controls on groundwater radium activities, we conducted a three-year time series of radium and barium, a chemical analogue for radium, within the subterranean estuary of a coastal aquifer (Waquoit Bay, MA, USA). Gonneea et al. (2013) demonstrated that movement of the salinity interface within the subterranean estuary is driven by changes in the hydraulic gradient between groundwater level and sea level height. For Waquoit Bay, seasonal scale sea level change, not groundwater level, was the main driver in hydraulic gradient fluctuations. Seasonal changes in groundwater chemistry can be attributed to the resulting movement of the salinity transition zone between terrestrial and marine groundwater. Landward movement of the interface results in a large release of radium isotopes (226Ra = 1400 dpm 100 L-1) and barium (3000 nmol kg-1) associated with an increase in groundwater salinity. The magnitude of these releases cannot be explained by in situ production or weathering alone, but is likely due to salinity driven desorption from surface-bound sediment inventory. The timing of these peak concentrations is not always in phase with model-derived estimates of SGD; as a result, the groundwater concentration rather than the water flux is the main driver of Ra and Ba inputs to Waquoit Bay surface waters. The behavior of

  4. The influence of plasma membrane electrostatic properties on the stability of cell ionic composition.

    PubMed Central

    Genet, S; Costalat, R; Burger, J

    2001-01-01

    An electro-osmotic model is developed to examine the influence of plasma membrane superficial charges on the regulation of cell ionic composition. Assuming membrane osmotic equilibrium, the ion distribution predicted by Gouy-Chapman-Grahame (GCG) theory is introduced into ion transport equations, which include a kinetic model of the Na/K-ATPase based on the stimulation of this ion pump by internal Na(+) ions. The algebro-differential equation system describing dynamics of the cell model has a unique resting state, stable with respect to finite-sized perturbations of various types. Negative charges on the membrane are found to greatly enhance relaxation toward steady state following these perturbations. We show that this heightened stability stems from electrostatic interactions at the inner membrane side that shift resting state coordinates along the sigmoidal activation curve of the sodium pump, thereby increasing the pump sensitivity to internal Na(+) fluctuations. The accuracy of electrostatic potential description with GCG theory is proved using an alternate formalism, based on irreversible thermodynamics, which shows that pressure contribution to ion potential energy is negligible in electrostatic double layers formed at the surfaces of biological membranes. We discuss implications of the results regarding a reliable operation of ionic process coupled to the transmembrane electrochemical gradient of Na(+) ions. PMID:11606261

  5. Analysis of very-high-resolution Galileo images of Europa: Implications for small-scale structure and surface evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, E. J.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Yin, A.; Prockter, L. M.; Patthoff, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Galileo Solid State Imager (SSI) recorded nine very high-resolution frames (8 at 12 m/pixel and 1 at 6 m/pixel) during the E12 flyby of Europa in Dec. 1997. To understand the implications for the small-scale structure and evolution of Europa, we mosaicked these frames (observations 12ESMOTTLE01 and 02, incidence ≈18°, emission ≈77°) into their regional context (part of observation 11ESREGMAP01, 220 m/pixel, incidence ≈74°, emission ≈23°), despite their very different viewing and lighting conditions. We created a map of geological units based on morphology, structure, and albedo along with stereoscopic images where the frames overlapped. The highly diverse units range from: high albedo sub-parallel ridge and grooved terrain; to variegated-albedo hummocky terrain; to low albedo and relatively smooth terrain. We classified and analyzed the diverse units solely based on the high-resolution image mosaic, prior to comparison to the context image, to obtain an in-depth look at possible surface evolution and underlying formational processes. We infer that some of these units represent different stages and forms of resurfacing, including cryovolcanic and tectonic resurfacing. However, significant morphological variation among units in the region indicates that there are different degrees of resurfacing at work. We have created candidate morphological sequences that provide insight into the conversion of ridged plains to chaotic terrain—generally, a process of subduing formerly sharp features through tectonic modification and/or cryovolcanism. When the map of the high-resolution area is compared to the regional context, features that appear to be one unit at regional resolution are comprised of several distinct units at high resolution, and features that appear to be smooth in the context image are found to show distinct textures. Moreover, in the context image, transitions from ridged units to disrupted units appear to be gradual; however the high

  6. Ionic Liquid Epoxy Resin Monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paley, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquid epoxide monomers capable of reacting with cross-linking agents to form polymers with high tensile and adhesive strengths. Ionic liquid epoxide monomers comprising at least one bis(glycidyl) N-substituted nitrogen heterocyclic cation are made from nitrogen heterocycles corresponding to the bis(glycidyl) N-substituted nitrogen heterocyclic cations by a method involving a non-nucleophilic anion, an alkali metal cation, epichlorohydrin, and a strong base.

