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Sample records for ionization chamber smoke detectors

  1. Ionization-chamber smoke detector system

    DOEpatents

    Roe, Robert F.

    1976-10-19

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

  2. The Analysis of Ionization Chambers Used for Detecting Smoke Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlej, Z. (Bish).

    Ionization type cells using a radioactive source of primary ions have been used as fire detectors for many years. They have proven sufficiently sensitive to give an alarm when exposed to the relatively small concentration of smoke particles that occur during the early stages of combustion when control of a fire is still possible. In this work the charging of smoke particles in ionization chambers such as typically employed in ionization smoke detectors are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The ionization chambers investigated in this work have parallel plate and spherical electrode geometries. In the absence of smoke particles, the ionization chambers were operated at some ambient electrode current, which depends upon the ion generation rate, the electrode geometries, the potential difference between the electrodes, and the thermodynamic properties of the gas within the chamber volume. When smoke particles are introduced into the ionization chamber they act as an additional sink for the ions, so that the ion current is reduced. The smoke particles in the experiment performed in this work were transferred from the particle generator to the volume surrounding the ionization chamber and allowed to diffuse inside the ionization chamber. An Aitken nuclei counter was employed to measure the concentration of smoke particles inside the ionization chamber. The electric current flowing through the ionization chamber was recorded as a function of time and concentration of the smoke particles inside the chamber. The current loss due to the particles present inside the chamber was calculated and compared with the experimental results. It was found that at the certain level of ambient electrode current, the current loss due to the smoke particles assumes a maximum value. This optimum operating electrode current was predicted by the mathematical model employed in this work. In the light of this model experimental ionization chambers of both parallel and spherical

  3. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  4. On line high dose static position monitoring by ionization chamber detector for industrial gamma irradiators.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ary A; Vieira, Jose M; Hamada, Margarida M

    2010-01-01

    A 1 cm(3) cylindrical ionization chamber was developed to measure high doses on line during the sample irradiation in static position, in a (60)Co industrial plant. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable for use as a dosimeter on line. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials.

  5. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    DOEpatents

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  6. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500.

    PubMed

    Stelljes, T S; Harmeyer, A; Reuter, J; Looe, H K; Chofor, N; Harder, D; Poppe, B

    2015-04-01

    The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm(2) measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array's readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor kNR for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array's central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1% over the range from 5 to 1000 MU. The

  7. Dosimetric characteristics of the novel 2D ionization chamber array OCTAVIUS Detector 1500

    SciTech Connect

    Stelljes, T. S. Looe, H. K.; Chofor, N.; Poppe, B.; Harmeyer, A.; Reuter, J.; Harder, D.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric properties of the OCTAVIUS Detector 1500 (OD1500) ionization chamber array (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) have been investigated. A comparative study was carried out with the OCTAVIUS Detector 729 and OCTAVIUS Detector 1000 SRS arrays. Methods: The OD1500 array is an air vented ionization chamber array with 1405 detectors in a 27 × 27 cm{sup 2} measurement area arranged in a checkerboard pattern with a chamber-to-chamber distance of 10 mm in each row. A sampling step width of 5 mm can be achieved by merging two measurements shifted by 5 mm, thus fulfilling the Nyquist theorem for intensity modulated dose distributions. The stability, linearity, and dose per pulse dependence were investigated using a Semiflex 31013 chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany) as a reference detector. The effective depth of measurement was determined by measuring TPR curves with the array and a Roos chamber type 31004 (PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). Comparative output factor measurements were performed with the array, the Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber and the Diode 60012 (both PTW-Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany). The energy dependence of the OD1500 was measured by comparing the array’s readings to those of a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber for varying mean photon energies at the depth of measurement, applying to the Semiflex chamber readings the correction factor k{sub NR} for nonreference conditions. The Gaussian lateral dose response function of a single array detector was determined by searching the convolution kernel suitable to convert the slit beam profiles measured with a Diode 60012 into those measured with the array’s central chamber. An intensity modulated dose distribution measured with the array was verified by comparing a OD1500 measurement to TPS calculations and film measurements. Results: The stability and interchamber sensitivity variation of the OD1500 array were within ±0.2% and ±0.58%, respectively. Dose linearity was within 1

  8. An ionization chamber and a Si-detector for lead-210 chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, M.; El-Daoushy, A. F.; El-Daoushy, M. F. A. F.

    1981-09-01

    Radon emanation and isotopic dilution techniques were used for the determination of 226Ra and "total" 210Pb in sediment samples. The "unsupported" 210Pb were then used to construct lake-sediment chronologies. Polonium was extracted at 550-600°C, transferred to chloride, then plated by self-deposition on silver disks. Memory effects due to adsorption of polonium on glass were carefully studied. Si-detectors were used for α-activity measurements. Background studies indicated instabilities in a Si-detector when left without bias for longer periods. The radium was extracted with the help of a barium carrier, which not only made the extraction quantitative but also eliminated the adsorption of radium on the glasses used. The 222Rn was measured in an ionization chamber. The gas counter with its modified filling system allowed both low level measurements of sediment samples and counter calibration with comparably active 226Ra standards. The increasing background of the ionization chamber was explained by the adsorption of 222Rn on the surfaces of the counter. The background was reduced by the removal of the adsorbed atoms. Normalization for discrimination shifts, due to electronegative impurities, is required in case the counting gas is impure.

  9. The magic cube and the pixel ionization chamber: detectors for monitor and dosimetry of radiotherapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerio, S.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Madon, E.; Marchetto, F.; Nastasi, U.; Peroni, C.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Sardo, A.; Trevisiol, E.

    2003-09-01

    Tumor therapy takes advantage of the energy deposition of radiation to concentrate high doses in the target while sparing healthy tissue. Elective pathologies for highly conformal radiotherapies such as photon Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and radiotherapy with hadrons are head and neck, eye, prostate and in general all tumors that are either deep or located close to critical organs. In the world there are several centers that are using such techniques and a common problem that is being experienced is the verification of treatment plans and monitoring of the beam. We have designed and built two detectors that allow 2D and 3D measurements of dose and fluence of such beams. The detectors allow measurements on big surfaces, up to 25∗25 cm2. The active media are parallel plate, strip and pixel segmented ionization chambers with front-end Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) readout and PC based data acquistion. The description of dosimeter, chamber and electronics will be given with results from beam tests and therapy plan verification.

  10. Technical note: a method for improving the calibration reproducibility of an ionization chamber detector array.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Simon; Morgan, Steve

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes an extension to a wide field calibration method implemented on a commercial detector array in order to improve the reproducibility of the calibration procedure. Following the standard array calibration procedure, two additional 10×10 cm exposures were acquired for each array axis with the detector array shifted by ±10 cm in the transverse or axial axes, or by ±10√2 cm in the positive or negative diagonal axes. These exposures were compared with a final baseline 10×10 cm exposure captured with the detector repositioned at the isocenter. The measurements were used to calculate a linear off-axis correction gradient which was then applied to the stored calibration factors. The mean coefficient of variation between five repeat calibrations was reduced from 4.17% to 0.48% and the maximum percentage error in individual calibration factors was reduced from 6.46% to 0.77%. The reproducibility of the calibration factors of an ionization chamber array was increased by capturing a baseline exposure and two further off-axis readings per calibration axis.

  11. Evaluation of smoke detectors for mining use. Report of investigations/1995

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.C.; Morrow, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines has constructed a smoke chamber and developed sensitivity tests for smoke detectors. Response of ionization- and optical-type commercially available smoke detectors have been investigated. Six smoke detectors were measured with respect to visually obscuring smoke characterized by a corresponding optical density for smoldering and flaming coal combustion in the smoke chamber. The responsive characteristics of the detectors evaluated with respect to known smoke conditions in the smoke chamber shows their potential for use as mine fire sensors or part of a mine atmospheric monitoring system to improve mine safety.

  12. Initial test results of an ionization chamber shower detector for a LHC luminosity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Datte, P.; Beche, J.-F.; Haguenauer, M.; Manfredi, P.F.; Manghisoni, M.; Millaud, J.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, L.; Riot, V.; Schmickler, H.; Speziali, V.; Turner, W.

    2002-11-05

    A novel, segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for optimization of the luminosity of the LHC. The ionization chambers are to be installed in the front quadrupole and zero degree neutral particle absorbers in the high luminosity IRs and sample the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. In this paper we report the initial results of our second test of this instrumentation in an SPS external proton beam. Single 300 GeV protons are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic shower produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC. The capability of instrumentations to measure the luminosity of individual bunches in a 40 MHz bunch train is demonstrated.

  13. Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo, Fire Chief Jay Stout of Safety Harbor, Florida, is explaining to young Richard Davis the workings of the Honeywell smoke and fire detector which probably saved Richard's life and that of his teen-age brother. Alerted by the detector's warning, the pair were able to escape their burning home. The detector in the Davis home was one of 1,500 installed in Safety Harbor residences in a cooperative program conducted by the city and Honeywell Inc.

  14. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  15. Development of coal combustion sensitivity test for smoke detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.C.; Morrow, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    Standard smoldering and flaming combustion tests using small coal samples have been developed by the US Bureau of Mines as a method to evaluate the response of a smoke detector. The tests are conducted using a standard smoke box designed and constructed according to Underwriters Laboratories. The tests provide a standard, easily reproducible smoke characteristic for smoldering and flaming coal combustion, based upon a comparison of the smoke optical density and the response of a standard ionization chamber to the smoke. With these standard tests, the range of threshold limits for the response of a smoke detector and the detector`s reliability can be evaluated for nearly identical smoke visibility and smoke physical characteristics. The detector`s threshold response limits and reliability need to be well defined prior to the instrument`s use as part of a mine fire warning system for improved mine safety.

  16. Correction of measured Gamma-Knife output factors for angular dependence of diode detectors and PinPoint ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Hršak, Hrvoje; Majer, Marija; Grego, Timor; Bibić, Juraj; Heinrich, Zdravko

    2014-12-01

    Dosimetry for Gamma-Knife requires detectors with high spatial resolution and minimal angular dependence of response. Angular dependence and end effect time for p-type silicon detectors (PTW Diode P and Diode E) and PTW PinPoint ionization chamber were measured with Gamma-Knife beams. Weighted angular dependence correction factors were calculated for each detector. The Gamma-Knife output factors were corrected for angular dependence and end effect time. For Gamma-Knife beams angle range of 84°-54°. Diode P shows considerable angular dependence of 9% and 8% for the 18 mm and 14, 8, 4 mm collimator, respectively. For Diode E this dependence is about 4% for all collimators. PinPoint ionization chamber shows angular dependence of less than 3% for 18, 14 and 8 mm helmet and 10% for 4 mm collimator due to volumetric averaging effect in a small photon beam. Corrected output factors for 14 mm helmet are in very good agreement (within ±0.3%) with published data and values recommended by vendor (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). For the 8 mm collimator diodes are still in good agreement with recommended values (within ±0.6%), while PinPoint gives 3% less value. For the 4 mm helmet Diodes P and E show over-response of 2.8% and 1.8%, respectively. For PinPoint chamber output factor of 4 mm collimator is 25% lower than Elekta value which is generally not consequence of angular dependence, but of volumetric averaging effect and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. Diodes P and E represent good choice for Gamma-Knife dosimetry. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Large area neutron detector based on Li6 ionization chamber with integrated body-moderator of high density polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Chung, Kiwhan; Makela, Mark F.

    2009-06-30

    A detector was developed and funded by DHS to be a lower cost alternative to 3He detectors. A 6Li foil-lined ionization chamber was prepared with fill gas at one atmosphere and pulse mode operation. The high-density polyethylene (HOPE) body serves also as a neutron moderator. All electrodes, including high voltage bias supply, are hermetically sealed within the plastic slabs.

  18. Dose estimation outside radiation field using Pinpoint and Semiflex ionization chamber detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaal, Ahmed M.; Attalla, Ehab M.; Elshemey, Wael M.

    2017-10-01

    This work aims to provide a comparison between two important detectors (Pinpoint and Semiflex) that are frequently used in radiation dosimetery in radiotherapy. This is carried out through the employment of both detectors in a quantitative estimation of the change in out-of-field dose with important dosimetric parameters such as field size (from 5×5 cm2 to 30×30 cm2) and depth (from 1.5 cm to 30 cm) at two different energies (6 MV and 15 MV) and two different collimator angles (0-90°). The change in out-of-field dose with Source-Skin-Distance (SSD) from 80 to 115 cm is also studied using both detectors. Results show that, the Pinpoint and Semiflex detectors both reported an increase in out-of-field dose with field size, depth, energy and SSD. In almost all measurements, Pinpoint detector reported considerably higher out-of-field dose values compared to Semiflex. For 6 MV and 0° collimator angle, the out-of-field dose at field size of 30×30 cm2 and at a depth of 1.5 cm is 7.3% for Pinpoint detector compared to 4.3% for Semiflex. At collimator angle of 90°, the out-of-field dose is 6.5% for Pinpoint detector compared to 5.5% for semiflex. The out-of-field dose for a depth of 30 cm and field size of 10×10 cm is 7.9% for Pinpoint detector compared to 5.9% for Semiflex. For 15 MV and 0° collimator angle, the out-of-field dose at field size of 30×30 cm2 and at a depth of 1.5 cm is 7.5% for Pinpoint detector compared 5.1% for Semiflex. At 6 MV, field size of 10×10 cm2 and depth of 1.5 cm, the out-of-field dose at SSD 115 cm is 3.7% for Pinpoint detector compared to 3.4% for Semiflex. The considerably higher out-of-field dose values reported by Pinpoint detector compared to Semiflex may be attributed to the relatively higher sensitivity of Pinpoint detector for low doses (such as out-of-field doses). Therefore, for reliable out-of-field dose measurements a Pinpoint detector is highly recommended.

  19. Liquid-filled ionization chamber temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Pardo, J.; Pazos, A.; Pena, J.; Zapata, M.

    2006-05-01

    Temperature and pressure corrections of the read-out signal of ionization chambers have a crucial importance in order to perform high-precision absolute dose measurements. In the present work the temperature and pressure dependences of a sealed liquid isooctane filled ionization chamber (previously developed by the authors) for radiotherapy applications have been studied. We have analyzed the thermal response of the liquid ionization chamber in a ˜20C interval around room temperature. The temperature dependence of the signal can be considered linear, with a slope that depends on the chamber collection electric field. For example, a relative signal slope of 0.27×10-2 K-1 for an operation electric field of 1.67×106 V m-1 has been measured in our detector. On the other hand, ambient pressure dependence has been found negligible, as expected for liquid-filled chambers. The thermal dependence of the liquid ionization chamber signal can be parametrized within the Onsager theory on initial recombination. Considering that changes with temperature of the detector response are due to variations in the free ion yield, a parametrization of this dependence has been obtained. There is a good agreement between the experimental data and the theoretical model from the Onsager framework.

  20. Comparison of depth-dose distributions of proton therapeutic beams calculated by means of logical detectors and ionization chamber modeled in Monte Carlo codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzak, Robert; Konefał, Adam; Sokół, Maria; Orlef, Andrzej

    2016-08-01

    The success of proton therapy depends strongly on the precision of treatment planning. Dose distribution in biological tissue may be obtained from Monte Carlo simulations using various scientific codes making it possible to perform very accurate calculations. However, there are many factors affecting the accuracy of modeling. One of them is a structure of objects called bins registering a dose. In this work the influence of bin structure on the dose distributions was examined. The MCNPX code calculations of Bragg curve for the 60 MeV proton beam were done in two ways: using simple logical detectors being the volumes determined in water, and using a precise model of ionization chamber used in clinical dosimetry. The results of the simulations were verified experimentally in the water phantom with Marcus ionization chamber. The average local dose difference between the measured relative doses in the water phantom and those calculated by means of the logical detectors was 1.4% at first 25 mm, whereas in the full depth range this difference was 1.6% for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations less than 2.4% and for the maximum measuring error of 1%. In case of the relative doses calculated with the use of the ionization chamber model this average difference was somewhat greater, being 2.3% at depths up to 25 mm and 2.4% in the full range of depths for the maximum uncertainty in the calculations of 3%. In the dose calculations the ionization chamber model does not offer any additional advantages over the logical detectors. The results provided by both models are similar and in good agreement with the measurements, however, the logical detector approach is a more time-effective method.

  1. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Smith, Graham; Mahler, George J.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  2. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  3. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  4. Ionization chamber dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Renner, Tim R.; Nyman, Mark A.; Stradtner, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    A method for fabricating an ion chamber dosimeter collecting array of the type utilizing plural discrete elements formed on a uniform collecting surface which includes forming a thin insulating layer over an aperture in a frame having surfaces, forming a predetermined pattern of through holes in the layer, plating both surfaces of the layer and simultaneously tilting and rotating the frame for uniform plate-through of the holes between surfaces. Aligned masking and patterned etching of the surfaces provides interconnects between the through holes and copper leads provided to external circuitry.

  5. Fluctuations of induced charge in ionization detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Samedov, V. V.

    2016-12-15

    Fluctuations of charge induced by charge carriers on the detector electrodes make a significant contribution to the energy resolution of ionization detectors, namely, semiconductor detectors and gas and liquid ionization chambers. These fluctuations are determined by the capture of charge carriers, as they drift in the bulk of the detector under the action of an electric field, by traps. In this study, we give a correct mathematical description of charge induction on electrodes of an ionization detector for an arbitrary electric field distribution in the detector with consideration of charge carrier capture by traps. The characteristic function obtained in this study yields the general expression for the distribution function of the charge induced on the detector electrodes. The formulas obtained in this study are useful for analysis of the influence of charge carrier transport on energy resolution of ionization detectors.

  6. Smoke Detectors and Legislation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Fire Prevention and Control Administration (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This manual, one of a series for use in public education, provides an in-depth review of the current status of state and local smoke detector legislation. First, for the community considering a smoke detector law or ordinance, six decision points are discussed: which residential occupancy sub-classes will be affected; what the time factors are for…

  7. Smoke and particle detector using tritiated semiconductor foil

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Alvarez-Ossa, D.; Kherani, N. P.; Zukotynski, S.; Chen, K. P.

    2008-07-15

    A smoke and particle ionization detector using tritiated amorphous silicon film as the radiation source is demonstrated. The ion chamber design includes both bipolar and unipolar region; the unipolar region is defined as the volume space extending beyond the range of ionizing particles. Attachment of ions to particulate matter in the unipolar region considerably reduces the mobility of the carriers, thus forming a space charge cloud accompanied by a reduction in the electrical field strength, thereby enhancing the particulate detection responsivity. Tritium {beta}s have a maximum range of about 6 mm in air, which makes the detector compact. Owing to the potential of increased specific activity, it results in a gamma-free detector with improved sensitivity. The results show that this gamma-free detector is several-fold to forty-fold more responsive than traditional ionization detectors using Am-241. In addition, this ion chamber can function as a dual detector having both photoelectric and ionization detector responsivities. (authors)

  8. Radiation damage to tetramethylsilane and tetramethylgermanium ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshi, Y.; Higuchi, M.; Oyama, K. . Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1994-08-01

    Two detector media suitable for a warm liquid, ionization chamber filled with tetramethylsilane (TMS) and tetramethylgermanium (TMG) were exposed to [gamma] radiation form a [sup 60]Co source up to dose 579 Gray and 902 Gray, respectively. The electron lifetimes and the free ion yields were measured as a function of accumulated radiation dose. A similar behavior of the electron lifetimes and the free ion yields with increasing radiation does was observed between the TMS and TMG ionization chambers.

  9. Preliminary studies of a new monitor ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    A new monitor ionization chamber was developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN) in order to monitor X-ray beams. The main difference of this monitor ionization chamber in relation to other monitor chambers is its geometry, which consists of a ring-shaped sensitive volume. Because of this geometry, the monitor chamber has a central hole through which the direct radiation beam passes. The operational characteristics of the monitor chamber were evaluated: saturation, ion collection efficiency and polarity effect. Besides these tests, the short- and medium-term stabilities of its response were also evaluated. During the tests the leakage current was always negligible. All results showed values within those recommended internationally (IEC, 1997. Medical electrical equipment-dosimeters with ionization chambers and/or semi-conductor detectors as used in X-ray diagnostic imaging. IEC 61674. International Electrotechnical Commission, Genève). Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and PA beam loss monitor (BLM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mei-Hang; Tian, Jian-Min; Chen, Chang; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Xu, Tao-Guang; Lu, Shuang-Tong

    2009-02-01

    Design and construction of the first prototype ionization chamber for CSNS and Proton Accelerator (PA) beam loss monitor (BLM) system is reported. The low leakage current (<0.1 pA), good plateau (approx800 V) and linearity range up to 200 Roentgen/h are obtained in the first prototype. All of these give us good experience for further improving the ionization chamber construction.

  11. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  12. Modulated voltage metastable ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Kojiro, D. R.; Humphrey, D. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The output current from a metastable ionization detector (MID) is applied to a modulation voltage circuit. An adjustment is made to balance out the background current, and an output current, above background, is applied to an input of a strip chart recorder. For low level concentrations, i.e., low detected output current, the ionization potential will be at a maximum and the metastable ionization detector will operate at its most sensitive level. When the detected current from the metastable ionization detector increases above a predetermined threshold level, a voltage control circuit is activated which turns on a high voltage transistor which acts to reduce the ionization potential. The ionization potential applied to the metastable ionization detector is then varied so as to maintain the detected signal level constant. The variation in ionization potential is now related to the concentration of the constituent and a representative amplitude is applied to another input of said strip chart recorder.

  13. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  14. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

    1994-03-29

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

  15. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  16. Smoke Detector Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Pamela, Ed.; Portugill, Jestyn, Ed.

    This manual, one in a series developed for public education, provides information on smoke detector selection, installation, operation, and maintenance. For the prospective buyer, the importance of looking for the seal of a recognized national testing laboratory--such as Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc. (UL)--indicating adequate laboratory testing…

  17. The effect of a compression paddle on energy response, calibration and measurement with mammographic dosimeters using ionization chambers and solid-state detectors.

    PubMed

    Hourdakis, C J; Boziari, A; Koumbouli, E

    2009-02-21

    A compression paddle is always used in mammography x-ray examinations, in order to improve image quality and reduce patient doses. Although clinical dose measurements should be performed with the paddle to interfere with the x-ray beam, calibration of mammography dosimeters is performed free in air without the presence of the paddle. The paddle hardens the x-ray beam, which has an impact on a dosimeter performance, particularly on high-energy-dependent detectors. Due to the paddle, clinical mammography x-ray systems may exhibit beams with HVL values exceeding those of the IEC 61267 RQR-M series qualities at which dosimeters are usually calibrated. In this study, the influence of the paddle in mammography dosimetry is examined, in Mo/Mo anode/filter x-ray qualities. PMMA slabs of 1, 2 and 3 mm thickness and Al foils of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15 mm thicknesses were used to simulate the paddles, producing beams with HVL values from 0.28 up to 0.43 mmAl. In these qualities, four solid-state (ST) detectors and three ionizations chambers (IC) were calibrated in terms of Kair and N(K) and k(Q) were deduced. The results showed that all IC and two modern-type ST dosimeters have a flat energy response in the above HVL range (less than 3%), so their calibration factor at RQR-M2 quality could be safely used for clinical measurements. Two other ST dosimeters exhibit up to 20% energy response, so differences up to 15% in dose measurement may be observed if the effect of paddle on their performance is ignored. Finally, the need of additional mammographic calibration qualities to the existing IEC 61267 RQR-M series is examined and discussed.

  18. A multiple sampling ionization chamber for the External Target Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. H.; Tang, S. W.; Ma, P.; Lu, C. G.; Yang, H. R.; Wang, S. T.; Yu, Y. H.; Yue, K.; Fang, F.; Yan, D.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, Z. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z. Y.; Duan, L. M.; Sun, B. H.

    2015-09-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber used as a particle identification device for high energy heavy ions has been developed for the External Target Facility. The performance of this detector was tested with a 239Pu α source and RI beams. A Z resolution (FWHM) of 0.4-0.6 was achieved for nuclear fragments of 18O at 400 AMeV.

  19. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  20. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  1. The effect of influence quantities and detector orientation on small-field patient-specific IMRT QA: comparison of measurements with various ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Godson, Henry Finlay; Manickam, Ravikumar; Saminathan, Sathiyan; Ganesh, Kadirampatti Mani; Ponmalar, Retna

    2017-06-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) requires a patient-specific quality assurance (QA) program to validate the treatment plan and a high level of dosimetric accuracy in the treatment delivery. Dosimetric verification generally consists of both absolute- and relative-dose measurements in a phantom using ionization chambers. Measurements were carried out with three different ionization chambers (Scanditronix FC 65G, Exradin A18, and PTW PinPoint 31014) to assess the effects of influence quantities such as the stability, pre- and post-irradiation leakage, stem effect, polarity, and ion recombination on the IMRT point-dose verification with two different orientations. The Exradin A18 and PTW PinPoint ion chambers demonstrated noticeable leakage to magnitudes of 0.6 and 1.2%, whereas negligible leakage was observed with FC 65G ion chamber. Maximum deviations of 0.5 and 0.6% were noticed for the smallest field owing to the ion recombination effect with the PTW PinPoint ion chamber in the parallel and perpendicular orientations, respectively. The calculated total uncertainties of all influence quantities for the FC 65G, A18, and PTW PinPoint ion chambers were 0.5, 0.7, and 1.3%, respectively. The uncertainties determined for each chamber were incorporated into the point-dose measurements of 30 head and neck patient-specific QA plans, and the variation was found to be within ±3%. The magnitude of the leakage in a small-volume ion chamber indicated the significance of incorporating the correction factors in the absolute-dose measurement. A paired t test analysis indicated that the influence quantities significantly affect the point-dose measurements in the patient-specific IMRT QA.

  2. Segmented ionization chambers for beam monitoring in hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, Saverio; Cirio, Roberto; Donetti, Marco; Marchetto, Flavio; Pittà, Giuseppe; Lavagno, Marco; La Rosa, Vanessa

    2015-05-01

    Segmented ionization chambers represent a good solution to monitor the position, the intensity and the shape of ion beams in hadrontherapy. Pixel and strip chambers have been developed for both passive scattering and active scanning dose delivery systems. In particular, strip chambers are optimal for pencil beam scanning, allowing for spatial and time resolutions below 0.1 mm and 1 ms, respectively. The MATRIX pixel and the Strip Accurate Monitor for Beam Applications (SAMBA) detectors are described in this paper together with the results of several beam tests and industrial developments based on these prototypes.

  3. Ionization Chamber for Prompt Fission Neutron Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Zeynalova, O.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Sedyshev, P.; Shvetsov, V.

    In this work we report recent achievements in design of twin back-to-back ionization chamber (TIC) for fission fragment (FF) mass and kinetic energy measurement. Correlated FF kinetic energies, their masses and the angle of FF in respect to the axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates can be determined from analysis of the heights and shapes of the pulses induced by the fission fragments on the anodes of TIC. Anodes of TIC were designed as consisting of isolated strips each having independent electronic circuitry and special multi-channel pulse processing apparatus. Mathematical formulae provided for FF angles measured in respect to the coordinate axes. It was shown how the point of fission fragments origin on the target plane may be determined using the same measured data. The last feature made the TIC a rather powerful tool for prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission investigation in event-by-event analysis of individual fission reactions from non- point fissile source. Position sensitive neutron induced fission detector for neutron-imaging applications with both thermal and low energy neutrons was found as another possible implementation of the designed TIC.

  4. a Liquid Ionization Chamber as Monitor in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghöfer, Th.; Engler, J.; Milke, J. M.; Hörandel, J. R.; Hartmann, G. H.

    2006-04-01

    First measurements with a prototype liquid ionization chamber are described to be applied as an online-monitor for intensity modulated radiotherapy. The detector consists of 480 individual electronic channels which allow parallel read-out of radiation induced currents at frequencies exceeding 10 Hz. Dose gradients in the direction of leaf movement of a multileaf collimator have been measured and a reconstruction method for individual leaf positions has been developed. The achieved reconstruction accuracy will be described.

  5. Neutron-chamber detectors and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.; Atwater, H.F.; Coop, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Detector applications in Nuclear Safeguards and Waste Management have included measuring neutrons from fission and (alpha,n) reactions with well-moderated neutron proportional counters, often embedded in a slab of polyethylene. Other less-moderated geometries are useful for detecting both bare and moderated fission-source neutrons with good efficiency. The neutron chamber is an undermoderated detector design comprising a large, hollow, polyethylene-walled chamber containing one or more proportional counters. Neutron-chamber detectors are relatively inexpensive; can have large apertures, usually through a thin chamber wall; and offer very good detection efficiency per dollar. Neutron-chamber detectors have also been used for monitoring vehicles and for assaying large crates of transuranic waste. Our Monte Carlo calculations for a new application (monitoring low-density waste for concealed plutonium) illustrate the advantages of the hollow-chamber design for detecting moderated fission sources. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Ionizing Radiation Detector

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Gomez W.; James, Ralph B.; Burger, Arnold; Chinn, Douglas A.

    2003-11-18

    A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

  7. Development of a pixel ionization chamber for beam monitor in proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, A.; Garella, M. A.; Attili, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; Marchetto, F.; Mazza, G.; Meyroneinc, S.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a detector to be used as monitor for proton therapy beam lines. The detector is a 2-D parallel plate ionization chamber, with the anode segmented in 1024 square pixels arranged in a 32×32 matrix. The detector characterization is presented.

  8. Wire chamber radiation detector with discharge control

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Mulera, Terrence A.

    1984-01-01

    A wire chamber radiation detector (11) has spaced apart parallel electrodes (16) and grids (17, 18, 19) defining an ignition region (21) in which charged particles (12) or other ionizing radiations initiate brief localized avalanche discharges (93) and defining an adjacent memory region (22) in which sustained glow discharges (94) are initiated by the primary discharges (93). Conductors (29, 32) of the grids (18, 19) at each side of the memory section (22) extend in orthogonal directions enabling readout of the X-Y coordinates of locations at which charged particles (12) were detected by sequentially transmitting pulses to the conductors (29) of one grid (18) while detecting transmissions of the pulses to the orthogonal conductors (36) of the other grid (19) through glow discharges (94). One of the grids (19) bounding the memory region (22) is defined by an array of conductive elements (32) each of which is connected to the associated readout conductor (36) through a separate resistance (37). The wire chamber (11) avoids ambiguities and imprecisions in the readout of coordinates when large numbers of simultaneous or near simultaneous charged particles (12) have been detected. Down time between detection periods and the generation of radio frequency noise are also reduced.

