Science.gov

Sample records for ionization chamber smoke detectors

  1. Ionization-chamber smoke detector system

    DOEpatents

    Roe, Robert F.

    1976-10-19

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

  2. The Analysis of Ionization Chambers Used for Detecting Smoke Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlej, Z. (Bish).

    Ionization type cells using a radioactive source of primary ions have been used as fire detectors for many years. They have proven sufficiently sensitive to give an alarm when exposed to the relatively small concentration of smoke particles that occur during the early stages of combustion when control of a fire is still possible. In this work the charging of smoke particles in ionization chambers such as typically employed in ionization smoke detectors are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The ionization chambers investigated in this work have parallel plate and spherical electrode geometries. In the absence of smoke particles, the ionization chambers were operated at some ambient electrode current, which depends upon the ion generation rate, the electrode geometries, the potential difference between the electrodes, and the thermodynamic properties of the gas within the chamber volume. When smoke particles are introduced into the ionization chamber they act as an additional sink for the ions, so that the ion current is reduced. The smoke particles in the experiment performed in this work were transferred from the particle generator to the volume surrounding the ionization chamber and allowed to diffuse inside the ionization chamber. An Aitken nuclei counter was employed to measure the concentration of smoke particles inside the ionization chamber. The electric current flowing through the ionization chamber was recorded as a function of time and concentration of the smoke particles inside the chamber. The current loss due to the particles present inside the chamber was calculated and compared with the experimental results. It was found that at the certain level of ambient electrode current, the current loss due to the smoke particles assumes a maximum value. This optimum operating electrode current was predicted by the mathematical model employed in this work. In the light of this model experimental ionization chambers of both parallel and spherical

  3. Total diesel exhaust particulate length measurements using a modified household smoke alarm ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Vojtisek-Lom, Michal

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of various means to combat the negative health effects of ultrafine particles emitted by internal combustion engines, a reliable, low-cost instrument for dynamic measurements of the exhaust emissions of ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is needed. In this study, an ordinary ionization-type building smoke detector was modified to serve as a measuring ionization chamber and utilized for dynamic measurements of PM emissions from diesel engines. When used with diluted exhaust, the readings show an excellent correlation with total particulate length. The instrument worked well with raw and diluted exhaust and with varying emission levels and is well suitable for on-board use.

  4. Total diesel exhaust particulate length measurements using a modified household smoke alarm ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Vojtisek-Lom, Michal

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of various means to combat the negative health effects of ultrafine particles emitted by internal combustion engines, a reliable, low-cost instrument for dynamic measurements of the exhaust emissions of ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is needed. In this study, an ordinary ionization-type building smoke detector was modified to serve as a measuring ionization chamber and utilized for dynamic measurements of PM emissions from diesel engines. When used with diluted exhaust, the readings show an excellent correlation with total particulate length. The instrument worked well with raw and diluted exhaust and with varying emission levels and is well suitable for on-board use. PMID:21387930

  5. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  6. a High Resolution Ionization Chamber for the SPIDER Fission Fragment Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Arnold, C. W.; Laptev, A. B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R. O.; White, M. C.; Hecht, A. A.; Mader, D.

    2014-09-01

    An ionization chamber for measuring the energy loss and kinetic energy of fragments produced through neutron-induced fission at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has been designed as a component of the the new SPIDER detector. Design criteria included energy resolutions of <1% for high energy resolution and increased charge resolution. The ionization chamber will be combined with a high resolution time-of-flight detector to achieve fragment yield measurements with mass and nuclear charge resolutions of 1 amu and Z=1. The present status of the ionization chamber will be presented.

  7. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  8. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  9. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  10. On line high dose static position monitoring by ionization chamber detector for industrial gamma irradiators.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ary A; Vieira, Jose M; Hamada, Margarida M

    2010-01-01

    A 1 cm(3) cylindrical ionization chamber was developed to measure high doses on line during the sample irradiation in static position, in a (60)Co industrial plant. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable for use as a dosimeter on line. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials.

  11. Effects of thoron on a radon detector of pulse-ionization chamber type.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T

    2004-01-01

    A radon detector of pulse-ionization chamber (PIC) type could have some sensitivity for thoron. Thus, the presence of thoron could interfere with precise measurement of radon. In the present study, effects of thoron on the most common type of PIC detector (commercial name AlphaGUARD) were investigated using an exposure chamber. The AlphaGUARD was exposed to a mixture of radon and thoron, together with a radon/thoron discriminative monitor that employs a silicon solid-state detector. The thoron sensitivity of the PIC detector was estimated by comparing the two detectors. As a result, the thoron sensitivity was about 10% compared with the radon sensitivity. In other words, the radon concentration (Bq m(-3)) measured with the PIC detector was approximately the sum of the actual radon concentration (Bq m(-3)) and 10% of the thoron concentration (Bq m(-3)). The sensitivity to thoron should be considered in measurements in thoron-enhanced areas. PMID:15103062

  12. Development of an Ionization Chamber for the SPIDER Fission Fragment Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Arnold, C. W.; Laptev, A. B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R. O.; White, M. C.

    2014-05-01

    The ionization chamber component of the SPIDER detector has been designed to measure energy loss and kinetic energy of fragments produced through neutron-induced fission with energy resolutions of <1% and a time-dependent signal collection. Important design elements implemented are an axial configuration of the electrodes for improved energy loss and measurement and a thin silicon nitride entrance window to minimize both energy loss and energy straggling of the incoming fragments. High energy resolution and improved charge resolution from the ionization chamber are combined with the high precision of the upstream time-of-flight component of SPIDER to achieve resolutions in mass and nuclear charge of 1 AMU and Z=1. A discussion of the present resolution capabilities of the ionization chamber will be presented.

  13. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  14. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500

    SciTech Connect

    Stelljes, T. S. Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Poppe, B.; Harmeyer, A.; Reuter, J.; Harder, D.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. Methods: The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm{sup 2} measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array’s readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor k{sub NR} for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array’s central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. Results: The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1

  15. Evaluation of smoke detectors for mining use. Report of investigations/1995

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.C.; Morrow, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines has constructed a smoke chamber and developed sensitivity tests for smoke detectors. Response of ionization- and optical-type commercially available smoke detectors have been investigated. Six smoke detectors were measured with respect to visually obscuring smoke characterized by a corresponding optical density for smoldering and flaming coal combustion in the smoke chamber. The responsive characteristics of the detectors evaluated with respect to known smoke conditions in the smoke chamber shows their potential for use as mine fire sensors or part of a mine atmospheric monitoring system to improve mine safety.

  16. Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo, Fire Chief Jay Stout of Safety Harbor, Florida, is explaining to young Richard Davis the workings of the Honeywell smoke and fire detector which probably saved Richard's life and that of his teen-age brother. Alerted by the detector's warning, the pair were able to escape their burning home. The detector in the Davis home was one of 1,500 installed in Safety Harbor residences in a cooperative program conducted by the city and Honeywell Inc.

  17. Large-Area Neutron Detector based on Li-6 Pulse Mode Ionization Chamber.

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.; Ianakiev, K. D.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Makela, M. F.

    2005-01-01

    Prototypes of a Li-6 Pulse Mode Ionization Chamber (LiPMIC) have been in development for the past two years for the purpose of providing large-area neutron detector. this system would be suitable for remote deployment for homeland security and counterterrorism needs at borders, ports, and nuclear facilities. A prototype of LiPMIC is expected to provide a similar level of performance to the current industry-standard, He-3 proportional counters, while keeping the initial cost of procurement down by an order of magnitude, especially where large numbers of detectors are required. The overall design aspect and the efficiency optimization process is discussed. Specifically, the MCNP simulations of a single-cell prototype were performed and benchmarked with the experimental results. MCNP simulations of a three dimensional array design show intrinsic efficiency comparable to that of an array of He-3 proportional counters. LiPMIC has shown steady progress toward fulfilling the design expectations and future design modification and optimization are discussed.

  18. Development of coal combustion sensitivity test for smoke detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.C.; Morrow, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    Standard smoldering and flaming combustion tests using small coal samples have been developed by the US Bureau of Mines as a method to evaluate the response of a smoke detector. The tests are conducted using a standard smoke box designed and constructed according to Underwriters Laboratories. The tests provide a standard, easily reproducible smoke characteristic for smoldering and flaming coal combustion, based upon a comparison of the smoke optical density and the response of a standard ionization chamber to the smoke. With these standard tests, the range of threshold limits for the response of a smoke detector and the detector`s reliability can be evaluated for nearly identical smoke visibility and smoke physical characteristics. The detector`s threshold response limits and reliability need to be well defined prior to the instrument`s use as part of a mine fire warning system for improved mine safety.

  19. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  20. Time-of-flight ERD with a 200 mm2 Si3N4 window gas ionization chamber energy detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julin, Jaakko; Laitinen, Mikko; Sajavaara, Timo

    2014-08-01

    Low energy heavy ion elastic recoil detection work has been carried out in Jyväskylä since 2009 using home made timing detectors, a silicon energy detector and a timestamping data acquisition setup forming a time-of-flight-energy telescope. In order to improve the mass resolution of the setup a new energy detector was designed to replace the silicon solid state detector, which suffered from radiation damage and had poor resolution for heavy recoils. In this paper the construction and operation of an isobutane filled gas ionization chamber with a 14 × 14 mm2 100 nm thick silicon nitride window are described. In addition to greatly improved energy resolution for heavy ions, the detector is also able to detect hydrogen recoils simultaneously in the energy range of 100-1000 keV. Additionally the detector has position sensitivity by means of timing measurement, which can be performed without compromising the performance of the detector in any other way. The achieved position sensitivity improves the depth resolution near the surface.

  1. Correction of measured Gamma-Knife output factors for angular dependence of diode detectors and PinPoint ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Hršak, Hrvoje; Majer, Marija; Grego, Timor; Bibić, Juraj; Heinrich, Zdravko

    2014-12-01

    Dosimetry for Gamma-Knife requires detectors with high spatial resolution and minimal angular dependence of response. Angular dependence and end effect time for p-type silicon detectors (PTW Diode P and Diode E) and PTW PinPoint ionization chamber were measured with Gamma-Knife beams. Weighted angular dependence correction factors were calculated for each detector. The Gamma-Knife output factors were corrected for angular dependence and end effect time. For Gamma-Knife beams angle range of 84°-54°. Diode P shows considerable angular dependence of 9% and 8% for the 18 mm and 14, 8, 4 mm collimator, respectively. For Diode E this dependence is about 4% for all collimators. PinPoint ionization chamber shows angular dependence of less than 3% for 18, 14 and 8 mm helmet and 10% for 4 mm collimator due to volumetric averaging effect in a small photon beam. Corrected output factors for 14 mm helmet are in very good agreement (within ±0.3%) with published data and values recommended by vendor (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). For the 8 mm collimator diodes are still in good agreement with recommended values (within ±0.6%), while PinPoint gives 3% less value. For the 4 mm helmet Diodes P and E show over-response of 2.8% and 1.8%, respectively. For PinPoint chamber output factor of 4 mm collimator is 25% lower than Elekta value which is generally not consequence of angular dependence, but of volumetric averaging effect and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. Diodes P and E represent good choice for Gamma-Knife dosimetry.

  2. Large area neutron detector based on Li6 ionization chamber with integrated body-moderator of high density polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Chung, Kiwhan; Makela, Mark F.

    2009-06-30

    A detector was developed and funded by DHS to be a lower cost alternative to 3He detectors. A 6Li foil-lined ionization chamber was prepared with fill gas at one atmosphere and pulse mode operation. The high-density polyethylene (HOPE) body serves also as a neutron moderator. All electrodes, including high voltage bias supply, are hermetically sealed within the plastic slabs.

  3. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  4. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumard, B.; Henderson, D. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Tang, X. D.

    2007-08-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the (α, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for (α, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only (α, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. × 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the (α, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the (α, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  5. Developmemt of coal combustion sensitivity tests for smoke detectors. Report of investigations/1995

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.C.; Morrow, G.S.

    1994-11-01

    Standard smoldering and flaming combustion tests using small coal samples have been developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as a method to evaluate the response of a smoke detector. The test provides a standard, easily reproducible smoke characteristic for coal smoldering and flaming combustion based upon a comparison of the smoke optical density and the response of a standard ionization chamber to the smoke. With these standard tests, the range of threshold limits for the response of a smoke detector and the detector`s reliability can be evaluated for nearly identical smoke visibility and smoke physical characteristics. The detector`s threshold response limits and reliability need to be well defined prior to the instrument`s use as part of a mine fire warning system for improved mine safety.

  6. Comparison of depth-dose distributions of proton therapeutic beams calculated by means of logical detectors and ionization chamber modeled in Monte Carlo codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, Robert; Konefał, Adam; Sokół, Maria; Orlef, Andrzej

    2016-08-01

    The success of proton therapy depends strongly on the precision of treatment planning. Dose distribution in biological tissue may be obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using various scientific codes making it possible to perform very accurate calculations. However, there are many factors affecting the accuracy of modeling. One of them is a structure of objects called bins registering a dose. In this work the influence of bin structure on the dose distributions was examined. The MCNPX code calculations of Bragg curve for the 60 MeV proton beam were done in two ways: using simple logical detectors being the volumes determined in water, and using a precise model of ionization chamber used in clinical dosimetry. The results of the simulations were verified experimentally in the water phantom with Marcus ionization chamber. The average local dose difference between the measured relative doses in the water phantom and those calculated by means of the logical detectors was 1.4% at first 25 mm, whereas in the full depth range this difference was 1.6% for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations less than 2.4% and for the maximum measuring error of 1%. In case of the relative doses calculated with the use of the ionization chamber model this average difference was somewhat greater, being 2.3% at depths up to 25 mm and 2.4% in the full range of depths for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations of 3%. In the dose calculations the ionization chamber model does not offer any additional advantages over the logical detectors. The results provided by both models are similar and in good agreement with the measurements, however, the logical detector approach is a more time-effective method.

  7. Smoke Detectors and Legislation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Fire Prevention and Control Administration (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This manual, one of a series for use in public education, provides an in-depth review of the current status of state and local smoke detector legislation. First, for the community considering a smoke detector law or ordinance, six decision points are discussed: which residential occupancy sub-classes will be affected; what the time factors are for…

  8. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Smith, Graham; Mahler, George J.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  9. Smoke and particle detector using tritiated semiconductor foil

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Alvarez-Ossa, D.; Kherani, N. P.; Zukotynski, S.; Chen, K. P.

    2008-07-15

    A smoke and particle ionization detector using tritiated amorphous silicon film as the radiation source is demonstrated. The ion chamber design includes both bipolar and unipolar region; the unipolar region is defined as the volume space extending beyond the range of ionizing particles. Attachment of ions to particulate matter in the unipolar region considerably reduces the mobility of the carriers, thus forming a space charge cloud accompanied by a reduction in the electrical field strength, thereby enhancing the particulate detection responsivity. Tritium {beta}s have a maximum range of about 6 mm in air, which makes the detector compact. Owing to the potential of increased specific activity, it results in a gamma-free detector with improved sensitivity. The results show that this gamma-free detector is several-fold to forty-fold more responsive than traditional ionization detectors using Am-241. In addition, this ion chamber can function as a dual detector having both photoelectric and ionization detector responsivities. (authors)

  10. Ionization chamber dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Renner, Tim R.; Nyman, Mark A.; Stradtner, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    A method for fabricating an ion chamber dosimeter collecting array of the type utilizing plural discrete elements formed on a uniform collecting surface which includes forming a thin insulating layer over an aperture in a frame having surfaces, forming a predetermined pattern of through holes in the layer, plating both surfaces of the layer and simultaneously tilting and rotating the frame for uniform plate-through of the holes between surfaces. Aligned masking and patterned etching of the surfaces provides interconnects between the through holes and copper leads provided to external circuitry.

  11. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  12. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  13. Smoke Detector Resource Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portugill, Jestyn, Ed.; Powell, Pamela, Ed.

    This manual is one of a series developed for public education on smoke detectors. First, basic facts are given including guidelines for selection and purchasing, installation, maintenance, and what to do if the alarm goes off. Second, five case studies are presented which are examples of public education programs. (The script to one slide…

  14. Smoke Detector Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Pamela, Ed.; Portugill, Jestyn, Ed.

    This manual, one in a series developed for public education, provides information on smoke detector selection, installation, operation, and maintenance. For the prospective buyer, the importance of looking for the seal of a recognized national testing laboratory--such as Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. (UL)--indicating adequate laboratory testing…

  15. Smoke Detectors Save Lives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kominski, John

    This resource bulletin provides information which can be used in classrooms, at conferences, and at meetings with parents to increase public awareness and acceptance of a new New York City ordinance which requires the installation of smoke detectors in apartments. The booklet contains information on the following: (1) background information for…

  16. Preliminary studies of a new monitor ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    A new monitor ionization chamber was developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) in order to monitor X-ray beams. The main difference of this monitor ionization chamber in relation to other monitor chambers is its geometry, which consists of a ring-shaped sensitive volume. Because of this geometry, the monitor chamber has a central hole through which the direct radiation beam passes. The operational characteristics of the monitor chamber were evaluated: saturation, ion collection efficiency and polarity effect. Besides these tests, the short- and medium-term stabilities of its response were also evaluated. During the tests the leakage current was always negligible. All results showed values within those recommended internationally (IEC, 1997. Medical electrical equipment-dosimeters with ionization chambers and/or semi-conductor detectors as used in X-ray diagnostic imaging. IEC 61674. International Electrotechnical Commission, Genève).

  17. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and PA beam loss monitor (BLM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mei-Hang; Tian, Jian-Min; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Xu, Tao-Guang; Lu, Shuang-Tong

    2009-02-01

    Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and Proton Accelerator (PA) beam loss monitor (BLM) system is reported. The low leakage current (<0.1 pA), good plateau (approx800 V) and linearity range up to 200 Roentgen/h are obtained in the first prototype. All of these give us good experience for further improving the ionization chamber construction.

  18. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  19. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  20. Modulated voltage metastable ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Kojiro, D. R.; Humphrey, D. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The output current from a metastable ionization detector (MID) is applied to a modulation voltage circuit. An adjustment is made to balance out the background current, and an output current, above background, is applied to an input of a strip chart recorder. For low level concentrations, i.e., low detected output current, the ionization potential will be at a maximum and the metastable ionization detector will operate at its most sensitive level. When the detected current from the metastable ionization detector increases above a predetermined threshold level, a voltage control circuit is activated which turns on a high voltage transistor which acts to reduce the ionization potential. The ionization potential applied to the metastable ionization detector is then varied so as to maintain the detected signal level constant. The variation in ionization potential is now related to the concentration of the constituent and a representative amplitude is applied to another input of said strip chart recorder.

  1. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

    1994-03-29

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

  2. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  3. A multiple sampling ionization chamber for the External Target Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. H.; Tang, S. W.; Ma, P.; Lu, C. G.; Yang, H. R.; Wang, S. T.; Yu, Y. H.; Yue, K.; Fang, F.; Yan, D.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, Z. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z. Y.; Duan, L. M.; Sun, B. H.

    2015-09-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber used as a particle identification device for high energy heavy ions has been developed for the External Target Facility. The performance of this detector was tested with a 239Pu α source and RI beams. A Z resolution (FWHM) of 0.4-0.6 was achieved for nuclear fragments of 18O at 400 AMeV.

  4. Segmented ionization chambers for beam monitoring in hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Saverio; Cirio, Roberto; Donetti, Marco; Marchetto, Flavio; Pittà, Giuseppe; Lavagno, Marco; La Rosa, Vanessa

    2015-05-01

    Segmented ionization chambers represent a good solution to monitor the position, the intensity and the shape of ion beams in hadrontherapy. Pixel and strip chambers have been developed for both passive scattering and active scanning dose delivery systems. In particular, strip chambers are optimal for pencil beam scanning, allowing for spatial and time resolutions below 0.1 mm and 1 ms, respectively. The MATRIX pixel and the Strip Accurate Monitor for Beam Applications (SAMBA) detectors are described in this paper together with the results of several beam tests and industrial developments based on these prototypes.

  5. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  6. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  7. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. PMID:25757823

  8. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report.

  9. Ionization Chamber for Prompt Fission Neutron Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Zeynalova, O.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Sedyshev, P.; Shvetsov, V.

    In this work we report recent achievements in design of twin back-to-back ionization chamber (TIC) for fission fragment (FF) mass and kinetic energy measurement. Correlated FF kinetic energies, their masses and the angle of FF in respect to the axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates can be determined from analysis of the heights and shapes of the pulses induced by the fission fragments on the anodes of TIC. Anodes of TIC were designed as consisting of isolated strips each having independent electronic circuitry and special multi-channel pulse processing apparatus. Mathematical formulae provided for FF angles measured in respect to the coordinate axes. It was shown how the point of fission fragments origin on the target plane may be determined using the same measured data. The last feature made the TIC a rather powerful tool for prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission investigation in event-by-event analysis of individual fission reactions from non- point fissile source. Position sensitive neutron induced fission detector for neutron-imaging applications with both thermal and low energy neutrons was found as another possible implementation of the designed TIC.

  10. A Fast Ionization Chamber for GODDESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, R. T.; Lipman, A. S.; Baugher, T.; Cizewski, J. A.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Pain, S. D.; Kozub, R. L.

    2014-09-01

    Transfer reactions are among the main methods used in nuclear physics to probe the structure of nuclei. Such information is needed to constrain nuclear models and to understand various nucleosynthesis processes. In many cases, the nuclear level densities are too high to be resolved in transfer reactions via charged particle detection alone. This problem and issues arising from contaminants in radioactive beams can be addressed by using particle- γ coincidence techniques along with heavy recoil identification in inverse kinematics. A device to accomplish these tasks is Gammasphere ORRUBA: Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS), currently being commissioned for the ATLAS facility at ANL. We are currently building a compact, tilted grid ionization chamber for GODDESS to detect and identify beam-like recoils near zero degrees in the lab. The tilt (30 degrees off normal to the beam) helps the ion pairs to be detected quickly, after drifting only a short distance away from the beam axis. This reduces the response time, allowing counting rates of ~500,000/s. The design and current status of the project will be presented. Research supported by the U. S. DOE.

  11. Neutron-chamber detectors and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.; Atwater, H.F.; Coop, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Detector applications in Nuclear Safeguards and Waste Management have included measuring neutrons from fission and (alpha,n) reactions with well-moderated neutron proportional counters, often embedded in a slab of polyethylene. Other less-moderated geometries are useful for detecting both bare and moderated fission-source neutrons with good efficiency. The neutron chamber is an undermoderated detector design comprising a large, hollow, polyethylene-walled chamber containing one or more proportional counters. Neutron-chamber detectors are relatively inexpensive; can have large apertures, usually through a thin chamber wall; and offer very good detection efficiency per dollar. Neutron-chamber detectors have also been used for monitoring vehicles and for assaying large crates of transuranic waste. Our Monte Carlo calculations for a new application (monitoring low-density waste for concealed plutonium) illustrate the advantages of the hollow-chamber design for detecting moderated fission sources. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Space-charge effects in liquid argon ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherfoord, J. P.; Walker, R. B.

    2015-03-01

    We have uniformly irradiated liquid argon ionization chambers with betas from high-activity 90Sr sources. The radiation environment is similar to that in the liquid argon calorimeters which are part of the ATLAS detector installed at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We measured the resulting ionization current over a wide range of applied potential for two different source activities and for three different chamber gaps. These studies provide operating experience at exceptionally high ionization rates. In particular they indicate a stability at the 0.1% level for these calorimeters over years of operation at the full LHC luminosity when operated in the normal mode at an electric field E = 1.0 kV / mm. We can operate these chambers in the normal mode or in the space-charge limited regime and thereby determine the transition point between the two. This transition point is parameterized by a positive argon ion mobility of μ+ = 0.08 ± 0.02mm2 / V s at a temperature of 88.0±0.5 K and at a pressure of 1.02±0.02 bar. In the space-charge limited regime the ionization currents are degraded and show signs of instability. At the highest electric fields in our study (6.7 kV/mm) the ionization current is still slowly rising with increasing electric field.

  13. 24 CFR 891.555 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 891.555 Section... Assistance § 891.555 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance requirement. After October 30, 1992, each dwelling unit must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, in proper working...

  14. 24 CFR 891.555 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 891.555 Section... Assistance § 891.555 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance requirement. After October 30, 1992, each dwelling unit must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, in proper working...

  15. 24 CFR 965.805 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 965.805 Section... PHA-OWNED OR LEASED PROJECTS-GENERAL PROVISIONS Fire Safety § 965.805 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, or such greater number as may be required by state or...

  16. 24 CFR 242.74 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 242.74 Section 242... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.74 Smoke detectors. Each occupied room must include such smoke detectors as are required by law....

  17. 24 CFR 242.74 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 242.74 Section 242... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.74 Smoke detectors. Each occupied room must include such smoke detectors as are required by law....

  18. 24 CFR 965.805 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 965.805 Section... PHA-OWNED OR LEASED PROJECTS-GENERAL PROVISIONS Fire Safety § 965.805 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, or such greater number as may be required by state or...

  19. 24 CFR 242.74 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 242.74 Section 242... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.74 Smoke detectors. Each occupied room must include such smoke detectors as are required by law....

  20. 24 CFR 232.591 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 232.591 Section... Equipment Property Requirements § 232.591 Smoke detectors. After October 30, 1992, each occupied room must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector in proper working condition. If...

  1. 24 CFR 891.555 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 891.555 Section... Assistance § 891.555 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance requirement. After October 30, 1992, each dwelling unit must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, in proper working...

  2. 24 CFR 242.74 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 242.74 Section 242... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.74 Smoke detectors. Each occupied room must include such smoke detectors as are required by law....

  3. 24 CFR 232.591 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 232.591 Section... Equipment Property Requirements § 232.591 Smoke detectors. After October 30, 1992, each occupied room must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector in proper working condition. If...

  4. 24 CFR 232.591 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 232.591 Section... Equipment Property Requirements § 232.591 Smoke detectors. After October 30, 1992, each occupied room must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector in proper working condition. If...

  5. 24 CFR 965.805 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 965.805 Section... PHA-OWNED OR LEASED PROJECTS-GENERAL PROVISIONS Fire Safety § 965.805 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, or such greater number as may be required by state or...

  6. 24 CFR 891.555 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 891.555 Section... Assistance § 891.555 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance requirement. After October 30, 1992, each dwelling unit must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, in proper working...

  7. 24 CFR 242.74 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 242.74 Section 242... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.74 Smoke detectors. Each occupied room must include such smoke detectors as are required by law....

  8. 24 CFR 232.591 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 232.591 Section... Equipment Property Requirements § 232.591 Smoke detectors. After October 30, 1992, each occupied room must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector in proper working condition. If...

  9. 24 CFR 965.805 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 965.805 Section... PHA-OWNED OR LEASED PROJECTS-GENERAL PROVISIONS Fire Safety § 965.805 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, or such greater number as may be required by state or...

  10. 24 CFR 891.555 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 891.555 Section... Assistance § 891.555 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance requirement. After October 30, 1992, each dwelling unit must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, in proper working...

  11. 24 CFR 965.805 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 965.805 Section... PHA-OWNED OR LEASED PROJECTS-GENERAL PROVISIONS Fire Safety § 965.805 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, or such greater number as may be required by state or...

  12. 24 CFR 232.591 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 232.591 Section... Equipment Property Requirements § 232.591 Smoke detectors. After October 30, 1992, each occupied room must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector in proper working condition. If...

  13. A double faced ionization chamber for quality control in diagnostic radiology beams.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jonas O; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    The development of new radiation detectors of low cost but with adequate materials is a very important task for countries that have to import ionization chambers such as Brazil. A special double faced ionization chamber was developed for use in conventional diagnostic radiology beams and computed tomography energy ranges. The results show that this new chamber present applicability in conventional diagnostic radiology and computed tomography quality control programs.

  14. Wire chamber radiation detector with discharge control

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Mulera, Terrence A.

    1984-01-01

    A wire chamber radiation detector (11) has spaced apart parallel electrodes (16) and grids (17, 18, 19) defining an ignition region (21) in which charged particles (12) or other ionizing radiations initiate brief localized avalanche discharges (93) and defining an adjacent memory region (22) in which sustained glow discharges (94) are initiated by the primary discharges (93). Conductors (29, 32) of the grids (18, 19) at each side of the memory section (22) extend in orthogonal directions enabling readout of the X-Y coordinates of locations at which charged particles (12) were detected by sequentially transmitting pulses to the conductors (29) of one grid (18) while detecting transmissions of the pulses to the orthogonal conductors (36) of the other grid (19) through glow discharges (94). One of the grids (19) bounding the memory region (22) is defined by an array of conductive elements (32) each of which is connected to the associated readout conductor (36) through a separate resistance (37). The wire chamber (11) avoids ambiguities and imprecisions in the readout of coordinates when large numbers of simultaneous or near simultaneous charged particles (12) have been detected. Down time between detection periods and the generation of radio frequency noise are also reduced.

  15. Ionizing Radiation Detector

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-11-18

    A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

  16. Two-dimensional position sensitive ionization chamber with GEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Noritaka; Noro, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Takao, Hideaki; Nishio, Yasutaka

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing a multi-anode ionization chamber for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at Kyushu University. Furthermore, we are planning to construct a neutron detector with high position resolution by combining the chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and a neutron converter. One of purposes is the measurement of p-> , pn knockout reaction from unstable nuclei. The multi-anode ionization chamber is composed of subdivided multiple anodes, a cathode to produce an uniform electric field, and a Frisch grid. The chamber must have position sensitivity because obtaining a beam profile is required for AMS measurements, where counting loss should be avoided. Also in the case of the neutron detector, it is necessary to measure the position to deduce the scattering angles. We have recently established a two-dimensional position readout system by the following methods: the measurement of horizontal position is enabled by trimming some anodes into wedge-like shape, and vertical position can be determined by the ratio of induced charge on the grid to the total charge on anodes. In addition, improvement of S/N ratio is important for isotope separation and position resolution. We installed a rectangular-shaped GEM and tried improving S/N ratio by electron amplification.

  17. 24 CFR 200.76 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 200.76 Section 200.76 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Property Requirements § 200.76 Smoke detectors. Smoke...

  18. 24 CFR 200.76 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 200.76 Section 200.76 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Property Requirements § 200.76 Smoke detectors. Smoke...

  19. 24 CFR 200.76 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 200.76 Section 200.76 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Property Requirements § 200.76 Smoke detectors. Smoke...

  20. 24 CFR 200.76 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 200.76 Section 200.76 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Property Requirements § 200.76 Smoke detectors. Smoke...

  1. 24 CFR 200.76 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 200.76 Section 200.76 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Property Requirements § 200.76 Smoke detectors. Smoke...

  2. SU-E-T-96: Demonstration of a Consistent Method for Correcting Surface Dose Measurements Using Both Solid State and Ionization Chamber Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T; Gerbi, B; Higgins, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the surface dose (SD) measured using a PTW 30-360 extrapolation chamber with different commonly used dosimeters (Ds): parallel plate ion chambers (ICs): RMI-449 (Attix), Capintec PS-033, PTW 30-329 (Markus) and Memorial; TLD chips (cTLD), TLD powder (pTLD), optically stimulated (OSLs), radiochromic (EXR2) and radiographic (EDR2) films, and to provide an intercomparison correction to Ds for each of them. Methods: Investigations were performed for a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian Clinac 2300, 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm). The Ds were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth dref=1.7cm. The measurements for cTLD, OSLs, EDR2 and EXR2 were corrected to SD using an extrapolation method (EM) indexed to the baseline PTW 30-360 measurements. A consistent use of the EM involved: 1) irradiation of three Ds stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. An additional measurement was performed with externally exposed OSLs (eOSLs), that were rotated out of their protective housing. Results: All single Ds measurements overestimated the SD compared with the extrapolation chamber, except for Attix IC. The closest match to the true SD was measured with the Attix IC (− 0.1%), followed by pTLD (0.5%), Capintec (4.5%), Memorial (7.3%), Markus (10%), cTLD (11.8%), eOSL (12.8%), EXR2 (14%), EDR2 (14.8%) and OSL (26%). The EM method of correction for SD worked well for all Ds, except the unexposed OSLs. Conclusion: This EM cross calibration of solid state detectors with an extrapolation or Attix chamber can provide thickness corrections for cTLD, eOSLs, EXR2, and EDR2. Standard packaged OSLs were not found to be simply corrected.

  3. Compact ion chamber based neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S.; Galambos, Paul C.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2015-10-27

    A directional neutron detector has an ion chamber formed in a dielectric material; a signal electrode and a ground electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the signal and ground electrodes; and a signal processor electrically coupled to the readout circuitry. The ion chamber has a pair of substantially planar electrode surfaces. The chamber pressure of the neutron absorbing material is selected such that the reaction particle ion trail length for neutrons absorbed by the neutron absorbing material is equal to or less than the distance between the electrode surfaces. The signal processor is adapted to determine a path angle for each absorbed neutron based on the rise time of the corresponding pulse in a time-varying detector signal.

  4. Performance parameters of a liquid filled ionization chamber array

    SciTech Connect

    Poppe, B.; Stelljes, T. S.; Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Harder, D.; Willborn, K.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: In this work, the properties of the two-dimensional liquid filled ionization chamber array Octavius 1000SRS (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) for use in clinical photon-beam dosimetry are investigated.Methods: Measurements were carried out at an Elekta Synergy and Siemens Primus accelerator. For measurements of stability, linearity, and saturation effects of the 1000SRS array a Semiflex 31013 ionization chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used as a reference. The effective point of measurement was determined by TPR measurements of the array in comparison with a Roos chamber (type 31004, PTW-Freiburg, Germany). The response of the array with varying field size and depth of measurement was evaluated using a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber as a reference. Output factor measurements were carried out with a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber, a diode (type 60012, PTW-Freiburg, Germany), and the detector array under investigation. The dose response function for a single detector of the array was determined by measuring 1 cm wide slit-beam dose profiles and comparing them against diode-measured profiles. Theoretical aspects of the low pass properties and of the sampling frequency of the detector array were evaluated. Dose profiles measured with the array and the diode detector were compared, and an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) field was verified using the Gamma-Index method and the visualization of line dose profiles.Results: The array showed a short and long term stability better than 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively. Fluctuations in linearity were found to be within ±0.2% for the vendor specified dose range. Saturation effects were found to be similar to those reported in other studies for liquid-filled ionization chambers. The detector's relative response varied with field size and depth of measurement, showing a small energy dependence accounting for maximum signal deviations of ±2.6% from the reference condition for the setup used. The σ-values of the

  5. Characterization of a homemade ionization chamber for radiotherapy beams.

    PubMed

    Neves, Lucio P; Perini, Ana P; dos Santos, Gelson P; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A homemade cylindrical ionization chamber was studied for routine use in therapy beams of (60)Co and X-rays. Several characterization tests were performed: leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, stability, stabilization time, chamber orientation and energy dependence. All results obtained were within international recommendations. Therefore the homemade ionization chamber presents usefulness for routine dosimetric procedures in radiotherapy beams.

  6. Use of a liquid ionization chamber for stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A; Crop, F; Lacornerie, T; Vandevelde, F; Reynaert, N

    2013-04-21

    Liquid ionization chambers (LICs) offer an interesting tool in the field of small beam dosimetry, allowing better spatial resolution and reduced perturbation effects. However, some aspects remain to be addressed, such as the higher recombination and the effects from the materials of the detector. Our aim was to investigate these issues and their impact. The first step was the evaluation of the recombination effects. Measurements were performed at different SSDs to vary the dose per pulse, and the collection efficiency was obtained. The BEAMnrc code was then used to model the Cyberknife head. Finally, the liquid ionization chamber itself was modelled using the EGSnrc-based code Cavity allowing the evaluation of the influence of the volume and the chamber materials. The liquid ionization charge collection efficiency is approximately 0.98 at 1.5 mGy pulse(-1), the highest dose per pulse that we have measured. Its impact on the accuracy of output factors is less than half a per cent. The detector modelling showed a significant contribution from the graphite electrode, up to 6% for the 5 mm collimator. The dependence of the average electronic mass collision stopping power of iso-octane with beam collimation is negligible and thus has no influence on output factor measurements. Finally, the volume effect reaches 5% for the small 5 mm collimator and becomes much smaller (<0.5%) for diameters above 10 mm. LICs can effectively be used for small beam relative dosimetry as long as adequate correction factors are applied, especially for the electrode and volume effects.

  7. Use of a liquid ionization chamber for stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Wagner, A; Crop, F; Lacornerie, T; Vandevelde, F; Reynaert, N

    2013-04-21

    Liquid ionization chambers (LICs) offer an interesting tool in the field of small beam dosimetry, allowing better spatial resolution and reduced perturbation effects. However, some aspects remain to be addressed, such as the higher recombination and the effects from the materials of the detector. Our aim was to investigate these issues and their impact. The first step was the evaluation of the recombination effects. Measurements were performed at different SSDs to vary the dose per pulse, and the collection efficiency was obtained. The BEAMnrc code was then used to model the Cyberknife head. Finally, the liquid ionization chamber itself was modelled using the EGSnrc-based code Cavity allowing the evaluation of the influence of the volume and the chamber materials. The liquid ionization charge collection efficiency is approximately 0.98 at 1.5 mGy pulse(-1), the highest dose per pulse that we have measured. Its impact on the accuracy of output factors is less than half a per cent. The detector modelling showed a significant contribution from the graphite electrode, up to 6% for the 5 mm collimator. The dependence of the average electronic mass collision stopping power of iso-octane with beam collimation is negligible and thus has no influence on output factor measurements. Finally, the volume effect reaches 5% for the small 5 mm collimator and becomes much smaller (<0.5%) for diameters above 10 mm. LICs can effectively be used for small beam relative dosimetry as long as adequate correction factors are applied, especially for the electrode and volume effects. PMID:23514761

  8. Development of the Position Sensitive Ionization Chamber for ANASEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Hannah; Blackmon, Jeff; Deibel, Catherine; Gardiner, Emily; Lai, Jianping; Lauer, Amber; Linhardt, Laura; Macon, Kevin; Rasco, Charlie; Baby, Lagy; Koshchiy, Yevegn; Rogachev, Grigory; Santiago-Gonzales, Daniel; Wiedenhoever, Ingo; Bardayan, Dan; Matos, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged-particle detector array developed for reaction studies using radioactive ion beams to help improve understanding of the nuclear reactions important in stellar explosions. A gas-filled ionization chamber with two position-sensitive anode wire grid planes read out in 32 channels, and 12 alternating anode/cathode planes was developed and tested for use with ANASEN to identify the kinematic trajectory and atomic number of recoiling heavy ions by their relative energy loss. The position sensitive grids are arranged perpendicularly to each other in order to determine the x-y position of each ion with better than 4 mm resolution. This ionization chamber was tested using a stable beam of 12C at FSU. We report on the performance of this test experiment and plans for measurements with radioactive ion beams at FSU. Two other versions of the detector have been constructed and are now in place at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and at the ATLAS accelerator facility at Argonne National Laboratory.

  9. NIST Ionization Chamber "A" Sample-Height Corrections.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For over 30 years scientists in the NIST radioactivity group have been using their pressurized ionization chamber "A" (PIC "A") to make measurements of radioactivity and radioactive half-lives. We now have evidence that some of those reported measurements were incorrect due to slippage of the source positioning ring over time. The temporal change in the holder caused an error in the source-height within the chamber, which was thought to be invariant. This unaccounted-for height change caused a change in the detector response and thus a relative error in measured activity on the order of 10(-5) to 10(-3) per year, depending on the radionuclide. The drifting detector response affected calibration factors and half-life determinations. After discovering the problem, we carried out historic research and new sensitivity tests. As a result, we have created a quantitative model of the effect and have used that model to estimate corrections to some of the past measurement results from PIC "A". In this paper we report the details and results of that model. Meanwhile, we have fixed the positioning ring and are recalibrating the detector using primary measurement methods and enhanced quality control measures.

  10. NIST Ionization Chamber “A” Sample-Height Corrections

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For over 30 years scientists in the NIST radioactivity group have been using their pressurized ionization chamber “A” (PIC “A”) to make measurements of radioactivity and radioactive half-lives. We now have evidence that some of those reported measurements were incorrect due to slippage of the source positioning ring over time. The temporal change in the holder caused an error in the source-height within the chamber, which was thought to be invariant. This unaccounted-for height change caused a change in the detector response and thus a relative error in measured activity on the order of 10−5 to 10−3 per year, depending on the radionuclide. The drifting detector response affected calibration factors and half-life determinations. After discovering the problem, we carried out historic research and new sensitivity tests. As a result, we have created a quantitative model of the effect and have used that model to estimate corrections to some of the past measurement results from PIC “A”. In this paper we report the details and results of that model. Meanwhile, we have fixed the positioning ring and are recalibrating the detector using primary measurement methods and enhanced quality control measures. PMID:26900515

  11. A multiple sampling time projection ionization chamber for nuclear fragment tracking and charge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Chance, J. C.; Christie, W. F.; Gilkes, M.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lynen, U.; Müller, Walter F. J.; Romero, J. L.; Sann, H.; Tull, C. E.; Warren, P.

    1997-02-01

    A detector has been developed for the tracking and charge measurement of the projectile fragment nuclei produced in relativistic nuclear collisions. This device, MUSIC II, is a second generation Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC), and employs the principles of ionization and time projection chambers. It provides unique charge determination for charges Z≥6, and excellent track position measurement. MUSIC II has been used most recently with the EOS (Equation of State) TPC and other EOS Collaboration detectors. Earlier it was used with other systems in experiments at the Heavy Ion Superconducting Spectrometer (HISS) facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the ALADIN spectrometer at GSI.

  12. SONTRAC: A solar neutron track chamber detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, G. M., Jr.; Jenkins, T. L.; Owens, A.

    1985-01-01

    The recent detection on the solar maximum mission (SMM) satellite of high energy neutrons emitted during large solar flares has provided renewed incentive to design a neutron detector which has the sensitivity, energy resolution, and time resolution to measure the neutron time and energy spectra with sufficient precision to improve our understanding of the basic flare processes. Over the past two decades a variety of neutron detectors has been flown to measure the atmospheric neutron intensity above 10 MeV and to search for solar neutrons. The SONTRAC (Solar Neutron Track Chamber) detector, a new type of neutron detector which utilizes n-p scattering and has a sensitivity 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than previous instruments in the 20-200 MeV range is described. The energy resolution is 1% for neutron kinetic energy, T sub n 50 MeV. When used with a coded aperture mask at 50 m (as would be possible on the space station) an angular resolution of approx. 4 arc sec could be achieved, thereby locating the sites of high energy nuclear interactions with an angular precision comparable to the existing x-ray experiments on SMM. The scintillation chamber is investigated as a track chamber for high energy physics, either by using arrays of scintillating optical fibers or by optical imaging of particle trajectories in a block of scintillator.

  13. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  14. Ionization detection system for aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Martin E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system utilizes a measuring ionization chamber which is modified to minimize false alarms and reductions in sensitivity resulting from changes in ambient temperature. In the preferred form of the modification, an annular radiation shield is mounted about the usual radiation source provided to effect ionization in the measuring chamber. The shield is supported by a bimetallic strip which flexes in response to changes in ambient temperature, moving the shield relative to the source so as to vary the radiative area of the source in a manner offsetting temperature-induced variations in the sensitivity of the chamber.

  15. Applying the helium ionization detector in chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K.; Andrawes, F. F.; Brazell, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    High noise levels and oversensitivity of helium detector make flame-ionization and thermal-conductivity detectors more suitable for chromotography. Deficiencies are eliminated by modifying helium device to operate in saturation rather than multiplication mode. Result is low background current, low noise, high stability, and high sensitivity. Detector analyzes halocarbons, hydrocarbons, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, and inorganics without requiring expensive research-grade helium.

  16. Gridded ionization chamber for detection of x-ray wave activity in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, M. A.; Hill, K. W.; Moshey, E. A.; Sauthoff, N. R.; von Goeler, S.

    1985-03-01

    In order to carry out x-ray observations of magnetohydrodynamic wave activity of the plasma during DD and DT (deuterium-beam-heated deuterium and tritium plasmas, respectively) operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), we will need detectors not susceptible to nuclear radiation damage. We have investigated the use of gridded ionization chambers as fast nondamageable x-ray detectors. A prototype chamber is described which was tested on the PDX tokamak. These tests and laboratory tests with a pulsed x-ray source suggest that the detector has sufficient sensitivity and speed for the required measurements.

  17. Gridded ionization chamber for detecion of x-ray wave activity in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M.A.; Hill, K.W.; Moshey, E.A.; Sauthoff, N.R.; von Goeler, S.

    1982-11-01

    In order to carry out X-ray observations of magnetohydrodynamic wave activity of the plasma during DD and DT (deuterium-beam-heated deuterium and tritium plasmas, respectively) operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), we will need detectors not susceptible to nuclear radiation damage. We have investigated the use of gridded ionization chambers as fast nondamageable X-ray detectors. A prototype chamber is described, which was tested on the PDX tokamak. These tests and laboratory tests with a pulsed X-ray source suggest that the detector has sufficient sensitivity and speed for the required measurements.

  18. Closed-loop pulsed helium ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detector for gas chromatography is operated in a constant current, pulse-modulated mode by configuring the detector, electrometer and a high voltage pulser in a closed-loop control system. The detector current is maintained at a fixed level by varying the frequency of fixed-width, high-voltage bias pulses applied to the detector. An output signal proportional to the pulse frequency is produced which is indicative of the charge collected for a detected species.

  19. A new mini gas ionization chamber for IBA applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A. M.; Cassimi, A.; Döbeli, M.; Mallepell, M.; Monnet, I.; Simon, M. J.; Suter, M.; Synal, H.-A.

    2011-12-01

    Novel prototypes of high resolution gas ionization chambers ( GIC) were designed with increased compactness and simplicity of the setup. They have no Frisch-grid and a simple anode wire. Under certain operating conditions these mini detectors have an energy resolution comparable with that of state-of-the-art GICs of much higher complexity. They can be operated both under vacuum and atmospheric pressure. First measurements were made with protons in the energy range of 0.3-1.0 MeV. For protons at 0.3 MeV an energy resolution of about 12 keV was achieved. With a 72 MeV 129Xe beam a relative resolution of 1.4% was obtained. Due to their versatility and reduced size the detectors can easily be applied in the field of ion beam analysis ( IBA) and accelerator mass spectrometry ( AMS) . Since they are almost completely insensitive to radiation damage they are especially suited for use in high fluence applications such as scanning transmission ion microscopy ( STIM). A comparison of the radiation hardness of the mini GIC with a Si PIN diode was therefore performed. The GIC showed no peak shift or change in energy resolution at all after collecting 10 15 protons per cm 2 while the performance of the Si detector clearly started to degrade at 10 12 particles per cm 2.

  20. Comparison of experimental and calculated calibration coefficients for a high sensitivity ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Amiot, M N; Mesradi, M R; Chisté, V; Morin, M; Rigoulay, F

    2012-09-01

    The response of a Vacutec 70129 ionization chamber was calculated using the PENELOPE-2008 Monte Carlo code and compared to experimental data. The filling gas mixture composition and its pressure have been determined using IC simulated response adjustment to experimental results. The Monte Carlo simulation revealed a physical effect in the detector response to photons due to the presence of xenon in the chamber. A very good agreement is found between calculated and experimental calibration coefficients for 17 radionuclides.

  1. a Solution for Dosimetry and Quality Assurance in Imrt and Hadrontherapy:. the Pixel Ionization Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerio, S.; Coda, S.; Nastasi, U.; Belletti, S.; Ghedi, B.; Boriano, A.; Cirio, R.; Luparia, A.; Marchetto, F.; Peroni, C.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Donetti, M.; Madon, E.; Trevisiol, E.; Urgesi, A.

    2002-11-01

    The new radiotherapy techniques require new detectors to monitor and measure the clinical field. The Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) techniques like step and shoot, sliding window, dynamic wedge or scanning beam add the time variable to the treatment field. In this case the water phantom with a single ionization chamber moving inside the field needs very long measurement time. Linear arrays of ionization chambers or diodes measure the field only along a line. 2D detectors like radiographic or gafchromic film are not suitable to be used as on line detectors. We have developed, built and tested an ionization chamber segmented in pixels that measure the dose in a plane at several points. Every channel has a dedicated electronic chain that digitizes the collected charge and data from all the channels are sent to the computer that performs the data acquisition. One read out cycle is very fast allowing to measure in real time the fluency and the shape of the field. The chamber can be used in two different ways, as monitor chamber and as relative dosemeter. A description of the detector, the electronics, and test results with both photon and hadron beams will be reported.

  2. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  3. Performance of three pencil-type ionization chambers (10 cm) in computed tomography standard beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, Maysa C.; Xavier, Marcos; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2016-07-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) has increased over the years, thus generating a concern about the doses received by patients undergoing this procedure. Therefore, it is necessary to perform routinely beam dosimetry with the use of a pencil-type ionization chamber. This detector is the most utilized in the procedures of quality control tests on this kind of equipment. The objective of this work was to perform some characterization tests in standard CT beams, as the saturation curve, polarity effect, ion collection efficiency and linearity of response, using three ionization chambers, one commercial and two developed at the IPEN.

  4. Construction of a fast ionization chamber for high-rate particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2014-07-01

    A new gas-filled ionization chamber for high count rate particle identification has been constructed and commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). To enhance the response time of the ionization chamber, a design utilizing a tilted entrance window and tilted electrodes was adopted, which is modified from an original design by Kimura et al. [1]. A maximum counting rate of ~700,000 particles per second has been achieved. The detector has been used for several radioactive beam measurements performed at the HRIBF.

  5. Development and testing of a Monte Carlo code system for analysis of ionization chamber responses

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.O.; Gabriel, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    To predict the perturbation of interactions between radiation and material by the presence of a detector, a differential Monte Carlo computer code system entitled MICAP was developed and tested. This code system determines the neutron, photon, and total response of an ionization chamber to mixed field radiation environments. To demonstrate the ability of MICAP in calculating an ionization chamber response function, a comparison was made to 05S, an established Monte Carlo code extensively used to accurately calibrate liquid organic scintillators. Both code systems modeled an organic scintillator with a parallel beam of monoenergetic neutrons incident on the scintillator. (LEW)

  6. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  7. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  8. Super-resolution non-parametric deconvolution in modelling the radial response function of a parallel plate ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, A; Tenhunen, M

    2012-11-01

    The signal of the dosimetric detector is generally dependent on the shape and size of the sensitive volume of the detector. In order to optimize the performance of the detector and reliability of the output signal the effect of the detector size should be corrected or, at least, taken into account. The response of the detector can be modelled using the convolution theorem that connects the system input (actual dose), output (measured result) and the effect of the detector (response function) by a linear convolution operator. We have developed the super-resolution and non-parametric deconvolution method for determination of the cylinder symmetric ionization chamber radial response function. We have demonstrated that the presented deconvolution method is able to determine the radial response for the Roos parallel plate ionization chamber with a better than 0.5 mm correspondence with the physical measures of the chamber. In addition, the performance of the method was proved by the excellent agreement between the output factors of the stereotactic conical collimators (4-20 mm diameter) measured by the Roos chamber, where the detector size is larger than the measured field, and the reference detector (diode). The presented deconvolution method has a potential in providing reference data for more accurate physical models of the ionization chamber as well as for improving and enhancing the performance of the detectors in specific dosimetric problems.

  9. RADIATION MONITOR CONTAINING TWO CONCENTRIC IONIZATION CHAMBERS AND MEANS FOR INSULATING THE SEPARATE CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Braestrup, C.B.; Mooney, R.T.