  7. Ionic emission from Taylor cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Reina, Sergio

    Electrified Taylor cones have been seen as an efficient way to generate thrust for space propulsion. Especially the pure ionic regime (PIR) combines a very high specific impulse (thrust per unit mass) and efficiency, which is very important to reduce fuel transportation costs. The PIR has been primarily based on electrosprays of liquid metals [Swatik and Hendricks 1968, Swatik 1969]. However, emissions dominated by or containing exclusively ions have also been observed from nonmetallic purely ionic substances, initially sulfuric acid [Perel et al. 1969], and more recently room temperature molten salts referred to as ionic liquids (ILs) [Romero-Sanz et al. 2003]. The recent use of the liquid metal ion source (LMIS) with ILs, becoming this "new" source to be known as ionic liquid ion source (ILIS) [Lozano and Martinez-Sanchez 2005], has shown important differences on the emission from Taylor cones with the traditional hollow capillary. This new source seems to be more flexible than the capillary [Paulo, Sergio, carlos], although its low emission level (low thrust) is an important drawback from the space propulsion point of view. Throughout the thesis I have studied some aspects of the ionic emission from ionic liquid Taylor cones and the influence of the properties of the liquids and the characteristic of source on the emission. I have unraveled the reason why ILIS emits such low currents (˜200 nA) and found a way to solve this problem increasing the current up to capillary levels (˜1000 nA) [Castro and Fernandez de la Mora 2009]. I have also tried to reduce ion evaporation while reducing the emitted droplet size in order to increase the thrust generated while keeping the efficiency relatively high and I have measured the energy of evaporation of several cations composing ionic liquids, mandatory step to understand ionic evaporation.

  8. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Victor R.; Nanjundiah, Chenniah; Carlin, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, and R.sub.6 are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F--, Cl--, CF.sub.3 --, SF.sub.5 --, CF.sub.3 S--, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 CHS-- or (CF.sub.3).sub.3 CS--; and X.sup.- is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 .ANG..sup.3.

  9. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koch, V.R.; Nanjundiah, C.; Carlin, R.T.

    1998-10-27

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas shown in a diagram wherein R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}, R{sub 3}, R{sub 4}, R{sub 5}, and R{sub 6} are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F-, Cl-, CF{sub 3}-, SF{sub 5}-, CF{sub 3}S-, (CF{sub 3}){sub 2}CHS- or (CF{sub 3}){sub 3}CS-; and X{sup {minus}} is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 {angstrom}{sup 3}. 4 figs.

  10. Survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis on spacecraft surfaces under simulated martian environments: implications for the forward contamination of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Kern, Roger G.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; McKay, Christopher P.

    2003-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in a Mars simulation chamber (MSC) to characterize the survival of endospores of Bacillus subtilis under high UV irradiation and simulated martian conditions. The MSC was used to create Mars surface environments in which pressure (8.5 mb), temperature (-80, -40, -10, or +23 degrees C), gas composition (Earth-normal N2/O2 mix, pure N2, pure CO2, or a Mars gas mix), and UV-VIS-NIR fluence rates (200-1200 nm) were maintained within tight limits. The Mars gas mix was composed of CO2 (95.3%), N2 (2.7%), Ar (1.7%), O2 (0.2%), and water vapor (0.03%). Experiments were conducted to measure the effects of pressure, gas composition, and temperature alone or in combination with Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR light environments. Endospores of B. subtilis, were deposited on aluminum coupons as monolayers in which the average density applied to coupons was 2.47 x 10(6) bacteria per sample. Populations of B. subtilis placed on aluminum coupons and subjected to an Earth-normal temperature (23 degrees C), pressure (1013 mb), and gas mix (normal N2/O2 ratio) but illuminated with a Mars-normal UV-VIS-NIR spectrum were reduced by over 99.9% after 30 sec exposure to Mars-normal UV fluence rates. However, it required at least 15 min of Mars-normal UV exposure to reduce bacterial populations on aluminum coupons to non-recoverable levels. These results were duplicated when bacteria were exposed to Mars-normal environments of temperature (-10 degrees C), pressure (8.5 mb), gas composition (pure CO2), and UV fluence rates. In other experiments, results indicated that the gas composition of the atmosphere and the temperature of the bacterial monolayers at the time of Mars UV exposure had no effects on the survival of bacterial endospores. But Mars-normal pressures (8.5 mb) were found to reduce survival by approximately 20-35% compared to Earth-normal pressures (1013 mb). The primary implications of these results are (a) that greater than 99.9% of bacterial populations on