  9. High resolution gas ionization chamber in proportional mode for low energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Arnold Milenko; Döbeli, Max; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2017-09-01

    The operation of the ETH gas ionization detector as a proportional chamber, where a secondary ionization avalanche is initiated between the Frisch grid and anode, was investigated for ions covering the mass range from H to 127I. By amplifying the detector electron signal through secondary ionization, the limitations due to the sensitivity of the detector electronics are minimized. It could be demonstrated that in the energy range of a few hundreds of keV and below a proportional chamber clearly outperforms a conventionally used gas ionization detector. Protons below 10 keV were measured with a resolution better than 1.4 keV and a good linearity of the particle energy and detector signal was found in the energy range between 50 and 1000 keV. At higher energies almost no difference in resolution for the two operation modes could be found.

  10. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance parameters of a liquid filled ionization chamber array.

    PubMed

    Poppe, B; Stelljes, T S; Looe, H K; Chofor, N; Harder, D; Willborn, K

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the properties of the two-dimensional liquid filled ionization chamber array Octavius 1000SRS (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) for use in clinical photon-beam dosimetry are investigated. Measurements were carried out at an Elekta Synergy and Siemens Primus accelerator. For measurements of stability, linearity, and saturation effects of the 1000SRS array a Semiflex 31013 ionization chamber (PTW-Freiburg, Germany) was used as a reference. The effective point of measurement was determined by TPR measurements of the array in comparison with a Roos chamber (type 31004, PTW-Freiburg, Germany). The response of the array with varying field size and depth of measurement was evaluated using a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber as a reference. Output factor measurements were carried out with a Semiflex 31010 ionization chamber, a diode (type 60012, PTW-Freiburg, Germany), and the detector array under investigation. The dose response function for a single detector of the array was determined by measuring 1 cm wide slit-beam dose profiles and comparing them against diode-measured profiles. Theoretical aspects of the low pass properties and of the sampling frequency of the detector array were evaluated. Dose profiles measured with the array and the diode detector were compared, and an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) field was verified using the Gamma-Index method and the visualization of line dose profiles. The array showed a short and long term stability better than 0.1% and 0.2%, respectively. Fluctuations in linearity were found to be within ±0.2% for the vendor specified dose range. Saturation effects were found to be similar to those reported in other studies for liquid-filled ionization chambers. The detector's relative response varied with field size and depth of measurement, showing a small energy dependence accounting for maximum signal deviations of ±2.6% from the reference condition for the setup used. The σ-values of the Gaussian dose response

  12. Compact ion chamber based neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S.; Galambos, Paul C.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2015-10-27

    A directional neutron detector has an ion chamber formed in a dielectric material; a signal electrode and a ground electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the signal and ground electrodes; and a signal processor electrically coupled to the readout circuitry. The ion chamber has a pair of substantially planar electrode surfaces. The chamber pressure of the neutron absorbing material is selected such that the reaction particle ion trail length for neutrons absorbed by the neutron absorbing material is equal to or less than the distance between the electrode surfaces. The signal processor is adapted to determine a path angle for each absorbed neutron based on the rise time of the corresponding pulse in a time-varying detector signal.

  13. Current-voltage characteristic of parallel-plane ionization chamber with inhomogeneous ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, D. G.

    2007-08-01

    The balances of particles and charges in the volume of parallel-plane ionization chamber are considered. Differential equations describing the distribution of current densities in the chamber volume are obtained. As a result of the differential equations solution an analytical form of the current-voltage characteristic of parallel-plane ionization chamber with inhomogeneous ionization in the volume is obtained.

  14. 24 CFR 965.805 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, or such greater number as may be required by state or local... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detectors to serve as adequate warning of fire. Public areas include... hearing-impaired residents, hard-wired smoke detectors must be connected to an alarm system designed...

  15. 24 CFR 242.74 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 242.74 Section 242... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.74 Smoke detectors. Each occupied room must include such smoke detectors as are required by law. ...

  16. 24 CFR 200.76 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 200.76 Section 200.76 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Property Requirements § 200.76 Smoke detectors. Smoke detectors...

  17. 24 CFR 242.74 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 242.74 Section 242... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.74 Smoke detectors. Each occupied room must include such smoke detectors as are required by law. ...

  18. 24 CFR 200.76 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 200.76 Section 200.76 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Property Requirements § 200.76 Smoke detectors. Smoke detectors...

  19. 24 CFR 891.555 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 891.555 Section... Assistance § 891.555 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance requirement. After October 30, 1992, each dwelling unit must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, in proper working...

  20. 24 CFR 232.591 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 232.591 Section... Equipment Property Requirements § 232.591 Smoke detectors. After October 30, 1992, each occupied room must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector in proper working condition. If...

  1. 24 CFR 891.555 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 891.555 Section... Assistance § 891.555 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance requirement. After October 30, 1992, each dwelling unit must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, in proper working...

  2. 24 CFR 965.805 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 965.805 Section... PHA-OWNED OR LEASED PROJECTS-GENERAL PROVISIONS Fire Safety § 965.805 Smoke detectors. (a) Performance... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, or such greater number as may be required by state or...

  3. 24 CFR 232.591 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 232.591 Section... Equipment Property Requirements § 232.591 Smoke detectors. After October 30, 1992, each occupied room must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector in proper working condition. If...

  4. 24 CFR 242.74 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 242.74 Section 242... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.74 Smoke detectors. Each occupied room must include such smoke detectors as are required by law....

  5. 24 CFR 242.74 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 242.74 Section 242... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.74 Smoke detectors. Each occupied room must include such smoke detectors as are required by law....

  6. 24 CFR 242.74 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 242.74 Section 242... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.74 Smoke detectors. Each occupied room must include such smoke detectors as are required by law....

  7. Use of a liquid ionization chamber for stereotactic radiotherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, A.; Crop, F.; Lacornerie, T.; Vandevelde, F.; Reynaert, N.

    2013-04-01

    Liquid ionization chambers (LICs) offer an interesting tool in the field of small beam dosimetry, allowing better spatial resolution and reduced perturbation effects. However, some aspects remain to be addressed, such as the higher recombination and the effects from the materials of the detector. Our aim was to investigate these issues and their impact. The first step was the evaluation of the recombination effects. Measurements were performed at different SSDs to vary the dose per pulse, and the collection efficiency was obtained. The BEAMnrc code was then used to model the Cyberknife head. Finally, the liquid ionization chamber itself was modelled using the EGSnrc-based code Cavity allowing the evaluation of the influence of the volume and the chamber materials. The liquid ionization charge collection efficiency is approximately 0.98 at 1.5 mGy pulse-1, the highest dose per pulse that we have measured. Its impact on the accuracy of output factors is less than half a per cent. The detector modelling showed a significant contribution from the graphite electrode, up to 6% for the 5 mm collimator. The dependence of the average electronic mass collision stopping power of iso-octane with beam collimation is negligible and thus has no influence on output factor measurements. Finally, the volume effect reaches 5% for the small 5 mm collimator and becomes much smaller (<0.5%) for diameters above 10 mm. LICs can effectively be used for small beam relative dosimetry as long as adequate correction factors are applied, especially for the electrode and volume effects.

  8. Performance of electret ionization chambers in magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, P; Stieff, L R; Mengers, T F; Shull, R D

    2006-04-01

    Electret ionization chambers are widely used for measuring radon and radiation. The radiation measured includes alpha, beta, and gamma radiation. These detectors do not have any electronics and as such can be introduced into magnetic field regions. It is of interest to study the effect of magnetic fields on the performance of these detectors. Relative responses are measured with and without magnetic fields present. Quantitative responses are measured as the magnetic field is varied from 8 kA/m to 716 kA/m (100 to 9,000 gauss). No significant effect is observed for measuring alpha radiation and gamma radiation. However, a significant systematic effect is observed while measuring beta radiation from a 90Sr-Y source. Depending upon the field orientation, the relative response increased from 1.0 to 2.7 (vertical position) and decreased from 1.0 to 0.60 (horizontal position). This is explained as due to the setting up of a circular motion for the electrons by the magnetic field, which may increase or decrease the path length in air depending upon the experimental configuration. It is concluded that these ionization chambers can be used for measuring alpha (and hence radon) and gamma radiation in the range of magnetic fields studied. However, caution must be exercised if measuring beta radiation.

  9. NIST Ionization Chamber "A" Sample-Height Corrections.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    For over 30 years scientists in the NIST radioactivity group have been using their pressurized ionization chamber "A" (PIC "A") to make measurements of radioactivity and radioactive half-lives. We now have evidence that some of those reported measurements were incorrect due to slippage of the source positioning ring over time. The temporal change in the holder caused an error in the source-height within the chamber, which was thought to be invariant. This unaccounted-for height change caused a change in the detector response and thus a relative error in measured activity on the order of 10(-5) to 10(-3) per year, depending on the radionuclide. The drifting detector response affected calibration factors and half-life determinations. After discovering the problem, we carried out historic research and new sensitivity tests. As a result, we have created a quantitative model of the effect and have used that model to estimate corrections to some of the past measurement results from PIC "A". In this paper we report the details and results of that model. Meanwhile, we have fixed the positioning ring and are recalibrating the detector using primary measurement methods and enhanced quality control measures.

  10. Design of ionization chambers for use in teaching x-ray dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Joseph

    Ionization chambers are one of the most commonly used radiation detectors in radiation dosimetry. In this project, nine ionization chambers were constructed for use in teaching radiation dosimetry to students of health physics, medical physics, nuclear engineering, and related disciplines. The components of these detectors such as detector wall composition, type of electrode, type of leakage current guard ring, fill gas pressure, and interior conducting material differ in a systematic way to show that various parameters of ionization chamber design can affect the response of the detectors. Each of these variables was investigated using an 80 keV x-ray machine to determine detector response in terms of absorbed dose, HVL, polarity, and operating voltage. Of the components studied, wall thickness and composition was found to be the most sensitive variable. The pressure inside the chamber did have a significant effect on the amount of charge collected and the absorbed dose. The leakage current guard ring was not a critical component for this ionization chamber design.

  11. A new ring-shaped graphite monitor ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizumi, M. T.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2010-07-01

    A ring-shaped monitor ionization chamber was developed at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares. This ionization chamber presents an entrance window of aluminized polyester foil. The guard ring and collecting electrode are made of graphite coated Lucite plates. The main difference between this new ionization chamber and commercial monitor chambers is its ring-shaped design. The new monitor chamber has a central hole, allowing the passage of the direct radiation beam without attenuation; only the penumbra radiation is measured by the sensitive volume. This kind of ionization chamber design has already been tested, but using aluminium electrodes. By changing the electrode material from aluminium to a graphite coating, an improvement in the chamber response stability was expected. The pre-operational tests, as saturation curve, recombination loss and polarity effect showed satisfactory results. The repeatability and the long-term stability tests were also evaluated, showing good agreement with international recommendations.

  12. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  13. Applying the helium ionization detector in chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K.; Andrawes, F. F.; Brazell, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    High noise levels and oversensitivity of helium detector make flame-ionization and thermal-conductivity detectors more suitable for chromotography. Deficiencies are eliminated by modifying helium device to operate in saturation rather than multiplication mode. Result is low background current, low noise, high stability, and high sensitivity. Detector analyzes halocarbons, hydrocarbons, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, and inorganics without requiring expensive research-grade helium.

  14. 24 CFR 200.76 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 200.76 Section 200.76 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Property Requirements § 200.76 Smoke detectors. Smoke...

  15. 24 CFR 200.76 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 200.76 Section 200.76 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Property Requirements § 200.76 Smoke detectors. Smoke...

  16. 24 CFR 200.76 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Smoke detectors. 200.76 Section 200.76 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Property Requirements § 200.76 Smoke detectors. Smoke...

  17. A well-type ionization chamber geometric correction factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiler, R. J.; Sibata, C. H.; Ho, A. K.; de Souza, C.; Shin, K. H.

    1996-07-01

    To correct for the influence of source configuration on the measured activity of spherical and cylindrical brachytherapy sources, a geometric correction factor was calculated for the Standard Imaging HDR-1000 well-type ionization chamber. A Fortran program modelled each source as a lattice of point sources. Because of the cylindrical symmetry of the well chamber, it could be uniquely modelled by point detectors along the perimeter of the radial plane of the detection volume. Path lengths were calculated and attenuation factors were applied to each source - detector point combination individually. The total dose rate at each detection point was found through a Sievert summation of the point source contributions. For sources with identical activities, a correction factor of was calculated, equal to the ratio of the dose rate of the cylindrical source to that of the sphere. Experimental verification using a Nuclear Associates 67-809 series cylindrical source and an Amersham spherical source yielded a correction factor of .

  18. SONTRAC: A solar neutron track chamber detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, G. M., Jr.; Jenkins, T. L.; Owens, A.

    1985-01-01

    The recent detection on the solar maximum mission (SMM) satellite of high energy neutrons emitted during large solar flares has provided renewed incentive to design a neutron detector which has the sensitivity, energy resolution, and time resolution to measure the neutron time and energy spectra with sufficient precision to improve our understanding of the basic flare processes. Over the past two decades a variety of neutron detectors has been flown to measure the atmospheric neutron intensity above 10 MeV and to search for solar neutrons. The SONTRAC (Solar Neutron Track Chamber) detector, a new type of neutron detector which utilizes n-p scattering and has a sensitivity 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than previous instruments in the 20-200 MeV range is described. The energy resolution is 1% for neutron kinetic energy, T sub n 50 MeV. When used with a coded aperture mask at 50 m (as would be possible on the space station) an angular resolution of approx. 4 arc sec could be achieved, thereby locating the sites of high energy nuclear interactions with an angular precision comparable to the existing x-ray experiments on SMM. The scintillation chamber is investigated as a track chamber for high energy physics, either by using arrays of scintillating optical fibers or by optical imaging of particle trajectories in a block of scintillator.

  19. Ionization detection system for aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Martin E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system utilizes a measuring ionization chamber which is modified to minimize false alarms and reductions in sensitivity resulting from changes in ambient temperature. In the preferred form of the modification, an annular radiation shield is mounted about the usual radiation source provided to effect ionization in the measuring chamber. The shield is supported by a bimetallic strip which flexes in response to changes in ambient temperature, moving the shield relative to the source so as to vary the radiative area of the source in a manner offsetting temperature-induced variations in the sensitivity of the chamber.

  20. Closed-loop pulsed helium ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detector for gas chromatography is operated in a constant current, pulse-modulated mode by configuring the detector, electrometer and a high voltage pulser in a closed-loop control system. The detector current is maintained at a fixed level by varying the frequency of fixed-width, high-voltage bias pulses applied to the detector. An output signal proportional to the pulse frequency is produced which is indicative of the charge collected for a detected species.

  1. 24 CFR 232.591 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector in proper working condition. If the... hearing-impaired persons, unless the smoke alarm is connected to a central alarm system that is...

  2. A model for electron/ion recombination in ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Sailor, W.C.

    1988-05-01

    The recombination of free electrons and positive ions along charged particle tracks in gases has been modeled using electron tranport equations, which assume homogeneous distribution in the vicinity of the tracks. The equations include space charge terms, which have been negelected in previous models. A formula for the electron yield as a function of detector applied potential is obtained from a perturbation solution valid when the ratio of the Debye length to the charge column radius is larger then unity. When this ratio is very large, the formula reduces to that of previous models. Pulse height measurements in a /sup 3/He ionization chamber indicate 2% to 30% losses to recombination which vary with applied field, particle type, and energy. Using reasonable values for the electron transport coefficients, the calculated loss of signal to recommendation is generally in agreement with experiment, but the variation with applied bias is stronger in the experiment.

  3. Dosimetric characterization of a large area pixel-segmented ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Amerio, S; Boriano, A; Bourhaleb, F; Cirio, R; Donetti, M; Fidanzio, A; Garelli, E; Giordanengo, S; Madon, E; Marchetto, F; Nastasi, U; Peroni, C; Piermattei, A; Sanz Freire, C J; Sardo, A; Trevisiol, E

    2004-02-01

    A pixel-segmented ionization chamber has been designed and built by Torino University and INFN. The detector features a 24 x 24 cm2 active area divided in 1024 independent cylindrical ionization chambers and can be read out in 500 micros without introducing dead time; the digital charge quantum can be adjusted between 100 fC and 800 fC. The sensitive volume of each single ionization chamber is 0.07 cm3. The purpose of the detector is to ease the two-dimensional (2D) verifications of fields with complex shapes and large gradients. The detector was characterized in a PMMA phantom using 60Co and 6 MV x-ray photon beams. It has shown good signal linearity with respect to dose and dose rate to water. The average sensitivity of a single ionization chamber was 2.1 nC/Gy, constant within 0.5% over one month of daily measurements. Charge collection efficiency was 0.985 at the operating polarization voltage of 400 V and 3.5 Gy/min dose rate. Tissue maximum ratio and output factor have been compared with a Farmer ionization chamber and were found in good agreement. The dose profiles have been compared with the ones obtained with an ionization chamber in water phantom for the field sizes supplied by a 3D-Line dynamic multileaf collimator. These results show that this detector can be used for 2D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams, supplying a good spatial resolution and sensibly reducing the time spent in dosimetric verification of complex radiation fields.

  4. High-resolution ionization detector and array of such detectors

    DOEpatents

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Rojeski, Ronald A.

    2001-01-16

    A high-resolution ionization detector and an array of such detectors are described which utilize a reference pattern of conductive or semiconductive material to form interaction, pervious and measurement regions in an ionization substrate of, for example, CdZnTe material. The ionization detector is a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector. Various geometries of such a detector and an array of such detectors produce room temperature operated gamma ray spectrometers with relatively high resolution. For example, a 1 cm.sup.3 detector is capable of measuring .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays with room temperature energy resolution approaching 2% at FWHM. Two major types of such detectors include a parallel strip semiconductor Frisch grid detector and the geometrically weighted trapezoid prism semiconductor Frisch grid detector. The geometrically weighted detector records room temperature (24.degree. C.) energy resolutions of 2.68% FWHM for .sup.137 Cs 662 keV gamma rays and 2.45% FWHM for .sup.60 Co 1.332 MeV gamma rays. The detectors perform well without any electronic pulse rejection, correction or compensation techniques. The devices operate at room temperature with simple commercially available NIM bin electronics and do not require special preamplifiers or cooling stages for good spectroscopic results.

  5. a Solution for Dosimetry and Quality Assurance in Imrt and Hadrontherapy:. the Pixel Ionization Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amerio, S.; Coda, S.; Nastasi, U.; Belletti, S.; Ghedi, B.; Boriano, A.; Cirio, R.; Luparia, A.; Marchetto, F.; Peroni, C.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Donetti, M.; Madon, E.; Trevisiol, E.; Urgesi, A.

    2002-11-01

    The new radiotherapy techniques require new detectors to monitor and measure the clinical field. The Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) techniques like step and shoot, sliding window, dynamic wedge or scanning beam add the time variable to the treatment field. In this case the water phantom with a single ionization chamber moving inside the field needs very long measurement time. Linear arrays of ionization chambers or diodes measure the field only along a line. 2D detectors like radiographic or gafchromic film are not suitable to be used as on line detectors. We have developed, built and tested an ionization chamber segmented in pixels that measure the dose in a plane at several points. Every channel has a dedicated electronic chain that digitizes the collected charge and data from all the channels are sent to the computer that performs the data acquisition. One read out cycle is very fast allowing to measure in real time the fluency and the shape of the field. The chamber can be used in two different ways, as monitor chamber and as relative dosemeter. A description of the detector, the electronics, and test results with both photon and hadron beams will be reported.

  6. 24 CFR 965.805 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, or such greater number as may be required by state or local... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detectors to serve as adequate warning of fire. Public areas include... equipped with both audible and visual types of alarm devices. (2) If needed, battery-operated...

  7. 24 CFR 965.805 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, or such greater number as may be required by state or local... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detectors to serve as adequate warning of fire. Public areas include... equipped with both audible and visual types of alarm devices. (2) If needed, battery-operated...

  8. 24 CFR 965.805 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, or such greater number as may be required by state or local... battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detectors to serve as adequate warning of fire. Public areas include... equipped with both audible and visual types of alarm devices. (2) If needed, battery-operated...

  9. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  10. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  11. Construction of a fast ionization chamber for high-rate particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2014-07-01

    A new gas-filled ionization chamber for high count rate particle identification has been constructed and commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). To enhance the response time of the ionization chamber, a design utilizing a tilted entrance window and tilted electrodes was adopted, which is modified from an original design by Kimura et al. [1]. A maximum counting rate of 700 , 000 particles per second has been achieved. The detector has been used for several radioactive beam measurements performed at the HRIBF.

  12. Super-resolution non-parametric deconvolution in modelling the radial response function of a parallel plate ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, A; Tenhunen, M

    2012-11-07

    The signal of the dosimetric detector is generally dependent on the shape and size of the sensitive volume of the detector. In order to optimize the performance of the detector and reliability of the output signal the effect of the detector size should be corrected or, at least, taken into account. The response of the detector can be modelled using the convolution theorem that connects the system input (actual dose), output (measured result) and the effect of the detector (response function) by a linear convolution operator. We have developed the super-resolution and non-parametric deconvolution method for determination of the cylinder symmetric ionization chamber radial response function. We have demonstrated that the presented deconvolution method is able to determine the radial response for the Roos parallel plate ionization chamber with a better than 0.5 mm correspondence with the physical measures of the chamber. In addition, the performance of the method was proved by the excellent agreement between the output factors of the stereotactic conical collimators (4-20 mm diameter) measured by the Roos chamber, where the detector size is larger than the measured field, and the reference detector (diode). The presented deconvolution method has a potential in providing reference data for more accurate physical models of the ionization chamber as well as for improving and enhancing the performance of the detectors in specific dosimetric problems.

  13. Ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms in rural Alaskan homes.

    PubMed

    Fazzini, T M; Perkins, R; Grossman, D

    2000-08-01

    To compare rates of nuisance alarms and disconnection between ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms. A prospective cohort study. Four Inupiat Eskimo villages in the Northwest Arctic Borough region of Alaska, 48 km (30 mi) above the Arctic Circle. Households in 4 communities with similar populations, number of homes, mean income, size of household, and square footage per home. Two villages had photoelectric alarms installed (58 homes), and 2 other villages had ionization alarms installed (65 homes) in standard locations. Follow-up household surveys were conducted after 6 months to determine rates of false alarms and detector disconnection. All of the households that could be contacted 104/123 agreed to participate in the follow-up surveys. Main outcome measures The proportion of households experiencing false alarms and the proportion of disabled alarms in households in each of the test communities. Homes with ionization alarms had more than 8 times the rate of false alarms as those with photoelectric alarms. Eleven of the ionization alarms (19%) were disconnected compared with 2 of the photoelectric devices (4%). In small rural residences, photoelectric smoke alarms have lower rates of false alarms and disconnection. Photoelectric alarms may be the preferred choice for dwellings with limited living space or frequent false alarms.

  14. Ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms in rural Alaskan homes

    PubMed Central

    Fazzini, Thomas M; Perkins, Ron; Grossman, David

    2000-01-01

    Objective To compare rates of nuisance alarms and disconnection between ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms. Design A prospective cohort study. Setting Four Inupiat Eskimo villages in the NorthwestArctic Borough region of Alaska, 48 km (30 mi) above the Arctic Circle.Subjects Households in 4 communities with similar populations, number of homes, mean income, size of household, and square footage per home.Intervention Two villages had photoelectric alarms installed (58homes), and 2 other villages had ionization alarms installed (65 homes) in standard locations. Follow-up household surveys were conducted after 6 months to determine rates of false alarms and detector disconnection. All of the households that could be contacted 104/123 agreed to participate in the follow-up surveys. Main outcome measures The proportion of households experiencing false alarms and the proportion of disabled alarms in households in each of the test communities. Results Homes with ionization alarms had more than 8 times the rate of false alarms as those with photoelectric alarms. Eleven of the ionization alarms (19%) were disconnected compared with2 of the photoelectric devices (4%). Conclusions In small rural residences, photoelectric smoke alarms have lower rates of false alarms and disconnection. Photoelectric alarms may be the preferred choice for dwellings with limited living space or frequent false alarms. PMID:10924426

  15. Resistive Plate Chambers as thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Mongelli, T.; Paticchio, V.; Ranieri, A.; Trentadue, R.

    2003-09-01

    We present a construction procedure suitable to make Resistive Plate Chambers detectors sensitive also to thermal neutrons. This procedure, consisting in coating the inner surface of one of the RPC Bakelite electrodes with a mixture of linseed oil and Gd203, is very simple, cheap, and suitable to be employed for industrial, medical or de-mining applications. Here the results of extensive tests aimed to asset the performance of two prototypes of Gd-RPCs are shown. While the detection efficiency to thermal neutrons for a standard not Gd-coated RPC results to be about 0.1%, Gd-RPCs reach, in stand-alone, absolute efficiencies of about 10%, and, when two of these detectors are coupled together, more than 15%. In addition RPCs have excellent time resolution and good imaging performance. This new type, position sensitive gas detector can be operated at atmospheric pressure, is light-weighted, has low γ-ray sensitivity, and is easy to build and handle even when large areas are to be covered.

  16. RADIATION MONITOR CONTAINING TWO CONCENTRIC IONIZATION CHAMBERS AND MEANS FOR INSULATING THE SEPARATE CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Braestrup, C.B.; Mooney, R.T.

    1964-01-21

    This invention relates to a portable radiation monitor containing two concentric ionization chambers which permit the use of standard charging and reading devices. It is particularly adapted as a personnel x-ray dosimeter and to this end comprises a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an inner energy dependent chamber, a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an outer energy independent chamber, and polymeric insulation means which insulates said chambers from each other and holds the chambers together with exposed connections in a simple, trouble-free, and compact assembly substantially without variation in directional response. (AEC)

  17. Ionization chamber radial response deconvolution in megavoltage photon beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulmala, A.; Tenhunen, M.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to study a radial response model as a method, to correct output factor results gathered with ionization chambers of different size and shape in cone collimated RT fields. An enhanced version of a non-parametric super-resolution deconvolution method able to model a radial response function of a small cylinder symmetric ionization chamber is described and demonstrated. The radial response of four ionization chambers with different geometry and radius are estimated using 6 MV photon beam in water at the isocentre plane. Finally the validity of the estimates is tested by applying the response functions to the output factor measurements of 4–20 mm conical collimators. The enhanced method is demonstrated by obtaining the response function characteristics with a spatial uncertainty smaller than 0.1 mm when the distance from chamber axis is larger than 0.5 mm. In all studied ionization chambers, a significant local response maximum is found close to the air cavity boundary. The agreement between the output factor results of different chambers is promising, the largest difference (max—min) in output factor is 4% obtained for the smallest 4 mm cone size.

  18. Quantification of static magnetic field effects on radiotherapy ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Agnew, J; O'Grady, F; Young, R; Duane, S; Budgell, G J

    2017-03-07

    Integrated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and radiotherapy (RT) delivery machines are currently being developed, with some already in clinical use. It is anticipated that the strong magnetic field used in some MR-RT designs will have a significant impact on routine measurements of dose in the MR-linac performed using ionization chambers, which provide traceability back to a primary standard definition of dose. In particular, the presence of small air gaps around ionization chambers may introduce unacceptably high uncertainty into these measurements. In this study, we investigate and quantify the variation attributable to air gaps for several routinely-used cylindrical ionization chambers in a magnetic field, as well as the effect of the magnetic field alone on the response of the chambers. The measurements were performed in a Co-60 beam, while the ionization chambers were positioned in custom-made Perspex phantoms between the poles of an electromagnet, which was capable of generating magnetic fields of up to 2 T field strength, although measurements were focused around 1.5 T. When an asymmetric air gap was rotated at cardinal angles around the ionization chambers investigated here, variation of up to 8.5  ±  0.2 percentage points (PTW 31006 chamber) was observed in an applied magnetic field of 1.5 T. The minimum peak-to-peak variation was 1.1  ±  0.1% (Exradin A1SL). When the same experiment was performed with a well-defined air gap of known position using the PTW 30013 chamber, a variation of 3.8  ±  0.2% was observed. When water was added to the phantom cavity to eliminate all air gaps, the variation for the PTW 30013 was reduced to 0.2  ±  0.01%.

  19. Quantification of static magnetic field effects on radiotherapy ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnew, J.; O’Grady, F.; Young, R.; Duane, S.; Budgell, G. J.

    2017-03-01

    Integrated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and radiotherapy (RT) delivery machines are currently being developed, with some already in clinical use. It is anticipated that the strong magnetic field used in some MR-RT designs will have a significant impact on routine measurements of dose in the MR-linac performed using ionization chambers, which provide traceability back to a primary standard definition of dose. In particular, the presence of small air gaps around ionization chambers may introduce unacceptably high uncertainty into these measurements. In this study, we investigate and quantify the variation attributable to air gaps for several routinely-used cylindrical ionization chambers in a magnetic field, as well as the effect of the magnetic field alone on the response of the chambers. The measurements were performed in a Co-60 beam, while the ionization chambers were positioned in custom-made Perspex phantoms between the poles of an electromagnet, which was capable of generating magnetic fields of up to 2 T field strength, although measurements were focused around 1.5 T. When an asymmetric air gap was rotated at cardinal angles around the ionization chambers investigated here, variation of up to 8.5  ±  0.2 percentage points (PTW 31006 chamber) was observed in an applied magnetic field of 1.5 T. The minimum peak-to-peak variation was 1.1  ±  0.1% (Exradin A1SL). When the same experiment was performed with a well-defined air gap of known position using the PTW 30013 chamber, a variation of 3.8  ±  0.2% was observed. When water was added to the phantom cavity to eliminate all air gaps, the variation for the PTW 30013 was reduced to 0.2  ±  0.01%.

  20. 24 CFR 891.555 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, in proper working condition... which case each bedroom occupied by a hearing-impaired person must have an alarm system connected to...

  1. 24 CFR 891.555 - Smoke detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... must include at least one battery-operated or hard-wired smoke detector, in proper working condition... which case each bedroom occupied by a hearing-impaired person must have an alarm system connected to...

  2. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  3. Absolute dosimetry on a dynamically scanned sample for synchrotron radiotherapy using graphite calorimetry and ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lye, J. E.; Harty, P. D.; Butler, D. J.; Crosbie, J. C.; Livingstone, J.; Poole, C. M.; Ramanathan, G.; Wright, T.; Stevenson, A. W.