    1964-01-21

    This invention relates to a portable radiation monitor containing two concentric ionization chambers which permit the use of standard charging and reading devices. It is particularly adapted as a personnel x-ray dosimeter and to this end comprises a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an inner energy dependent chamber, a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an outer energy independent chamber, and polymeric insulation means which insulates said chambers from each other and holds the chambers together with exposed connections in a simple, trouble-free, and compact assembly substantially without variation in directional response. (AEC)

  10. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  11. Absolute dosimetry on a dynamically scanned sample for synchrotron radiotherapy using graphite calorimetry and ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, J. E.; Harty, P. D.; Butler, D. J.; Crosbie, J. C.; Livingstone, J.; Poole, C. M.; Ramanathan, G.; Wright, T.; Stevenson, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    The absolute dose delivered to a dynamically scanned sample in the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter anticipated to be established as a primary standard for synchrotron dosimetry. The calorimetry was compared to measurements using a free-air chamber (FAC), a PTW 31 014 Pinpoint ionization chamber, and a PTW 34 001 Roos ionization chamber. The IMBL beam height is limited to approximately 2 mm. To produce clinically useful beams of a few centimetres the beam must be scanned in the vertical direction. In practice it is the patient/detector that is scanned and the scanning velocity defines the dose that is delivered. The calorimeter, FAC, and Roos chamber measure the dose area product which is then converted to central axis dose with the scanned beam area derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and film measurements. The Pinpoint chamber measures the central axis dose directly and does not require beam area measurements. The calorimeter and FAC measure dose from first principles. The calorimetry requires conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water using MC calculations with the EGSnrc code. Air kerma measurements from the free air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. The two ionization chambers are secondary standards requiring calibration with kilovoltage x-ray tubes. The Roos and Pinpoint chambers were calibrated against the Australian primary standard for air kerma at the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). Agreement of order 2% or better was obtained between the calorimetry and ionization chambers. The FAC measured a dose 3-5% higher than the calorimetry, within the stated uncertainties.

  12. Absolute dosimetry on a dynamically scanned sample for synchrotron radiotherapy using graphite calorimetry and ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Lye, J E; Harty, P D; Butler, D J; Crosbie, J C; Livingstone, J; Poole, C M; Ramanathan, G; Wright, T; Stevenson, A W

    2016-06-01

    The absolute dose delivered to a dynamically scanned sample in the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter anticipated to be established as a primary standard for synchrotron dosimetry. The calorimetry was compared to measurements using a free-air chamber (FAC), a PTW 31 014 Pinpoint ionization chamber, and a PTW 34 001 Roos ionization chamber. The IMBL beam height is limited to approximately 2 mm. To produce clinically useful beams of a few centimetres the beam must be scanned in the vertical direction. In practice it is the patient/detector that is scanned and the scanning velocity defines the dose that is delivered. The calorimeter, FAC, and Roos chamber measure the dose area product which is then converted to central axis dose with the scanned beam area derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and film measurements. The Pinpoint chamber measures the central axis dose directly and does not require beam area measurements. The calorimeter and FAC measure dose from first principles. The calorimetry requires conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water using MC calculations with the EGSnrc code. Air kerma measurements from the free air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. The two ionization chambers are secondary standards requiring calibration with kilovoltage x-ray tubes. The Roos and Pinpoint chambers were calibrated against the Australian primary standard for air kerma at the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). Agreement of order 2% or better was obtained between the calorimetry and ionization chambers. The FAC measured a dose 3-5% higher than the calorimetry, within the stated uncertainties. PMID:27192396

  13. Absolute dosimetry on a dynamically scanned sample for synchrotron radiotherapy using graphite calorimetry and ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, J. E.; Harty, P. D.; Butler, D. J.; Crosbie, J. C.; Livingstone, J.; Poole, C. M.; Ramanathan, G.; Wright, T.; Stevenson, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    The absolute dose delivered to a dynamically scanned sample in the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter anticipated to be established as a primary standard for synchrotron dosimetry. The calorimetry was compared to measurements using a free-air chamber (FAC), a PTW 31 014 Pinpoint ionization chamber, and a PTW 34 001 Roos ionization chamber. The IMBL beam height is limited to approximately 2 mm. To produce clinically useful beams of a few centimetres the beam must be scanned in the vertical direction. In practice it is the patient/detector that is scanned and the scanning velocity defines the dose that is delivered. The calorimeter, FAC, and Roos chamber measure the dose area product which is then converted to central axis dose with the scanned beam area derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and film measurements. The Pinpoint chamber measures the central axis dose directly and does not require beam area measurements. The calorimeter and FAC measure dose from first principles. The calorimetry requires conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water using MC calculations with the EGSnrc code. Air kerma measurements from the free air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. The two ionization chambers are secondary standards requiring calibration with kilovoltage x-ray tubes. The Roos and Pinpoint chambers were calibrated against the Australian primary standard for air kerma at the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). Agreement of order 2% or better was obtained between the calorimetry and ionization chambers. The FAC measured a dose 3–5% higher than the calorimetry, within the stated uncertainties.

  14. Construction and commissioning of a position-sensitive ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwag, M. S.; Chae, K. Y.; Cha, S. M.; Kim, A.; Kim, M. J.; Lee, E. J.; Lee, J. H.

    2016-05-01

    A position-sensitive ionization chamber has been constructed and commissioned at the Physics Department of Sungkyunkwan University to extract position information on incident charged particles for future nuclear reaction measurements. By utilizing the newly-designed position-sensitive anodes and the previously-commissioned portable gas-filled ionization chamber by Chae et al., position information on incident particles could be obtained. The device was tested with an 241Am α-emitting source, and the standard deviation of the fitted Gaussian distribution was measured to be 1.76 mm when a collimator with a 2 mm hole was used.

  15. The response of ionization chambers to relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Grimm, G.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    The LBL Bevalac for the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on HEAO-3, compared the response of a set of laboratory ionization chambers to beams of 26Fe, 36Kr, 54Xe, 67 Ho, and 79Au nuclei at maximum energies ranging from 1666 MeV/amu for Fe to 1049 MeV/amu for Au. The response of these chambers shows a significant deviation from the expected energy dependence, but only a slight deviation from Z sq scaling.

  16. Pulse mode readout techniques for use with non-gridded industrial ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Vladimir E.; Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2011-10-01

    Highly sensitive readout technique for precision long-term radiation measurements has been developed and tested in the Radiation Control Department at Jefferson Lab. The new electronics design is used to retrieve ionization data in a pulse mode. The dedicated data acquisition system works with M=Audio Audiophile 192 High-Definition 24-bit/192 kHz audio cards, taking data in continuous waveform recording mode. The on-line data processing algorithms extract signals of the ionization events from the data flow and measure the ionization value for each event. Two different ion chambers are evaluated. The first is a Reuter-Stokes Argon-filled (at 25 atm) High Pressure Ionization Chamber (HPIC), commonly used as a detector part in many GE Reuter-Stokes instruments of the RSS series. The second is a VacuTec Model 70181, 5 atm Xenon-filled ionization chamber. Results for both chambers indicate that the techniques allow using industrial ICs for high sensitivity and precision long-term radiation measurements, while at the same time providing information about spectral characteristics of the radiation fields.

  17. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, O.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2015-03-01

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  18. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, O. Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2015-03-15

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  19. Hard disk drive based microsecond X-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Müller, O; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Frahm, R

    2015-03-01

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper. PMID:25832273

  20. Characterization of a CT ionization chamber for radiation field mapping.

    PubMed

    Perini, Ana P; Neves, Lucio P; Vivolo, Vitor; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A pencil-type ionization chamber, developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN), was characterized with the objective to verify the possibility of its application in radiation field mapping procedures. The characterization tests were evaluated, and the results were satisfactory. The results obtained for the X radiation field mapping with the homemade chamber were compared with those of a PTW Farmer-type chamber (TN 30011-1). The maximum difference observed in this comparison was only 1.25%, showing good agreement.

  1. Assessment of radiation doses from residential smoke detectors that contain americium-241

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, F.R.; Etnier, E.L.; Holton, G.A.; Travis, C.C.

    1981-10-01

    External dose equivalents and internal dose commitments were estimated for individuals and populations from annual distribution, use, and disposal of 10 million ionization chamber smoke detectors that contain 110 kBq (3 ..mu..Ci) americium-241 each. Under exposure scenarios developed for normal distribution, use, and disposal using the best available information, annual external dose equivalents to average individuals were estimated to range from 4 fSv (0.4 prem) to 20 nSv (2 ..mu..rem) for total body and from 7 fSv to 40 nSv for bone. Internal dose commitments to individuals under post disposal scenarios were estimated to range from 0.006 to 80 ..mu..Sv (0.0006 to 8 mrem) to total body and from 0.06 to 800 ..mu..Sv to bone. The total collective dose (the sum of external dose equivalents and 50-year internal dose commitments) for all individuals involved with distribution, use, or disposal of 10 million smoke detectors was estimated to be about 0.38 person-Sv (38 person-rem) to total body and 00 ft/sup 2/).

  2. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  3. The time response of glass Resistive Plate Chambers to heavily ionizing particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, A.; Blondel, A.; Bogomilov, M.; Booth, C.; Borghi, S.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera–Villanueva, A.; Chimenti, P.; Dumarchez, J.; Gastaldi, U.; Giani, S.; Gómez–Cadenas, J. J.; Graulich, J. S.; Grégoire, G.; Grossheim, A.; Guglielmi, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Kolev, D.; Meurer, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Panman, J.; Piperov, S.; Popov, B.; Radicioni, E.; Schroeter, R.; Temnikov, P.; Tcherniaev, E.; Tsenov, R.; Tsukerman, I.; Wiebusch, C.

    2007-10-01

    The HARP system of resistive plate chambers (RPCs) was designed to perform particle identification by the measurement of the difference in the time-of-flight of different particles. In previous papers an apparent discrepancy was shown between the response of the RPCs to minimum ionizing pions and heavily ionizing protons. Using the kinematics of elastic scattering off a hydrogen target a controlled beam of low momentum recoil protons was directed onto the RPC chambers. With this method the trajectory and momentum, and hence the time-of-flight of the protons can be precisely predicted without need for a measurement of momentum of the protons. It is demonstrated that the measurement of the time-of-arrival of particles by the thin gas-gap glass RPC system of the HARP experiment depends on the primary ionization deposited by the particle in the detector.

  4. Beam-loss monitoring system with free-air ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, H.; Shibata, S.; Hiramatsu, S.; Uchino, K.; Takashima, T.

    1980-08-01

    A monitoring system for proton beam losses was installed in the proton synchrotron at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan (KEK). The system consists of 56 air ionization chambers (AIC) for radiation detectors, 56 integrators, 56 variable gain amplifiers, two multiplexers, a computer interface circuit, a manual controller and a high tension power supply. The characteristics of the AIC, time resolution, radiation measurement upper limit saturation, kinetic energy dependence of the sensitivity, chamber activation effect, the beam loss detection system and the results of observations with the monitoring system are described.

  5. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, J.; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M. M.; deSouza, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. Optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (< 5 MeV / A) the detector presents only three 0.5 μm/cm2 foils to the beam in addition to the detector gas. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a risetime of 60-70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate and providing a time resolution of 6-8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as ∼ 8 % for an energy deposit of ∼3.5 MeV. The energy resolution with beams of 2.5 and 4.0 MeV/A 39K ions and the dependence of the energy resolution on beam intensity is measured. At an instantaneous rate of 3×105 ions/s the energy resolution has degraded to 14% with a pileup of 12%. The good energy resolution of this detector at rates up to 3×105 ions/s makes it an effective tool in the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams.

  6. Wire-chamber radiation detector with discharge control

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Mulera, T.A.

    1982-03-29

    A wire chamber; radiation detector has spaced apart parallel electrodes and grids defining an ignition region in which charged particles or other ionizing radiations initiate brief localized avalanche discharges and defining an adjacent memory region in which sustained glow discharges are initiated by the primary discharges. Conductors of the grids at each side of the memory section extend in orthogonal directions enabling readout of the X-Y coordinates of locations at which charged particles were detected by sequentially transmitting pulses to the conductors of one grid while detecting transmissions of the pulses to the orthogonal conductors of the other grid through glow discharges. One of the grids bounding the memory region is defined by an array of conductive elements each of which is connected to the associated readout conductor through a separate resistance. The wire chamber avoids ambiguities and imprecisions in the readout of coordinates when large numbers of simultaneous or; near simultaneous charged particles have been detected. Down time between detection periods and the generation of radio frequency noise are also reduced.

  7. The response of ionization chambers to relativistic heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Grimm, G.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a recent calibration at the LBL Bevalac for the Heavy Nuclei Experiment on HEAO-3, the response of a set of laboratory ionization chambers were compared to beams of 26Fe, 36 Kr, 54Xe, 67 Ho, and 79 Au nuclei at maximum energies ranging from 1666 MeV/amu for Fe to 1049 MeV/amu for Au. The response of these chambers shows a significant deviation from the expected energy dependence, but only a slight deviation from Z squared scaling.

  8. A vertex drift chamber for the VENUS detector at TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Hayashi, K.; Ishihara, N.; Nakamura, S.; Ohama, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Hinode, F.; Narita, Y.; Oyama, T.; Utsumi, M.; Yabuki, F.; Hemmi, Y.; Kurashige, H.; Miyake, K.; Okamoto, A.; Daigo, M.; Tamura, N.

    1993-06-01

    A high-precision drift chamber has been constructed in order to add vertex information to the VENUS detector at the TRISTAN e+e- collider. It is a jet-type drift chamber comprising 12 tilted drift sectors filled with pressurized slow gas. The structure and initial performance are described.

  9. Monte Carlo Simulation in the Optimization of a Free-Air Ionization Chamber for Dosimetric Control in Medical Digital Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, A.; Piñera, I.; Montaño, L. M.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.

    2008-08-01

    During the earliest tests of a free-air ionization chamber a poor response to the X-rays emitted by several sources was observed. Then, the Monte Carlo simulation of X-rays transport in matter was employed in order to evaluate chamber behavior as X-rays detector. The photons energy deposition dependence with depth and its integral value in all active volume were calculated. The obtained results reveal that the designed device geometry is feasible to be optimized.

  10. Electron energy constancy check using a five-chamber detector array.

    PubMed

    Ho, A K; deSouza, C N; Sibata, C H; Shin, K H

    1994-01-01

    Two methods are shown here to determine the 50% depth ionization (d50) using buildup materials of different thickness placed on top of a five-chamber detector array. In the first method, two sets of different thickness buildup material are required to perform the check, one set for checking 6 and 9 MeV, while another set is used for 12, 16, and 20 MeV electron beam from a Varian Clinac 2100C. The second method only requires two data points to determine the d50 depth for each energy. The d50 depths determined were compared with the d50 depth obtained using a water phantom with ionization chamber measurements. The method is simple to use especially for departments that use a similar detector to perform quality assurance tests such as output/symmetry/flatness check.

  11. Characterization tests of a new parallel plate ionization chamber for use in electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonato, Fernanda B. C.; Sakuraba, Roberto K.; da Cruz, José Carlos; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-11-01

    Linear accelerators with electron beams are used in several Brazilian hospitals. Consequently, there is an increasing demand for parallel-plate ionization chambers, to be utilized for dosimetry of electron beams. In Brazil, the commercial ionization chambers utilized are imported. The ionization chambers have usually a simple construction, using different materials and geometries. A homemade ionization chamber was developed to be used in electron beams of linear accelerator. The ionization chamber body is made of acrylic and the collecting electrode is painted with graphite powder mixed with nail polish. Several tests were applied, and the results showed values better than the limits established by the international recommendations, except for the polarity effect test, but the response of the developed ionization chamber, for this test, is similar in relation to the response of other commercial ionization chambers from the literature.

  12. Optical and Ionization Basic Cosmic Ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, Julian; Andrade, Diego A.; Araujo, Aurora C.; Arceo, Luis; Cervantes, Carlos A.; Molina, Jorge A.; Palacios, Luz R.

    2014-03-01

    There are drift tubes, operating in the Geiger mode, to detect ionization radiation and there are Cerenkov radiation detectors based on photomultiplier tubes. Here is the design, the construction, the operation and the characterization of a hybrid detector that combines both a drift tube and a Cerenkov detector, used mainly so far to detect cosmic rays. The basic cell is a structural Aluminum 101.6 cm-long, 2.54 cm X 2.54 cm-cross section, 0.1 cm-thick tube, interiorly polished to mirror and slightly covered with TiCO2, and filed with air, and Methane-Ar at different concentrations. There is a coaxial 1 mil Tungsten wire Au-coated at +700 to +1200 Volts electronically instrumented to read out in both ends; and there is in each end of the Aluminum tube a S10362-11-100U Hamamatsu avalanche photodiode electronically instrumented to be read out simultaneously with the Tungsten wire signal. This report is about the technical operation and construction details, the characterization results and potential applications of this hybrid device as a cosmic ray detector element. CONACYT, Mexico.

  13. Response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeter to beta radiation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Munish; Gupta, Anil; Pradhan, S M; Bakshi, A K; Chougaonkar, M P; Babu, D A R

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative estimate of the response of ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters (DRDs) to various beta sources was performed. It has been established that the ionization chamber based pocket dosimeters do not respond to beta particles having energy (Emax)<1 MeV and same was verified using (147)Pm, (85)Kr and (204)Tl beta sources. However, for beta particles having energy >1 MeV, the DRDs exhibit measureable response and the values are ~8%, ~14% and ~27% per mSv for natural uranium, (90)Sr/(90)Y and (106)Ru/(106)Rh beta sources respectively. As the energy of the beta particles increases, the response also increases. The response of DRDs to beta particles having energy>1 MeV arises due to the fact that the thickness of the chamber walls is less than the maximum range of beta particles. This may also be one of the reasons for disparity between doses measured with passive/legal dosimeters (TLDs) and DRDs in those situations in which radiation workers are exposed to mixed field of gamma photons and beta particles especially at uranium processing plants, nuclear (power and research) reactors, waste management facilities and fuel reprocessing plants etc. The paper provides the reason (technical) for disparity between the doses recorded by TLDs and DRDs in mixed field of photons and beta particles.

  14. Bubble chamber as a trace chemical detector

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, X.; McCreary, E.I.; Atencio, J.H.; McCown, A.W.; Sander, R.K.

    1998-08-01

    A novel concept for trace chemical analysis in liquid has been demonstrated. The technique utilizes light absorption in a superheated liquid. Although a superheated liquid is thermodynamically unstable, a high degree of superheating can be dynamically achieved for a short period of time. During this time the superheated liquid is extremely sensitive to boiling at nucleation sites produced by energy deposition. Observation of bubbles in the superheated liquid in some sense provides amplification of the initial energy deposition. Bubble chambers containing superheated liquids have been used to detect energetic particles; now a bubble chamber is used to detect a trace chemical in superheated liquid propane by observing bubble formation initiated by optical absorption. Crystal violet is used as a test case and can be detected at the subpart-per-10{sup 12} level by using a Nd:YAG laser. The mechanism for bubble formation and ideas for further improvement are discussed. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  15. Bubble chamber as a trace chemical detector.

    PubMed

    Luo, X; McCreary, E I; Atencio, J H; McCown, A W; Sander, R K

    1998-08-20

    A novel concept for trace chemical analysis in liquids has been demonstrated. The technique utilizes light absorption in a superheated liquid. Although a superheated liquid is thermodynamically unstable, a high degree of superheating can be dynamically achieved for a short period of time. During this time the superheated liquid is extremely sensitive to boiling at nucleation sites produced by energy deposition. Observation of bubbles in the superheated liquid in some sense provides amplification of the initial energy deposition. Bubble chambers containing superheated liquids have been used to detect energetic particles; now a bubble chamber is used to detect a trace chemical in superheated liquid propane by observing bubble formation initiated by optical absorption. Crystal violet is used as a test case and can be detected at the subpart-per-10(12) level by using a Nd:YAG laser. The mechanism for bubble formation and ideas for further improvement are discussed.

  16. Diamond solid state ionization chambers for x-ray absorption spectroscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    De Sio, A.; Bocci, A.; Pace, E.; Castellano, C.; Cinque, G.; Tartoni, N.; D'Acapito, F.

    2008-08-25

    The photoresponse of a diamond detector has been compared with a standard ionization chamber in x-ray absorption spectroscopy applications. A photoconductive device based on a nitrogen-doped single crystal diamond has been tested by synchrotron radiation. Time stability and linearity have been studied by x rays at 10 keV to assess its performances. Finally, extended x-ray absorption fine structure at the Fe K-edge was carried on a standard iron target using both the diamond device and the IC. Spectroscopical results have been compared including references to literature.

  17. Amplitude distribution of ionization jerks in ionization-chamber ASK-1 according long-term measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Vladislav

    2016-07-01

    As part of the Yakut complex systems by measuring the intensity of cosmic rays has a unique device spherical - ionization chamber ASK-1 with a lead screen thickness of 12 cm. The camera allows you to explore the physical characteristics of the so-called "ionization jerks " - sharp increases ionization current caused by the passage through the device much ionizing particles of cosmic origin. Due to a large increase in current nuclear cascade "showers", formed mainly by particles of cosmic rays in the camera screen. Over the entire period of observation (50 years old) camera ASK-1 was registered 59125 aftershocks. Their nature and properties still does not sufficiently studied, especially in medium and large amplitudes.

  18. Improving the accuracy of ionization chamber dosimetry in small megavoltage x-ray fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNiven, Andrea L.

    computed tomography dose index (CTDI), a concept normally used in diagnostic radiology. This involved experimental determination of the fan beam thickness using the ion chambers to acquire fan beam profiles and extrapolation to a 'zero-size' detector. In conclusion, improvements have been made in the accuracy of small field dosimetry measurements in stereotactic radiotherapy and helical tomotherapy. This was completed through introduction of an original technique involving micro-CT imaging for sensitive volume determination and potentially ion chamber calibration coefficients, the use of appropriate Monte Carlo derived correction factors for RDF measurement, and the exploitation of the partial volume effect for helical tomotherapy fan beam dosimetry. With improved dosimetry for a wide range of challenging small x-ray field situations, it is expected that the patient's radiation safety will be maintained, and that clinical trials will adopt calibration protocols specialized for modern radiotherapy with small fields or beamlets. Keywords. radiation therapy, ionization chambers, small field dosimetry, stereotactic radiotherapy, helical tomotherapy, micro-CT.

  19. Bubble chamber as a trace chemical detector

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xin; McCreary, E.I.; Atencio, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    We have developed a novel concept of trace chemical analysis by detecting optical absorption in superheated liquid. The technique exploits the fact that many common solvents can be extensively superheated for a short period of time while maintaining their liquid state. During this time, the superheated liquid is extremely sensitive to boiling at nucleation sites produced by energy deposition. A small energy deposition can initiate nucleation within the superheated liquid. The nucleation center of critical size or larger will spontaneously grow through evaporation of the superheated liquid. Observation of bubbles in the superheated liquid in some sense provides `amplification` for the initial energy deposition. Bubble chambers containing superheated liquids have been used to detect energetic particles, now we demonstrate that we can use a bubble chamber to detect trace species in superheated liquid propane by observing the bubble formation initiated by optical absorption. Crystal violet used as an initial test case can be detected at the sub-per-trillion level. The mechanism for bubble formation and ideas for further improvement will also be discussed.

  20. Parallel plate ionization chamber in low pressure helium gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D.; Heinz, A.; Winkler, R.; Qian, J.; Casperson, R. J.; Terry, J. R.

    2007-10-01

    A parallel plate ionization chamber was constructed for beam intensity monitoring. The chamber is placed in a gas-filled volume 1.5m upstream from the gas-filled separator SASSYER. Its output current will be used to determine absolute reaction cross sections. In a dedicated test experiment with a 100 MeV ^32S beam and an applied potential of 300V, the signal current had an average standard deviation of 0.4%, and demonstrated a linear relationship (R^2 = 0.9894) with the beam intensity. Also, at an intensity of 6 particle nanoamperes, the current exhibited a linear dependence (R^2 = 0.9813) on voltage, indicating that the chamber was operating in the proportional counter region. Our results agreed well with predictions made using extrapolated Townsend coefficients, though we observed a constant systematic and constant deviation between these estimates and our output current. This work was supported under US DOE grant number DE-FG0291ER-40609 and the Yale College Dean's Fellowship for Research in the Sciences.

  1. Particle and Smoke Detection on ISS for Next Generation Smoke Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary; Yuan, Zeng-guang; Sheredy, William; Funk, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Rapid fire detection requires the ability to differentiate fire signatures from background conditions and nuisance sources. Proper design of a fire detector requires detailed knowledge of all of these signal sources so that a discriminating detector can be designed. Owing to the absence of microgravity smoke data, all current spacecraft smoke detectors were designed based upon normal-g conditions. The removal of buoyancy reduces the velocities in the high temperature zones in flames, increasing the residence time of smoke particles and consequently allowing longer growth time for the particles. Recent space shuttle experiments confirmed that, in some cases, increased particles sizes are seen in low-gravity and that the relative performance of the ISS (International Space Station) and space-shuttle smoke-detectors changes in low-gravity; however, sufficient particle size information to design new detectors was not obtained. To address this issue, the SAME (Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment) experiment is manifested to fly on the ISS in 2007. The SAME experiment will make measurements of the particle size distribution of the smoke particulate from several typical spacecraft materials providing quantitative design data for spacecraft smoke detectors. A precursor experiment (DAFT: Dust Aerosol measurement Feasibility Test) flew recently on the ISS and provided the first measurement of the background smoke particulate levels on the ISS. These background levels are critical to the design of future smoke detectors. The ISS cabin was found to be a very clean environment with particulate levels substantially below the space shuttle and typical ground-based environments.

  2. Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) for measurements of fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernández Niello, J.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-11-01

    A detection technique for high-efficiency measurements of fusion reactions with low-intensity radioactive beams was developed. The technique is based on a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) operating as an active target and detection system, where the ionization gas acts as both target and counting gas. In this way, we can sample an excitation function in an energy range determined by the gas pressure, without changing the beam energy. The detector provides internal normalization to the incident beam and drastically reduces the measuring time. In a first experiment we tested the performance of the technique by measuring the 10,13,15C+12C fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  3. Drift chamber vertex detectors for SLC/LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, K.G.

    1987-03-01

    The short but measurable lifetimes of the b and c quarks and the tau lepton have motivated the development of high precision tracking detectors capable of providing information on the decay vertex topology of events containing these particles. This paper reviews the OPAL, L3, and MARK II experiments vertex drift chambers.

  4. A liquid-filled ionization chamber for high precision relative dosimetry.

    PubMed

    González-Castaño, D M; Gómez, F; Brualla, L; Roselló, J V; Planes, D; Sánchez, M; Pombar, M

    2011-04-01

    Radiosurgery and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments are based on the delivery of narrow and/or irregularly shaped megavoltage photon beams. This kind of beams present both lack of charged particle equilibrium and steep dose gradients. Quality assurance (QA) measurements involved in these techniques must therefore be carried out with a dosimeter featuring high small volume. In order to obtain a good signal to noise ratio, a relatively dense material is needed as active medium. Non-polar organic liquids were proposed as active mediums with both good tissue equivalence and showing high signal to noise ratio. In this work, a liquid-filled ionization chamber is presented. Some results acquired with this detector in relative dosimetry are studied and compared with results obtained with unshielded diode. Medium-term stability measurements were also carried out and its results are shown. The liquid-filled ionization chamber presented here shows its ability to perform profile measurements and penumbrae determination with excellent accuracy. The chamber features a proper signal stability over the period studied.

  5. Proton beam dosimetry: a comparison between a plastic scintillator, ionization chamber and Faraday cup.

    PubMed

    Ghergherehchi, Mitra; Afarideh, Hossein; Ghannadi, Mohammad; Mohammadzadeh, Ahmad; Aslani, Golam Reza; Boghrati, Behzad

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a comparison was made between a plastic scintillator (BC400), a Faraday Cup (FC) and an ionization chamber (IC) used for routine proton dosimetry. Thin scintillators can be applied to proton dosimetry and consequently to proton therapy as relative dosimeters because of their water-equivalent nature, high energy-light conversion efficiency, low dimensions and good proportionality to the absorbed dose at low stopping powers. To employ such scintillators as relative dosimeters in proton therapy, the corrective factors must be applied to correct the quenching luminescence at the Bragg peak. A fine linear proportionality between the luminescence light yield Y and the proton flux in a thin (0.5 mm) scintillator for the 20 and 30 MeV proton beams were observed. The experimental peak/plateau ratios of Bragg Curve for 2, 1 and 0.5 mm scintillators with an accuracy of 0.5% were obtained to be 1.87, 1.91 and 2.30, respectively. With combination of the Markus chamber and the CR-39 detector, the peak/plateau ratio was improved to 3.26. The obtained data of the luminescence yield as a function of the specific energy loss is in agreement with the Craun-Birk's theory. Results show that the FC and Markus ionization chamber are in agreement within 4%, while the FC gives a lower dose evaluation. For a defined beam, the data for the fluence measurements are reproducible within a good accuracy.

  6. A new multi-strip ionization chamber used as online beam monitor for heavy ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhiguo; Mao, Ruishi; Duan, Limin; She, Qianshun; Hu, Zhengguo; Li, He; Lu, Ziwei; Zhao, Qiecheng; Yang, Herun; Su, Hong; Lu, Chengui; Hu, Rongjiang; Zhang, Junwei

    2013-11-01

    A multi-strip ionization chamber has been built for precise and fast monitoring of the carbon beam spatial distribution at Heavy Ion Researched Facility of Lanzhou Cooling Storing Ring (HIRFL-CSR). All the detector's anode, cathode and sealed windows are made by 2 μm aluminized Mylar film in order to minimize the beam lateral deflection. The sensitive area of the detector is (100×100) mm2, with the anode segmented in 100 strips, and specialized front-end electronics has been developed for simplifying the data acquisition and quick feedback of the relevant parameters to beam control system. It can complete one single beam profile in 200 μs.

  7. An automated ionization chamber for secondary radioactivity standards.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R

    2010-01-01

    I report on the operation and characterization of a new ionization chamber system, "AUTOIC", featuring a commercial digital electrometer and a commercial robotic sample changer. The relative accuracy of the electrometer was improved significantly beyond the manufacturer's specifications through an in-house calibration of the various ranges, applied via software. The measurement precision and repeatability of the system have been determined by measuring multiple samples of the same radionuclide over the span of two or three years. The linearity of the system was examined by following the decay of (99m)Tc, (99)Mo and (133)Xe sources for up to 19 half-lives and determining half-life values. All of these values agree with the accepted literature values, within their combined uncertainties.

  8. Polarity correction factor for flattening filter free photon beams in several cylindrical ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiyuki; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Masao; Tsudou, Shinji; Masutani, Takashi; Okayama, Takanobu

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the polarity correction factor in ionization chambers for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams and flattening filter (FF) beams. Measurements were performed with both 6 and 10 MV FFF and FF beams. Five commercial ionization chambers were evaluated: PTW TN30013; IBA Dosimetry CC01, CC04, and CC13; and Exradin A12S. Except for the CC01 ionization chamber, the other four chambers showed less than a 0.3 % difference in the polarity effect between the FFF and the FF beams. The CC01 chamber showed a strong field-size-dependence, unlike the other chambers. The polarity effect for all chambers with FFF beams did not change with the dose rate. Except in the case of the CC01 chamber, the difference in the polarity effect between FFF and FF beams was not significant.

  9. Integrated atom detector based on field ionization near carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gruener, B.; Jag, M.; Stibor, A.; Visanescu, G.; Haeffner, M.; Kern, D.; Guenther, A.; Fortagh, J.

    2009-12-15

    We demonstrate an atom detector based on field ionization and subsequent ion counting. We make use of field enhancement near tips of carbon nanotubes to reach extreme electrostatic field values of up to 9x10{sup 9} V/m, which ionize ground-state rubidium atoms. The detector is based on a carpet of multiwall carbon nanotubes grown on a substrate and used for field ionization, and a channel electron multiplier used for ion counting. We measure the field enhancement at the tips of carbon nanotubes by field emission of electrons. We demonstrate the operation of the field ionization detector by counting atoms from a thermal beam of a rubidium dispenser source. By measuring the ionization rate of rubidium as a function of the applied detector voltage we identify the field ionization distance, which is below a few tens of nanometers in front of nanotube tips. We deduce from the experimental data that field ionization of rubidium near nanotube tips takes place on a time scale faster than 10{sup -10} s. This property is particularly interesting for the development of fast atom detectors suitable for measuring correlations in ultracold quantum gases. We also describe an application of the detector as partial pressure gauge.

  10. Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Yatabe, Yoshinori; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    For quality assurance, gas-filled ionization chamber method was tested at two reference facilities for radon calibration: EML (USA) and PTB (Germany). Consequently, the radon concentrations estimated by the ionization chamber method were in good agreement with the reference radon concentrations provided by EML as well as PTB.

  11. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    PubMed

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L). PMID:27294937

  12. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    PubMed

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-06-10

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L).

  13. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L). PMID:27294937

  14. Investigation of electric field distribution on FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2016-07-01

    One of the important parameters for establishing charge particle equilibrium (CPE) conditions of free-air ionization chamber is an electric field distribution. In this paper, electric field distribution inside the ionization chamber was investigated by finite element method. For this purpose, the effects of adding guard plate and guard strips on the electric field distribution in the ionization chamber were studied. it is necessary to apply a lead box around the ionization chamber body to avoid of scattered radiation effects on the ionization chamber operation, but the lead box changes the electric field distribution. In the following, the effect of lead box on the electric field distribution was studied. Finally, electric field distribution factor (kfield) was calculated by the simulation. The results of the simulation showed that presence of the guard plate and guard strips, and applying a suitable potential to lead box, a convergence of kfield to 1 was achieved.

  15. A new method for measuring the response time of the high pressure ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhentao; Shen, Yixiong; An, Jigang

    2012-08-01

    Time response is an important performance characteristic for gas-pressurized ionization chambers. To study the time response, it is especially crucial to measure the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. In this paper, a new approach is proposed to study the ion drift time in high pressure ionization chambers. It is carried out with a short-pulsed X-ray source and a high-speed digitizer. The ion drift time in the chamber is then determined from the digitized data. By measuring the ion drift time of a 15 atm xenon testing chamber, the method has been proven to be effective in the time response studies of ionization chambers.

  16. Performance of the Time Expansion Chamber / Transition Radiation Detector in PHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luiz Silva, Cesar

    2004-10-01

    The Time Expansion Chamber / Transition Radiation Detector (TEC/TRD) in the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC measures ionization losses (dE/dX) and transition radiation from charged particles produced by beam collisions. It is designed to perform tracking and identification for charged particles on very high particle multiplicity environment. The TEC/TRD consists of 24 wire chambers readout on both sides filled with recycled Xe-based gas mixture. This wire chamber configuration, besides providing measurements of ionization losses for charged particles, can absorb X-Ray photons generated by transition radiation from incident particles with γ>1000 crossing fiber radiators placed at the entrance of the chambers. This allows TEC/TRD to distinguish electrons from the huge pion signal produced over a broad momentum range (1GeV/c

  17. Characterization of Recombination Effects in a Liquid Ionization Chamber Used for the Dosimetry of a Radiosurgical Accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Antoine; Crop, Frederik; Lacornerie, Thomas; Reynaert, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Most modern radiation therapy devices allow the use of very small fields, either through beamlets in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or via stereotactic radiotherapy where positioning accuracy allows delivering very high doses per fraction in a small volume of the patient. Dosimetric measurements on medical accelerators are conventionally realized using air-filled ionization chambers. However, in small beams these are subject to nonnegligible perturbation effects. This study focuses on liquid ionization chambers, which offer advantages in terms of spatial resolution and low fluence perturbation. Ion recombination effects are investigated for the microLion detector (PTW) used with the Cyberknife system (Accuray). The method consists of performing a series of water tank measurements at different source-surface distances, and applying corrections to the liquid detector readings based on simultaneous gaseous detector measurements. This approach facilitates isolating the recombination effects arising from the high density of the liquid sensitive medium and obtaining correction factors to apply to the detector readings. The main difficulty resides in achieving a sufficient level of accuracy in the setup to be able to detect small changes in the chamber response. PMID:24835586

  18. Characterization of recombination effects in a liquid ionization chamber used for the dosimetry of a radiosurgical accelerator.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Antoine; Crop, Frederik; Lacornerie, Thomas; Reynaert, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Most modern radiation therapy devices allow the use of very small fields, either through beamlets in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or via stereotactic radiotherapy where positioning accuracy allows delivering very high doses per fraction in a small volume of the patient. Dosimetric measurements on medical accelerators are conventionally realized using air-filled ionization chambers. However, in small beams these are subject to nonnegligible perturbation effects. This study focuses on liquid ionization chambers, which offer advantages in terms of spatial resolution and low fluence perturbation. Ion recombination effects are investigated for the microLion detector (PTW) used with the Cyberknife system (Accuray). The method consists of performing a series of water tank measurements at different source-surface distances, and applying corrections to the liquid detector readings based on simultaneous gaseous detector measurements. This approach facilitates isolating the recombination effects arising from the high density of the liquid sensitive medium and obtaining correction factors to apply to the detector readings. The main difficulty resides in achieving a sufficient level of accuracy in the setup to be able to detect small changes in the chamber response.

  19. A patient-specific quality assurance study on absolute dose verification using ionization chambers of different volumes in RapidArc treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Syam Kumar, S.A.; Sukumar, Prabakar; Sriram, Padmanaban; Rajasekaran, Dhanabalan; Aketi, Srinu; Vivekanandan, Nagarajan

    2012-01-01

    measurements using the semiflex ionization chamber with intermediate volume (0.125 cm{sup 3}) shows good agreement with the TPS calculated among the detectors used in this study. Positioning is very important when using smaller volume chambers because they are more sensitive to geometrical errors within the treatment fields. It is also suggested to average the dose over the sensitive volume for larger-volume chambers. The ionization chamber-phantom combinations used in this study can be used interchangeably for routine RapidArc patient-specific quality assurance with a satisfactory accuracy for clinical practice.

  20. High spatial resolution dosimetric response maps for radiotherapy ionization chambers measured using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, D. J.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wright, T. E.; Harty, P. D.; Lehmann, J.; Livingstone, J.; Crosbie, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Small circular beams of synchrotron radiation (0.1 mm and 0.4 mm in diameter) were used to irradiate ionization chambers of the types commonly used in radiotherapy. By scanning the chamber through the beam and measuring the ionization current, a spatial map of the dosimetric response of the chamber was recorded. The technique is able to distinguish contributions to the large-field ionization current from the chamber walls, central electrode and chamber stem. Scans were recorded for the NE 2571 Farmer chamber, the PTW 30013, IBA FC65-G Farmer-type chambers, the NE 2611A and IBA CC13 thimble chambers, the PTW 31006 and 31014 pinpoint chambers, the PTW Roos and Advanced Markus plane-parallel chambers, and the PTW 23342 thin-window soft x-ray chamber. In all cases, large contributions to the response arise from areas where the incident beam grazes the cavity surfaces. Quantitative as well as qualitative information about the relative chamber response was extracted from the maps, including the relative contribution of the central electrode. Line scans using monochromatic beams show the effect of the photon energy on the chamber response. For Farmer-type chambers, a simple Monte Carlo model was in good agreement with the measured response.

  1. Low-level measurements of Ra-226/Rn-222 by pulse ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Daoushy, Fand; Garcia-Tenorio, Rafael

    1988-10-01

    Characteristics of two ionization chambers have been studied and the chambers utilized for 226Ra/ 222Rn measurements for more than ten years. The results obtained show that coating of internal surfaces with a pure and thin Ag-layer enhances the background of ionization chambers in spite of some improvements at the early stages of operation. In addition to previously known parameters influencing the accuracy in routine measurements, new correction factors are suggested. 226Ra impurities in the body of ionization chambers are found to act not only as a permanent, but also as a temperature-dependent source of background. Earlier accuracies of 226Ra/ 222Rn measurements have been considerably improved by assuring long-term mechanical and thermal stability of the ionization chambers.

  2. Higher-Sensitivity Ionization Trace-Species Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boumsellek, Said; Chutjian, Ara

    1995-01-01

    Electron source and electron optics of reversal electron-attachment detector modified to increase sensitivity. Original version described in "High-Sensitivity Ionization Trace-Species Detector" (NPO-17596). Used to detect molecules of particular chemical species of interest (e.g., narcotics, explosives, or organic wastes) present in air at low concentrations, and known to attach extremely low-energy electrons. Apparatus does this by ionizing molecules from sampled atmosphere, then detecting ions of species of interest. Detector features indirectly heated spherical cathode and redesigned electron optics, together, deliver more electrons at low kinetic energy to reversal plane, R. Greater electron current generates more ions for detection.

  3. Monte Carlo calculation of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilin, Chen; Shuming, Peng; Dan, Meng; Yuehong, He; Heyi, Wang

    2014-10-01

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements has been theoretically studied using Monte Carlo code MCNP 5. The influence of many factors, including carrier gas, chamber size, wall materials and gas pressure, has been evaluated in the simulations. It is found that β rays emitted by tritium deposit much more energy into chambers flowing through with argon than with deuterium in them, as much as 2.7 times higher at pressure 100 Pa. As chamber size gets smaller, energy deposition decreases sharply. For an ionization chamber of 1 mL, β rays deposit less than 1% of their energy at pressure 100 Pa and only 84% even if gas pressure is as high as 100 kPa. It also indicates that gold plated ionization chamber results in the highest deposition ratio while aluminum one leads to the lowest. In addition, simulations were validated by comparison with experimental data. Results show that simulations agree well with experimental data.

  4. Calibration of ionization chamber for ¹⁸F and ⁶⁸Ga.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carlos J; de Oliveira, Estela M; Iwahara, A; Delgado, José U; Poledna, R; de Oliveira, Antônio E; Moreira, Denise S; da Silva, Ronaldo L; Gomes, Regio dos Santos; de Veras, Eduardo V

    2014-05-01

    In order to maintain the results of primary activity standardizations carried out in 2011 the LNMRI has determined the calibration factors for a pressurized 4π-ionization chamber for the nuclides (18)F and (68)Ga. This ionization chamber is coupled to a 6517A Keithley electrometer which is controlled by a homemade LabVIEW program. This paper will describe the main issues related to the calibration of an ionization chamber system for positron emitters and short half-life radionuclides such as timing, current measurement, background, decay, and (226)Ra check source measurements.

  5. Calibration of ionization chamber for ¹⁸F and ⁶⁸Ga.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carlos J; de Oliveira, Estela M; Iwahara, A; Delgado, José U; Poledna, R; de Oliveira, Antônio E; Moreira, Denise S; da Silva, Ronaldo L; Gomes, Regio dos Santos; de Veras, Eduardo V

    2014-05-01

    In order to maintain the results of primary activity standardizations carried out in 2011 the LNMRI has determined the calibration factors for a pressurized 4π-ionization chamber for the nuclides (18)F and (68)Ga. This ionization chamber is coupled to a 6517A Keithley electrometer which is controlled by a homemade LabVIEW program. This paper will describe the main issues related to the calibration of an ionization chamber system for positron emitters and short half-life radionuclides such as timing, current measurement, background, decay, and (226)Ra check source measurements. PMID:24361323

  6. The control system of the multi-strip ionization chamber for the HIMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Yuan, Y. J.; Mao, R. S.; Xu, Z. G.; Li, Peng; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhang, Nong

    2015-03-01

    Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) is a carbon ion cancer treatment facility which is being built by the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) in China. In this facility, transverse profile and intensity of the beam at the treatment terminals will be measured by the multi-strip ionization chamber. In order to fulfill the requirement of the beam position feedback to accomplish the beam automatic commissioning, less than 1 ms reaction time of the Data Acquisition (DAQ) of this detector must be achieved. Therefore, the control system and software framework for DAQ have been redesigned and developed with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input/Output (CompactRIO) instead of PXI 6133. The software is Labview-based and developed following the producer-consumer pattern with message mechanism and queue technology. The newly designed control system has been tested with carbon beam at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR) and it has provided one single beam profile measurement in less than 1 ms with 1 mm beam position resolution. The fast reaction time and high precision data processing during the beam test have verified the usability and maintainability of the software framework. Furthermore, such software architecture is easy-fitting to applications with different detectors such as wire scanner detector.

  7. A Liquid Xenon Ionization Chamber in an All-fluoropolymer Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    LePort, F.; Pocar, A.; Bartoszek, L.; DeVoe, R.; Fierlinger, P.; Flatt, B.; Gratta, G.; Green, M.; Montero Diez, M.; Neilson, R.; O'Sullivan, K.; Wodin, J.; Woisard, D.; Baussan, E.; Breidenbach, M.; Conley, R.; Fairbank, W., Jr.; Farine, J.; Hall, K.; Hallman, D.; Hargrove, C.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Applied Plastics Technology, Bristol /Neuchatel U. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Carleton U. /Alabama U. /Moscow, ITEP

    2007-02-26

    A novel technique has been developed to build vessels for liquid xenon ionization detectors entirely out of ultra-clean fluoropolymer. We describe the advantages in terms of low radioactivity contamination, provide some details of the construction techniques, and show the energy resolution achieved with a prototype all-fluoropolymer ionization detector.

  8. Polarity effect of the thimble-type ionization chamber at a low dose rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Kyun; Park, Se-Hwan; Kim, Han-Soo; Kang, Sang-Mook; Ha, Jang-Ho; Chung, Chong-Eun; Cho, Seung-Yeon; Kim, J. K.

    2005-11-01

    It is known that the current collected from an ionization chamber exposed to a constant radiation intensity changes in magnitude when the polarity of the collecting potential is reversed. It is called the polarity effect of the ionization chamber. There are many possible causes that induce the polarity effect and one of them can be a field distortion due to a potential difference between the guard electrode and the collector. We studied how much the polarity effect depends on the design of the electrodes in the thimble-type ionization chamber. Two thimble-type ionization chambers, which had different electrode structures, were designed and fabricated at KAERI. We calculated the field distortions due to the potential difference between the guard electrode and the collector for the two ionization chambers. MAXWELL and Garfield were employed to calculate the electron drift lines inside the chamber. The polarity effects of the two ionization chambers were measured, and they were consistent with the field calculation. We could conclude that the polarity effect is mostly induced from the field distortion due to the potential difference between the guard electrode and the collector in our experiment and it depends significantly on the design of the electrodes.

  9. In-mine evaluation of smoke detectors. Information Circular/1992

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, G.S.; Litton, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    The report presents the results of an evaluation of smoke detectors placed in conveyor belt entries of underground coal mines. The selected mines are located in six different Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) Coal Mine Safety and Health districts; are operated by seven different companies; and use atmospheric monitoring systems from seven different manufacturers. Principal concerns are early detection and warning of fires, reliability of operation, frequency of maintenance, and adaptability of detectors to monitoring systems and the mining environment. The data contained in the report provides for some comparisons between smoke detectors and carbon monoxide (CO) sensors, specifically in the areas of early detection of fires and nuisance alarms due to diesel exhaust contaminants. Finally, recommendations are presented that discuss performance standards, sensitivity tests, detector classification, and maintenance.

  10. Experimental and Monte Carlo evaluation of an ionization chamber in a 60Co beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perini, A. P.; Neves, L. P.; Santos, W. S.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    Recently a special parallel-plate ionization chamber was developed and characterized at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. The operational tests presented results within the recommended limits. In order to determine the influence of some components of the ionization chamber on its response, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out. The experimental and simulation results pointed out that the dosimeter evaluated in the present work has favorable properties to be applied to 60Co dosimetry at calibration laboratories.

  11. Use of a novel two-dimensional ionization chamber array for pencil beam scanning proton therapy beam quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D; Mertens, Thierry; Baeumer, Christian; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2015-01-01

    The need to accurately and efficiently verify both output and dose profiles creates significant challenges in quality assurance of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton delivery. A system for PBS QA has been developed that combines a new two-dimensional ionization chamber array in a waterproof housing that is scanned in a water phantom. The MatriXX PT has the same detector array arrangement as the standard MatriXX(Evolution) but utilizes a smaller 2 mm plate spacing instead of 5mm. Because the bias voltage of the MatriXX PT and Evolution cannot be changed, PPC40 and FC65-G ionization chambers were used to assess recombination effects. The PPC40 is a parallel plate chamber with an electrode spacing of 2mm, while the FC65-G is a Farmer chamber FC65-G with an electrode spacing of 2.8 mm. Three bias voltages (500, 200, and 100 V) were used for both detectors to determine which radiation type (continuous, pulse or pulse-scanned beam) could closely estimate Pion from the ratios of charges collected. In comparison with the MatriXX(Evolution), a significant improvement in measurement of absolute dose with the MatriXX PT was observed. While dose uncertainty of the MatriXX(Evolution) can be up to 4%, it is < 1% for the MatriXX PT. Therefore the MatriXX(Evolution) should not be used for QA of PBS for conditions in which ion recombination is not negligible. Farmer chambers should be used with caution for measuring the absolute dose of PBS beams, as the uncertainty of Pion can be > 1%; chambers with an electrode spacing of 2 mm or smaller are recommended.

  12. Use of a novel two-dimensional ionization chamber array for pencil beam scanning proton therapy beam quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D; Mertens, Thierry; Baeumer, Christian; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2015-01-01

    The need to accurately and efficiently verify both output and dose profiles creates significant challenges in quality assurance of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton delivery. A system for PBS QA has been developed that combines a new two-dimensional ionization chamber array in a waterproof housing that is scanned in a water phantom. The MatriXX PT has the same detector array arrangement as the standard MatriXX(Evolution) but utilizes a smaller 2 mm plate spacing instead of 5mm. Because the bias voltage of the MatriXX PT and Evolution cannot be changed, PPC40 and FC65-G ionization chambers were used to assess recombination effects. The PPC40 is a parallel plate chamber with an electrode spacing of 2mm, while the FC65-G is a Farmer chamber FC65-G with an electrode spacing of 2.8 mm. Three bias voltages (500, 200, and 100 V) were used for both detectors to determine which radiation type (continuous, pulse or pulse-scanned beam) could closely estimate Pion from the ratios of charges collected. In comparison with the MatriXX(Evolution), a significant improvement in measurement of absolute dose with the MatriXX PT was observed. While dose uncertainty of the MatriXX(Evolution) can be up to 4%, it is < 1% for the MatriXX PT. Therefore the MatriXX(Evolution) should not be used for QA of PBS for conditions in which ion recombination is not negligible. Farmer chambers should be used with caution for measuring the absolute dose of PBS beams, as the uncertainty of Pion can be > 1%; chambers with an electrode spacing of 2 mm or smaller are recommended. PMID:26103492

  13. Pediatric counseling and subsequent use of smoke detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.E.; Reisinger, K.S.; Blatter, M.M.; Wucher, F.

    1982-04-01

    Effects of a brief educational and purchase program concerning home fires and smoke detectors by two pediatricians were compared to ''routine'' counseling without such a program using two groups each of 120 patients of well children. Inspection performed four to six weeks after the office visits showed that of 55 experimental group parents without detectors prior to the program, 26 purchased and 19 installed them correctly. No control group parents did so.

  14. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-06-01

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (±0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a 5.0 mm distance in a 9  ×  9 square of spots. PRs of an electron-density (with tissue-equivalent inserts) phantom and a head phantom were acquired. The integral depth dose (IDD) curves of the delivered spots were computed by the TPS in a volume of water simulating the MLIC, and virtually added to the CT at the exit side of the phantoms. For each spot, measured and calculated IDD were overlapped in order to compute a map of range errors. On the head-phantom, the maximum dose from PR acquisition was estimated. Additionally, on the head phantom the impact on the range errors map was estimated in case of a 1 mm position misalignment. In the electron-density phantom, range errors were within 1 mm in the soft-tissue rods, but greater in the dense-rod. In the head-phantom the range errors were  -0.9  ±  2.7 mm on the whole map and within 1 mm in the brain area. On both phantoms greater errors were observed at inhomogeneity interfaces, due to sensitivity to small misalignment, and inaccurate TPS dose computation. The effect of the 1 mm misalignment was clearly visible on the range error map and produced an increased spread of range errors (-1.0  ±  3.8 mm on the whole map). The dose to the patient for such PR acquisitions would be acceptable as the maximum dose to the head phantom was  <2cGyE. By the described 2D method, allowing to discriminate misalignments, range verification can be performed in selected areas to implement an in vivo quality assurance program.