  11. High performance ultracapacitors with carbon nanomaterials and ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Wen; Henry, Kent Douglas

    2012-10-09

    The present invention is directed to the use of carbon nanotubes and/or electrolyte structures in various electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors having an ionic liquid electrolyte. The carbon nanotubes are preferably aligned carbon nanotubes. Compared to randomly entangled carbon nanotubes, aligned carbon nanotubes can have better defined pore structures and higher specific surface areas.

  12. Drip-Water Temperatures in Caves: Surface Signals or Cave Processes? - Implications for Speleothem Deposits and Paleoclimate Archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, M. S.; Cuthbert, M. O.; Rau, G. C.; Baker, A.; Roshan, H.; Rutlidge, H.; Marjo, C.; Markowska, M.; Graham, P. W.; Mariethoz, G.

    2013-12-01

    Caves offer a unique opportunity to enter the subsurface to study vadose zone hydrological processes. Limestone caves, with their speleothem deposits, offer additional advantages as archives of past climate. As such they can serve as observatories for past and present hydrological observations. Correct interpretation of past climates using speleothem deposits requires a systematic understanding of karst physico-chemical processes. With the aim of studying near surface flow and heat transport processes, a series of controlled recharge experiments were carried out above Wellington Caves, located in the temperate semi-arid zone of NSW, Australia. Variable amounts of cooled water were irrigated onto the land surface on four consecutive days in January 2013. The applied recharge rates varied from 40 to 70 mm/d and are comparable to mid-sized recharge events. The temperature of the applied water was varied from 0.3 °C to 24.2 °C using ice. Miniature self-contained temperature loggers (DST micro-T, Star Oddi, Iceland) were deployed to measure the soil temperature and strapped directly on to stalactite features inside the cave located about 2 m below the surface. The stalactites have previously activated regularly by mid-sized precipitation events. Below on the cave floor, drip-loggers (Stalagmate, Driptych, UK) were aligned with the stalactites to capture onset of flow as well as drip rates. Three events of inflow were observed in the initially dry cave. The first irrigation did not produce any inflow since the amount of water applied was not large enough to overcome the soil moisture deficit. Subsequently, each inflow had a higher peak drip rate and duration than the previous event. Surprisingly the stalagmite temperature results showed no discernible effect of the cool water applied to the land surface, despite large changes in the soil temperature caused by the irrigation water. Considering the shallow location of the studied cave this highlights that the temperature

  13. Structure, morphology and ionic conductivity of solid polymer electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Arup; Karan, S.; Dey, Ashis; De, S.K.

    2011-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Two-dimensional atomic force image of pure polyethylene oxide presents a crystallized network of regular spherulites developing spirals and branches of well distributed surface contours. Highlights: {yields} The incorporation of ceria significantly modifies the morphology of polyethylene oxide (PEO)-KI complex. {yields} The ionic conductivity increases by about two orders of magnitude by the addition of ceria nanoparticles. {yields} Ionic conductivity as a function of ceria concentration reveals two maxima. {yields} Grain boundary effect of nanofiller, strong Lewis acid-base interaction between PEO and nanosized ceria, change of conformation of PEO molecule and epitaxial effect of ceria nanoparticles control the ionic conductivity of composite polymer electrolyte. -- Abstract: Polyethylene oxide (PEO) complexed with potassium iodide (KI) is synthesized to investigate the ionic conductivity of alkaline based polymer electrolytes. The structural and morphological characterizations of the nanocomposite polymer electrolytes are performed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. The ionic conductivity increases with the increase of KI concentration up to about 20 wt.%. The effect of nanosized ceria (CeO{sub 2} {approx} 10 nm) fillers on ionic conductivity in PEO-KI polymer electrolyte is also carried out, keeping PEO to KI wt.% ratio 80:20 and 85:15. The result reveals that the addition of ceria nanoparticles enhances the conductivity by two orders of magnitude. The presence of ceria at the highest concentration induces the same molecular environment within PEO chain as that of undoped PEO. Temperature dependence of ionic conductivity follows Arrhenius mechanism.