    2016-06-01

    The absolute dose delivered to a dynamically scanned sample in the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter anticipated to be established as a primary standard for synchrotron dosimetry. The calorimetry was compared to measurements using a free-air chamber (FAC), a PTW 31 014 Pinpoint ionization chamber, and a PTW 34 001 Roos ionization chamber. The IMBL beam height is limited to approximately 2 mm. To produce clinically useful beams of a few centimetres the beam must be scanned in the vertical direction. In practice it is the patient/detector that is scanned and the scanning velocity defines the dose that is delivered. The calorimeter, FAC, and Roos chamber measure the dose area product which is then converted to central axis dose with the scanned beam area derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and film measurements. The Pinpoint chamber measures the central axis dose directly and does not require beam area measurements. The calorimeter and FAC measure dose from first principles. The calorimetry requires conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water using MC calculations with the EGSnrc code. Air kerma measurements from the free air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. The two ionization chambers are secondary standards requiring calibration with kilovoltage x-ray tubes. The Roos and Pinpoint chambers were calibrated against the Australian primary standard for air kerma at the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). Agreement of order 2% or better was obtained between the calorimetry and ionization chambers. The FAC measured a dose 3-5% higher than the calorimetry, within the stated uncertainties.

  4. Absolute dosimetry on a dynamically scanned sample for synchrotron radiotherapy using graphite calorimetry and ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Lye, J E; Harty, P D; Butler, D J; Crosbie, J C; Livingstone, J; Poole, C M; Ramanathan, G; Wright, T; Stevenson, A W

    2016-06-07

    The absolute dose delivered to a dynamically scanned sample in the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter anticipated to be established as a primary standard for synchrotron dosimetry. The calorimetry was compared to measurements using a free-air chamber (FAC), a PTW 31 014 Pinpoint ionization chamber, and a PTW 34 001 Roos ionization chamber. The IMBL beam height is limited to approximately 2 mm. To produce clinically useful beams of a few centimetres the beam must be scanned in the vertical direction. In practice it is the patient/detector that is scanned and the scanning velocity defines the dose that is delivered. The calorimeter, FAC, and Roos chamber measure the dose area product which is then converted to central axis dose with the scanned beam area derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and film measurements. The Pinpoint chamber measures the central axis dose directly and does not require beam area measurements. The calorimeter and FAC measure dose from first principles. The calorimetry requires conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water using MC calculations with the EGSnrc code. Air kerma measurements from the free air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. The two ionization chambers are secondary standards requiring calibration with kilovoltage x-ray tubes. The Roos and Pinpoint chambers were calibrated against the Australian primary standard for air kerma at the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA). Agreement of order 2% or better was obtained between the calorimetry and ionization chambers. The FAC measured a dose 3-5% higher than the calorimetry, within the stated uncertainties.

  5. Pulse mode readout techniques for use with non-gridded industrial ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Vladimir E.; Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2011-10-01

    Highly sensitive readout technique for precision long-term radiation measurements has been developed and tested in the Radiation Control Department at Jefferson Lab. The new electronics design is used to retrieve ionization data in a pulse mode. The dedicated data acquisition system works with M=Audio Audiophile 192 High-Definition 24-bit/192 kHz audio cards, taking data in continuous waveform recording mode. The on-line data processing algorithms extract signals of the ionization events from the data flow and measure the ionization value for each event. Two different ion chambers are evaluated. The first is a Reuter-Stokes Argon-filled (at 25 atm) High Pressure Ionization Chamber (HPIC), commonly used as a detector part in many GE Reuter-Stokes instruments of the RSS series. The second is a VacuTec Model 70181, 5 atm Xenon-filled ionization chamber. Results for both chambers indicate that the techniques allow using industrial ICs for high sensitivity and precision long-term radiation measurements, while at the same time providing information about spectral characteristics of the radiation fields.

  6. CHAMBER - IONIZATION - EXPERIMENT - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-6 EQUIPMENT - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-10

    S65-61788 (For release: 11 Dec. 1965) --- Close-up view of equipment which will be used in the D-8 (Radiation in Spacecraft) experiment on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Gemini-6 spaceflight. This experiment is designed to make highly accurate measurements of the absorbed dose rate of radiation which penetrates the Gemini spacecraft, and determine the spatial distribution of dose levels inside the spacecraft particularly in the crew area. This is experimentation of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, N.M. LOWER LEFT: The second ionization chamber, this one is unshielded. This chamber can be removed from its bracket by the astronaut who will periodically take measurements at various locations in the spacecraft. Nearby is Passive Dosimeter Unit which is one of five small packets each containing a standard pocket ionization chamber, gamma electron sensitive film, glass needles and thermo luminescent dosimeters which are mounted at various locations in the cabin. UPPER LEFT: Photo illustrates how ionization chamber can be removed from bracket for measurements. LOWER RIGHT: Shield of bulb-shaped chamber will be removed (shown in photo) as the spacecraft passes through the South Atlantic anomaly, the area where the radiation belt dips closest to Earth's surface. UPPER RIGHT: Dome-shaped object is shield covering one of two Tissue Equivalent Ionization Chambers (sensors) which will read out continuously the instantaneous rate at which dose is delivered during the flight. This chamber is mounted permanently. The information will be recorded aboard the spacecraft, and will also be received directly by ground stations. This chamber is shielded to simulate the amount of radiation the crew members are receiving beneath their skin. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  7. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, O.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2015-03-01

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  8. Hard disk drive based microsecond x-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, O. Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R.

    2015-03-15

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  9. Hard disk drive based microsecond X-ray chopper for characterization of ionization chambers and photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Müller, O; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Frahm, R

    2015-03-01

    A fast X-ray chopper capable of producing ms long X-ray pulses with a typical rise time of few μs was realized. It is ideally suited to investigate the temporal response of X-ray detectors with response times of the order of μs to ms, in particular, any kind of ionization chambers and large area photo diodes. The drive mechanism consists of a brushless DC motor and driver electronics from a common hard disk drive, keeping the cost at an absolute minimum. Due to its simple construction and small dimensions, this chopper operates at home lab based X-ray tubes and synchrotron radiation sources as well. The dynamics of the most important detectors used in time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy, namely, ionization chambers and Passivated Implanted Planar Silicon photodiodes, were investigated in detail. The results emphasize the applicability of this X-ray chopper.

  10. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  11. Characterization of a CT ionization chamber for radiation field mapping.

    PubMed

    Perini, Ana P; Neves, Lucio P; Vivolo, Vitor; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A pencil-type ionization chamber, developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN), was characterized with the objective to verify the possibility of its application in radiation field mapping procedures. The characterization tests were evaluated, and the results were satisfactory. The results obtained for the X radiation field mapping with the homemade chamber were compared with those of a PTW Farmer-type chamber (TN 30011-1). The maximum difference observed in this comparison was only 1.25%, showing good agreement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. EML pulse ionization chamber systems for /sup 222/Rn measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fisenne, I M; Keller, H W

    1985-03-01

    Radon measurements have been performed with pulse ionization chambers at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for over 35 years. This report describes the evolution of radon measurement systems, with emphasis on the continuous quality control efforts at EML. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Smoke density studies with the Arapahoe and NBS chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Machado, A. M.; Murphy, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    Smoke density studies on twelve cellulosic and five synthetic materials using the Arapahoe and NBS smoke chambers show an empirical relationship between smoke weight as per cent of initial weight in the Arapahoe test and maximum specific optical density under piloted conditions in the NBS test. The NBS optical density data under piloted conditions exhibited sensitivity to test artifacts such as type of pilot burner.

  14. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, J.; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M. M.; deSouza, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. Optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (< 5 MeV / A) the detector presents only three 0.5 μm/cm2 foils to the beam in addition to the detector gas. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a risetime of 60-70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate and providing a time resolution of 6-8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as ∼ 8 % for an energy deposit of ∼3.5 MeV. The energy resolution with beams of 2.5 and 4.0 MeV/A 39K ions and the dependence of the energy resolution on beam intensity is measured. At an instantaneous rate of 3×105 ions/s the energy resolution has degraded to 14% with a pileup of 12%. The good energy resolution of this detector at rates up to 3×105 ions/s makes it an effective tool in the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams.

  15. Comparison of experimental and calculated calibration coefficients for a high sensitivity ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Amiot, M N; Mesradi, M R; Chisté, V; Morin, M; Rigoulay, F

    2012-09-01

    The response of a Vacutec 70129 ionization chamber was calculated using the PENELOPE-2008 Monte Carlo code and compared to experimental data. The filling gas mixture composition and its pressure have been determined using IC simulated response adjustment to experimental results. The Monte Carlo simulation revealed a physical effect in the detector response to photons due to the presence of xenon in the chamber. A very good agreement is found between calculated and experimental calibration coefficients for 17 radionuclides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of a 2D ionization chamber array for IMRT plan verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alashrah, S.; Kandaiya, S.; Yong, S. Y.; Cheng, S. K.

    2010-07-01

    A commercialized array of 2D pixel ionization chambers MatriXX from Scanditronix Wellhöfer was evaluated with the objective to implement for quality assurance in IMRT treatment plan verification. The device consists of 1020 chambers arranged in a 32×32 grid. The distance between the chamber centres is 7.6 mm and the volume of the chamber is 0.08 cm 3. The effective point measurement of the MatriXX was verified and it agreed with the MatriXX's manual specifications. The start-up behaviour, and the short- and long-term reproducibilities of the array detector were tested. Dose linearity and energy independence were also analyzed. The results showed that the dose was linear within the range 9-800 cGy and the response of the 2D array was independent of energy for 6 and 10 MV photon beams. The MatriXX was independent of dose rate ranging from 183 to 483 cGy/min. For field sizes 3×3 cm 2 and above the output factors of the 2D agreed within 1% with those obtained using the FC65-G ionization chamber. But at field size 2×2 cm 2 the percentage difference was 5%. However, there was a poor correlation with differences greater than 1 mm in the penumbra region. The preliminary investigations indicate that the detector is suitable for IMRT plan verifications but corrections have to be applied in regions of high dose gradient.

  17. Modelling ionization chamber response to nonstandard beam configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantot, L.; Seuntjens, J.

    2008-02-01

    Novel technologies aiming at improving target dose coverage while minimising dose to organs at risk use delivery of radiation fields that significantly deviate from reference conditions defined in protocols such as TG-51 and TRS-398. The use of ionization chambers for patient-specific quality assurance of these new delivery procedures calibrated in reference conditions increases the uncertainties on dose delivery. The conversion of the dose to the chamber cavity to the dose to water becomes uncertain; and the geometrical details of the chamber, as well as the details of the delivery, are expected to be significant. In this study, a realistic model of the Exradin® A12 Farmer chamber is simulated. A framework is applied for the calculation of ionization chamber response to arbitrarily modulated fields as a summation of responses to pencil beams. This approach is used with the chamber model and tested against measurements in static open fields and dynamic MLC IMRT fields. As a benchmark test of the model, quality conversion factors values calculated by Monte-Carlo simulation with the chamber model are in agreement within 0.1 % and 0.4 % with those in the AAPM TG-51, for 6 MV and 18 MV photon beams, respectively. Pencil-beam kernels show a strong dependence on the geometrical details of the chamber. Kernel summations with open fields show a relative agreement within 4.0 % with experimental data; the agreement is within 2.0 % for dynamic MLC IMRT beams. Simulations show a strong sensitivity of chamber response on positioning uncertainties, sometimes leading to dose uncertainties of 15 %.

  18. Absolute neutron dosimetry: Effects of ionization chamber wall thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Ten Haken, R.K.; Awschalom, M.; Rosenberg, I.

    1985-01-01

    To assess the effect of ionization chamber wall thickness on absolute neutron absorbed dose determinations, measurements were made of the charge collected by an A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic ionization chamber irradiated by a p(66)Be(49) neutron therapy beam as a function of chamber wall thickness both in air and in four different media: tissue-equivalent solution, water, motor oil, and glycerin. Wall thicknesses ranged from 1 to 31 mm, where isolation of the chamber gas volume from protons originating outside the chamber wall was assured. The in-air measurements compare favorably with earlier buildup measurements performed with an A-150 extrapolation chamber in an A-150 phantom. The in-phantom results may be explained if the effect of charged particles reaching the gas volume from the medium and the wall as well as the differences in neutron attenuation by the wall and the medium displaced by the wall are taken into account. The errors in absolute absorbed dose determination caused by ignoring the above processes are assessed.

  19. Technical Note: Scanning of parallel-plate ionization chamber and diamond detector for measurements of water-dose profiles in the vicinity of a narrow x-ray microbeam.

    PubMed

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2017-09-22

    Scanning of dosimeters facilitates dose distribution measurements with fine spatial resolutions. This paper presents a method of conversion of the scanning results to water-dose profiles and provides an experimental verification. An Advanced Markus chamber and a diamond detector were scanned at a resolution of 6 μm near the beam edges during irradiation with a 25-μm-wide white narrow x-ray beam from a synchrotron radiation source. For comparison, GafChromic films HD-810 and HD-V2 were also irradiated. The conversion procedure for the water dose values was simulated with Monte Carlo photon-electron transport code as a function of the x-ray incidence position. This method was deduced from nonstandard beam reference-dosimetry protocols used for high-energy x-rays. Among the calculated nonstandard beam correction factors, Pwall , which is the ratio of the absorbed dose in the sensitive volume of the chamber with water wall to that with a polymethyl methacrylate wall, was found to be the most influential correction factor in most conditions. The total correction factor ranged from 1.7 to 2.7 for the Advanced Markus chamber and from 1.15 to 1.86 for the diamond detector as a function of the x-ray incidence position. The water dose values obtained with the Advanced Markus chamber and the HD-810 film were in agreement in the vicinity of the beam, within 35% and 18% for the upper and lower sides of the beam, respectively. The beam width obtained from the diamond detector was greater, and the doses out of the beam were smaller than the doses of the others. The comparison between the Advanced Markus chamber and HD-810 revealed that the dose obtained with the scanned chamber could be converted to the water dose around the beam by applying nonstandard beam reference-dosimetry protocols. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Ionization chamber gradient effects in nonstandard beam configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Kawrakow, Iwan

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: For the purpose of nonstandard beam reference dosimetry, the current concept of reporting absorbed dose at a point in water located at a representative position in the chamber volume is investigated in detail. As new nonstandard beam reference dosimetry protocols are under development, an evaluation of the role played by the definition of point of measurement could lead to conceptual improvements prior to establishing measurement procedures. Methods: The present study uses the current definition of reporting absorbed dose to calculate ionization chamber perturbation factors for two cylindrical chamber models (Exradin A12 and A14) using the Monte Carlo method. The EGSnrc based user-code EGS lowbar chamber is used to calculate chamber dose responses of 14 IMRT beams chosen to cause considerable dose gradients over the chamber volume as previously used by Bouchard and Seuntjens [''Ionization chamber-based reference dosimetry of intensity modulated radiation beams,'' Med. Phys. 31(9), 2454-5465 (2004)]. Results: The study shows conclusively the relative importance of each physical effect involved in the nonstandard beam correction factors of 14 IMRT beams. Of all correction factors involved in the dosimetry of the beams studied, the gradient perturbation correction factor has the highest magnitude, on average, 11% higher compared to reference conditions for the Exradin A12 chamber and about 5% higher for the Extradin A14 chamber. Other perturbation correction factors (i.e., P{sub wall}, P{sub stem}, and P{sub cel}) are, on average, less than 0.8% different from reference conditions for the chambers and beams studied. The current approach of reporting measured absorbed dose at a point in water coinciding with the location of the centroid of the chamber is the main factor responsible for large correction factors in nonstandard beam deliveries (e.g., intensity modulated radiation therapy) reported in literature. Conclusions: To reduce or eliminate the magnitude

  1. Wire-chamber radiation detector with discharge control

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Mulera, T.A.

    1982-03-29

    A wire chamber; radiation detector has spaced apart parallel electrodes and grids defining an ignition region in which charged particles or other ionizing radiations initiate brief localized avalanche discharges and defining an adjacent memory region in which sustained glow discharges are initiated by the primary discharges. Conductors of the grids at each side of the memory section extend in orthogonal directions enabling readout of the X-Y coordinates of locations at which charged particles were detected by sequentially transmitting pulses to the conductors of one grid while detecting transmissions of the pulses to the orthogonal conductors of the other grid through glow discharges. One of the grids bounding the memory region is defined by an array of conductive elements each of which is connected to the associated readout conductor through a separate resistance. The wire chamber avoids ambiguities and imprecisions in the readout of coordinates when large numbers of simultaneous or; near simultaneous charged particles have been detected. Down time between detection periods and the generation of radio frequency noise are also reduced.

  2. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of Radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouza, Romualdo; Vadas, Justin; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M.

    2017-01-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. The detector is optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (<) 5 MeV/A. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a rise-time of 60 to 70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate while providing a time resolution of 6 to 8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as 8 % for an energy deposit of 3.5 MeV. Beam tests indicate that the detector is an effective tool for the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams at beam intensities up to 3 x 105 ions/s. Supported by the U.S. DOE under Award # DE-FG02-88ER-40404 and the NSF under Grant No. 1342962.

  3. Examining the influence of humidity on reference ionization chamber performance.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Malcolm R; Taank, Jaswinder

    2017-02-01

    International dosimetry protocols require measurements made with a vented ionization chamber to be corrected for the influence of air density by using the standard temperature-pressure correction factor. The effect of humidity, on the other hand, is generally ignored with the provision that the relative humidity (RH) is within certain limits (typically 20% to 80%). However, there is little experimental data in the published literature as to the true effect of humidity on modern reference-class ionization chambers. This investigation used two different radiation beams - a Co-60 irradiator and an Sr-90 check source - to examine the effect of humidity on several Farmer-type ionization chambers. An environmental cabinet controlled the humidity. For the Co-60 beam, the irradiation was external, whereas for the Sr-90 measurements, the source itself was placed within the cabinet. Extensive measurements were carried out to ensure that the experimental setup provided reproducible readings. Four chamber types were investigated: IBA FC65-G, IBA FC65-P, PTW 30013 and Exradin A19. The different wall materials provided potentially different mechanical responses (i.e., in terms of expansion/contraction) to the water content in the air. The relative humidity was varied between 8% and 98% and measurements were made with both increasing and decreasing humidity to investigate any possible hysteresis effects. Measurements in Co-60 were consistent with the published data obtained with primary standard cavity chambers in ICRU Report 31 (i.e., a very small variation <0.1% for RH >10%). The measurements in the Sr-90 field showed no dependence with the relative humidity, within the measurement uncertainties (0.05%, k = 1). Very good repeatability of the ionization current was obtained over successive wet/dry cycles, no hysteresis was observed, and there was no dependence on chamber type. These results indicate that humidity has no significant effect on these particular types of ionization

  4. Ionization chamber for measurements of high-level tritium gas

    SciTech Connect

    Carstens, D.H.W.; David, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction and calibration of a simple ionization-chamber apparatus for measurement of high level tritium gas is described. The apparatus uses an easily constructed but rugged chamber containing the unknown gas and an inexpensive digital multimeter for measuring the ion current. The equipment after calibration is suitable for measuring 0.01 to 100% tritium gas in hydrogen-helium mixes with an accuracy of a few percent. At both the high and low limits of measurements deviations from the predicted theoretical current are observed. These are briefly discussed.

  5. Neutron Dosimetry Using a Tissue-Equivalent Ionization Chamber.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    procedures are described, and correction factors discussed. /’ On a montg et v~rifiA un systtme de niesure d’oZz la dose ou le kerma tissulaire neutronique ...tube 3.8 cm in diameter. At the same time, it is advantageous to keep the active volume as large as possible in order to maximize sensitivity. The...CHAMBER The construction of the FWT TE Ionization chamber is Illustrated in figure 1. The active volume lies between the central electrode and the

  6. Fiber optic linear smoke fire detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulakov, Sergei V.; Moskaletz, Oleg D.; Preslenev, Leonid N.; Shabardin, Alexander N.

    2001-11-01

    A global and versatile problem of fire and environmental safety is formulated. It is pointed out that one of the main ways to solve this problem is the development of equipment for early fire detection. The results of the development and study of a smoke fiber optic fire detector are presented. Such detector is absolutely explosion-safe and immune to increased radiation level and aggressive chemical environment.

  7. Monte Carlo Simulation in the Optimization of a Free-Air Ionization Chamber for Dosimetric Control in Medical Digital Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Leyva, A.; Pinera, I.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.; Montano, L. M.

    2008-08-11

    During the earliest tests of a free-air ionization chamber a poor response to the X-rays emitted by several sources was observed. Then, the Monte Carlo simulation of X-rays transport in matter was employed in order to evaluate chamber behavior as X-rays detector. The photons energy deposition dependence with depth and its integral value in all active volume were calculated. The obtained results reveal that the designed device geometry is feasible to be optimized.

  8. Properties of liquid ionization chambers at LDR brachytherapy dose rates.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B; Wickman, G; Holmström, T

    1995-04-01

    Properties such as sensitivity, general recombination and reproducibility of liquid-filled parallel-plate ionization chambers for dosimetry in low-dose-rate brachytherapy radiation fields have been evaluated. Two different dielectric liquids, isooctane (C8H(1)8) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4), have been used as sensitive media in chambers having a coin-shaped sensitive volume of 3 mm in diameter and 1 mm thickness. An electric field strength of 300 kV m-1 was found to be optimal with respect to sensitivity, leakage current and general recombination. At absorbed dose rates from 0.1-100 mGy min-1 the ionization charge measurements at an irradiation time of 1 min showed a reproducibility better than 1%, and a general recombination not exceeding 0.5%. The calibration--absorbed dose to water against ionization charge at a 60Co reference source--did not show any significant change over an observation time of one year for any of the chambers.

  9. Strip Ionization Chamber as Beam Monitor in the Proton Therapy Eye Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetto, F.; Cirio, R.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Boriano, A.; Givehchi, N.; La Rosa, A.; Peroni, C.; Donetti, M.; Bourhaleb, F.; Pitta', G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M. G.; Valastro, L.

    2006-04-01

    Since spring 2002, ocular pathologies have been treated in Catania at the Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate (CATANA) within a collaboration between INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Physics Department, Ophthalmology Institute, Radiology Institute of the Catania University and CSFNSM Catania. A beam line from a 62 MeV Superconducting Cyclotron is used to treat shallow tumors. The beam is conformed to the tumor shape with a passive delivery system. A detector system has been developed in collaboration with INFN-Torino to be used as real time beam monitor. The detector, placed upstream of the patient collimator, consists of two parallel plate ionization chambers with the anode segmented in strips. Each anode is made of 0.5 mm-wide 256 strips corresponding to (12.8 × 12.8) cm2 sensitive area. With the two strip ionization chambers one can measure the relevant beam parameters during treatment to probe both asymmetry and flatness. In the test carried out at CATANA the detector has been used under different and extreme beam conditions. Preliminary results are given for profiles and skewness, together with a comparison with reference detectors.

  10. Assessment of radiation doses from residential smoke detectors that contain americium-241

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, F.R.; Etnier, E.L.; Holton, G.A.; Travis, C.C.

    1981-10-01

    External dose equivalents and internal dose commitments were estimated for individuals and populations from annual distribution, use, and disposal of 10 million ionization chamber smoke detectors that contain 110 kBq (3 ..mu..Ci) americium-241 each. Under exposure scenarios developed for normal distribution, use, and disposal using the best available information, annual external dose equivalents to average individuals were estimated to range from 4 fSv (0.4 prem) to 20 nSv (2 ..mu..rem) for total body and from 7 fSv to 40 nSv for bone. Internal dose commitments to individuals under post disposal scenarios were estimated to range from 0.006 to 80 ..mu..Sv (0.0006 to 8 mrem) to total body and from 0.06 to 800 ..mu..Sv to bone. The total collective dose (the sum of external dose equivalents and 50-year internal dose commitments) for all individuals involved with distribution, use, or disposal of 10 million smoke detectors was estimated to be about 0.38 person-Sv (38 person-rem) to total body and 00 ft/sup 2/).

  11. Optical and Ionization Basic Cosmic Ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, Julian; Andrade, Diego A.; Araujo, Aurora C.; Arceo, Luis; Cervantes, Carlos A.; Molina, Jorge A.; Palacios, Luz R.

    2014-03-01

    There are drift tubes, operating in the Geiger mode, to detect ionization radiation and there are Cerenkov radiation detectors based on photomultiplier tubes. Here is the design, the construction, the operation and the characterization of a hybrid detector that combines both a drift tube and a Cerenkov detector, used mainly so far to detect cosmic rays. The basic cell is a structural Aluminum 101.6 cm-long, 2.54 cm X 2.54 cm-cross section, 0.1 cm-thick tube, interiorly polished to mirror and slightly covered with TiCO2, and filed with air, and Methane-Ar at different concentrations. There is a coaxial 1 mil Tungsten wire Au-coated at +700 to +1200 Volts electronically instrumented to read out in both ends; and there is in each end of the Aluminum tube a S10362-11-100U Hamamatsu avalanche photodiode electronically instrumented to be read out simultaneously with the Tungsten wire signal. This report is about the technical operation and construction details, the characterization results and potential applications of this hybrid device as a cosmic ray detector element. CONACYT, Mexico.

  12. Nuclear signal simulation applied to gas ionizing chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Coulon, Romain; Dumazert, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Particle transport codes used in detector simulation allow the calculation of the energy deposited by charged particles produced following an interaction. The pulses temporal shaping is more and more used in nuclear measurement into pulse shape analysis techniques. A model is proposed in this paper to simulate the pulse temporal shaping and the associated noise level thanks to the output track file PTRAC provides by Monte-Carlo particle transport codes. The model has been dedicated to ion chambers and more especially for High Pressure Xenon chambers HPXe where the pulse shape analysis can resolve some issues regarding with this technology as the ballistic deficit phenomenon. The model is fully described and an example is presented as a validation of such full detector simulation. (authors)

  13. Directional Dark Matter Detector Prototype (Time Projection Chamber)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Mallory, Kelsey; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Kadyk, John; Lopex-Thibodeaux, Mayra

    2013-04-01

    The time projection chamber is a mature technology that has emerged as a promising candidate for the directional detection of the WIMP particle. In order to utilize this technology in WIMP detection, the operational parameters must be chosen in the non-ideal regime. A prototype WIMP detector with a 10cm field cage, double GEM amplification, and ATLAS FEI3 pixel chip readout was constructed for the purpose of investigating effects of varying gas pressure in different gas mixtures. The rms radii of ionization clusters of photoelectrons caused by X-rays from a Fe-55 source were measured for several gas pressures between 760torr and 99torr in Ar(70)/ CO2(30), CF4, He(80)/Isobutane(20), and He(80)/CF4(20) mixtures. Average radii were determined from distributions of the data for each gas mixture and pressure, and revealed a negative correlation between pressure and radius in Ar(70)/CO2(30) and He(80)/Isobutane(20) mixtures. Investigation of the pressure-radius measurements are in progress using distributions of photoelectron and auger electron practical ranges (Univ. of Pisa) and diffusion, using the Garfield Monte Carlo program.

  14. An evaluation of ionization chambers for the relative dosimetry of kilovoltage x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Robin; Mo Zhao; Haque, Mamoon; Baldock, Clive

    2009-09-15

    In this work, the authors have evaluated ten different ionization chambers for the relative dosimetry of kilovoltage x-ray beams in the energy range of 50-280 kVp. Percentage depth doses in water and relative detector response (in Solid Water and in air) were measured for each of the x-ray beams studied using a number of chambers. Measured depth dose data were compared with Monte Carlo calculated depth doses using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo package and the BEAMnrc user code. The accuracy of the phase space files generated by BEAMnrc was verified by calculating the half-value layer and comparing with the measured half-value layer of each x-ray beam. The results indicate that the Advanced Markus, Markus, NACP, and Roos parallel plate ionization chambers were suitable for the measurement of depth dose data in this beam quality range with an uncertainty of less than 3%, including in the regions close to the water surface. While the relative detector response of the Farmer and scanning thimble chambers exhibited a better energy response, they were not suitable for depth dose measurements in the first 5 mm below the water surface with differences of up to 12% in the surface dose measurement for the 50 kVp x-ray beam. These differences were due to dose artifacts generated by the chamber size and the dose gradient. However, at depths greater than 5 mm, the Farmer and thimble scanning chambers gave uncertainties of less than 3% for the depth dose measurements for all beam energies. The PTW PinPoint 31006 chamber was found to give varying dose differences of up to 8% depending on the x-ray beam energy; this was attributed to the steel central electrode. The authors recommend that one of the parallel plate ionization chambers investigated be used to determine depth dose data for kilovoltage x-ray beams in the energy range studied and give correct dose information close to the surface and at depth in the water phantom.

  15. Comparison of ionization chamber efficiencies for activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Schrader, H; Svec, A

    2004-01-01

    The calibration of ionization chamber measuring systems in terms of activity is described. The energy-dependent efficiency curves of three chambers at the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, the National Physical Laboratory and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt are determined and compared using a fitting procedure for the experimental radionuclide efficiencies by the Microsoft (MS) EXCEL Solver program. An estimation of the uncertainty of the efficiency curves and the deviations of experimental and calculated radionuclide efficiencies are given. By this fitting method, discrepancies in the efficiency determination can be detected at a level of about one percent. Systematic deviations entering into the calculations either from emission probabilities per decay or from absolute activity standardization are discussed.

  16. Amplitude distribution of ionization jerks in ionization-chamber ASK-1 according long-term measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, Vladislav

    2016-07-01

    As part of the Yakut complex systems by measuring the intensity of cosmic rays has a unique device spherical - ionization chamber ASK-1 with a lead screen thickness of 12 cm. The camera allows you to explore the physical characteristics of the so-called "ionization jerks " - sharp increases ionization current caused by the passage through the device much ionizing particles of cosmic origin. Due to a large increase in current nuclear cascade "showers", formed mainly by particles of cosmic rays in the camera screen. Over the entire period of observation (50 years old) camera ASK-1 was registered 59125 aftershocks. Their nature and properties still does not sufficiently studied, especially in medium and large amplitudes.

  17. SU-E-T-525: Ionization Chamber Perturbation in Flattening Filter Free Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, D; Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Zink, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Changing the characteristic of a photon beam by mechanically removing the flattening filter may impact the dose response of ionization chambers. Thus, perturbation factors of cylindrical ionization chambers in conventional and flattening filter free photon beams were calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: The EGSnrc/BEAMnrc code system was used for all Monte Carlo calculations. BEAMnrc models of nine different linear accelerators with and without flattening filter were used to create realistic photon sources. Monte Carlo based calculations to determine the fluence perturbations due to the presens of the chambers components, the different material of the sensitive volume (air instead of water) as well as the volume effect were performed by the user code egs-chamber. Results: Stem, central electrode, wall, density and volume perturbation factors for linear accelerators with and without flattening filter were calculated as a function of the beam quality specifier TPR{sub 20/10}. A bias between the perturbation factors as a function of TPR{sub 20/10} for flattening filter free beams and conventional linear accelerators could not be observed for the perturbations caused by the components of the ionization chamber and the sensitive volume. Conclusion: The results indicate that the well-known small bias between the beam quality correction factor as a function of TPR20/10 for the flattening filter free and conventional linear accelerators is not caused by the geometry of the detector but rather by the material of the sensitive volume. This suggest that the bias for flattening filter free photon fields is only caused by the different material of the sensitive volume (air instead of water)

  18. Resistive Plate Chambers with Gd-coated electrodes as thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Mongelli, T.; Paticchio, V.; Ranieri, A.; Trentadue, R.