  15. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-06-01

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (±0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a 5.0 mm distance in a 9  ×  9 square of spots. PRs of an electron-density (with tissue-equivalent inserts) phantom and a head phantom were acquired. The integral depth dose (IDD) curves of the delivered spots were computed by the TPS in a volume of water simulating the MLIC, and virtually added to the CT at the exit side of the phantoms. For each spot, measured and calculated IDD were overlapped in order to compute a map of range errors. On the head-phantom, the maximum dose from PR acquisition was estimated. Additionally, on the head phantom the impact on the range errors map was estimated in case of a 1 mm position misalignment. In the electron-density phantom, range errors were within 1 mm in the soft-tissue rods, but greater in the dense-rod. In the head-phantom the range errors were  ‑0.9  ±  2.7 mm on the whole map and within 1 mm in the brain area. On both phantoms greater errors were observed at inhomogeneity interfaces, due to sensitivity to small misalignment, and inaccurate TPS dose computation. The effect of the 1 mm misalignment was clearly visible on the range error map and produced an increased spread of range errors (‑1.0  ±  3.8 mm on the whole map). The dose to the patient for such PR acquisitions would be acceptable as the maximum dose to the head phantom was  <2cGyE. By the described 2D method, allowing to discriminate misalignments, range verification can be performed in selected areas to implement an in vivo quality assurance program.

  16. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-06-01

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (±0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a 5.0 mm distance in a 9  ×  9 square of spots. PRs of an electron-density (with tissue-equivalent inserts) phantom and a head phantom were acquired. The integral depth dose (IDD) curves of the delivered spots were computed by the TPS in a volume of water simulating the MLIC, and virtually added to the CT at the exit side of the phantoms. For each spot, measured and calculated IDD were overlapped in order to compute a map of range errors. On the head-phantom, the maximum dose from PR acquisition was estimated. Additionally, on the head phantom the impact on the range errors map was estimated in case of a 1 mm position misalignment. In the electron-density phantom, range errors were within 1 mm in the soft-tissue rods, but greater in the dense-rod. In the head-phantom the range errors were  -0.9  ±  2.7 mm on the whole map and within 1 mm in the brain area. On both phantoms greater errors were observed at inhomogeneity interfaces, due to sensitivity to small misalignment, and inaccurate TPS dose computation. The effect of the 1 mm misalignment was clearly visible on the range error map and produced an increased spread of range errors (-1.0  ±  3.8 mm on the whole map). The dose to the patient for such PR acquisitions would be acceptable as the maximum dose to the head phantom was  <2cGyE. By the described 2D method, allowing to discriminate misalignments, range verification can be performed in selected areas to implement an in vivo quality assurance program.

  17. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-06-01

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (±0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a 5.0 mm distance in a 9  ×  9 square of spots. PRs of an electron-density (with tissue-equivalent inserts) phantom and a head phantom were acquired. The integral depth dose (IDD) curves of the delivered spots were computed by the TPS in a volume of water simulating the MLIC, and virtually added to the CT at the exit side of the phantoms. For each spot, measured and calculated IDD were overlapped in order to compute a map of range errors. On the head-phantom, the maximum dose from PR acquisition was estimated. Additionally, on the head phantom the impact on the range errors map was estimated in case of a 1 mm position misalignment. In the electron-density phantom, range errors were within 1 mm in the soft-tissue rods, but greater in the dense-rod. In the head-phantom the range errors were  -0.9  ±  2.7 mm on the whole map and within 1 mm in the brain area. On both phantoms greater errors were observed at inhomogeneity interfaces, due to sensitivity to small misalignment, and inaccurate TPS dose computation. The effect of the 1 mm misalignment was clearly visible on the range error map and produced an increased spread of range errors (-1.0  ±  3.8 mm on the whole map). The dose to the patient for such PR acquisitions would be acceptable as the maximum dose to the head phantom was  <2cGyE. By the described 2D method, allowing to discriminate misalignments, range verification can be performed in selected areas to implement an in vivo quality assurance program. PMID:27164479

  18. A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) for measuring the charge of relativistic heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, W. B.; Romero, J. L.; Brady, F. P.; Tull, C. E.; Castaneda, C. M.; Barasch, E. F.; Webb, M. L.; Drummond, J. R.; Crawford, H. J.; Flores, I.; Greiner, D. E.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Sann, H.; Young, J. C.

    1987-04-01

    A large area (1 m × 2 m) multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) has been constructed and tested. The MUSIC detector makes multiple measurements of energy "loss", d E/d x, for a relativistic heavy ion. Given the velocity, the charge of the ion can be extracted from the energy loss distributions. The widths of the distributions we observe are much narrower than predicted by Vavilov's theory for energy loss while agreeing well with the theory of Badhwar which deals with the energy deposited. The versatile design of MUSIC allows a variety of anode configurations which results in a large dynamic range of charge. In our tests to date we have observed charge resolutions of 0.25e fwhm for 727 MeV/nucleon40A and 0.30e fwhm for 1.08 GeV/nucleon139La and139La fragments. Vertical position and multiple track determination are obtained by using time projection chamber electronics. Preliminary tests indicate that the position resolution is also very good with α ≅ 100 μm.

  19. Possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers for percent depth-dose measurements in clinical electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers for percent depth-dose (PDD) measurements in high-energy clinical electron beams. Methods: The cavity correction factor, P{sub cav}, for cylindrical chambers with various diameters was calculated as a function of depth from the surface to R{sub 50}, in the energy range of 6-18 MeV electrons with the EGSnrc C ++ -based user-code CAVITY. The results were compared with those for IBA NACP-02 and PTW Roos parallel-plate ionization chambers. The effective point of measurement (EPOM) for the cylindrical chamber and the parallel-plate chamber was positioned according to the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice. The overall correction factor, P{sub Q}, and the percent depth-ionization (PDI) curve for a PTW30013 Farmer-type chamber were also compared with those of NACP-02 and Roos chambers. Results: The P{sub cav} values at depths between the surface and R{sub 50} for cylindrical chambers were all lower than those with parallel-plate chambers. However, the variation in depth for cylindrical chambers equal to or less than 4 mm in diameter was equivalent to or smaller than that for parallel-plate chambers. The P{sub Q} values for the PTW30013 chamber mainly depended on P{sub cav}, and for parallel-plate chambers depended on the wall correction factor, P{sub wall}, rather than P{sub cav}. P{sub Q} at depths from the surface to R{sub 50} for the PTW30013 chamber was consequently a lower value than that with parallel-plate chambers. However, the variation in depth was equivalent to that of parallel-plate chambers at electron energies equal to or greater than 9 MeV. The shift to match calculated PDI curves for the PTW30013 chamber and water (perturbation free) varied from 0.65 to 0 mm between 6 and 18 MeV beams. Similarly, the shifts for NACP-02 and Roos chambers were 0.5-0.6 mm and 0.2-0.3 mm, respectively, and were nearly independent of electron energy. Conclusions: Calculated PDI curves for PTW

  20. New drift chamber for the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Burchat, P.R.; Hanson, G.G.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.

    1984-10-01

    The design of the new cylindrical drift chamber for the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider is described. Prototype tests to determine the working parameters of the chamber and to study possible gas mixtures are discussed.

  1. A comparison of different experimental methods for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jonas; Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Gómez, Faustino; Jäkel, Oliver; Pardo-Montero, Juan; Tölli, Heikki

    2012-11-01

    Radiation dosimetry of highly modulated dose distributions requires a detector with a high spatial resolution. Liquid filled ionization chambers (LICs) have the potential to become a valuable tool for the characterization of such radiation fields. However, the effect of an increased recombination of the charge carriers, as compared to using air as the sensitive medium has to be corrected for. Due to the presence of initial recombination in LICs, the correction for general recombination losses is more complicated than for air-filled ionization chambers. In the present work, recently published experimental methods for general recombination correction for LICs are compared and investigated for both pulsed and continuous beams. The experimental methods are all based on one of two approaches: either measurements at two different dose rates (two-dose-rate methods), or measurements at three different LIC polarizing voltages (three-voltage methods). In a comparison with the two-dose-rate methods, the three-voltage methods fail to achieve accurate corrections in several instances, predominantly at low polarizing voltages and dose rates. However, for continuous beams in the range of polarizing voltages recommended by the manufacturer of the LICs used, the agreement between the different methods is generally within the experimental uncertainties. For pulsed beams, the agreement between the methods is poor. The inaccuracies found in the results from the three-voltage methods are associated with numerical difficulties in solving the resulting equation systems, which also make these methods sensitive to small variations in the experimental data. These issues are more pronounced for the case of pulsed beams. Furthermore, the results suggest that the theoretical modelling of initial recombination used in the three-voltage methods may be a contributing factor to the deviating results observed.

  2. Isothermal flow measurements in a gas turbine combustor using a fast flame ionization detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, R. W.; Hochgreb, S.

    2010-05-01

    A fast-response flame ionization detector (FFID) has been used to study isothermal gas transport and mixing inside a gas turbine combustion chamber. The large, highly linear dynamic range of the FFID coupled with a frequency response that extends up to approximately 200 Hz can reveal large-scale features of interest in turbulent flows. Experiments were performed in a ground-based test facility simulating high-altitude restart conditions. Pulses of propane were discharged into the core swirler of a fuel injector through a high-speed valve. The mole fraction of this tracer was monitored at various locations inside the combustion chamber. These measurements allowed the identification of recirculation timescales and flow instabilities at different points inside the combustion chamber, providing important insights into the altitude restart process.

  3. Beam tests of ionization chambers for the NuMI neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect

    Robert M. Zwaska et al.

    2003-09-25

    We have conducted tests at the Fermilab Booster of ionization chambers to be used as monitors of the NuMI neutrino beamline. The chambers were exposed to proton fluxes of up to 10{sup 12} particles/cm{sup 2}/1.56 {micro}s. We studied space charge effects which can reduce signal collection from the chambers at large charged particle beam intensities.

  4. The change of response of ionization chambers in the penumbra and transmission regions: impact for IMRT verification.

    PubMed

    González-Castaño, D; Pena, J; Sánchez-Doblado, F; Hartmann, G H; Gómez, F; Leal, A

    2008-04-01

    Significant deviations from the expected dose have been reported in the absolute dosimetry validation of an intensity modulated radiation therapy treatment when individual segments are analyzed. However, when full treatment is considered and all segment doses are added together, these discrepancies fade out, leading to overall dose deviations below a 5% action level. This contradictory behavior may be caused by a partial compensation between detector over-responding and under-responding for measurement conditions far from radiation equilibrium. We consider three treatment verification scenarios that may lead to ionization chamber miss-responding, namely: narrow beam irradiation, field penumbra location and multi-leaf collimator transmission contribution. In this work we have analyzed the response of three different ionization chambers with different active volume under these conditions by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation methods. Correction factors needed to convert the detector readout into actual dose to water were calculated by inserting the specific detector geometry (carefully modeled) into the simulations. This procedure required extensive use of parallel computing resources in order to achieve the desired level of uncertainty in the final results. The analysis of the simulations shows the relative contribution of each of the three previously mentioned miss-responding scenarios. Additionally, we provide some evidence on dose deviation compensation in multi-segment radiotherapy treatment verification.

  5. [Influence on measurements of pre-irradiation due to differences in ionization chamber shape or frequency in use].

    PubMed

    Shimono, Tetsunori; Nambu, Hidekazu; Matsubara, Kosuke; Koshida, Kichiro; Gomi, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Ionization chamber measurements in radiation therapy should be repeatedly performed until a stable reading is obtained. Ionization chambers exhibit a response which depends on time elapsed since the previous irradiation. In this study, we investigated the response of a set of two Farmer-style, one Plane parallel, and seven small ionization chambers, which are exposed to 4, 6, 10, and 14 MV. The results show that Farmer-style and Plane parallel ionization chambers settle quickly within 9-20 min. On the other hand, small ionization chambers exhibit settling times of 12-33 min for 6, 10, and 14 MV. It will take longer for a settling time of 4 MV. The settling time showed time dependent irradiation. The first reading was up to 0.76% lower in the Farmer-style and Plane parallel ionization chambers. The small ionization chambers had a 2.60% lower first reading and more gradual response in reaching a stable reading. In this study, individual ionization chambers can vary significantly in their settling behavior. Variation of the responses on ionization chambers were confirmed not only when radiation was not used for a week but also when it was halted for a month. Pre-irradiation of small ionization chambers is clearly warranted for eliminating inadvertent error in the calibration of radiation beams.

  6. Quantification of Cigarette Smoke Particle Deposition In Vitro Using a Triplicate Quartz Crystal Microbalance Exposure Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Jason; Thorne, David; McAughey, John; Dillon, Deborah; Meredith, Clive

    2013-01-01

    There are a variety of smoke exposure systems available to the tobacco industry and respiratory toxicology research groups, each with their own way of diluting/delivering smoke to cell cultures. Thus a simple technique to measure dose in vitro needs to be utilised. Dosimetry—assessment of dose—is a key element in linking the biological effects of smoke generated by various exposure systems. Microbalance technology is presented as a dosimetry tool and a way of measuring whole smoke dose. Described here is a new tool to quantify diluted smoke particulate deposition in vitro. The triplicate quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) chamber measured real-time deposition of smoke at a range of dilutions 1 : 5–1 : 400 (smoke : air). Mass was read in triplicate by 3 identical QCMs installed into one in vitro exposure chamber, each in the location in which a cell culture would be exposed to smoke at the air-liquid interface. This resulted in quantification of deposited particulate matter in the range 0.21–28.00 μg/cm2. Results demonstrated that the QCM could discriminate mass between dilutions and was able to give information of regional deposition where cell cultures would usually be exposed within the chamber. Our aim is to use the QCM to support the preclinical (in vitro) evaluation of tobacco products. PMID:23484139

  7. Backscattered radiation into a transmission ionization chamber: measurement and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    Backscattered radiation (BSR) from field-defining collimators can affect the response of a monitor chamber in X-radiation fields. This contribution must be considered since this kind of chamber is used to monitor the equipment response. In this work, the dependence of a transmission ionization chamber response on the aperture diameter of the collimators was studied experimentally and using a Monte Carlo (MC) technique. According to the results, the BSR increases the chamber response of over 4.0% in the case of a totally closed collimator and 50 kV energy beam, using both techniques. The results from Monte Carlo simulation confirm the validity of the simulated geometry.

  8. Time-resolved dosimetry using a pinpoint ionization chamber as quality assurance for IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Louwe, Robert J. W. Satherley, Thomas; Day, Rebecca A.; Greig, Lynne; Wendling, Markus; Monshouwer, René

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a method to verify the dose delivery in relation to the individual control points of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using an ionization chamber. In addition to more effective problem solving during patient-specific quality assurance (QA), the aim is to eventually map out the limitations in the treatment chain and enable a targeted improvement of the treatment technique in an efficient way. Methods: Pretreatment verification was carried out for 255 treatment plans that included a broad range of treatment indications in two departments using the equipment of different vendors. In-house developed software was used to enable calculation of the dose delivery for the individual beamlets in the treatment planning system (TPS), for data acquisition, and for analysis of the data. The observed deviations were related to various delivery and measurement parameters such as gantry angle, field size, and the position of the detector with respect to the field edge to distinguish between error sources. Results: The average deviation of the integral fraction dose during pretreatment verification of the planning target volume dose was −2.1% ± 2.2% (1 SD), −1.7% ± 1.7% (1 SD), and 0.0% ± 1.3% (1 SD) for IMRT at the Radboud University Medical Center (RUMC), VMAT (RUMC), and VMAT at the Wellington Blood and Cancer Centre, respectively. Verification of the dose to organs at risk gave very similar results but was generally subject to a larger measurement uncertainty due to the position of the detector at a high dose gradient. The observed deviations could be related to limitations of the TPS beam models, attenuation of the treatment couch, as well as measurement errors. The apparent systematic error of about −2% in the average deviation of the integral fraction dose in the RUMC results could be explained by the limitations of the TPS beam model in the calculation of the beam penumbra. Conclusions: This

  9. Measurement of the spark probability of a GEM detector for the CBM muon chamber (MuCh)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S.; Abuhoza, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Garabatos, C.; Hehner, J.; Kleipa, V.; Morhardt, T.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmidt, H. R.; Wiechula, J.

    2015-11-01

    The triple GEM detectors for the CBM muon chamber (MuCh) will be operated in a high rate environment of heavily ionizing particles due to the presence of thick iron absorber in the system. Therefore, the stability of the detectors needs to be tested. In a dedicated beam time double mask triple GEM detectors have been tested at CERN SPS/H4. In this study pion beam of ~ 150 GeV/c has been used. Different methods to determine the spark has been described in this paper. The stability of the triple GEM detector setup in an environment of high energetic showers is studied. To this end the spark probability in a shower environment is compared to the spark probability in a pion beam. The spark probability was found to be ~10-7 in a high momentum pion beam and in an induced particle shower.

  10. Variable pressure ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Michelle V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus for differentiating organic compounds based on their electron affinity. An electron capture detector cell (ECD) is operated at pressures ranging from atmospheric to less than 1 torr. Through variation of the pressure within the ECD cell, the organic compounds are induced to either capture or emit electrons. Differentiation of isomeric compounds can be obtianed when, at a given pressure, one isomer is in the emission mode and the other is in the capture mode. Output of the ECD is recorded by chromatogram. The invention also includes a method for obtaining the zero-crossing pressure of a compound, defined as the pressure at which the competing emission and capture reactions are balanced and which may be correlated to the electron affinity of a compound.

  11. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhilin; Chang, Ruiming; Mu, Long; Song, Guoyang; Wang, Heyi; Wu, Guanyin; Wei, Xiye

    2010-07-01

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of beta particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7x10(5) Bq/m(3).

  12. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilin; Chang, Ruiming; Mu, Long; Song, Guoyang; Wang, Heyi; Wu, Guanyin; Wei, Xiye

    2010-07-01

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of β particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7×105 Bq/m3.

  13. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhilin; Chang Ruiming; Mu Long; Song Guoyang; Wang Heyi; Wu Guanyin; Wei Xiye

    2010-07-15

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of {beta} particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7x10{sup 5} Bq/m{sup 3}.

  14. Mechanistic study and optimization of a hydrogen atmosphere flame ionization detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, C.H.

    1985-01-01

    A residual gas analyzer was modified to study ions produced by flames similar to those used in the organometallic and organosilicon selective hydrogen atmosphere flame ionization detectors, HAFID and HAFID-Si, respectively. Flame ions traveled from 1 to 7 cm at atmospheric pressure prior to entering the vacuum chamber. The ions were then extracted and focused using an Einzel lens system into a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometry system was calibrated using the ions produced by a radioactive Ni-63 foil which had nitrogen gas blown over it. Optimization of the system was accomplished by varying parameters while the Ni-63 foil was the ionizing source and then with a hydrogen in air diffusion flame. The mass spectrum from a flame similar in composition to that used in the gas chromatographic flame ionization detector was compared to literature spectra to validate the results. Characterization studies of the HAFID indicated a linear range of two orders of magnitude for organics with a minimum detectable amount of 500 ng for tetradecane. An equal per carbon response pattern similar to that observed in the FID was observed with the HAFID for a homologous n-alkane series. A new detector design that allows the collector to jet tip height to be varied while the detector flame is burning was utilized in the simplex optimization of the detector. A computer program that utilizes variable sized steps in the simplex was developed to determine the next set of conditions to be tested and to determine when the optimum had been reached. A mechanism was developed to account for the selective response of the organometallic and organosilicon selective detectors. The mechanisms were based on the results of the mass spectrometric studies, characterization studies and thermodynamic data obtained from the literature.

  15. Miniature metastable ionization detectors for exobiology flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    The Metastable Ionization Detector (MID) is three orders of magnitude more sensitive than the thermal conductivity detectors used on previous flight instruments. The miniature MID provides scientists with a much smaller and highly sensitive detector for flight gas chromatographs. A miniature MID featuring an unconventional triaxial electrode configuration was developed and used routinely in the laboratory. Although much smaller and lighter than the commercial MID, its performance characteristics parallel those of the traditional design. The detector is compatible with the modulated voltage circuitry, also developed here, and thus can perform over an expanded response range of more than 7 orders magnitude. A micro volume version of a miniature MID, with an internal volume of less than 8 microliter, was recently designed is now being tested. The micro volume MID uses carrier gas flow rates of approx. 2cc/min thus eliminating the need for makeup gas when capillary columns are used.

  16. Calibration of KRISS reference ionization chamber for key comparison of (99m)Tc measurement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Man; Lee, K B; Lee, S H; Park, Tae Soon

    2012-09-01

    KRISS, as the national metrology institute of Korea, has used a reference ionization chamber system to certify the activity of (99m)Tc aqueous sources, but could only recently participate in a comparison exercise by the BIPM (BIPM.RI(II)-K4.Tc-99m) to secure the international equivalence of (99m)Tc radioactivity measurement by way of the BIPM transfer instrument (SIRTI). The KRISS ionization chamber system was calibrated about 100 days before the comparison with a (99m)Tc solution source standardized by the 4πβ(LS)-γ(NaI(Tl)) coincidence counting method. During the comparison, beginning with a higher activity mother solution, the KRISS ionization chamber measured its specific activity without a dilution. The activity of a diluted-solution source was measured by the SIRTI at the same time.

  17. Dosimetric application of a special pencil ionization chamber in radiotherapy X-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Fernández-Varea, José M.; Cassola, Vagner F.; Kramer, Richard; Khoury, Helen J.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study the performance of a pencil ionization chamber with a sensitive volume of only 1.06 cm3 and a length of 3.0 cm, developed at the Calibration Laboratory of the IPEN, in very low-energy radiotherapy X-ray beams. These beams are still used for certain skin cancer treatments due to their rapid attenuation in tissue. The dosimeter performance was evaluated in some tests proposed by the IEC 60731 standard: short- and long-term stability and linearity of response. For a complete analysis of the dosimeter response, the EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation was utilized to investigate the influence of its different parts on the ionization chamber response. All results of the tests were in accordance with the recommended limits, and this work shows that it is possible to extend the application of this pencil-type ionization chamber developed at the LCI.

  18. Extraction of depth-dependent perturbation factors for parallel-plate chambers in electron beams using a plastic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lacroix, Frederic; Guillot, Mathieu; McEwen, Malcolm; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Gingras, Luc; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: This work presents the experimental extraction of the overall perturbation factor P{sub Q} in megavoltage electron beams for NACP-02 and Roos parallel-plate ionization chambers using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The authors used a single scanning PSD mounted on a high-precision scanning tank to measure depth-dose curves in 6, 12, and 18 MeV clinical electron beams. The authors also measured depth-dose curves using the NACP-02 and PTW Roos chambers. Results: The authors found that the perturbation factors for the NACP-02 and Roos chambers increased substantially with depth, especially for low-energy electron beams. The experimental results were in good agreement with the results of Monte Carlo simulations reported by other investigators. The authors also found that using an effective point of measurement (EPOM) placed inside the air cavity reduced the variation of perturbation factors with depth and that the optimal EPOM appears to be energy dependent. Conclusions: A PSD can be used to experimentally extract perturbation factors for ionization chambers. The dosimetry protocol recommendations indicating that the point of measurement be placed on the inside face of the front window appear to be incorrect for parallel-plate chambers and result in errors in the R{sub 50} of approximately 0.4 mm at 6 MeV, 1.0 mm at 12 MeV, and 1.2 mm at 18 MeV.

  19. Detecting MLC errors in stereotactic radiotherapy plans with a liquid filled ionization chamber array.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Patrick; Seshadri, Venkatakrisnan; Charles, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Quality assurance of stereotactic radiotherapy demands the use of equipment with the highest resolution and sensitivity available. This study examines the sensitivity of a commercially available liquid-filled ionization chamber array--the Octavius 1000 SRS (PTW, Frieburg, Germany) for detecting small (sub-millimetre) multi-leaf collimator (MLC) alignment errors in static square fields (side length 16-40 mm). Furthermore, the effectiveness of detecting small MLC errors in clinical stereotactic radiotherapy patient plans using the device was also evaluated. The commonly used gamma pass rate metric (of the measurements compared with treatment planning system generated results) was used. The gamma pass rates were then evaluated as a function of MLC position error (MLC error size 0.1-2.5 mm). The detector array exhibited a drop in pass rate between plans without error and those which had MLC errors induced. For example a drop in pass rate of 4.5% (gamma criteria 3%, 1 mm) was observed when a 0.8 mm error was introduced into a 16 mm square field. Furthermore the drop in pass rate increased as the MLC position error increased. This study showed that the Octavius 1000 SRS array could be a useful tool for applications requiring the detection of small geometric delivery uncertainties.

  20. Tobacco smoke aging in the presence of ozone: A room-sized chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Lauren M.; Sleiman, Mohamad; Dubowski, Yael; Gundel, Lara A.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2011-09-01

    Exposure to tobacco pollutants that linger indoors after smoking has taken place ( thirdhand smoke, THS) can occur over extended periods and is modulated by chemical processes involving atmospheric reactive species. This study investigates the role of ozone and indoor surfaces in chemical transformations of tobacco smoke residues. Gas and particle constituents of secondhand smoke (SHS) as well as sorbed SHS on chamber internal walls and model materials (cotton, paper, and gypsum wallboard) were characterized during aging. After smoldering 10 cigarettes in a 24-m 3 room size chamber, gas-phase nicotine was rapidly removed by sorption to chamber surfaces, and subsequently re-emitted during ventilation with clean air to a level of ˜10% that during the smoking phase. During chamber ventilation in the presence of ozone (180 ppb), ozone decayed at a rate of 5.6 h -1 and coincided with a factor of 5 less nicotine sorbed to wallboard. In the presence of ozone, no gas phase nicotine was detected as a result of re-emission, and higher concentrations of nicotine oxidation products were observed than when ventilation was performed with ozone-free air. Analysis of the model surfaces showed that heterogeneous nicotine-ozone reaction was faster on paper than cotton, and both were faster than on wallboard. However, wallboard played a dominant role in ozone-initiated reaction in the chamber due to its large total geometric surface area and sink potential compared to the other substrates. This study is the first to show in a room-sized environmental chamber that the heterogeneous ozone chemistry of sorbed nicotine generates THS constituents of concern, as observed previously in bench-top studies. In addition to the main oxidation products (cotinine, myosmine and N-methyl formamide), nicotine-1-oxide was detected for the first time.

  1. Response and Monte Carlo evaluation of a reference ionization chamber for radioprotection level at calibration laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Vivolo, Vitor; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2015-07-01

    A special parallel plate ionization chamber, inserted in a slab phantom for the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) determination, was developed and characterized in this work. This ionization chamber has collecting electrodes and window made of graphite, and the walls and phantom made of PMMA. The tests comprise experimental evaluation following international standards and Monte Carlo simulations, employing the PENELOPE code to evaluate the design of this new dosimeter. The experimental tests were conducted employing the radioprotection level quality N-60 established at the IPEN, and all results were within the recommended standards.

  2. Update of NIST half-life results corrected for ionization chamber source-holder instability.

    PubMed

    Unterweger, M P; Fitzgerald, R

    2014-05-01

    As reported at the ICRM 2011, it was discovered that the source holder used for calibrations in the NIST 4πγ ionization chamber (IC) was not stable. This has affected a large number of half-life measurement results previously reported and used in compilations of nuclear data. Corrections have been made on all of the half-life data based on the assumption that the changes to the ionization chamber response were gradual. The corrections are energy dependent and therefore radionuclide specific. This presentation will review our results and present the recommended changes in half-life values and/or uncertainties.

  3. Characterization of a free air ionization chamber for low energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, N. F.; Xavier, M.; Vivolo, V.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    Free air ionization chambers are used by most primary metrology laboratories as primary standards of the quantities air kerma and exposure in X-ray beams. The free air ionization chamber for low energies of the Calibration Laboratory (LCI) of IPEN showed in a characterization test a problem in the set responsible for the variation of its sensitive volume. After a modification in the support of the micrometers used for the movement of the internal cylinder and the establishment of a new alignment system protocol, the tests were redone. The objective of this work was to present the results obtained in the new condition.

  4. Virtual-detector approach to tunnel ionization and tunneling times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teeny, Nicolas; Keitel, Christoph H.; Bauke, Heiko

    2016-08-01

    Tunneling times in atomic ionization are studied theoretically by a virtual detector approach. A virtual detector is a hypothetical device that allows one to monitor the wave function's density with spatial and temporal resolution during the ionization process. With this theoretical approach, it becomes possible to define unique moments when the electron enters and leaves with highest probability the classically forbidden region from first principles and a tunneling time can be specified unambiguously. It is shown that neither the moment when the electron enters the tunneling barrier nor when it leaves the tunneling barrier coincides with the moment when the external electric field reaches its maximum. Under the tunneling barrier as well as at the exit the electron has a nonzero velocity in the electric field direction. This nonzero exit velocity has to be incorporated when the free motion of the electron is modeled by classical equations of motion.

  5. A comparative study of three ionizing chambers for measurements of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C.; Cardoso, J.; Silva, H.

    2015-11-01

    A comparative study of three ionization chambers which directly measure the quantity personal dose equivalent Hp(10), was performed. Results show that the ratio between the response (air kerma) determined by Monte Carlo and the experimental response (collected charge) normalized by the monitor unit is the same whatever is the chamber and that this ratio is proportional to the conversion coefficients for air kerma from photon fluence.

  6. Investigation of thermal and temporal responses of ionization chambers in radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    AlMasri, Hussein; Funyu, Akira; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2012-07-01

    The ionization chamber is a primary dosimeter that is used in radiation dosimetry. Generally, the ion chamber response requires temperature/pressure correction according to the ideal gas law. However, this correction does not consider the thermal volume effect of chambers. The temporal and thermal volume effects of various chambers (CC01, CC13, NACP parallel-plate, PTW) with different wall and electrode materials have been studied in a water phantom. Measurements were done after heating the water with a suitable heating system, and chambers were submerged for a sufficient time to allow for temperature equilibrium. Temporal results show that all chambers equilibrate quickly in water. The equilibration time was between 3 and 5 min for all chambers. Thermal results show that all chambers expanded in response to heating except for the PTW, which contracted. This might be explained by the differences in the volumes of all chambers and also by the difference in wall material composition of PTW from the other chambers. It was found that the smallest chamber, CC01, showed the greatest expansion. The magnitude of the expansion was ~1, 0.8, and 0.9% for CC01, CC13, and parallel-plate chambers, respectively, in the temperature range of 295-320 K. The magnitude of the detected contraction was <0.3% for PTW in the same temperature range. For absolute dosimetry, it is necessary to make corrections for the ion chamber response, especially for small ion chambers like the CC01. Otherwise, room and water phantom temperatures should remain within a close range. PMID:22467281

  7. Assessment of small volume ionization chambers as reference dosimeters in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, M.; de Carlan, L.; Delaunay, F.; Donois, M.; Fournier, P.; Ostrowsky, A.; Vouillaume, A.; Bordy, J. M.

    2011-09-01

    LNE-LNHB is involved in a European project aiming at establishing absorbed dose-to-water standards for photon-radiation fields down to 2 × 2 cm2. This requires the calibration of reference ionization chambers of small volume. Twenty-four ionization chambers of eight different types with volume ranging from 0.007 to 0.057 cm3 were tested in a 60Co beam. For each chamber, two major characteristics were investigated: (1) the stability of the measured current as a function of the irradiation time under continuous irradiation. At LNE-LNHB, the variation of the current should be less than ±0.1% in comparison with its first value (over a 16 h irradiation time); (2) the variation of the ionization current with the applied polarizing voltage and polarity. Leakage currents were also measured. Results show that (1) every tested PTW (31015, 31016 and 31014) and Exradin A1SL chambers demonstrate a satisfying stability under irradiation. Other types of chambers have a stability complying with the stability criterion for some or none of them. (2) IBA CC01, IBA CC04 and Exradin A1SL show a proper response as a function of applied voltage for both polarities. PTW, Exradin A14SL and Exradin A16 do not. Only three types of chambers were deemed suitable as reference chambers according to LNE-LNHB requirements and specifications from McEwen (2010 Med. Phys. 37 2179-93): Exradin A1SL chambers (3/3), IBA CC04 (2/3) and IBA CC01 (1/3). The Exradin A1SL type with an applied polarizing voltage of 150 V was chosen as an LNE-LNHB reference chamber type in 2 × 2 cm2 radiation fields.

  8. A method to increase the nominal range resolution of a stack of parallel-plate ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, I.; Brons, S.; Jäkel, O.; Voss, B.; Parodi, K.

    2014-09-01

    A detector prototype based on a stack of 61 parallel-plate ionisation chambers (PPIC) interleaved with absorber plates of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was assembled for transmission imaging purposes in ion beam therapy. The thickness of the absorber sheets in the PPIC stack determines the nominal range resolution of the detector. In the current set-up, 3 mm PMMA slabs are used. The signal of the 61 active channels of the stack thereby provides a discrete approximation of the Bragg curve in the detector. In this work, a data processing method to increase the range resolution (MIRR) in a stack of ionization chambers is presented. In the MIRR the position of the maximum of the Bragg curve is deduced from the ratio of measured signals in adjacent PPIC channels. The method is developed based on Bragg curves obtained from Monte Carlo simulations and validated with experimental data of a wedge-shaped PMMA phantom acquired with the PPIC stack using carbon ion beams. The influence of the initial beam energy and of phantom inhomogeneities on the MIRR is quantitatively evaluated. Systematic errors as well as inaccuracies related to signal noise are discussed and quantified. It is shown that with the MIRR an increased range resolution of 0.7 mm PMMA equivalent or 0.8 mm water equivalent thickness is achieved for the considered experimental data.

  9. Study of the surface ionization detector for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Wu, Dapeng; Chen, Shiheng; Peng, Hong; Guan, Yafeng

    2011-09-23

    The structure of the surface ionization detector (SID) and the operation parameters of GC-SID were investigated to reduce peak tailing and to enhance sensitivity. The performances of the GC-SID, including its repeatability, linearity, sensitivity, selectivity, and tolerance towards water vapor, were evaluated systematically. Compared with nitrogen-phosphorus detector (NPD), the SID was able to detect fg level triethylamine, and selectively respond to alkylamines, some anilines, and some nitrogen heterocyclic compounds. Among alkylamines, the SID sensitivity to diisobutylamine was rather small. Even so, it was also still 10 times higher than that on NPD. The SID selectivity, defined as the sensitivity ratio between triethylamine and various tested non-nitrogen compounds, was higher than 10(6). It was found that the SID is highly tolerant towards water vapor, allowing direct injection of water sample. Finally, the GC-SID was applied to directly measure trace amines in headspace gases of rotted meat and trace simazine in tap water. The SID sensitivity to simazine was proven to be 5 times higher than that on flame ionization detector (FID). This study suggests that the SID is a promising GC detector. PMID:21839459

  10. Determination of relative ion chamber calibration coefficients from depth-ionization measurements in clinical electron beams.

    PubMed

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R; Rogers, D W O

    2014-10-01

    A method is presented to obtain ion chamber calibration coefficients relative to secondary standard reference chambers in electron beams using depth-ionization measurements. Results are obtained as a function of depth and average electron energy at depth in 4, 8, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams from the NRC Elekta Precise linac. The PTW Roos, Scanditronix NACP-02, PTW Advanced Markus and NE 2571 ion chambers are investigated. The challenges and limitations of the method are discussed. The proposed method produces useful data at shallow depths. At depths past the reference depth, small shifts in positioning or drifts in the incident beam energy affect the results, thereby providing a built-in test of incident electron energy drifts and/or chamber set-up. Polarity corrections for ion chambers as a function of average electron energy at depth agree with literature data. The proposed method produces results consistent with those obtained using the conventional calibration procedure while gaining much more information about the behavior of the ion chamber with similar data acquisition time. Measurement uncertainties in calibration coefficients obtained with this method are estimated to be less than 0.5%. These results open up the possibility of using depth-ionization measurements to yield chamber ratios which may be suitable for primary standards-level dissemination.

  11. Determination of relative ion chamber calibration coefficients from depth-ionization measurements in clinical electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-10-01

    A method is presented to obtain ion chamber calibration coefficients relative to secondary standard reference chambers in electron beams using depth-ionization measurements. Results are obtained as a function of depth and average electron energy at depth in 4, 8, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams from the NRC Elekta Precise linac. The PTW Roos, Scanditronix NACP-02, PTW Advanced Markus and NE 2571 ion chambers are investigated. The challenges and limitations of the method are discussed. The proposed method produces useful data at shallow depths. At depths past the reference depth, small shifts in positioning or drifts in the incident beam energy affect the results, thereby providing a built-in test of incident electron energy drifts and/or chamber set-up. Polarity corrections for ion chambers as a function of average electron energy at depth agree with literature data. The proposed method produces results consistent with those obtained using the conventional calibration procedure while gaining much more information about the behavior of the ion chamber with similar data acquisition time. Measurement uncertainties in calibration coefficients obtained with this method are estimated to be less than 0.5%. These results open up the possibility of using depth-ionization measurements to yield chamber ratios which may be suitable for primary standards-level dissemination.

  12. Multiplexed electronically programmable multimode ionization detector for chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Marcus B.; Buchanan, Michelle V.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting and differentiating organic compounds based on their electron affinity. An electron capture detector cell (ECD) is operated in a plurality of multiplexed electroncially programmable operating modes to alter the detector response during a single sampling cycle to acquire multiple simultaneous chromatograms corresponding to each of the different operating modes. The cell is held at a constant subatmospheric pressure while the electron collection bias voltage applied to the cell is modulated electronically to allow acquisition of multiple chromatograms for a single sample elution from a chromatograph representing three distinctly different response modes. A system is provided which automatically controls the programmed application of bias pulses at different intervals and/or amplitudes to switch the detector from an ionization mode to the electron capture mode and various degrees therebetween to provide an improved means of tuning an ECD for multimode detection and improved specificity.

  13. Multiplexed electronically programmable multimode ionization detector for chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Wise, M.B.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1988-05-19

    Method and apparatus for detecting and differentiating organic compounds based on their electron affinity. An electron capture detector cell (ECD) is operated in a plurality of multiplexed electronically programmable operating modes to alter the detector response during a single sampling cycle to acquire multiple simultaneous chromatograms corresponding to each of the different operating modes. The cell is held at a constant subatmospheric pressure while the electron collection bias voltage applied to the cell is modulated electronically to allow acquisition of multiple chromatograms for a single sample elution from a chromatograph representing three distinctly different response modes. A system is provided which automatically controls the programmed application of bias pulses at different intervals and/or amplitudes to switch the detector from an ionization mode to the electron capture mode and various degrees therebetween to provide an improved means of tuning an ECD for multimode detection and improved specificity. 6 figs.

  14. SU-E-T-415: An Ionization Chamber Array with High Spatial Resolution for External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Togno, M; Wilkens, J; Menichelli, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize an ionization chamber array technology with high spatial resolution and high charge collection efficiency for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: The prototype under test is a linear array of air vented ionization chambers developed by IBA Dosimetry, consisting of 80 pixels with 3.5mm spatial resolution and 4mm{sup 3} sensitive volume. The detector was characterized in a plastic phantom with {sup 60} Co radiation and MV X-rays from an ELEKTA Agility LINAC (with flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Bias voltage was varied in order to evaluate charge collection efficiency. A commercial array of ionization chambers (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry) and an amorphous silicon flat panel in direct conversion configuration were used as references. Results: Repeatability (0.4%) and stability under continuous gamma irradiation (0.3%) are very good, in spite of low active volume and sensitivity (∼200pC/Gy). Charge collection efficiency is higher than 99% already at 150V with ∼2mGy dose per pulse, leading to a ±1.1% sensitivity change with dose per pulse in the range 0.09-2mGy (covering all flattened and unflattened applications). Measured dose profiles are in agreement with MatriXX for fields larger than 2×2cm{sup 2}, in which case the linear array offers a much better characterization of the penumbra region. Down to 1×1cm{sup 2}, measured profiles are in very good agreement with the flat panel. Conclusion: The array represents a valuable tool for the characterization of treatment fields in which high spatial resolution is required, together with the dosimetric performance of air vented ionization chambers. Such a technology would be particularly valuable in association with advanced treatment modalities such as rotational radiotherapy, stereotactic treatments (even with unflattened beam qualities) and proton therapy, due to the insensitivity of the chambers on dose per pulse. In the future, a two dimensional prototype based on this

  15. Source geometry factors for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, D. R.; Sander, T.; Nutbrown, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated 192Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR 192Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, ksg, is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR 192Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR 192Ir Flexisource ksg was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  16. Calibration coefficient of reference brachytherapy ionization chamber using analytical and Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D

    2010-06-01

    A cylindrical graphite ionization chamber of sensitive volume 1002.4 cm(3) was designed and fabricated at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) for use as a reference dosimeter to measure the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. The air kerma calibration coefficient (N(K)) of this ionization chamber was estimated analytically using Burlin general cavity theory and by the Monte Carlo method. In the analytical method, calibration coefficients were calculated for each spectral line of an HDR (192)Ir source and the weighted mean was taken as N(K). In the Monte Carlo method, the geometry of the measurement setup and physics related input data of the HDR (192)Ir source and the surrounding material were simulated using the Monte Carlo N-particle code. The total photon energy fluence was used to arrive at the reference air kerma rate (RAKR) using mass energy absorption coefficients. The energy deposition rates were used to simulate the value of charge rate in the ionization chamber and N(K) was determined. The Monte Carlo calculated N(K) agreed within 1.77 % of that obtained using the analytical method. The experimentally determined RAKR of HDR (192)Ir sources, using this reference ionization chamber by applying the analytically estimated N(K), was found to be in agreement with the vendor quoted RAKR within 1.43%.

  17. Simultaneous operation of a test apparatus filled with liquid argon as bubble chamber, calorimeter and scintillation detector: Outlook and possible applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigel, Gert G.

    1984-09-01

    Physics motivations for the use of argon as a new bubble chamber liquid are discussed. Results, obtained from a 2.7 1 argon detector in SPS and SC beams at CERN, comprise its track sensitivity to ionizing particles and to a laser beam in the bubble chamber mode, its use as a calorimeter through the collection of free charges in an electric field and the recording of the scintillation light produced by ionizing particles. Various interference phenomena during the simultaneous use of the hybrid properties, as well as purity requirements on the liquid are discussed. Furthermore, nitrogen and argon/nitrogen mixtures were investigated. Applications of our technique for neutrino experiments at TeV accelerators and as vertex detectors are briefly outlined. In-line holography, successfully tested in BEBC, could simplify the optical track recording and improve the resolution in very large detectors.

  18. Home radon monitor modeled after the common smoke detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, R.D.; Arnone, G.J.; Johnson, J.P.

    1995-02-01

    The EPA has declared that five million or so of the nation`s 80 million homes may have indoor radon levels that pose an unacceptably high risk of lung cancer to occupants. They estimate that four times as many people die from radon-induced lung cancers as from fires in the home. Therefore the EPA has recommended that all homes be tested and that action be taken to reduce the radon concentration in homes that test above the 4 pCi/L level. The push to have homeowners voluntarily test for elevated radon levels has been only marginally successful. A reliable, inexpensive, and accurate in-home radon monitor designed along the same general lines as a home smoke detector might overcome much of the public reluctance to test homes for radon. Such a Home Radon Monitor (HRM) is under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. To be acceptable to the public, HRMs should have the following characteristics in common with smoke detectors: low cost, small size, ease of installation and use, low maintenance, and high performance. Recent advances in Long-Range Alpha Detection technology are being used in the design of a HRM that should meet or exceed all these characteristics. A proof-of-principle HRM detector prototype has been constructed and results from tests of this prototype will be presented.

  19. Stability of A-150 plastic ionization chamber response over a ~30 year period

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, Thomas K.; Lennox, Arlene J.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    At the NIU Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab, the clinical tissue-equivalent ionization chamber response is measured every treatment day using a cesium source that was configured to match readings obtained at the National Bureau of Standards. Daily measurements are performed in air using the air-to-tissue dose conversion factors given in AAPM Report no. 7. The measured exposure calibration factors have been tabulated and graphed as a function of time from 1978 to present. For A-150 plastic ionization chambers, these factors exhibit a sinusoidal variation with a period of approximately one year and amplitude of {+-} 1%. This variation, attributable to the hygroscopic nature of A-150 plastic, is correlated with the relative humidity of the facility, and is greater than the humidity corrections for gas described in the literature. Our data suggest that chamber calibration should be performed at least weekly to accommodate these variations.

  20. Characterization of a two-dimensional liquid-filled ion chamber detector array used for verification of the treatments in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Markovic, Miljenko Stathakis, Sotirios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Jurkovic, Ines-Ana; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to investigate the characteristics of a two-dimensional (2D) liquid-filled ion chamber detector array, which is used for the verification of radiotherapy treatment plans that use small field sizes of up to 10 × 10 cm. Methods: The device used in this study was Octavius 1000 SRS model (PTW, Freiburg, Germany). Its 2D array of detectors consists of 977 liquid-filled ion chambers arranged over an area of 11 × 11 cm. The size of the detectors is 2.3 × 2.3 × 0.5 mm (volume of 0.003 cm{sup 3}) and their spacing in the inner area of 5.5 × 5.5 cm is 2.5 mm center-to-center, whereas in the outer area it is 5 mm center-to-center. The detector reproducibility, dose linearity, and sensitivity to positional changes of the collimator were tested. Also, the output factors of field sizes ranging from 0.5 × 0.5 to 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} both for open and wedged fields have been measured and compared against those measured by a pin-point ionization chamber, liquid filled microchamber, SRS diode, and EDR2 film. Results: Its short-term reproducibility was within 0.2% and its medium and long-term reproducibility was within 0.5% (verified with air ionization chamber absolute dose measurements), which is an excellent result taking into account the daily fluctuation of the linear accelerator and the errors in the device setup reproducibility. The dose linearity and dose rate dependence were measured in the range of 0.5–85 Gy and 0.5–10 Gy min{sup −1}, respectively, and were verified with air ionization chamber absolute dose measurements was within 3%. The measurements of the sensitivity showed that the 2D Array could detect millimetric collimator positional changes. The measured output factors showed an agreement of better than 0.3% with the pinpoint chamber and microliquid filled chamber for the field sizes between 3 × 3 and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. For field sizes down to 1 × 1 cm{sup 2}, the agreement with SRS diode and microliquid filled

  1. Performance evaluation of multi sampling ionization chamber for heavy ion beams by comparison with GEANT4 simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanke, Yuki; Himac H093 Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    In high-energy heavy-ion accelerator facilities, multi sampling ionization chambers are often used for the identification of the atomic number Z by detecting the energy deposit in it. In the study at GSI, the picture of the escape of secondary electrons, δ rays, from the ionization chamber explains the experimental data of pulse-height resolution. If this picture is correct, the pulse-height resolution should depend on the effective area of the ionization chamber. The experiment have been performed at NIRS-HIMAC. The pulse-height resolutions of two ionization chambers with different effective area were compared by using a 400-MeV/u Ni beam and their fragments. The difference in the pulse-height resolutions was observed. By comparison with the GEANT4 simulation including the δ-rays emission, the performance of the ionization chamber have been evaluated.

  2. Ionization chamber volume determination and quality assurance using micro-CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNiven, Andrea L.; Umoh, Joseph; Kron, Tomas; Holdsworth, David W.; Battista, Jerry J.

    2008-09-01

    Ion chamber dosimetry requires a high degree of precision, at all steps within the dosimetric process, in order to ensure accurate dose measurements. This work presents a novel technique for ion chamber volume determination and quality assurance, using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Four nominally identical Exradin A1SL chambers (0.056 cm3) (Standard Imaging, WI, USA) were imaged using a micro-CT system (GE Locus, GE Healthcare, London, Ontario) and irradiated in a 6 MV x-ray reference field. Air volumes were calculated from the CT datasets using 3D analysis software (Microview 2.1.1, General Electric Healthcare, London, Ontario). Differences in the volumes of each chamber determined using micro-CT images agreed with differences in the ionization response within 1% for each chamber. Calibration coefficients were then compared through cross-calibration with a calibrated ion chamber and from the CT-measured volumes. The average ratio of these values was found to be 0.958 ± 0.009 indicating good correlation. The results demonstrate the promise of using micro-CT imaging for the absolute volumetric characterization of ion chambers. The images have the potential to be an important clinical tool for quality assurance of ion chamber construction and integrity after routine clinical usage.

  3. Determination of ion recombination correction factors for a liquid ionization chamber in megavoltage photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum-Bae; Ji, Young Hoon; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Seonghoon; Huh, Hyun Do

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the ion recombination correction factor for a liquid ionization chamber in a high energy photon beam by using our experimental method. The ion recombination correction factors were determined by using our experimental method and were compared with theoretical and experimental methods proposed by using the theoretical method (Greening, Johansson) and the two-dose rate method in a cobalt beam and a high energy photon beam. In order to apply the liquid ionization chamber in a reference and small field dosimetry, we acquired the absorbed dose to water correction coefficient, the beam quality correction factor, and the influence quantities for the microLion chamber according to the TRS-398 protocol and applied the results to a high energy photon beam used in clinical fields. As a result, our experimental method for ion recombination in a cobalt beam agreed with the results from the heoretical method (Greening theory) better than it did with the results from the two-dose rate method. For high energy photon beams, the two-dose rate and our experimental methods were in good agreement, less than 2% deviation, while the theoretical general collection efficiency (Johansson et al.) deviated greatly from the experimental values. When we applied the factors for the absorbed dose to water measurement, the absorbed dose to water for the microLion chamber was in good agreement, within 1%, compared with the values for the PTW 30013 chamber in 6 and 10 MV Clinac iX and 6 and 15 MV Oncor impression. With these results, not only can the microLion ionization chamber be used to measure the absorbed dose to water in a reference condition, it can also be used to a the chamber for small, non-standard field dosimetry.

  4. Simultaneous operation of a liquid argon detector as bubble chamber and calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berset, J. C.; Burns, M.; Harigel, G.; Lindsay, J.; Linser, G.; Schenk, F.

    1982-12-01

    The first successful operation of a new detector, filled with liquid argon is described. It can be used simultaneously as bubble chamber and calorimeter, and may find interesting applications at high-energy accelerators.

  5. Calibration of PICO Bubble Chamber Dark Matter Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Miaotianzi; PICO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PICO Collaboration builds bubble chambers for the direct detection of WIMP dark matter. I will present the suite of calibration experiments performed to measure the sensitivity of these chambers to nuclear recoils (the expected WIMP signal) and to gamma rays (a common background to the WIMP signal). These calibrations include measurements with a 10-ml C3F8 bubble chamber at Northwestern University and with a 30-ml C3F8 bubble chamber deployed in the University of Montreal's tandem Van de Graaf facility, giving the bubble chamber response to a variety of gamma rays, broad-spectrum neutron sources, and mono-energetic low energy neutrons. I will compare our measured sensitivities to those predicted by a simple thermodynamic model and will show how the results impact our ability to detect dark matter, with a focus on light WIMP searches. Supported by DOE Grant: DE-SC0012161.

  6. Correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in CyberKnife: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Antolin, Elena; Fayos-Ferrer, Francisco; Simon, Rocio; Gonzalez-Castano, Diego M.; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Gomez, Faustino; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the application of the formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [R. Alfonso, P. Andreo, R. Capote, M. S. Huq, W. Kilby, P. Kjaell, T. R. Mackie, H. Palmans, K. Rosser, J. Seuntjens, W. Ullrich, and S. Vatnitsky, 'A new formalism for reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields,' Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] to the CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system. Correction factors for intermediate calibration fields, a machine-specific reference field (msr) and two plan-class specific reference fields (pcsr), have been studied. Furthermore, the applicability of the new formalism to clinical dosimetry has been analyzed through the investigation of two clinical treatments. Methods: PTW31014 and Scanditronix-Wellhofer CC13 ionization chamber measurements were performed for the fields under investigation. Absorbed dose to water was determined using alanine reference dosimetry, and experimental correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber readings ratios. In addition, correction factors were calculated for the intermediate calibration fields and one of the clinical treatment fields using the Monte Carlo method and these were compared with the experimental values. Results: Overall correction factors deviating from unity by approximately 2% were obtained from both measurements and simulations, with values below and above unity for the studied intermediate calibration fields and clinical fields for the ionization chambers under consideration. Monte Carlo simulations yielded correction factors comparable with those obtained from measurements for the machine-specific reference field, although differences from 1% to 3.3% were observed between measured and calculated correction factors for the composite intermediate calibration fields. Dose distribution inhomogeneities are thought to be responsible for such discrepancies. Conclusions: The differences found between overall

  7. Calculation of correction factors for ionization chamber measurements with small fields in low-density media.

    PubMed

    Pisaturo, O; Pachoud, M; Bochud, F O; Moeckli, R

    2012-07-21

    The quantity of interest for high-energy photon beam therapy recommended by most dosimetric protocols is the absorbed dose to water. Thus, ionization chambers are calibrated in absorbed dose to water, which is the same quantity as what is calculated by most treatment planning systems (TPS). However, when measurements are performed in a low-density medium, the presence of the ionization chamber generates a perturbation at the level of the secondary particle range. Therefore, the measured quantity is close to the absorbed dose to a volume of water equivalent to the chamber volume. This quantity is not equivalent to the dose calculated by a TPS, which is the absorbed dose to an infinitesimally small volume of water. This phenomenon can lead to an overestimation of the absorbed dose measured with an ionization chamber of up to 40% in extreme cases. In this paper, we propose a method to calculate correction factors based on the Monte Carlo simulations. These correction factors are obtained by the ratio of the absorbed dose to water in a low-density medium □D(w,Q,V1)(low) averaged over a scoring volume V₁ for a geometry where V₁ is filled with the low-density medium and the absorbed dose to water □D(w,QV2)(low) averaged over a volume V₂ for a geometry where V₂ is filled with water. In the Monte Carlo simulations, □D(w,QV2)(low) is obtained by replacing the volume of the ionization chamber by an equivalent volume of water, according to the definition of the absorbed dose to water. The method is validated in two different configurations which allowed us to study the behavior of this correction factor as a function of depth in phantom, photon beam energy, phantom density and field size.