  14. Electrotunable Lubricity with Ionic Liquid Nanoscale Films

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, O. Y.; Bresme, F.; Kornyshev, A. A.; Urbakh, M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in tribology is finding the way for an in situ control of friction without changing the lubricant. One of the ways for such control is via the application of electric fields. In this respect a promising new class of lubricants is ionic liquids, which are solvent-free electrolytes, and their properties should be most strongly affected by applied voltage. Based on a minimal physical model, our study elucidates the connection between the voltage effect on the structure of the ionic liquid layers and their lubricating properties. It reveals two mechanisms of variation of the friction force with the surface charge density, consistent with recent AFM measurements, namely via the (i) charge effect on normal and in-plane ordering in the film and (ii) swapping between anion and cation layers at the surfaces. We formulate conditions that would warrant low friction coefficients and prevent wear by resisting “squeezing-out” of the liquid under compression. These results give a background for controllable variation of friction. PMID:25572127

  15. Dual Ionic and Organic Nature of Ionic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Rui; Wang, Yanting

    2016-01-01

    Inherited the advantages of inorganic salts and organic solvents, ionic liquids (ILs) exhibit many superior properties allowing them promising green solvents for the future. Although it has been widely acknowledged that the unique features of ILs originate from their dual ionic and organic nature, its microscopic physical origin still remains blurry. In this work, by comparing the ion/molecule cage structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations for seven prototypic liquids—a molten inorganic salt, four ILs, a strongly polar organic solvent, and a weakly polar organic solvent, we have revealed that the depth of the cage energy landscape characterizes the ionic nature of ILs, whereas the slope and curvature of its mimimum determine the organic nature of ILs. This finding advances our understanding of ILs and thus will help their efficient utilization as well as the systematic design of novel functionalized ILs. PMID:26782660

  16. Quantifying small-scale temporal surface change on glaciers and salt pans using terrestrial laser scanning: implications for modelling ablation and dust emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nield, J. M.; Wiggs, G. F. S.; Leyland, J.; Darby, S. E.; King, J.; Eckardt, F. D.; Chiverrell, R. C.; Vircavs, L. H.; Jacobs, B.

    2012-04-01

    Physical surface roughness is important in glacial and desert environments as it influences aerodynamic roughness, which in turn determines the ability of the wind to contribute to the turbulent heat flux component of the energy balance for glacial ice ablation or the likelihood of a surface emitting dust. Surface microtopography has traditionally been quantified by single 2D transects, but little is known about how these surfaces vary over time and the feedback between surface properties and other geomorphic processes. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) is the perfect tool to examine geomorphic microtopography over large spatial areas relatively quickly with the opportunity for repeat temporal measurements. Here we present examples of daily and weekly surface change measured on the Sua Pan, Botswana and the Svínafellsjökull, Iceland with mm accuracy using TLS. For the first time it is possible to quantify salt crust plucking and extrusion events and elucidate links between surface and wind shear interactions, as well as possible changes in aerodynamic roughness over time as surfaces evolve. Clear patterning is evident, with crust expansion limited to topographic highs. Likewise, we illustrate examples of measured daily ablation rates and patterns, and allude to implications for energy balance modelling by improving estimates of aerodynamic roughness. Specific ice patterning includes melt water eroding channels, the unique interactions of surface debris (volcanic ash from the 21 - 30 May 2011 eruption of Grímsvötn) melting out from the glacier and surface water forming a diverse microtopography of debris cones, cryoconite holes and perched blocks. However, whilst TLS represents a step-change in our ability to move from small transect derived roughness measurements to complete 3D surface change, detecting change on mobile surfaces through time is challenging, and linking surface properties to other point-based process measurements can be problematic.