    2003-12-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are wide spread, cheap, easy-to-build and large size detectors, used mainly to reveal ionizing particles in high energy experiments. Here a tecnique, consisting in coating the inner surface of the bakelite electrodes with a mixture of linseed oil and Gd2O3 will be reported; this allows to make RPCs sensitive also to thermal neutrons, making them suitable to be employed for industrial, medical or de-ming applications. This new type, position sensitive gas detector can be operated at atmospheric pressure, is lightweighted, has low γ-ray sensitivity, and is easy to handle even when large areas are to be covered.

  19. Bubble chamber as a trace chemical detector.

    PubMed

    Luo, X; McCreary, E I; Atencio, J H; McCown, A W; Sander, R K

    1998-08-20

    A novel concept for trace chemical analysis in liquids has been demonstrated. The technique utilizes light absorption in a superheated liquid. Although a superheated liquid is thermodynamically unstable, a high degree of superheating can be dynamically achieved for a short period of time. During this time the superheated liquid is extremely sensitive to boiling at nucleation sites produced by energy deposition. Observation of bubbles in the superheated liquid in some sense provides amplification of the initial energy deposition. Bubble chambers containing superheated liquids have been used to detect energetic particles; now a bubble chamber is used to detect a trace chemical in superheated liquid propane by observing bubble formation initiated by optical absorption. Crystal violet is used as a test case and can be detected at the subpart-per-10(12) level by using a Nd:YAG laser. The mechanism for bubble formation and ideas for further improvement are discussed.

  20. Analytical form of current-voltage characteristic of parallel-plane, cylindrical and spherical ionization chambers with homogeneous ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, D. G.

    2007-11-01

    The elementary processes taking place in the formation of charged particles and their flow in parallel-plane, cylindrical and spherical geometry cases of ionization chamber are considered. On the basis of particles and charges balance a differential equation describing the distribution of current densities in the ionization chamber volume is obtained. As a result of the differential equation solution an analytical form of the current-voltage characteristic of an ionization chamber with homogeneous ionization is obtained. For the parallel-plane case comparision with experimental data is performed.

  1. Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) for measurements of fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernández Niello, J.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-11-01

    A detection technique for high-efficiency measurements of fusion reactions with low-intensity radioactive beams was developed. The technique is based on a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) operating as an active target and detection system, where the ionization gas acts as both target and counting gas. In this way, we can sample an excitation function in an energy range determined by the gas pressure, without changing the beam energy. The detector provides internal normalization to the incident beam and drastically reduces the measuring time. In a first experiment we tested the performance of the technique by measuring the 10,13,15C+12C fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  2. Use of relativistic rise in ionization chambers for measurement of high energy heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Vogel, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A balloon-borne instrument has been constructed to measure the energy spectra of cosmic-ray heavy nuclei in the range of about 0.3 to about 100 GeV/amu. It makes use of the relativistic rise portion of the Bethe-Bloch curve in ionization chambers for energy determination in the 10- to 100-GeV/amu interval. The instrument consists of six layers of dual-gap ionization chambers for energy determination above 10 GeV/amu. Charge is determined with a NE114 scintillator and a Pilot 425 plastic Cerenkov counter. A CO2 gas Cerenkov detector (1 atm; threshold of 30 GeV/amu) calibrates the ion chambers in the relativistic rise region. The main emphasis of the instrument is the determination of the change of the ratio of Iron (26) to the Iron secondaries (21-25) in the energy range of 10 to 100 GeV/amu. Preliminary data from a balloon flight in the fall of 1982 from Palestine, TX is presented.

  3. Use of relativistic rise in ionization chambers for measurement of high energy heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Vogel, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A balloon-borne instrument has been constructed to measure the energy spectra of cosmic-ray heavy nuclei in the range of about 0.3 to about 100 GeV/amu. It makes use of the relativistic rise portion of the Bethe-Bloch curve in ionization chambers for energy determination in the 10- to 100-GeV/amu interval. The instrument consists of six layers of dual-gap ionization chambers for energy determination above 10 GeV/amu. Charge is determined with a NE114 scintillator and a Pilot 425 plastic Cerenkov counter. A CO2 gas Cerenkov detector (1 atm; threshold of 30 GeV/amu) calibrates the ion chambers in the relativistic rise region. The main emphasis of the instrument is the determination of the change of the ratio of Iron (26) to the Iron secondaries (21-25) in the energy range of 10 to 100 GeV/amu. Preliminary data from a balloon flight in the fall of 1982 from Palestine, TX is presented.

  4. Drift chamber vertex detectors for SLC/LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, K.G.

    1987-03-01

    The short but measurable lifetimes of the b and c quarks and the tau lepton have motivated the development of high precision tracking detectors capable of providing information on the decay vertex topology of events containing these particles. This paper reviews the OPAL, L3, and MARK II experiments vertex drift chambers.

  5. An automated ionization chamber for secondary radioactivity standards.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R

    2010-01-01

    I report on the operation and characterization of a new ionization chamber system, "AUTOIC", featuring a commercial digital electrometer and a commercial robotic sample changer. The relative accuracy of the electrometer was improved significantly beyond the manufacturer's specifications through an in-house calibration of the various ranges, applied via software. The measurement precision and repeatability of the system have been determined by measuring multiple samples of the same radionuclide over the span of two or three years. The linearity of the system was examined by following the decay of (99m)Tc, (99)Mo and (133)Xe sources for up to 19 half-lives and determining half-life values. All of these values agree with the accepted literature values, within their combined uncertainties. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. A multiwire ionization chamber readout circuit using current mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawnsley, W. R.; Smith, D.; Moskven, T.

    1997-01-01

    A circuit which utilizes current mirrors has been used to apply high voltage bias to the wires of a multiwire ionization chamber (MWIC) profile monitor while still allowing measurement of the beam-induced ion-electron currents collected on the wires. Bias voltages of up to 250 V have been used while wire currents over a range of 0.5 nA to 50 nA have been measured. The circuit is unipolar but can be designed for positive or negative bias. The mirrors also provide a current gain of 10, reducing the effects of transistor leakage and extending the useful range of the circuit to lower signal levels. A module containing 32 Wilson current mirrors has been constructed and is used with a MWIC monitor in TRIUMF's Parity experiment beamline.

  7. Time-zero fission-fragment detector based on low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Assamagan, Ketevi; Baker, O.; Bayatian, G.; Carlini, Roger; Danagoulian, Areg; Eden, Thomas; Egiyan, Kim; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Gan, Liping; Gasparian, Ashot; Grigoryan, Hovhannes; Greenwood, Z; Gueye, Paul; Hashimoto, Osamu; Johnston, Kathleen; Keppel, Cynthia; Knyazian, S.; Majewski, Stanislaw; Magaryan, A; Margarian, Yu.; Marikyan, Gagik; Martoff, Charles; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; PARLAKYAN, L.; Parlakyan, L.; Sato, Ikuro; Sawafta, Reyad; Simicevic, Neven; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tang, Liguang; VARTANYAN, G.; Vulcan, William; Wells, Steven; Wood, Stephen

    1999-05-01

    A time-zero fission fragment (FF) detector, based on the technique of low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers (LPMWPC), has been designed and constructed for the heavy hypernuclear lifetime experiment (E95-002) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Its characteristics and the method of time-zero reconstruction were investigated using fission fragments from a 252Cf spontaneous fission source. The influence of the ionization energy loss was also studied. It is shown that Heptane, Hexane, and Isobutane gases at a pressure of 1z2Torr are all suitable for such a FF detector. As desired by experiment, a timing resolution of about 200ps (FWHM) for a chamber size of 21z21cm2 was achieved.

  8. Integrated atom detector based on field ionization near carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gruener, B.; Jag, M.; Stibor, A.; Visanescu, G.; Haeffner, M.; Kern, D.; Guenther, A.; Fortagh, J.

    2009-12-15

    We demonstrate an atom detector based on field ionization and subsequent ion counting. We make use of field enhancement near tips of carbon nanotubes to reach extreme electrostatic field values of up to 9x10{sup 9} V/m, which ionize ground-state rubidium atoms. The detector is based on a carpet of multiwall carbon nanotubes grown on a substrate and used for field ionization, and a channel electron multiplier used for ion counting. We measure the field enhancement at the tips of carbon nanotubes by field emission of electrons. We demonstrate the operation of the field ionization detector by counting atoms from a thermal beam of a rubidium dispenser source. By measuring the ionization rate of rubidium as a function of the applied detector voltage we identify the field ionization distance, which is below a few tens of nanometers in front of nanotube tips. We deduce from the experimental data that field ionization of rubidium near nanotube tips takes place on a time scale faster than 10{sup -10} s. This property is particularly interesting for the development of fast atom detectors suitable for measuring correlations in ultracold quantum gases. We also describe an application of the detector as partial pressure gauge.

  9. Polarity correction factor for flattening filter free photon beams in several cylindrical ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiyuki; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Masao; Tsudou, Shinji; Masutani, Takashi; Okayama, Takanobu

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the polarity correction factor in ionization chambers for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams and flattening filter (FF) beams. Measurements were performed with both 6 and 10 MV FFF and FF beams. Five commercial ionization chambers were evaluated: PTW TN30013; IBA Dosimetry CC01, CC04, and CC13; and Exradin A12S. Except for the CC01 ionization chamber, the other four chambers showed less than a 0.3 % difference in the polarity effect between the FFF and the FF beams. The CC01 chamber showed a strong field-size-dependence, unlike the other chambers. The polarity effect for all chambers with FFF beams did not change with the dose rate. Except in the case of the CC01 chamber, the difference in the polarity effect between FFF and FF beams was not significant.

  10. Polarity effect in plane-parallel ionization chambers using air or a dielectric liquid as ionization medium

    SciTech Connect

    Wickman, G.; Holmstroem, T. )

    1992-05-01

    A plane-parallel ionization chamber having a sensitive volume of 2 mm{sup 3} and using the dielectric liquid tetramethylsilane as the sensitive medium instead of air is described. In the design of the chamber special attention was given to the factors that can cause unwanted currents in the cable, stem, or the chamber dielectric material. The chamber has been tested with respect to the polarity effect in regions of radiation fields where ordinary plane-parallel ionization chambers will often fail. These regions are the build-up region in photon fields, and the region close to the practical range for electrons where nonelectronic equilibrium is significant. Experimental results show that, despite the extremely small ionization volume in the liquid ionization chamber, the polarity effect never exceeds a few tenths of a percent in field positions where well-known commercially available chambers with much less spatial resolution designed for measurements in radiation therapy fields can show polarity effects of 5% to 30%. The origin of spurious currents and how they must be minimized in the design of either a liquid- or gas-filled ionization chamber is discussed.

  11. Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Yatabe, Yoshinori; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    For quality assurance, gas-filled ionization chamber method was tested at two reference facilities for radon calibration: EML (USA) and PTB (Germany). Consequently, the radon concentrations estimated by the ionization chamber method were in good agreement with the reference radon concentrations provided by EML as well as PTB.

  12. Ionization chamber volume averaging effects in dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy beams.

    PubMed

    Low, Daniel A; Parikh, Parag; Dempsey, James F; Wahab, Sasha; Huq, Saiful

    2003-07-01

    The commercial cylindrical ionization chamber ionization integration accuracy of dynamically moving fields was evaluated. The ionization chambers were exposed to long (14 cm), narrow (0.6, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 cm) 6 MV and 18 MV fields. Rather than rely on the linear accelerator to reproducibly scan across the chamber, the chambers were scanned beneath fixed portals. A water-equivalent phantom was constructed with cavities that matched the chambers and placed on a computer-controlled one-dimensional table. Computer-controlled electrometers were utilized in continuous charge integrate mode, with 10 samples of the charge, along with time stamps, acquired for each chamber location. A reference chamber was placed just beneath the linear accelerator jaws to adjust for variations in linear accelerator dose rate. The scan spatial resolution was selected to adequately sample regions of steep dose gradient and second spatial derivative (curvature). A fixed measurement in a 10 x 10 cm2 field was used to normalize the profiles to absolute chamber response. Three ionization chambers were tested, a microchamber (0.009 cm3), a Farmer chamber (0.6 cm3) and a waterproof scanning chamber (0.125 cm3). The larger chambers exhibited severe under-response at the small field's centers, but all of the chambers, independent of orientation, accurately integrated the ionization across the scanned portal. This indicates that the tested ionization chambers provide accurate integrated charges in regions of homogeneous dose regions. Partial integration (less than the field width plus the chamber length plus 2 cm), yielded integration errors of greater than 1% and 2% for 6 MV and 18 MV, respectively, with errors for the Farmer chamber of greater than 10% even for the 4 cm wide field.

  13. Investigation of electric field distribution on FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2016-07-01

    One of the important parameters for establishing charge particle equilibrium (CPE) conditions of free-air ionization chamber is an electric field distribution. In this paper, electric field distribution inside the ionization chamber was investigated by finite element method. For this purpose, the effects of adding guard plate and guard strips on the electric field distribution in the ionization chamber were studied. it is necessary to apply a lead box around the ionization chamber body to avoid of scattered radiation effects on the ionization chamber operation, but the lead box changes the electric field distribution. In the following, the effect of lead box on the electric field distribution was studied. Finally, electric field distribution factor (kfield) was calculated by the simulation. The results of the simulation showed that presence of the guard plate and guard strips, and applying a suitable potential to lead box, a convergence of kfield to 1 was achieved.

  14. A patient-specific quality assurance study on absolute dose verification using ionization chambers of different volumes in RapidArc treatments.

    PubMed

    Syam Kumar, S A; Sukumar, Prabakar; Sriram, Padmanaban; Rajasekaran, Dhanabalan; Aketi, Srinu; Vivekanandan, Nagarajan

    2012-01-01

    ionization chamber with intermediate volume (0.125 cm(3)) shows good agreement with the TPS calculated among the detectors used in this study. Positioning is very important when using smaller volume chambers because they are more sensitive to geometrical errors within the treatment fields. It is also suggested to average the dose over the sensitive volume for larger-volume chambers. The ionization chamber-phantom combinations used in this study can be used interchangeably for routine RapidArc patient-specific quality assurance with a satisfactory accuracy for clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L). PMID:27294937

  16. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    PubMed

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-06-10

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L).

  17. High spatial resolution dosimetric response maps for radiotherapy ionization chambers measured using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, D. J.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wright, T. E.; Harty, P. D.; Lehmann, J.; Livingstone, J.; Crosbie, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Small circular beams of synchrotron radiation (0.1 mm and 0.4 mm in diameter) were used to irradiate ionization chambers of the types commonly used in radiotherapy. By scanning the chamber through the beam and measuring the ionization current, a spatial map of the dosimetric response of the chamber was recorded. The technique is able to distinguish contributions to the large-field ionization current from the chamber walls, central electrode and chamber stem. Scans were recorded for the NE 2571 Farmer chamber, the PTW 30013, IBA FC65-G Farmer-type chambers, the NE 2611A and IBA CC13 thimble chambers, the PTW 31006 and 31014 pinpoint chambers, the PTW Roos and Advanced Markus plane-parallel chambers, and the PTW 23342 thin-window soft x-ray chamber. In all cases, large contributions to the response arise from areas where the incident beam grazes the cavity surfaces. Quantitative as well as qualitative information about the relative chamber response was extracted from the maps, including the relative contribution of the central electrode. Line scans using monochromatic beams show the effect of the photon energy on the chamber response. For Farmer-type chambers, a simple Monte Carlo model was in good agreement with the measured response.

  18. Performance of the Time Expansion Chamber / Transition Radiation Detector in PHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luiz Silva, Cesar

    2004-10-01

    The Time Expansion Chamber / Transition Radiation Detector (TEC/TRD) in the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC measures ionization losses (dE/dX) and transition radiation from charged particles produced by beam collisions. It is designed to perform tracking and identification for charged particles on very high particle multiplicity environment. The TEC/TRD consists of 24 wire chambers readout on both sides filled with recycled Xe-based gas mixture. This wire chamber configuration, besides providing measurements of ionization losses for charged particles, can absorb X-Ray photons generated by transition radiation from incident particles with γ>1000 crossing fiber radiators placed at the entrance of the chambers. This allows TEC/TRD to distinguish electrons from the huge pion signal produced over a broad momentum range (1GeV/c

  19. Higher-Sensitivity Ionization Trace-Species Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boumsellek, Said; Chutjian, Ara

    1995-01-01

    Electron source and electron optics of reversal electron-attachment detector modified to increase sensitivity. Original version described in "High-Sensitivity Ionization Trace-Species Detector" (NPO-17596). Used to detect molecules of particular chemical species of interest (e.g., narcotics, explosives, or organic wastes) present in air at low concentrations, and known to attach extremely low-energy electrons. Apparatus does this by ionizing molecules from sampled atmosphere, then detecting ions of species of interest. Detector features indirectly heated spherical cathode and redesigned electron optics, together, deliver more electrons at low kinetic energy to reversal plane, R. Greater electron current generates more ions for detection.

  20. The properties of the ultramicrocylindrical ionization chamber for small field used in stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Vahc, Y W; Chung, W K; Park, K R; Lee, J Y; Lee, Y H; Kwon, O; Kim, S

    2001-03-01

    Accurate dosimetry of small-field photon beams tends to be difficult to perform due to the presence of lateral electronic disequilibrium and steep dose gradients. In stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), small fields of 6-30 mm in diameter are used. Generally thermoluminescence dosimetry chips, Farmer, Thimble ion chamber, and film dosimetry are not adequate to measure dose in SRS beams. These techniques generally do not provide the required precision due to their energy dependence and/or poor resolution. It is necessary to construct a small, accurate detector with high spatial resolution for the small fields used in SRS. The ultramicrocylindrical ionization chamber (UCIC) with a gold wall of 2.2 mm in diameter and 4.0 mm in length has dual sensitive volumes of air (8.0 mm3) and borosilicate (2.6 mm3) cavity. Reproducibility, linearity, and radiation damage with respect to absorbed dose, beam profile of small beam, and independence of dose rate of the UCIC are tested by the dose measurements in high energy photon (5, 15 MV) and electron (9 MeV) beams. The UCIC with a unique supporting system in the polystyrene phantom is demonstrated to be a suitable detector for the dose measurements in a small beam size.

  1. Ionization Collection in Detectors of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, Arran T.J.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the composition of dark matter is at the forefront of modern scientific research. There is compelling evidence for the existence of vast quantities of dark matter throughout the universe, however it has so-far eluded all direct detection efforts and its identity remains a mystery. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a favored dark matter candidate and have been the primary focus of direct detection for several decades. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) has developed the Z-dependent Ionization and Phonon (ZIP) detector to search for such particles. Typically made from germanium, these detectors are capable of distinguishing between electromagnetic background and a putative WIMP signal through the simultaneous measurement of ionization and phonons produced by scattering events. CDMS has operated several arrays of these detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory (Soudan, MN, USA) resulting in many competitive (often world-leading) WIMP exclusion limits. This dissertation focuses on ionization collection in these detectors under the sub-Kelvin, low electric field, and high crystal purity conditions unique to CDMS. The design and performance of a fully cryogenic HEMT-based amplifier capable of achieving the SuperCDMS SNOLAB ionization energy resolution goal of 100 eVee is presented. The experimental apparatus which has been used to record electron and hole properties under CDMS conditions is described. Measurements of charge transport, trapping, and impact ionization as a function of electric field in two CDMS detectors are shown, and the ionization collection efficiency is determined. The data is used to predict the error in the nuclear recoil energy scale under both CDMSlite and iZIP operating modes. A two species, two state model is developed to describe how ionization collection and space charge generation in CDMS detectors are controlled by the presence of “overcharged” D- donor and A+ acceptor impurity states. The thermal

  2. Recombination factors for the cylindrical FC65-G ionization chamber in pulsed photon beams and the plane-parallel Roos ionization chamber in pulsed electron beams.

    PubMed

    Berg, Martin; Noerrevang, Ole

    2004-12-07

    The use of ionization chambers in linac radiotherapy dosimetry requires various corrections to the measured charges, one of these being the recombination correction. The recombination correction factor (k(s)) is generally estimated from the two-voltage analysis (TVA) for each beam quality. However, it is possible that the ionization chamber above some threshold polarizing voltage does not follow the accepted Boag theory very well. Secondly the TVA is time-consuming as the chamber needs to stabilize after each polarizing voltage change and since it must be performed for each beam quality. Another approach consists in using the fact that k(s) is predicted to depend linearly on dose per pulse by Boag theory: determining this relationship once and for all using a multi-voltage analysis (MVA), one also checks the range validity of the Boag theory for the chamber considered. This work presents a thorough analysis of k(s) dependence on dose per pulse of FC65-G (cylindrical) and Roos (plane-parallel) ionization chambers in pulsed photon and electron beams, respectively. Within the uncertainties, the recombination factors are found to be independent of beam quality, and no deviation from the Boag theory is observed within the tested range of polarizing voltages. Before adapting the equations given using the MVA other users should check that their ionization chambers show the same dose per pulse dependence using the TVA for a few beam qualities.

  3. Randomized controlled trial of ionization and photoelectric smoke alarm functionality.

    PubMed

    Mueller, B A; Sidman, E A; Alter, H; Perkins, R; Grossman, D C

    2008-04-01

    To compare functionality, reasons for non-function, and nuisance alarm levels of two common types of smoke alarms after installation in low- to mid-level income households in King County, Washington. Randomized controlled trial of 761 households. An ionization or photoelectric smoke alarm was installed between June 1, 2000 and July 31, 2002. Main outcome measures were: percentage of study alarms that were working, observed reasons for non-functional status, and self-reported frequency of nuisance alarms at 9 and 15 months of follow-up. At 9 months after installation, 20% of ionization, vs 5% of photoelectric alarms were non-functional, a difference that persisted at 15 months, with the most common reasons for both types being a disconnected or absent battery. The risk ratio for ionization, relative to photoelectric alarms, being non-functional or removed was 2.7 (95% CI 1.8 to 4.1) at 15 months of follow-up. These findings were not altered by educational level, or the presence of smokers, children <5 years, or adults > or =65 years. Burn prevention efforts are geared towards increasing smoke alarm ownership and improving maintenance of functional status. Results suggest that the selective use of photoelectric alarms by fire injury prevention programs or consumers may provide longer-term protection in similar populations. Designing smoke alarms that minimize nuisance alarming may also result in longer term functionality.

  4. Monte Carlo calculation of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilin, Chen; Shuming, Peng; Dan, Meng; Yuehong, He; Heyi, Wang

    2014-10-01

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements has been theoretically studied using Monte Carlo code MCNP 5. The influence of many factors, including carrier gas, chamber size, wall materials and gas pressure, has been evaluated in the simulations. It is found that β rays emitted by tritium deposit much more energy into chambers flowing through with argon than with deuterium in them, as much as 2.7 times higher at pressure 100 Pa. As chamber size gets smaller, energy deposition decreases sharply. For an ionization chamber of 1 mL, β rays deposit less than 1% of their energy at pressure 100 Pa and only 84% even if gas pressure is as high as 100 kPa. It also indicates that gold plated ionization chamber results in the highest deposition ratio while aluminum one leads to the lowest. In addition, simulations were validated by comparison with experimental data. Results show that simulations agree well with experimental data.

  5. The control system of the multi-strip ionization chamber for the HIMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Yuan, Y. J.; Mao, R. S.; Xu, Z. G.; Li, Peng; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhang, Nong

    2015-03-01

    Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) is a carbon ion cancer treatment facility which is being built by the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) in China. In this facility, transverse profile and intensity of the beam at the treatment terminals will be measured by the multi-strip ionization chamber. In order to fulfill the requirement of the beam position feedback to accomplish the beam automatic commissioning, less than 1 ms reaction time of the Data Acquisition (DAQ) of this detector must be achieved. Therefore, the control system and software framework for DAQ have been redesigned and developed with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input/Output (CompactRIO) instead of PXI 6133. The software is Labview-based and developed following the producer-consumer pattern with message mechanism and queue technology. The newly designed control system has been tested with carbon beam at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR) and it has provided one single beam profile measurement in less than 1 ms with 1 mm beam position resolution. The fast reaction time and high precision data processing during the beam test have verified the usability and maintainability of the software framework. Furthermore, such software architecture is easy-fitting to applications with different detectors such as wire scanner detector.

  6. Optimization of signal extraction and front-end design in a fast,multigap ionization chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Datte, P.S.; Manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J.E.; Placidi, M.; Ratti,L.; Speziali, V.; Traversi, G.; Turner, W.C.

    2001-11-05

    This paper discusses the criteria that have been adopted tooptimize the signal processing in a shower detector to be employed as LHCbeam luminosity monitor. The original aspect ofthis instrument is itsablility to operate on a bunch-by-bunch basis. This means that it mustperform accurate charge measurements at a repetition rate of 40 MHz. Thedetector must withstand an integrated dose of 100 Grad, that is, two tothree orders of magnitude beyond those expected in the experiments. Tomeet the above requirements, an ionization chamber consisting of severalgaps of thickness 0.5 mm, filled with a gas that is expected to beradiation resistant, has been designed. Crucial in the development of thesystem is the signal processing, as the electronic noise may set thedominant limitation to the accuracy of the measurement. This is relatedto two aspects. One is the short time available for the chargemeasurement. The second one is the presence of a few meter cable betweenthe detector and the preamplifier, as this must be located out of theregion of highest radiation field. Therefore the optimization of thesignal-to-noise ratio requires that the best configuration of the chambergaps be determined under the constraint of the presence of a cable ofnon-negligible length between detector and preamplifier. The remoteplacement of the amplifying electronics will require that the front-endelectronics be radiation hard although to a lesser extent than thedetector.

  7. Dosimetric Performance of Newly Developed Farmer-Type Ionization Chamber in Radiotherapy Practice.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, Sathiyan; Godson, Henry Finlay; Ponmalar, Retna; Manickam, Ravikumar; Mazarello, James; Fernandes, Rahul

    2016-12-01

    Dose measurement with ionization chamber is essential to deliver accurate dose to the tumor in radiotherapy. The cylindrical Farmer-type ionization chamber is recommended by various dosimetry protocols for dose measurement of radiotherapy beams. The air-equivalent graphite wall Farmer-type ionization chamber (FAR 65 GB) of active volume 0.65 cm(3) with aluminum as the central electrode material was fabricated. Various dosimetric parameters were studied for the newly developed ionization chamber in cobalt-60, 6 and 18 MV photon beams. The preirradiation and postirradiation leakage of the chamber was within 0.08%. The long-term stability and the stem effect of the chamber were within 0.07% and 0.3%, respectively. The sensitivity of the ionization chamber was found to be 22.15 nC/Gy. The chamber shows linear response with dose for cobalt-60, 6 and 18 MV photon beams. The ion recombination correction factor increases with increase in bias voltage. For all energies and field sizes, the polarity correction factor is almost closer to unity. The ion recombination and polarity correction measurements show that the polarizing potential and polarity recommended during the calibration of ionization chamber should be used for routine measurement to avoid the uncertainty. The chamber response is independent of dose rate and energy. The chamber is cost-effective and shows precise and reproducible response. The study carried out confirms that the newly fabricated ion chamber can be used in the measurement of absolute dose for high-energy photon beams. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Particle and Smoke Detection on ISS for Next Generation Smoke Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary; Yuan, Zeng-guang; Sheredy, William; Funk, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Rapid fire detection requires the ability to differentiate fire signatures from background conditions and nuisance sources. Proper design of a fire detector requires detailed knowledge of all of these signal sources so that a discriminating detector can be designed. Owing to the absence of microgravity smoke data, all current spacecraft smoke detectors were designed based upon normal-g conditions. The removal of buoyancy reduces the velocities in the high temperature zones in flames, increasing the residence time of smoke particles and consequently allowing longer growth time for the particles. Recent space shuttle experiments confirmed that, in some cases, increased particles sizes are seen in low-gravity and that the relative performance of the ISS (International Space Station) and space-shuttle smoke-detectors changes in low-gravity; however, sufficient particle size information to design new detectors was not obtained. To address this issue, the SAME (Smoke Aerosol Measurement Experiment) experiment is manifested to fly on the ISS in 2007. The SAME experiment will make measurements of the particle size distribution of the smoke particulate from several typical spacecraft materials providing quantitative design data for spacecraft smoke detectors. A precursor experiment (DAFT: Dust Aerosol measurement Feasibility Test) flew recently on the ISS and provided the first measurement of the background smoke particulate levels on the ISS. These background levels are critical to the design of future smoke detectors. The ISS cabin was found to be a very clean environment with particulate levels substantially below the space shuttle and typical ground-based environments.

  9. Two-dimensional and quasi-three-dimensional dosimetry of hadron and photon beams with the Magic Cube and the Pixel Ionization Chamber.

    PubMed

    Cirio, R; Garelli, E; Schulte, R; Amerio, S; Boriano, A; Bourhaleb, F; Coutrakon, G; Donetti, M; Giordanengo, S; Koss, P; Madon, E; Marchetto, F; Nastasi, U; Peroni, C; Santuari, D; Sardo, A; Scielzo, G; Stasi, M; Trevisiol, E

    2004-08-21

    Two detectors for fast two-dimensional (2D) and quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) verification of the dose delivered by radiotherapy beams have been developed at University and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) of Torino. The Magic Cube is a stack of strip-segmented ionization chambers interleaved with water-equivalent slabs. The parallel plate ionization chambers have a sensitive area of 24 x 24 cm2, and consist of 0.375 cm wide and 24 cm long strips. There are a total of 64 strips per chamber. The Magic Cube has been tested with the clinical proton beam at Loma Linda University Medical Centre (LLUMC), and was shown to be capable of fast and precise quasi-3D dose verification. The Pixel Ionization Chamber (PXC) is a detector with pixel anode segmentation. It is a 32 x 32 matrix of 1024 cylindrical ionization cells arranged in a square 24 x 24 cm2 area. Each cell has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height, at a pitch of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent cells. The sensitive volume of each single ionization cell is 0.07 cm3. The detectors are read out using custom designed front-end microelectronics and a personal computer-based data acquisition system. The PXC has been used to verify dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck and breast cancers.

  10. Two-dimensional and quasi-three-dimensional dosimetry of hadron and photon beams with the Magic Cube and the Pixel Ionization Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirio, R.; Garelli, E.; Schulte, R.; Amerio, S.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Coutrakon, G.; Donetti, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Koss, P.; Madon, E.; Marchetto, F.; Nastasi, U.; Peroni, C.; Santuari, D.; Sardo, A.; Scielzo, G.; Stasi, M.; Trevisiol, E.