  8. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  9. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953. PMID:23938362

  10. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, K.; van Asselen, B.; Kok, J. G. M.; Aalbers, A. H. L.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  11. Validation of the neutron and gamma fields in the JSI TRIGA reactor using in-core fission and ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Kaiba, Tanja; Radulović, Vladimir; Jazbec, Anže; Rupnik, Sebastjan; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-02-01

    CEA developed fission chambers and ionization chambers were utilized at the JSI TRIGA reactor to measure neutron and gamma fields. The measured axial fission rate distributions in the reactor core are generally in good agreement with the calculated values using the Monte Carlo model of the reactor thus verifying both the computational model and the fission chambers. In future, multiple absolutely calibrated fission chambers could be used for more accurate online reactor thermal power monitoring. PMID:25479432

  12. Validation of the neutron and gamma fields in the JSI TRIGA reactor using in-core fission and ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Žerovnik, Gašper; Kaiba, Tanja; Radulović, Vladimir; Jazbec, Anže; Rupnik, Sebastjan; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-02-01

    CEA developed fission chambers and ionization chambers were utilized at the JSI TRIGA reactor to measure neutron and gamma fields. The measured axial fission rate distributions in the reactor core are generally in good agreement with the calculated values using the Monte Carlo model of the reactor thus verifying both the computational model and the fission chambers. In future, multiple absolutely calibrated fission chambers could be used for more accurate online reactor thermal power monitoring.

  13. A field-ionization neutral detector - FIND. [neutral particle mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, C. C.; Hsieh, K. C.; Fan, C. Y.; Swanson, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The field ionization neutral detector FIND operates according to the following principle: Neutral atoms are attracted toward the field ionization tips since they are polarized by the electric field of the tips. The atoms are singly ionized and repelled by the positive potential of the tips toward the detector situated behind a grid at ground potential. The ions deposit in the detector their kinetic energies, typically 26 keV, corresponding to the potential difference between the ionization region and the detector. Laboratory results show that FIND can have the resolution, sensitivities and durability required to perform in situ measurements of neutral H and He fluxes in interplanetary space, cometary halos and exospheres.

  14. PTRAC File Utilization for Calculation of Free-Air Ionization Chamber Correction Factors by MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolc, Jaroslav; Sochor, Vladimír

    2014-06-01

    A free-air ionization chamber is used as a standard of photon air-kerma. Several correction factors are applied to the air-kerma value. Correction factors for electron loss (kloss) and for additional ionization current caused by photon scatter (ksc), photon fluorescence (kfl), photon transmission through diaphragm edge (kdtr), and photon scatter from the surface of the diaphragm aperture (kdsc) were determined by the MCNPX code utilizing information stored in Particle Track (PTRAC) output files. Individual steps of the procedure are described and the calculated values of the correction factors are presented. The values are in agreement with the correction factors published in a literature for similar free-air chambers.

  15. Source self-attenuation in ionization chamber measurements of (57)Co solutions.

    PubMed

    Cessna, Jeffrey T; Golas, Daniel B; Bergeron, Denis E

    2016-03-01

    Source self-attenuation for solutions of (57)Co of varying density and carrier concentration was measured in nine re-entrant ionization chambers maintained at NIST. The magnitude of the attenuation must be investigated to determine whether a correction is necessary in the determination of the activity of a source that differs in composition from the source used to calibrate the ionization chamber. At our institute, corrections are currently made in the measurement of (144)Ce, (109)Cd, (67)Ga, (195)Au, (166)Ho, (177)Lu, and (153)Sm. This work presents the methods used as recently applied to (57)Co. A range of corrections up to 1% were calculated for dilute to concentrated HCl at routinely used carrier concentrations.

  16. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-21

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  17. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-01

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  18. Study of the replacement correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry by Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lilie

    In ionization chamber radiation dosimetry, the introduction of the ion chamber into medium will unavoidably distort the radiation field near the chamber because the chamber cavity material (air) is different from the medium. A replacement correction factor, Prepl was introduced in order to correct the chamber readings to give an accurate radiation dose in the medium without the presence of the chamber. Generally it is very hard to measure the values of Prepl since they are intertwined with the chamber wall effect. In addition, the P repl values always come together with the stopping-power ratio of the two media involved. This makes the problem of determining the P repl values even more complicated. Monte Carlo simulation is an ideal method to investigate the replacement correction factors. In this study, four different methods of calculating the values of Prepl by Monte Carlo simulation are discussed. Two of the methods are designated as 'direct' methods in the sense that the evaluation of the stopping-power ratio is not necessary. The systematic uncertainties of the two direct methods are estimated to be about 0.1-0.2% which comes from the ambiguous definition of the energy cutoff Delta used in the Spencer-Attix cavity theory. The two direct methods are used to calculate the values of P repl for both plane-parallel chambers and cylindrical thimble chambers in either electron beams or photon beams. The calculation results are compared to measurements. For electron beams, good agreements are obtained. For thimble chambers in photon beams, significant discrepancies are observed between calculations and measurements. The experiments are thus investigated and the procedures are simulated by the Monte Carlo method. It is found that the interpretation of the measured data as the replacement correction factors in dosimetry protocols are not correct. In applying the calculation to the BIPM graphite chamber in a 60Co beam, the calculated values of P repl differ from those

  19. Comments on 'Ionization chamber volume determination and quality assurance using micro-CT imaging'.

    PubMed

    Ross, C K

    2009-03-21

    The authors of a recent paper (McNiven et al 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 5029-43) measured the volume of a particular type of a small ionization chamber using CT images. Using four Exradin A1SL chambers, they find that the volume measured using CT imaging is, on average, 4.3% larger than the value derived from the chamber calibration coefficient. Although they point out that the effective chamber volume is defined by electric field lines between the collector and the chamber body, they do not estimate how the mechanical volume might differ from the effective volume. We have used a commercial software package to calculate the electric field in the cavity and we show that the field lines define a volume that is about 11% smaller than the mechanical volume. We also show that the effective volume is very sensitive to small changes in the chamber geometry near the base of the collector. We conclude that simply determining the mechanical volume without careful consideration of the electric field lines within the cavity is not a useful dosimetric technique.

  20. Air-kerma determination using a variable-volume cavity ionization chamber standard.

    PubMed

    Burns, D T; Kessler, C; Roger, P

    2007-12-01

    A graphite-walled cavity ionization chamber of modular design and variable volume has been used to determine the air-kerma rate in the reference 60Co field at the BIPM. The chamber can be configured in five sizes. High-accuracy mechanical measurements of the volume of the air cavity were made for each configuration using a co-ordinate measuring machine. Ionization current measurements were made for each configuration and corrected for the effects of ion recombination and diffusion, stem scatter and chamber orientation. Monte Carlo calculations of cavity dose were made to evaluate the correction factors kwall and kan. A reproducibility of the ionization current per mass of 1.5 parts in 10(4) was achieved on the repeated assembly of each configuration. The results show an air-kerma rate determination that increases with volume, the total change being around 8 parts in 10(4). When analysed differentially, the air-kerma rate relative to the BIPM standard is Kdiff/KBIPM = 1.0026(6). A detailed uncertainty budget is presented. Possible reasons for the observed behaviour are discussed that might have consequences for all existing standards for air-kerma.

  1. Ionization signals from diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Griesmayer, E.; Kavrigin, P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel analysis technique for measurements with single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (sCVD) diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields. This method exploits the unique electronic property of sCVD diamond sensors that the signal shape of the detector current is directly proportional to the initial ionization profile. In fast-neutron fields the diamond sensor acts simultaneously as target and sensor. The interaction of neutrons with the stable isotopes 12 C and 13 C is of interest for fast-neutron diagnostics. The measured signal shapes of detector current pulses are used to identify individual types of interactions in the diamond with the goal to select neutron-induced reactions in the diamond and to suppress neutron-induced background reactions as well as γ-background. The method is verified with experimental data from a measurement in a 14.3 MeV neutron beam at JRC-IRMM, Geel/Belgium, where the 13C(n, α)10Be reaction was successfully extracted from the dominating background of recoil protons and γ-rays and the energy resolution of the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction was substantially improved. The presented analysis technique is especially relevant for diagnostics in harsh radiation environments, like fission and fusion reactors. It allows to extract the neutron spectrum from the background, and is particularly applicable to neutron flux monitoring and neutron spectroscopy.

  2. A numerical model of initial recombination for high-LET irradiation: Application to liquid-filled ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, P.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a numerical model of initial recombination in media irradiated with high linear energy transfer (LET) ions, which relies on an amorphous track model of ionization of high LET particles, and diffusion, drift and recombination of ionized charge carriers. The model has fundamental applications for the study of recombination in non-polar liquids, as well as practical ones, like in modelling hadrontherapy dosimetry with ionization chambers. We have used it to study the response of liquid-filled ionization chambers to hadrontherapy beams: dependence of initial recombination on ion species, energy and applied external electric field.

  3. Theoretical study of Jesse effect in tritium measurements using ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilin; Peng, Shuming; Lu, Hanghang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Wang, Heyi; Long, Xingui; Masao, Matsuyama

    2016-01-01

    Jesse effect caused by impurities in helium might enhance the output signal significantly in tritium measurements with ionization chamber, which will lead to overestimation of tritium concentration in experiments. A theoretical method was proposed to evaluate Jesse effect quantitatively. Results indicate that besides Penning ionization, sub-excitation electrons also place very important influence on ionization enhancement by Jesse effect. An experiential expression about the relationship between enhancement factor and impurity concentration was established, in which second order of it fits experimental results very well. Theoretical calculation method in this paper is also applicable to evaluate Jesse effect in other kinds of mixtures besides hydrogen as impurities in helium. In addition, Jesse effects about tritium molecules as impurities have also been investigated.

  4. Calibration of the KRISS reference ionization chamber for certification of ²²²Rn gaseous sources.

    PubMed

    Lee, J M; Lee, K B; Lee, S H; Oh, P J; Park, T S; Kim, B C; Lee, M S

    2013-11-01

    A primary measurement system for gaseous (222)Rn based on the defined solid angle counting method has recently been constructed at KRISS and the reference ionization chamber used to measure the activities of gamma-emitting single radionuclides was adopted as a secondary standard for gaseous (222)Rn. A 20 mL flame-sealed glass ampoule source from the primary measurement system was used to calibrate the ionization chamber for (222)Rn. The (222)Rn efficiency of the ionization chamber was compared with that calculated by using a photon energy-dependent efficiency curve and that measured by using a standard (226)Ra solution. From the comparisons we draw the conclusion that the reference ionization chamber for gamma-emitting radionuclides can be a suitable secondary measurement system for gaseous (222)Rn sources.

  5. Ionization detector, electrode configuration and single polarity charge detection method

    DOEpatents

    He, Z.

    1998-07-07

    An ionization detector, an electrode configuration and a single polarity charge detection method each utilize a boundary electrode which symmetrically surrounds first and second central interlaced and symmetrical electrodes. All of the electrodes are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. The first central electrode is held at a higher potential than the second central or boundary electrodes. By forming the first and second central electrodes in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern and forming the boundary electrode symmetrically about the first and second central electrodes, signals generated by charge carriers are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the central electrodes. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carriers move to within close proximity of the first central electrode and are received at the first central electrode. The measured signals are then subtracted and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge. 10 figs.

  6. Ionization detector, electrode configuration and single polarity charge detection method

    DOEpatents

    He, Zhong

    1998-01-01

    An ionization detector, an electrode configuration and a single polarity charge detection method each utilize a boundary electrode which symmetrically surrounds first and second central interlaced and symmetrical electrodes. All of the electrodes are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. The first central electrode is held at a higher potential than the second central or boundary electrodes. By forming the first and second central electrodes in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern and forming the boundary electrode symmetrically about the first and second central electrodes, signals generated by charge carriers are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the central electrodes. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carriers move to within close proximity of the first central electrode and are received at the first central electrode. The measured signals are then subtracted and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge.

  7. A two-dimensional liquid-filled ionization chamber array prototype for small-field verification: characterization and first clinical tests.

    PubMed

    Brualla-González, Luis; Gómez, Faustino; Vicedo, Aurora; González-Castaño, Diego M; Gago-Arias, Araceli; Pazos, Antonio; Zapata, Martín; Roselló, Joan V; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2012-08-21

    In this work we present the design, characterization and first clinical tests of an in-house developed two-dimensional liquid-filled ionization chamber prototype for the verification of small radiotherapy fields and treatments containing such small fields as in radiosurgery, which consists of 2 mm × 2 mm pixels arranged on a 16×8 rectangular grid. The ionization medium is isooctane. The characterization of the device included the study of depth, field-size and dose-rate dependences, which are sufficiently moderate for a good operation at therapy radiation levels. However, the detector presents an important anisotropic response, up to ≃ 12% for front versus near-lateral incidence, which can impact the verification of full treatments with different incidences. In such a case, an anisotropy correction factor can be applied. Output factors of small square fields measured with the device show a small systematic over-response, less than 1%, when compared to unshielded diode measurements. An IMRT radiosurgery treatment has been acquired with the liquid-filled ionization chamber device and compared with film dosimetry by using the gamma method, showing good agreement: over 99% passing rates for 1.2% and 1.2 mm for an incidence-per-incidence analysis; 100% passing rates for tolerances 1.8% and 1.8 mm when the whole treatment is analysed and the anisotropy correction factor is applied. The point dose verification for each incidence of the treatment performed with the liquid-filled ionization chamber agrees within 1% with a CC01 ionization chamber. This prototype has shown the utility of this kind of technology for the verification of small fields/treatments. Currently, a larger device covering a 5 cm × 5 cm area is under development.

  8. Characterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA-universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, C.; Boissonnat, G.; Brusasco, C.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Marchand, B.; Mertens, T.; de Neuter, S.; Peronnel, J.

    2014-02-01

    Every radiotherapy center has to be equipped with real-time beam monitoring devices. In 2008, we developed an ionization chamber in collaboration with the IBA (Ion Beam Applications) company. This monitoring device called IC2/3 was developed to be used in IBA universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). Here we present the characterization of the IC2/3 monitor in the energy and flux ranges used in protontherapy. The equipment has been tested with an IBA cyclotron able to deliver proton beams from 70 to 230 MeV. This beam monitoring device has been validated and is now installed at the Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen protontherapy center (WPE, Germany). The results obtained in both terms of spatial resolution and dose measurements are at least equal to the initial specifications needed for PBS purposes. The detector measures the dose with a relative uncertainty lower than 1% in the range from 0.5 Gy/min to 8 Gy/min while the spatial resolution is better than 250 μm. The technology has been patented and five IC2/3 chambers were delivered to IBA. Nowadays, IBA produces the IC2/3 beam monitoring device as a part of its Proteus 235 product.

  9. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carcreff, H.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g-1 and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  10. Influence of field size on a PTW type 23342 plane-parallel ionization chamber's response

    SciTech Connect

    Austerlitz, C.; Villar, H.P.; Santos, M.A.P.

    2004-12-01

    The response of a PTW type 23342 plane-parallel ionization chamber, both in air and in phantom, was evaluated for x-ray tube potentials between 30 and 100 kV and radiation field diameters ranging from 30 to 70 mm. The experiments were performed with a calibrated Pantak x-ray machine and made use of the same set of x-ray qualities adopted by the PTB primary laboratory for the calibration of such chambers. A Plexiglas registered phantom (1.18 g cm{sup -3}) 110 mm long, 110 mm wide, and 80 mm deep was used for phantom measurements. X-ray qualities were characterized by using 99.99% pure aluminum filters. On the basis of the IAEA's TRS 398, the article discusses the dependence of the plane-parallel ionization chamber readings with field size in air and in phantom, its implication with regard to clinical dosimetry, cross-calibration, and dissemination of calibration factors.

  11. Particle size distribution and PAH concentrations of incense smoke in a combustion chamber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi-Ru; Lin, Ta-Chang; Chang, Feng-Hsiang

    2007-01-01

    The particle size distribution and the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in incense smoke were studied using a custom-designed combustion chamber. Among the nine types of incense investigated, the particle and the total PAH emission factors varied significantly. The average mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of the smoke aerosol was 262+/-49nm, which positively correlated to particle emission factor (mg/stick, p<0.05). Coagulation was a major mechanism that dictates the MMAD of the smoke. The total toxic equivalency (the sum of the benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentration) of the solid-phase PAHs (S-PAHs) was over 40 times higher than that of the corresponding gas-phase PAHs, indicating that the S-PAHs in incense smoke may pose potential health risk. Experiments show that each lowered percentage of total carbon content in the raw incense helped decrease the particle emission factor by 2.6mg/g-incense, and the reduction of S-PAH emission factor ranged from 8.7 to 26% when the carbon content was lowered from 45 to 40%.

  12. Analysis of dose perturbation factors of a NACP-02 ionization chamber in clinical electron beams.

    PubMed

    Chin, E; Palmans, H; Shipley, D; Bailey, M; Verhaegen, F

    2009-01-21

    For well-guarded plane-parallel ionization chambers, international dosimetry protocols recommend a value of unity for electron perturbation factors in water. However, recent data published by various groups have challenged this. Specifically for the NACP-02 chamber, non-unity electron perturbation factors have already been published by Verhaegen et al (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 1221-35) and Buckley and Rogers (2006 Med. Phys. 33 1788-96). Recently it was found that the mass thickness of the front chamber window can be 35% greater than is listed in the IAEA's TRS-398 absorbed dose protocol (Chin et al 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 N119-26). This study therefore recalculated NACP-02 electron perturbation correction factors for energies 4-18 MeV at depths z(ref) and R(50) to determine the effect of the chamber model change. Results showed that perturbation factors at z(ref) are fairly stable for similar chamber models but become highly sensitive to small changes at deeper depths. The results also showed some dependence on using 1 keV versus 10 keV for the transport cut-off. Additional investigations revealed that the wall perturbation factor, p(wall), is strongly influenced by the chamber back wall at z(ref) and at larger depths small changes in the positioning of the effective point of measurement cause large fluctuations in the final value. Finally, the cavity perturbation factor, p(cav), was found to be primarily influenced by electron backscatter.

  13. Monte Carlo calculations of correction factors for plane-parallel ionization chambers in clinical electron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio

    2008-09-15

    Recent standard dosimetry protocols recommend that plane-parallel ionization chambers be used in the measurements of depth-dose distributions or the calibration of low-energy electron beams with beam quality R{sub 50}<4 g/cm{sup 2}. In electron dosimetry protocols with the plane-parallel chambers, the wall correction factor, P{sub wall}, in water is assumed to be unity and the replacement correction factor, P{sub repl}, is taken to be unity for well-guarded plane-parallel chambers, at all measurement depths. This study calculated P{sub wall} and P{sub repl} for NACP-02, Markus, and Roos plane-parallel chambers in clinical electron dosimetry using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. The P{sub wall} values for the plane-parallel chambers increased rapidly as a function of depth in water, especially at lower energy. The value around R{sub 50} for NACP-02 was about 10% greater than unity at 4 MeV. The effect was smaller for higher electron energies. Similarly, P{sub repl} values with depth increased drastically at the region with the steep dose gradient for lower energy. For Markus P{sub repl} departed more than 10% from unity close to R{sub 50} due to the narrow guard ring width. P{sub repl} for NACP-02 and Roos was close to unity in the plateau region of depth-dose curves that includes a reference depth, d{sub ref}. It was also found that the ratio of the dose to water and the dose to the sensitive volume in the air cavity for the plane-parallel chambers, D{sub w}/[D{sub air}]{sub pp}, at d{sub ref} differs significantly from that assumed by electron dosimetry protocols.

  14. Characterization of a new ionization chamber in radiotherapy beams: angular dependence and variation of response with distance.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jonas O; Linda V E, Caldas

    2012-10-01

    A new double faced ionization chamber was constructed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. It has different collecting electrode materials: aluminum and graphite. It was irradiated in standard radiotherapy beams ((60)Co and X-rays). The response variation with distance and the angular dependence of this ionization chamber were evaluated. It was verified that the chamber response follows the inverse square law within a maximum variation of 11.2% in relation to the reference value. For the angular dependence it showed good agreement with international standards.

  15. Detection and measurement of delay in the yield of negative ions from the ionization chamber of a mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. G.; Khvostenko, O. G.; Tuimedov, G. M.

    2016-02-01

    The times of extraction of negative ions from the ionization chamber of a mass spectrometer have been measured. The obtained values amount to several dozen microseconds or above—that is, significantly exceed the time of free ion escape from the chamber. It is established that ions are retained in the ionization chamber because of their adsorption on the inner surface. This leads to distortion of the experimentally measured lifetimes of negative ions that become unstable with respect to autodetachment of the excess electron.

  16. IFIN-HH ionization chamber calibration and its validation; electrometric system improvement.

    PubMed

    Sahagia, M; Wätjen, A C; Luca, A; Ivan, C

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in the calibration of the CENTRONIC IG12/20A ionization chamber for 18 gamma ray emitters, and its improvement with a Keithley 6517A electrometer. The calibration figures were determined either directly in pA MBq(-1) units, or calculated from old units, by using the system capacity value. The calibration figures, determined with RML's standards, are compared with those deduced from the KCRV or the mean of the comparisons, and the values determined at PTB-Germany.

  17. Calibration and efficiency curve of SANAEM ionization chamber for activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Yeltepe, Emin; Kossert, Karsten; Dirican, Abdullah; Nähle, Ole; Niedergesäß, Christiane; Kemal Şahin, Namik

    2016-03-01

    A commercially available Fidelis ionization chamber was calibrated and assessed in PTB with activity standard solutions. The long-term stability and linearity of the system was checked. Energy-dependent efficiency curves for photons and beta particles were determined, using an iterative method in Excel™, to enable calibration factors to be calculated for radionuclides which were not used in the calibration. Relative deviations between experimental and calculated radionuclide efficiencies are of the order of 1% for most photon emitters and below 5% for pure beta emitters. The system will enable TAEK-SANAEM to provide traceable activity measurements.

  18. Application of patent BR102013018500-0 in well type ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, C. H. S.; Peixoto, J. G. P.

    2016-07-01

    The definition of the radioactive sample position in a well type ionization chamber is the largest source of uncertainty in the measurement of quantity activity. The determination of this parameter in two activimeters helped to improve their accuracies, from 2.62 and 2.59% to 3.87 and 1.74%, with and without the use of the positioning device, concluding, that with their use has reached an uncertainty of U =2276 and 0.2677% (k = 2) 95.45%.

  19. Development and Application of a Pulsed Ionization Chamber-Based Multiprobe Plasma Diagnostic System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Won Young

    An experimental system based on the Pulsed Ionization Chamber (PIC) technique was developed and applied to the investigation of the characteristics of nuclear-generated plasmas, which are related to critical engineering design parameters of uranium fluoride based gas-core reactor/MHD converter systems. Plasma parameters measured included ionization production rate, recombinational loss coefficient, electron density, mobility, and electrical conductivity for plasmas containing various concentrations of UF _6 and rare gases such as He, Ar and Xe. The measurements demonstrated the advantage of the PIC technique in obtaining multiple plasmas simultaneously. The PIC system was subsequently upgraded to the Multi-Probe Ionization Chamber (MPIC) to improve its capabilities and to extend its range of measurement to higher plasma densities and temperatures by providing it with additional measurement features in the form of conductivity and Langmuir probes. To accommodate these additional capabilities and to obtain complete automation of experiment, a technique was developed for remote switching between several GPIB instruments controlled by a software system. Performance tests of the MPIC system using both ^{60}Co and ^3 He(n,p)T ionization sources showed that the chamber functions according to design. Of particular importance, leakage current, the limiting factor in high temperature chamber operation, was negligible at temperature of 1000 K due to the new electrode design. In addition, the responses of the three measurement features (PIC, Conductivity, Langmuir) exhibit regions of overlap under high plasma density conditions with good agreement and reproducibility. At higher pressures and for electronegative species such as UF_6, evidence of cluster formation was observed with an approximate T^ {-4} plasma loss temperature dependence. The measured electrical conductivity of 1 atm He (1% UF _6) gas was in the range of 5times10 ^{-7} to 1times10 ^{-4} (S/m) over the thermal

  20. Development and characterization of a graphite-walled ionization chamber as a reference dosimeter for 60Co beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-11-01

    A graphite-walled ionization chamber with a sensitive volume of 6.4 cm3 was developed at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN (LCI) to determine the air kerma rate of a 60Co source. This new prototype was developed to be a simple chamber, without significant nongraphite components and with a simple set-up, which allows the determination of its various required correction factors by Monte Carlo simulations. This new ionization chamber was characterized according to the IEC 60731 standard, and all results were obtained within its limits. Furthermore, Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken to obtain the correction factors involved with the air kerma determination. The air kerma rate obtained with the graphite-walled ionization chamber was compared with that from the reference dosimeter at the LCI, a PTW ionization chamber (model TN30002). The results obtained showed good agreement within the statistical uncertainties. A graphite ionization chamber was assembled and characterized as a reference dosimeter. The characterization test results were within recommended limits. Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken to obtain the correction factors. The air kerma rate of a 60Co source was obtained with satisfactory results.

  1. Development of an improved field ionization detector incorporating a secondary electron stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahy, A.; O'Donnell, K. M.; Barr, M.; Zhou, X. J.; Allison, W.; Dastoor, P. C.

    2011-11-01

    Field ionization from sharp tips is attracting increased attention for use in detectors for neutral atomic/molecular species. However, the direct detection of the ionized species typically results in low sensitivities due to the small acceptance angle of the receiving ion-sensitive measurement device (usually a channel electron multiplier) and can result in sputtering damage due to the relatively high mass and energy of the incident ion species. Here we present a design for a field-ionization-based neutral atom detector incorporating a simple secondary electron generating stage. The use of such a stage decouples the field-ionized species from the detected electron signal, thus eliminating any sputtering damage to the channel electron multiplier. The detector armature discussed is shown to exhibit a linear response to neutral gas pressure and a sensitivity that is improved by more than two orders of magnitude over a previous field ionization detector design.

  2. Use of a two-dimensional ionization chamber array for proton therapy beam quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Sahoo, Narayan; Ding, Xiaoning; Gillin, Michael

    2008-09-01

    Two-dimensional ion chamber arrays are primarily used for conventional and intensity modulated radiotherapy quality assurance. There is no commercial device of such type available on the market that is offered for proton therapy quality assurance. We have investigated suitability of the MatriXX, a commercial two-dimensional ion chamber array detector for proton therapy QA. This device is designed to be used for photon and electron therapy QA. The device is equipped with 32 x 32 parallel plate ion chambers, each with 4.5 mm diam and 7.62 mm center-to-center separation. A 250 MeV proton beam was used to calibrate the dose measured by this device. The water equivalent thickness of the buildup material was determined to be 3.9 mm using a 160 MeV proton beam. Proton beams of different energies were used to measure the reproducibility of dose output and to evaluate the consistency in the beam flatness and symmetry measured by MatriXX. The output measurement results were compared with the clinical commissioning beam data that were obtained using a 0.6 cc Farmer chamber. The agreement was consistently found to be within 1%. The profiles were compared with film dosimetry and also with ion chamber data in water with an excellent agreement. The device is found to be well suited for quality assurance of proton therapy beams. It provides fast two-dimensional dose distribution information in real time with the accuracy comparable to that of ion chamber measurements and film dosimetry.

  3. Long term response stability of a well-type ionization chamber used in calibration of high dose rate brachytherapy sources

    PubMed Central

    Vandana, S.; Sharma, S. D.

    2010-01-01

    Well-type ionization chamber is often used to measure strength of brachytherapy sources. This study aims to check long term response stability of High Dose Rate (HDR)-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of a reference 137Cs brachytherapy source and recommend an optimum frequency of recalibration. An HDR-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber, a reference 137Cs brachytherapy source (CDCSJ5), and a MAX-4000 electrometer were used in this study. The HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was calibrated in terms of reference air kerma rate by the Standards Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna. The response of the chamber was verified at regular intervals over a period of eight years using the reference 137Cs source. All required correction factors were applied in the calculation of the RAKR of the 137Cs source. This study reveals that the response of the HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was well within ±0.5% for about three years after calibration/recalibration. However, it shows deviations larger than ±0.5% after three years of calibration/recalibration and the maximum variation in response of the chamber during an eight year period was 1.71%. The optimum frequency of recalibration of a high dose rate well-type chamber should be three years. PMID:20589119

  4. Long term response stability of a well-type ionization chamber used in calibration of high dose rate brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Vandana, S; Sharma, S D

    2010-04-01

    Well-type ionization chamber is often used to measure strength of brachytherapy sources. This study aims to check long term response stability of High Dose Rate (HDR)-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber in terms of reference air kerma rate (RAKR) of a reference (137)Cs brachytherapy source and recommend an optimum frequency of recalibration. An HDR-1000 Plus well-type ionization chamber, a reference (137)Cs brachytherapy source (CDCSJ5), and a MAX-4000 electrometer were used in this study. The HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was calibrated in terms of reference air kerma rate by the Standards Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna. The response of the chamber was verified at regular intervals over a period of eight years using the reference (137)Cs source. All required correction factors were applied in the calculation of the RAKR of the (137)Cs source. This study reveals that the response of the HDR-1000 Plus well-type chamber was well within +/-0.5% for about three years after calibration/recalibration. However, it shows deviations larger than +/-0.5% after three years of calibration/recalibration and the maximum variation in response of the chamber during an eight year period was 1.71%. The optimum frequency of recalibration of a high dose rate well-type chamber should be three years.

  5. Charge collection efficiency in ionization chambers exposed to electron beams with high dose per pulse.

    PubMed

    Laitano, R F; Guerra, A S; Pimpinella, M; Caporali, C; Petrucci, A

    2006-12-21

    The correction for charge recombination was determined for different plane-parallel ionization chambers exposed to clinical electron beams with low and high dose per pulse, respectively. The electron energy was nearly the same (about 7 and 9 MeV) for any of the beams used. Boag's two-voltage analysis (TVA) was used to determine the correction for ion losses, k(s), relevant to each chamber considered. The presence of free electrons in the air of the chamber cavity was accounted for in determining k(s) by TVA. The determination of k(s) was made on the basis of the models for ion recombination proposed in past years by Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk to account for the presence of free electrons. The absorbed dose measurements in both low-dose-per-pulse (less than 0.3 mGy per pulse) and high-dose-per-pulse (20-120 mGy per pulse range) electron beams were compared with ferrous sulphate chemical dosimetry, a method independent of the dose per pulse. The results of the comparison support the conclusion that one of the models is more adequate to correct for ion recombination, even in high-dose-per-pulse conditions, provided that the fraction of free electrons is properly assessed. In this respect the drift velocity and the time constant for attachment of electrons in the air of the chamber cavity are rather critical parameters because of their dependence on chamber dimensions and operational conditions. Finally, a determination of the factor k(s) was also made by zero extrapolation of the 1/Q versus 1/V saturation curves, leading to the conclusion that this method does not provide consistent results in high-dose-per-pulse beams. PMID:17148826

  6. Technical Note: Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of two cylindrical ionization chambers in a clinical proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, Yuya; Nishio, Teiji; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: IAEA TRS-398 notes that cylindrical ionization chambers are preferred for reference proton dosimetry. If a cylindrical ionization chamber is used in a phantom to measure the dose as a function of depth, the effective point of measurement (EPOM) must be taken into account. IAEA TRS-398 recommends a displacement of 0.75 times the inner cavity radius (0.75R) for heavy ion beams. Theoretical models by Palmans and by Bhullar and Watchman confirmed this value. However, the experimental results vary from author to author. The purpose of this study is to accurately measure the displacement and explain the past experimental discrepancies. Methods: In this work, we measured the EPOM of cylindrical ionization chambers with high accuracy by comparing the Bragg-peak position obtained with cylindrical ionization chambers (PTW 30013, PTW 31016) to that obtained using a plane-parallel ionization chamber (PTW 34045). Results: The EPOMs of PTW 30013 and 31016 were shifted by 0.92 ± 0.07 R with R = 3.05 mm and 0.90 ± 0.14 R with R = 1.45 mm, respectively, from the reference point toward the source. Conclusions: The EPOMs obtained were greater than the value of 0.75R proposed by the IAEA TRS-398 and the analytical results.

  7. Assessment of ionization chamber correction factors in photon beams using a time saving strategy with PENELOPE code.

    PubMed

    Reis, C Q M; Nicolucci, P

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Monte Carlo-based perturbation and beam quality correction factors for ionization chambers in photon beams using a saving time strategy with PENELOPE code. Simulations for calculating absorbed doses to water using full spectra of photon beams impinging the whole water phantom and those using a phase-space file previously stored around the point of interest were performed and compared. The widely used NE2571 ionization chamber was modeled with PENELOPE using data from the literature in order to calculate absorbed doses to the air cavity of the chamber. Absorbed doses to water at reference depth were also calculated for providing the perturbation and beam quality correction factors for that chamber in high energy photon beams. Results obtained in this study show that simulations with phase-space files appropriately stored can be up to ten times shorter than using a full spectrum of photon beams in the input-file. Values of kQ and its components for the NE2571 ionization chamber showed good agreement with published values in the literature and are provided with typical statistical uncertainties of 0.2%. Comparisons to kQ values published in current dosimetry protocols such as the AAPM TG-51 and IAEA TRS-398 showed maximum percentage differences of 0.1% and 0.6% respectively. The proposed strategy presented a significant efficiency gain and can be applied for a variety of ionization chambers and clinical photon beams.

  8. A new standard cylindrical graphite-walled ionization chamber for dosimetry in 60Co beams at calibration laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Lucio P.; Perini, Ana P.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-11-01

    60Co sources are used mostly at dosimetry laboratories for calibration of ionization chambers utilized for radiotherapy dosimetry, mainly in those laboratories where there is no linear accelerator available. In this work, a new cylindrical ionization chamber was developed and characterized to be used as a reference dosimeter at the Calibration Laboratory of the IPEN. The characterization tests were performed according to the IEC 60731 standard, and all tests presented results within its recommended limits. Furthermore, the correction factors for the wall, stem, central collecting electrode, nonaxial uniformity and the mass-energy absorption coefficient were determined using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. The air kerma rate determined with this new dosimeter was compared to the one obtained with the IPEN standard, presenting a difference of 1.5%. Therefore, the new ionization chamber prototype developed and characterized in this work presents potential use as a primary standard dosimeter at radiation metrology laboratories.

  9. Determination of small-field correction factors for cylindrical ionization chambers using a semiempirical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Bak, Jino; Park, Sungho; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Suk Won

    2016-02-01

    A semiempirical method based on the averaging effect of the sensitive volumes of different air-filled ionization chambers (ICs) was employed to approximate the correction factors for beam quality produced from the difference in the sizes of the reference field and small fields. We measured the output factors using several cylindrical ICs and calculated the correction factors using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution; in the method, we modeled the variable and inhomogeneous energy fluence function within the chamber cavity. The parameters of the modeled function and the correction factors were determined by solving a developed system of equations as well as on the basis of the measurement data and the geometry of the chambers. Further, Monte Carlo (MC) computations were performed using the Monaco® treatment planning system to validate the proposed method. The determined correction factors (k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} ) were comparable to the values derived from the MC computations performed using Monaco®. For example, for a 6 MV photon beam and a field size of 1  ×  1 cm2, k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} was calculated to be 1.125 for a PTW 31010 chamber and 1.022 for a PTW 31016 chamber. On the other hand, the k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} values determined from the MC computations were 1.121 and 1.031, respectively; the difference between the proposed method and the MC computation is less than 2%. In addition, we determined the k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} values for PTW 30013, PTW 31010, PTW 31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13 chambers as well. We devised a method for determining k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} from both the measurement of the output factors and model-based mathematical computation. The proposed method can be useful in case the MC simulation would not be applicable for the clinical settings.

  10. [Experimental investigation of the collection efficiency of a PTW Roos ionization chamber irradiated with pulsed beams at high pulse dose with different pulse lengths].

    PubMed

    Karsch, Leonhard; Richter, Christian; Pawelke, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    In gas-filled ionization chambers as radiation detectors, the collection of the charge carriers is affected by the recombination effect. In dosimetry this effect must be accounted for by the saturation correction factor k(S). The physical description of the correction factor by Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk for pulsed radiation is well established. However, this description is only accurate when the pulse length is short compared to the collection time of the ionization chamber. In this work experimental investigations of the saturation correction factor have been made for pulses of 4 μ s up to pulse doses of about 230 mGy, and the theory of Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk was again confirmed. For longer pulses, however, the correction factor decreases and at a pulse duration of about 200μs reaches 75% of the value valid for short pulses. This reduced influence of the ion recombination is interpreted by the reaction kinetics of ion recombination as a second-order reaction. This effect is negligible for PTW Roos chambers at clinical linear accelerators with 4 μ s pulse duration for pulse doses up to 120 mGy.

  11. History of the bubble chamber and related active- and internal-target nuclear tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.

    2015-06-01

    Donald Glaser, 1960 Nobel laureate in Physics, recently passed away (2013), as have many of his colleagues who were involved with the early development of bubble chambers at the University of Michigan. In this paper I will review those early years and the subsequent wide-spread application of active-target (AT) bubble chambers that dominated high-energy physics (HEP) research for over thirty years. Some of the related, but more modern nuclear tracking detectors being used in HEP, neutrino astrophysics and dark-matter searches also will be discussed.

  12. Performance of a multi-axis ionization chamber array in a 1.5 T magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; Kok, J G M; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-04-01

    At the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of an 8 MV Elekta linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips MRI system. This paper investigates the performance of the IC PROFILER™, a multi-axis ionization chamber array, in a 1.5 T magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field on the IC PROFILER™ reproducibility, dose response linearity, pulse rate frequency dependence, power to electronics, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape were investigated. The linearity, reproducibility, pulse rate frequency dependence, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape are unaffected by the magnetic field. When the measurements results are normalized to the centre reference chamber, the measurements can commence unaltered. Orientation of the ionization chambers in the magnetic field is of importance, therefore caution must be taken when comparing or normalizing results from several different axes. IC PROFILER™ dose profiles were compared with film dose profiles obtained simultaneously in the MR-linac. Deviation between the film and the IC PROFILER™ data was caused by the noise in the film, indicating correct performance of the IC PROFILER™ in the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field.

  13. Performance of a multi-axis ionization chamber array in a 1.5 T magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; Kok, J G M; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-04-01

    At the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of an 8 MV Elekta linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips MRI system. This paper investigates the performance of the IC PROFILER™, a multi-axis ionization chamber array, in a 1.5 T magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field on the IC PROFILER™ reproducibility, dose response linearity, pulse rate frequency dependence, power to electronics, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape were investigated. The linearity, reproducibility, pulse rate frequency dependence, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape are unaffected by the magnetic field. When the measurements results are normalized to the centre reference chamber, the measurements can commence unaltered. Orientation of the ionization chambers in the magnetic field is of importance, therefore caution must be taken when comparing or normalizing results from several different axes. IC PROFILER™ dose profiles were compared with film dose profiles obtained simultaneously in the MR-linac. Deviation between the film and the IC PROFILER™ data was caused by the noise in the film, indicating correct performance of the IC PROFILER™ in the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. PMID:24625540

  14. Performance of a multi-axis ionization chamber array in a 1.5 T magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, K.; Kok, J. G. M.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2014-04-01

    At the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of an 8 MV Elekta linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips MRI system. This paper investigates the performance of the IC PROFILER™, a multi-axis ionization chamber array, in a 1.5 T magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field on the IC PROFILER™ reproducibility, dose response linearity, pulse rate frequency dependence, power to electronics, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape were investigated. The linearity, reproducibility, pulse rate frequency dependence, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape are unaffected by the magnetic field. When the measurements results are normalized to the centre reference chamber, the measurements can commence unaltered. Orientation of the ionization chambers in the magnetic field is of importance, therefore caution must be taken when comparing or normalizing results from several different axes. IC PROFILER™ dose profiles were compared with film dose profiles obtained simultaneously in the MR-linac. Deviation between the film and the IC PROFILER™ data was caused by the noise in the film, indicating correct performance of the IC PROFILER™ in the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field.

  15. Design and implementation of the detector control system for the BESIII drift chamber cosmic ray test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi-Hui; Xie, Xiao-Xi; Li, Xiao-Nan; Gao, Cui-Shan; Zhang, Yin-Hong; Nie, Zhen-Dong; Min, Jian; Xie, Yi-GANG

    2008-08-01

    After the construction of the BESIII drift chamber, a long period of cosmic rays test is necessary to verify its performance. This also provides a good opportunity to integrate the detector readout electronics and Detector Control System (DCS) into a unified working system. The goal of the DCS is to guarantee reliable physics data quality and the safe operation of the detector. It monitors and controls the HV, gas, VME crates and the environmental variables. The upper-level system is mainly developed from LabVIEW and the lower-level system mainly uses MCU and PLC technology. The system is designed to be highly flexible and scalable so that it can be applied to other detectors with little or no change. In the immediate future, it will be integrated into the entire BESIII Slow Control System.

  16. Comparison of pencil-type ionization chamber calibration results and methods between dosimetry laboratories.

    PubMed

    Hourdakis, Costas J; Büermann, Ludwig; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Csete, Istvan; Delis, Harry; Gomola, Igor; Persson, Linda; Novak, Leos; Petkov, Ivailo; Toroi, Paula

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of calibration results and procedures in terms of air kerma length product, PKL, and air kerma, K, was conducted between eight dosimetry laboratories. A pencil-type ionization chamber (IC), generally used for computed tomography dose measurements, was calibrated according to three calibration methods, while its residual signal and other characteristics (sensitivity profile, active length) were assessed. The results showed that the "partial irradiation method" is the preferred method for the pencil-type IC calibration in terms of PKL and it could be applied by the calibration laboratories successfully. Most of the participating laboratories achieved high level of agreement (>99%) for both dosimetry quantities (PKL and K). Estimated relative standard uncertainties of comparison results vary among laboratories from 0.34% to 2.32% depending on the quantity, beam quality and calibration method applied. Detailed analysis of the assigned uncertainties have been presented and discussed.

  17. Quality assurance of proton beams using a multilayer ionization chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanesar, Sandeep; Sahoo, Narayan; Kerr, Matthew; Taylor, M. Brad; Summers, Paige; Zhu, X. Ronald; Poenisch, Falk; Gillin, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The measurement of percentage depth-dose (PDD) distributions for the quality assurance of clinical proton beams is most commonly performed with a computerized water tank dosimetry system with ionization chamber, commonly referred to as water tank. Although the accuracy and reproducibility of this method is well established, it can be time-consuming if a large number of measurements are required. In this work the authors evaluate the linearity, reproducibility, sensitivity to field size, accuracy, and time-savings of another system: the Zebra, a multilayer ionization chamber system.Methods: The Zebra, consisting of 180 parallel-plate ionization chambers with 2 mm resolution, was used to measure depth-dose distributions. The measurements were performed for scattered and scanned proton pencil beams of multiple energies delivered by the Hitachi PROBEAT synchrotron-based delivery system. For scattered beams, the Zebra-measured depth-dose distributions were compared with those measured with the water tank. The principal descriptors extracted for comparisons were: range, the depth of the distal 90% dose; spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) length, the region between the proximal 95% and distal 90% dose; and distal-dose fall off (DDF), the region between the distal 80% and 20% dose. For scanned beams, the Zebra-measured ranges were compared with those acquired using a Bragg peak chamber during commissioning.Results: The Zebra demonstrated better than 1% reproducibility and monitor unit linearity. The response of the Zebra was found to be sensitive to radiation field sizes greater than 12.5 × 12.5 cm; hence, the measurements used to determine accuracy were performed using a field size of 10 × 10 cm. For the scattered proton beams, PDD distributions showed 1.5% agreement within the SOBP, and 3.8% outside. Range values agreed within −0.1 ± 0.4 mm, with a maximum deviation of 1.2 mm. SOBP length values agreed within 0 ± 2 mm, with a maximum deviation of 6 mm. DDF

  18. Unexpected bias in NIST 4πγ ionization chamber measurements.

    PubMed

    Unterweger, M P; Fitzgerald, R

    2012-09-01

    In January of 2010, it was discovered that the source holder used for calibrations in the NIST 4πγ ionization chamber (IC) has not been stable. The positioning ring that determines the height of the sample in the reentrant tube of the IC has slowly shifted during 35 years of use. This has led to a slow change in the calibration factors for the various radionuclides measured by this instrument. The changes are dependent on γ-ray energy and the time the IC was calibrated for a given radionuclide. A review of the historic data with regard to when the calibrations were done has enabled us to approximate the magnitude of the changes with time. This requires a number of assumptions, and corresponding uncertainty components, including whether the changes in height were gradual or in steps as will be shown in drawings of sample holder. For calibrations the changes in calibration factors have been most significant for low energy gamma emitters such as (133)Xe, (241)Am, (125)I and (85)Kr. The corrections to previous calibrations can be approximated and the results corrected with an increase in the overall uncertainty. At present we are recalibrating the IC based on new primary measurements of the radionuclides measured on the IC. Likewise we have been calibrating a new automated ionization-chamber system. A bigger problem is the significant number of half-life results NIST has published over the last 35 years that are based on IC measurements. The effect on half-life is largest for long-lived radionuclei, especially low-energy γ-ray emitters. This presentation will review our results and recommend changes in values and/or uncertainties. Any recommendation for withdrawal of any results will also be undertaken.

  19. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M.; Gazdic-Santic, Maja

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of {sup 125}I seeds.Methods: Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for {sup 125}I selectSeed{sup TM} brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level.Results: Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber.Conclusions: Variations of the altitude and

  20. Dosimetry for electron Intra-Operative RadioTherapy: Comparison of output factors obtained through alanine/EPR pellets, ionization chamber and Monte Carlo-GEANT4 simulations for IORT mobile dedicate accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Longo, Anna; Russo, Giorgio; Casarino, Carlo; Candiano, Giuliana; Gallo, Salvatore; Carlino, Antonio; Brai, Maria

    2015-09-01

    In this work a comparison between the response of alanine and Markus ionization chamber was carried out for measurements of the output factors (OF) of electron beams produced by a linear accelerator used for Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). Output factors (OF) for conventional high-energy electron beams are normally measured using ionization chamber according to international dosimetry protocols. However, the electron beams used in IORT have characteristics of dose per pulse, energy spectrum and angular distribution quite different from beams usually used in external radiotherapy, so the direct application of international dosimetry protocols may introduce additional uncertainties in dosimetric determinations. The high dose per pulse could lead to an inaccuracy in dose measurements with ionization chamber, due to overestimation of ks recombination factor. Furthermore, the electron fields obtained with IORT-dedicated applicators have a wider energy spectrum and a wider angular distribution than the conventional fields, due to the presence of electrons scattered by the applicator's wall. For this reason, a dosimetry system should be characterized by a minimum dependence from the beam energy and from angle of incidence of electrons. This become particularly critical for small and bevelled applicators. All of these reasons lead to investigate the use of detectors different from the ionization chamber for measuring the OFs. Furthermore, the complete characterization of the radiation field could be accomplished also by the use of Monte Carlo simulations which allows to obtain detailed information on dose distributions. In this work we compare the output factors obtained by means of alanine dosimeters and Markus ionization chamber. The comparison is completed by the Monte Carlo calculations of OFs determined through the use of the Geant4 application "iort _ therapy" . The results are characterized by a good agreement of response of alanine pellets and Markus

  1. Scintillation properties of N2 and CF4 and performances of a scintillating ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehaut, G.; Salvador, S.; Fontbonne, J.-M.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Perronnel, J.; Vandamme, Ch.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we studied the emission yields, decay times and coincidence resolving times (CRT) of two gases, nitrogen (N2) and tetrafluoromethane (CF4), used for particle detection in the context of fission products measurement. The set-up was made of an ionization chamber and two photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) placed front-to-front on each side of the active zone of the chamber. Using the photomultiplier tubes, the number of photoelectrons (phe) converted at the photocathodes from the scintillation processes in each gas was quantified and the scintillation time spectra were recorded. A scintillation emission yield of 24 phe MeV-1 with a decay time of τd = 2.5 ns in N2, and 225 phe MeV-1 with τd = 6.2 ns for CF4, has been measured. With our set-up, the coincidence resolving time (σ values) between the two PMTs have been measured using alpha particles at 1.4 ns and 0.34 ns for N2 and CF4, respectively.

  2. A gridded ionization chamber with a movable cathode for precise measurements of W-values in highly purified rare gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Shinichi; Miyajima, Mitsuhiro; Katoh, Kazuaki; Takebe, Masahiro; Seto, Kunio

    1987-04-01

    A single gridded ionization chamber with a movable cathode was constructed in order to measure W-values in highly purified rare gases without ambiguity. The chamber gases were continuously purified with a purifier filled with many pellets of titanium-barium getter. The purifier proved to be so powerful as to reduce impurities in rare gases to the level of 1 ppb or less. Performance tests of the chamber were made by measurements of W-values of argon-methane mixtures relative to that of argon. The measurements were made with a precision of ±0.14%.

  3. Fast-neutron spectrometry using a ³He ionization chamber and digital pulse shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Chichester, D L; Johnson, J T; Seabury, E H

    2012-08-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type (3)He ionization chamber to measure the fast-neutron spectra of a deuterium-deuterium electronic neutron generator, a bare (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron source, and of the transmitted fast neutron spectra of a (252)Cf source attenuated by water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, and magnesium. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common approach for analyzing n +(3)He→(1)H+(3)H ionization events and improved to account for wall-effect and pile-up events, increasing the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed of the different experimental arrangements and compared with the measurements, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA-processed fast-neutron spectra and predictions. The fast-neutron resonance features of the attenuation cross sections of the attenuating materials are clearly visible within the resolution limits of the electronics used for the measurements, and the potential applications of high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry for nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards measurements are discussed.

  4. Description of ARCAL XXXIV Project: Repair and Calibration of Electrometers and Ionization Chambers Used in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Estrada, P.; Ramírez-Jiménez, F. J.; Villaverde-Lozano, A.

    2003-09-01

    The technological tools for the diagnosis of diseases and treatment of cancer are based mostly on the use of ionizing radiations. This situation worries to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which has implemented programs of technical cooperation for the protection of the human health. One of these programs is running in Latin America under the ARCAL project (Regional Agreement of Cooperation for the Promotion of the Nuclear Science and Technology in Latin America and the Caribbean). One objective of the ARCAL XXXIV project is the establishment of three Regional Centres for the repair, maintenance and electrical calibration of clinical dosimeters, in Mexico we have one of these centres. Some other objectives of the project are: the generation of calibration procedures, the release of training courses in the region, the establishment of an inter-comparison network for the region in the control of standards of calibration with electrometers and the design of low current sources that simulates the ionization chamber and can serve as field standards for each of the participant countries. A description of the results of the project is presented in this work.

  5. Performance of a gas flow ionization detector filled with He-iso-C4H10 mixtures for STIM-T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. C.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Fonte, P.; Beasley, D. G.; Cruz, C.; Alves, L. C.; da Silva, R. C.