  17. Influence of the atmosphere on the evaluation of the geopotential from global models on the surface of the Earth: implications for the realization of a World Height System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, Jaakko

    2016-04-01

    Outside the atmosphere, the potential of a standard atmosphere can with high accuracy be approximated with the potential of a surface layer with the same mass, independently of the scale height of the atmosphere. Not so when the potential is evaluated on the surface of the Earth. In a spherically symmetric approximation and assuming a scale height of 7.6 km, the potential at zero height is in a back-of-the-envelope calculation 0.12 percent less than the potential of the surface laýer. This corresponds to a difference of -1.2 ppb in the total geopotential evaluated on the surface of the Earth, the equivalent of a difference of +8 mm in height. Using a realistic atmospheric and Earth model, the difference is not constant. This has obvious implications for the geopotential values associated with a World Height System. The question has in fact already been extensively analyzed in the context of geoid determination.

  18. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  19. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    PubMed Central

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  20. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  1. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-04

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  2. Thermal decomposition of carboxylate ionic liquids: trends and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Clough, Matthew T; Geyer, Karolin; Hunt, Patricia A; Mertes, Jürgen; Welton, Tom

    2013-12-21

    The thermal stability of a series of dialkylimidazolium carboxylate ionic liquids has been investigated using a broad range of experimental and computational techniques. Ionic liquids incorporating fluoroalkyl carboxylate anions were found to have profoundly differing thermal stabilities and decomposition mechanisms compared with their non-fluorinated analogues. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate was observed to largely decompose via an S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution reaction when under inert gas conditions, predominantly at the imidazolium methyl substituent. The Arrhenius equations for thermal decomposition of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, and the C(2)-methylated analogue 1-ethyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium acetate, were determined from isothermal Thermogravimetric Analysis experiments. The low thermal stability of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate has important implications for biomass experiments employing this ionic liquid. For these two ionic liquids, ion pair and transition state structures were optimised using Density Functional Theory. The activation barriers for the S(N)2 nucleophilic substitution mechanisms are in good agreement with the experimentally determined values. PMID:24173605

  3. Diphosphonium Ionic Liquids as Broad Spectrum Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, George A.; Wathier, Michel; Zegans, Michael E.; Shanks, Robert M.Q.; Kowalski, Regis; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose One of the most disturbing trends in recent years is the growth of resistant strains of bacteria with the simultaneous dearth of new antimicrobial agents. Thus, new antimicrobial agents for use on the ocular surface are needed. Methods We synthesized a variety of ionic liquid compounds, which possess two positively charged phosphonium groups separated by ten methylene units in a “bola” type configuration. We tested these compounds for antimicrobial activity versus a variety of ocular pathogens, as well as their cytoxicity in vitro in a corneal cell line and in vivo in mice. Results The ionic liquid Di-Hex C10 demonstrated broad in vitro antimicrobial activity at the low micromolar concentrations versus Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, as well as ocular fungal pathogens. Treatment with Di-Hex C10 resulted in bacterial killing in as little as 15 minutes in vitro. Di-Hex C10 showed little cytotoxicity at 1 μM versus a corneal epithelial cell line or at 10 μM in a mouse corneal wound model. We also show that this bis-phosphonium ionic liquid structure is key, as a comparable mono phosphonium ionic liquid is cytotoxic to both bacteria and corneal epithelial cells. Conclusions Here we report the first use of dicationic bis-phosphonium ionic liquids as antimicrobial agents. Our data suggest that diphosphonium ionic liquids may represent a new class of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents for use on the ocular surface. PMID:22236790

  4. Elucidating graphene - Ionic Liquid interfacial region: a combined experimental and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Shutthanandan, V.; Hu, Jian Z.; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2014-01-10

    The interfacial region between graphene and an imidazolium based ionic liquid is studied using spectroscopic analysis and computational modelling. This combined approach reveals that the molecular level structure of the interfacial region is significantly influenced by functional group defects on the graphene surface.The combined experimental and computational study reveals that the molecular structure at interfacial region between graphene and imidazolium based ionic liquid is defined by the hydroxyl functional groups on the graphene surface

  5. A view of aqueous electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction to formate at indium electrodes, and the reversible electrodeposition of silver in ionic liquids through the lens of fundamental surface science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detweiler, Zachary M.