    2004-08-01

    Two detectors for fast two-dimensional (2D) and quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) verification of the dose delivered by radiotherapy beams have been developed at University and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) of Torino. The Magic Cube is a stack of strip-segmented ionization chambers interleaved with water-equivalent slabs. The parallel plate ionization chambers have a sensitive area of 24 × 24 cm2, and consist of 0.375 cm wide and 24 cm long strips. There are a total of 64 strips per chamber. The Magic Cube has been tested with the clinical proton beam at Loma Linda University Medical Centre (LLUMC), and was shown to be capable of fast and precise quasi-3D dose verification. The Pixel Ionization Chamber (PXC) is a detector with pixel anode segmentation. It is a 32 × 32 matrix of 1024 cylindrical ionization cells arranged in a square 24 × 24 cm2 area. Each cell has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height, at a pitch of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent cells. The sensitive volume of each single ionization cell is 0.07 cm3. The detectors are read out using custom designed front-end microelectronics and a personal computer-based data acquisition system. The PXC has been used to verify dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck and breast cancers.

  11. D-IMRT verification with a 2D pixel ionization chamber: dosimetric and clinical results in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Stasi, M; Giordanengo, S; Cirio, R; Boriano, A; Bourhaleb, F; Cornelius, I; Donetti, M; Garelli, E; Gomola, I; Marchetto, F; Porzio, M; Sanz Freire, C J; Sardo, A; Peroni, C

    2005-10-07

    Dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (D-IMRT) using the sliding-window technique is currently applied for selected treatments of head and neck cancer at Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment of Candiolo (Turin, Italy). In the present work, a PiXel-segmented ionization Chamber (PXC) has been used for the verification of 19 fields used for four different head and neck cancers. The device consists of a 32x32 matrix of 1024 parallel-plate ionization chambers arranged in a square of 24x24 cm2 area. Each chamber has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height; a distance of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent chambers. The sensitive volume of each single ionization chamber is 0.07 cm3. Each of the 1024 independent ionization chambers is read out with a custom microelectronics chip.The output factors in water obtained with the PXC at a depth of 10 cm were compared to other detectors and the maximum difference was 1.9% for field sizes down to 3x3 cm2. Beam profiles for different field dimensions were measured with the PXC and two other types of ionization chambers; the maximum distance to agreement (DTA) in the 20-80% penumbra region of a 3x3 cm2 field was 0.09 cm. The leaf speed of the multileaf collimator was varied between 0.07 and 2 cm s-1 and the detector response was constant to better than 0.6%. The behaviour of the PXC was measured while varying the dose rate between 0.21 and 1.21 Gy min-1; the mean difference was 0.50% and the maximum difference was 0.96%. Using fields obtained with an enhanced dynamic wedge and a staircase-like (step) IMRT field, the PXC has been tested for simple 1D modulated beams; comparison with film gave a maximum DTA of 0.12 cm. The PXC was then used to check four different IMRT plans for head and neck cancer treatment: cervical chordoma, parotid, ethmoid and skull base. In the comparison of the PXC versus film and PXC versus treatment planning system, the number of pixels with gamma parameter

  12. D-IMRT verification with a 2D pixel ionization chamber: dosimetric and clinical results in head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasi, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Cirio, R.; Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cornelius, I.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Gomola, I.; Marchetto, F.; Porzio, M.; Sanz Freire, C. J.; Sardo, A.; Peroni, C.

    2005-10-01

    Dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (D-IMRT) using the sliding-window technique is currently applied for selected treatments of head and neck cancer at Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment of Candiolo (Turin, Italy). In the present work, a PiXel-segmented ionization Chamber (PXC) has been used for the verification of 19 fields used for four different head and neck cancers. The device consists of a 32 × 32 matrix of 1024 parallel-plate ionization chambers arranged in a square of 24 × 24 cm2 area. Each chamber has 0.4 cm diameter and 0.55 cm height; a distance of 0.75 cm separates the centre of adjacent chambers. The sensitive volume of each single ionization chamber is 0.07 cm3. Each of the 1024 independent ionization chambers is read out with a custom microelectronics chip. The output factors in water obtained with the PXC at a depth of 10 cm were compared to other detectors and the maximum difference was 1.9% for field sizes down to 3 × 3 cm2. Beam profiles for different field dimensions were measured with the PXC and two other types of ionization chambers; the maximum distance to agreement (DTA) in the 20-80% penumbra region of a 3 × 3 cm2 field was 0.09 cm. The leaf speed of the multileaf collimator was varied between 0.07 and 2 cm s-1 and the detector response was constant to better than 0.6%. The behaviour of the PXC was measured while varying the dose rate between 0.21 and 1.21 Gy min-1; the mean difference was 0.50% and the maximum difference was 0.96%. Using fields obtained with an enhanced dynamic wedge and a staircase-like (step) IMRT field, the PXC has been tested for simple 1D modulated beams; comparison with film gave a maximum DTA of 0.12 cm. The PXC was then used to check four different IMRT plans for head and neck cancer treatment: cervical chordoma, parotid, ethmoid and skull base. In the comparison of the PXC versus film and PXC versus treatment planning system, the number of pixels with γ parameter <=1 was 97.7% and 97

  13. Time projection chambers for the T2K near detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abgrall, N.; Andrieu, B.; Baron, P.; Bene, P.; Berardi, V.; Beucher, J.; Birney, P.; Blaszczyk, F.; Blondel, A.; Bojechko, C.; Boyer, M.; Cadoux, F.; Calvet, D.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera, A.; Colas, P.; De La Broise, X.; Delagnes, E.; Delbart, A.; Di Marco, M.; Druillole, F.; Dumarchez, J.; Emery, S.; Escudero, L.; Faszer, W.; Ferrere, D.; Ferrero, A.; Fransham, K.; Gaudin, A.; Giganti, C.; Giomataris, I.; Giraud, J.; Goyette, M.; Hamano, K.; Hearty, C.; Henderson, R.; Herlant, S.; Ieva, M.; Jamieson, B.; Jover-Mañas, G.; Karlen, D.; Kato, I.; Konaka, A.; Laihem, K.; Langstaff, R.; Laveder, M.; Le Coguie, A.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Ross, M.; Lenckowski, M.; Lux, T.; Macaire, M.; Mahn, K.; Masciocchi, F.; Mazzucato, E.; Mezzetto, M.; Miller, A.; Mols, J.-Ph.; Monfregola, L.; Monmarthe, E.; Myslik, J.; Nizery, F.; Openshaw, R.; Perrin, E.; Pierre, F.; Pierrepont, D.; Poffenberger, P.; Popov, B.; Radicioni, E.; Ravonel, M.; Reymond, J.-M.; Ritou, J.-L.; Roney, M.; Roth, S.; Sánchez, F.; Sarrat, A.; Schroeter, R.; Stahl, A.; Stamoulis, P.; Steinmann, J.; Terhorst, D.; Terront, D.; Tvaskis, V.; Usseglio, M.; Vallereau, A.; Vasseur, G.; Wendland, J.; Wikström, G.; Zito, M.

    2011-05-01

    The T2K experiment is designed to study neutrino oscillation properties by directing a high intensity neutrino beam produced at J-PARC in Tokai, Japan, towards the large Super-Kamiokande detector located 295 km away, in Kamioka, Japan. The experiment includes a sophisticated near detector complex, 280 m downstream of the neutrino production target in order to measure the properties of the neutrino beam and to better understand neutrino interactions at the energy scale below a few GeV. A key element of the near detectors is the ND280 tracker, consisting of two active scintillator-bar target systems surrounded by three large time projection chambers (TPCs) for charged particle tracking. The data collected with the tracker are used to study charged current neutrino interaction rates and kinematics prior to oscillation, in order to reduce uncertainties in the oscillation measurements by the far detector. The tracker is surrounded by the former UA1/NOMAD dipole magnet and the TPCs measure the charges, momenta, and particle types of charged particles passing through them. Novel features of the TPC design include its rectangular box layout constructed from composite panels, the use of bulk micromegas detectors for gas amplification, electronics readout based on a new ASIC, and a photoelectron calibration system. This paper describes the design and construction of the TPCs, the micromegas modules, the readout electronics, the gas handling system, and shows the performance of the TPCs as deduced from measurements with particle beams, cosmic rays, and the calibration system.

  14. Diamond detector versus silicon diode and ion chamber in photon beams of different energy and field size.

    PubMed

    Bucciolini, M; Buonamici, F Banci; Mazzocchi, S; De Angelis, C; Onori, S; Cirrone, G A P

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this work was to test the suitability of a PTW diamond detector for nonreference condition dosimetry in photon beams of different energy (6 and 25 MV) and field size (from 2.6 cm x 2.6 cm to 10 cm x 10 cm). Diamond behavior was compared to that of a Scanditronix p-type silicon diode and a Scanditronix RK ionization chamber. Measurements included output factors (OF). percentage depth doses (PDD) and dose profiles. OFs measured with diamond detector agreed within 1% with those measured with diode and RK chamber. Only at 25 MV, for the smallest field size, RK chamber underestimated OFs due to averaging effects in a pointed shaped beam profile. Agreement was found between PDDs measured with diamond detector and RK chamber for both 6 MV and 25 MV photons and down to 5 cm x 5 cm field size. For the 2.6 cm x 2.6 cm field size, at 25 MV, RK chamber underestimated doses at shallow depth and the difference progressively went to zero in the distal region. PDD curves measured with silicon diode and diamond detector agreed well for the 25 MV beam at all the field sizes. Conversely, the nontissue equivalence of silicon led, for the 6 MV beam, to a slight overestimation of the diode doses in the distal region, at all the field sizes. Penumbra and field width measurements gave values in agreement for all the detectors but with a systematic overestimate by RK measurements. The results obtained confirm that ion chamber is not a suitable detector when high spatial resolution is required. On the other hand, the small differences in the studied parameters, between diamond and silicon systems, do not lead to a significant advantage in the use of diamond detector for routine clinical dosimetry.

  15. [Absorbed dose measurement of photon beam with Farmer-type ionization chambers in Japanese dosimetry protocols].

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Hiraoka, Takeshi; Osawa, Atsushi; Nakajima, Masaru; Kuwabara, Akio; Yokoyama, Koichi; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Tomaru, Teizo; Inada, Tetsuo

    2004-01-01

    The Japan Society of Medical Physics (JSMP) has published a new dosimetry protocol "JSMP-01" (standard dosimetry of absorbed dose in external beam radiotherapy) which conforms to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA TRS-398) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM TG-51) protocols for the calibration of radiotherapy beams. Since the new protocol offers the physical data for the Famer-type ionization chambers of the various wall materials, the user can measure the absorbed dose at reference point (D(r)) using most of the commercially available Famer-type ionization chambers. In this paper, the six Famer-type ionization chambers of the various wall materials are examined for photon beam by two ways. To verify the JSMP-01 protocol as the first way, D(r) was cross-measured based on the JSMP-01 protocol using a Farmer-type ionization chamber of the acrylic wall material which is called "JARP-chamber" and the Farmer-type ionization chambers of the various wall materials, and compared. To compare the basic data in previous and new protocols as the second way, D(r) was measured based on the previous protocol (JSMP-86) and the JSMP-01 protocol using the Farmer-type ionization chambers of the various wall materials. Dose calculation was made using common exposure calibration factor for (60)Co gamma-rays (Nc) for each of the Farmer-type ionization chambers. Measurement was made with each ionization chamber for 6 and 10 MV photon beams in two facilities. D(r) were found to agree to that of JARP-chamber within about +/- 1% despite significant differences of ratio of calibration factor (k(D,X)) and beam quality conversion factor (k(Q)) for photon beams. The ratios JSMP-01/JSMP-86 of the reference dose were found to lie on between 0.999 and 1.004 for 6 MV and on between 0.999 and 1.005 for 10 MV depending upon the Farmer-type ionization chambers used. The largest discrepancies between the previous and new protocols arise from

  16. Use of a novel two-dimensional ionization chamber array for pencil beam scanning proton therapy beam quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D; Mertens, Thierry; Baeumer, Christian; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2015-05-08

    The need to accurately and efficiently verify both output and dose profiles creates significant challenges in quality assurance of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton delivery. A system for PBS QA has been developed that combines a new two-dimensional ionization chamber array in a waterproof housing that is scanned in a water phantom. The MatriXX PT has the same detector array arrangement as the standard MatriXX(Evolution) but utilizes a smaller 2 mm plate spacing instead of 5mm. Because the bias voltage of the MatriXX PT and Evolution cannot be changed, PPC40 and FC65-G ionization chambers were used to assess recombination effects. The PPC40 is a parallel plate chamber with an electrode spacing of 2mm, while the FC65-G is a Farmer chamber FC65-G with an electrode spacing of 2.8 mm. Three bias voltages (500, 200, and 100 V) were used for both detectors to determine which radiation type (continuous, pulse or pulse-scanned beam) could closely estimate Pion from the ratios of charges collected. In comparison with the MatriXX(Evolution), a significant improvement in measurement of absolute dose with the MatriXX PT was observed. While dose uncertainty of the MatriXX(Evolution) can be up to 4%, it is < 1% for the MatriXX PT. Therefore the MatriXX(Evolution) should not be used for QA of PBS for conditions in which ion recombination is not negligible. Farmer chambers should be used with caution for measuring the absolute dose of PBS beams, as the uncertainty of Pion can be > 1%; chambers with an electrode spacing of 2 mm or smaller are recommended.

  17. Use of a novel two-dimensional ionization chamber array for pencil beam scanning proton therapy beam quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liyong; Kang, Minglei; Solberg, Timothy D; Mertens, Thierry; Baumer, Christian; Ainsley, Christopher G; McDonough, James E

    2015-05-01

    The need to accurately and efficiently verify both output and dose profiles creates significant challenges in quality assurance of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton delivery. A system for PBS QA has been developed that combines a new two-dimensional ionization chamber array in a waterproof housing that is scanned in a water phantom. The MatriXX PT has the same detector array arrangement as the standard MatriXXEvolution but utilizes a smaller 2 mm plate spacing instead of 5 mm. Because the bias voltage of the MatriXX PT and Evolution cannot be changed, PPC40 and FC65-G ionization chambers were used to assess recombination effects. The PPC40 is a parallel plate chamber with an electrode spacing of 2 mm, while the FC65-G is a Farmer chamber FC65-G with an electrode spacing of 2.8 mm. Three bias voltages (500, 200, and 100 V) were used for both detectors to determine which radiation type (continuous, pulse or pulse-scanned beam) could closely estimate Pion from the ratios of charges collected. In comparison with the MatriXXEvolution, a significant improvement in measurement of absolute dose with the MatriXX PT was observed. While dose uncertainty of the MatriXXEvolution can be up to 4%, it is <1% for the MatriXX PT. Therefore the MatriXXEvolution should not be used for QA of PBS for conditions in which ion recombination is not negligible. Farmer chambers should be used with caution for measuring the absolute dose of PBS beams, as the uncertainty of Pion can be <1%; chambers with an electrode spacing of 2 mm or smaller are recommended. PACS number: 87.53.Qc.

  18. Experimental and Monte Carlo evaluation of an ionization chamber in a 60Co beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perini, A. P.; Neves, L. P.; Santos, W. S.; Caldas, L. V. E.

    2016-07-01

    Recently a special parallel-plate ionization chamber was developed and characterized at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. The operational tests presented results within the recommended limits. In order to determine the influence of some components of the ionization chamber on its response, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out. The experimental and simulation results pointed out that the dosimeter evaluated in the present work has favorable properties to be applied to 60Co dosimetry at calibration laboratories.

  19. Construction of an ionization chamber for the measurement of dose of low energy x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Y. B. Alcantara; Jimenez, F. J. Ramirez

    2008-08-11

    We designed and constructed the prototype of an ionization chamber to measure the dose of an X-ray tube with Molybdenum anode. This X-ray tube is located in the Physics department at CINVESTAV and is used for medical physics purposes in the imaging area. The ionization chamber is designed to measure doses on biological samples exposed to X-rays and will be applied in radiation protection studies.

  20. Pencil beam proton radiography using a multilayer ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farace, Paolo; Righetto, Roberto; Meijers, Arturs

    2016-06-01

    A pencil beam proton radiography (PR) method, using a commercial multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) integrated with a treatment planning system (TPS) was developed. A Giraffe (IBA Dosimetry) MLIC (±0.5 mm accuracy) was used to obtain pencil beam PR by delivering spots uniformly positioned at a 5.0 mm distance in a 9  ×  9 square of spots. PRs of an electron-density (with tissue-equivalent inserts) phantom and a head phantom were acquired. The integral depth dose (IDD) curves of the delivered spots were computed by the TPS in a volume of water simulating the MLIC, and virtually added to the CT at the exit side of the phantoms. For each spot, measured and calculated IDD were overlapped in order to compute a map of range errors. On the head-phantom, the maximum dose from PR acquisition was estimated. Additionally, on the head phantom the impact on the range errors map was estimated in case of a 1 mm position misalignment. In the electron-density phantom, range errors were within 1 mm in the soft-tissue rods, but greater in the dense-rod. In the head-phantom the range errors were  -0.9  ±  2.7 mm on the whole map and within 1 mm in the brain area. On both phantoms greater errors were observed at inhomogeneity interfaces, due to sensitivity to small misalignment, and inaccurate TPS dose computation. The effect of the 1 mm misalignment was clearly visible on the range error map and produced an increased spread of range errors (-1.0  ±  3.8 mm on the whole map). The dose to the patient for such PR acquisitions would be acceptable as the maximum dose to the head phantom was  <2cGyE. By the described 2D method, allowing to discriminate misalignments, range verification can be performed in selected areas to implement an in vivo quality assurance program.

  1. Performances of a VLSI wide dynamic range current-to-frequency converter for strip ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonazzola, G. C.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Marchetto, F.; Mazza, G.; Peroni, C.; Zampieri, A.

    1998-02-01

    In this paper we report on the design and test of a 14-channel VLSI chip to perform the current to frequency conversion for parallel plate strip ionization chambers. The chambers measure the intensity and the geometrical characteristics of a therapeutical beam.

  2. A pixel ionization chamber used as beam monitor at the Institut Curie—Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay (CPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, A.; Garella, M. A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, F.; Meyroneinc, S.; Peroni, C.; Pittà, G.

    2006-09-01

    The Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale and the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Torino, in collaboration with the Institut Curie—Centre de Protontherapie de Orsay (CPO), have developed and built a pixel parallel plate ionization chamber to be used as monitor for the proton therapy beam line at the Institut Curie—CPO (Orsay, France). The sensitive area of the detector is (160×160) mm 2, with the anode segmented in 1024 square pixels arranged in a 32×32 matrix; the area of each pixel is (5×5) mm 2. The detector has been placed on the beam line just upstream of the last collimator to monitor the beam shape and to measure the stability and reproducibility of the delivery system. In this paper, we present a detailed description of the detector and the results of a set of preliminary tests.

  3. 40 CFR 1065.260 - Flame-ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flame-ionization detector. 1065.260 Section 1065.260 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon Measurements § 1065.260...

  4. The PRIME Lab gas ionization detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knies, David L.; Elmore, David

    1994-06-01

    A gas ionization detection system was built for optimal identification of AMS radionuclides, in particular 10Be and 36Cl. For 36Cl, a combination of 1) the difference in arrival times for electrons at two anode plates and 2) a novel split anode plate has led to a reduction in misidentified 36S. A peak-stabilizing routine incorporated in the data acquisition system has allowed us to run at higher counting rates. Changing to propane gas has reduced random signal amplitude shifts.

  5. Preliminary results with a strip ionization chamber used as beam monitor for hadrontherapy treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Luparia, A.; Marchette, F.; Peroni, C.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M. G.; Valastro, L.

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test of a parallel plate ionization chamber with the anode segmented in strips (MOPI) to be used as a beam monitor for therapeutical treatments on the 62 MeV proton beam line of the INFN-LNS Superconducting Cyclotron. Ocular pathologies have been treated at the Catana facility since March 2002. The detector, placed downstream of the patient collimator, will allow the measurement of the relevant beam diagnostic parameters during treatment such as integrated beam fluence, for dose determination; the beam baricentre, width and asymmetry will be obtained from the fluence profile sampled with a resolution of about 100 Urn at a rate up to 1 kHz with no dead time. In this test, carried out at LNS, the detector has been exposed to different beam shapes and the integrated fluence derived by the measured beam profiles has been compared with that obtained with other dosimeters normally used for treatment. The skewness of the beam profile has been measured and shown to be suitable to on-line check variations of the beam shape.

  6. Correlates of reported smoke detector usage in an inner-city population: participants in a smoke detector give-away program.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, K N; McCormick, M C; Kustra, S L; Ruddy, R M; Casey, R D

    1988-01-01

    As part of a smoke detector give-away program, 388 adults were surveyed to characterize smoke detector ownership in a low-income population and to identify those who would acquire a free smoke detector following their child's visit to the hospital. Factors associated with smoke detector ownership included higher education, home ownership (vs public housing), knowledge of the city smoke detector law, and the practice of other injury prevention measures. Regardless of ownership, the great majority of parents (82 per cent) acquired a free smoke detector, but those previously without a smoke detector were more likely to do so. These characteristics of smoke detector usage and acquisition should be considered in targeting future intervention strategies. PMID:3369594

  7. Effect of recombination in a high quantum efficiency prototype ionization-chamber-based electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Gopal, A; Samant, S S

    2007-08-01

    The quantum efficiency (QE) of an imaging detector can be increased by utilizing a thick, high-density detection medium to increase the number of quantum interactions. However, image quality is more accurately described by the detection quantum efficiency (DQE). If a significant fraction of the increase in the number of detected quanta from a thick, dense detector were to result in useful imaging signal, this represents a favorable case where enhanced QE leads to increased DQE. However, for ionization-type detectors, one factor that limits DQE is the recombination between ion pairs that acts as a secondary quantum sink due to which enhancement in QE may not result in higher DQE depending on the extent of the signal loss from recombination. Therefore, an analysis of signal loss mechanisms or quantum sinks in an imaging system is essential for validating the overall benefit of high QE detectors. In this paper, a study of ion recombination as a secondary quantum sink is presented for a high QE prototype ion-chamber-based electronic portal imaging device (EPID): the kinestatic charge detector (KCD). The KCD utilizes a high pressure noble gas (krypton or xenon at 100 atm) and an arbitrarily large detector thickness (of the order of centimeters), resulting in a high QE imager. Compared with commercial amorphous silicon flat panel imagers that provide DQE(0) approximately 0.01, the KCD has much higher DQE. Studies indicated that DQE(0) = 0.20 for 6.1 cm thick, 100 atm (rho = 3.4 g/cm3) xenon chamber, and DQE(0)=0.34 for a 9.1 cm thick chamber. A series of experiments was devised and conducted to determine the signal loss due to recombination for a KCD chamber. The measurements indicated a fractional recombination loss of about 14% for a krypton chamber and about 18% for a xenon chamber under standard operating conditions (100 atm chamber pressure and 1275 V/cm electric field intensity). A theoretical treatment of the effect of recombination on imaging signal

  8. Quantitative ionization chamber alignment to a water surface: Performance of multiple chambers.

    PubMed

    Ververs, James D; McEwen, Malcolm R; Siebers, Jeffrey V

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to experimentally examine the reliability of the gradient chamber alignment point (gCAP) determination method for accurately identifying water surface location with a range of ionization chambers (ICs). Twelve cylindrical ICs were scanned from depth through a water surface into air using a customized high-accuracy scanning system which allows for accurate alignment of the IC with respect to the true water surface. Thirteen other cylindrical ICs and five parallel-plate ICs were scanned using a standard commercially available scanning system. The thirty different ICs used in this study represent 22 different IC models. Measurements were taken with different radiation field parameters such as incident photon beam energies and field sizes. The effects of scan direction and water surface tension were also investigated. The depth at which the gradient of the relative ionization was maximized and discontinuous, the gCAP, was found for each curve. Each measured gCAP depth was compared with the theoretically expected gCAP location, the depth at which the submerged IC outer radius (OR) coincides with the water surface. When scanning an IC from in water to air, the only parameter that affects the gCAP location is the IC OR. The gCAP location corresponds with the IC central axis positioned at a depth equal to the IC OR within the 0.1 mm measurement scan resolution for all eighteen ICs studied with the commercially available system. Using the customized scanning system, all but three ICs were identified exhibiting a gCAP within the scan resolution, with the other three within 0.25 mm of the expected location. This discrepancy was not observed in the same IC model when using the conventional scanning system. Altering the beam energy from 6 to 25 MV did not alter the gCAP location, nor did variations in the radiation field size or scan parameters. In-air IC response is proportional to the IC wall thickness. The water-to-air scanning method coupled

  9. Consistency in quality correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in scanned proton beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Sorriaux, Jefferson; Testa, Mauro; Paganetti, Harald; Bertrand, Damien; Lee, John Aldo; Palmans, Hugo; Vynckier, Stefaan; Sterpin, Edmond

    2017-09-01

    The IAEA TRS-398 code of practice details the reference conditions for reference dosimetry of proton beams using ionization chambers and the required beam quality correction factors (kQ ). Pencil beam scanning (PBS) systems cannot approximate reference conditions using a single spot. However, dose distributions requested in TRS-398 can be reproduced with PBS using a combination of spots. This study aims to demonstrate, using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, that kQ factors computed/measured for broad beams can be used with scanned beams for similar reference dose distributions with no additional significant uncertainty. We consider the Alfonso formalism(13) usually employed for nonstandard photon beams. To approach reference conditions similar as IAEA TRS-398 and the associated dose distributions, PBS must combine many pencil beams with range or energy modulation and shaping techniques that differ from those used in passive systems (broad beams). In order to evaluate the impact of these differences on kQ factors, ionization chamber responses are computed with MC (Geant4 9.6) in three different proton beams, with their corresponding quality factors (Q), producing a 10 × 10 cm(2) field with a flat dose distribution for (a) a dedicated scanned pencil beam (Qpbs ), (b) a hypothetical proton source (Qhyp ), and (c) a double-scattering beam (Qds ). The tested ionization chamber cavities are a 2 × 2 × 0.2 mm³ air cavity, a Roos-type ionization chamber, and a Farmer-type ionization chamber. Ranges of Qpbs , Qhyp , and Qds are consistent within 0.4 mm. Flatnesses of dose distributions are better than 0.5%. Calculated kQpbs,Qhypfpbs,fref is 0.999 ± 0.002 for the air cavity and the Farmer-type ionization chamber and 1.001 ± 0.002 for the Roos-type ionization chamber. The quality correction factors kQpbs,Qdsfpbs,fref is 0.999 ± 0.002 for the Farmer-type and Roos-type ionization chambers and 1.001 ± 0.001 for the Roos-type ionization chamber. The Alfonso formalism was

  10. Particle identification in a LKr ionization chamber by multiple induced current measurements using the shape analysis of the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaferia, R.; Lanni, F.; Maggi, B.; Palombo, F.; Sala, A.; Cantoni, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Stagni, L.

    1996-01-01

    Charged particle (π/K) separation in the momentum range 0.5-0.7 GeV/c using a new method of shape analysis of the signal from a liquid krypton ionization chamber has been studied experimentally. The detector has been exposed to pions and protons at the T11 test beam at CERN PS. The shape of preamplifier output signal has been recorded by a waveform digitizer and differentiated to obtain multiple measurements of induced current inside a 2 cm gap. Results on particle separation are presented and compared with a Monte Carlo simulation.

  11. Particle identification in a LKr ionization chamber by multiple induced current measurements using the shape analysis of the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantoni, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Stagni, L.; Diaferia, R.; Lanni, F.; Maggi, B.; Palombo, F.; Sala, A.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.

    1995-02-01

    Charged particle ( {π}/{K}) separation in the momentum range 0.5-0.7 GeV/ c using a new method of shape analysis of the signal from a liquid krypton ionization chamber has been studied experimentally. The detector has been exposed to the T11 test beam at CERN PS. The shape of the preamplifier output signal has been recorded by a waveform digitizer and differentiated to obtain multiple measurements of induced current inside a 2 cm gap. Results on particle separation are presented.

  12. Investigation of the initial and volume recombination losses in gamma versatile cylindrical ionization chamber VGIC developed for gamma ray dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Fares, M.; Mameri, S.; Abdlani, I.; Negara, K.

    2015-07-01

    A versatile Gamma ionization chambers are used for flow control in systems with gamma nuclear reactors and reprocessing plants in and monitoring atmosphere around these facilities, this in order to protect staff. In the Laboratory Detection and Measures (LDM) Division for Study and Development of Nuclear Instrumentation (DSDNI) of CRNB, we designed, developed and characterized a versatile gamma ionization chamber (VGIC) to study experimentally its characteristics according to the geometry of the electrodes, the volume and pressure of the filler gas for the design of a gamma sealed chamber. The tests were conducted under the IEC (International Electro-technical Commission). In this paper, we present the results obtained in the various nuclear tests for characterization and calibration that we have made on the ionization chamber gamma VGIC prototype developed at our Department. To do this, three irradiators were operated at the Laboratory Calibration (SSDL) of the Department of Medical Physics Nuclear Research Center of Algiers (CRNA). Irradiator intensive gamma ({sup 60}Co: 1.25 MeV), one medium intensity gamma ({sup 137}Cs: 0.662 MeV) and 3rd low intensity ({sup 60}Co). Saturation curves and linearity were identified and the operating range and the sensitivity of the chamber have been deducted. The (I,V) characteristics of the chamber filled, with argon gas at 3 bar (0.3 M pa) pressure, for gamma ray irradiator sources were studied. To do so, the chamber was irradiated with gamma rays using different numbers of gamma sources (i.e. Up to 5). The plateau region is reached above 200 V and the detector operating voltage is found to be 600 V. It is observed that in the plateau region the slope is constant with an increase in the exposure rate. The (1/I, 1/V) and (I, l/V{sup 2}) characteristic curves reveal the presence of the initial and volume recombination losses. The volume recombination losses are found to be smaller than the initial recombination losses. Finally

  13. A new parallel-plate graphite ionization chamber as a 60Co gamma radiation reference instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P.; Fernández-Varea, José M.; Cassola, Vagner F.; Kramer, Richard; Khoury, Helen J.; Caldas, Linda V. E.

    2014-02-01

    The calibration procedure in radiotherapy treatments is very important and a sensitive task due to the high doses delivered to the patients. Generally, the air-kerma cavity standards for 60Co gamma rays are graphite cavity ionization chambers. In this work a new parallel-plate graphite ionization chamber was studied to analyze its potential use as a reference instrument. In order to evaluate its performance in 60Co beams, it was submitted to several characterization tests. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations were undertaken using the EGSnrc code to study the influence of the chamber components on its response. The results obtained showed that this new ionization chamber presented a satisfactory performance in all evaluated tests.