    2015-04-01

    A cylindrical gas flow ionization chamber has been developed for measuring particle energy in Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T) experiments due to its ability to withstand the direct beam. The response of a He-iso-C4H10 filled ionization detector to 2 MeV H+ and He+ beams was studied. Different operating parameters, such as concentration of isobutane (in the range of 55-100%), anode voltage, amplifier shaping time, the geometry of the detector entrance canal and the solid angle of the detector, were investigated. The stable operating plateau and the anode voltage at which the best energy resolution is attained were also determined for every gas mixture. The best energy resolution achieved so far for 2 MeV H+ and He+ static beams was ∼1.3%, which is comparable to that of Si PIN diode detectors (in the range of 15-30 keV). Computed tomography (CT) was applied to a set of STIM projections acquired with the gas ionization chamber at the IST/CTN microprobe beam line in order to visualize the 3D-mass distribution in a test structure.

  6. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Tseng-Te; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chen, Yen-Fu; Wu, Shu-Wei; Nievaart, Sander; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary 60Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the 60Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations reached 7

  7. Source geometry factors for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations.

    PubMed

    Shipley, D R; Sander, T; Nutbrown, R F

    2015-03-21

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated (192)Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR (192)Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, k(sg), is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR (192)Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR (192)Ir Flexisource k(sg) was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  8. Ionization chamber measurements of the half-lives of 24Na, 42K, 76As and 198Au.

    PubMed

    Unterweger, M P; Lindstrom, R M

    2004-01-01

    Samples of 24Na, 42K, 76As and 198Au were produced by irradiation in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reactor, and examined for impurities before and after measurement. Half-life measurements were carried out in the NIST 4pigamma pressurized ionization chamber. The results are compared to presently accepted values and previous NIST measurements. PMID:14987662

  9. Compact cosmic ray detector for unattended atmospheric ionization monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aplin, K L; Harrison, R G

    2010-12-01

    Two vertical cosmic ray telescopes for atmospheric cosmic ray ionization event detection are compared. Counter A, designed for low power remote use, was deployed in the Welsh mountains; its event rate increased with altitude as expected from atmospheric cosmic ray absorption. Independently, Counter B's event rate was found to vary with incoming particle acceptance angle. Simultaneous co-located comparison of both telescopes exposed to atmospheric ionization showed a linear relationship between their event rates. PMID:21198037

  10. Compact cosmic ray detector for unattended atmospheric ionization monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.

    2010-12-15

    Two vertical cosmic ray telescopes for atmospheric cosmic ray ionization event detection are compared. Counter A, designed for low power remote use, was deployed in the Welsh mountains; its event rate increased with altitude as expected from atmospheric cosmic ray absorption. Independently, Counter B's event rate was found to vary with incoming particle acceptance angle. Simultaneous co-located comparison of both telescopes exposed to atmospheric ionization showed a linear relationship between their event rates.

  11. Front-End electronics development for the new Resistive Plate Chamber detector of HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A.; Belver, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Díaz, J.; Garzón, J. A.; González-Díaz, D.; Koenig, W.; Lange, J. S.; Marín, J.; Montes, N.; Skott, P.; Traxler, M.

    2007-11-01

    In this paper we present the new RPC wall, which is being installed in the HADES detector at Darmstadt GSI. It consists of time-of-flight (TOF) detectors used for both particle identification and triggering. Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors are becoming widely used because of their excellent TOF capabilities and reduced cost. The wall will contain 1024 RPC modules, covering an active area of around 7 m2, replacing the old TOFino detector at the low polar angle region. The excellent TOF and good charge resolutions of the new detector will improve the time resolution to values better than 100 ps. The Front-End electronics for the readout of the RPC signals is implemented with two types of boards to satisfy the space constraints: the Daughterboards are small boards that amplify the low level signals from the detector and provide fast discriminators for time of flight measurements, as well as an integrator for charge measurements. The Motherboard provides stable DC voltages and a stable ground, threshold DACs for the discriminators, multiplicity trigger and impedance matched paths for transfer of time window signals that contain information about time and charge. These signals are sent to a custom TDC board that label each event and send data through Ethernet to be conveniently stored.

  12. Electrode configuration and signal subtraction technique for single polarity charge carrier sensing in ionization detectors

    DOEpatents

    Luke, P.

    1996-06-25

    An ionization detector electrode and signal subtraction apparatus and method provide at least one first conductive trace formed onto the first surface of an ionization detector. The first surface opposes a second surface of the ionization detector. At least one second conductive trace is also formed on the first surface of the ionization detector in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern with the at least one first conductive trace. Both of the traces are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. By forming the traces in a substantially interlaced and symmetric pattern, signals generated by a charge carrier are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the traces. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carrier moves to within close proximity of the traces and is received at the collecting trace. The measured signals are then subtracted and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge and to determine the position at which the charge carrier originated within the ionization detector. 9 figs.

  13. Electrode configuration and signal subtraction technique for single polarity charge carrier sensing in ionization detectors

    DOEpatents

    Luke, Paul

    1996-01-01

    An ionization detector electrode and signal subtraction apparatus and method provides at least one first conductive trace formed onto the first surface of an ionization detector. The first surface opposes a second surface of the ionization detector. At least one second conductive trace is also formed on the first surface of the ionization detector in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern with the at least one first conductive trace. Both of the traces are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. By forming the traces in a substantially interlaced and symmetric pattern, signals generated by a charge carrier are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the traces. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carrier moves to within close proximity of the traces and is received at the collecting trace. The measured signals are then subtracted and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge and to determine the position at which the charge carrier originated within the ionization detector.

  14. Ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Tullis, Andrew M.

    1987-01-01

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber ype comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  15. Determinations of the correction factors for small fields in cylindrical ionization chambers based on measurement and numerical calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Sungho; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Bak, Jino

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the volume averaging effect for air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers to determine the correction factors in a small photon field for a given chamber. We measured output factors with several cylindrical ionization chambers, and by using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution, we modeled the non-constant and inhomogeneous exposure function in the cavity of the chamber. The parameters in the exposure function and the correction factors were determined by solving a system of equations that we had developed by using the measured data and the geometry of the given chamber. The correction factors (CFs) were very similar to those obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For example, the CFs in this study were found to be 1.116 for PTW31010 and 1.0225 for PTW31016 while the CFs obtained from MC simulations were reported as being approximately between 1.17 and 1.20 for PTW31010 and between 1.02 and 1.06 for PTW31016 in a 6-MV photon beam of 1 × 1 cm2. Furthermore, the method of deconvolution combined with the MC result for the chamber's response function showed a similar CF for PTW 30013, which was reported as 2.29 and 1.54 for a 1 × 1 cm2 and a 1.5 × 1.5 cm2 field size, respectively. The CFs from our method were similar, 2.42 and 1.54. In addition, we report CFs for PTW30013, PTW31010, PTW31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13. As a consequence, we suggest the use of our method to measure the correct output factor by using the fact that an inhomogeneous exposure causes a volume averaging effect in the cavity of air-filled cylindrical ionization chamber. The result obtained by using our method is very similar to that obtained from MC simulations. The method we developed can easily be applied in clinics.

  16. The forward drift chamber system for the GlueX detector

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Simon

    2007-10-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is planning an upgrade of the existing electron beam energy from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. The program calls for the construction of a new experimental hall - Hall D - and a new Tagger hall in which the electron beam will be converted to a photon beam that interacts with a target at the center of the GlueX detector housed in Hall D. The detector is based on a solenoidal design with drift chambers and a lead-scintillator calorimeter inside the bore of the magnet and sets of time- of-flight scintillators and lead-glass crystals in the downstream direction outside of the magnet. The Forward Drift Chambers will measure the paths of charged particles travelling in the forward direction downstream of the target. Each chamber unit will consist of a wire plane flanked on either side by cathode planes divided into strips. The combination of wire and cathode readout allows for reconstruction of "space points" at several positions along

  17. Development of an aerosol chamber for calibration of 220Rn progeny detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes an aerosol chamber system that can be used for calibrations and performance experiments of passive 220Rn progeny detectors. For the purpose of this study, an aerosol generation system using carnauba wax as the aerosol material was mounted into the 220Rn chamber. We used the chamber to measure characteristics of the equilibrium factor (F) of 220Rn and unattached fraction (fp) of 220Rn progeny, which are important parameters for dose estimation. The first experiment showed that continuous and stable generation of the unattached and aerosol-attached 220Rn progeny concentrations was obtained. We observed that the spatial distributions in the chamber of the vertical profiles of the unattached and aerosol-attached 220Rn progeny concentrations were homogeneous, as were the particle number concentration and count median diameter. The values of F and fp and their characteristics observed in this study were in the same range as the values reported from indoor measurements. We found that the characteristics of F and fp were dependent on the aerosol conditions (particle diameter and particle number concentration).

  18. Liquid ionization chamber initial recombination dependence on LET for electrons and photons.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Erik; Andersson, Jonas; Johansson, Lennart; Tölli, Heikki

    2013-06-21

    The possibility of indirect measurements of linear energy transfer (LET) with a liquid ionization chamber (LIC) has been investigated by studying initial recombination losses at different applied voltages. A linear fit is made to the voltage-signal curve and the intersection point of the fit and the voltage-axis is shown to correlate with LET. The LIC applied voltages were 100-700 V, which corresponds to electric field strengths between 0.3 and 2.0 MV m(-1). Several different photon and electron beams have been studied, and by using MCNPX™ the respective LET spectra have been determined. The beam qualities in this study were found to have a fluence averaged LET between 0.17 and 1.67 keV µm(-1) and a corresponding dose averaged LET between 0.97 and 4.62 keV µm(-1). For the experimental data in this study the linear fit method yields consistent results with respect to Monte Carlo simulated LET values. A calibration curve for LET determination is provided for the LIC used in the present work.

  19. Quantitative Verification of Dynamic Wedge Dose Distribution Using a 2D Ionization Chamber Array.

    PubMed

    Sahnoun, Tarek; Farhat, Leila; Mtibaa, Anis; Besbes, Mounir; Daoud, Jamel

    2015-10-01

    The accuracy of two calculation algorithms of the Eclipse 8.9 treatment planning system (TPS)--the anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) and pencil-beam convolution (PBC)--in modeling the enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) was investigated. Measurements were carried out for 6 and 18 MV photon beams using a 2D ionization chamber array. Accuracy of the TPS was evaluated using a gamma index analysis with the following acceptance criteria for dose differences (DD) and distance to agreement (DTA): 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm. The TPS models the dose distribution accurately except for 20×20 cm(2) field size, 60 (°) and 45 (°) wedge angles using PBC at 6 MV photon energy. For these latter fields, the pass rate and the mean value of gamma were less than 90% and more than 0.5, respectively at the (3%/3 mm) acceptance criteria. In addition, an accuracy level of (2%/2 mm) was achieved using AAA with better agreement for 18 MV photon energy.

  20. Dose verifications by use of liquid ionization chamber of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID).

    PubMed

    Tateoka, Kunihiko; Oouchi, Atsushi; Nakata, Kensei; Hareyama, Masato

    2008-07-01

    In this study, we examined the ability of an L-EPID to verify rectangular and irregular fields and to measure the transmitted exit doses. With respect to the beam profile of rectangular and irregular fields and the doses transmitted through an inhomogeneous phantom, the L-EPID dose obtained from the L-EPID measurement was compared with the conventional dose measured by use of a 0.12-cc ionization chamber and a 3D water phantom. In the comparison of the rectangular and irregular fields, the difference in the off-center ratio (OCR) between the L-EPID dose and the conventional dose was approximately 3% in the steep-dose-gradient region (penumbra regions, >30%/cm) and approximately +/-0.5% in the gentle-dose-gradient region (5%/cm). On the other hand, the dose differences between the L-EPID and the measured doses were less than approximately 2% in the gentle-dose-gradient region. In addition, in the steep-dose-gradient region, the maximum difference was 30%. However, the differences in the distance-to-agreement (DTA) were less than approximately +/-1 mm and were unrelated to the dose gradient. These results suggest that dose verification by L-EPID is very useful in clinical applications.

  1. Acoustic studies for alpha background rejection in dark matter bubble chamber detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Cabo, M.; Felis, I.; Ardid, M.; Collaboration: COUPP Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics) is an experiment with bubble chambers able to detect dark matter directly either with Spin-Dependent or with Spin-Independent interactions. The target material is a superheated liquid (usually CF3I) that can be bubble nucleated due to nuclear recoils produced by elastic collisions of dark matter particles. The bubble growth inside the chamber is accompanied with an acoustic signature. The acoustic technique has been successfully used to have a good alpha discrimination (about 99%). In this paper, we present different studies and results related with the characterization of the acoustic properties of the detector and the different phenomena involved in the acoustic measurements of the bubble growth, such as sound generation, sound transmission and optimization of piezoelectric transducers.

  2. High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Winefordner, James D.; Matveev, Oleg I.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    1999-01-01

    A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

  3. Determination of absorbed dose in high-energy electron and photon radiation by means of an uncalibrated ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Klevenhagen, S C

    1991-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a dosimetric method based on an ionization chamber which has an uncalibrated sensitive volume but which behaves as a Bragg-Gray cavity in high-energy radiation. The new type of chamber developed in the course of this study has a variable volume and is constructed from water-similar materials. It can be used in a water phantom directly in a beam of a therapy megavoltage machine under clinical conditions. The chamber allows absorbed dose to be determined from first principles, overcoming many of the problems encountered with conventional dosimetry based on calibrated chambers. The study involved an intercomparison of the performance of the new chamber in high-energy electron and photon radiation with the conventional calibrated chambers employed according to the established dosimetry protocols. Good agreement was found between these dosimetric methods and it may therefore be concluded that the method developed in this work can be successfully employed for absolute dosimetry. The new chamber is a promising device for research in various aspects of dosimetry.

  4. Effect of the calibration in water and the build-up cap on the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber measurements.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Hyvönen, H; Uusi-Simola, J; Jokelainen, I; Kosunen, A; Kortesniemi, M; Seppälä, T; Auterinen, I; Savolainen, S

    2011-12-01

    Magnesium-walled argon gas flow ionization chamber (Mg(Ar)) is used for photon dose measurements in the epithermal neutron beam of FiR 1 reactor in Finland. In this study, the photon dose measurements were re-evaluated against calculations applying a new chamber calibration factor defined in water instead of in air. Also, effect of the build-up cap on the measurements was investigated. The new calibration factor provides improved agreement between measured and calculated photon dose. Use of the build-up cap does not affect the measured signal in water in neutron beam.

  5. Development of a Bioaerosol single particle detector (BIO IN) for the Fast Ice Nucleus CHamber FINCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, U.; Reimann, B.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Bingemer, H.

    2010-02-01

    In this work we present the setup and first tests of our new BIO IN detector. This detector was constructed to classify atmospheric ice nuclei (IN) for their biological content. It is designed to be coupled to the Fast Ice Nucleus CHamber FINCH. If one particle acts as an ice nucleus, it will be at least partly covered with ice at the end of the development section of the FINCH chamber. The device combines an auto-fluorescence detector and a circular depolarization detector for simultaneous detection of biological material and discrimination between water droplets, ice crystals and non activated large aerosol particles. The excitation of biological material with UV light and analysis of auto-fluorescence is a common principle used for flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, spectroscopy and imaging. The detection of auto-fluorescence of airborne single particles demands some more experimental effort. However, expensive commercial sensors are available for special purposes, e.g. size distribution measurements. But these sensors will not fit the specifications needed for the FINCH IN counter (e.g. high sample flow of up 10 LPM). The newly developed -low cost- BIO IN sensor uses a single high-power UV LED for the electronic excitation instead of much more expensive UV lasers. Other key advantages of the new sensor are the low weight, compact size, and the little effect on the aerosol sample, which allows it to be coupled with other instruments for further analysis. The instrument will be flown on one of the first missions of the new German research aircraft "HALO" (High Altitude and LOng range).

  6. (Effects of ionizing radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors)

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, J.

    1992-01-01

    It is my task to summarise the great variety of topics (covering a refreshing mix of physics, chemistry and technology) presented at this conference, which has focused on the effects of ionising radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors. One of the reasons and the central interest of many of the participants was the use of such detectors in experiments at two future large hadron colliders: the Superconducting Super Collider to be operating outside of Dallas in the United States by the turn of the decade and its European counterpart the Large Hadron Collider to be operating outside of Geneva in Switzerland on a similar time scale. These accelerators are the apple of the high energy physicist's eye.'' Their goal is to uncover the elusive Higgs particle and thereby set the cornerstone in our current knowledge of elementary particle interactions. This is the Quest, and from this lofty height the presentations rapidly moved on to the specific questions of experimental science: how such an experiment is carried out; why radiation damage is an issue; how radiation damage affects detectors; which factors affect radiation damage characteristics; which factors are not affected by radiation damage; and how better detectors may be constructed. These were the substance of this conference.

  7. Predicting the yield performances of multicomponent oil smokes confined in closed chambers. Technical report Jan-Nov 80

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, G.O.

    1983-06-01

    A semiempirical model is developed to predict the yield performances of multicomponent oil smokes confined in closed chambers. The model employs vapor pressure-percent mass evaporated correlations, which were derived from oil droplet evaporation studies, to predict the saturation requirements of fog, oil, PEG 200 and No. 2 diesel fuel. Comparison of model predictions and experiment indicates good agreement for fog oil and PEG 200 vaporization/condensation yield tests. Both model and experiment demonstrate the inferior yield performance of No. 2 diesel fuel, possessing a yield less than half that of either fog oil or PEG 200. The lower yield performance of No. 2 diesel fuel is due to the high volatility of diesel fuel as compared to fog oil or PEG 200. The model also illustrates the dependency of multicomponent oil yield performances on chamber volume. As a result, while fog oil and PEG200 will be characterized by similar yields at a specific chamber volume, the yield equivalency will not hold at larger chamber volumes. Implications on the liquid smoke-open atmosphere persistency characteristics are discussed. Finally, the hygroscopic nature of PEG 200 is discussed and a model is developed for the prediction of the yield performance of PEG 200 as a function of relative humidity. It is also shown the yield of PEG 200 can exceed that of fog oil under high-relative humidity conditions.

  8. A standard Fricke dosimeter compared to an ionization chamber used for dosimetric characterization of 60Co photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussous, Ouiza; Medjadj, Toufik

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the Fricke dosimeter water equivalent system for measurement of dosimetric parameters for photon beam. The parameters measured with the Fricke dosimeter were compared to those obtained with an ionization chamber. In this work characteristics for 60Co γ-rays of field sizes ranging from 5 × 5 cm2 to 20 × 20 cm2 are reported. The measurements were carried out in the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory using a collimated 60Co gamma source therapy unit. The 60Co beam output in terms of absorbed dose to water was obtained as per IAEA TRS 398 recommendations using cylindrical ionization chamber, whose ND,w has been supplied by the IAEA's reference laboratory. Specific quantities measured include: output factors, peak scatter factor, lateral beam profiles and percentage depth dose. The Fricke dosimeters were irradiated in a water phantom using the suitable poly (methyl methacrylate), PMMA stand. Our results demonstrate that Fricke dosimeter and ionization chamber agree with each other.

  9. Monte Carlo calculation of beam quality correction factors in proton beams using detailed simulation of ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomà, Carles; Andreo, Pedro; Sempau, Josep

    2016-03-01

    This work calculates beam quality correction factors (k Q ) in monoenergetic proton beams using detailed Monte Carlo simulation of ionization chambers. It uses the Monte Carlo code penh and the electronic stopping powers resulting from the adoption of two different sets of mean excitation energy values for water and graphite: (i) the currently ICRU 37 and ICRU 49 recommended {{I}\\text{w}}=75~\\text{eV} and {{I}\\text{g}}=78~\\text{eV} and (ii) the recently proposed {{I}\\text{w}}=78~\\text{eV} and {{I}\\text{g}}=81.1~\\text{eV} . Twelve different ionization chambers were studied. The k Q factors calculated using the two different sets of I-values were found to agree with each other within 1.6% or better. k Q factors calculated using current ICRU I-values were found to agree within 2.3% or better with the k Q factors tabulated in IAEA TRS-398, and within 1% or better with experimental values published in the literature. k Q factors calculated using the new I-values were also found to agree within 1.1% or better with the experimental values. This work concludes that perturbation correction factors in proton beams—currently assumed to be equal to unity—are in fact significantly different from unity for some of the ionization chambers studied.

  10. SMOKE: Characterization of Smoke Particulate for Spacecraft Fire Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Mulholland, G.; Yuan, Z. G.; Yang, J.; Cleary, T.

    2001-01-01

    'Smoke' is a flight definition investigation whose purpose is to characterize the smoke particulate from microgravity smoke sources to enable improved design of future space-craft smoke detectors. In the earliest missions (Mercury, Gemini and Apollo), the crew quarters were so cramped that it was considered reasonable that the astronauts would rapidly detect any fire. The Skylab module, however, included approximately 30 UV-sensing fire detectors. The Space Shuttle Orbiter has nine particle-ionization smoke detectors in the mid-deck and flight deck. The detectors for the US segments of the International Space Station (ISS) are laser-diode, forward-scattering, smoke detectors. Current plans for the ISS call for two detectors in the open area of the module, and detectors in racks that have cooling air-flow. Due to the complete absence of microgravity data, all three of these detector systems were designed based upon 1-g test data and experience. As planned mission durations and complexity increase and the volume of spacecraft increases, the need for and importance of effective, crew-independent, fire detection will grow significantly, necessitating more research into microgravity fire phenomena. In 1997 the Comparative Soot Diagnostics Experiment (CSD) flew in the Orbiter Middeck as a Glovebox payload. The CSD experiment was designed to produce small quantities of smoke from several sources to obtain particulate samples and to determine the response of the ISS and Orbiter smoke detectors to these sources. Marked differences in the performance of the detectors compared to their behavior in 1-g were observed. In extreme cases, the detector used in the orbiter was completely blind to easily visible smoke from sources that were readily detected in 1-g. It is hypothesized but as yet unverified that this performance difference was due to enhanced growth of liquid smoke droplets in low-g. These CSD results clearly demonstrate that spacecraft smoke detector design cannot be

  11. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  14. Using Ionizing Radiation Detectors. Module 11. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on using ionizing radiation detectors. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming and telling the function…

  15. General collection efficiency in liquid iso-octane and tetramethylsilane used as sensitive media in a thimble ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Bengt Erik; Bahar-Gogani, Jalil; Wickman, Göran

    1999-09-01

    The general collection efficiency in the dielectric liquids iso-octane (C8H18; 2-2-4 trimethylpentane) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4), used as sensitive media in a thimble liquid ionization chamber (LIC) with a liquid layer thickness of 1 mm, has been studied. Measurements were made for continuous radiation at varying dose rates using 140 keV photons from the decay of 99mTc for chamber polarizing voltages of 50, 100 and 500 V. The maximum dose rate in each measurement session was about 150 mGy min-1. The experimental results were compared with theoretical general collection efficiencies calculated by the equation for the general collection efficiency in gases. The results show that the general collection efficiency in a thimble LIC for continuous radiation can be calculated with the equation for the general collection efficiency in gas ionization chambers, using the same chamber geometry correction factors and analogous characteristic ion recombination parameters for the dielectric liquids.

  16. A model for the pyrolysis of unfilled and filled polymers and comparisons with NBS smoke-density chamber data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    This paper considers a model for the pyrolysis of polymers for use in mass loss and smoke density predictions in a fire situation. It is based on the fundamental postulate that the overall rate-limiting reactions are in the relatively low temperature condensed phase; the rate limiting step is the polymer degradation to a vaporizable state. The state of the polymer (chain length) at the surface is specified by the vapor pressure equilibrium criterion. For the case of polymers with inert fillers, like alumina trihydrate, the further assumption is made that the linear regression rate of the material is identical to the unfilled material's at the same surface temperature. The fraction of polymer mass loss converted to smoke is inferred from the literature. The smoke density in the NBS-smoke density chamber is predicted for a polyester and the same polyester with two different loads of alumina trihydrate filler. Diffusional effects in the smoke spreading are considered in an elementary manner. The comparisons with experimental data are encouraging. The overall fire characteristics are predicted using only the fundamental physicochemical property values of ingredients.

  17. Direct measurement of absorbed dose to water in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy: Water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Kawrakow, Iwan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Gafchromic film and ionometric calibration procedures for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources in terms of dose rate to water are presented and the experimental results are compared to the TG-43 protocol as well as with the absolute dose measurement results from a water calorimetry-based primary standard. Methods: EBT-1 Gafchromic films, an A1SL Exradin miniature Shonka thimble type chamber, and an SI HDR 1000 Plus well-type chamber (Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI) with an ADCL traceable S{sub k} calibration coefficient (following the AAPM TG-43 protocol) were used. The Farmer chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were performed directly in water. All results were compared to direct and absolute absorbed dose to water measurements from a 4 deg. C stagnant water calorimeter. Results: Based on water calorimetry, the authors measured the dose rate to water to be 361{+-}7 {mu}Gy/(h U) at a 55 mm source-to-detector separation. The dose rate normalized to air-kerma strength for all the techniques agree with the water calorimetry results to within 0.83%. The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43 dose rate measurement amounts to 1.90%, 1.44%, 1.78%, and 2.50%, respectively. Conclusions: This work allows us to build a more realistic uncertainty estimate for absorbed dose to water determination using the TG-43 protocol. Furthermore, it provides the framework necessary for a shift from indirect HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy dosimetry to a more accurate, direct, and absolute measurement of absorbed dose to water.

  18. Effects of ionization chamber construction on dose measurements in a heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Mauceri, T.; Kase, K.

    1987-07-01

    Traditionally, measurements have been made in heterogeneous phantoms to determine the factors which should be applied to dose calculations, when calculating a dose to a heterogeneous medium. Almost all measurements have relied on relatively thin-walled ion chambers, with no attempt to match ion chamber wall material to the measuring medium. The recent AAPM dosimetry protocol has established that a mismatch between ion chamber wall and phantom material can have an effect on dose measurement. To investigate the affect of this mismatch of ion chamber wall material to phantom material, two parallel-plate ion chambers were constructed. One ion chamber from solid water, for measurements in a solid water phantom and the other from plastic lung material, for measurements in a plastic lung material phantom. Correction factors measured by matching ion chamber to media were compared to correction factors measured by using a thin-walled cavity ion chamber with no regard for matching wall and media for cobalt-60, 6-, 10- and 20-MV photon beams. The results demonstrated that the matching of ion chamber to measuring media can be ignored, provided that a small, approximately tissue-equivalent, thin-walled ion chamber is used for measuring the correction factors.

  19. Investigation of particle and vapor wall-loss effects on controlled wood-smoke smog-chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; May, A. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    Smog chambers are extensively used to study processes that drive gas and particle evolution in the atmosphere. A limitation of these experiments is that particles and gas-phase species may be lost to chamber walls on shorter timescales than the timescales of the atmospheric processes being studied in the chamber experiments. These particle and vapor wall losses have been investigated in recent studies of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, but they have not been systematically investigated in experiments of primary emissions from combustion. The semi-volatile nature of combustion emissions (e.g. from wood smoke) may complicate the behavior of particle and vapor wall deposition in the chamber over the course of the experiments due to the competition between gas/particle and gas/wall partitioning. Losses of vapors to the walls may impact particle evaporation in these experiments, and potential precursors for SOA formation from combustion may be lost to the walls, causing underestimates of aerosol yields. Here, we conduct simulations to determine how particle and gas-phase wall losses contributed to the observed evolution of the aerosol during experiments in the third Fire Lab At Missoula Experiment (FLAME III). We use the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics algorithm coupled with the organic volatility basis set (VBS) and wall-loss formulations to examine the predicted extent of particle and vapor wall losses. We limit the scope of our study to the dark periods in the chamber before photo-oxidation to simplify the aerosol system for this initial study. Our model simulations suggest that over one third of the initial particle-phase organic mass (36%) was lost during the experiments, and roughly half of this particle organic mass loss was from direct particle wall loss (56% of the loss) with the remainder from evaporation of the particles driven by vapor losses to the walls (44% of the loss). We perform a series of sensitivity tests to understand

  20. Investigation of particle and vapor wall-loss effects on controlled wood-smoke smog-chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; May, A. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    Smog chambers are extensively used to study processes that drive gas and particle evolution in the atmosphere. A limitation of these experiments is that particles and gas-phase species may be lost to chamber walls on shorter timescales than the timescales of the atmospheric processes being studied in the chamber experiments. These particle and vapor wall losses have been investigated in recent studies of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, but they have not been systematically investigated in experiments of primary emissions from combustion. The semi-volatile nature of combustion emissions (e.g. from wood smoke) may complicate the behavior of particle and vapor wall deposition in the chamber over the course of the experiments due to the competition between gas/particle and gas/wall partitioning. Losses of vapors to the walls may impact particle evaporation in these experiments, and potential precursors for SOA formation from combustion may be lost to the walls, causing underestimations of aerosol yields. Here, we conduct simulations to determine how particle and gas-phase wall losses contributed to the observed evolution of the aerosol during experiments in the third Fire Lab At Missoula Experiment (FLAME III). We use the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics algorithm coupled with the organic volatility basis set (VBS) and wall-loss formulations to examine the predicted extent of particle and vapor wall losses. We limit the scope of our study to the dark periods in the chamber before photo-oxidation to simplify the aerosol system for this initial study. Our model simulations suggest that over one-third of the initial particle-phase organic mass (41 %) was lost during the experiments, and over half of this particle-organic mass loss was from direct particle wall loss (65 % of the loss) with the remainder from evaporation of the particles driven by vapor losses to the walls (35 % of the loss). We perform a series of sensitivity tests to understand

  1. Development of TOF-PET detectors based on the Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, U.; Borghi, G.; Bucciantonio, M.; Kieffer, R.; Samarati, J.; Sauli, F.; Watts, D.

    2015-04-01

    We describe the development, construction and preliminary results obtained with medium-size Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chambers prototypes designed to detect and localize 511 keV photons for Positron Emission Tomography imaging applications. The devices are intended for in-beam monitoring of the treatment plans throughout deep tumor therapy with hadron beams; emphasis is put on achieving coincidence time resolutions of few hundred ps, in order to exploit optimized reconstruction algorithm and reduce the heavy non-correlated background contributions distinctive of this operation. Using technologies developed for high energy physics experiments, the detectors can be built for covering large areas, thus leading the way to the conception of full-body PET systems at low cost.

  2. A new method for total OH reactivity measurements using a fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-05-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were equivalent to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  3. Electron beam quality correction factors for plane-parallel ionization chambers: Monte Carlo calculations using the PENELOPE system.

    PubMed

    Sempau, Josep; Andreo, Pedro; Aldana, Judith; Mazurier, Jocelyne; Salvat, Francesc

    2004-09-21

    Simulations of three plane-parallel ionization chambers have been used to determine directly the chamber- and quality-dependent factors fc,Q, instead of the product (Sw,air p)Q, and kQ,Q0 (or kQ,Q,int) for a broad range of electron beam qualities (4-20 MeV) using divergent monoenergetic beams and phase-space data from two accelerators. An original calculation method has been used which circumvents the weakness of the so far assumed independence between stopping-power ratios and perturbation factors. Very detailed descriptions of the geometry and materials of the chambers have been obtained from the manufacturers, and prepared as input to the PENELOPE 2003 Monte Carlo system using a computer code that includes correlated sampling and particle splitting. Values of the beam quality factors have been determined for the case of an electron reference beam. The calculated values have been compared with those in the IAEA TRS-398 dosimetry protocol and the differences analysed. The results for a NACP-02 chamber show remarkably good agreement with TRS-398 at high electron beam qualities but differ slightly at low energies. Arguments to explain the differences include questioning the undemonstrated assumption that the NACP is a 'perturbation-free' chamber even at very low electron beam energies. Results for Wellhöfer PPC-40 and PPC-05 chambers cannot be compared with data from others for these chambers because no calculations or reliable experimental data exist. It has been found that the results for the PPC-40 are very close to those of a Roos chamber, but the values for the PPC-05 are considerably different from those of a Markus chamber, and rather approach those of a Roos chamber. Results for monoenergetic electrons and accelerator phase-space data have been compared to assess the need for detailed and costly simulations, finding very small differences. This questions the emphasis given in recent years to the use of 'realistic' source data for accurate electron beam

  4. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife® unit reference field using ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón-Martínez, Nestor; Gómez-Muñoz, Arnulfo; Massillon-JL, Guerda

    2014-11-01

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian® iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism1. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm × 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm × 10 cm and 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife® conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm × 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife® conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  5. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife® unit reference field using ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Aragón-Martínez, Nestor Massillon-JL, Guerda; Gómez-Muñoz, Arnulfo

    2014-11-07

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian® iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism{sup 1}. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm × 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm × 10 cm and 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife® conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm × 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife® conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  6. Detector Characterization Report, Response Related to Linear Movement and Radiation Levels for an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)-Developed Ion Chamber and a Commercial Ion Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaro, P.J.

    2001-01-11

    Recent activities regarding the safeguarding of radioactive material have indicated there is a need to use radiation sensors to monitor intentional or unintentional material movement. Existing radiation detection systems were not typically designed for this type of operation since most of their use accounted for monitoring material while the material is stationary. To ensure that a radiation monitoring system is capable of detecting the movement of radioactive material, a series of tests were needed. These tests would need to be performed in known radiological conditions, under controlled environmental conditions, and at known movement speeds. The Radiation Effects Facility (REF), located at the Radiation Calibration Laboratory, provided the necessary capabilities to perform these tests. This report provides a compilation of the results from a characterization of two different sensors--a simple, air ionization chamber-based sensor developed at ORNL that consists of an ion chamber connected to a separate amplifier, and an Eberline model RO-7-LD. The RO-7-LD is also an air ionization chamber-based sensor, but the electronics are in the same physical package.

  7. An experimental study of recombination and polarity effect in a set of customized plane parallel ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Kron, T; McNiven, A; Witruk, B; Kenny, M; Battista, J

    2006-12-01

    Plane parallel ionization chambers are an important tool for dosimetry and absolute calibration of electron beams used for radiotherapy. Most dosimetric protocols require corrections for recombination and polarity effects, which are to be determined experimentally as they depend on chamber design and radiation quality. Both effects were investigated in electron beams from a linear accelerator (Varian 21CD) for a set of four tissue equivalent plane parallel ionization chambers customized for the present research by Standard Imaging (Madison WI). All four chambers share the same design and air cavity dimensions, differing only in the diameter of their collecting electrode and the corresponding width of the guard ring. The diameters of the collecting electrodes were 2 mm, 4 mm, 10 mm and 20 mm. Measurements were taken using electron beams of nominal energy 6 to 20 MeV in a 10 cm x 10 cm field size with a SSD of 100 cm at various depths in a Solid Water slab phantom. No significant variation of recombination effect was found with radiation quality, depth of measurement or chamber design. However, the polarity effect exceeded 5% for the chambers with small collecting electrode for an effective electron energy below 4 MeV at the point of measurement. The magnitude of the effect increased with decreasing electron energy in the phantom. The polarity correction factor calculated following AAPM protocol TG51 ranged from approximately 1.00 for the 20.0 mm chamber to less than 0.95 for the 2 mm chamber at 4.1 cm depth in a electron beam of nominally 12 MeV. By inverting the chamber it could be shown that the polarity effect did not depend on the polarity of the electrode first traversed by the electron beam. Similarly, the introduction of an air gap between the overlying phantom layer and the chambers demonstrated that the angular distribution of the electrons at the point of measurement had a lesser effect on the polarity correction than the electron energy itself. The

  8. Testing of multigap Resistive Plate Chambers for Electron Ion Collider Detector Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Hannah; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Despite decades of research on the subject, some details of the spin structure of the nucleon continues to be unknown. To improve our knowledge of the nucleon spin structure, the construction of a new collider is needed. This is one of the primary goals of the proposed Electron Ion Collider (EIC). Planned EIC spectrometers will require good particle identification. This can be provided by time of flight (TOF) detectors with excellent timing resolutions of 10 ps. A potential TOF detector that could meet this requirement is a glass multigap resistive plate chamber (mRPC). These mRPCs can provide excellent timing resolution at a low cost. The current glass mRPC prototypes have a total of twenty 0.1 mm thick gas gaps. In order to test the feasibility of this design, a cosmic test stand was assembled. This stand used the coincidence of scintillators as a trigger, and contains fast electronics. The construction, the method of testing, and the test results of the mRPCs will be presented.

  9. The analog Resistive Plate Chamber detector of the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, B.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Branchini, P.; Budano, A.; Camarri, P.; Cao, Z.; Cardarelli, R.; Catalanotti, S.; Chen, S. Z.; Chen, T. L.; Creti, P.; Cui, S. W.; Dai, B. Z.; D'Amone, A.; Danzengluobu; De Mitri, I.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Sciascio, G.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, H. H.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M.; Iuppa, R.; Jia, H. Y.; Labaciren; Li, H. J.; Liguori, G.; Liu, C.; Liu, J.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, X. H.; Mancarella, G.; Mari, S. M.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Mastroianni, S.; Montini, P.; Ning, C. C.; Panareo, M.; Perrone, L.; Pistilli, P.; Ruggieri, F.; Salvini, P.; Santonico, R.; Shen, P. R.; Sheng, X. D.; Shi, F.; Surdo, A.; Tan, Y. H.; Vallania, P.; Vernetto, S.; Vigorito, C.; Wang, H.; Wu, C. Y.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yang, Q. Y.; Yang, X. C.; Yao, Z. G.; Yuan, A. F.; Zha, M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zhaxiciren; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.; Zhu, F. R.; Zhu, Q. Q.; Zizzi, G.

    2015-07-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment has been in stable data taking from November 2007 till February 2013 at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Observatory (4300 m a.s.l.). The detector consists of a single layer of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) (6700 m2) operated in streamer mode. The signal pick-up is obtained by means of strips facing one side of the gas volume. The digital readout of the signals, while allows a high space-time resolution in the shower front reconstruction, limits the measurable energy to a few hundred TeV. In order to fully investigate the 1-10 PeV region, an analog readout has been implemented by instrumenting each RPC with two large size electrodes facing the other side of the gas volume. Since December 2009 the RPC charge readout has been in operation on the entire central carpet (∼5800 m2). In this configuration the detector is able to measure the particle density at the core position where it ranges from tens to many thousands of particles per m2. Thus ARGO-YBJ provides a highly detailed image of the charge component at the core of air showers. In this paper we describe the analog readout of RPCs in ARGO-YBJ and discuss both the performance of the system and the physical impact on the EAS measurements.

  10. Characterization of 2 MeV, 4 MeV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV buildup caps for use with a 0.6 cubic centimeter thimble ionization chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, R.L.; VanDenburg, J.W.; Prinja, A.K.; Kirby, T.; Busch, R.; Hong-Nian Jow

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV and 6 MeV buildup caps, and to determine if a buildup cap can be made for the 0.6 cm{sup 3} thimble ionization chamber that will accurately measure exposures in a high-energy photon radiation field. Two different radiation transport codes were used to computationally characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV, and 6 MeV buildup caps for a 0.6 cm{sup 3} active volume thimble ionization chamber: ITS, The Integrated TIGER Series of Coupled Electron-Photon Monte Carlo Transport Codes; and CEPXS/ONEDANT, A One-Dimensional Coupled Electron-Photon Discrete Ordinates Code Package. These codes were also used to determine the design characteristics of a buildup cap for use in the 18 MeV photon beam produced by the 14 TW pulsed power HERMES-III electron accelerator. The maximum range of the secondary electron, the depth at which maximum dose occurs, and the point where dose and collision kerma are equal have been determined to establish the validity of electronic equilibrium. The ionization chamber with the appropriate buildup cap was then subjected to a 4 MeV and a 6 MeV bremmstrahlung radiation spectrum to determine the detector response.

  11. Derivation of a formula describing the saturation correction of plane-parallel ionization chambers in pulsed fields with arbitrary repetition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsch, Leonhard

    2016-04-01

    Gas-filled ionization chambers are widely used radiation detectors in radiotherapy. A quantitative description and correction of the recombination effects exists for two cases, for continuous radiation exposure and for pulsed radiation fields with short single pulses. This work gives a derivation of a formula for pulsed beams with arbitrary pulse rate for which the prerequisites of the two existing descriptions are not fulfilled. Furthermore, an extension of the validity of the two known cases is investigated. The temporal evolution of idealized charge density distributions within a plane parallel chamber volume is described for pulsed beams of vanishing pulse duration and arbitrary pulse repetition rate. First, the radiation induced release, movement and collection of the charge carriers without recombination are considered. Then, charge recombination is calculated basing on these simplified charge distributions and the time dependent spatial overlap of positive and negative charge carrier distributions. Finally, a formula for the calculation of the saturation correction factor is derived by calculation and simplification of the first two terms of a Taylor expansion for small recombination. The new formula of saturation correction contains the two existing cases, descriptions for exposure by single pulses and continuous irradiation, as limiting cases. Furthermore, it is possible to determine the pulse rate range for which each of the three descriptions is applicable by comparing the dependencies of the new formula with the two existing cases. As long as the time between two pulses is lower than one third of the collection time of the chamber, the formalism for a continuous exposure can be used. The known description for single pulse irradiation is only valid if the repetition rate is less than 1.2 times the inverse collection time. For all other repetition rates in between the new formula should be used. The experimental determination by Jaffe diagrams can be

  12. Evaluation of dosimetric characteristics of multi-leaf and conventional collimated radiation fields using a scanning liquid ionization chamber EPID.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, M; Bezak, E

    2008-12-01

    The characteristics of radiation fields set up using conventional and Multi-Leaf collimators were investigated using a Scanning Liquid Ionization Chamber Electronic Portal Imaging Device (SLIC-EPID). Results showed that the radiation fields set up using MLCs are generally larger than those set up using conventional collimators. A significant difference was observed between the penumbra width for conventional and MLC radiation fields. SLIC-EPID was found to be a sensitive device to evaluate the characteristics of the radiation fields generated with MLCs.

  13. Discovery of multiple, ionization-created CS{sub 2} anions and a new mode of operation for drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Snowden-Ifft, Daniel P.

    2014-01-15

    This paper focuses on the surprising discovery of multiple species of ionization-created CS{sub 2} anions in gas mixtures containing electronegative CS{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, identified by their slightly different drift velocities. Data are presented to understand the formation mechanism and identity of these new anions. Regardless of the micro-physics, however, this discovery offers a new, trigger-less mode of operation for the drift chambers. A demonstration of trigger-less operation is presented.

  14. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Software alignment of the BESIII main drift chamber using the Kalman Filter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-Ke; Mao, Ze-Pu; Bian, Jian-Ming; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chen, Shen-Jian; Deng, Zi-Yan; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Gao, Yuan-Ning; He, Kang-Lin; He, Miao; Hua, Chun-Fei; Huang, Bin; Huang, Xing-Tao; Ji, Xiao-Bin; Li, Fei; Li, Hai-Bo; Li, Wei-Dong; Liang, Yu-Tie; Liu, Chun-Xiu; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Suo; Liu, Ying-Jie; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Mao, Ya-Jun; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Pan, Ming-Hua; Pang, Cai-Ying; Ping, Rong-Gang; Qin, Ya-Hong; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Sun, Yong-Zhao; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wen, Shuo-Pin; Wu, Ling-Hui; Xie, Yu-Guang; Xu, Min; Yan, Liang; You, Zheng-Yun; Yuan, Chang-Zheng; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Bing-Yun; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Yang-Heng; Zhu, Ke-Jun; Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Zhu, Zhi-Li; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2009-03-01

    Software alignment is quite important for a tracking detector to reach its ultimate position accuracy and momentum resolution. We developed a new alignment algorithm for the BESIII Main Drift Chamber using the Kalman Filter method. Two different types of data which are helix tracks and straight tracks are used to test this algorithm, and the results show that the design and implementation is successful.

  15. The response of smoke detectors to pyrolysis and combustion products from aircraft interior materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, R. G.; Alvares, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The following projects were completed as part of the effort to develop and test economically feasible fire-resistant materials for interior furnishings of aircraft as well as detectors of incipient fires in passenger and cargo compartments: (1) determination of the sensitivity of various contemporary gas and smoke detectors to pyrolysis and combustion products from materials commonly used in aircraft interiors and from materials that may be used in the future, (2) assessment of the environmental limitations to detector sensitivity and reliability. The tests were conducted on three groups of materials by exposure to the following three sources of exposure: radiant and Meeker burner flame, heated coil, and radiant source only. The first test series used radiant heat and flame exposures on easily obtainable test materials. Next, four materials were selected from the first group and exposed to an incandescent coil to provide the conditions for smoldering combustion. Finally, radiant heat exposures were used on advanced materials that are not readily available.

  16. Positioning of a plane-parallel ionization chamber in clinical electron beams and the impact on perturbation factors.

    PubMed

    Zink, K; Wulff, J

    2009-04-21

    Current dosimetry protocols recommend the use of plane-parallel ionization chambers for the dosimetry of clinical electron beams. The necessary perturbation corrections p(wall) and p(cav) are assumed to be unity, independent of the depth of measurement and the energy of the primary electrons. To verify these assumptions detailed Monte Carlo studies of a Roos chamber in clinical electron beams with energies in the range of 6-21 MeV are performed at different depths in water and analyzed in terms of Spencer-Attix cavity theory. Separate simulations for the perturbation corrections p(wall) and p(cav) indicate quite different properties of both correction factors with depth. Dose as well as fluence calculations show a nearly depth-independent wall correction factor for a shift of the Roos chamber Deltaz = -0.017 cm toward the focus. This value is in good agreement with the positioning recommendation given in all dosimetry protocols. Regarding the fluence perturbation p(cav) the simulation of the electron fluence inside the air cavity in comparison to water unambiguously reveals an in-scattering of low energy electrons, despite the fact, that the cavity is 'well guarded'. For depths beyond the reference depth z(ref) this effect is superimposed by an increased loss of primary electrons from the beam resulting in p(cav) > 1. This effect is largest for low electron energies but present for all electron energies involved in this study. Based on the different depth dependences of p(wall) and p(cav) it is possible to choose a chamber shift Deltaz in a way to minimize the depth dependence of the overall perturbation factor p. For the Roos chamber this shift is Deltaz = -0.04 cm independent of electron energy.

  17. Dosimetric parameters for small field sizes using Fricke xylenol gel, thermoluminescent and film dosimeters, and an ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Calcina, Carmen S Guzmán; de Oliveira, Lucas N; de Almeida, Carlos E; de Almeida, Adelaide

    2007-03-01

    Dosimetric measurements in small therapeutic x-ray beam field sizes, such as those used in radiosurgery, that have dimensions comparable to or smaller than the build-up depth, require special care to avoid incorrect interpretation of measurements in regions of high gradients and electronic disequilibrium. These regions occur at the edges of any collimated field, and can extend to the centre of small fields. An inappropriate dosimeter can result in an underestimation, which would lead to an overdose to the patient. We have performed a study of square and circular small field sizes of 6 MV photons using a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD), Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) and film dosimeters. PMMA phantoms were employed to measure lateral beam profiles (1 x 1, 3 x 3 and 5 x 5 cm2 for square fields and 1, 2 and 4 cm diameter circular fields), the percentage depth dose, the tissue maximum ratio and the output factor. An ionization chamber (IC) was used for calibration and comparison. Our results demonstrate that high resolution FXG, TLD and film dosimeters agree with each other, and that an ionization chamber, with low lateral resolution, underestimates the absorbed dose. Our results show that, when planning small field radiotherapy, dosimeters with adequate lateral spatial resolution and tissue equivalence are required to provide an accurate basic beam data set to correctly calculate the absorbed dose in regions of electronic disequilibrium.

  18. The development of new devices for accurate radiation dose measurement: A guarded liquid ionization chamber and an electron sealed water calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Kristin J.

    In this work we developed two new devices that aim to improve the accuracy of relative and reference dosimetry for radiation therapy: a guarded liquid ionization chamber (GLIC) and an electron sealed water (ESW) calorimeter. With the GLIC we aimed to develop a perturbation-free energy-independent detector with high spatial resolution for relative dosimetry. We achieved sufficient stability for short-term measurements using the GLIC-03, which has a sensitive volume of approximately 2 mm3. We evaluated ion recombination in pulsed photon beams using a theoretical model and also determined a new empirical method to correct for relative differences in general recombination which could be used in cases where the theoretical model was not applicable. The energy dependence of the GLIC-03 was 1.1% between 6 and 18 MV photon beams. Measurements in the build-up region of an 18 MV beam indicated that this detector produces minimal perturbation to the radiation field and confirmed the validity of the empirical recombination correction. The ESW calorimeter was designed to directly measure absorbed dose to water in clinical electron beams. We obtained reproducible measurements for 6 to 20 MeV beams. We determined corrections for perturbations to the radiation field caused by the glass calorimeter vessel and for conductive heat transfer due to the dose gradient and non-water materials. The overall uncertainty on the ESW calorimeter dose was 0.5% for the 9 to 20 MeV beams and 1.0% for 6 MeV, showing for the first time that the development of a water-calorimeter-based standard for electron beams over a wide range of energies is feasible. Comparison between measurements with the ESW calorimeter and the NRC photon beam standard calorimeter in a 6 MeV beam revealed a discrepancy of 0.7+/-0.2% which is still under investigation. Absorbed-dose beam quality conversion factors in electron beams were measured using the ESW calorimeter for the Exradin A12 and PTW Roos ionization chambers

  19. Experimental investigation of the effect of air cavity size in cylindrical ionization chambers on the measurements in ⁶⁰Co radiotherapy beams.

    PubMed

    Swanpalmer, John; Johansson, Karl-Axel

    2011-11-21

    In the late 1970s, Johansson et al (1978 Int. Symp. National and International Standardization of Radiation Dosimetry (Atlanta 1977) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) pp 243-70) reported experimentally determined displacement correction factors (p(dis)) for cylindrical ionization chamber dosimetry in ⁶⁰Co and high-energy photon beams. These p(dis) factors have been implemented and are currently in use in a number of dosimetry protocols. However, the accuracy of these factors has recently been questioned by Wang and Rogers (2009a Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1609-20), who performed Monte Carlo simulations of the experiments performed by Johansson et al. They reported that the inaccuracy of the p(dis) factors originated from the normalization procedure used by Johansson et al. In their experiments, Johansson et al normalized the measured depth-ionization curves at the depth of maximum ionization for each of the different ionization chambers. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of air cavity size of cylindrical ionization chambers in a PMMA phantom and ⁶⁰Co γ-beam. Two different pairs of air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers were used. The chambers in each pair had identical construction and materials but different air cavity volume (diameter). A 20 MeV electron beam was utilized to determine the ratio of the mass of air in the cavity of the two chambers in each pair. This ratio of the mass of air in each pair was then used to compare the ratios of the ionizations obtained at different depths in the PMMA phantom and ⁶⁰Co γ-beam using the two pairs of chambers. The diameter of the air cavity of cylindrical ionization chambers influences both the depth at which the maximum ionization is observed and the ionization per unit mass of air at this depth. The correction determined at depths of 50 mm and 100 mm is smaller than the correction currently used in many dosimetry protocols. The results presented here agree with the findings of Wang and Rogers

  20. Experimental investigation of the effect of air cavity size in cylindrical ionization chambers on the measurements in 60Co radiotherapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanpalmer, John; Johansson, Karl-Axel

    2011-11-01

    In the late 1970s, Johansson et al (1978 Int. Symp. National and International Standardization of Radiation Dosimetry (Atlanta 1977) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) pp 243-70) reported experimentally determined displacement correction factors (pdis) for cylindrical ionization chamber dosimetry in 60Co and high-energy photon beams. These pdis factors have been implemented and are currently in use in a number of dosimetry protocols. However, the accuracy of these factors has recently been questioned by Wang and Rogers (2009a Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1609-20), who performed Monte Carlo simulations of the experiments performed by Johansson et al. They reported that the inaccuracy of the pdis factors originated from the normalization procedure used by Johansson et al. In their experiments, Johansson et al normalized the measured depth-ionization curves at the depth of maximum ionization for each of the different ionization chambers. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of air cavity size of cylindrical ionization chambers in a PMMA phantom and 60Co γ-beam. Two different pairs of air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers were used. The chambers in each pair had identical construction and materials but different air cavity volume (diameter). A 20 MeV electron beam was utilized to determine the ratio of the mass of air in the cavity of the two chambers in each pair. This ratio of the mass of air in each pair was then used to compare the ratios of the ionizations obtained at different depths in the PMMA phantom and 60Co γ-beam using the two pairs of chambers. The diameter of the air cavity of cylindrical ionization chambers influences both the depth at which the maximum ionization is observed and the ionization per unit mass of air at this depth. The correction determined at depths of 50 mm and 100 mm is smaller than the correction currently used in many dosimetry protocols. The results presented here agree with the findings of Wang and Rogers' Monte Carlo

  1. The iQID Camera: An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Barber, Bradford H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-06-11

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detectors response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The detector’s response to a broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier andmore » then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. Individual particles are identified and their spatial position (to sub-pixel accuracy) and energy are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, high sensitivity, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discrimate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is single-particle, real-time digital autoradiography. In conclusion, we present the latest results and discuss potential applications.« less

  2. The iQID Camera: An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Barber, Bradford H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-06-11

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detectors response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The detector’s response to a broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. Individual particles are identified and their spatial position (to sub-pixel accuracy) and energy are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, high sensitivity, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discrimate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is single-particle, real-time digital autoradiography. In conclusion, we present the latest results and discuss potential applications.