    Two systems were studied using in situ measurement techniques, demonstrating the importance of creative experimental design. The electroreduction of CO2 at heterogeneous indium electrodes in aqueous solution was analyzed by cyclic voltammetry. Bulk electrolyses showed that increased indium oxide presence prior to electrolysis improved the Faradaic efficiency of CO 2 reduction to formate in 0.5 M K2SO2 aqueous solutions at a pH of 4.4. In order to more accurately assign speciation at the electrode surface ex situ O2 and H2O dosing of metallic indium under UHV was studied with XPS, HREELS and TPD. Ambient pressure XPS showed that the ratio of oxide to hydroxide at the indium interface is strongly dependent on the partial pressure of water; decreasing as P(H2O) increases. Using this information, a qualitative picture of the indium interface could be generated. In situ ATR-FTIR with an indium thin film as the working electrode showed that bulk oxide quickly reduces with applied potential, but an interfacial oxide is still present at high reductive overpotential. Additionally, an adsorbed carbonate at the thin film interface was observed upon introducing CO 2 to the cell. The implication of a surface bound carbonate as the CO 2 reduction intermediate draws on a mechanism that has not previously been discussed in the electrochemical reduction of CO2. The previous study of this mechanism from Ficscher-Tropsch literature helps to predict the further reduced products found at more electropositive metals, such as copper or magnesium, the latter of which is described here. Additionaly described here is a series of ILs that were employed as electrolyte for reversible silver deposition. BMIM N(TfO)2 was found to be the most promising of those studied, intrinsically giving a more uniform deposit that was bright and reversible. Deposit formation was studied using SEM and EDX as a function of deposition potential and deposition time. In situ reflectometry was employed to get a

  6. Model uncertainties affecting satellite-based inverse modeling of nitrogen oxides emissions and implications for surface ozone simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.-T.; Liu, Z.; Zhang, Q.; Liu, H.; Mao, J.; Zhuang, G.

    2012-06-01

    cannot account for the large model underestimates in cities and other extremely polluted areas (particularly in the north) as compared to satellite retrievals, likely pointing to underestimates of the a priori emission inventory in these places with important implications for understanding of atmospheric chemistry and air quality. Post-model modifications also have large impacts on surface ozone concentrations with the peak values in July over North China decreasing by about 15 ppb. Individually, modification for the uptake of the hydroperoxyl radical on aerosols has the largest impact for both NO2 and ozone, followed by various other parameters important for some species in some seasons. Note that these modifications are simplified and should be used with caution for error apportionment.

  7. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Xu, Kang; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

  8. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  9. Adsorption of xenon ions onto defects in organic surfaces: Implications for the origin and the nature of organics in primitive meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchi, Yves; Marty, Bernard; Reinhardt, Peter; Robert, François

    2011-10-01

    Noble gases trapped in primitive meteorites are quantitatively hosted by a poorly defined organic phase, labeled phase Q. Xenon is enriched in heavy isotopes by +1.30 ± 0.06% per atomic mass unit (amu, 1 σ) in phase Q relative to solar. To understand the origin of this fractionation, we have performed adsorption experiments of xenon atoms and ions, ionized in a radiofrequency plasma. Within the reaction vessel, anthracite was heated and the resulting smoke deposited onto the walls of the vessel, resulting in carbon-rich films. Xenon was trapped in the carbon films either as ions in the ionization zone of the vessel, or as neutral atoms outside this zone. Xenon trapped as ionic Xe is tightly bound and is enriched by +1.36 ± 0.05%/amu (1 σ) in heavy isotopes, reproducing the isotopic fractionation of xenon trapped in phase Q relative to solar. Neutral xenon is more loosely trapped, is in much lower concentration, and is not isotopically fractionated. Ionized conditions allow the constant xenon isotopic composition observed in meteorite during stepwise heating release to be reproduced. Furthermore, the trapping efficiency of Xe + estimated from these experiments is consistent with the high xenon concentration measured in phase Q of primitives meteorites. Xenon was not trapped in the film by implantation because the energies of the incident Xe atoms and ions were far too low (<1 eV). From the difference of behavior between ionic and neutral forms, we propose that xenon ions were trapped via chemical bonding at the surface of the newly created C-rich film. The observed mass-dependent fractionation of xenon is unlikely to have occurred in the gas phase. It is more probably related to variations in chemical bonding strengths of Xe isotopes as chemical bonds involving heavy Xe isotopes are more stable than those involving light ones. For young stars, including the young Sun, photons emitted in the far UV energy range able to ionize noble gases (<100 nm) were orders of

  10. Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

    2014-08-12

    A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

  11. High-flux ionic diodes, ionic transistors and ionic amplifiers based on external ion concentration polarization by an ion exchange membrane: a new scalable ionic circuit platform.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gongchen; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2016-04-01

    A microfluidic ion exchange membrane hybrid chip is fabricated using polymer-based, lithography-free methods to achieve ionic diode, transistor and amplifier functionalities with the same four-terminal design. The high ionic flux (>100 μA) feature of the chip can enable a scalable integrated ionic circuit platform for micro-total-analytical systems.