  14. Quantitative determination of smoke and toxic product potential of materials with the AMINCO (registered) NBS smoke density chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, S.

    1975-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of smoke obscuration produced by standard area samples under high energy pyrolysis both with and without an ignition source, using a collimated vertical light beam in conjunction with an ultra-linear photomultiplier microphotometer are obtainable with the smoke density chamber. Results are expressed in dimensionless specific optical density permitting usage calculations in accordance with a geometric relationship.

  15. Polarity and ion recombination corrections in continuous and pulsed beams for ionization chambers with high Z chamber walls.

    PubMed

    Aldosary, Ghada; Safigholi, Habib; Song, William; Seuntjens, Jan; Sarfehnia, Arman

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the response of Farmer-type ionization chambers fitted with high atomic number (Z) walls is studied, and results of the effects of such walls on polarity and ion recombination correction factors in both continuous and pulsed beams are presented. Measurements were made in a continuous Co-60 beam and a pulsed 6MV linac beam using an Exradin-A12 ionization chamber fitted with the manufacturer's C-552 plastic wall, as well as geometrically identical walls made from aluminum, copper and molybdenum. The bias voltage was changed between 10values (range: +50 to +560V). Ion recombination was determined from Jaffé plots and by using the "two-voltage technique". The saturation charge measured with each chamber wall was extrapolated from Jaffé plots. Additionally, the effect of different wall materials on chamber response was studied using MCNP simulations. Results showed that the polarity correction factor is not significantly affected by changes in chamber wall material (within 0.1%). Furthermore, although the saturation charges greatly vary with each chamber wall material, and charge multiplication increases for higher atomic number wall materials, the standard methods of calculating ion recombination yielded results that differed by only 0.2%. Therefore, polarity and ion recombination correction factors are not greatly affected by the chamber wall material. The experimental saturation charges for all the different wall materials agreed well within the uncertainty with MCNP simulations. The breakdown of the linear relationship in Jaffé plots that was previously reported to exist for conventional chamber walls was also observed with the different wall materials. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Variable pressure ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Michelle V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus for differentiating organic compounds based on their electron affinity. An electron capture detector cell (ECD) is operated at pressures ranging from atmospheric to less than 1 torr. Through variation of the pressure within the ECD cell, the organic compounds are induced to either capture or emit electrons. Differentiation of isomeric compounds can be obtianed when, at a given pressure, one isomer is in the emission mode and the other is in the capture mode. Output of the ECD is recorded by chromatogram. The invention also includes a method for obtaining the zero-crossing pressure of a compound, defined as the pressure at which the competing emission and capture reactions are balanced and which may be correlated to the electron affinity of a compound.

  17. Time-resolved dosimetry using a pinpoint ionization chamber as quality assurance for IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Louwe, Robert J. W. Satherley, Thomas; Day, Rebecca A.; Greig, Lynne; Wendling, Markus; Monshouwer, René

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a method to verify the dose delivery in relation to the individual control points of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using an ionization chamber. In addition to more effective problem solving during patient-specific quality assurance (QA), the aim is to eventually map out the limitations in the treatment chain and enable a targeted improvement of the treatment technique in an efficient way. Methods: Pretreatment verification was carried out for 255 treatment plans that included a broad range of treatment indications in two departments using the equipment of different vendors. In-house developed software was used to enable calculation of the dose delivery for the individual beamlets in the treatment planning system (TPS), for data acquisition, and for analysis of the data. The observed deviations were related to various delivery and measurement parameters such as gantry angle, field size, and the position of the detector with respect to the field edge to distinguish between error sources. Results: The average deviation of the integral fraction dose during pretreatment verification of the planning target volume dose was −2.1% ± 2.2% (1 SD), −1.7% ± 1.7% (1 SD), and 0.0% ± 1.3% (1 SD) for IMRT at the Radboud University Medical Center (RUMC), VMAT (RUMC), and VMAT at the Wellington Blood and Cancer Centre, respectively. Verification of the dose to organs at risk gave very similar results but was generally subject to a larger measurement uncertainty due to the position of the detector at a high dose gradient. The observed deviations could be related to limitations of the TPS beam models, attenuation of the treatment couch, as well as measurement errors. The apparent systematic error of about −2% in the average deviation of the integral fraction dose in the RUMC results could be explained by the limitations of the TPS beam model in the calculation of the beam penumbra. Conclusions: This

  18. Miniature metastable ionization detectors for exobiology flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    The Metastable Ionization Detector (MID) is three orders of magnitude more sensitive than the thermal conductivity detectors used on previous flight instruments. The miniature MID provides scientists with a much smaller and highly sensitive detector for flight gas chromatographs. A miniature MID featuring an unconventional triaxial electrode configuration was developed and used routinely in the laboratory. Although much smaller and lighter than the commercial MID, its performance characteristics parallel those of the traditional design. The detector is compatible with the modulated voltage circuitry, also developed here, and thus can perform over an expanded response range of more than 7 orders magnitude. A micro volume version of a miniature MID, with an internal volume of less than 8 microliter, was recently designed is now being tested. The micro volume MID uses carrier gas flow rates of approx. 2cc/min thus eliminating the need for makeup gas when capillary columns are used.

  19. Theoretical study of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhilin; Peng, Shuming; Meng, Dan; He, Yuehong; Wang, Heyi

    2013-10-15

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers has been theoretically studied for tritium measurements in gaseous form. A one-dimension model is introduced to establish the quantitative relationship between energy deposition rate and many factors, including carrier gas, gas pressure, wall material, chamber size, and gas temperature. Energy deposition rate has been calculated at pressure varying from 5 kPa to 500 kPa based on some approximations. It is found that energy deposition rate varies greatly for different parameters, especially at low gas pressure. For the same chamber, energy deposition rate in argon is much higher than in deuterium, as much as 70.7% higher at 5 kPa. Gold plated chamber gives highest energy deposition rate in the calculations while aluminum chamber results in the lowest. As chamber size gets smaller, β ray emitted by tritium will deposit less energy in the sensitive region of the chamber. For chambers flowing through with the same gas, energy deposition rate in a 10 L chamber is 23.9% higher than in a 0.05 L chamber at 5 kPa. Gas temperature also places slight influence on energy deposition rate, and 373 K will lead to 6.7% lower deposition rate than 233 K at 5 kPa. In addition, experiments have been performed to obtain energy deposition rate in a gold plated chamber, which show good accordance with theoretical calculations.

  20. Theoretical study of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilin; Peng, Shuming; Meng, Dan; He, Yuehong; Wang, Heyi

    2013-10-01

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers has been theoretically studied for tritium measurements in gaseous form. A one-dimension model is introduced to establish the quantitative relationship between energy deposition rate and many factors, including carrier gas, gas pressure, wall material, chamber size, and gas temperature. Energy deposition rate has been calculated at pressure varying from 5 kPa to 500 kPa based on some approximations. It is found that energy deposition rate varies greatly for different parameters, especially at low gas pressure. For the same chamber, energy deposition rate in argon is much higher than in deuterium, as much as 70.7% higher at 5 kPa. Gold plated chamber gives highest energy deposition rate in the calculations while aluminum chamber results in the lowest. As chamber size gets smaller, β ray emitted by tritium will deposit less energy in the sensitive region of the chamber. For chambers flowing through with the same gas, energy deposition rate in a 10 L chamber is 23.9% higher than in a 0.05 L chamber at 5 kPa. Gas temperature also places slight influence on energy deposition rate, and 373 K will lead to 6.7% lower deposition rate than 233 K at 5 kPa. In addition, experiments have been performed to obtain energy deposition rate in a gold plated chamber, which show good accordance with theoretical calculations.

  1. Current saturation in free-air ionization chambers with chopped synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2013-01-01

    Saturation curves for free-air ionization chambers with electrode gap widths of 4.2, 8.4 and 18 mm were obtained for 10 and 15 keV undulator synchrotron radiation thinned with a 230 Hz rotating-disk chopper. Ion recombination in free-air ionization chambers was found to be inversely proportional to the applied electric field, and an expression that satisfactorily reproduced the ion-recombination rate is determined. A comparison of the expressions for continuous and pulsed X-rays revealed that chopped high-intensity X-rays require a higher voltage to attain saturation when the product of the pulse width and electric field exceeds a value that depends on the X-ray energy. This behaviour was observed explicitly for 10 keV X-rays in measurements with the ionization chamber placed before and after the chopper. PMID:23955032

  2. ``24/36/48`` Cathode Strip Chamber layout for SSC GEM Detector muon subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Belser, F.C.; Clements, J.W.; Horvath, J.A.

    1993-12-15

    The ``48/48/48`` {phi}-segmentation design for the Cathode Strip Chambers in the GEM Detector produces a number of coverage ``gaps`` in {phi} and {theta}. A revised ``24/36/48`` {phi}-segmentation layout provides increased geometric coverage and a significant reduction in the number of chambers in the detector. This will increase physics performance while reducing the labor costs associated with building and installing chambers in the GEM Detector. This paper documents the physical layout of the proposed change to the baseline chamber arrangement.

  3. Detecting MLC errors in stereotactic radiotherapy plans with a liquid filled ionization chamber array.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Patrick; Seshadri, Venkatakrisnan; Charles, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Quality assurance of stereotactic radiotherapy demands the use of equipment with the highest resolution and sensitivity available. This study examines the sensitivity of a commercially available liquid-filled ionization chamber array--the Octavius 1000 SRS (PTW, Frieburg, Germany) for detecting small (sub-millimetre) multi-leaf collimator (MLC) alignment errors in static square fields (side length 16-40 mm). Furthermore, the effectiveness of detecting small MLC errors in clinical stereotactic radiotherapy patient plans using the device was also evaluated. The commonly used gamma pass rate metric (of the measurements compared with treatment planning system generated results) was used. The gamma pass rates were then evaluated as a function of MLC position error (MLC error size 0.1-2.5 mm). The detector array exhibited a drop in pass rate between plans without error and those which had MLC errors induced. For example a drop in pass rate of 4.5% (gamma criteria 3%, 1 mm) was observed when a 0.8 mm error was introduced into a 16 mm square field. Furthermore the drop in pass rate increased as the MLC position error increased. This study showed that the Octavius 1000 SRS array could be a useful tool for applications requiring the detection of small geometric delivery uncertainties.

  4. An improved leakage current compensation technique for a 4πγ ionization chamber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Y.; Kawada, Y.; Nazaroh

    1996-02-01

    A current integration method using a small capacitor is most commonly employed for precise measurements of small currents from 4πγ ionization chambers for the secondary standardization of radionuclides. An improved technique has been developed for eliminating the possible effect due to the electrical leakage and/or current loss across the feedback capacitor used in the integration of the ionization current. This method is based upon charge integration from a fixed negative level of potential to nearly the same level of positive potential via the zero point. The validity of this method is demonstrated for some typical applications of 4πγ ionization chamber systems. This technique can contribute to the improvement of accuracy and to the extension of the intensity range of radioactive source in 4πγ ionization measurement.

  5. In-mine evaluation of smoke detectors. Information Circular/1992

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, G.S.; Litton, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    The report presents the results of an evaluation of smoke detectors placed in conveyor belt entries of underground coal mines. The selected mines are located in six different Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) Coal Mine Safety and Health districts; are operated by seven different companies; and use atmospheric monitoring systems from seven different manufacturers. Principal concerns are early detection and warning of fires, reliability of operation, frequency of maintenance, and adaptability of detectors to monitoring systems and the mining environment. The data contained in the report provides for some comparisons between smoke detectors and carbon monoxide (CO) sensors, specifically in the areas of early detection of fires and nuisance alarms due to diesel exhaust contaminants. Finally, recommendations are presented that discuss performance standards, sensitivity tests, detector classification, and maintenance.

  6. Extraction of depth-dependent perturbation factors for parallel-plate chambers in electron beams using a plastic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lacroix, Frederic; Guillot, Mathieu; McEwen, Malcolm; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Gingras, Luc; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: This work presents the experimental extraction of the overall perturbation factor P{sub Q} in megavoltage electron beams for NACP-02 and Roos parallel-plate ionization chambers using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The authors used a single scanning PSD mounted on a high-precision scanning tank to measure depth-dose curves in 6, 12, and 18 MeV clinical electron beams. The authors also measured depth-dose curves using the NACP-02 and PTW Roos chambers. Results: The authors found that the perturbation factors for the NACP-02 and Roos chambers increased substantially with depth, especially for low-energy electron beams. The experimental results were in good agreement with the results of Monte Carlo simulations reported by other investigators. The authors also found that using an effective point of measurement (EPOM) placed inside the air cavity reduced the variation of perturbation factors with depth and that the optimal EPOM appears to be energy dependent. Conclusions: A PSD can be used to experimentally extract perturbation factors for ionization chambers. The dosimetry protocol recommendations indicating that the point of measurement be placed on the inside face of the front window appear to be incorrect for parallel-plate chambers and result in errors in the R{sub 50} of approximately 0.4 mm at 6 MeV, 1.0 mm at 12 MeV, and 1.2 mm at 18 MeV.

  7. Extraction of depth-dependent perturbation factors for parallel-plate chambers in electron beams using a plastic scintillation detector

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Frédéric; Guillot, Mathieu; McEwen, Malcolm; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Gingras, Luc; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This work presents the experimental extraction of the overall perturbation factor PQ in megavoltage electron beams for NACP-02 and Roos parallel-plate ionization chambers using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The authors used a single scanning PSD mounted on a high-precision scanning tank to measure depth-dose curves in 6, 12, and 18 MeV clinical electron beams. The authors also measured depth-dose curves using the NACP-02 and PTW Roos chambers. Results: The authors found that the perturbation factors for the NACP-02 and Roos chambers increased substantially with depth, especially for low-energy electron beams. The experimental results were in good agreement with the results of Monte Carlo simulations reported by other investigators. The authors also found that using an effective point of measurement (EPOM) placed inside the air cavity reduced the variation of perturbation factors with depth and that the optimal EPOM appears to be energy dependent. Conclusions: A PSD can be used to experimentally extract perturbation factors for ionization chambers. The dosimetry protocol recommendations indicating that the point of measurement be placed on the inside face of the front window appear to be incorrect for parallel-plate chambers and result in errors in the R50 of approximately 0.4 mm at 6 MeV, 1.0 mm at 12 MeV, and 1.2 mm at 18 MeV. PMID:20879593

  8. Update of NIST half-life results corrected for ionization chamber source-holder instability.

    PubMed

    Unterweger, M P; Fitzgerald, R

    2014-05-01

    As reported at the ICRM 2011, it was discovered that the source holder used for calibrations in the NIST 4πγ ionization chamber (IC) was not stable. This has affected a large number of half-life measurement results previously reported and used in compilations of nuclear data. Corrections have been made on all of the half-life data based on the assumption that the changes to the ionization chamber response were gradual. The corrections are energy dependent and therefore radionuclide specific. This presentation will review our results and present the recommended changes in half-life values and/or uncertainties. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Study of the surface ionization detector for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Wu, Dapeng; Chen, Shiheng; Peng, Hong; Guan, Yafeng

    2011-09-23

    The structure of the surface ionization detector (SID) and the operation parameters of GC-SID were investigated to reduce peak tailing and to enhance sensitivity. The performances of the GC-SID, including its repeatability, linearity, sensitivity, selectivity, and tolerance towards water vapor, were evaluated systematically. Compared with nitrogen-phosphorus detector (NPD), the SID was able to detect fg level triethylamine, and selectively respond to alkylamines, some anilines, and some nitrogen heterocyclic compounds. Among alkylamines, the SID sensitivity to diisobutylamine was rather small. Even so, it was also still 10 times higher than that on NPD. The SID selectivity, defined as the sensitivity ratio between triethylamine and various tested non-nitrogen compounds, was higher than 10(6). It was found that the SID is highly tolerant towards water vapor, allowing direct injection of water sample. Finally, the GC-SID was applied to directly measure trace amines in headspace gases of rotted meat and trace simazine in tap water. The SID sensitivity to simazine was proven to be 5 times higher than that on flame ionization detector (FID). This study suggests that the SID is a promising GC detector. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiplexed electronically programmable multimode ionization detector for chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Marcus B.; Buchanan, Michelle V.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting and differentiating organic compounds based on their electron affinity. An electron capture detector cell (ECD) is operated in a plurality of multiplexed electroncially programmable operating modes to alter the detector response during a single sampling cycle to acquire multiple simultaneous chromatograms corresponding to each of the different operating modes. The cell is held at a constant subatmospheric pressure while the electron collection bias voltage applied to the cell is modulated electronically to allow acquisition of multiple chromatograms for a single sample elution from a chromatograph representing three distinctly different response modes. A system is provided which automatically controls the programmed application of bias pulses at different intervals and/or amplitudes to switch the detector from an ionization mode to the electron capture mode and various degrees therebetween to provide an improved means of tuning an ECD for multimode detection and improved specificity.

  11. Multiplexed electronically programmable multimode ionization detector for chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Wise, M.B.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1988-05-19

    Method and apparatus for detecting and differentiating organic compounds based on their electron affinity. An electron capture detector cell (ECD) is operated in a plurality of multiplexed electronically programmable operating modes to alter the detector response during a single sampling cycle to acquire multiple simultaneous chromatograms corresponding to each of the different operating modes. The cell is held at a constant subatmospheric pressure while the electron collection bias voltage applied to the cell is modulated electronically to allow acquisition of multiple chromatograms for a single sample elution from a chromatograph representing three distinctly different response modes. A system is provided which automatically controls the programmed application of bias pulses at different intervals and/or amplitudes to switch the detector from an ionization mode to the electron capture mode and various degrees therebetween to provide an improved means of tuning an ECD for multimode detection and improved specificity. 6 figs.

  12. Pediatric counseling and subsequent use of smoke detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.E.; Reisinger, K.S.; Blatter, M.M.; Wucher, F.

    1982-04-01

    Effects of a brief educational and purchase program concerning home fires and smoke detectors by two pediatricians were compared to ''routine'' counseling without such a program using two groups each of 120 patients of well children. Inspection performed four to six weeks after the office visits showed that of 55 experimental group parents without detectors prior to the program, 26 purchased and 19 installed them correctly. No control group parents did so.

  13. Investigation of thermal and temporal responses of ionization chambers in radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    AlMasri, Hussein; Funyu, Akira; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2012-07-01

    The ionization chamber is a primary dosimeter that is used in radiation dosimetry. Generally, the ion chamber response requires temperature/pressure correction according to the ideal gas law. However, this correction does not consider the thermal volume effect of chambers. The temporal and thermal volume effects of various chambers (CC01, CC13, NACP parallel-plate, PTW) with different wall and electrode materials have been studied in a water phantom. Measurements were done after heating the water with a suitable heating system, and chambers were submerged for a sufficient time to allow for temperature equilibrium. Temporal results show that all chambers equilibrate quickly in water. The equilibration time was between 3 and 5 min for all chambers. Thermal results show that all chambers expanded in response to heating except for the PTW, which contracted. This might be explained by the differences in the volumes of all chambers and also by the difference in wall material composition of PTW from the other chambers. It was found that the smallest chamber, CC01, showed the greatest expansion. The magnitude of the expansion was ~1, 0.8, and 0.9% for CC01, CC13, and parallel-plate chambers, respectively, in the temperature range of 295-320 K. The magnitude of the detected contraction was <0.3% for PTW in the same temperature range. For absolute dosimetry, it is necessary to make corrections for the ion chamber response, especially for small ion chambers like the CC01. Otherwise, room and water phantom temperatures should remain within a close range.

  14. Assessment of small volume ionization chambers as reference dosimeters in high-energy photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, M.; de Carlan, L.; Delaunay, F.; Donois, M.; Fournier, P.; Ostrowsky, A.; Vouillaume, A.; Bordy, J. M.

    2011-09-01

    LNE-LNHB is involved in a European project aiming at establishing absorbed dose-to-water standards for photon-radiation fields down to 2 × 2 cm2. This requires the calibration of reference ionization chambers of small volume. Twenty-four ionization chambers of eight different types with volume ranging from 0.007 to 0.057 cm3 were tested in a 60Co beam. For each chamber, two major characteristics were investigated: (1) the stability of the measured current as a function of the irradiation time under continuous irradiation. At LNE-LNHB, the variation of the current should be less than ±0.1% in comparison with its first value (over a 16 h irradiation time); (2) the variation of the ionization current with the applied polarizing voltage and polarity. Leakage currents were also measured. Results show that (1) every tested PTW (31015, 31016 and 31014) and Exradin A1SL chambers demonstrate a satisfying stability under irradiation. Other types of chambers have a stability complying with the stability criterion for some or none of them. (2) IBA CC01, IBA CC04 and Exradin A1SL show a proper response as a function of applied voltage for both polarities. PTW, Exradin A14SL and Exradin A16 do not. Only three types of chambers were deemed suitable as reference chambers according to LNE-LNHB requirements and specifications from McEwen (2010 Med. Phys. 37 2179-93): Exradin A1SL chambers (3/3), IBA CC04 (2/3) and IBA CC01 (1/3). The Exradin A1SL type with an applied polarizing voltage of 150 V was chosen as an LNE-LNHB reference chamber type in 2 × 2 cm2 radiation fields.

  15. Determination of relative ion chamber calibration coefficients from depth-ionization measurements in clinical electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-10-01

    A method is presented to obtain ion chamber calibration coefficients relative to secondary standard reference chambers in electron beams using depth-ionization measurements. Results are obtained as a function of depth and average electron energy at depth in 4, 8, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams from the NRC Elekta Precise linac. The PTW Roos, Scanditronix NACP-02, PTW Advanced Markus and NE 2571 ion chambers are investigated. The challenges and limitations of the method are discussed. The proposed method produces useful data at shallow depths. At depths past the reference depth, small shifts in positioning or drifts in the incident beam energy affect the results, thereby providing a built-in test of incident electron energy drifts and/or chamber set-up. Polarity corrections for ion chambers as a function of average electron energy at depth agree with literature data. The proposed method produces results consistent with those obtained using the conventional calibration procedure while gaining much more information about the behavior of the ion chamber with similar data acquisition time. Measurement uncertainties in calibration coefficients obtained with this method are estimated to be less than 0.5%. These results open up the possibility of using depth-ionization measurements to yield chamber ratios which may be suitable for primary standards-level dissemination.

  16. SU-E-T-415: An Ionization Chamber Array with High Spatial Resolution for External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Togno, M; Wilkens, J; Menichelli, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize an ionization chamber array technology with high spatial resolution and high charge collection efficiency for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: The prototype under test is a linear array of air vented ionization chambers developed by IBA Dosimetry, consisting of 80 pixels with 3.5mm spatial resolution and 4mm{sup 3} sensitive volume. The detector was characterized in a plastic phantom with {sup 60} Co radiation and MV X-rays from an ELEKTA Agility LINAC (with flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Bias voltage was varied in order to evaluate charge collection efficiency. A commercial array of ionization chambers (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry) and an amorphous silicon flat panel in direct conversion configuration were used as references. Results: Repeatability (0.4%) and stability under continuous gamma irradiation (0.3%) are very good, in spite of low active volume and sensitivity (∼200pC/Gy). Charge collection efficiency is higher than 99% already at 150V with ∼2mGy dose per pulse, leading to a ±1.1% sensitivity change with dose per pulse in the range 0.09-2mGy (covering all flattened and unflattened applications). Measured dose profiles are in agreement with MatriXX for fields larger than 2×2cm{sup 2}, in which case the linear array offers a much better characterization of the penumbra region. Down to 1×1cm{sup 2}, measured profiles are in very good agreement with the flat panel. Conclusion: The array represents a valuable tool for the characterization of treatment fields in which high spatial resolution is required, together with the dosimetric performance of air vented ionization chambers. Such a technology would be particularly valuable in association with advanced treatment modalities such as rotational radiotherapy, stereotactic treatments (even with unflattened beam qualities) and proton therapy, due to the insensitivity of the chambers on dose per pulse. In the future, a two dimensional prototype based on this

  17. Absorbed dose dependence of the correction factors for ionization chamber cable irradiation effects.

    PubMed

    Campos, L L; Caldas, L V

    1991-03-01

    A simple method was developed, for possible use by hospital physicists, to evaluate the irradiation effects on cables and connectors during large-radiation-field dosimetry with ionization chambers and to determine correction factors for the used system or geometry. This method was based on the absorbed dose dependence of the correction factor.

  18. Stability of A-150 plastic ionization chamber response over a ~30 year period

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, Thomas K.; Lennox, Arlene J.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    At the NIU Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab, the clinical tissue-equivalent ionization chamber response is measured every treatment day using a cesium source that was configured to match readings obtained at the National Bureau of Standards. Daily measurements are performed in air using the air-to-tissue dose conversion factors given in AAPM Report no. 7. The measured exposure calibration factors have been tabulated and graphed as a function of time from 1978 to present. For A-150 plastic ionization chambers, these factors exhibit a sinusoidal variation with a period of approximately one year and amplitude of {+-} 1%. This variation, attributable to the hygroscopic nature of A-150 plastic, is correlated with the relative humidity of the facility, and is greater than the humidity corrections for gas described in the literature. Our data suggest that chamber calibration should be performed at least weekly to accommodate these variations.

  19. Miniature triaxial metastable ionization detector for gas chromatographic trace analysis of extraterrestrial volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Kojiro, D. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a miniature metastable ionization detector featuring an unconventional electrode configuration, whose performance characteristics parallel those of traditional design. The ionization detector is to be incorporated in a flight gas chromatograph (GC) for use in the Space Shuttle. The design of the detector is discussed, taking into account studies which verified the sensitivity of the detector. The triaxial design of the detector is compared with a flat-plate style. The obtained results show that the principal goal of developing a miniature, highly sensitive ionization detector for flight applications was achieved. Improved fabrication techniques will utilize glass-to-metal seals and brazing procedures.

  20. Free-air ionization chamber, FAC-IR-300, designed for medium energy X-ray dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2017-01-01

    The primary standard for X-ray photons is based on parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber (FAC). Therefore, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) is tried to design and build the free-air ionization chamber, FAC-IR-300, for low and medium energy X-ray dosimetry. The main aim of the present work is to investigate specification of the FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber and design it. FAC-IR-300 dosimeter is composed of two parallel plates, a high voltage (HV) plate and a collector plate, along with a guard electrode that surrounds the collector plate. The guard plate and the collector were separated by an air gap. For obtaining uniformity in the electric field distribution, a group of guard strips was used around the ionization chamber. These characterizations involve determining the exact dimensions of the ionization chamber by using Monte Carlo simulation and introducing correction factors.

  1. Characterization of a two-dimensional liquid-filled ion chamber detector array used for verification of the treatments in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Markovic, Miljenko Stathakis, Sotirios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Jurkovic, Ines-Ana; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to investigate the characteristics of a two-dimensional (2D) liquid-filled ion chamber detector array, which is used for the verification of radiotherapy treatment plans that use small field sizes of up to 10 × 10 cm. Methods: The device used in this study was Octavius 1000 SRS model (PTW, Freiburg, Germany). Its 2D array of detectors consists of 977 liquid-filled ion chambers arranged over an area of 11 × 11 cm. The size of the detectors is 2.3 × 2.3 × 0.5 mm (volume of 0.003 cm{sup 3}) and their spacing in the inner area of 5.5 × 5.5 cm is 2.5 mm center-to-center, whereas in the outer area it is 5 mm center-to-center. The detector reproducibility, dose linearity, and sensitivity to positional changes of the collimator were tested. Also, the output factors of field sizes ranging from 0.5 × 0.5 to 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} both for open and wedged fields have been measured and compared against those measured by a pin-point ionization chamber, liquid filled microchamber, SRS diode, and EDR2 film. Results: Its short-term reproducibility was within 0.2% and its medium and long-term reproducibility was within 0.5% (verified with air ionization chamber absolute dose measurements), which is an excellent result taking into account the daily fluctuation of the linear accelerator and the errors in the device setup reproducibility. The dose linearity and dose rate dependence were measured in the range of 0.5–85 Gy and 0.5–10 Gy min{sup −1}, respectively, and were verified with air ionization chamber absolute dose measurements was within 3%. The measurements of the sensitivity showed that the 2D Array could detect millimetric collimator positional changes. The measured output factors showed an agreement of better than 0.3% with the pinpoint chamber and microliquid filled chamber for the field sizes between 3 × 3 and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. For field sizes down to 1 × 1 cm{sup 2}, the agreement with SRS diode and microliquid filled

  2. Characterization of a two-dimensional liquid-filled ion chamber detector array used for verification of the treatments in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Miljenko; Stathakis, Sotirios; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Jurkovic, Ines-Ana; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the characteristics of a two-dimensional (2D) liquid-filled ion chamber detector array, which is used for the verification of radiotherapy treatment plans that use small field sizes of up to 10 × 10 cm. The device used in this study was Octavius 1000 SRS model (PTW, Freiburg, Germany). Its 2D array of detectors consists of 977 liquid-filled ion chambers arranged over an area of 11 × 11 cm. The size of the detectors is 2.3 × 2.3 × 0.5 mm (volume of 0.003 cm(3)) and their spacing in the inner area of 5.5 × 5.5 cm is 2.5 mm center-to-center, whereas in the outer area it is 5 mm center-to-center. The detector reproducibility, dose linearity, and sensitivity to positional changes of the collimator were tested. Also, the output factors of field sizes ranging from 0.5 × 0.5 to 10 × 10 cm(2) both for open and wedged fields have been measured and compared against those measured by a pin-point ionization chamber, liquid filled microchamber, SRS diode, and EDR2 film. Its short-term reproducibility was within 0.2% and its medium and long-term reproducibility was within 0.5% (verified with air ionization chamber absolute dose measurements), which is an excellent result taking into account the daily fluctuation of the linear accelerator and the errors in the device setup reproducibility. The dose linearity and dose rate dependence were measured in the range of 0.5-85 Gy and 0.5-10 Gy min(-1), respectively, and were verified with air ionization chamber absolute dose measurements was within 3%. The measurements of the sensitivity showed that the 2D Array could detect millimetric collimator positional changes. The measured output factors showed an agreement of better than 0.3% with the pinpoint chamber and microliquid filled chamber for the field sizes between 3 × 3 and 10 × 10 cm(2). For field sizes down to 1 × 1 cm(2), the agreement with SRS diode and microliquid filled chamber is better than 2%. The measurements of open and

  3. Determination of ion recombination correction factors for a liquid ionization chamber in megavoltage photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum-Bae; Ji, Young Hoon; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Seonghoon; Huh, Hyun Do

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the ion recombination correction factor for a liquid ionization chamber in a high energy photon beam by using our experimental method. The ion recombination correction factors were determined by using our experimental method and were compared with theoretical and experimental methods proposed by using the theoretical method (Greening, Johansson) and the two-dose rate method in a cobalt beam and a high energy photon beam. In order to apply the liquid ionization chamber in a reference and small field dosimetry, we acquired the absorbed dose to water correction coefficient, the beam quality correction factor, and the influence quantities for the microLion chamber according to the TRS-398 protocol and applied the results to a high energy photon beam used in clinical fields. As a result, our experimental method for ion recombination in a cobalt beam agreed with the results from the heoretical method (Greening theory) better than it did with the results from the two-dose rate method. For high energy photon beams, the two-dose rate and our experimental methods were in good agreement, less than 2% deviation, while the theoretical general collection efficiency (Johansson et al.) deviated greatly from the experimental values. When we applied the factors for the absorbed dose to water measurement, the absorbed dose to water for the microLion chamber was in good agreement, within 1%, compared with the values for the PTW 30013 chamber in 6 and 10 MV Clinac iX and 6 and 15 MV Oncor impression. With these results, not only can the microLion ionization chamber be used to measure the absorbed dose to water in a reference condition, it can also be used to a the chamber for small, non-standard field dosimetry.