  3. Investigation and performance tests of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with double sensitive volume for measuring diagnostic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, B.; Zamani Zeinali, H.; Soltani, J.; Negarestani, A.; Shahvar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Medical diagnostic equipment, like diagnostic radiology and mammography require a dosimeter with high accuracy for dosimetry of the diagnostic X-ray beam. Ionization chambers are suitable instruments for dosimetry of diagnostic-range X-ray beams because of their appropriate response and high reliability. This work introduces the design and fabrication of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with a PMMA body, graphite-coated PMMA windows (0.5 mm thick) and a graphite-foil central electrode (0.1 mm thick, 0.7 g/cm3 dense). This design improves upon the response characteristics of existing designs through the specific choice of materials as well as the appropriate size and arrangement of the ionization chamber components. The results of performance tests conducted at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry laboratory in Karaj-Iran demonstrated the short and long-term stability, the low leakage current, the low directional dependence, and the high ion collection efficiency of the design. Furthermore, the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations confirmed the low effect of central electrode on this new ionization chamber response. The response characteristics of the parallel plate ionization chamber presented in this work makes the instrument suitable for use as a standard dosimeter in laboratories.

  4. SU-D-19A-01: Can Farmer-Type Ionization Chambers Be Used to Improve the Accuracy of Low-Energy Electron Beam Reference Dosimetry?

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of cylindrical Farmer-type ionization chambers to improve the accuracy of low-energy electron beam calibration. Historically, these chamber types have not been used in beams with incident energies less than 10 MeV (R{sub 5} {sub 0} < 4.3 cm) because early investigations suggested large (up to 5 %) fluence perturbation factors in these beams, implying that a significant component of uncertainty would be introduced if used for calibration. More recently, the assumptions used to determine perturbation corrections for cylindrical chambers have been questioned. Methods: Measurements are made with cylindrical chambers in Elekta Precise 4, 8 and 18 MeV electron beams. Several chamber types are investigated that employ graphite walls and aluminum electrodes with very similar specifications (NE2571, NE2505/3, FC65-G). Depth-ionization scans are measured in water in the 8 and 18 MeV beams. To reduce uncertainty from chamber positioning, measurements in the 4 MeV beam are made at the reference depth in Virtual Water™. The variability of perturbation factors is quantified by comparing normalized response of various chambers. Results: Normalized ion chamber response varies by less than 0.7 % for similar chambers at average electron energies corresponding to that at the reference depth from 4 or 6 MeV beams. Similarly, normalized measurements made with similar chambers at the reference depth in the 4 MeV beam vary by less than 0.4 %. Absorbed dose calibration coefficients derived from these results are stable within 0.1 % on average over a period of 6 years. Conclusion: These results indicate that the uncertainty associated with differences in fluence perturbations for cylindrical chambers with similar specifications is only 0.2 %. The excellent long-term stability of these chambers in both photon and electron beams suggests that these chambers might offer the best performance for all reference dosimetry applications.

  5. Influence of solvothermal synthesis conditions in BiSI nanostructures for application in ionizing radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, I.; Mombrú, M.; Pérez Barthaburu, M.; Bentos Pereira, H.; Fornaro, L.

    2016-02-01

    BiSI belongs to the A V B VI C VII chalcohalides group of compounds. These compounds show several interesting properties such as ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity along the c axis, and photoconductivity. Moreover, BiSI is a potential semiconductor material for room-temperature gamma and x-ray detection, given its band gap of 1.57 eV and its high density, 6.41 g cm-3. In this work we present BiSI nanostructures synthesized by the solvothermal method with the intention of using them for ionizing radiation detection. The solvent was varied to study its influence in morphology, particle size and size distribution. Three different conditions were tested, using either water, monoethylene glycol and a mixture of both solvents. Nanostructures were characterized by XRD to determine the phase obtained and reaction completeness; TEM was used to observe nanostructures morphology, size, size distribution and crystallinity; and finally FT-IR diffuse reflectance was used to study monoethylene glycol presence in the samples. Nanorods in the range of 100-200 nm width were obtained in all samples, but round nanoparticles of around 10 nm in diameter were also detected in samples synthesized only with monoethylene glycol. Samples synthesized in monoethylene glycol were used to fabricate pellets to construct detectors. The detectors responded to ionizing radiation and a resistivity in the order of 1013 Ω cm was estimated. This work proposes, to our knowledge, the first study of BiSI for its application in ionizing radiation detection.

  6. Detectors for alpha particles and X-rays operating in ambient air in pulse counting mode or/and with gas amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpak, G.; Benaben, P.; Breuil, P.; Peskov, V.

    2008-02-01

    Ionization chambers working in ambient air in current detection mode are attractive due to their simplicity and low cost and are widely used in several applications such as smoke detection, dosimetry, therapeutic beam monitoring and so on. The aim of this work was to investigate if gaseous detectors can operate in ambient air in pulse counting mode as well as with gas amplification which potentially offers the highest possible sensitivity in applications like alpha particle detection or high energy X-ray photon or electron detection. To investigate the feasibility of this method two types of open- end gaseous detectors were build and successfully tested. The first one was a single wire or multiwire cylindrical geometry detector operating in pulse mode at a gas gain of one (pulse ionization chamber). This detector was readout by a custom made wide -band charge sensitive amplifier able to deal with slow induced signals generated by slow motion of negative and positive ions. The multiwire detector was able to detect alpha particles with an efficiency close to 22%. The second type of an alpha detector was an innovative GEM-like detector with resistive electrodes operating in air in avalanche mode at high gas gains (up to 104). This detector can also operate in a cascaded mode or being combined with other detectors, for example with MICROMEGAS. This detector was readout by a conventional charge -sensitive amplifier and was able to detect alpha particles with 100% efficiency. This detector could also detect X-ray photons or fast electrons. A detailed comparison between these two detectors is given as well as a comparison with commercially available alpha detectors. The main advantages of gaseous detectors operating in air in a pulse detection mode are their simplicity, low cost and high sensitivity. One of the possible applications of these new detectors is alpha particle background monitors which, due to their low cost can find wide application not only in houses, but

  7. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, K.; Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von; Looe, H. K.; Harder, D.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known “inscattering effect,” whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the in–out balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the in–out balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the

  8. Characterization of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber with the Valencia lodgment for (125)I seed verification.

    PubMed

    Tornero-López, Ana M; Torres Del Río, Julia; Ruiz, Carmen; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Guirado, Damián; Lallena, Antonio M

    2015-12-01

    In brachytherapy using (125)I seed implants, a verification of the air kerma strength of the sources used is required. Typically, between 40 and 100 seeds are implanted. Checking all of them is unaffordable, especially when seeds are disposed in sterile cartridges. Recently, a new procedure allowing the accomplishment of the international recommendations has been proposed for the seedSelectron system of Elekta Brachytherapy. In this procedure, the SourceCheck ionization chamber is used with a special lodgment (Valencia lodgment) that allows to measure up to 10 seeds simultaneously. In this work we analyze this procedure, showing the feasibility of the approximations required for its application, as well as the effect of the additional dependence with the air density that shows the chamber model used. Uncertainty calculations and the verification of the approximation needed to obtain a calibration factor for the Valencia lodgment are carried out. The results of the present work show that the chamber dependence with the air density is the same whether the Valencia lodgment is used or not. On the contrary, the chamber response profile is influenced by the presence of the lodgment. The determination of this profile requires various measurements due to the nonnegligible variability found between different experiments. If it is considered, the uncertainty in the determination of the air-kerma strength increases from 0.5% to 1%. Otherwise, a systematic additional uncertainty of 1% would occur. This could be relevant for the comparison between user and manufacturer measurements that is mandatory in the case studied here.

  9. Intelligent monitor functional model with ionization chamber for mixed nuclear radiation field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Valcov, N.; Purghel, L.; Celarel, A.

    1998-12-31

    By using the statistical discrimination technique, the components of an ionization current, due to a mixed radiation field, may be simultaneously measured. A functional model, including a series manufactured gamma-ray ratemeter was done, as an intermediate step in the design of specialized nuclear instrumentation, in order to check the concept of statistical discrimination method. The obtained results are in good agreement with the estimations of the statistical discrimination method.

  10. The iQID camera: An ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Barber, H. Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detector’s response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The confirmed response to this broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated by particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. The spatial location and energy of individual particles are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, excellent detection efficiency for charged particles, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discriminate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is real-time, single-particle digital autoradiography. We present the latest results and discuss potential applications. PMID:26166921

  11. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310... for radiation detectors. Radiation detectors, radiation sensors, electron tube devices, or ionization chambers, herein referred to as “radiation detectors,” that contain only Division 2.2 gases, are...

  12. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310... for radiation detectors. Radiation detectors, radiation sensors, electron tube devices, or ionization chambers, herein referred to as “radiation detectors,” that contain only Division 2.2 gases, are...

  13. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310... for radiation detectors. Radiation detectors, radiation sensors, electron tube devices, or ionization chambers, herein referred to as “radiation detectors,” that contain only Division 2.2 gases, are...

  14. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310... for radiation detectors. Radiation detectors, radiation sensors, electron tube devices, or ionization chambers, herein referred to as “radiation detectors,” that contain only Division 2.2 gases, are...

  15. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310... for radiation detectors. Radiation detectors, radiation sensors, electron tube devices, or ionization chambers, herein referred to as “radiation detectors,” that contain only Division 2.2 gases, are...

  16. Pulse-Shape Analysis of Ionization Signals in Cryogenic Ge Detectors for Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, N.; Broniatowski, A.; Eitel, K.; Marnieros, S.; Paul, B.; Piro, M.-C.; Siebenborn, B.

    2016-08-01

    The detectors of the direct dark matter search experiment EDELWEISS consist of high-purity germanium crystals operated at cryogenic temperatures (mathrm {{<}20 mK}) and low electric fields (mathrm {{<}1 V/cm}). The surface discrimination is based on the simultaneous measurement of the charge amplitudes on different sets of electrodes. As the rise time of a charge signal strongly depends on the location of an interaction in the crystal, a time-resolved measurement can also be used to identify surface interactions. This contribution presents the results of a study of the discrimination power of the rise time parameter from a hot carrier transport simulation in combination with time-resolved measurements using an EDELWEISS-type detector in a test cryostat at ground level. We show the setup for the time-resolved ionization signal read-out in the EDELWEISS-III experiment and first results from data taking in the underground laboratory of Modane.

  17. Multi-concentric-ring open-air ionization chamber for high-intensity X-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2014-11-01

    An ionization chamber with four concentric ring electrodes was used to measure doses of white, 10, 15 and 20 keV synchrotron X-ray beams. The ring-shaped electrodes, which had diameters less than 11.8 mm, collected charges independently only around the beam, excluding strong in-beam charges when the beams passed through a small hole in the electrode centers. As a result, under low saturation voltages, the measured dose rates were confirmed to correlate with the beam intensity when conversion factors calculated with a Monte Carlo code were employed. The influence of the assumed beam sizes and incident positions on the current was almost negligible, with the exception of the incident position dependence at 10 keV.

  18. Improved ion detector

    DOEpatents

    Tullis, A.M.

    1986-01-30

    An improved ion detector device of the ionization detection device chamber type comprises an ionization chamber having a central electrode therein surrounded by a cylindrical electrode member within the chamber with a collar frictionally fitted around at least one of the electrodes. The collar has electrical contact means carried in an annular groove in an inner bore of the collar to contact the outer surface of the electrode to provide electrical contact between an external terminal and the electrode without the need to solder leads to the electrode.

  19. Isobar separation of 93Zr and 93Nb at 24 MeV with a new multi-anode ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martschini, Martin; Buchriegler, Josef; Collon, Philippe; Kutschera, Walter; Lachner, Johannes; Lu, Wenting; Priller, Alfred; Steier, Peter; Golser, Robin

    2015-10-01

    93Zr with a half-life of 1.6 Ma is produced with high yield in nuclear fission, and thus should be present as a natural or anthropogenic trace isotope in all compartments of the general environment. Sensitive measurements of this isotope would immediately find numerous applications, however, its detection at sufficiently low levels has not yet been achieved. AMS measurements of 93Zr suffer from the interference of the stable isobar 93Nb. At the Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator VERA a new multi-anode ionization chamber was built. It is optimized for isobar separation in the medium mass range and is based on the experience from AMS experiments of 36Cl at our 3-MV tandem accelerator facility. The design provides high flexibility in anode configuration and detector geometry. After validating the excellent energy resolution of the detector with 36S, it was recently used to study iron-nickel and zirconium-niobium-molybdenum isobar separation. To our surprise, the separation of 94Zr (Z = 40) from 94Mo (Z = 42) was found to be much better than that of 58Fe (Z = 26) from 58Ni (Z = 28), despite the significantly larger ΔZ/Z of the latter pair. This clearly contradicts results from SRIM-simulations and suggests that differences in the stopping behavior may unexpectedly favor identification of 93Zr. At 24 MeV particle energy, a 93Nb (Z = 41) suppression factor of 1000 is expected based on a synthetic 93Zr spectrum obtained by interpolation between experimental spectra from the two neighboring stable isotopes 92Zr and 94Zr. Assuming realistic numbers for chemical niobium reduction, a detection level of 93Zr/Zr below 10-9 seems feasible.

  20. Smoking

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body. Cigarette smoking causes 87 percent of lung cancer deaths. ... of the same problems as smokers do. E-cigarettes often look like cigarettes, but they work differently. ...

  1. Atmospheric measurements by Medipix-2 and Timepix Ionizing Radiation Imaging Detectors on BEXUS stratospheric balloon campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbar, Jaroslav; Scheirich, Jan; Jakubek, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Results of the first two experiments using semiconductor pixel detectors of the Medipix family for cosmic ray imaging in the stratospheric environment are presented. The original detecting device was based on the hybrid pixel detectors of Medipix-2 and Timepix developed at CERN with USB interface developed at Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics of Czech Technical University in Prague. The detectors were used in tracking mode allowing them to operate as an "active nuclear emulsion". The actual flight time of BEXUS7 with Medipix-2 on 8th October 2008 was over 4 hours, with 2 hours at stable floating altitude of 26km. BEXUS9 measurements of similar duration by Timepix, Medipix-2 and ST-6 Geiger telescope instruments took place in arctic atmosphere below 24km altitude on 11th October 2009. This balloon platform is quite ideal for such in-situ measurements. Not only because of the high altitudes reached, but also due to its slow ascent velocity for statistically relevant sampling of the ambient environment for improving cosmic ray induced ionisation rate model inputs. The flight opportunity for BEXUS student projects was provided by Education department of the European Space Agency (ESA) and Eurolaunch - Collaboration of Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) and German Space Agency (DLR). The scientific goal was to check energetic particle type altitudinal dependencies, also testing proper detector calibration by detecting fluxes of ionizing radiation, while evaluating instrumentation endurance and performance.

  2. Development of a Mesoscale Pulsed Discharge Helium Ionization Detector for Portable Gas Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Mowry, Curtis D; Pimentel, Adam S; Mangan, Michael A; Moorman, Matthew W; Sparks, Elizabeth S; Allen, Amy; Achyuthan, Komandoor E

    2015-01-01

    Miniaturization of gas chromatography (GC) instrumentation enables field detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for chembio-applications such as clandestine human transport and disease diagnostics. We fabricated a mesoscale pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (micro-PDHID) for integrating with our previously described mini-GC hardware. Stainless steel electrodes fabricated by photochemical etching and electroforming facilitated rapid prototyping and enabled nesting of inter-electrode insulators for self-alignment of the detector core during assembly. The prototype was ∼10 cm(3) relative to >400 cm(3) of a commercial PDHID, but with a comparable time to sweep a VOC peak from the detector cell (170 ms and 127 ms, respectively). Electron trajectory modeling, gas flow rate, voltage bias, and GC outlet location were optimized for improving sensitivity. Despite 40-fold miniaturization, the micro-PDHID detected 18 ng of the human emanation, 3-methyl-2-hexenoic acid with <3-fold decrease in sensitivity relative to the commercial detector. The micro-PDHID was rugged and operated for 9 months without failure. PMID:26561264

  3. Development of a Mesoscale Pulsed Discharge Helium Ionization Detector for Portable Gas Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Mowry, Curtis D; Pimentel, Adam S; Mangan, Michael A; Moorman, Matthew W; Sparks, Elizabeth S; Allen, Amy; Achyuthan, Komandoor E

    2015-01-01

    Miniaturization of gas chromatography (GC) instrumentation enables field detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for chembio-applications such as clandestine human transport and disease diagnostics. We fabricated a mesoscale pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (micro-PDHID) for integrating with our previously described mini-GC hardware. Stainless steel electrodes fabricated by photochemical etching and electroforming facilitated rapid prototyping and enabled nesting of inter-electrode insulators for self-alignment of the detector core during assembly. The prototype was ∼10 cm(3) relative to >400 cm(3) of a commercial PDHID, but with a comparable time to sweep a VOC peak from the detector cell (170 ms and 127 ms, respectively). Electron trajectory modeling, gas flow rate, voltage bias, and GC outlet location were optimized for improving sensitivity. Despite 40-fold miniaturization, the micro-PDHID detected 18 ng of the human emanation, 3-methyl-2-hexenoic acid with <3-fold decrease in sensitivity relative to the commercial detector. The micro-PDHID was rugged and operated for 9 months without failure.

  4. Electron beam quality kQ,Q0 factors for various ionization chambers: a Monte Carlo investigation with penelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erazo, F.; Brualla, L.; Lallena, A. M.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we calculate the beam quality correction factor {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} for various plane-parallel ionization chambers. A set of Monte Carlo calculations using the code penelope/penEasy have been carried out to calculate the overall correction factor fc,Q for eight electron beams corresponding to a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D, with nominal energies ranging between 6 MeV and 22 MeV, for a 60Co beam, that has been used as the reference quality Q0 and also for eight monoenergetic electron beams reproducing the quality index R50 of the Clinac beams. Two field sizes, 10 × 10 cm2 and 20 × 20 cm2 have been considered. The {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} factors have been calculated as the ratio between fc,Q and {{f}\\text{c,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} . Values for the Exradin A10, A11, A11TW, P11, P11TW, T11 and T11TW ionization chambers, manufactured by Standard Imaging, as well as for the NACP-02 have been obtained. The results found with the Clinac beams for the two field sizes analyzed show differences below 0.6%, even in the case of the higher energy electron beams. The {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} values obtained with the Clinac beams are 1% larger than those found with the monoenergetic beams for the higher energies, above 12 MeV. This difference can be ascribed to secondary photons produced in the linac head and the air path towards the phantom. Contrary to what was quoted in a previous work (Sempau et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4427-44), the beam quality correction factors obtained with the complete Clinac geometries and with the monoenergetic beams differ significantly for energies above 12 MeV. Material differences existing between chambers that have the same geometry produce non-negligible modifications in the value of these correction factors.

  5. Electron beam quality k(Q,Q0) factors for various ionization chambers: a Monte Carlo investigation with PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Erazo, F; Brualla, L; Lallena, A M

    2014-11-01

    In this work we calculate the beam quality correction factor k(Q,Q0) for various plane-parallel ionization chambers. A set of Monte Carlo calculations using the code PENELOPE/PENEASY have been carried out to calculate the overall correction factor f(c,Q) for eight electron beams corresponding to a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D, with nominal energies ranging between 6 MeV and 22 MeV, for a (60)Co beam, that has been used as the reference quality Q0 and also for eight monoenergetic electron beams reproducing the quality index R50 of the Clinac beams. Two field sizes, 10 × 10 cm(2) and 20 × 20 cm(2) have been considered. The k(Q,Q0) factors have been calculated as the ratio between f(c,Q) and f(c,Q0). Values for the Exradin A10, A11, A11TW, P11, P11TW, T11 and T11TW ionization chambers, manufactured by Standard Imaging, as well as for the NACP-02 have been obtained. The results found with the Clinac beams for the two field sizes analyzed show differences below 0.6%, even in the case of the higher energy electron beams. The k(Q,Q0) values obtained with the Clinac beams are 1% larger than those found with the monoenergetic beams for the higher energies, above 12 MeV. This difference can be ascribed to secondary photons produced in the linac head and the air path towards the phantom. Contrary to what was quoted in a previous work (Sempau et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4427-44), the beam quality correction factors obtained with the complete Clinac geometries and with the monoenergetic beams differ significantly for energies above 12 MeV. Material differences existing between chambers that have the same geometry produce non-negligible modifications in the value of these correction factors. PMID:25325343

  6. Preliminary Experiments Using a Passive Detector for Measuring Indoor 220Rn Progeny Concentrations with an Aerosol Chamber.

    PubMed

    Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Tokonami, Shinji; Kranrod, Chutima; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes preliminary experiments using a passive detector for integrating measurements of indoor thoron (²²⁰Rn) progeny concentrations with an aerosol chamber. A solid state nuclear detector (CR-39) covered with a thin aluminum-vaporized polyethylene plate (Mylar film) was used to detect only alpha particles emitted from ²¹²Po due to ²²⁰Rn progeny deposited on the detector surfaces. The initial experiment showed that Mylar film with area density of more than 5 mg cm⁻² was suitable to cut off completely alpha particles of 7.7 MeV from ²¹⁴Po of ²²²Rn progeny decay. In the experiment using the passive detector, it was observed that the net track density increased linearly with an increase of time-integrating ²²⁰Rn progeny concentration. As a result of dividing deposition rates by atom concentrations, the deposition velocity was given as 0.023 cm s⁻¹ for total ²²⁰Rn progeny. The model estimates of deposition velocities were 0.330 cm s⁻¹ for unattached ²²⁰Rn progeny and 0.0011 cm s⁻¹ for aerosol-attached ²²⁰Rn progeny using Lai-Nazaroff formulae. These deposition velocities were in the same range with the results reported in the literature. It was also found that the exposure experiments showed little influence of vertical profiles and surface orientations of the passive detector in the chamber on the detection responses, which was in good agreement with that in the model estimates. Furthermore, it was inferred that the main uncertainty of the passive detector was inhomogeneous deposition of Rn progeny onto its detection surfaces.

  7. Dosimetry for the MRI accelerator: the impact of a magnetic field on the response of a Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Meijsing, I; Raaymakers, B W; Raaijmakers, A J E; Kok, J G M; Hogeweg, L; Liu, B; Lagendijk, J J W

    2009-05-21

    The UMC Utrecht is constructing a 1.5 T MRI scanner integrated with a linear accelerator (Lagendijk et al 2008 Radiother. Oncol. 86 25-9). The goal of this device is to facilitate soft-tissue contrast based image-guided radiotherapy, in order to escalate the dose to the tumour while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Dosimetry for the MRI accelerator has to be performed in the presence of a magnetic field. This paper investigates the feasibility of using a Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber for absolute dosimetry. The impact of the mcagnetic field on the response of this ionization chamber has been measured and simulated using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. Two orientations of the ionization chamber with respect to the incident beam and the magnetic field which are feasible in the MRI accelerator configuration are taken into account. Measurements are performed using a laboratory magnet ranging from 0 to 1.2 T. In the simulations a range from 0 to 2 T is used. For both orientations, the measurements and simulations agreed within the uncertainty of the measurements and simulations. In conclusion, the response of the ionization chamber as a function of the magnetic field is understood and can be simulated using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. The system of forward-backward drift chambers in the UA2 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conta, C.; Fraternali, M.; Fumagalli, G.; Gildemeister, O.; Goggi, V. G.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Impellizzeri, F.; Iuvino, G.; Kofoed-Hansen, O.; Livan, M.; Madsen, B.; Mantovani, G. C.; Mapelli, L.; Möllerud, R.; Pastore, F.; Rimoldi, A.; Rossini, B.; Vicini, A.

    1984-07-01

    The system of multiplane drift chambers for the forward-backward toroidal spectrometers of the UA2 experiment at the SPS pp¯ collider is described. Details about mechanical design and construction techniques are given. Results on the performance of the chambers are reported.

  9. On the effect of temperature and the width of the turbulent combustion zone on the ionization detector readings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikin, A. P.; Galiev, I. R.

    2016-08-01

    We have considered the functional dependence of the ionization detector readings (ion current) on the composition of the fuel-air mixture, adiabatic temperature, and the turbulent combustion zone width. Experiments on the engine show that, for an air excess factor of 0.75-1.15, the coincidence of the calculated and experimental data exceeds 90%. Our results can be used to predict and monitor the adiabatic temperature of the flame and the width of the turbulent combustion zone in the combustion changer of the internal combustion engine using the ionization detector.

  10. NOTE: Determination of the recombination correction factor kS for some specific plane-parallel and cylindrical ionization chambers in pulsed photon and electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggmoser, G.; Saum, R.; Schmachtenberg, A.; Schmid, F.; Schüle, E.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown from an evaluation of the inverse reading of the dosemeter (1/M) against the inverse of the polarizing voltage (1/V), obtained with a number of commercially available ionization chambers, using dose per pulse values between 0.16 and 5 mGy, that a linear relationship between the recombination correction factor kS and dose per pulse (DPP) can be found. At dose per pulse values above 1 mGy the method of a general equation with coefficients dependent on the chamber type gives more accurate results than the Boag method. This method was already proposed by Burns and McEwen (1998, Phys. Med. Biol. 43 2033) and avoids comprehensive and time-consuming measurements of Jaffé plots which are a prerequisite for the application of the multi-voltage analysis (MVA) or the two-voltage analysis (TVA). We evaluated and verified the response of ionization chambers on the recombination effect in pulsed accelerator beams for both photons and electrons. Our main conclusions are: (1) The correction factor kS depends only on the DPP and the chamber type. There is no influence of radiation type and energy. (2) For all the chambers investigated there is a linear relationship between kS and DPP up to 5 mGy/pulse, and for two chambers we could show linearity up to 40 mGy/pulse. (3) A general formalism, such as that of Boag, characterizes chambers exclusively by the distance of the electrodes and gives a trend for the correction factor, and therefore (4) a general formalism has to reflect the influence of the chamber construction on the recombination by the introduction of chamber-type dependent coefficients.

  11. Headspace stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of the diluted vapor phase of cigarette smoke delivered to an in vitro cell exposure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navneet; Cabral, Jean-Louis; Morin, André; Waldron, Karen C

    2011-01-14

    Advanced smoke generation systems, such as the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) smoking machine used in combination with the BAT exposure chamber, allow for the generation, dilution and delivery of fresh cigarette smoke to cell or tissue cultures for in vitro cell culture analyses. Recently, our group confirmed that the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) is a reliable tool to generate and deliver repeatable and reproducible exposure concentrations of whole smoke to in vitro cultures. However, the relationship between dose and diluted smoke components found within the exposure chamber has not been characterized. The current study focused on the development of a headspace stir bar sorptive extraction (HSSE) method to chemically characterize some of the vapor phase components of cigarette smoke generated by the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) and collected within a cell culture exposure chamber. The method was based on passive sampling within the chamber by HSSE using a Twister™ stir bar. Following exposure, sorbed analytes were recovered using a thermal desorption unit and a cooled injection system coupled to gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry for identification and quantification. Using the HSSE method, sixteen compounds were identified. The desorption parameters were assessed using ten reference compounds and the following conditions led to the maximal response: desorption temperature of 200°C for 2 min with cryofocussing temperature of -75°C. During transfer of the stir bars to the thermal desorption system, significant losses of analytes were observed as a function of time; therefore, the exposure-to-desorption time interval was kept at the minimum of 10±0.5 min. Repeatability of the HSSE method was assessed by monitoring five reference compounds present in the vapor phase (10.1-12.9% RSD) and n-butyl acetate, the internal standard (18.5% RSD). The smoke dilution precision was found to be 17.2, 6.2 and 11.7% RSD for exposure concentrations of 1, 2 and 5% (v/v) cigarette vapor phase in air

  12. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs [1, 2]. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions [see 3 for a review]. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique [4] and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examinedReferences[1] F. Salama, E. Bakes, L.J. Allamandola, A.G.G.M. Tielens, Astrophys. J., 458 (1996) p.621[2] F. Salama, The ISO Revolution, EDP Sciences, Les Ulis, France (1999) p.65[3] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press,4, S251,(2008), p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[4

  13. A pyroloysis technique for determining microamounts of hydrogen in lunar soil using the helium ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bustin, R.

    1983-01-01

    A method has been developed which will determine hydrogen in sub-milligram samples of lunar soil. It consists of heating the sample in a pyroprobe followed by the gas chromatographic determination of hydrogen using the helium ionization detector. Using a 7 foot, 1/8 OD stainless steel column packed with Carbosieve S, 120/140 mesh, hydrogen was well-separated from the other gases released from lunar soil. Standards of hydrogen in helium were used for calibration. The limit to detection under the conditions used was about 2 ng. The method was linear from 2 ng to 270 ng. The method was checked using some actual lunar samples. Results were typical of those obtained for lunar soils using other methods.

  14. Experimental determination of the absorbed dose to water in a scanned proton beam using a water calorimeter and an ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnebin, Solange; Twerenbold, Damian; Pedroni, Eros; Meer, David; Zenklusen, Silvan; Bula, Christian

    2010-03-01

    The absorbed dose to water is the reference physical quantity for the energy absorbed in tissue when exposed to beams of ionizing radiation in radiotherapy. The SI unit of absorbed dose to water is the gray (Gy = 1 J/kg). Ionization chambers are used as the dosimeters of choice in the clinical environment because they show a high reproducibility and are easy to use. However, ionization chambers have to be calibrated in order to convert the measured electrical charge into absorbed dose to water. In addition, protocols require these conversion factors to be SI traceable to a primary standard of absorbed dose to water. We present experimental results where the ionization chamber used for the dosimetry for the scanned proton beam facility at PSI is compared with the direct determination of absorbed dose to water from the METAS primary standard water calorimeter. The agreement of 3.2% of the dose values measured by the two techniques are within their respective statistical uncertainties.

  15. On the interpretation of current-voltage curves in ionization chambers using the exact solution of the Thomson problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridenti, M. A.; Pascholati, P. R.; Gonçalves, J. A. C.; Bueno, C. C.

    2015-09-01

    The I - ΔV characteristic curve of a well type ionization chamber irradiated with 192Ir sources (0.75 Ci-120 Ci) was fitted using the exact solution of the Thomson problem. The recombination coefficient and saturation current were estimated using this new approach. The saturation current was compared with the results of the conventional method based on Boag-Wilson formula. It was verified that differences larger than 1% between both methods only occurred at activities higher than 55 Ci. We concluded that this new approach is recommended for a more accurate estimate of the saturation current when it is not possible to measure currents satisfying the condition I /Isat > 0.95. From the calibration curve the average value of pairs of carriers created per unit volume was estimated to be equal to η = 8.1 ×10-3cm-3s-1 Bq-1 and from that value it was estimated that ~ 17 pairs were created on average per second for each decay of the source.

  16. Fission Product Yield Study of 235U, 238U and 239Pu Using Dual-Fission Ionization Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, C.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C.; Tornow, W.; Gooden, M.; Kelley, J.; Arnold, C.; Bond, E.; Bredeweg, T.; Fowler, M.; Moody, W.; Rundberg, R.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J.; Becker, J.; Macri, R.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M.; Tonchev, A.

    2014-05-01

    To resolve long-standing differences between LANL and LLNL regarding the correct fission basis for analysis of nuclear test data [M.B. Chadwick et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010); H. Selby et al., Nucl. Data Sheets 111, 2891 (2010)], a collaboration between TUNL/LANL/LLNL has been established to perform high-precision measurements of neutron induced fission product yields. The main goal is to make a definitive statement about the energy dependence of the fission yields to an accuracy better than 2-3% between 1 and 15 MeV, where experimental data are very scarce. At TUNL, we have completed the design, fabrication and testing of three dual-fission chambers dedicated to 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. The dual-fission chambers were used to make measurements of the fission product activity relative to the total fission rate, as well as for high-precision absolute fission yield measurements. The activation method was employed, utilizing the mono-energetic neutron beams available at TUNL. Neutrons of 4.6, 9.0, and 14.5 MeV were produced via the 2H(d,n)3He reaction, and for neutrons at 14.8 MeV, the 3H(d,n)4He reaction was used. After activation, the induced γ-ray activity of the fission products was measured for two months using high-resolution HPGe detectors in a low-background environment. Results for the yield of seven fission fragments of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu and a comparison to available data at other energies are reported. For the first time results are available for neutron energies between 2 and 14 MeV.

  17. An electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometer as detector for high- performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zühlke, Martin; Riebe, Daniel; Beitz, Toralf; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Zenichowski, Karl; Diener, Marc; Linscheid, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The application of electrospray ionization (ESI) ion mobility (IM) spectrometry on the detection end of a high-performance liquid chromatograph has been a subject of study for some time. So far, this method has been limited to low flow rates or has required splitting of the liquid flow. This work presents a novel concept of an ESI source facilitating the stable operation of the spectrometer at flow rates between 10 μL mn(-1) and 1500 μL min(-1) without flow splitting, advancing the T-cylinder design developed by Kurnin and co-workers. Flow rates eight times faster than previously reported were achieved because of a more efficient dispersion of the liquid at increased electrospray voltages combined with nebulization by a sheath gas. Imaging revealed the spray operation to be in a rotationally symmetric multijet mode. The novel ESI-IM spectrometer tolerates high water contents (≤90%) and electrolyte concentrations up to 10mM, meeting another condition required of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) detectors. Limits of detection of 50 nM for promazine in the positive mode and 1 μM for 1,3-dinitrobenzene in the negative mode were established. Three mixtures of reduced complexity (five surfactants, four neuroleptics, and two isomers) were separated in the millisecond regime in stand-alone operation of the spectrometer. Separations of two more complex mixtures (five neuroleptics and 13 pesticides) demonstrate the application of the spectrometer as an HPLC detector. The examples illustrate the advantages of the spectrometer over the established diode array detector, in terms of additional IM separation of substances not fully separated in the retention time domain as well as identification of substances based on their characteristic Ims.

  18. Gas gain operations with single photon resolution using an integrating ionization chamber in small-angle X-ray scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menk, R. H.; Sarvestani, A.; Besch, H. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Amenitsch, H.; Bernstorff, S.

    2000-01-01

    In this work a combination of an ionization chamber with one-dimensional spatial resolution and a MicroCAT structure will be presented. Initially, MicroCAT was thought of as a shielding grid (Frisch-grid) but later was used as an active electron amplification device that enables single X-ray photon resolution measurements at low fluxes even with integrating readout electronics. Moreover, the adjustable gas gain that continuously covers the entire range from pure ionization chamber mode up to high gas gains (30 000 and more) provides stable operation yielding a huge dynamic range of about 10 8 and more. First measurements on biological samples using small angle X-ray scattering techniques with synchrotron radiation will be presented.

  19. Chemical ionization mass spectrometric measurements of SO2 emissions from jet engines in flight and test chamber operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunton, D. E.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Borghetti, J. F.; Federico, G. S.; Miller, T. M.; Thorn, W. F.; Viggiano, A. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Cofer, W. R.; McDougal, D. S.; Wey, C. C.

    2000-11-01

    We report the results of two measurements of the concentrations and emission indices of gas-phase sulfur dioxide (EI(SO2)) in the exhaust of an F100-200E turbofan engine. The broad goals of both experiments were to obtain exhaust sulfur speciation and aerosol properties as a function of fuel sulfur content. In the first campaign, an instrumented NASA T-39 Sabreliner aircraft flew in close formation behind several F-16 fighter aircraft to obtain near-field plume composition and aerosol properties. In the second, an F-100 engine of the same type was installed in an altitude test chamber at NASA Glenn Research Center where gas composition and nonvolatile aerosol concentrations and size distributions were obtained at the exit plane of the engine. In both experiments, SO2 concentrations were measured with the Air Force Research Laboratory chemical ionization mass spectrometer as a function of altitude, engine power, and fuel sulfur content. A significant aspect of the program was the use of the same fuels, the same engine type, and many of the same diagnostics in both campaigns. Several different fuels were purchased specifically for these experiments, including high-sulfur Jet A (˜1150 ppmm S), low-sulfur Jet A (˜10 ppmm S), medium-sulfur mixtures of these two fuels, and military JP-8+100 (˜170 and ˜300 ppmm S). The agreement between the flight and test cell measurements of SO2 concentrations was excellent, showing an overall precision of better than ±10% and an estimated absolute accuracy of ±20%. The EI(SO2) varied from 2.49 g SO2/kg fuel for the high-sulfur fuel in the test chamber to less than 0.01 g/kg for the lowest-sulfur fuel. No dependence of emission index on engine power, altitude or simulated altitude, separation distance or plume age, or the presence of contrails was observed. In all experiments the measured EI(SO2) was consistent with essentially all of the fuel sulfur appearing as gas-phase SO2 in the exhaust. However, accurate determination of S

  20. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi; Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki; Kawamura, Shinji

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43 protocol

  1. D-Zero General Support: Description of the D-Zero High Sensitivity Smoke Detector System (HSSD)

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, Rick; /Fermilab

    2001-01-25

    There are nine separate zones of high sensitivity smoke detection (HSSD) at Dzero. These zones, their coverage, their condition thresholds, and their response to conditions are described in the table in the 'Zones & Responses' section of this document. This is an 'air-sampling' smoke detection system. Each zone is formed of a network of pipes which contain strategically sized and located air sampling holes. Each zone has a fanbox/detector head that continuously draws air into the holes and through the pipes to the detector head where it is evaluated for combustion products. The fanbox/detector heads are located on the Dzero detector platform and in the trusses. Each fanbox/detector head has a remotely located display control card (DCC) for monitoring the level of obscuration of the air sample. This remote equipment is located on the roof of the moving counting house. The DCC for each zone is networked to a single intelligent interface module (11M), also on the roof of the MCH, that collects the information from all nine zones and delivers it to the Dzero control room via an isolated RS-485 link to an operators console. This console is replicated via a 'remote video, keyboard, mouse system' in the DAB 4th floor entry lobby for use by fire response personnel. Internal thresholds that have been set in the DCC via the operators console provides alarm level I (lowest), alarm level 2, and alarm level 3 (highest) for each zone. These alarms are then used as inputs to the Fermilab FIRUS system, and as interlocks to equipment. This system is nearly 2000 times more sensitive than conventional smoke detectors. It is sensitive enough to detect invisible products of combustion such as the outgassing of electrical components, overheating PVC wire insulation, or small changes in the ambient level of obscuration caused in the incipient stage of a fire.

  2. SU-D-213-04: Accounting for Volume Averaging and Material Composition Effects in An Ionization Chamber Array for Patient Specific QA

    SciTech Connect

    Fugal, M; McDonald, D; Jacqmin, D; Koch, N; Ellis, A; Peng, J; Ashenafi, M; Vanek, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study explores novel methods to address two significant challenges affecting measurement of patient-specific quality assurance (QA) with IBA’s Matrixx Evolution™ ionization chamber array. First, dose calculation algorithms often struggle to accurately determine dose to the chamber array due to CT artifact and algorithm limitations. Second, finite chamber size and volume averaging effects cause additional deviation from the calculated dose. Methods: QA measurements were taken with the Matrixx positioned on the treatment table in a solid-water Multi-Cube™ phantom. To reduce the effect of CT artifact, the Matrixx CT image set was masked with appropriate materials and densities. Individual ionization chambers were masked as air, while the high-z electronic backplane and remaining solid-water material were masked as aluminum and water, respectively. Dose calculation was done using Varian’s Acuros XB™ (V11) algorithm, which is capable of predicting dose more accurately in non-biologic materials due to its consideration of each material’s atomic properties. Finally, the exported TPS dose was processed using an in-house algorithm (MATLAB) to assign the volume averaged TPS dose to each element of a corresponding 2-D matrix. This matrix was used for comparison with the measured dose. Square fields at regularly-spaced gantry angles, as well as selected patient plans were analyzed. Results: Analyzed plans showed improved agreement, with the average gamma passing rate increasing from 94 to 98%. Correction factors necessary for chamber angular dependence were reduced by 67% compared to factors measured previously, indicating that previously measured factors corrected for dose calculation errors in addition to true chamber angular dependence. Conclusion: By comparing volume averaged dose, calculated with a capable dose engine, on a phantom masked with correct materials and densities, QA results obtained with the Matrixx Evolution™ can be significantly

  3. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS Study of low momentum track reconstruction for the BESIII main drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lu-Kui; Mao, Ze-Pu; Li, Wei-Dong; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Deng, Zi-Yan; He, Kang-Lin; Liu, Chun-Yan; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Qiu-Guang; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Tian, Hao-Lai; Wang, Ji-Ke; Wu, Ling-Hui; Yuan, Ye; Zang, Shi-Lei; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Yao; Zhu, Kai; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2010-12-01

    In order to overcome the difficulty brought by the circling charged tracks with transverse momentum less than 120 MeV in the BESIII Main Drift Chamber (MDC), a specialized method called TCurlFinder was developed. This tracking method focuses on the charged track reconstruction under 120 MeV and possesses a special mechanism to reject background noise hits. The performance of the package has been carefully checked and tuned by both Monte Carlo data and real data. The study shows that this tracking method could obviously enhance the reconstruction efficiency in the low transverse momentum region, providing physics analysis with more and reliable data.

  4. Aerial surveillance for gas and liquid hydrocarbon pipelines using a flame ionization detector (FID)

    SciTech Connect

    Riquetti, P.V.; Fletcher, J.I.; Minty, C.D.

    1996-12-31

    A novel application for the detection of airborne hydrocarbons has been successfully developed by means of a highly sensitive, fast responding Flame Ionization Detector (FID). The traditional way to monitor pipeline leaks has been by ground crews using specific sensors or by airborne crews highly trained to observe anomalies associated with leaks during periodic surveys of the pipeline right-of-way. The goal has been to detect leaks in a fast and cost effective way before the associated spill becomes a costly and hazardous problem. This paper describes a leak detection system combined with a global positioning system (GPS) and a computerized data output designed to pinpoint the presence of hydrocarbons in the air space of the pipeline`s right of way. Fixed wing aircraft as well as helicopters have been successfully used as airborne platforms. Natural gas, crude oil and finished products pipelines in Canada and the US have been surveyed using this technology with excellent correlation between the aircraft detection and in situ ground detection. The information obtained is processed with a proprietary software and reduced to simple coordinates. Results are transferred to ground crews to effect the necessary repairs.

  5. Data-driven exploration of the ionization-phonon partitioning in scintillating radiation detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, Kim F.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Jordan, David V.; Jones, Dumont M.

    2008-06-01

    An information-based approach to scintillating materials development has been applied to ranking the alkali halide and alkali earth halide series in terms of their energy conversion efficiency. The efficiency of scintillating radiation detection materials can be viewed as the product of a consecutive series of electronic processes (energy conversion, transfer, and luminescence) as outlined by Lempicki and others. Relevant data are relatively sparse, but sufficient for the development of forward mapping of materials properties through materials signatures. These mappings have been used to explore the limits of the K ratio in the Lempicki model with chemical composition, and examine its relationship with another common design objective, density. The alkali halides and alkali earth halide compounds separate themselves into distinct behavior classes favoring heavier cations and anions for improved K ratio. While the coupling of ionization is strongly related to the optical phonon modes, both dielectric and band gap contributions cannot be ignored. When applied within a candidate screen, the resulting model for K imposes design rules—simple structural restrictions—on scintillating radiation detector materials.

  6. Development of a bioaerosol single particle detector (BIO IN) for the fast ice nucleus chamber FINCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, U.; Reimann, B.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Bingemer, H.

    2009-10-01

    In this work we present the setup and first tests of our new BIO IN detector. This detector is designed to classify atmospheric ice nuclei (IN) for their biological content. Biological material is identified via its auto-fluorescence (intrinsic fluorescence) after irradiation with UV radiation. Ice nuclei are key substances for precipitation development via the Bergeron-Findeisen process. The level of scientific knowledge regarding origin and climatology (temporal and spatial distribution) of IN is very low. Some biological material is known to be active as IN even at relatively high temperatures of up to -2°C (e.g. pseudomonas syringae bacteria). These biological IN could have a strong influence on the formation of clouds and precipitation. We have designed the new BIO IN sensor to analyze the abundance of IN of biological origin. The instrument will be flown on one of the first missions of the new German research aircraft ''HALO'' (High Altitude and LOng Range).

  7. Final results of the EDELWEISS-I dark matter search with cryogenic heat-and-ionization Ge detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sanglard, V.; Chabert, L.; Jesus, M. de; Di Stefano, P.; Drain, D.; Gascon, J.; Gerlic, E.; Goyot, M.; Luca, M.; Stern, M.; Vagneron, L.; Benoit, A.; Berge, L.; Broniatowski, A.; Censier, B.; Collin, S.; Dolgorouky, Y.; Dumoulin, L.; Juillard, A.; Kikuchi, C.

    2005-06-15

    The final results of the EDELWEISS-I dark matter search using cryogenic heat-and-ionization Ge detectors are presented. The final data sample corresponds to an increase by a factor 5 in exposure relative to the previously published results. A recoil energy threshold of 13 keV or better was achieved with three 320 g detectors working simultaneously over four months of stable operation. Limits on the spin-independent cross section for the scattering of a weakly interacting massive particle on a nucleon are derived from an accumulated fiducial exposure of 62 kg d.

  8. Smoke alarms in the home: what every physician should know.

    PubMed

    Sultan, M A; Feldman, W M

    1985-12-15

    Primary care physicians interested in health education and accident prevention should be knowledgeable about smoke alarms (smoke detectors with built-in alarms). Either ionization or photoelectric smoke alarms can help save lives if they are properly installed and maintained. The number, site and maintenance of smoke alarms in the home and the steps a person should take in the event of a fire are discussed. Considering the rates of death, disability and disfigurement associated with residential fires, early warning devices such as smoke alarms make sense. PMID:4063931

  9. CONTINUOUSLY SENSITIVE BUBBLE CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Good, R.H.

    1959-08-18

    A radiation detector of the bubble chamber class is described which is continuously sensitive and which does not require the complex pressure cycling equipment characteristic of prior forms of the chamber. The radiation sensitive element is a gas-saturated liquid and means are provided for establishing a thermal gradient across a region of the liquid. The gradient has a temperature range including both the saturation temperature of the liquid and more elevated temperatures. Thus a supersaturated zone is created in which ionizing radiations may give rise to visible gas bubbles indicative of the passage of the radiation through the liquid. Additional means are provided for replenishing the supply of gas-saturated liquid to maintaincontinuous sensitivity.

  10. A table-top ion and electron beam facility for ionization quenching measurement and gas detector calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraz, J. F.; Médard, J.; Couturier, C.; Fourrel, C.; Guillaudin, O.; Lamy, T.; Marton, M.; Riffard, Q.; Sortais, P.; Santos, D.; Sauzet, N.

    2016-10-01

    In the frame of the MiMAC project, the LPSC (Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie) has developed COMIMAC, a miniaturized and transportable table-top beam line, producing ions or electrons to make measurements of the "quenching" factor in ionization and detector calibration. The energy range of the COMIMAC beam facility starts from a few tens of eV up to 50 keV.

  11. Correction factors for A1SL ionization chamber dosimetry in TomoTherapy: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Rodriguez-Romero, Ruth; Sanchez-Rubio, Patricia; Miguel Gonzalez-Castano, Diego; Gomez, Faustino; Nunez, Luis; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Recently, an international working group on nonstandard fields presented a new formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [Alfonso et al., Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] which has been adopted by AAPM TG-148. This work presents an experimental determination of the correction factors for reference dosimetry with an Exradin A1SL thimble ionization chamber in a TomoTherapy unit, focusing on: (i) machine-specific reference field, (ii) plan-class-specific reference field, and (iii) two clinical treatments. Methods: Ionization chamber measurements were performed in the TomoTherapy unit for intermediate (machine-specific and plan-class-specific) calibration fields, based on the reference conditions defined by AAPM TG-148, and two clinical treatments (lung and head-and-neck). Alanine reference dosimetry was employed to determine absorbed dose to water at the point of interest for the fields under investigation. The corresponding chamber correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber measurements ratios. Results: Two different methods of determining the beam quality correction factor k{sub Q,Q{sub 0}} for the A1SL ionization chamber in this TomoTherapy unit, where reference conditions for conventional beam quality determination cannot be met, result in consistent values. The observed values of overall correction factors obtained for intermediate and clinical fields are consistently around 0.98 with a typical expanded relative uncertainty of 2% (k = 2), which when considered make such correction factors compatible with unity. However, all of them are systematically lower than unity, which is shown to be significant when a hypothesis test assuming a t-student distribution is performed (p=1.8x10{sup -2}). Correction factors k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub p{sub c{sub s{sub r}{sup f{sub c}{sub l}{sub i}{sub n},f{sub p}{sub c}{sub s}{sub r}}}}}}}}}} and k{sub Q{sub c{sub l{sub i{sub n,Q{sub m{sub s

  12. [The design and evaluation of horizontal pipe mini-flame atomization and ionization synchronous detector in GC/AAS].

    PubMed

    Yan, Z; Sun, J M; Qiao, Y Q; Sun, H W

    2001-01-01

    Gas chromatography/atomic absorption spectroscopy(GC/AAS) is a good method for the species analysis of organometallic compounds. But the traditional atomizers are not very suitable for this technology and all of them response only to one kind of signal--the concentration of the metallic atoms of the ground state. They can not give any information about the organic group of organometallic compounds and organic compounds which coexist with the former. For GC/AAS we want to design and manufacture a new kind of detector which is much more sensitive and has a much smaller dead volume and will sensitively and synchronously response to the atomization signal of organometallic compound and ionization signal of organic compound. The authors have noticed that the atomization of organometallic compound and ionization of organic compound have been existing in the same hydrogen flame. The question is how to gain and exchange and output the two signals which are completely different in characters. For this purpose we designed and manufactured a new type of horizontal pipe mini-flame atomization and ionization synchronous detector. The key part is a T type glass tube (80 mm x 13 mm x 10 mm i.d.) which covers horizontally on the jet of the mini-flame atomizer and a long pipe stainless steel collector (70 mm x 9.5 mm o.d. x 9 mm i.d.) is tightly inserted in the tube. The light beam of the hollow cathode lamp passes through the hydrogen flame along the axial center of the glass tube and the ground state metallic atoms in the flame diffuses to both ends of the tube along the axial center of the glass tube too. This process enriches the depth of the light absorption and then increases the sensitivity of atomization. At the same time the long pipe collector can enrich the collection efficiency of the ionization and increases the sensitivity and widens the linear range. So the detector can synchronously and sensitively detect the organometallic and organic compounds. The detection limit

  13. Absolute dose measurements by means of a small cylindrical ionization chamber for very high dose per pulse high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Karaj, E.; Righi, S.; Di Martino, F.

    2007-03-15

    Very high dose per pulse (3-13 cGy/pulse) high energy electron beams are currently produced by special linear accelerators (linac) dedicated to Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). The electron beams produced by such linacs are collimated by special Perspex applicators of various size and cylindrically shaped. The biggest problems from the dosimetric point of view are caused by the high dose-per-pulse values and the use of inclined applicators. In this work measurements of absolute dose for the inclined applicators were done by using a small cylindrical ionization chamber, type CC01 (Wellhofer), a parallel plane ionization chamber type Markus (PTW 23343) and radiochromic films type EBT. We show a method which allows calculating the quality correction factors for CC01 chamber with an uncertainty of 1% and the absolute dose value for the inclined applicators using CC01 with an uncertainty of 3.1% for electron beams of energy of 6 and 7 MeV produced by the linac dedicated to IORT Novac7.