  12. The hype with ionic liquids as solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Werner; Häckl, Katharina

    2016-09-01

    In this mini review, we give our personal opinion about the present state of the art concerning Ionic Liquids, proposed as alternative solvents. In particular, we consider their different drawbacks and disadvantages and discuss the critical aspects of the research of Ionic Liquids as solvents. Finally, we point out some aspects on potentially promising Ionic Liquid solvents.

  13. High-flux ionic diodes, ionic transistors and ionic amplifiers based on external ion concentration polarization by an ion exchange membrane: a new scalable ionic circuit platform.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gongchen; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2016-04-01

    A microfluidic ion exchange membrane hybrid chip is fabricated using polymer-based, lithography-free methods to achieve ionic diode, transistor and amplifier functionalities with the same four-terminal design. The high ionic flux (>100 μA) feature of the chip can enable a scalable integrated ionic circuit platform for micro-total-analytical systems. PMID:26960551

  14. Non-Fickian Ionic Diffusion Across High-Concentration Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Anne E.; Wheatcraft, Stephen W.; Glass, Robert J.; O'Rourke, John P.

    1995-09-01

    A non-Fickian physico-chemical model for electrolyte transport in high-ionic strength systems is developed and tested with laboratory experiments with copper sulfate as an example electrolyte. The new model is based on irreversible thermodynamics and uses measured mutual diffusion coefficients, varying with concentration. Compared to a traditional Fickian model, the new model predicts less diffusion and asymmetric diffusion profiles. Laboratory experiments show diffusion rates even smaller than those predicted by our non-Fickian model, suggesting that there are additional, unaccounted for processes retarding diffusion. Ionic diffusion rates may be a limiting factor in transporting salts whose effect on fluid density will in turn significantly affect the flow regime. These findings have important implications for understanding and predicting solute transport in geologic settings where dense, saline solutions occur.

  15. Molecular dynamics studies on the adaptability of an ionic liquid in the extraction of solid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Frost, Denzil S; Machas, Michael; Dai, Lenore L

    2012-10-01

    Recently, a number of publications have suggested that ionic liquids (ILs) can absorb solid particles. This development may have implications in fields like oil sand processing, oil spill beach cleanup, and water treatment. In this Article, we provide a computational investigation of this phenomenon via molecular dynamics simulations. Two particle surface chemistries were investigated: (1) hydrocarbon-saturated and (2) silanol-saturated, representing hydrophobic and hydrophilic particles, respectively. Employing 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF(6)]) as a model IL, these nanoparticles were allowed to equilibrate at the IL/water and IL/hexane interfaces to observe the interfacial self-assembled structures. At the IL/water interface, the hydrocarbon-based nanoparticles were nearly completely absorbed by the IL, while the silica nanoparticles maintained equal volume in both phases. At the IL/hexane interface, the hydrocarbon nanoparticles maintained minimal interactions with the IL, whereas the silica nanoparticles were nearly completely absorbed by it. Studies of these two types of nanoparticles immersed in the bulk IL indicate that the surface chemistry has a great effect on the corresponding IL liquid structure. These effects include layering of the ions, hydrogen bonding, and irreversible absorption of some ions to the silica nanoparticle surface. We quantify these effects with respect to each nanoparticle. The results suggest that ILs likely exhibit this absorption capability because they can form solvation layers with reduced dynamics around the nanoparticles. PMID:22950605

  16. Evaporative Control on Soil Water Isotope Ratios: Implications for Atmosphere-Land Surface Water Fluxes and Interpretation of Terrestrial Proxy Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, A.; Noone, D. C.; Berkelhammer, M. B.; O'Neill, M.