  4. The central electrode correction factor for high-Z electrodes in small ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Muir, B R; Rogers, D W O

    2011-02-01

    Recent Monte Carlo calculations of beam quality conversion factors for ion chambers that use high-Z electrodes [B. R. Muir and D. W. O. Rogers, Med. Phys. 37, 5939-5950 (2010)] have shown large deviations of kQ values from values calculated using the same techniques as the TG-51 and TRS-398 protocols. This report investigates the central electrode correction factor, Pcel, for these chambers. Ionization chambers are modeled and Pcel is calculated using the EGSnrc user code egs_chamber for three cases: in photon and electron beams under reference conditions; as a function of distance from an iridium-192 point source in a water phantom; and as a function of depth in a water phantom on which a 200 kVp x-ray source or 6 MV beam is incident. In photon beams, differences of up to 3% between Pcel calculations for a chamber with a high-Z electrode and those used by TG-51 for a 1 mm diameter aluminum electrode are observed. The central electrode correction factor for a given value of the beam quality specifier is different depending on the amount of filtration of the photon beam. However, in an unfiltered 6 MV beam, Pcel, varies by only 0.3% for a chamber with a high-Z electrode as the depth is varied from 1 to 20 cm in water. The difference between Pcel calculations for chambers with high-Z electrodes and TG-51 values for a chamber with an aluminum electrode is up to 0.45% in electron beams. The central electrode correction, which is roughly proportional to the chambers absorbed dose sensitivity, is found to be large and variable as a function of distance for chambers with high-Z and aluminum electrodes in low-energy photon fields. In this work, ionization chambers that employ high-Z electrodes have been shown to be problematic in various situations. For beam quality conversion factors, the ratio of Pcel in a beam quality Q to that in a Co-60 beam is required; for some chambers, kQ is significantly different from current dosimetry protocol values because of central

  5. Correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in CyberKnife: Machine-specific, plan-class, and clinical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Antolin, Elena; Fayos-Ferrer, Francisco; Simon, Rocio; Gonzalez-Castano, Diego M.; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Gomez, Faustino; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is the application of the formalism for ionization chamber reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields [R. Alfonso, P. Andreo, R. Capote, M. S. Huq, W. Kilby, P. Kjaell, T. R. Mackie, H. Palmans, K. Rosser, J. Seuntjens, W. Ullrich, and S. Vatnitsky, 'A new formalism for reference dosimetry of small and nonstandard fields,' Med. Phys. 35, 5179-5186 (2008)] to the CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery system. Correction factors for intermediate calibration fields, a machine-specific reference field (msr) and two plan-class specific reference fields (pcsr), have been studied. Furthermore, the applicability of the new formalism to clinical dosimetry has been analyzed through the investigation of two clinical treatments. Methods: PTW31014 and Scanditronix-Wellhofer CC13 ionization chamber measurements were performed for the fields under investigation. Absorbed dose to water was determined using alanine reference dosimetry, and experimental correction factors were calculated from alanine to ionization chamber readings ratios. In addition, correction factors were calculated for the intermediate calibration fields and one of the clinical treatment fields using the Monte Carlo method and these were compared with the experimental values. Results: Overall correction factors deviating from unity by approximately 2% were obtained from both measurements and simulations, with values below and above unity for the studied intermediate calibration fields and clinical fields for the ionization chambers under consideration. Monte Carlo simulations yielded correction factors comparable with those obtained from measurements for the machine-specific reference field, although differences from 1% to 3.3% were observed between measured and calculated correction factors for the composite intermediate calibration fields. Dose distribution inhomogeneities are thought to be responsible for such discrepancies. Conclusions: The differences found between overall

  6. Influence of ambient humidity on the current delivered by air-vented ionization chambers revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Aurélie; Douysset, Guilhem

    2006-10-01

    The influence of ambient humidity on the current delivered by a vented ionization chamber has been re-investigated. A Nucletron 077.091 well-type chamber together with a 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source was enclosed in a climatic test chamber and the current was recorded for various humidity values. Great care has been taken for the design of the experimental setup in order to obtain reliable measurements of currents and humidity values inside the chamber active volume. A ±0.35% linear variation of the measured currents has been observed over a common range of humidities. This result is larger than the expected variation. No formal explanation of such a discrepancy has been found yet, however the present results could lead to a set of recommendations.

  7. Quantification of Cigarette Smoke Particle Deposition In Vitro Using a Triplicate Quartz Crystal Microbalance Exposure Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Jason; Thorne, David; McAughey, John; Dillon, Deborah; Meredith, Clive

    2013-01-01

    There are a variety of smoke exposure systems available to the tobacco industry and respiratory toxicology research groups, each with their own way of diluting/delivering smoke to cell cultures. Thus a simple technique to measure dose in vitro needs to be utilised. Dosimetry—assessment of dose—is a key element in linking the biological effects of smoke generated by various exposure systems. Microbalance technology is presented as a dosimetry tool and a way of measuring whole smoke dose. Described here is a new tool to quantify diluted smoke particulate deposition in vitro. The triplicate quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) chamber measured real-time deposition of smoke at a range of dilutions 1 : 5–1 : 400 (smoke : air). Mass was read in triplicate by 3 identical QCMs installed into one in vitro exposure chamber, each in the location in which a cell culture would be exposed to smoke at the air-liquid interface. This resulted in quantification of deposited particulate matter in the range 0.21–28.00 μg/cm2. Results demonstrated that the QCM could discriminate mass between dilutions and was able to give information of regional deposition where cell cultures would usually be exposed within the chamber. Our aim is to use the QCM to support the preclinical (in vitro) evaluation of tobacco products. PMID:23484139

  8. SU-E-T-623: Polarity Effects for Small Volume Ionization Chambers in Cobalt-60 Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y; Bhatnagar, J; Huq, M Saiful

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the polarity effects for small volume ionization chambers in {sup 60}Co gamma-ray beams using the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion. Methods: Measurements were made for 7 small volume ionization chambers (a PTW 31016, an Exradin A14, 2 Capintec PR0-5P, and 3 Exradin A16) using a PTW UNIDOSwebline Universal Dosemeter and an ELEKTA solid water phantom with proper inserts. For each ion chamber, the temperature/pressure corrected electric charge readings were obtained for 16 voltage values (±50V, ±100V, ±200V, ±300V, ±400V, ±500V, ±600V, ±700V). For each voltage, a five-minute leakage charge reading and a series of 2-minute readings were continuously taken during irradiation until 5 stable signals (less than 0.05% variation) were obtained. The average of the 5 reading was then used for the calculation of the polarity corrections at the voltage and for generating the saturation curves. Results: The polarity effects are more pronounced at high or low voltages than at the medium voltages for all chambers studied. The voltage dependence of the 3 Exradin A16 chambers is similar in shape. The polarity corrections for the Exradin A16 chambers changes rapidly from about 1 at 500V to about 0.98 at 700V. The polarity corrections for the 7 ion chambers at 300V are in the range from 0.9925 (for the PTW31016) to 1.0035 (for an Exradin A16). Conclusion: The polarity corrections for certain micro-chambers are large even at normal operating voltage.

  9. Calculation of correction factors for ionization chamber measurements with small fields in low-density media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisaturo, O.; Pachoud, M.; Bochud, F. O.; Moeckli, R.

    2012-07-01

    The quantity of interest for high-energy photon beam therapy recommended by most dosimetric protocols is the absorbed dose to water. Thus, ionization chambers are calibrated in absorbed dose to water, which is the same quantity as what is calculated by most treatment planning systems (TPS). However, when measurements are performed in a low-density medium, the presence of the ionization chamber generates a perturbation at the level of the secondary particle range. Therefore, the measured quantity is close to the absorbed dose to a volume of water equivalent to the chamber volume. This quantity is not equivalent to the dose calculated by a TPS, which is the absorbed dose to an infinitesimally small volume of water. This phenomenon can lead to an overestimation of the absorbed dose measured with an ionization chamber of up to 40% in extreme cases. In this paper, we propose a method to calculate correction factors based on the Monte Carlo simulations. These correction factors are obtained by the ratio of the absorbed dose to water in a low-density medium □Dw,Q,V1low averaged over a scoring volume V1 for a geometry where V1 is filled with the low-density medium and the absorbed dose to water □Dw,QV2low averaged over a volume V2 for a geometry where V2 is filled with water. In the Monte Carlo simulations, □Dw,QV2low is obtained by replacing the volume of the ionization chamber by an equivalent volume of water, according to the definition of the absorbed dose to water. The method is validated in two different configurations which allowed us to study the behavior of this correction factor as a function of depth in phantom, photon beam energy, phantom density and field size.

  10. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, K.; van Asselen, B.; Kok, J. G. M.; Aalbers, A. H. L.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2013-09-01

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  11. Towards reference dosimetry for the MR-linac: magnetic field correction of the ionization chamber reading.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; van Asselen, B; Kok, J G M; Aalbers, A H L; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2013-09-07

    In the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of a 6 MV Elekta (Crawley, UK) linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips (Best, The Netherlands) Achieva MRI system. This paper investigates the feasibility to correct the ionization chamber reading for the magnetic field within the dosimetry calibration method described by Almond et al (1999 Med. Phys. 26 1847-70). Firstly, the feasibility of using an ionization chamber in an MR-linac was assessed by investigating possible influences of the magnetic field on NE2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber characteristics: linearity, repeatability, orientation in the magnetic field; and AAPM TG51 correction factor for voltage polarity and ion recombination. We found that these AAPM correction factors for the NE2571 chamber were not influenced by the magnetic field. Secondly, the influence of the permanent 1.5 T magnetic field on the NE2571 chamber reading was quantified. The reading is influenced by the magnetic field; therefore, a correction factor has been added. For the standardized setup used in this paper, the NE2571 chamber reading increases by 4.9% (± 0.2%) due to the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field. Dosimetry measurements in an MR-linac are feasible, if a setup-specific magnetic field correction factor (P1.5 T) for the charge reading is introduced. For the setup investigated in this paper, the P1.5 T has a value of 0.953.

  12. A new, sensitive, high resolution Raman detector based on ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, B. W.; Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    A novel detection method for weak pulsed or cw Raman fluxes is described. The detector is based upon the production of Raman scatter with a tunable pulsed or cw dye laser, collecting a large fraction of the Raman scatter and transferring it efficiently into an ionization detector containing a metal (M) vapor, such as Li. The resonance ionization detector (RID) is simultaneously illuminated by a second dye laser. When the second laser is tuned to an excited state transition of the metal vapor M and when the first laser is at such a wavelength that the Raman scatter appears at the ground state absorption transition of the metal, then a current will be produced in the RID which is proportional to the Raman scatter intensity. Both the production and collection of this current can be made very efficient (approaching 100%) and should result in improved sensitivity compared to conventional dispersive or FT Raman techniques. The new approach should be much less sensitive to scatter, should have a spectral resolution better than 0.1 cm -1 and should allow Raman scatter measurements to be made at wavenumbers below 100 cm -1 and under certain conditions to 0.01 cm -1. The approach should be especially useful in highly scattering environments like Ag-sols in surface enhanced Raman and should be useful for detection of ultratrace levels of drugs and metabolites in biological fluids. The Raman-RID approach should also be useful for resonance Raman since laser scatter and molecular fluorescence should have minimal effects.

  13. Calibration of PICO Bubble Chamber Dark Matter Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Miaotianzi; PICO Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PICO Collaboration builds bubble chambers for the direct detection of WIMP dark matter. I will present the suite of calibration experiments performed to measure the sensitivity of these chambers to nuclear recoils (the expected WIMP signal) and to gamma rays (a common background to the WIMP signal). These calibrations include measurements with a 10-ml C3F8 bubble chamber at Northwestern University and with a 30-ml C3F8 bubble chamber deployed in the University of Montreal's tandem Van de Graaf facility, giving the bubble chamber response to a variety of gamma rays, broad-spectrum neutron sources, and mono-energetic low energy neutrons. I will compare our measured sensitivities to those predicted by a simple thermodynamic model and will show how the results impact our ability to detect dark matter, with a focus on light WIMP searches. Supported by DOE Grant: DE-SC0012161.

  14. Particle and energy dependence of the statistical fluctuations of an ionization chamber current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purghel, Lidia; Vaˆlcov, Nicolae

    For the purpose of getting more detailed information concerning the processes leading to statistical fluctuations of an ionization chamber current, measurements with various radioactive sources have been done. By using the experimental arrangement described elsewhere [A. Necula et al. Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 332 (1993) 501] the mean value and the standard deviation of the ionization current for 3H (water vapours), 60Co (sealed source), 85Kr (gas), 204Tl (8 mm diameter disk) and 239Pu (10 mm diameter disk), beta, gamma and alpha sources have been measured. A statistical model explaining the experimental data is proposed.

  15. Ionization signals from diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Griesmayer, E.; Kavrigin, P.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel analysis technique for measurements with single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (sCVD) diamond detectors in fast-neutron fields. This method exploits the unique electronic property of sCVD diamond sensors that the signal shape of the detector current is directly proportional to the initial ionization profile. In fast-neutron fields the diamond sensor acts simultaneously as target and sensor. The interaction of neutrons with the stable isotopes 12 C and 13 C is of interest for fast-neutron diagnostics. The measured signal shapes of detector current pulses are used to identify individual types of interactions in the diamond with the goal to select neutron-induced reactions in the diamond and to suppress neutron-induced background reactions as well as γ-background. The method is verified with experimental data from a measurement in a 14.3 MeV neutron beam at JRC-IRMM, Geel/Belgium, where the 13C(n, α)10Be reaction was successfully extracted from the dominating background of recoil protons and γ-rays and the energy resolution of the 12C(n, α)9Be reaction was substantially improved. The presented analysis technique is especially relevant for diagnostics in harsh radiation environments, like fission and fusion reactors. It allows to extract the neutron spectrum from the background, and is particularly applicable to neutron flux monitoring and neutron spectroscopy.

  16. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G.; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-01

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  17. A novel convolution-based approach to address ionization chamber volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2015-08-21

    The ionization chamber volume averaging effect is a well-known issue without an elegant solution. The purpose of this study is to propose a novel convolution-based approach to address the volume averaging effect in model-based treatment planning systems (TPSs). Ionization chamber-measured beam profiles can be regarded as the convolution between the detector response function and the implicit real profiles. Existing approaches address the issue by trying to remove the volume averaging effect from the measurement. In contrast, our proposed method imports the measured profiles directly into the TPS and addresses the problem by reoptimizing pertinent parameters of the TPS beam model. In the iterative beam modeling process, the TPS-calculated beam profiles are convolved with the same detector response function. Beam model parameters responsible for the penumbra are optimized to drive the convolved profiles to match the measured profiles. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to identical volume averaging effect, the calculated profiles match the real profiles when the optimization converges. The method was applied to reoptimize a CC13 beam model commissioned with profiles measured with a standard ionization chamber (Scanditronix Wellhofer, Bartlett, TN). The reoptimized beam model was validated by comparing the TPS-calculated profiles with diode-measured profiles. Its performance in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) for ten head-and-neck patients was compared with the CC13 beam model and a clinical beam model (manually optimized, clinically proven) using standard Gamma comparisons. The beam profiles calculated with the reoptimized beam model showed excellent agreement with diode measurement at all measured geometries. Performance of the reoptimized beam model was comparable with that of the clinical beam model in IMRT QA. The average passing rates using the reoptimized beam model increased substantially from 92.1% to

  18. PTRAC File Utilization for Calculation of Free-Air Ionization Chamber Correction Factors by MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šolc, Jaroslav; Sochor, Vladimír

    2014-06-01

    A free-air ionization chamber is used as a standard of photon air-kerma. Several correction factors are applied to the air-kerma value. Correction factors for electron loss (kloss) and for additional ionization current caused by photon scatter (ksc), photon fluorescence (kfl), photon transmission through diaphragm edge (kdtr), and photon scatter from the surface of the diaphragm aperture (kdsc) were determined by the MCNPX code utilizing information stored in Particle Track (PTRAC) output files. Individual steps of the procedure are described and the calculated values of the correction factors are presented. The values are in agreement with the correction factors published in a literature for similar free-air chambers.

  19. XIth Workshop on Resistive Plate Chambers and Related Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RPC2012 continues the tradition of regular scientific meetings, first started in 1991 at Lecce, with following editions in Roma, Pavia, Napoli, Bari, Coimbra, Clermont-Ferrand, Seoul, Mumbai, Darmstadt. The RPC detection technique has found large application in LHC detectors and in astroparticle physics experiments. The workshop focused on performance of large RPC systems, ageing and detector materials studies, electronics for RPCs, physics of basic processes in the gas, timing applications, new ideas for RPC detectors.

  20. Some specific features of ionization chamber calibrations in linac x-ray beams at the LNE-LNHB.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, F; Ostrowsky, A

    2007-05-07

    The purpose of this note is to give some details about the modus operandi employed today to calibrate ionization chambers in radiotherapy linac photon beams at the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB). Some specific features are described: first the equipment (including the external monitoring ionization chambers), second the calculations of the profile or radial non-uniformity correction factors (up to 0.5% effect for commonly used ionization chambers) and finally the calculations to get the calibration coefficients for customer beam qualities.

  1. Design and Installation of a Field Ionization Test Chamber for Ion Thrusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    2011 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Design and Installation of a Field Ionization Test Chamber for Ion...Meter MS Mass Spectrometry MWNT Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube MUF Mass Utilization Factor NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration NPS...has a mass range of 1–10kg [1]. In comparison, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration ( NASA ) Solar Electric Propulsion Technology

  2. Fast-neutron and photon doses determined with proportional counters and ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Higgins, P.D.; Schell, M.C.; Pearson, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    A /sup 60/Co teletherapy source has recently been coupled to an existing source of fast neutrons. These sources may be operated to provide precise and controlled mixtures of photons and neutrons. In this work we report the application of paired miniature proportional counters to n/..gamma.. dose separation. Graphite- and A150 plastic-walled proportional counters were employed. Results are compared to dose values deduced from a cnventional A150 plastic ionization chamber and a neutron insensitive GM counter.

  3. Tobacco smoke aging in the presence of ozone: A room-sized chamber study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrick, Lauren M.; Sleiman, Mohamad; Dubowski, Yael; Gundel, Lara A.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2011-09-01

    Exposure to tobacco pollutants that linger indoors after smoking has taken place ( thirdhand smoke, THS) can occur over extended periods and is modulated by chemical processes involving atmospheric reactive species. This study investigates the role of ozone and indoor surfaces in chemical transformations of tobacco smoke residues. Gas and particle constituents of secondhand smoke (SHS) as well as sorbed SHS on chamber internal walls and model materials (cotton, paper, and gypsum wallboard) were characterized during aging. After smoldering 10 cigarettes in a 24-m 3 room size chamber, gas-phase nicotine was rapidly removed by sorption to chamber surfaces, and subsequently re-emitted during ventilation with clean air to a level of ˜10% that during the smoking phase. During chamber ventilation in the presence of ozone (180 ppb), ozone decayed at a rate of 5.6 h -1 and coincided with a factor of 5 less nicotine sorbed to wallboard. In the presence of ozone, no gas phase nicotine was detected as a result of re-emission, and higher concentrations of nicotine oxidation products were observed than when ventilation was performed with ozone-free air. Analysis of the model surfaces showed that heterogeneous nicotine-ozone reaction was faster on paper than cotton, and both were faster than on wallboard. However, wallboard played a dominant role in ozone-initiated reaction in the chamber due to its large total geometric surface area and sink potential compared to the other substrates. This study is the first to show in a room-sized environmental chamber that the heterogeneous ozone chemistry of sorbed nicotine generates THS constituents of concern, as observed previously in bench-top studies. In addition to the main oxidation products (cotinine, myosmine and N-methyl formamide), nicotine-1-oxide was detected for the first time.

  4. Differences between signal currents for both polarities of applied voltages on cavity ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, N.

    2001-06-01

    A difference between the surface potential of the charge collecting electrode and that of the guard electrode of an ionization chamber changes the charge collecting volume depending on the applied voltage. If the difference is large, the saturation curve of the signal current shows a maximum at a low applied voltage. Even when there is no electrical or mechanical defect, the signal current from a parallel plate ionization chamber irradiated with 60Co γ-rays increases or decreases with the applied voltage beyond the recombination region depending on the polarity of the applied voltage. The variation in the signal current is explained as a result of the change in the stopping power of air due to the acceleration or deceleration of secondary electrons. These electrons are emitted from the polarizing electrode towards the collector as a result of Compton scattering. In a range of low applied voltages, the signal current from a cylindrical ionization chamber is expected to be smaller for a negative applied voltage than for a positive applied voltage. This is because epithermal electrons are expected to have a higher probability of being lost by back diffusion than positive ions which are originally produced in a thermal equilibrium condition. An experimental result, however, showed no difference in the polarities of the applied voltage. The result may be explained as a consequence of the fact that epithemal electrons do not drift for long distances and maintain their energies.

  5. Ionization detector, electrode configuration and single polarity charge detection method

    DOEpatents

    He, Zhong

    1998-01-01

    An ionization detector, an electrode configuration and a single polarity charge detection method each utilize a boundary electrode which symmetrically surrounds first and second central interlaced and symmetrical electrodes. All of the electrodes are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. The first central electrode is held at a higher potential than the second central or boundary electrodes. By forming the first and second central electrodes in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern and forming the boundary electrode symmetrically about the first and second central electrodes, signals generated by charge carriers are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the central electrodes. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carriers move to within close proximity of the first central electrode and are received at the first central electrode. The measured signals are then subtracted and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge.

  6. Ionization detector, electrode configuration and single polarity charge detection method

    DOEpatents

    He, Z.

    1998-07-07

    An ionization detector, an electrode configuration and a single polarity charge detection method each utilize a boundary electrode which symmetrically surrounds first and second central interlaced and symmetrical electrodes. All of the electrodes are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. The first central electrode is held at a higher potential than the second central or boundary electrodes. By forming the first and second central electrodes in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern and forming the boundary electrode symmetrically about the first and second central electrodes, signals generated by charge carriers are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the central electrodes. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carriers move to within close proximity of the first central electrode and are received at the first central electrode. The measured signals are then subtracted and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge. 10 figs.

  7. A numerical model of initial recombination for high-LET irradiation: Application to liquid-filled ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, P.; Pardo-Montero, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a numerical model of initial recombination in media irradiated with high linear energy transfer (LET) ions, which relies on an amorphous track model of ionization of high LET particles, and diffusion, drift and recombination of ionized charge carriers. The model has fundamental applications for the study of recombination in non-polar liquids, as well as practical ones, like in modelling hadrontherapy dosimetry with ionization chambers. We have used it to study the response of liquid-filled ionization chambers to hadrontherapy beams: dependence of initial recombination on ion species, energy and applied external electric field.

  8. Monte Carlo calculation of the ionization chamber response to 60Co beam using PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chul-Young; Hah, Suck-Ho; Yeom, Min Sun

    2006-05-01

    The calculation of the ionization chamber response is one of key factors to develop a primary standard of air kerma. Using Monte Carlo code PENELOPE, we simulated the cavity response of the plane parallel ionization chamber to the monoenergetic 60Co beam incident normally on a flat surface of the chamber. Two simulation techniques, namely, the uniform interaction technique and the reentrance technique, were introduced. The effect of the input parameters such as C1 (average angular deflection in a single step between hard elastic events), C2 (maximum average fractional energy loss in a step), S(max) (maximum step length) and W(cc) (the lower energy of secondary electrons created as a result of a hard collision) on the simulated cavity dose was evaluated. We found that the simulated cavity response of the graphite and solid air chambers obtained by PENELOPE to the monoenergetic 60Co beam could be consistent with the value expected from the cross-sections of PENELOPE to within 0.2% (one standard deviation) when W(cc) and S(max) were selected carefully.

  9. Micro-flame ionization detector with a novel structure for portable gas chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianwei; Wang, Hua; Duan, Chunfeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2010-08-15

    A micro-flame ionization detector (micro-FID) for portable gas chromatograph (GC) based on conventional mechanical fabrication techniques was developed and evaluated. Structure was redesigned and dimensions were optimized for best performance. Air is introduced from upper part of the detector, flowing downwards into the burning chamber along a narrow round gap between the collection electrode and the inner wall of the detector body, forming a uniform flow field around the burning jet. The lowest detection limit of the mu-FID was 5x10(-13)g/s for n-decane, with a linear response range of five orders of magnitude. The consumption of gases is only 10 ml/min for hydrogen, and 120 ml/min for air, that is about 1/3 of the gases required for conventional FIDs. A comparative study between the micro-FID and commercial FID was also performed that proved the advantages of the micro-FID. The micro-FID is simple in structure, low heating power, and low consumption of gases that not only decrease the cost of running, but also increase the portability of GC for filed applications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of the two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Jonas; Tölli, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    A method to correct for the general recombination losses for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams has been developed. The proposed method has been derived from Greening's theory for continuous beams and is based on measuring the signal from a liquid ionization chamber and an air filled monitor ionization chamber at two different dose rates. The method has been tested with two plane parallel liquid ionization chambers in a continuous radiation x-ray beam with a tube voltage of 120 kV and with dose rates between 2 and 13 Gy min-1. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers were isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4). The general recombination effect was studied using chamber polarizing voltages of 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 V for both liquids. The relative standard deviation of the results for the collection efficiency with respect to general recombination was found to be a maximum of 0.7% for isooctane and 2.4% for tetramethylsilane. The results are in excellent agreement with Greening's theory for collection efficiencies over 90%. The measured and corrected signals from the liquid ionization chambers used in this work are in very good agreement with the air filled monitor chamber with respect to signal to dose linearity.

  11. Application of the two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jonas; Tölli, Heikki

    2011-01-21

    A method to correct for the general recombination losses for liquid ionization chambers in continuous beams has been developed. The proposed method has been derived from Greening's theory for continuous beams and is based on measuring the signal from a liquid ionization chamber and an air filled monitor ionization chamber at two different dose rates. The method has been tested with two plane parallel liquid ionization chambers in a continuous radiation x-ray beam with a tube voltage of 120 kV and with dose rates between 2 and 13 Gy min(-1). The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers were isooctane (C(8)H(18)) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH(3))(4)). The general recombination effect was studied using chamber polarizing voltages of 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 V for both liquids. The relative standard deviation of the results for the collection efficiency with respect to general recombination was found to be a maximum of 0.7% for isooctane and 2.4% for tetramethylsilane. The results are in excellent agreement with Greening's theory for collection efficiencies over 90%. The measured and corrected signals from the liquid ionization chambers used in this work are in very good agreement with the air filled monitor chamber with respect to signal to dose linearity.

  12. WE-EF-207-11: Energy and Depth Response of Thermoluminescent Dosimeters and Ionization Chambers in Water for Kilovoltage X-Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, M; Palmer, B; DeWerd, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the effects of changes in beam quality on detector response in the kilovoltage energy range by modulating the x-ray tube voltage and the measurement depth in water. Methods: Measurements were performed with TLD-100 and TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters and an A12 farmer-type ionization chamber. To assess the energy response of the detectors, irradiations were performed at a depth of 3 cm in a custom-built thin-window water phantom using the moderately filtered x-ray beams at the UWADCL (20 kVp-250 kVp) and a Co-60 beam.The x-ray beams and detectors were modeled using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. The model was validated by simulating dose to the collecting volume of an A12 farmer chamber and comparing it with measured A12 signal as a function of depth. Dose was tallied to each detector and to water for comparison with measurements. Simulations were used to calculate the predicted energy response, which was compared to the measured response of each detector. Dose to each detector and dose to water as a function of depth were also simulated. Results: Detector output per dose to water was found to deviate by up to 15%, 20% and 30% as a function of energy relative to Co-60 for the A12, TLD-100H and TLD-100, respectively. The EGSnrc simulations produced results similar to the measurements for ionization chambers, but discrepancies of up to 30% were observed for TLD-100H. Simulated detector response as a function of depth was found to vary by up to 3%. Conclusion: These results suggest that changes in beam quality in kilovoltage x-ray beams can have a significant impact on detector response. In-water detector response was found to differ from the previously investigated in-air response. Deviations in detector response as a function of depth were less significant, but could potentially cause dosimetric errors if ignored.

  13. Evaluation of the smoke density chamber as an apparatus for fire toxicity screening tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Labossiere, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    The smoke density chamber is perhaps the most widely used apparatus for smoke measurements. Because of its availability, it has been proposed as an apparatus for evaluating fire toxicity. The standard apparatus and procedure were not found suitable for toxicity screening tests using laboratory animals, because not enough materials of interest produced animal mortality or even incapacitation under standard test conditions. With modifications, the chamber offers greater promise as a screening tool, but other tests specifically designed to measure relative toxicity may be more cost-effective. Where one-dimensional heat flux is a requirement, the chamber is the most suitable apparatus available. It should be improved in regard to visibility of animals and ease of cleaning.

  14. Calibration of the KRISS reference ionization chamber for certification of ²²²Rn gaseous sources.

    PubMed

    Lee, J M; Lee, K B; Lee, S H; Oh, P J; Park, T S; Kim, B C; Lee, M S

    2013-11-01

    A primary measurement system for gaseous (222)Rn based on the defined solid angle counting method has recently been constructed at KRISS and the reference ionization chamber used to measure the activities of gamma-emitting single radionuclides was adopted as a secondary standard for gaseous (222)Rn. A 20 mL flame-sealed glass ampoule source from the primary measurement system was used to calibrate the ionization chamber for (222)Rn. The (222)Rn efficiency of the ionization chamber was compared with that calculated by using a photon energy-dependent efficiency curve and that measured by using a standard (226)Ra solution. From the comparisons we draw the conclusion that the reference ionization chamber for gamma-emitting radionuclides can be a suitable secondary measurement system for gaseous (222)Rn sources.