  14. Lactic acidosis occurrence during exercises in the smoke chamber in a 53-year-old firefighter with no significant medical history.

    PubMed

    Bronisz, Agata; Spychalska, Magdalena; Szafrańska, Małgorzata

    2014-04-01

    Lactic acidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis with a high anion gap, reduced rate of arterial blood pH under 7.35 mmol/l, and lactic acid concentration over 7 mmol/l. In the literature we can find some descriptions of the cases of lactic acidosis in patients with severe systemic diseases (cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, sepsis, diabetes with cardiovascular disease and after organ transplantations). We present the case of lactic acidosis in a patient with no chronic disease--a firefighter in whom lactic acidosis has developed during standard exercises in the smoke chamber.

  15. "Smoke": Characterization Of Smoke Particulate For Spacecraft Fire Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Mulholland, George W.; Yang, Jiann; Cleary, Thomas G.; Yuan, Zeng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The "Smoke" experiment is a flight definition investigation that seeks to increase our understanding of spacecraft fire detection through measurements of particulate size distributions of preignition smokes from typical spacecraft materials. Owing to the catastrophic risk posed by even a very small fire in a spacecraft, the design goal for spacecraft fire detection is to detect the fire as quickly as possible, preferably in the preignition phase before a real flaming fire has developed. Consequently the target smoke for detection is typically not soot (typical of established hydrocarbon fires) but instead, pyrolysis products, and recondensed polymer particles. At the same time, false alarms are extremely costly as the crew and the ground team must respond quickly to every alarm. The U.S. Space Shuttle (STS: Space Transportation System) and the International Space Station (ISS) both use smoke detection as the primary means of fire detection. These two systems were designed in the absence of any data concerning low-gravity smoke particle (and background dust) size distributions. The STS system uses an ionization detector coupled with a sampling pump and the ISS system is a forward light scattering detector operating in the near IR. These two systems have significantly different sensitivities with the ionization detector being most sensitive (on a mass concentration basis) to smaller particulate and the light scattering detector being most sensitive to particulate that is larger than 1 micron. Since any smoke detection system has inherent size sensitivity characteristics, proper design of future smoke detection systems will require an understanding of the background and alarm particle size distributions that can be expected in a space environment.

  16. Evaluation of the pulsed discharge helium ionization detector for the analysis of hydrogen and methane in breath.

    PubMed

    Roberge, Mark T; Finley, John W; Lukaski, Henry C; Borgerding, Anthony J

    2004-02-20

    Under the appropriate separation conditions the pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (PDHID) was used to detect hydrogen and methane separated from the matrix components of human breath samples. The sensitivity of this method is over an order of magnitude better than published methods using a flame ionization detector (FID) and a thermal conductivity detector (TCD), and has the further advantage of detecting both analytes with only one detector. Limits of detection were 0.3 ppmv for both hydrogen and methane and the method had a linear dynamic range (LDR) of three orders of magnitude (0.3-400 ppm, v/v). The PDHID was also compared to the FID and the TCD in regard to selectivity, sensitivity and reproducibility for high-speed gas chromatography (HSGC). It was shown that the PDHID is as sensitive as the FID for fast separations but is limited by the difficulty of resolving analyte peaks from O2 and N2. The PDHID was at least three orders of magnitude more sensitive than the TCD for all of the analytes examined. PMID:14971479

  17. Electrodeless drift chambers with 50-cm drift distance

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, D.S.; Price, L.E.

    1982-08-01

    The electrodeless drift-chamber technique is potentially very useful in applications requiring the drifting of ionization in gas over long distances in narrow channels. Chamber construction is simple and cheap; the technique is well suited to very large detectors operating in low-rate environments. Prototype tests on planar chambers reveal excellent drifting characteristics after the initial charging, but show a substantial degradation of pulse height from cosmic rays over a two-week period. The loss of efficiency appears to be caused by excess charge buildup on the dielectric surfaces of the chamber. Several solutions are suggested.

  18. A simplified analytical approach to estimate the parameters required for strength determination of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources using a Farmer-type ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Srinivasan, P; Sharma, S D; Mayya, Y S

    2012-01-01

    Measuring the strength of high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir brachytherapy sources on receipt from the vendor is an important component of a quality assurance program. Owing to their ready availability in radiotherapy departments, the Farmer-type ionization chambers are also used to determine the strength of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. The use of a Farmer-type ionization chamber requires the estimation of the scatter correction factor along with positioning error (c) and the constant of proportionality (f) to determine the strength of HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources. A simplified approach based on a least squares method was developed for estimating the values of f and M(s). The seven distance method was followed to record the ionization chamber readings for parameterization of f and M(s). Analytically calculated values of M(s) were used to determine the room scatter correction factor (K(sc)). The Monte Carlo simulations were also carried out to calculate f and K(sc) to verify the magnitude of the parameters determined by the proposed analytical approach. The value of f determined using the simplified analytical approach was found to be in excellent agreement with the Monte Carlo simulated value (within 0.7%). Analytically derived values of K(sc) were also found to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculated values (within 1.47%). Being far simpler than the presently available methods of evaluating f, the proposed analytical approach can be adopted for routine use by clinical medical physicists to estimate f by hand calculations.

  19. Standardization of 64Cu and 68Ga by the 4π(PC)β-γ coincidence method and calibration of the ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Sahagia, M; Luca, A; Antohe, A; Ivan, C

    2012-09-01

    The paper treats the application of the 4π(PC)β-γ coincidence method for the standardization of the radionuclides (64)Cu and (68)Ga. The general coincidence equations are written. Two types of extrapolation were described and used in measurement: the positron-annihilation coincidence, and the counting of all emitted radiations; both methods are compared with respect to results, advantages and drawbacks. The impurities' content correction was applied. The standardized solutions were used to calibrate the ionization chamber CENTRONIC IG12/20A and to determine the gamma-rays emission intensities.

  20. (18)F primary standard at ENEA-INMRI by three absolute techniques and calibration of a well-type IG11 ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Capogni, Marco; Carconi, Pierluigi; De Felice, Pierino; Fazio, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    A new (18)F primary standardization carried out at ENEA-INMRI by three different absolute techniques, i.e. 4πγNaI(Tl)γ high-efficiency counting, TDCR and 4πβ(LS)-γ[NaI(Tl)] coincidence counting method, allowed the calibration of a fixed well-reentrant IG11 ionization chamber (IC), with an uncertainty lower than 1%, and to check the calibration factor of a portable well-type IC NPL-CRC model, previously calibrated. By the new standard the ENEA-INMRI was linked to the BIPM International Reference System (SIR) through the BIPM SIR Transfer Instrument (SIRTI).

  1. (18)F primary standard at ENEA-INMRI by three absolute techniques and calibration of a well-type IG11 ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Capogni, Marco; Carconi, Pierluigi; De Felice, Pierino; Fazio, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    A new (18)F primary standardization carried out at ENEA-INMRI by three different absolute techniques, i.e. 4πγNaI(Tl)γ high-efficiency counting, TDCR and 4πβ(LS)-γ[NaI(Tl)] coincidence counting method, allowed the calibration of a fixed well-reentrant IG11 ionization chamber (IC), with an uncertainty lower than 1%, and to check the calibration factor of a portable well-type IC NPL-CRC model, previously calibrated. By the new standard the ENEA-INMRI was linked to the BIPM International Reference System (SIR) through the BIPM SIR Transfer Instrument (SIRTI). PMID:26774395

  2. Analytic And Monte Carlo Study Of The Perturbation Factor kp For A Standard Of Dw Through An Ka Standard Ionization Chamber BEV-CC01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Verdesoto, M. X.; Álvarez Romero, J. T.

    2003-09-01

    To characterize an ionization chamber BEV-CC01 as a standard of absorbed dose to water Dw at SSDL-Mexico, the approach developed by the BIPM for 60Co gamma radiation, [1] has been chosen. This requires the estimation of a factor kp, which stems from the perturbation introduced by the presence of the ionization chamber in the water phantom, and due to finite size of the cavity. This factor is the product of four terms: ψw,c, (μen/ρ)w,c, (1 + μ'.ȳ)w,c and kcav. Two independent determinations are accomplished using a combination of the Monte Carlo code MCNP4C in ITS mode [2,3] and analytic methods: one kp∥=1.1626 ± uc=: 0.90% for the chamber axis parallel to the beam axis; and another kp =1.1079± uc=0.89% for the chamber axis perpendicular to the beam axis. The variance reduction techniques: splitting-Russian roulette, source biasing and forced photon collisions are employed in the simulations to improve the calculation efficiency. The energy fluence for the 60Co housing-source Picker C/9 is obtained by realistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, it is verified by comparison of MC calculated and measured beam output air kerma factors, and percent depth dose curves in water, PDD. This spectrum is considered as input energy for a point source (74% is from primary photons and the rest 26% is from scattered radiation) in the determination of the kp factors. Details of the calculations are given together with the theoretical basis of the ionometric standard employed.

  3. A time-resolved measurement technique for particulate number density in diesel exhaust using a fast-response flame ionization detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. H.; Chan, S. H.

    1997-03-01

    The fast-response flame ionization detector (FRFID) has been used widely to measure, in real time, the concentration of unburnt hydrocarbons in internal combustion engines. In this study, a FRFID is modified to measure, simultaneously, the concentration of the gaseous hydrocarbons and the number density of soot particulates present in the exhaust of a turbocharged Dl diesel engine. The system is also capable of differentiating the hydrocarbon fraction of the particulates from that of gaseous hydrocarbons, hence providing information for deducing the amount of gaseous hydrocarbon that is adsorbed by or condensed onto the surface of the particulates. Another unmodified FRFID, with a particulate collector placed immediately upstream of it, is used to determine the total particulate matter in terms of mass concentration. Experimental results show that the particulate number density measured by the modified FRFID is correlated well with the mass concentration determined by the filtration method under various engine operating conditions. The hydrocarbon fraction of the particulates shows a similar trend to the gaseous hydrocarbon present in the raw exhaust gas stream under various steady-speed engine test runs. A transient engine load acceptance test concludes the usability of this modified FRFID to measure, on a time-resolved basis, the particulate number densities with trends similar to those of generally known smoke opacities.

  4. Quantification of biogenic volatile organic compounds with a flame ionization detector using the effective carbon number concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Erickson, M. H.; Fricaud, V. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2012-03-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere by plants and include isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their oxygenated derivatives. These BVOCs are among the principal factors influencing the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere in forested regions. BVOC emission rates are often measured by collecting samples onto adsorptive cartridges in the field and then transporting these samples to the laboratory for chromatographic analysis. One of the most commonly used detectors in chromatographic analysis is the flame ionization detector (FID). For quantitative analysis with an FID, relative response factors may be estimated using the effective carbon number (ECN) concept. The purpose of this study was to determine the ECN for a variety of terpenoid compounds to enable improved quantification of BVOC measurements. A dynamic dilution system was developed to make quantitative gas standards of VOCs with mixing ratios from 20-55 ppb. For each experiment using this system, one terpene standard was co-injected with an internal reference, n-octane, and analyzed via an automated cryofocusing system interfaced to a gas chromatograph flame ionization detector and mass spectrometer (GC/MS/FID). The ECNs of 16 compounds (14 BVOCs) were evaluated with this approach, with each test compound analyzed at least three times. The difference between the actual carbon number and measured ECN ranged from -24% to -2%. The difference between theoretical ECN and measured ECN ranged from -22% to 9%. Measured ECN values were within 10% of theoretical ECN values for most terpenoid compounds.

  5. Quantification of biogenic volatile organic compounds with a flame ionization detector using the effective carbon number concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Erickson, M. H.; Fricaud, V. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2012-08-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere by plants and include isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their oxygenated derivatives. These BVOCs are among the principal factors influencing the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere in forested regions. BVOC emission rates are often measured by collecting samples onto adsorptive cartridges in the field and then transporting these samples to the laboratory for chromatographic analysis. One of the most commonly used detectors in chromatographic analysis is the flame ionization detector (FID). For quantitative analysis with an FID, relative response factors may be estimated using the effective carbon number (ECN) concept. The purpose of this study was to determine the ECN for a variety of terpenoid compounds to enable improved quantification of BVOC measurements. A dynamic dilution system was developed to make quantitative gas standards of VOCs with mixing ratios from 20-55 ppb. For each experiment using this system, one terpene standard was co-injected with an internal reference, n-octane, and analyzed via an automated cryofocusing system interfaced to a gas chromatograph flame ionization detector and mass spectrometer (GC/MS/FID). The ECNs of 16 compounds (14 BVOCs) were evaluated with this approach, with each test compound analyzed at least three times. The difference between the actual carbon number and measured ECN ranged from -24% to -2%. The difference between theoretical ECN and measured ECN ranged from -22% to 9%. Measured ECN values were within 10% of theoretical ECN values for most terpenoid compounds.

  6. Conception and realization of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for the absolute dosimetry of an ultrasoft X-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Groetz, J-E; Ounoughi, N; Mavon, C; Belafrites, A; Fromm, M

    2014-08-01

    We report the design of a millimeter-sized parallel plate free-air ionization chamber (IC) aimed at determining the absolute air kerma rate of an ultra-soft X-ray beam (E = 1.5 keV). The size of the IC was determined so that the measurement volume satisfies the condition of charged-particle equilibrium. The correction factors necessary to properly measure the absolute kerma using the IC have been established. Particular attention was given to the determination of the effective mean energy for the 1.5 keV photons using the PENELOPE code. Other correction factors were determined by means of computer simulation (COMSOL™ and FLUKA). Measurements of air kerma rates under specific operating parameters of the lab-bench X-ray source have been performed at various distances from that source and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the developed ionization chamber makes it possible to determine accurate photon fluence rates in routine work and will constitute substantial time-savings for future radiobiological experiments based on the use of ultra-soft X-rays.

  7. Conception and realization of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for the absolute dosimetry of an ultrasoft X-ray beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groetz, J.-E.; Ounoughi, N.; Mavon, C.; Belafrites, A.; Fromm, M.

    2014-08-01

    We report the design of a millimeter-sized parallel plate free-air ionization chamber (IC) aimed at determining the absolute air kerma rate of an ultra-soft X-ray beam (E = 1.5 keV). The size of the IC was determined so that the measurement volume satisfies the condition of charged-particle equilibrium. The correction factors necessary to properly measure the absolute kerma using the IC have been established. Particular attention was given to the determination of the effective mean energy for the 1.5 keV photons using the PENELOPE code. Other correction factors were determined by means of computer simulation (COMSOL™and FLUKA). Measurements of air kerma rates under specific operating parameters of the lab-bench X-ray source have been performed at various distances from that source and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the developed ionization chamber makes it possible to determine accurate photon fluence rates in routine work and will constitute substantial time-savings for future radiobiological experiments based on the use of ultra-soft X-rays.

  8. Conception and realization of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for the absolute dosimetry of an ultrasoft X-ray beam

    SciTech Connect

    Groetz, J.-E. Mavon, C.; Fromm, M.; Ounoughi, N.; Belafrites, A.

    2014-08-15

    We report the design of a millimeter-sized parallel plate free-air ionization chamber (IC) aimed at determining the absolute air kerma rate of an ultra-soft X-ray beam (E = 1.5 keV). The size of the IC was determined so that the measurement volume satisfies the condition of charged-particle equilibrium. The correction factors necessary to properly measure the absolute kerma using the IC have been established. Particular attention was given to the determination of the effective mean energy for the 1.5 keV photons using the PENELOPE code. Other correction factors were determined by means of computer simulation (COMSOL™and FLUKA). Measurements of air kerma rates under specific operating parameters of the lab-bench X-ray source have been performed at various distances from that source and compared to Monte Carlo calculations. We show that the developed ionization chamber makes it possible to determine accurate photon fluence rates in routine work and will constitute substantial time-savings for future radiobiological experiments based on the use of ultra-soft X-rays.

  9. Characteristics of a miniature parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber for measuring the intensity of synchrotron radiation from an undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2004-09-01

    In order to develop an absolute intensity monitor for synchrotron radiation from an undulator, the characteristics of a parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber with a plate separation of 4.2 mm, which was considered to be as narrow as possible, were investigated using 8-30 keV monoenergetic photons at SPring-8. Using a Si-PIN photodiode as the reference monitor, saturation was confirmed at 8-30 keV at a photon intensity of an order of 1013 photons/s. The collection efficiency became almost unity at 8 and 10 keV within 3.8% and 1.1%, respectively, which gradually decreased with increasing energy and attained 0.52 at 30 keV because some of the high-energy electrons escaped from the sensitive volume. When the pair of electrodes was transferred from the upper and lower sides to the left and right sides of the beam axis in order to investigate the influence of linear polarization of synchrotron radiation, a decrease in the collection efficiency was observed. Monte Carlo simulations considering linear polarization showed that the plate separation required for no electron loss was 26, 14, and 8 mm for 30, 20, and 15 keV photons, respectively. For 20 keV photons, saturation characteristics were investigated using an ionization chamber with 14 mm plate separation.

  10. The Physics of Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Dan

    2000-08-01

    Here is a comprehensive introduction to the physical principles and design of particle detectors, covering all major detector types in use today. After discussing the size and energy scales involved in different physical processes, the book considers nondestructive methods, including the photoelectric effect, photomultipliers, scintillators, Cerenkov and transition radiation, scattering and ionization, and the use of magnetic fields in drift and wire chambers. A complete chapter is devoted to silicon detectors. In the final part of the book, Green discusses destructive measurement techniques. Throughout, he emphasizes the physical principles underlying detection and shows, through appropriate examples, how those principles are best utilized in real detectors. Exercises and detailed further reading lists are included.

  11. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikezic, D.; Yu, K. N.; Stajic, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK_TEST.F90 and TRACK_VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

  12. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements.

    PubMed

    Nikezic, D; Yu, K N; Stajic, J M

    2014-02-01

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK_TEST.F90 and TRACK_VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment. PMID:24593338

  13. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nikezic, D. Stajic, J. M.; Yu, K. N.

    2014-02-15

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK-TEST.F90 and TRACK-VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

  14. Track segment finding with CGEM-IT and matching to outer drift chamber tracks in the BESIII detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xin-Hua; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wu, Ling-Hui; Ju, Xu-Dong; Xiu, Qing-Lei; Dong, Liao-Yuan; Dong, Ming-Yi; Li, Wei-Dong; Li, Wei-Guo; Liu, Huai-Min; Ou-Yang, Qun; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yao

    2016-09-01

    The relative differences in coordinates of Cylindrical Gas Electron Multiplier Detector-based Inner Tracker (CGEM-IT) clusters are studied to search for track segments in CGEM-IT for the BESIII experiment. With the full simulation of single muon track samples, clear patterns are found and parameterized for the correct cluster combinations. The cluster combinations satisfying the patterns are selected as track segment candidates in CGEM-IT with an efficiency higher than 99%. The parameters of the track segments are obtained by a helix fitting. Some χ2 quantities, evaluating the differences in track parameters between the track segments in CGEM-IT and the tracks found in the outer drift chamber, are calculated and used to match them. Proper χ2 requirements are determined as a function of transverse momentum and the matching efficiency is found to be reasonable. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856706), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575222, 11205184, 11205182, 11121092, 11475185) and Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1232201)

  15. 3D sensitive voxel detector of ionizing radiation based on Timepix device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, P.; Jakubek, J.; Vykydal, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Position sensitive detectors are evolving towards higher segmentation geometries from 0D (single pad) over 1D (strip) to 2D (pixel) detectors. Each step has brought up substantial expansion in the field of applications. The next logical step in this evolution is to design a 3D, i.e. voxel detector. The voxel detector can be constructed from 2D volume element detectors arranged in layers forming a 3D matrix of sensitive elements — voxels. Such detectors can effectively record tracks of energetic particles. By proper analysis of these tracks it is possible to determine the type, direction and energy of the primary particle. One of the prominent applications of such device is in the localization and identification of gamma and neutron sources in the environment. It can be also used for emission and transmission radiography in many fields where standard imagers are currently utilized. The qualitative properties of current imagers such as: spatial resolution, efficiency, directional sensitivity, energy sensitivity and selectivity (background suppression) can be improved. The first prototype of a voxel detector was built using a number of Timepix devices. Timepix is hybrid semiconductor detector consisting of a segmented semiconductor sensor bump-bonded to a readout chip. Each sensor contains 256x256 square pixels of 55 μm size. The voxel detector prototype was successfully tested to prove the concept functionality. The detector has a modular architecture with a daisy chain connection of the individual detector layers. This permits easy rearrangement due to its modularity, while keeping a single readout system for a variable number of detector layers. A limitation of this approach is the relatively large inter-layer distance (4 mm) compared to the pixel thickness (0.3 mm). Therefore the next step in the design is to decrease the space between the 2D detectors.

  16. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusciac, D.; Bordy, J.-M.; Daures, J.; Blideanu, V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists' demands for high-energy (6 - 9 MeV) photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors) are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes), a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV) has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this "realistic" radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  17. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples.

  18. High performance mini-gas chromatography-flame ionization detector system based on micro gas chromatography column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jianhai; Ning, Zhanwu; Zhang, Yanni; Liu, Jinhua

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was a very important measure for preventing environmental pollution, therefore, a mini gas chromatography (GC) flame ionization detector (FID) system integrated with a mini H2 generator and a micro GC column was developed for environmental VOC monitoring. In addition, the mini H2 generator was able to make the system explode from far away due to the abandoned use of a high pressure H2 source. The experimental result indicates that the fabricated mini GC FID system demonstrated high repeatability and very good linear response, and was able to rapidly monitor complicated environmental VOC samples.

  19. Transmission detectors for cyclotron in-vivo irradiations with neutrons.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, K V; Thomas, B J; Filkin, O J

    1975-01-01

    The neutron fluence imparted to the irradiated subjects needs to be measured accurately in order to obtain meaningful results from diagnostic irradiations. A convenient neutron detector for this purpose is in the form of a transmission chamber, which covers the whole beam directed at the subject. In one design the detector is an ionization chamber, filled with propane gas, in another a thin sheet of plastic scintillator is coupled to a pair of photomultipliers.

  20. SU-E-P-35: Real-Time Patient Transit Dose Verification of Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy by a 2D Ionization Chamber Array

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the real-time dose verification method in volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with a 2D array ion chamber array. Methods: The 2D ion chamber array was fixed on the panel of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Source-detector distance (SDD)was 140cm. 8mm RW3 solid water was added to the detector panel to achieve maximum readings.The patient plans for esophageal, prostate and liver cancers were selected to deliver on the cylindrical Cheese phantom 5 times in order to validate the reproducibility of doses. Real-time patient transit dose measurements were performed at each fraction. Dose distributions wereevaluated using gamma index criteria of 3mm DTA and 3% dose difference referred to the firsttime Result. Results: The gamma index pass rate in the Cheese phantom were about 98%; The gamma index pass rate for esophageal, liver and prostate cancer patient were about 92%,94%, and 92%, respectively; Gamma pass rate for all single fraction were more than 90%. Conclusion: The 2D array is capable of monitoring the real time transit doses during VMAT delivery. It is helpful to improve the treatment accuracy.

  1. Liquid argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, P.J.; Mahler, H.J.; Chen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The principal features of the liquid argon TPC are outlined and the status of development efforts, particularly at UCI, are discussed. Technical problems associated with liquid TPC's are: the liquid must be maintained at a high level of purity to enable long distance drifting of ionization electrons, and the signal size is small due to the absence of practical charge multiplication as found in gas chambers. These problems have been largely resolved in studies using small (1 to 100 l) detectors, thus allowing a realistic consideration of the physics potential of such devices.

  2. Two years experience with quality assurance protocol for patient related Rapid Arc treatment plan verification using a two dimensional ionization chamber array

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To verify the dose distribution and number of monitor units (MU) for dynamic treatment techniques like volumetric modulated single arc radiation therapy - Rapid Arc - each patient treatment plan has to be verified prior to the first treatment. The purpose of this study was to develop a patient related treatment plan verification protocol using a two dimensional ionization chamber array (MatriXX, IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). Method Measurements were done to determine the dependence between response of 2D ionization chamber array, beam direction, and field size. Also the reproducibility of the measurements was checked. For the patient related verifications the original patient Rapid Arc treatment plan was projected on CT dataset of the MatriXX and the dose distribution was calculated. After irradiation of the Rapid Arc verification plans measured and calculated 2D dose distributions were compared using the gamma evaluation method implemented in the measuring software OmniPro (version 1.5, IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany). Results The dependence between response of 2D ionization chamber array, field size and beam direction has shown a passing rate of 99% for field sizes between 7 cm × 7 cm and 24 cm × 24 cm for measurements of single arc. For smaller and larger field sizes than 7 cm × 7 cm and 24 cm × 24 cm the passing rate was less than 99%. The reproducibility was within a passing rate of 99% and 100%. The accuracy of the whole process including the uncertainty of the measuring system, treatment planning system, linear accelerator and isocentric laser system in the treatment room was acceptable for treatment plan verification using gamma criteria of 3% and 3 mm, 2D global gamma index. Conclusion It was possible to verify the 2D dose distribution and MU of Rapid Arc treatment plans using the MatriXX. The use of the MatriXX for Rapid Arc treatment plan verification in clinical routine is reasonable. The passing rate should be 99% than the verification

  3. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1987-01-01

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10.sup.6. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  4. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1985-02-19

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10/sup 6/. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  5. [Influence of position of ionization chamber and leaf-end on verification value in IMRT verification for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Harumitsu; Nagano, Hisato; Katou, Masahiro; Nakanishi, Masanori; Watanabe, Motoi; Shimo, Takahiro; Ichinose, Tsukasa; Agawa, Mutsumi; Tashima, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-20

    In IMRT for prostate cancer, MU verification is performed by the actual measurement. We have experienced a remarkable improvement in results, once succeeding in finding out the more suitable and optimal evaluation dose point in some cases even though the deviation between a designed MU score and our actual record gained at the iso-center was more than 3%. In this study, we tried to demonstrate how much influence would be given to the point dose verification by the 3D arrangement between an ion chamber and tips of the MLC. The five cases in which the bias between each actual datum and planed MU score showed that about 3% were picked up and through these MLC configurations, 8 leaf-ends around the chamber were highlighted as the influential ones. After each distance from 4 pairs, a total of 8 leaves to the axis (the mid-line) of our ion chamber were mapped. The indexes (PlanLeafScores) were computed through these distances and segmental MU scores. The ratio of these scores and results obtained at the 12 sites within 1 cm from the iso-center were carried out by single regression analysis. In all cases the ratios of planed MU values to the actual ones tended to go down in inverse proportion to the increase in PlanLeafScores (r<-0.77, p<0.002). As the dimensional arrangement between the ion chamber and the edges of the MLC were thought to determine the result of the verification. PlanLeafScores will enable us to determine the optimal evaluation of the dose point.

  6. Search for new, long-lived, charged particles using ionization in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axen, Bradley; Atlas Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Several extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of charged, very massive, and long-lived particles. Because of their high masses these particles would propagate non-relativistically through the ATLAS pixel detector and are therefore be identifiable through a measurement of large specific energy loss. Measuring heavy, long-lived particles through their track parameters in the pixel detector allows sensitivity to particles with lifetimes in the nanosecond range and above. This search presents an inner detector driven method for identifying such particles in proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV with the 2015 dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.5 pb-1.

  7. The coated cathode conductive layer chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouclier, R.; Gaudaen, J.; Sauli, F.

    1991-12-01

    We describe a gaseous detector consisting of thin anode strips vacuum-evaporated on one side of a 100 μm thick plastic layer, alternating on the back side of the same foil with wider parallel cathode strips. Ionization released in a drift space on the anode side is amplified and detected much in the same way as in the microstrip gas chamber; in our detector however spontaneous breakdown due to surface currents is completely avoided by the presence of the insulating layer between anodes and cathodes. To reduce surface and volume charging up, we have used polymer foils with a moderate volume resistivity. The first results show good efficiency, good plateaux and time resolution in detecting low-rate minimum ionizing electrons. Although not suited for high rate or good energy resolution applications, this kind of detector seems rather promising for realizing cheaply large active surfaces.

  8. Comparison of dosimeter response: ionization chamber, TLD, and Gafchromic EBT2 film in 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT techniques for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitriandini, A.; Wibowo, W. E.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    This research was conducted by measuring point dose in the target area (lungs), heart, and spine using four dosimeters (PTW N30013, Exradin A16, TLD, and the Gafchromic EBT2 film). The measurement was performed in CIRS 002LFC thorax phantom. The main objective of this study was to compare the dosimetry of those different systems. Dose measurements performed only in a single fraction of irradiation. The measurements result shown that TLD has the least accuracy and precision. As the effect of volume averaging, ionization chamber reaches the discrepancy value up to -13.30% in the target area. EBT2 film has discrepancy value of <1% in the 3D-CRT and IMRT techniques. This dosimeter is proposed to be an appropriate alternative dosimeter to be used at point dose verification.

  9. The FiR 1 photon beam model adjustment according to in-air spectrum measurements with the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Schmitz, T; Hippeläinen, E; Liu, Y-H; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Auterinen, I; Savolainen, S

    2014-06-01

    The mixed neutron-photon beam of FiR 1 reactor is used for boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in Finland. A beam model has been defined for patient treatment planning and dosimetric calculations. The neutron beam model has been validated with an activation foil measurements. The photon beam model has not been thoroughly validated against measurements, due to the fact that the beam photon dose rate is low, at most only 2% of the total weighted patient dose at FiR 1. However, improvement of the photon dose detection accuracy is worthwhile, since the beam photon dose is of concern in the beam dosimetry. In this study, we have performed ionization chamber measurements with multiple build-up caps of different thickness to adjust the calculated photon spectrum of a FiR 1 beam model.

  10. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, Peter A. W.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Hall, Christopher J.; Lye, Jessica E.; Nordstroem, Terese; Midgley, Stewart M.; Lewis, Robert A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. Methods: The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Results: Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 {+-} 0.015 and 0.412 {+-} 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 {+-} 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. Conclusions: The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation

  11. Measurements of miniature ionization chamber currents in the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor demonstrate the importance of the delayed contribution to the photon field in nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulović, Vladimir; Fourmentel, Damien; Barbot, Loïc; Villard, Jean-François; Kaiba, Tanja; Gašper, Žerovnik; Snoj, Luka

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of experimental locations of a research nuclear reactor implies the determination of neutron and photon flux levels within, with the best achievable accuracy. In nuclear reactors, photon fluxes are commonly calculated by Monte Carlo simulations but rarely measured on-line. In this context, experiments were conducted with a miniature gas ionization chamber (MIC) based on miniature fission chamber mechanical parts, recently developed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission) irradiated in the core of the Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The aim of the study was to compare the measured MIC currents with calculated currents based on simulations with the MCNP6 code. A discrepancy of around 50% was observed between the measured and the calculated currents; in the latter taking into consideration only the prompt photon field. Further experimental measurements of MIC currents following reactor SCRAMs (reactor shutdown with rapid insertions of control rods) provide evidence that over 30% of the total measured signal is due to the delayed photon field, originating from fission and activation products, which are untreated in the calculations. In the comparison between the measured and calculated values, these findings imply an overall discrepancy of less than 20% of the total signal which is still unexplained.

  12. Development of a wide-range tritium-concentration detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, F.; Zhe, L.; Shicheng, L.; Jiangfeng, S.; Deli, L.

    2015-03-15

    According to the requirements of the tritium related systems of the TBM (Test Blanket Module) for monitoring the on-line tritium concentration, a wide-range tritium-concentration detector has been developed to measure the tritium concentration in the range of 10{sup 4} Bq/ml - 5*10{sup 8} Bq/ml. This detector is combined with a low-memory helium ionization chamber. The weak current signal collected in the ionization chamber is converted to the voltage signal by an I-V converter. The minimum weak current which the detector could be measured is 10{sup -14} A. The performance of the background current and the current response linearity of the prototype have been tested. The test result indicates that the linear response of the current signal of the prototype without connecting the ionization chamber is good. The linear correlation coefficient is R{sup 2} = 0.998.

  13. Dosimetry with diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervino, G.; Marino, C.; Silvestri, F.; Lavagno, A.; Truc, F.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper we present the dosimetry analysis in terms of stability and repeatability of the signal and dose rate dependence of a synthetic single crystal diamond grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique. The measurements carried out by 5 MeV X-ray photons beam show very promising results, even if the dose rate detector response points out that the charge trapping centers distribution is not uniform inside the crystal volume. This handicap that affects the detectors performances, must be ascribed to the growing process. Synthetic single crystal diamonds could be a valuable alternative to air ionization chambers for quality beam control and for intensity modulated radiation therapy beams dosimetry.

  14. Total OH reactivity measurements using a new fast Gas Chromatographic Photo-Ionization Detector (GC-PID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, A. C.; Sinha, V.; Bockisch, S.; Klüpfel, T.; Williams, J.

    2012-12-01

    The primary and most important oxidant in the atmosphere is the hydroxyl radical (OH). Currently OH sinks, particularly gas phase reactions, are poorly constrained. One way to characterize the overall sink of OH is to measure directly the ambient loss rate of OH, the total OH reactivity. To date, direct measurements of total OH reactivity have been either performed using a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system ("pump-and-probe" or "flow reactor") or the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS). Both techniques require large, complex and expensive detection systems. This study presents a feasibility assessment for CRM total OH reactivity measurements using a new detector, a Gas Chromatographic Photoionization Detector (GC-PID). Such a system is smaller, more portable, less power consuming and less expensive than other total OH reactivity measurement techniques. Total OH reactivity is measured by the CRM using a competitive reaction between a reagent (here pyrrole) with OH alone and in the presence of atmospheric reactive molecules. The new CRM method for total OH reactivity has been tested with parallel measurements of the GC-PID and the previously validated PTR-MS as detector for the reagent pyrrole during laboratory experiments, plant chamber and boreal field studies. Excellent agreement of both detectors was found when the GC-PID was operated under optimum conditions. Time resolution (60-70 s), sensitivity (LOD 3-6 s-1) and overall uncertainty (25% in optimum conditions) for total OH reactivity were similar to PTR-MS based total OH reactivity measurements. One drawback of the GC-PID system was the steady loss of sensitivity and accuracy during intensive measurements lasting several weeks, and a possible toluene interference. Generally, the GC-PID system has been shown to produce closely comparable results to the PTR-MS and thus in suitable environments (e.g. forests) it presents a viably economical

  15. Homolytic Reactive Mass Spectrometry of Fullerenes: Peculiarities of the Reactions of C60 with Aromatic Compounds in the Ionization Chambers of Mass Spectrometers and in Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovetsky, Yury I.; Shilova, Elena A.; Belokon, Alexander I.; Panz, Larisa I.; Tumanskii, Boris L.

    2013-04-01

    C60 reacted with PhH, PhCl, BnH, BnNH2, and o-C2H2B10H10 in the electron impact (EI) ion source of a mass spectrometer at 300 °C forming phenyl, benzyl, and o-carboranyl adducts, respectively, stabilized by hydrogen addition and loss. Besides, the additions to C60 of methyl and phenyl radicals for toluene, and a phenyl radical for benzylamine were observed. A homolytic reaction mechanism was suggested involving the reaction of the radicals formed from the aromatics under EI with C60 at the ionization chamber walls. While the ion/molecule reaction of C60 with benzene performed by Sun et al. under chemical ionization conditions at 200 °C afforded the complex C60•PhH+•, quite a different isomer, HC60Ph+•, was detected in the present study as a sequence of the different reaction mechanisms. C60 also reacted with benzyl bromide in the laser desorption/ionization (LDI) source of a mass spectrometer to give C60CPh+. Phenyl and benzyl derivatives of C60 were found, respectively, when the reactions of the fullerene with PhCl, BnH, and BnBr were performed in solution under ultra violet irradiation. For the reaction with toluene, the strong chemically induced dynamic electron polarization of the intermediate benzylfullerenyl radical with the reverse phase effect was found. The coincidence of the results of the mass spectrometry and solution reactions of C60 with aromatics, even though incomplete, additionally supports the hypothesis, formulated earlier, that the former results can predict the latter ones to a significant extent and shows that this conclusion is valid for both EI and LDI initiated reactions in mass spectrometers.

  16. Assaying multiple 125I seeds with the well-ionization chamber SourceCheck4π 33005 and a new insert

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Vijande, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide a practical solution that can be adopted in clinical routine to fulfill the AAPM-ESTRO recommendations regarding quality assurance of seeds used in prostate permanent brachytherapy. The aim is to design a new insert for the well-ionization chamber SourceCheck4π 33005 (PTW, Germany) that allows evaluating the mean air-kerma strength of up to ten 125I seeds with one single measurement instead of measuring each seed individually. Material and methods The material required is: a) the SourceCheck4π 33005 well-ionization chamber provided with a PTW insert to measure the air-kerma strength S K of one single seed at a time; b) a newly designed insert that accommodates ten seeds in one column, which allows measuring the mean S K of the ten seeds in one single measurement; and c) a container with ten seeds from the same batch and class of the seeds used for the patient implant, and a set of nine non-radioactive seeds. The new insert is characterized by determining its calibration coefficient, used to convert the reading of the well-chamber when ten seeds are measured to their mean S K. The proposed method is validated by comparing the mean S K of the ten seeds obtained from the new insert with the individual measurement of S K of each seed, evaluated with the PTW insert. Results The ratio between the calibration coefficient of the new insert and the calibration coefficient of the PTW insert for the SourceCheck4π 33005 is 1.135 ± 0.007 (k = 1). The mean S K of a set of ten seeds evaluated with this new system is in agreement with the mean value obtained from measuring independently the S K of each seed. Conclusions The new insert and procedure allow evaluating the mean S K of ten seeds prior to the implant in a single measurement. The method is faster and more efficient from radiation protection point of view than measuring the individual S K of each seed. PMID:26816507

  17. Results from the Medipix-2 and Timepix Ionizing Radiation Imaging Detectors on BEXUS stratospheric balloon student campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbar, Jaroslav; Scheirich, Jan; Jakubek, Jan

    Results of the first two experiments using the semiconductor pixel detectors of the Medipix fam-ily for energetic particle imaging in the stratospheric environment are presented. The original detecting device was based on the hybrid pixel detectors of Medipix-2 and Timepix developed at CERN with USB interface developed at Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics of Czech Technical University in Prague. The detectors were used in tracking mode allowing them to operate as an active nuclear emulsion". The actual flight time of BEXUS7 with Medipix-2 on 8th October 2008 was over 4 hours, with 2 hours at stable floating altitude of 26km. BEXUS9 measurements of 3.5 hour duration by Timepix, Medipix-2 and ST-6 Geiger telescope instruments took place in arctic atmosphere till ceiling altitude of 24km on 11th October 2009. Stratospheric balloon platform is the optimal realization for all in-situ measurements of atmo-spheric electricity. Not only because of the high altitudes reached, but also due to its slow ascent velocity for statistically relevant sampling of the ambient environment for improving cosmic ray induced ionisation rate model inputs. The flight opportunity for BEXUS student projects was provided by Education department of the European Space Agency (ESA) and Eu-rolaunch -Collaboration of Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) and German Space Agency (DLR). The scientific goal was to check energetic particle type altitudinal dependencies, si-multaneously testing proper detector calibration by detecting fluxes of ionizing radiation while evaluating instrumentation endurance and performance.

  18. Calibration of relative sensitivity factors for impact ionization detectors with high-velocity silicate microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiege, Katherina; Trieloff, Mario; Hillier, Jon K.; Guglielmino, Massimo; Postberg, Frank; Srama, Ralf; Kempf, Sascha; Blum, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    Impact ionization mass spectrometers, e.g., the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard the Cassini spacecraft can quantitatively analyze the chemical composition of impacting particles, if the ionization efficiencies of the elements to be quantified are appropriately calibrated. Although silicates are an abundant dust species inside and outside the Solar System, an experimental calibration was not available for elements typically found in silicates. We performed such a calibration by accelerating orthopyroxene dust of known composition with a modified Van de Graaff accelerator to velocities of up to 37.9 km s-1 and subsequent analyses by a high resolution impact ionization mass spectrometer, the Large Area Mass Analyzer (LAMA). The orthopyroxene dust, prepared from a natural rock sample, contains ∼90% orthopyroxene and ∼10% additional mineral species, such as clinopyroxene, spinel, amphibole, olivine and glasses, which are present as impurities within the orthopyroxene, due to inclusion or intergrowth. Hence, the dust material can be regarded as a multi-mineral mixture. After analyses, we find that most particle data cluster at a composition ascribed to pure orthopyroxene. Some data scatter is caused by stochastic effects, other data scatter is caused by the chemically different mineral impurities. Our data indicate that these minor mineral phases can be recognized within a multi-mineral mixture. Here, for the first time, we present experimentally derived relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) for impact ionization mass spectroscopy of silicates, enabling the quantitative determination of the composition of cosmic dust grains. Orthopyroxene data were used to infer RSFs for Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe and K, for particles with radii ranging from 0.04 μm to 0.2 μm and velocities between 19 and 37.9 km s-1, impacting on a Rh-target.

  19. Monte Carlo study of conversion factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in solid slab phantoms for MV photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dong-wook; Lee, Jai-ki

    2016-08-01

    For high energy photon beams, solid phantom to water dose conversion factors were calculated by using a Monte Carlo method, and the result were compared with measurements and published data. Based on the absorbed dose to water dosimetry protocol, the conversion factor was theoretically divided into stopping powers ratios, perturbation factors and ratios of absorbed dose to water and that to solid phantom. Data for a Farmer-type chamber and a solid phantom based on polystyrene which is one of the most common material were applied to calculate the conversion factors for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. All measurements were conducted after 10 Gy pre-irradiation and thermal equilibrium had been established with solid slabs in a treatment room. The calculated and the measured conversion factors were in good agreement and could be used to confirm the feasibility of the solid phantom as a substitute for water for high energy photon beam.

  20. [Effects of ionizing radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors]. Conference summary

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, J.

    1992-09-01

    It is my task to summarise the great variety of topics (covering a refreshing mix of physics, chemistry and technology) presented at this conference, which has focused on the effects of ionising radiation on scintillators and other particle detectors. One of the reasons and the central interest of many of the participants was the use of such detectors in experiments at two future large hadron colliders: the Superconducting Super Collider to be operating outside of Dallas in the United States by the turn of the decade and its European counterpart the Large Hadron Collider to be operating outside of Geneva in Switzerland on a similar time scale. These accelerators are the ``apple of the high energy physicist`s eye.`` Their goal is to uncover the elusive Higgs particle and thereby set the cornerstone in our current knowledge of elementary particle interactions. This is the Quest, and from this lofty height the presentations rapidly moved on to the specific questions of experimental science: how such an experiment is carried out; why radiation damage is an issue; how radiation damage affects detectors; which factors affect radiation damage characteristics; which factors are not affected by radiation damage; and how better detectors may be constructed. These were the substance of this conference.

  1. Quantitative analysis of triglyceride species of vegetable oils by high performance liquid chromatography via a flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Phillips, F C; Erdahl, W L; Schmit, J A; Privett, O S

    1984-11-01

    A method for the quantitative analysis of triglyceride species composition of vegetable oils by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) via a flame ionization detector (FID) is described. Triglycerides are separated into molecular species via Zorbax chemically bonded octadecylsilane (ODS) columns using gradient elution with methylene chloride in acetonitrile. Identification of species is made by matching the retention times of the peaks in the chromatogram with the order of elution of all of the species that could be present in the sample on the basis of a random distribution of the fatty acids and comparison of experimental and calculated theoretical carbon numbers (TCN). Quantitative analysis is based on a direct proportionality of peak areas. Differences in the response of individual species were small and did not dictate the use of response factors. The method is applied to cocoa butter before and after randomization, soybean oil and pure olive oil.

  2. Atomic ionization by sterile-to-active neutrino conversion and constraints on dark matter sterile neutrinos with germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Chi, Hsin-Chang; Lin, Shin-Ted; Liu, C.-P.; Singh, Lakhwinder; Wong, Henry T.; Wu, Chih-Liang; Wu, Chih-Pan

    2016-05-01

    The transition magnetic moment of a sterile neutrino can give rise to its conversion to an active neutrino through radiative decay or nonstandard interaction (NSI) with matter. For sterile neutrinos of keV-mass as dark matter candidates, their decay signals are actively searched for in cosmic x-ray spectra. In this work, we consider the NSI that leads to atomic ionization, which can be detected by direct dark matter experiments. It is found that this inelastic scattering process for a nonrelativistic sterile neutrino has a pronounced enhancement in the differential cross section at energy transfer about half of its mass, manifesting experimentally as peaks in the measurable energy spectra. The enhancement effects gradually smear out as the sterile neutrino becomes relativistic. Using data taken with low-threshold low-background germanium detectors, constraints on sterile neutrino mass and its transition magnetic moment are derived and compared with those from astrophysical observations.

  3. New structural limits on magma chamber locations at the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Wallmann, P.C.; Pollard, D.D. ); Hildreth, W. ); Eichelberger, J.C. )

    1990-12-01

    New structural data from the Novarupta basin, Katmai National Park, Alaska, site of the largest volcanic eruption of this century (1912), provide limits for the location of magma chambers associated with this eruption. To investigate the subsurface structure of the 1912 vents, and to support an interdisciplinary study of this young volcanic system, a project of geologic mapping of surficial and bedrock structures in the vent region of the 1912 eruption has been undertaken. Landslide scarps, arcuate grabens, a monoclinal fold, and truncated ridges circumscribe the Novarupta basin, marking the inferred outer rim of the vent. A set of radial fissures crosses the southern margin of the basin, striking {approximately}140{degree}, subparallel to the dominant bedrock joint set. These fissures and joints, along with the local plate-motion vector and the inferred regional stress orientation, are consistent with a feeder dike propagating from a reservoir beneath Trident volcano to the eruptive vent.

  4. NOTE: Gating characteristics of an Elekta radiotherapy treatment unit measured with three types of detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Philip M.; Symonds-Tayler, J. Richard N.; Colgan, Ruth; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Letts, Nicky; Sandin, Carlos

    2010-04-01

    The characteristics of an Elekta Precise treatment machine with a gating interface were investigated. Three detectors were used: a Farmer ionization chamber, a MatriXX ionization chamber array and an in-house, single pulse-measurement ionization chamber (IVC). Measurements were made of dosimetric accuracy, flatness and symmetry characteristics and duty cycle for a range of beam-on times and gating periods. Results were compared with a standard ungated delivery as a reference. For all beam-on times, down to 0.5 s, dosimetric differences were below ±1% and flatness and symmetry parameter variations were below ±1.5%. For the shorter beam-on times the in-house detector deviated from the other two detectors, suggesting that this device should be used in conjunction with other detectors for absolute dosimetry purposes. However, it was found to be useful for studying gated beam characteristics pulse by pulse.

  5. CONTINUOUS ROTATION SCATTERING CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Verba, J.W.; Hawrylak, R.A.

    1963-08-01

    An evacuated scattering chamber for use in observing nuclear reaction products produced therein over a wide range of scattering angles from an incoming horizontal beam that bombards a target in the chamber is described. A helically moving member that couples the chamber to a detector permits a rapid and broad change of observation angles without breaching the vacuum in the chamber. Also, small inlet and outlet openings are provided whose size remains substantially constant. (auth)

  6. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Performance testing of a long-strip two-end readout multi-gap resistive plate chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Yi; Luo, Ming; Li, Yuan-Jing; Cheng, Jian-Ping

    2009-02-01

    Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) is a new generation of gas detector with good timing and spacial resolution, whose technique is widely applied in some recent high energy (nuclear) physics experiments. In this letter, we report a long-strip two-end readout MRPC and its test beam performance. The measurements show that the long-strip performs a transmission line characteristic and the impedance is independent of the length of strip. The MRPC module we developed is presented to gain a timing resolution of ~80 ps and a spacial resolution of ~6.4 mm. The possible application of the MRPC is also discussed.

  7. Soudan 2 proposal. [Nucleon Decay Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    A proposal to build a Nucleon Decay Detector emphasizing fine-grained tracking and ionization measurements has been submitted by groups from Argonne National Laboratory, University of Minnesota, and Oxford University to funding agencies in the US and UK. The proposal is based on the use of long drifting in gas detectors surrounded by steel. Planar drift chambers with 50 cm drifts have been developed for the detector. Alternative drifting schemes are being investigated. The detector will have an initial mass of 1000 tons, yielding a sensitivity to nucleon decay at the 10/sup 32/ year lifetime level. It will later be expanded to 5000 tons.

  8. Multi Electrode Semiconductor Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendolia, S. R.; Batignani, G.; Bertolucci, E.; Bosisio, L.; Budinich, M.; Bradaschia, C.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Focardi, E.; Giazotto, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Menzione, A.; Ristori, L.; Rolandi, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Vincelli, M. L.

    1981-04-01

    Detectors with very high space resolution have been built in our laboratory and tested at CERN in order to investigate their possible use in high energy physics experiments. These detectors consist of thin layers of silicon crystals acting as ionization chambers. Thin electrodes, structured in strips or in more fancy shapes are applied to their surfaces by metal coating. The space resolution which could be reached is of the order of a few microns. An interesting feature of these solid state detectors is that they can work under very high or low external pressure or at very low temperature. The use of these detectors would strongly reduce the dimensions and the cost of high energy experiments.

  9. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  10. Penning Ionization Electron Spectroscopy in Glow Discharge: A New Dimension for Gas Chromatography Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheverev, V. A.; Khromov, N. A.; Kojiro, D. R.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Admixtures to helium of 100 ppm and 5 ppm of nitrogen, and 100 ppm and 10 ppm of carbon monoxide were identified and measured in the helium discharge afterglow using an electrical probe placed into the plasma. For nitrogen and carbon monoxide gases, the measured electron energy spectra display distinct characteristic peaks (fingerprints). Location of the peaks on the energy scale is determined by the ionization energies of the analyte molecules. Nitrogen and carbon monoxide fingerprints were also observed in a binary mixture of these gases in helium, and the relative concentration analytes has been predicted. The technically simple and durable method is considered a good candidate for a number of analytical applications, and in particular, in GC and for analytical flight instrumentation.

  11. Examination system utilizing ionizing radiation and a flexible, miniature radiation detector probe

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Kross, Brian J.; Zorn, Carl J.; Majewski, Lukasz A.

    1996-01-01

    An optimized examination system and method based on the Reverse Geometry X-Ray.RTM. (RGX.RTM.) radiography technique are presented. The examination system comprises a radiation source, at least one flexible, miniature radiation detector probe positioned in appropriate proximity to the object to be examined and to the radiation source with the object located between the source and the probe, a photodetector device attachable to an end of the miniature radiation probe, and a control unit integrated with a display device connected to the photodetector device. The miniature radiation detector probe comprises a scintillation element, a flexible light guide having a first end optically coupled to the scintillation element and having a second end attachable to the photodetector device, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible light guide. The probe may be portable and insertable, or may be fixed in place within the object to be examined. An enclosed, flexible, liquid light guide is also presented, which comprises a thin-walled flexible tube, a liquid, preferably mineral oil, contained within the tube, a scintillation element located at a first end of the tube, closures located at both ends of the tube, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible tube. The examination system and method have applications in non-destructive material testing for voids, cracks, and corrosion, and may be used in areas containing hazardous materials. In addition, the system and method have applications for medical and dental imaging.

  12. Examination system utilizing ionizing radiation and a flexible, miniature radiation detector probe

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, S.; Kross, B.J.; Zorn, C.J.; Majewski, L.A.

    1996-10-22

    An optimized examination system and method based on the Reverse Geometry X-Ray{trademark} (RGX{trademark}) radiography technique are presented. The examination system comprises a radiation source, at least one flexible, miniature radiation detector probe positioned in appropriate proximity to the object to be examined and to the radiation source with the object located between the source and the probe, a photodetector device attachable to an end of the miniature radiation probe, and a control unit integrated with a display device connected to the photodetector device. The miniature radiation detector probe comprises a scintillation element, a flexible light guide having a first end optically coupled to the scintillation element and having a second end attachable to the photodetector device, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible light guide. The probe may be portable and insertable, or may be fixed in place within the object to be examined. An enclosed, flexible, liquid light guide is also presented, which comprises a thin-walled flexible tube, a liquid, preferably mineral oil, contained within the tube, a scintillation element located at a first end of the tube, closures located at both ends of the tube, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible tube. The examination system and method have applications in non-destructive material testing for voids, cracks, and corrosion, and may be used in areas containing hazardous materials. In addition, the system and method have applications for medical and dental imaging. 5 figs.