    2014-12-01

    model at the land surface to weight the contributions of rainfall, surface water vapor exchange and sub-surface vapor diffusion to soil water isotope values. This has implications both for modeling short-term gas exchange at the land surface as well as for estimating past evaporative conditions from proxies like cave deposits and tree cellulose.

  17. Comparison of Three Ionic Liquid-Tolerant Cellulases by Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Vance; Burney, Patrick; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2015-01-01

    We have employed molecular dynamics to investigate the differences in ionic liquid tolerance among three distinct family 5 cellulases from Trichoderma viride, Thermogata maritima, and Pyrococcus horikoshii. Simulations of the three cellulases were conducted at a range of temperatures in various binary mixtures of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate with water. Our analysis demonstrates that the effects of ionic liquids on the enzymes vary in each individual case from local structural disturbances to loss of much of one of the enzyme’s secondary structure. Enzymes with more negatively charged surfaces tend to resist destabilization by ionic liquids. Specific and unique structural changes in the enzymes are induced by the presence of ionic liquids. Disruption of the secondary structure, changes in dynamical motion, and local changes in the binding pocket are observed in less tolerant enzymes. Ionic-liquid-induced denaturation of one of the enzymes is indicated over the 500 ns timescale. In contrast, the most tolerant cellulase behaves similarly in water and in ionic-liquid-containing mixtures. Unlike the heuristic approaches that attempt to predict enzyme stability using macroscopic properties, molecular dynamics allows us to predict specific atomic-level structural and dynamical changes in an enzyme’s behavior induced by ionic liquids and other mixed solvents. Using these insights, we propose specific experimentally testable hypotheses regarding the origin of activity loss for each of the systems investigated in this study. PMID:25692593

  18. Comparison of three ionic liquid-tolerant cellulases by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Vance; Burney, Patrick; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2015-02-17

    We have employed molecular dynamics to investigate the differences in ionic liquid tolerance among three distinct family 5 cellulases from Trichoderma viride, Thermogata maritima, and Pyrococcus horikoshii. Simulations of the three cellulases were conducted at a range of temperatures in various binary mixtures of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate with water. Our analysis demonstrates that the effects of ionic liquids on the enzymes vary in each individual case from local structural disturbances to loss of much of one of the enzyme's secondary structure. Enzymes with more negatively charged surfaces tend to resist destabilization by ionic liquids. Specific and unique structural changes in the enzymes are induced by the presence of ionic liquids. Disruption of the secondary structure, changes in dynamical motion, and local changes in the binding pocket are observed in less tolerant enzymes. Ionic-liquid-induced denaturation of one of the enzymes is indicated over the 500 ns timescale. In contrast, the most tolerant cellulase behaves similarly in water and in ionic-liquid-containing mixtures. Unlike the heuristic approaches that attempt to predict enzyme stability using macroscopic properties, molecular dynamics allows us to predict specific atomic-level structural and dynamical changes in an enzyme's behavior induced by ionic liquids and other mixed solvents. Using these insights, we propose specific experimentally testable hypotheses regarding the origin of activity loss for each of the systems investigated in this study. PMID:25692593

  19. Automatic identification of topographic surfaces related to the sub-Cambrian peneplain (SCP) in southern Norway - Surface generation algorithms and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarsve, Erlend M.; Krøgli, Svein Olav; Etzelmüller, Bernd; Gabrielsen, Roy H.

    2014-04-01

    Two methods for digital mapping and analysis of topographic surfaces of moderate relief, such as erosional surfaces, are introduced and discussed in this paper. The surface fit method uses least squares to solve the problem of finding the best surface fit to the data, whereas the region grow method uses the surface slope and a set of properties (e.g. maximum slope between adjacent pixels) to generate surfaces from single seed GPS-positions. In both methods the analysed surface was identified from field controlled geological maps. The surface fit method is applicable to landscapes with great topographic varieties, whereas the region grow method is most applicable to relatively flat areas. Both methods were used to identify the sub-Cambrian peneplain (SCP). The result suggests that the SCP occurs across significant parts of the Hardangervidda area, with a greater lateral extent in the central part of the area compared to the northern part. This can be attributed to more extensive faulting of the SCP in the northern part.

  20. Observation of ionic Coulomb blockade in nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jiandong; Liu, Ke; Graf, Michael; Dumcenco, Dumitru; Kis