  13. Xenon bubble chambers for direct dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, C.; Fallon, S.; Genovesi, J.; Khaitan, D.; Klimov, K.; Mock, J.; Szydagis, M.

    2016-03-01

    The search for dark matter is one of today's most exciting fields. As bigger detectors are being built to increase their sensitivity, background reduction is an ever more challenging issue. To this end, a new type of dark matter detector is proposed, a xenon bubble chamber, which would combine the strengths of liquid xenon TPCs, namely event by event energy resolution, with those of a bubble chamber, namely insensitivity to electronic recoils. In addition, it would be the first time ever that a dark matter detector is active on all three detection channels, ionization and scintillation characteristic of xenon detectors, and heat through bubble formation in superheated fluids. Preliminary simulations show that, depending on threshold, a discrimination of 99.99% to 99.9999+% can be achieved, which is on par or better than many current experiments. A prototype is being built at the University at Albany, SUNY. The prototype is currently undergoing seals, thermal, and compression testing.

  14. An Efficient, FPGA-Based, Cluster Detection Algorithm Implementation for a Strip Detector Readout System in a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E. (Editor); Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photoelectron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  15. An efficient, FPGA-based, cluster detection algorithm implementation for a strip detector readout system in a Time Projection Chamber polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E.; Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photo- electron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  16. Extrapolation Ionization Chamber Dosimetry of Fluorescent X-Ray Energies from 4.5 to 19.6 keV.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, Joseph T; Tucker, Mark A; Snyder, Michael G; Makar, Simon P; Yudele, Mark; Burmeister, Jay; Joiner, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Characteristic X rays of energies less than approximately 20 keV are of interest in radiobiology and radiation oncology. There is evidence that these low-energy photons produce higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) relative to higher energies. Lower energy X rays also offer the advantage of healthy tissue sparing beyond the target treatment depth. Electronic brachytherapy systems that can deliver characteristic and bremsstrahlung X rays of varying energy are in clinical use as well as under development. We performed low-energy extrapolation ionization chamber dosimetry using two methods: 1. the exposure-to-dose method; and 2. the Burlin theory method combined with the extrapolation chamber method of Klevenhagen. We investigated fluorescent X rays emitted from seven metals: titanium (Ti, Z = 22); chromium (Cr, Z = 24); iron (Fe, Z = 26); cobalt (Co, Z = 27); copper (Cu, Z = 29); zinc (Zn, Z = 30); and molybdenum (Mo, Z = 42). X rays were produced by irradiation of the metals with a 55 kVp, 45 mA silver anode spectrum. The data obtained were air kerma rate (cGy/min), and radiation dose rate (cGy/min) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution and water. Air kerma rates ranged from 3.55 ± 0.10 to 14.36 ± 0.39 cGy/min. Dose rates ranged from 3.85 ± 0.10 to 16.96 ± 0.46 cGy/min in PBS and 3.59 ± 0.10 to 16.06 ± 0.43 cGy/min in water. Dose-rate energy dependence of both models was examined by taking a ratio of measured to Monte Carlo calculated dose rates. Dosimetry method 1 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0127 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9276. Method 2 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0467 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9933. Method 1 or 2 may be used as a relative dosimetry system to derive dose rates to water by using a second reference ion chamber with a NIST-traceable calibration for the molybdenum spectrum.

  17. Extrapolation Ionization Chamber Dosimetry of Fluorescent X-Ray Energies from 4.5 to 19.6 keV.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, Joseph T; Tucker, Mark A; Snyder, Michael G; Makar, Simon P; Yudele, Mark; Burmeister, Jay; Joiner, Michael C

    2016-09-01

    Characteristic X rays of energies less than approximately 20 keV are of interest in radiobiology and radiation oncology. There is evidence that these low-energy photons produce higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and lower oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) relative to higher energies. Lower energy X rays also offer the advantage of healthy tissue sparing beyond the target treatment depth. Electronic brachytherapy systems that can deliver characteristic and bremsstrahlung X rays of varying energy are in clinical use as well as under development. We performed low-energy extrapolation ionization chamber dosimetry using two methods: 1. the exposure-to-dose method; and 2. the Burlin theory method combined with the extrapolation chamber method of Klevenhagen. We investigated fluorescent X rays emitted from seven metals: titanium (Ti, Z = 22); chromium (Cr, Z = 24); iron (Fe, Z = 26); cobalt (Co, Z = 27); copper (Cu, Z = 29); zinc (Zn, Z = 30); and molybdenum (Mo, Z = 42). X rays were produced by irradiation of the metals with a 55 kVp, 45 mA silver anode spectrum. The data obtained were air kerma rate (cGy/min), and radiation dose rate (cGy/min) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution and water. Air kerma rates ranged from 3.55 ± 0.10 to 14.36 ± 0.39 cGy/min. Dose rates ranged from 3.85 ± 0.10 to 16.96 ± 0.46 cGy/min in PBS and 3.59 ± 0.10 to 16.06 ± 0.43 cGy/min in water. Dose-rate energy dependence of both models was examined by taking a ratio of measured to Monte Carlo calculated dose rates. Dosimetry method 1 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0127 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9276. Method 2 exhibited a linear relationship across all energies with a slope of 0.0467 keV(-1) and R(2) of 0.9933. Method 1 or 2 may be used as a relative dosimetry system to derive dose rates to water by using a second reference ion chamber with a NIST-traceable calibration for the molybdenum spectrum. PMID:27548518

  18. Two large-area anode-pad MICROMEGAS chambers as the basic elements of a pre-shower detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aphecetche, L.; Delagrange, H.; D'Enterria, D. G.; Le Guay, M.; Li, X.; Martínez, G.; Mora, M. J.; Pichot, P.; Roy, D.; Schutz, Y.

    2001-03-01

    The design of a detector based on MICROMEGAS (MICRO MEsh GAseous Structure) technology is presented. Our detector is characterized by a large active area of 398×281 mm2, a pad read-out with 20×22 mm2 segmentation, and an uniform amplification gap obtained by insulating spacers ( 100 μm high and 200 μm in diameter). The performances of several prototypes have been evaluated under irradiation with secondary beams of 2 GeV/c momentum charged pions and electrons. We consider such a detector as the basic element for a pre-shower detector to equip the PHOton Spectrometer (PHOS) of the ALICE experiment. Its assets are modularity, small amount of material, robustness and low cost.

  19. Quantification of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds with a Flame Ionization Detector Using the Effective Carbon Number Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Erickson, M. H.; Fricaud, V. L.; Wallace, H. W.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere by plants and include structurally complex organic molecules such as monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their oxygenated derivatives. These BVOCs are among the principle factors influencing the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere in forested regions. BVOC emission rates are often measured by collecting samples onto adsorptive cartridges in the field and then transporting these samples to the laboratory for chromatographic analysis. One of the most commonly used detectors in gas chromatography is the flame ionization detector (FID) due to its broad linear range, high sensitivity, and predictable response to many compounds. The FID response to saturated aliphatic molecules is proportional to carbon number. However, deviations occur as the complexity of the molecular structure increases. To account for these deviations, Sternberg et al. (1962) developed the effective carbon number (ECN) concept, which describes the number of carbons the FID "effectively" responds to. The ECN of a complex molecule can be estimated from the number and type of functional groups present, allowing an estimate of relative response factors for quantification. This approach is particularly useful for applications where samples contain a mixture of organic compounds and standards are not realistically accessible- a common predicament for environmental measurements. ECNs for a limited number of compounds with varying functional groups have been quantified in previous studies. However, there remain large gaps in the variety of compounds for which published data are available. This results in higher than necessary uncertainties when quantifying compounds that are structurally dissimilar to those that have been reported in the literature. The purpose of this study was to determine the ECN for a variety of terpenoid compounds to enable improved quantification of BVOC measurements. A dynamic dilution system was developed to

  20. Evaluation of relative transmitted dose for a step and shoot head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy using a scanning liquid ionization chamber electronic portal imaging device

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Mohammad; Bezak, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The dose delivery verification for a head and neck static intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) case using a scanning liquid ionization chamber electronic portal imaging device (SLIC-EPID) was investigated. Acquired electronic portal images were firstly converted into transmitted dose maps using an in-house developed method. The dose distributions were then compared with those calculated in a virtual EPID using the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (TPS). Using gamma evaluation with the ΔDmax and DTA criteria of 3%/2.54 mm, an excellent agreement was observed between transmitted dose measured using SLIC-EPID and that calculated by TPS (gamma score approximately 95%) for large MLC fields. In contrast, for several small subfields, due to SLIC-EPID image blurring, significant disagreement was found in the gamma results. Differences between EPID and TPS dose maps were also observed for several parts of the radiation subfields, when the radiation beam passed through air on the outside of tissue. The transmitted dose distributions measured using portal imagers such as SLIC-EPID can be used to verify the dose delivery to a patient. However, several aspects such as accurate calibration procedure and imager response under different conditions should be taken into the consideration. In addition, SLIC-EPID image blurring is another important issue, which should be considered if the SLIC-EPID is used for clinical dosimetry verification. PMID:22363108

  1. Evaluation of relative transmitted dose for a step and shoot head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy using a scanning liquid ionization chamber electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mohammad; Bezak, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The dose delivery verification for a head and neck static intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) case using a scanning liquid ionization chamber electronic portal imaging device (SLIC-EPID) was investigated. Acquired electronic portal images were firstly converted into transmitted dose maps using an in-house developed method. The dose distributions were then compared with those calculated in a virtual EPID using the Pinnacle(3) treatment planning system (TPS). Using gamma evaluation with the ΔD(max) and DTA criteria of 3%/2.54 mm, an excellent agreement was observed between transmitted dose measured using SLIC-EPID and that calculated by TPS (gamma score approximately 95%) for large MLC fields. In contrast, for several small subfields, due to SLIC-EPID image blurring, significant disagreement was found in the gamma results. Differences between EPID and TPS dose maps were also observed for several parts of the radiation subfields, when the radiation beam passed through air on the outside of tissue. The transmitted dose distributions measured using portal imagers such as SLIC-EPID can be used to verify the dose delivery to a patient. However, several aspects such as accurate calibration procedure and imager response under different conditions should be taken into the consideration. In addition, SLIC-EPID image blurring is another important issue, which should be considered if the SLIC-EPID is used for clinical dosimetry verification.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Advances in the determination of absorbed dose to water in clinical high-energy photon and electron beams using ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiful Huq, M.; Andreo, Pedro

    2004-02-01

    During the last two decades, absorbed dose to water in clinical photon and electron beams was determined using dosimetry protocols and codes of practice based on radiation metrology standards of air kerma. It is now recommended that clinical reference dosimetry be based on standards of absorbed dose to water. Newer protocols for the dosimetry of radiotherapy beams, based on the use of an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water, ND,w, in a standards laboratory's reference quality beam, have been published by several national or regional scientific societies and international organizations. Since the publication of these protocols multiple theoretical and experimental dosimetry comparisons between the various ND,w based recommendations, and between the ND,w and the former air kerma (NK) based protocols, have been published. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the dosimetry protocols based on these standards and of the intercomparisons of the different protocols published in the literature, discussing the reasons for the observed discrepancies between them. A summary of the various types of standards of absorbed dose to water, together with an analysis of the uncertainties along the various steps of the dosimetry chain for the two types of formalism, is also included. It is emphasized that the NK-ND,air and ND,w formalisms have very similar uncertainty when the same criteria are used for both procedures. Arguments are provided in support of the recommendation for a change in reference dosimetry based on standards of absorbed dose to water.

  3. BTEX determination in water matrices using HF-LPME with gas chromatography-flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Sarafraz-Yazdi, A; Amiri, A H; Es'haghi, Z

    2008-03-01

    In the present work, a sample pre-treatment technique for the determination of trace concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene (BTEX) in aqueous samples has been developed and applied to analysis of the selected analytes in environmental water samples. The extraction procedure is based on coupling polypropylene hollow-fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) with gas chromatography by flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The effective parameters such as organic solvent, extraction time, agitation speed and salting effect were investigated. Good reproducibilities of the extraction performance were obtained, with the RSD values ranging from 2.02 to 4.61% (n=5). The method provided 41.47-128.01 fold preconcentration of the target analytes. The limits of detections for the BTEX were in the range of 0.005-03microg ml(-1). In addition, sample clean-up was achieved during LPME due to the selectivity of the hollow fiber, which prevented undesirable large molecules from being extracted. Real samples (River and waste waters) containing BTEX were examined using this method with good linearity and precision (RSDs most lower than 6.00%, n=5). All experiments were carried out at room temperature, 22+/-0.5 degrees C.

  4. Ionizing Radiation Detectors Based on Ge-Doped Optical Fibers Inserted in Resonant Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Avino, Saverio; D’Avino, Vittoria; Giorgini, Antonio; Pacelli, Roberto; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Cella, Laura; De Natale, Paolo; Gagliardi, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of ionizing radiation (IR) is a crucial issue in different areas of interest, from environmental safety and industrial monitoring to aerospace and medicine. Optical fiber sensors have recently proven good candidates as radiation dosimeters. Here we investigate the effect of IR on germanosilicate optical fibers. A piece of Ge-doped fiber enclosed between two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is irradiated with gamma radiation generated by a 6 MV medical linear accelerator. With respect to other FBG-based IR dosimeters, here the sensor is only the bare fiber without any special internal structure. A near infrared laser is frequency locked to the cavity modes for high resolution measurement of radiation induced effects on the fiber optical parameters. In particular, we observe a variation of the fiber thermo-optic response with the radiation dose delivered, as expected from the interaction with Ge defect centers, and demonstrate a detection limit of 360 mGy. This method can have an impact in those contexts where low radiation doses have to be measured both in small volumes or over large areas, such as radiation therapy and radiation protection, while bare optical fibers are cheap and disposable. PMID:25686311

  5. BTEX determination in water matrices using HF-LPME with gas chromatography-flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Sarafraz-Yazdi, A; Amiri, A H; Es'haghi, Z

    2008-03-01

    In the present work, a sample pre-treatment technique for the determination of trace concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene (BTEX) in aqueous samples has been developed and applied to analysis of the selected analytes in environmental water samples. The extraction procedure is based on coupling polypropylene hollow-fiber liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME) with gas chromatography by flame ionization detection (GC-FID). The effective parameters such as organic solvent, extraction time, agitation speed and salting effect were investigated. Good reproducibilities of the extraction performance were obtained, with the RSD values ranging from 2.02 to 4.61% (n=5). The method provided 41.47-128.01 fold preconcentration of the target analytes. The limits of detections for the BTEX were in the range of 0.005-03microg ml(-1). In addition, sample clean-up was achieved during LPME due to the selectivity of the hollow fiber, which prevented undesirable large molecules from being extracted. Real samples (River and waste waters) containing BTEX were examined using this method with good linearity and precision (RSDs most lower than 6.00%, n=5). All experiments were carried out at room temperature, 22+/-0.5 degrees C. PMID:18221982

  6. Smart smoke alarm

    SciTech Connect

    Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A; Frank, Steven Shane

    2015-04-28

    Methods and apparatus for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a smoke detector uses linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to determine whether observed conditions indicate that an alarm is warranted.

  7. Wide range radioactive gas concentration detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1984-01-01

    A wide range radioactive gas concentration detector and monitor which is capable of measuring radioactive gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude. The device of the present invention is designed to have an ionization chamber which is sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  8. The eye (and brain) as ionizing particle detector? First results from the ALTEA - space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narici, Livio

    The first part of ALTEA-Space experiments have been performed on the ISS (USLab) between August 2006 and July 2007. The ALTEA hardware features 6 particle telescopes each with 6 striped 8 x 16 cm2 silicon planes arranged alternately in the x and y direction. These detectors are hold by helmet shaped holder. ALTEA features also a light tight visual stimulation unit, a 32 channel EEG cap and electronics, a 3-buttons pushbutton. Two different experiment modalities were run: DOSI and CNSM. The former is the study of the radiation environment of the USLab, and results from these measurements are mostly covered by other papers in this conference; the latter is the study of the electrophysiological activity in coincidence with particle traveling through the eye/brain of the astronaut, with specific reference to the observed light flashes. In this paper we will present first results from these measurements and discuss, within this panorama, the amount of the measured radiation in the brain/eye. Seven CNSM sessions have been performed (on three astronauts), with a total of 20 light flashes perceived. Comparisons with previous measurements in Low Earth Orbit and during the flights to the Moon will be also shown

  9. Joint measurement of the atmospheric muon flux through the Puy de Dome volcano with plastic scintillators and Resistive Plate Chambers detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Ambrosino, F.; Anastasio, A.; Bross, A.; Bene, S.; Boivin, P.; Bonechi, L.; Carloganu, C.; Ciaranfi, R.; Cimmino, L.; Combaret, Ch.; et al

    2015-11-14

    The muographic imaging of volcanoes relies on the measured transmittance of the atmospheric muon flux through the target. An important bias affecting the result comes from background contamination mimicking a higher transmittance. The MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations measured independently in 2013 the atmospheric muon flux transmitted through the Puy de Dôme volcano using their early prototype detectors, based on plastic scintillators and on Glass Resistive Plate Chambers, respectively. These detectors had three (MU-RAY) or four (TOMUVOL) detection layers of 1 m2 each, tens (MU-RAY) or hundreds (TOMUVOL) of nanosecond time resolution, a few millimeter position resolution, an energy threshold ofmore » few hundreds MeV, and no particle identification capabilities. The prototypes were deployed about 1.3 km away from the summit, where they measured, behind rock depths larger than 1000 m, remnant fluxes of 1.83±0.50(syst)±0.07(stat) m–2 d–1 deg–2 (MU-RAY) and 1.95±0.16(syst)±0.05(stat) m–2 d–1 deg–2 (TOMUVOL), that roughly correspond to the expected flux of high-energy atmospheric muons crossing 600 meters water equivalent (mwe) at 18° elevation. This implies that imaging depths larger than 500 mwe from 1 km away using such prototype detectors suffer from an overwhelming background. These measurements confirm that a new generation of detectors with higher momentum threshold, time-of-flight measurement, and/or particle identification is needed. As a result, the MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations expect shortly to operate improved detectors, suitable for a robust muographic imaging of kilometer-scale volcanoes.« less

  10. Joint measurement of the atmospheric muon flux through the Puy de Dome volcano with plastic scintillators and Resistive Plate Chambers detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosino, F.; Anastasio, A.; Bross, A.; Bene, S.; Bonechi, L.; Carloganu, C.; Cimmino, L.; Combaret, Ch.; Durand, S.; Fehr, F.; Gailler, L.; Labazuy, Ph.; Laktineh, I.; Masone, V.; Miallier, D.; Mori, N.; Niess, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Portal, A.; Rubinov, P.; Saracino, G.; Scarlini, E.; Strolin, P.; Vulpescu, B.

    2015-11-14

    The muographic imaging of volcanoes relies on the measured transmittance of the atmospheric muon flux through the target. An important bias affecting the result comes from background contamination mimicking a higher transmittance. The MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations measured independently in 2013 the atmospheric muon flux transmitted through the Puy de Dôme volcano using their early prototype detectors, based on plastic scintillators and on Glass Resistive Plate Chambers, respectively. These detectors had three (MU-RAY) or four (TOMUVOL) detection layers of 1 m2 each, tens (MU-RAY) or hundreds (TOMUVOL) of nanosecond time resolution, a few millimeter position resolution, an energy threshold of few hundreds MeV, and no particle identification capabilities. The prototypes were deployed about 1.3 km away from the summit, where they measured, behind rock depths larger than 1000 m, remnant fluxes of 1.83±0.50(syst)±0.07(stat) m–2 d–1 deg–2 (MU-RAY) and 1.95±0.16(syst)±0.05(stat) m–2 d–1 deg–2 (TOMUVOL), that roughly correspond to the expected flux of high-energy atmospheric muons crossing 600 meters water equivalent (mwe) at 18° elevation. This implies that imaging depths larger than 500 mwe from 1 km away using such prototype detectors suffer from an overwhelming background. These measurements confirm that a new generation of detectors with higher momentum threshold, time-of-flight measurement, and/or particle identification is needed. As a result, the MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations expect shortly to operate improved detectors, suitable for a robust muographic imaging of kilometer-scale volcanoes.

  11. Joint measurement of the atmospheric muon flux through the Puy de Dôme volcano with plastic scintillators and Resistive Plate Chambers detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, F.; Anastasio, A.; Bross, A.; Béné, S.; Boivin, P.; Bonechi, L.; Cârloganu, C.; Ciaranfi, R.; Cimmino, L.; Combaret, Ch.; D'Alessandro, R.; Durand, S.; Fehr, F.; Français, V.; Garufi, F.; Gailler, L.; Labazuy, Ph.; Laktineh, I.; Lénat, J.-F.; Masone, V.; Miallier, D.; Mirabito, L.; Morel, L.; Mori, N.; Niess, V.; Noli, P.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Portal, A.; Rubinov, P.; Saracino, G.; Scarlini, E.; Strolin, P.; Vulpescu, B.

    2015-11-01

    The muographic imaging of volcanoes relies on the measured transmittance of the atmospheric muon flux through the target. An important bias affecting the result comes from background contamination mimicking a higher transmittance. The MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations measured independently in 2013 the atmospheric muon flux transmitted through the Puy de Dôme volcano using their early prototype detectors, based on plastic scintillators and on Glass Resistive Plate Chambers, respectively. These detectors had three (MU-RAY) or four (TOMUVOL) detection layers of 1 m2 each, tens (MU-RAY) or hundreds (TOMUVOL) of nanosecond time resolution, a few millimeter position resolution, an energy threshold of few hundreds MeV, and no particle identification capabilities. The prototypes were deployed about 1.3 km away from the summit, where they measured, behind rock depths larger than 1000 m, remnant fluxes of 1.83±0.50(syst)±0.07(stat) m-2 d-1 deg-2 (MU-RAY) and 1.95±0.16(syst)±0.05(stat) m-2 d-1 deg-2 (TOMUVOL), that roughly correspond to the expected flux of high-energy atmospheric muons crossing 600 meters water equivalent (mwe) at 18° elevation. This implies that imaging depths larger than 500 mwe from 1 km away using such prototype detectors suffer from an overwhelming background. These measurements confirm that a new generation of detectors with higher momentum threshold, time-of-flight measurement, and/or particle identification is needed. The MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations expect shortly to operate improved detectors, suitable for a robust muographic imaging of kilometer-scale volcanoes.

  12. A new total reflection X-ray fluorescence vacuum chamber with sample changer analysis using a silicon drift detector for chemical analysis*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Pepponi, G.; Zoeger, N.

    2004-08-01

    There are several TXRF spectrometers commercially available for chemical analysis as well as for wafer surface analysis, but there is up to now no spectrometer for chemical analysis available that allows to measure samples under vacuum conditions. Simply a rough vacuum of 10 -2 mbar for the sample environment reduces the background due to scattering from air, thus to improve the detection limits. The absorption of low energy fluorescence radiation from low Z elements is reduced and therefore extends the elemental range to be measured down to Na. Finally evacuation of the chamber removes the Ar K-lines from the spectrum. The new vacuum chamber for TXRF named WOBISTRAX is equipped with a 12-position sample changer, a 10-mm 2 silicon drift detector (SDD) with an 8-μm Be entrance window and electrical cooling by Peltier effect, so no LN 2 is required. The chamber was designed to be attached to a diffraction tube housing. WOBISTRAX can be operated with a 3 kW long fine focus Mo-X-ray tube and uses a Mo/Si multilayer for monochromatization. The modified software is performing the motion control between sample changer and MCA features. The performance is expressed in terms of detection limits which are 700 fg Rb for Mo Kα excitation with 50 kV, 40 mA excitation conditions, 1000 s livetime. Using a Cr-X-ray tube for excitation of Al the achieved detection limits are 52 pg. So it could be shown that with the same measuring chamber and using an SDD with 8 μm Be window and a Cr-tube for excitation, low Z elements can be also measured with good detection limits.

  13. Development of Pattern Recognition Software for Tracks of Ionizing Radiation In Medipix2-Based (TimePix) Pixel Detector Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilalta, R.; Kuchibhotla, S.; Valerio, R.; Pinsky, L.

    2011-12-01

    The principal aim of our project is to develop an efficient pattern recognition tool for the automated identification and classification of tracks of ionizing radiation as measured by a TimePix version of the hybrid semiconductor Medipix2 pixel detector system. Such a software tool would have a number of applications including dosimeters to assess the risk of human exposure to radiation, and area monitors to characterize the general background radiation environment harmful to humans and electronic equipment. We are particularly interested in the development of the real-time analysis software needed to support an operational dosimeter that can assess the radiation environment during space missions. Our software development project makes use of data taken in beams of heavy ions at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Facility) in Chiba, Japan, including data from several different heavy ions with similar Linear Energy Transfers (LETs) for calibration purposes. We describe two modules of our pattern recognition tool: feature generation and classification. Our first module builds on a segmentation algorithm that identifies tracks from the pixel image assuming an approximately elliptical form that varies in size and degree of elongation based on multiple factors, including the particle species and angle of incidence. Determining the charge and energy of the particles creating each track is a particularly challenging task because different energy and charge incident particles can produce very similar patterns. Our classification module invokes different algorithms such as decision trees, support vector machines, and Bayesian classifiers.

  14. Search for lightly ionizing particles using CDMS-II data and fabrication of CDMS detectors with improved homogeneity in properties

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental particles are always observed to carry charges which are integral multiples of one-third charge of electron, e/3. While this is a well established experimental fact, the theoretical understanding for the charge quantization phenomenon is lacking. On the other hand, there exist numerous theoretical models that naturally allow for existence of particles with fractional electromagnetic charge. These particles, if existing, hint towards existence of physics beyond the standard model. Multiple high energy, optical, cosmological and astrophysical considerations restrict the allowable mass-charge parameter space for these fractional charges. Still, a huge unexplored region remains. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II), located at Soudan mines in northern Minnesota, employs germanium and silicon crystals to perform direct searches for a leading candidate to dark matter called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Alternately, the low detection threshold allows search for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent with corresponding \\signatures" resulting from the passage of a fractionally charged particle. In this dissertation, the CDMS-II data is analyzed to search for LIPs, with an expected background of 0.078 0.078 events. No candidate events are observed, allowing exclusion of new parameter space for charges between e/6 and e/200.

  15. [Gas chromatography with a Pulsed discharge helium ionization detector for measurement of molecular hydrogen(H2) in the atmosphere].

    PubMed

    Luan, Tian; Fang, Shuang-xi; Zhou, Ling-xi; Wang, Hong-yang; Zhang, Gen

    2015-01-01

    A high precision GC system with a pulsed discharge helium ionization detector was set up based on the commercial Agilent 7890A gas chromatography. The gas is identified by retention time and the concentration is calculated through the peak height. Detection limit of the system is about 1 x 10(-9) (mole fraction, the same as below). The standard deviation of 140 continuous injections with a standard cylinder( concentration is roughly 600 x 10(-9)) is better than 0.3 x 10(-9). Between 409.30 x 10(-9) and 867.74 x 10(-9) molecular hydrogen mole fractions and peak height have good linear response. By using two standards to quantify the air sample, the precision meets the background molecular hydrogen compatibility goal within the World Meteorological Organization/Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO/GAW) program. Atmospheric molecular hydrogen concentration at Guangzhou urban area was preliminarily measured by this method from January to November 2013. The results show that the atmospheric molecular hydrogen mole fraction varies from 450 x 10(-9) to 700 x 10(-9) during the observation period, with the lowest value at 14:00 (Beijing time, the same as below) and the peak value at 20:00. The seasonal variation of atmospheric hydrogen at Guangzhou area was similar with that of the same latitude stations in northern hemisphere.

  16. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  17. The focus-to-detector distance as a source of systematical errors in the measurement of Chaoul therapy units.

    PubMed

    Zaránd, P

    1980-09-01

    The skin exposure rates measured on 22 Chaoul units in two consecutive years were compared and their variance was analysed. The statistical fluctuation of the ionization method was 3.1% by a factor of about 2 to 2.5 smaller than the variations due to lack of reproducibility of the Chaoul units. The authors observed systematical errors among exposure rate measurement performed at different focus-to-detector distances. The effective source-to-detector distance is different for various ionization chambers. It is the sum of nominal focus-to-detector distance plus a geometrical constant. The geometrical constant is for a particular chamber only to a small extent dependent on the front wall thickness and on the focus-to detector distance. Sufficient standardization of both calibration procedure and construction of ionization chambers may help in avoiding this effect.

  18. Simultaneous determination of 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rates from building materials used in Central Italy with accumulation chambers and a continuous solid state alpha detector: influence of particle size, humidity and precursors concentration.

    PubMed

    Tuccimei, P; Moroni, M; Norcia, D

    2006-02-01

    A method to determine simultaneously the rates of 222Rn and 220Rn released from building materials quarried in Central Italy is presented. The method makes use of a continuous monitor equipped with a solid state alpha detector, in-line connected to a small accumulation chamber. The effects of chamber leakage and back diffusion on 222Rn free exhalation rate is evaluated. The influence of available exhalation surface, humidity content and precursors concentration on radon and thoron exhalation rates is investigated.

  19. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm-3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.

  20. Hybrid plan verification for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using the 2D ionization chamber array I'mRT MatriXX--a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Dobler, Barbara; Streck, Natalia; Klein, Elisabeth; Loeschel, Rainer; Haertl, Petra; Koelbl, Oliver

    2010-01-21

    The 2D ionization chamber array I'mRT MatriXX (IBA, Schwarzenbruck, Germany) has been developed for absolute 2D dosimetry and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for perpendicular beam incidence. The aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of I'mRT MatriXX for oblique beam incidence and hybrid plan verification of IMRT with original gantry angles. For the assessment of angular dependence, open fields with gantry angles in steps of 10 degrees were calculated on a CT scan of I'mRT MatriXX. For hybrid plan verification, 17 clinical IMRT plans and one rotational plan were used. Calculations were performed with pencil beam (PB), collapsed cone (CC) and Monte Carlo (MC) methods, which had been previously validated. Measurements were conducted on an Elekta SynergyS linear accelerator. To assess the potential and limitations of the system, gamma evaluation was performed with different dose tolerances and distances to agreement. Hybrid plan verification passed the gamma test with 4% dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement in all cases, in 82-88% of the cases for tolerances of 3%/3 mm, and in 59-76% of the cases if 3%/2 mm were used. Separate evaluation of the low dose and high dose regions showed that I'mRT MatriXX can be used for hybrid plan verification of IMRT plans within 3% dose tolerance and 3 mm distance to agreement with a relaxed dose tolerance of 4% in the low dose region outside the multileaf collimator (MLC).

  1. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm−3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 daysmore » of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  2. TU-F-BRE-03: Application of a Novel Mass-Density Compensation Optimization Method to Improve the Response of a Liquid-Filled Ionization Chamber in Nonstandard Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kamio, Y; Bouchard, H

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To improve the response of the microLion detector (PTW 31018) in small field conditions by optimizing the density of the detector's non-sensitive components using a novel method based on the detector's dose response function. Methods: The central values h(0,0) of the perturbation functions for the microLion detector and a volume of water equivalent to its sensitive volume were calculated using the Monte Carlo user code egs-chamber by scoring the dose absorbed by a 6 MV photon pencil beam incident on their centroids. Values of h(0,0) were plotted as a function of the density of the microLion's graphite electrode with the detector placed in the axial orientation. The optimized density was found by finding the minimal value of h(0,0). Results: A density of 1.37 g/cm3 was found to minimize the perturbation function of the microLion detector. The modified microLion's response was then evaluated in small square fields with sides in the range of 5 – 40 mm and found to be consistent with highly watere-quivalent detectors such as a scintillating detector (Exradin W1) and a generic alanine detector in both axial and radial orientations. Conclusion: This work illustrates a novel method which can used to optimize the design of radiation detectors in small fields. This method should also work with other optimization parameters (e.g. thickness of electrode). Density-compensated detectors have the potential to eliminate the need to evaluate nonstandard field correction factors as described by the IAEA-AAPM formalism (Alfonso et al.) and simplify future dosimetry protocols for SRS/SBRT modalities. Finally, we also expect an improvement in the response of density-compensated detectors for composite IMRT fields.

  3. Evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Sciarrone, Danilo; Purcaro, Giorgia; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-10

    The present research is focused on the use and evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector, defined as barrier discharge ionization detector (BID), within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (FM GC×GC). The performance of the BID device was compared to that of a flame ionization detector (FID), under similar FM GC×GC conditions. Following development and optimization of the FM GC×GC method, the BID was subjected to fine tuning in relation to acquisition frequency and discharge flow. Moreover, the BID performance was measured and compared to that of the FID, in terms of extra-column band broadening, sensitivity and dynamic range. The comparative study was carried out by using standard compounds belonging to different chemical classes, along with a sample of diesel fuel. Advantages and disadvantages of the BID system, also within the context of FM GC×GC, are critically discussed. In general, the BID system was characterized by a more limited dynamic range and increased sensitivity, compared to the FID. Additionally, BID and FID contribution to band broadening was found to be similar under the operational conditions applied. Particular attention was devoted to the behaviour of the FM GC×GC-BID system toward saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, for a possible future use in the field of mineral-oil food contamination research.

  4. Evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Sciarrone, Danilo; Purcaro, Giorgia; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-10

    The present research is focused on the use and evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector, defined as barrier discharge ionization detector (BID), within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (FM GC×GC). The performance of the BID device was compared to that of a flame ionization detector (FID), under similar FM GC×GC conditions. Following development and optimization of the FM GC×GC method, the BID was subjected to fine tuning in relation to acquisition frequency and discharge flow. Moreover, the BID performance was measured and compared to that of the FID, in terms of extra-column band broadening, sensitivity and dynamic range. The comparative study was carried out by using standard compounds belonging to different chemical classes, along with a sample of diesel fuel. Advantages and disadvantages of the BID system, also within the context of FM GC×GC, are critically discussed. In general, the BID system was characterized by a more limited dynamic range and increased sensitivity, compared to the FID. Additionally, BID and FID contribution to band broadening was found to be similar under the operational conditions applied. Particular attention was devoted to the behaviour of the FM GC×GC-BID system toward saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, for a possible future use in the field of mineral-oil food contamination research. PMID:26032893

  5. Calibration of impact ionization cosmic dust detectors: first tests to investigate how the dust density influences the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasmin Sterken, Veerle; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Hillier, Jon; Fielding, Lee; Lovett, Joseph; Armes, Steven; Fechler, Nina; Srama, Ralf; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hornung, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Impact ionization experiments have been performed since more than 40 years for calibrating cosmic dust detectors. A linear Van de Graaff dust accelerator was used to accelerate the cosmic dust analogues of submicron to micron-size to speeds up to 80 km s^-1. Different materials have been used for calibration: iron, carbon, metal-coated minerals and most recently, minerals coated with conductive polymers. While different materials with different densities have been used for instrument calibration, a comparative analysis of dust impacts of equal material but different density is necessary: porous or aggregate-like particles are increasingly found to be present in the solar system: e.g. dust from comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko [Fulle et al 2015], aggregate particles from the plumes of Enceladus [Gao et al 2016], and low-density interstellar dust [Westphal 2014 et al, Sterken et al 2015]. These recalibrations are relevant for measuring the size distributions of interplanetary and interstellar dust and thus mass budgets like the gas-to-dust mass ratio in the local interstellar cloud.We report about the calibrations that have been performed at the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility for investigating the influence of particle density on the impact ionization charge. We used the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer for the target, and compared hollow versus compact silica particles in our study as a first attempt to investigate experimentally the influence of dust density on the signals obtained. Also, preliminary tests with carbon aerogel were performed, and (unsuccessful) attempts to accelerate silica aerogel. In this talk we explain the motivation of the study, the experiment set-up, the preparation of — and the materials used, the results and plans and recommendations for future tests.Fulle, M. et al 2015, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 802, Issue 1, article id. L12, 5 pp. (2015)Gao, P. et al 2016, Icarus, Volume 264, p. 227-238Westphal, A. et al 2014, Science

  6. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Design and test of a Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber with Long readout-strip (LMRPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yong-Jie; Li, Cheng; Zhou, Yi; Shao, Ming; Zhao, Yan-E.; Chen, Hong-Fang

    2009-02-01

    A new kind (two end readout) of Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber with long readout-strip (LMRPC) is developed to be used at the large-area Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) at mid-rapidity at RHIC/STAR experiment for Time-of-Flight (TOF) measurement. The LMRPC has an active area of 87 cm × 17 cm, 10 gas gaps of 250 μm arranged in 2 stacks, with readout strips of 2.5 cm wide and 90 cm long. The considerations in LMRPC design related to its performance are discussed in this paper. The cosmic ray test results of a prototype LMRPC show a detection efficiency >95% and the time resolution ~70 ps.

  7. Static diffusion cloud chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, G.

    1981-01-01

    The chamber geometry and optical arrangement are described. The supersaturation range is given and consists of readings taken at five fixed points: 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1.0%, and 1.25%. The detection system is described including light source, cameras, and photocell detectors. The temperature control and the calibration of the chamber are discussed.

  8. Comment on 'Proton beam monitor chamber calibration'.

    PubMed

    Palmans, Hugo; Vatnitsky, Stanislav M

    2016-09-01

    We comment on a recent article (Gomà et al 2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) which compares different routes of reference dosimetry for the energy dependent beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams. In this article, a 3% discrepancy is reported between a Faraday cup and a plane-parallel ionization chamber in the experimental determination of the number of protons per monitor unit. It is further claimed that similar discrepancies between calorimetry and ionization chamber based dosimetry indicate that [Formula: see text]-values tabulated for proton beams in IAEA TRS-398 might be overestimated. In this commentary we show, however, that this supporting argument misrepresents the evidence in the literature and that the results presented, together with published data, rather confirm that there exist unresolved problems with Faraday cup dosimetry. We also show that the comparison in terms of the number of protons gives a biased view on the uncertainty estimates for both detectors while the quantity of interest is absorbed dose to water or dose-area-product to water, even if a beam monitor is calibrated in terms of the number of protons. Gomà et al (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) also report on the discrepancy between cylindrical and plane-parallel ionization chambers and confirm experimentally that in the presence of a depth dose gradient, theoretical values of the effective point of measurement, or alternatively a gradient correction factor, account for the discrepancy. We believe this does not point to an error or shortcoming of IAEA TRS-398, which prescribes taking the centre of cylindrical ionization chambers as reference point, since it recommends reference dosimetry to be performed in the absence of a depth dose gradient. But these observations reveal that important aspects of beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams are not addressed in IAEA TRS-398 given that those types of beams were not widely implemented at the time of its publication

  9. Fast determination of 3-ethenylpyridine as a marker of environmental tobacco smoke at trace level using direct atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Cheng-Yong; Sun, Shi-Hao; Zhang, Qi-Dong; Liu, Jun-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Xun; Zong, Yong-Li; Xie, Jian-Ping

    2013-03-01

    A method with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) was developed and applied to direct analysis of Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS), using 3-ethenylpyridine (3-EP) as a vapour-phase marker. In this study, the ion source of APCI-MS/MS was modified and direct analysis of gas sample was achieved by the modified instrument. ETS samples were directly introduced, via an atmospheric pressure inlet, into the APCI source. Ionization was carried out in positive-ion APCI mode and 3-EP was identified by both full scan mode and daughter scan mode. Quantification of 3-EP was performed by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The calibration curve was obtained in the range of 1-250 ng L-1 with a satisfactory regression coefficient of 0.999. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.5 ng L-1 and 1.6 ng L-1, respectively. The precision of the method, calculated as relative standard deviation (RSD), was characterized by repeatability (RSD 3.92%) and reproducibility (RSD 4.81%), respectively. In real-world ETS samples analysis, compared with the conventional GC-MS method, the direct APCI-MS/MS has shown better reliability and practicability in the determination of 3-EP at trace level. The developed method is simple, fast, sensitive and repeatable; furthermore, it could provide an alternative way for the determination of other volatile pollutants in ambient air at low levels.

  10. Applications of gaseous particle detectors in physics and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauli, Fabio

    1995-08-01

    The multi-wire proportional chamber, introduced in 1967 by Georges Charpak (recipient of the 1992 Nobel prize for physics) allows to achieve high-rate, fully electronics detection and localization of ionizing radiation. The myriad of devices inspired by this initial work generated a revolution in the conception of detectors for elementary particle physics experiments; examples are the time projection chamber, the drift chamber, the micro-strip gas chamber. After a brief introduction on the basic operating principles of the device, I will describe several examples of application of advanced gas detectors in medicine and biology and analyze the operating characteristics that make the new devices attractive when confronted with classic detectors.

  11. SU-E-T-35: An Investigation of the Accuracy of Cervical IMRT Dose Distribution Using 2D/3D Ionization Chamber Arrays System and Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Yang, J; Liu, H; Liu, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to compare the verification results of three solutions (2D/3D ionization chamber arrays measurement and Monte Carlo simulation), the results will help make a clinical decision as how to do our cervical IMRT verification. Methods: Seven cervical cases were planned with Pinnacle 8.0m to meet the clinical acceptance criteria. The plans were recalculated in the Matrixx and Delta4 phantom with the accurate plans parameters. The plans were also recalculated by Monte Carlo using leaf sequences and MUs for individual plans of every patient, Matrixx and Delta4 phantom. All plans of Matrixx and Delta4 phantom were delivered and measured. The dose distribution of iso slice, dose profiles, gamma maps of every beam were used to evaluate the agreement. Dose-volume histograms were also compared. Results: The dose distribution of iso slice and dose profiles from Pinnacle calculation were in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation, Matrixx and Delta4 measurement. A 95.2%/91.3% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Pinnacle distributions within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. A 96.4%/95.6% gamma pass ratio was obtained between the Matrixx/Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation within 2mm/2% gamma criteria, almost 100% gamma pass ratio within 3mm/3% gamma criteria. The DVH plot have slightly differences between Pinnacle and Delta4 measurement as well as Pinnacle and Monte Carlo simulation, but have excellent agreement between Delta4 measurement and Monte Carlo simulation. Conclusion: It was shown that Matrixx/Delta4 and Monte Carlo simulation can be used very efficiently to verify cervical IMRT delivery. In terms of Gamma value the pass ratio of Matrixx was little higher, however, Delta4 showed more problem fields. The primary advantage of Delta4 is the fact it can measure true 3D dosimetry while Monte Carlo can simulate in patients CT images but not in phantom.

  12. Accuracy of the electron transport in mcnp5 and its suitability for ionization chamber response simulations: A comparison with the egsnrc and penelope codes

    SciTech Connect

    Koivunoro, Hanna; Siiskonen, Teemu; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Hippelaeinen, Eero; Savolainen, Sauli

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: In this work, accuracy of the mcnp5 code in the electron transport calculations and its suitability for ionization chamber (IC) response simulations in photon beams are studied in comparison to egsnrc and penelope codes. Methods: The electron transport is studied by comparing the depth dose distributions in a water phantom subdivided into thin layers using incident energies (0.05, 0.1, 1, and 10 MeV) for the broad parallel electron beams. The IC response simulations are studied in water phantom in three dosimetric gas materials (air, argon, and methane based tissue equivalent gas) for photon beams ({sup 60}Co source, 6 MV linear medical accelerator, and mono-energetic 2 MeV photon source). Two optional electron transport models of mcnp5 are evaluated: the ITS-based electron energy indexing (mcnp5{sub ITS}) and the new detailed electron energy-loss straggling logic (mcnp5{sub new}). The electron substep length (ESTEP parameter) dependency in mcnp5 is investigated as well. Results: For the electron beam studies, large discrepancies (>3%) are observed between the mcnp5 dose distributions and the reference codes at 1 MeV and lower energies. The discrepancy is especially notable for 0.1 and 0.05 MeV electron beams. The boundary crossing artifacts, which are well known for the mcnp5{sub ITS}, are observed for the mcnp5{sub new} only at 0.1 and 0.05 MeV beam energies. If the excessive boundary crossing is eliminated by using single scoring cells, the mcnp5{sub ITS} provides dose distributions that agree better with the reference codes than mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5 dose estimates for the gas cavity agree within 1% with the reference codes, if the mcnp5{sub ITS} is applied or electron substep length is set adequately for the gas in the cavity using the mcnp5{sub new}. The mcnp5{sub new} results are found highly dependent on the chosen electron substep length and might lead up to 15% underestimation of the absorbed dose. Conclusions: Since the mcnp5 electron

  13. SU-E-T-552: Monte Carlo Calculation of Correction Factors for a Free-Air Ionization Chamber in Support of a National Air-Kerma Standard for Electronic Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mille, M; Bergstrom, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To use Monte Carlo radiation transport methods to calculate correction factors for a free-air ionization chamber in support of a national air-kerma standard for low-energy, miniature x-ray sources used for electronic brachytherapy (eBx). Methods: The NIST is establishing a calibration service for well-type ionization chambers used to characterize the strength of eBx sources prior to clinical use. The calibration approach involves establishing the well-chamber’s response to an eBx source whose air-kerma rate at a 50 cm distance is determined through a primary measurement performed using the Lamperti free-air ionization chamber. However, the free-air chamber measurements of charge or current can only be related to the reference air-kerma standard after applying several corrections, some of which are best determined via Monte Carlo simulation. To this end, a detailed geometric model of the Lamperti chamber was developed in the EGSnrc code based on the engineering drawings of the instrument. The egs-fac user code in EGSnrc was then used to calculate energy-dependent correction factors which account for missing or undesired ionization arising from effects such as: (1) attenuation and scatter of the x-rays in air; (2) primary electrons escaping the charge collection region; (3) lack of charged particle equilibrium; (4) atomic fluorescence and bremsstrahlung radiation. Results: Energy-dependent correction factors were calculated assuming a monoenergetic point source with the photon energy ranging from 2 keV to 60 keV in 2 keV increments. Sufficient photon histories were simulated so that the Monte Carlo statistical uncertainty of the correction factors was less than 0.01%. The correction factors for a specific eBx source will be determined by integrating these tabulated results over its measured x-ray spectrum. Conclusion: The correction factors calculated in this work are important for establishing a national standard for eBx which will help ensure that dose

  14. [Passive smoking].

    PubMed

    Grandjean, E; Weber, A; Fischer, T

    1979-03-01

    Passive smoking is the involuntary inspiration of smoky indoor air. Based on the information available today, it may be assumed that passive smoking normally is no health hazard as far as the classical smoker's diseases (lung cancer, myocardial infarct, etc.) are concerned. Nevertheless, it is probable that irritations caused by tobacco smoke have an unfavorable influence on the health of small children and that of already sick persons. The main problem of passive smoking is annoyance due to odor and irritations of eyes and respiratory organs. Our investigations in a climatic chamber with healthy subjects show that air pollution caused by tobacco smoke as indicated by 5 ppm CO leads to marked eye irritations--objectively as well as subjectively--in 15 to 20% of the subjects. This corresponds to smoking 10 cigarettes per hour in a small room with an air ventilation rate of four times per hour. If air pollution caused by tobacco smoke lies below the level of 2 ppm CO, irritations and annoyance for healthy persons are regarded as low and tolerable. This corresponds to about four cigarettes per hour under the same circumstances.

  15. Calorimetric determination of kQ factors for NE 2561 and NE 2571 ionization chambers in 5 cm × 5 cm and 10 cm × 10 cm radiotherapy beams of 8 MV and 16 MV photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Achim; Kapsch, Ralf-Peter

    2007-10-01

    The relative uncertainty of the ionometric determination of the absorbed dose to water, Dw, in the reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams is in the order of 1.5% and is dominated by the uncertainty of the calculated chamber- and energy-dependent correction factors kQ. In the present investigation, kQ values were determined experimentally in 5 cm × 5 cm and 10 cm × 10 cm radiotherapy beams of 8 MV and 16 MV bremsstrahlung by means of a water calorimeter operated at 4 °C. Ionization chambers of the types NE 2561 and NE 2571 were calibrated directly in the water phantom of the calorimeter. The measurements were carried out at the linear accelerator of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. It is shown that the kQ factor of a single ionization chamber can be measured with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.3%. No significant variations of kQ were found for the different lateral sizes of the radiation fields used in this investigation.

  16. Application of gas chromatography/flame ionization detector-based metabolite fingerprinting for authentication of Asian palm civet coffee (Kopi Luwak).

    PubMed

    Jumhawan, Udi; Putri, Sastia Prama; Yusianto; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-11-01

    Development of authenticity screening for Asian palm civet coffee, the world-renowned priciest coffee, was previously reported using metabolite profiling through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, a major drawback of this approach is the high cost of the instrument and maintenance. Therefore, an alternative method is needed for quality and authenticity evaluation of civet coffee. A rapid, reliable and cost-effective analysis employing a universal detector, GC coupled with flame ionization detector (FID), and metabolite fingerprinting has been established for discrimination analysis of 37 commercial and non-commercial coffee beans extracts. gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) provided higher sensitivity over a similar range of detected compounds than GC/MS. In combination with multivariate analysis, GC/FID could successfully reproduce quality prediction from GC/MS for differentiation of commercial civet coffee, regular coffee and coffee blend with 50 wt % civet coffee content without prior metabolite details. Our study demonstrated that GC/FID-based metabolite fingerprinting can be effectively actualized as an alternative method for coffee authenticity screening in industries.

  17. Application of gas chromatography/flame ionization detector-based metabolite fingerprinting for authentication of Asian palm civet coffee (Kopi Luwak).

    PubMed

    Jumhawan, Udi; Putri, Sastia Prama; Yusianto; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-11-01

    Development of authenticity screening for Asian palm civet coffee, the world-renowned priciest coffee, was previously reported using metabolite profiling through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, a major drawback of this approach is the high cost of the instrument and maintenance. Therefore, an alternative method is needed for quality and authenticity evaluation of civet coffee. A rapid, reliable and cost-effective analysis employing a universal detector, GC coupled with flame ionization detector (FID), and metabolite fingerprinting has been established for discrimination analysis of 37 commercial and non-commercial coffee beans extracts. gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) provided higher sensitivity over a similar range of detected compounds than GC/MS. In combination with multivariate analysis, GC/FID could successfully reproduce quality prediction from GC/MS for differentiation of commercial civet coffee, regular coffee and coffee blend with 50 wt % civet coffee content without prior metabolite details. Our study demonstrated that GC/FID-based metabolite fingerprinting can be effectively actualized as an alternative method for coffee authenticity screening in industries. PMID:25912451

  18. Smoke detection

    DOEpatents

    Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2015-10-27

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  19. Smoke detection

    DOEpatents

    Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2016-09-06

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  20. The emulsion chamber technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Photographic emulsion has the unique property of recording tracks of ionizing particles with a spatial precision of 1 micron, while also being capable of deployment over detector areas of square meters or 10's of square meters. Detectors are passive, their cost to fly in Space is a fraction of that of instruments of similar collecting. A major problem in their continued use has been the labor intensiveness of data retrieval by traditional microscope methods. Two factors changing the acceptability of emulsion technology in space are the astronomical costs of flying large electronic instruments such as ionization calorimeters in Space, and the power and low cost of computers, a small revolution in the laboratory microscope data-taking. Our group at UAH made measurements of the high energy composition and spectra of cosmic rays. The Marshall group has also specialized in space radiation dosimetry. Ionization calorimeters, using alternating layers of lead and photographic emulsion, to measure particle energies up to 10(exp 15) eV were developed. Ten balloon flights were performed with them. No such calorimeters have ever flown in orbit. In the ECT program, a small emulsion chamber was developed and will be flown on the Shuttle mission OAST-2 to resolve the principal technological questions concerning space exposures. These include assessments of: (1) pre-flight and orbital exposure to background radiation, including both self-shielding and secondary particle generation; the practical limit to exposure time in space can then be determined; (2) dynamics of stack to optimize design for launch and weightlessness; and (3) thermal and vacuum constraints on emulsion performance. All these effects are cumulative and affect our ability to perform scientific measurements but cannot be adequately predicted by available methods.