  15. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Tornero-López, Ana M; Guirado, Damián; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel; Simancas, Fernando; Gazdic-Santic, Maja; Lallena, Antonio M

    2013-12-01

    Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of (125)I seeds. Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for (125)I selectSeed(TM) brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level. Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber. Variations of the altitude and changes in the weather conditions may produce

  16. A two-dimensional liquid-filled ionization chamber array prototype for small-field verification: characterization and first clinical tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brualla-González, Luis; Gómez, Faustino; Vicedo, Aurora; González-Castaño, Diego M.; Gago-Arias, Araceli; Pazos, Antonio; Zapata, Martín; Roselló, Joan V.; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2012-08-01

    In this work we present the design, characterization and first clinical tests of an in-house developed two-dimensional liquid-filled ionization chamber prototype for the verification of small radiotherapy fields and treatments containing such small fields as in radiosurgery, which consists of 2 mm × 2 mm pixels arranged on a 16×8 rectangular grid. The ionization medium is isooctane. The characterization of the device included the study of depth, field-size and dose-rate dependences, which are sufficiently moderate for a good operation at therapy radiation levels. However, the detector presents an important anisotropic response, up to ≃ 12% for front versus near-lateral incidence, which can impact the verification of full treatments with different incidences. In such a case, an anisotropy correction factor can be applied. Output factors of small square fields measured with the device show a small systematic over-response, less than 1%, when compared to unshielded diode measurements. An IMRT radiosurgery treatment has been acquired with the liquid-filled ionization chamber device and compared with film dosimetry by using the gamma method, showing good agreement: over 99% passing rates for 1.2% and 1.2 mm for an incidence-per-incidence analysis; 100% passing rates for tolerances 1.8% and 1.8 mm when the whole treatment is analysed and the anisotropy correction factor is applied. The point dose verification for each incidence of the treatment performed with the liquid-filled ionization chamber agrees within 1% with a CC01 ionization chamber. This prototype has shown the utility of this kind of technology for the verification of small fields/treatments. Currently, a larger device covering a 5 cm × 5 cm area is under development.

  17. The calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers for dosimetry of electron beams.

    PubMed

    Almond, P R; Xu, Z; Li, H; Park, H C

    1995-08-01

    The AAPM TG 39 protocol has proposed three different methods of calibrating plane-parallel ionization chambers, i.e., in-phantom irradiation with a high-energy electron beam and in-phantom and in-air 60Co irradiation. To verify the consistency of the three methods, we have measured Ngaspp values using each of these techniques for the five most commonly used plane-parallel chambers considered by the protocol. Our results demonstrate that the measured Ngaspp values for the three different methods for any of the chambers agree to within +/- 0.6%. Once Ngaspp was measured, the determination of absorbed dose for electron beams with different energies for an AECL Therac 20 and Philips SL25 was carried out according to the AAPM TG 39 protocol. The results show that the determination of the absorbed dose outputs for any of the five chambers agree to within +/- 0.7% for electron-beam energies of 4-20 MeV if all five chambers had Ngaspp values determined by the electron-beam method. The uncertainties are well within the expected error for these approaches.

  18. Home radon monitor modeled after the common smoke detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, R.D.; Arnone, G.J.; Johnson, J.P.

    1995-02-01

    The EPA has declared that five million or so of the nation`s 80 million homes may have indoor radon levels that pose an unacceptably high risk of lung cancer to occupants. They estimate that four times as many people die from radon-induced lung cancers as from fires in the home. Therefore the EPA has recommended that all homes be tested and that action be taken to reduce the radon concentration in homes that test above the 4 pCi/L level. The push to have homeowners voluntarily test for elevated radon levels has been only marginally successful. A reliable, inexpensive, and accurate in-home radon monitor designed along the same general lines as a home smoke detector might overcome much of the public reluctance to test homes for radon. Such a Home Radon Monitor (HRM) is under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. To be acceptable to the public, HRMs should have the following characteristics in common with smoke detectors: low cost, small size, ease of installation and use, low maintenance, and high performance. Recent advances in Long-Range Alpha Detection technology are being used in the design of a HRM that should meet or exceed all these characteristics. A proof-of-principle HRM detector prototype has been constructed and results from tests of this prototype will be presented.

  19. Characterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA-universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, C.; Boissonnat, G.; Brusasco, C.; Colin, J.; Cussol, D.; Fontbonne, J. M.; Marchand, B.; Mertens, T.; de Neuter, S.; Peronnel, J.

    2014-02-01

    Every radiotherapy center has to be equipped with real-time beam monitoring devices. In 2008, we developed an ionization chamber in collaboration with the IBA (Ion Beam Applications) company. This monitoring device called IC2/3 was developed to be used in IBA universal irradiation head for Pencil Beam Scanning (PBS). Here we present the characterization of the IC2/3 monitor in the energy and flux ranges used in protontherapy. The equipment has been tested with an IBA cyclotron able to deliver proton beams from 70 to 230 MeV. This beam monitoring device has been validated and is now installed at the Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen protontherapy center (WPE, Germany). The results obtained in both terms of spatial resolution and dose measurements are at least equal to the initial specifications needed for PBS purposes. The detector measures the dose with a relative uncertainty lower than 1% in the range from 0.5 Gy/min to 8 Gy/min while the spatial resolution is better than 250 μm. The technology has been patented and five IC2/3 chambers were delivered to IBA. Nowadays, IBA produces the IC2/3 beam monitoring device as a part of its Proteus 235 product.

  20. An online proton beam monitor for cancer therapy based on ionization chambers with micro pattern readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile, E.; Carloni, A.; Castelluccio, D. M.; Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; De Angelis, G.; Fratoni, R.; Frullani, S.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Santavenere, F.; Vacca, G.

    2012-03-01

    A unique compact LINAC accelerator for proton therapy is under development in Italy within the TOP-IMPLART project. The proton beam will reach the kinetic energy of 230 MeV, it will have a widely variable current intensity (0.1-10 μA, with average up to 3.5 nA) associated with a high pulse repetition frequency (1-3.5 μs long pulses at 10-100 Hz). The TOP-IMPLART system will provide a fully active 3+1D dose delivery, that is longitudinal (energy modulation), transverse active spot scanning, and current intensity modulation. These accelerator features will permit a highly conformational dose distribution, which therefore requires an effective, online, beam monitor system with wide dynamic range, good sensitivity, adequate spatial resolution and rapid response. In order to fulfill these requisites a new device is under development for the monitoring of the beam intensity profile, its centroid and direction; it is based on transmission, segmented, ionization chambers with typical active area of 100 × 100 mm2. Micro pattern x/y pad like design has been used for the readout plane in order to maximize the field uniformity, reduce the chamber thickness and obtain both beam coordinates on a single chamber. The chamber prototype operates in ionization region to minimize saturation and discharge effects. Simulations (based on FLUKA) have been carried on to study the perturbation of the chamber on the beam parameters and the effects on the delivered dose (on a water phantom). The charge collected in each channel is integrated by dedicated auto-ranging readout electronics: an original scheme has been developed in order to have an input dynamic range greater than 104 with sensitivity better than 3%. This is achieved by a dynamical adjustment of the integrating capacitance to the signal intensity.

  1. The response of prototype plane-parallel ionization chambers in small megavoltage x-ray fields.

    PubMed

    McNiven, Andrea L; Mulligan, Matt; Kron, Tomas; Battista, Jerry J

    2006-11-01

    Accurate small-field dosimetry has become important with the use of multiple small fields in modern radiotherapy treatments such as IMRT and stereotactic radiosurgery. In this study, we investigate the response of a set of prototype plane-parallel ionization chambers, based upon the Exradin T11 chamber, with active volume diameters of 2, 4, 10, and 20 mm, exposed to 6 MV stereotactic radiotherapy x-ray fields. Our goal was to assess their usefulness for accurate small x-ray field dose measurements. The relative ionization response was measured in circular fields (0.5 to 4 cm diameter) as compared to a 10 x 10 cm2 reference field. A large discrepancy (approximately 40%) was found between the relative response in the smallest plane-parallel chamber and other small volume dosimeters (radiochromic film, micro-metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor and diode) used for comparison. Monte Carlo BEAMnrc simulations were used to simulate the experimental setup in order to investigate the cause of the under-response and to calculate appropriate correction factors that could be applied to experimental measurements. It was found that in small fields, the air cavity of these custom-made research chambers perturbed the secondary electron fluence profile significantly, resulting in decreased fluence within the active volume, which in turn produces a chamber under-response. It is demonstrated that a large correction to the p(fl) correction factor would be required to improve dosimetric accuracy in small fields, and that these factors could be derived using Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carcreff, H.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g-1 and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  3. Ambiguities in the grid-inefficiency correction for Frisch-Grid Ionization Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adili, A.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Bencardino, R.; Oberstedt, S.; Pomp, S.

    2012-05-01

    Ionization chambers with Frisch grids have been very successfully applied to neutron-induced fission-fragment studies during the past 20 years. They are radiation resistant and can be easily adapted to the experimental conditions. The use of Frisch grids has the advantage to remove the angular dependency from the charge induced on the anode plate. However, due to the Grid Inefficiency (GI) in shielding the charges, the anode signal remains slightly angular dependent. The correction for the GI is, however, essential to determine the correct energy of the ionizing particles. GI corrections can amount to a few percent of the anode signal. Presently, two contradicting correction methods are considered in literature. The first method adding the angular-dependent part of the signal to the signal pulse height; the second method subtracting the former from the latter. Both additive and subtractive approaches were investigated in an experiment where a Twin Frisch-Grid Ionization Chamber (TFGIC) was employed to detect the spontaneous fission fragments (FF) emitted by a 252Cf source. Two parallel-wire grids with different wire spacing (1 and 2 mm, respectively), were used individually, in the same chamber side. All the other experimental conditions were unchanged. The 2 mm grid featured more than double the GI of the 1 mm grid. The induced charge on the anode in both measurements was compared, before and after GI correction. Before GI correction, the 2 mm grid resulted in a lower pulse-height distribution than the 1 mm grid. After applying both GI corrections to both measurements only the additive approach led to consistent grid independent pulse-height distributions. The application of the subtractive correction on the contrary led to inconsistent, grid-dependent results. It is also shown that the impact of either of the correction methods is small on the FF mass distributions of 235U(nth, f).

  4. Monte Carlo calculations of correction factors for plane-parallel ionization chambers in clinical electron dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio

    2008-09-15

    Recent standard dosimetry protocols recommend that plane-parallel ionization chambers be used in the measurements of depth-dose distributions or the calibration of low-energy electron beams with beam quality R{sub 50}<4 g/cm{sup 2}. In electron dosimetry protocols with the plane-parallel chambers, the wall correction factor, P{sub wall}, in water is assumed to be unity and the replacement correction factor, P{sub repl}, is taken to be unity for well-guarded plane-parallel chambers, at all measurement depths. This study calculated P{sub wall} and P{sub repl} for NACP-02, Markus, and Roos plane-parallel chambers in clinical electron dosimetry using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. The P{sub wall} values for the plane-parallel chambers increased rapidly as a function of depth in water, especially at lower energy. The value around R{sub 50} for NACP-02 was about 10% greater than unity at 4 MeV. The effect was smaller for higher electron energies. Similarly, P{sub repl} values with depth increased drastically at the region with the steep dose gradient for lower energy. For Markus P{sub repl} departed more than 10% from unity close to R{sub 50} due to the narrow guard ring width. P{sub repl} for NACP-02 and Roos was close to unity in the plateau region of depth-dose curves that includes a reference depth, d{sub ref}. It was also found that the ratio of the dose to water and the dose to the sensitive volume in the air cavity for the plane-parallel chambers, D{sub w}/[D{sub air}]{sub pp}, at d{sub ref} differs significantly from that assumed by electron dosimetry protocols.

  5. Feasibility of calibrating elongated brachytherapy sources using a well-type ionization chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Meigooni, Ali S.; Awan, Shahid B.; Dou, Kai

    2006-11-15

    Recently, elongated brachytherapy sources (active length >1 cm) have become commercially available for interstitial prostate implants. These sources were introduced to improve the quality of brachytherapy procedures by eliminating the migration and seed bunching associated with loose seed-type implants. However, the inability to calibrate elongated brachytherapy sources with the Wide-Angle Free-Air Chamber (WAFAC) used by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) hinders the experimental determination of dosimetric parameters of these source types. In order to resolve this shortcoming, an interim solution has been introduced for calibration of elongated brachytherapy sources using a commercially available well-type ionization chamber. The feasibility of this procedure was examined by calibrating RadioCoil{sup Tm} {sup 103}Pd sources with active lengths ranging from 1 to 7 cm.

  6. Argon/propane ionization-chamber dosimetry for mixed x-ray/neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R J

    1978-01-01

    The photoneutrons produced by high-energy x-ray machines can diffuse through the mazes usually employed at the treatment-room entrance and readily penetrate the lead-lined doors used for x-ray shielding. The measurement of these neutrons in the presence of x-rays and the determination of dose equivalent poses a problem for which there is currently no standard method of solution. In order to separate x-ray dose from neutron dose, the author employed an ionization chamber alternately filled with argon or propane. The response characteristics of this chamber to x-ray and neutrons are described. Quality factors were determined from a calculated neutron spectrum. As a result of these measurements, a 10-in. polyethylene door was added to the entranceway of a 25-MV linear accelerator.

  7. Application of patent BR102013018500-0 in well type ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, C. H. S.; Peixoto, J. G. P.

    2016-07-01

    The definition of the radioactive sample position in a well type ionization chamber is the largest source of uncertainty in the measurement of quantity activity. The determination of this parameter in two activimeters helped to improve their accuracies, from 2.62 and 2.59% to 3.87 and 1.74%, with and without the use of the positioning device, concluding, that with their use has reached an uncertainty of U =2276 and 0.2677% (k = 2) 95.45%.

  8. Calibration and efficiency curve of SANAEM ionization chamber for activity measurements.

    PubMed

    Yeltepe, Emin; Kossert, Karsten; Dirican, Abdullah; Nähle, Ole; Niedergesäß, Christiane; Kemal Şahin, Namik

    2016-03-01

    A commercially available Fidelis ionization chamber was calibrated and assessed in PTB with activity standard solutions. The long-term stability and linearity of the system was checked. Energy-dependent efficiency curves for photons and beta particles were determined, using an iterative method in Excel™, to enable calibration factors to be calculated for radionuclides which were not used in the calibration. Relative deviations between experimental and calculated radionuclide efficiencies are of the order of 1% for most photon emitters and below 5% for pure beta emitters. The system will enable TAEK-SANAEM to provide traceable activity measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pulsed Discharge Helium Ionization Detector for Highly Sensitive Aquametry.

    PubMed

    Mowry, Curtis D; Pimentel, Adam S; Sparks, Elizabeth S; Moorman, Matthew W; Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Manginell, Ronald P

    2016-01-01

    Trace moisture quantitation is crucial in medical, civilian and military applications. Current aquametry technologies are limited by the sample volume, reactivity, or interferences, and/or instrument size, weight, power, cost, and complexity. We report for the first time on the use of a pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (PDHID-D2) (∼196 cm(3)) for the sensitive (limit of detection, 0.047 ng; 26 ppm), linear (r(2) >0.99), and rapid (< 2 min) quantitation of water using a small (0.2 - 5.0 μL) volume of liquid or gas. The relative humidity sensitivity was 0.22% (61.4 ppmv) with a limit of detection of less than 1 ng moisture with gaseous samples. The sensitivity was 10 to 100 to fold superior to competing technologies without the disadvantages inherent to these technologies. The PDHID-D2, due to its small footprint and low power requirement, has good size, weight, and power-portability (SWAPP) factors. The relatively low cost (∼$5000) and commercial availability of the PDHID-D2 makes our technique applicable to highly sensitive aquametry.

  10. Ion recombination for ionization chamber dosimetry in a helical tomotherapy unit.

    PubMed

    Palmans, H; Thomas, R A S; Duane, S; Sterpin, E; Vynckier, S

    2010-06-01

    Ion recombination for ionization chambers in pulsed high-energy photon beams is a well-studied phenomenon. Despite this, the correction for ion recombination is often determined inaccurately due to the inappropriate combination of using a high polarizing voltage and the simple two-voltage method. An additional complication arises in new treatment modalities such as IMRT and tomotherapy, where the dosimetry of a superposition of many constituting fields becomes more relevant than of single static fields. For these treatment modalities, the irradiation of the ion chamber geometry can be instantaneously inhomogeneous and time dependent. This article presents a study of ion recombination in ionization chambers used for dosimetry in a helical tomotherapy beam. Models are presented for studying the recombination correction factors in a continuous beam, in pulsed large and small fields, and in helical fields. Measurements using Exradin A1SL, NE2571, and NE2611 type chambers and Monte Carlo simulations usingPENELOPE are performed in support of these models. Initial recombination and charge multiplication are found to be the same in C60o and in the pulsed high-energy photon beam for the chambers and operating voltages used in this study. Applying the two-voltage technique for the A1SL chamber at its recommended operating voltage of 300 V leads to an overestimation of the recombination. Operating at a voltage of 100 V yields larger but more accurate values for the recombination correction. The recombination correction measured for this chamber in the TomoTherapy HiArt unit is lower than the 1% applied in the routine dosimetry for this treatment unit. For a helical dose delivery with a small slice width, lateral electron scatter in the cavity makes that the recombination is smaller than for an open beam delivering the same total dose. In a Farmer type chamber, a helical delivery with a 1 cm slice field results in a time and spatially integrated volume recombination of 55% of

  11. Ion recombination for ionization chamber dosimetry in a helical tomotherapy unit.

    PubMed

    Palmans, H; Thomas, R A S; Duane, S; Sterpin, E; Vynckier, S

    2010-06-01

    Ion recombination for ionization chambers in pulsed high-energy photon beams is a well-studied phenomenon. Despite this, the correction for ion recombination is often determined inaccurately due to the inappropriate combination of using a high polarizing voltage and the simple two-voltage method. An additional complication arises in new treatment modalities such as IMRT and tomotherapy, where the dosimetry of a superposition of many constituting fields becomes more relevant than of single static fields. For these treatment modalities, the irradiation of the ion chamber geometry can be instantaneously inhomogeneous and time dependent. This article presents a study of ion recombination in ionization chambers used for dosimetry in a helical tomotherapy beam. Models are presented for studying the recombination correction factors in a continuous beam, in pulsed large and small fields, and in helical fields. Measurements using Exradin A1SL, NE2571, and NE2611 type chambers and Monte Carlo simulations using PENELOPE are performed in support of these models. Initial recombination and charge multiplication are found to be the same in 60Co and in the pulsed high-energy photon beam for the chambers and operating voltages used in this study. Applying the two-voltage technique for the A1SL chamber at its recommended operating voltage of 300 V leads to an overestimation of the recombination. Operating at a voltage of 100 V yields larger but more accurate values for the recombination correction. The recombination correction measured for this chamber in the TomoTherapy HiArt unit is lower than the 1% applied in the routine dosimetry for this treatment unit. For a helical dose delivery with a small slice width, lateral electron scatter in the cavity makes that the recombination is smaller than for an open beam delivering the same total dose. In a Farmer type chamber, a helical delivery with a 1 cm slice field results in a time and spatially integrated volume recombination of 55% of

  12. Use of a two-dimensional ionization chamber array for proton therapy beam quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Arjomandy, Bijan; Sahoo, Narayan; Ding, Xiaoning; Gillin, Michael

    2008-09-01

    Two-dimensional ion chamber arrays are primarily used for conventional and intensity modulated radiotherapy quality assurance. There is no commercial device of such type available on the market that is offered for proton therapy quality assurance. We have investigated suitability of the MatriXX, a commercial two-dimensional ion chamber array detector for proton therapy QA. This device is designed to be used for photon and electron therapy QA. The device is equipped with 32 x 32 parallel plate ion chambers, each with 4.5 mm diam and 7.62 mm center-to-center separation. A 250 MeV proton beam was used to calibrate the dose measured by this device. The water equivalent thickness of the buildup material was determined to be 3.9 mm using a 160 MeV proton beam. Proton beams of different energies were used to measure the reproducibility of dose output and to evaluate the consistency in the beam flatness and symmetry measured by MatriXX. The output measurement results were compared with the clinical commissioning beam data that were obtained using a 0.6 cc Farmer chamber. The agreement was consistently found to be within 1%. The profiles were compared with film dosimetry and also with ion chamber data in water with an excellent agreement. The device is found to be well suited for quality assurance of proton therapy beams. It provides fast two-dimensional dose distribution information in real time with the accuracy comparable to that of ion chamber measurements and film dosimetry.

  13. A new re-entrant ionization chamber for the calibration of iridium-192 high dose rate sources.

    PubMed

    Goetsch, S J; Attix, F H; DeWerd, L A; Thomadsen, B R

    1992-01-01

    A re-entrant (well-type) ionization chamber has been designed and fabricated at the University of Wisconsin for use with iridium-192 high dose-rate (HDR) remote after-loading brachytherapy devices. The chamber was designed to provide an ionization current of about 10(-8) ampere with a nominal 10 curie iridium-192 source. A narrow opening is provided into the sensitive volume of the chamber to insert a Nucletron MicroSelectron catheter, or catheters with similar diameters from other HDR manufacturers. The chamber exhibits a flat response (+/- 0.1%) for any source position within +/-4 mm of the chamber center. A 300 volt chamber bias yields a 99.96% ion collection efficiency. The chamber is capable of being calibrated directly with an iridium-192 source which has in turn been calibrated with thimble-type ion chambers. Reproducibility for readings in the current mode for 10 consecutive insertions of the MicroSelectron iridium-192 HDR source is within 0.02% or less. Two thimble chambers calibrated by the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology provide calibration traceability of iridium-192 HDR sources and re-entrant chambers to a primary national standards laboratory. Results of activity measurements of 6 commercial iridium-192 HDR sources are reported.

  14. Technical Note: Impact of the geometry dependence of the ion chamber detector response function on a convolution-based method to address the volume averaging effect.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, Brendan; Li, Jonathan G; Lebron, Sharon; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the geometry dependence of the detector response function (DRF) of three commonly used scanning ionization chambers and its impact on a convolution-based method to address the volume averaging effect (VAE). A convolution-based approach has been proposed recently to address the ionization chamber VAE. It simulates the VAE in the treatment planning system (TPS) by iteratively convolving the calculated beam profiles with the DRF while optimizing the beam model. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to the same VAE, the calculated profiles match the implicit "real" ones when the optimization converges. Three DRFs (Gaussian, Lorentzian, and parabolic function) were used for three ionization chambers (CC04, CC13, and SNC125c) in this study. Geometry dependent/independent DRFs were obtained by minimizing the difference between the ionization chamber-measured profiles and the diode-measured profiles convolved with the DRFs. These DRFs were used to obtain eighteen beam models for a commercial TPS. Accuracy of the beam models were evaluated by assessing the 20%-80% penumbra width difference (PWD) between the computed and diode-measured beam profiles. The convolution-based approach was found to be effective for all three ionization chambers with significant improvement for all beam models. Up to 17% geometry dependence of the three DRFs was observed for the studied ionization chambers. With geometry dependent DRFs, the PWD was within 0.80 mm for the parabolic function and CC04 combination and within 0.50 mm for other combinations; with geometry independent DRFs, the PWD was within 1.00 mm for all cases. When using the Gaussian function as the DRF, accounting for geometry dependence led to marginal improvement (PWD < 0.20 mm) for CC04; the improvement ranged from 0.38 to 0.65 mm for CC13; for SNC125c, the improvement was slightly above 0.50 mm. Although all three DRFs were found adequate to represent the response of the studied ionization

  15. Technical Note: Impact of the geometry dependence of the ion chamber detector response function on a convolution-based method to address the volume averaging effect

    SciTech Connect

    Barraclough, Brendan; Lebron, Sharon; Li, Jonathan G.; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray; Yan, Guanghua

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the geometry dependence of the detector response function (DRF) of three commonly used scanning ionization chambers and its impact on a convolution-based method to address the volume averaging effect (VAE). Methods: A convolution-based approach has been proposed recently to address the ionization chamber VAE. It simulates the VAE in the treatment planning system (TPS) by iteratively convolving the calculated beam profiles with the DRF while optimizing the beam model. Since the convolved and the measured profiles are subject to the same VAE, the calculated profiles match the implicit “real” ones when the optimization converges. Three DRFs (Gaussian, Lorentzian, and parabolic function) were used for three ionization chambers (CC04, CC13, and SNC125c) in this study. Geometry dependent/independent DRFs were obtained by minimizing the difference between the ionization chamber-measured profiles and the diode-measured profiles convolved with the DRFs. These DRFs were used to obtain eighteen beam models for a commercial TPS. Accuracy of the beam models were evaluated by assessing the 20%–80% penumbra width difference (PWD) between the computed and diode-measured beam profiles. Results: The convolution-based approach was found to be effective for all three ionization chambers with significant improvement for all beam models. Up to 17% geometry dependence of the three DRFs was observed for the studied ionization chambers. With geometry dependent DRFs, the PWD was within 0.80 mm for the parabolic function and CC04 combination and within 0.50 mm for other combinations; with geometry independent DRFs, the PWD was within 1.00 mm for all cases. When using the Gaussian function as the DRF, accounting for geometry dependence led to marginal improvement (PWD < 0.20 mm) for CC04; the improvement ranged from 0.38 to 0.65 mm for CC13; for SNC125c, the improvement was slightly above 0.50 mm. Conclusions: Although all three DRFs were found adequate to

  16. Technical Note: Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of two cylindrical ionization chambers in a clinical proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, Yuya; Nishio, Teiji; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: IAEA TRS-398 notes that cylindrical ionization chambers are preferred for reference proton dosimetry. If a cylindrical ionization chamber is used in a phantom to measure the dose as a function of depth, the effective point of measurement (EPOM) must be taken into account. IAEA TRS-398 recommends a displacement of 0.75 times the inner cavity radius (0.75R) for heavy ion beams. Theoretical models by Palmans and by Bhullar and Watchman confirmed this value. However, the experimental results vary from author to author. The purpose of this study is to accurately measure the displacement and explain the past experimental discrepancies. Methods: In this work, we measured the EPOM of cylindrical ionization chambers with high accuracy by comparing the Bragg-peak position obtained with cylindrical ionization chambers (PTW 30013, PTW 31016) to that obtained using a plane-parallel ionization chamber (PTW 34045). Results: The EPOMs of PTW 30013 and 31016 were shifted by 0.92 ± 0.07 R with R = 3.05 mm and 0.90 ± 0.14 R with R = 1.45 mm, respectively, from the reference point toward the source. Conclusions: The EPOMs obtained were greater than the value of 0.75R proposed by the IAEA TRS-398 and the analytical results.

  17. Ion-recombination correction for different ionization chambers in high dose rate flattening-filter-free photon beams.

    PubMed

    Lang, Stephanie; Hrbacek, Jan; Leong, Aidan; Klöck, Stephan

    2012-05-07

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in flattening-filter-free (FFF) linear accelerators. Removal of the filter results in available dose rates up to 24 Gy min(-1) (for nominal energy 10 MV in depth of maximum dose, a source-surface distance of 100 cm and a field size of 10×10 cm2). To guarantee accurate relative and reference dosimetry for the FFF beams, we investigated the charge collection efficiency of multiple air-vented and one liquid ionization chamber for dose rates up to 31.9 Gy min(-1). For flattened beams, the ion-collection efficiency of all air-vented ionization chambers (except for the PinPoint chamber) was above 0.995. By removing the flattening filter, we found a reduction in collection efficiency of approximately 0.5-0.9% for a 10 MV beam. For FFF beams, the Markus chamber showed the largest collection efficiency of 0.994. The observed collection efficiencies were dependent on dose per pulse, but independent of the pulse repetition frequency. Using the liquid ionization chamber, the ion-collection efficiency for flattened beams was above 0.990 for all dose rates. However, this chamber showed a low collection efficiency of 0.940 for the FFF 10 MV beam at a dose rate of 31.9 Gy min(-1). All investigated air-vented ionization chambers can be reliably used for relative dosimetry of FFF beams. The order of correction for reference dosimetry is given in the manuscript. Due to their increased saturation in high dose rate FFF beams, liquid ionization chambers appear to be unsuitable for dosimetry within these contexts.

  18. Ion-recombination correction for different ionization chambers in high dose rate flattening-filter-free photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Stephanie; Hrbacek, Jan; Leong, Aidan; Klöck, Stephan

    2012-05-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in flattening-filter-free (FFF) linear accelerators. Removal of the filter results in available dose rates up to 24 Gy min-1 (for nominal energy 10 MV in depth of maximum dose, a source-surface distance of 100 cm and a field size of 10×10 cm2). To guarantee accurate relative and reference dosimetry for the FFF beams, we investigated the charge collection efficiency of multiple air-vented and one liquid ionization chamber for dose rates up to 31.9 Gy min-1. For flattened beams, the ion-collection efficiency of all air-vented ionization chambers (except for the PinPoint chamber) was above 0.995. By removing the flattening filter, we found a reduction in collection efficiency of approximately 0.5-0.9% for a 10 MV beam. For FFF beams, the Markus chamber showed the largest collection efficiency of 0.994. The observed collection efficiencies were dependent on dose per pulse, but independent of the pulse repetition frequency. Using the liquid ionization chamber, the ion-collection efficiency for flattened beams was above 0.990 for all dose rates. However, this chamber showed a low collection efficiency of 0.940 for the FFF 10 MV beam at a dose rate of 31.9 Gy min-1. All investigated air-vented ionization chambers can be reliably used for relative dosimetry of FFF beams. The order of correction for reference dosimetry is given in the manuscript. Due to their increased saturation in high dose rate FFF beams, liquid ionization chambers appear to be unsuitable for dosimetry within these contexts.

  19. Matrix:. AN Innovative Pixel Ionization Chamber for On-Line Beam Monitoring in Hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braccini, S.; Pitta', G.; Donetti, M.; Cirio, R.; La Rosa, A.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Marchetto, F.; Peroni, C.

    2006-04-01

    The control of intensity, position and shape of clinical beams are key issues in the treatment of tumours using hadron beams, especially in the case of active dose distribution systems. For this purpose an innovative pixel ionization chamber, named MATRIX, has been designed, constructed and tested. The chamber is conceived to be located very near the patient to precisely monitor the beam parameters used to verify the treatment planning specifications. MATRIX operates in air and is characterized by a 21 × 21 cm2 sensitive area subdivided in 1024 pixels of 6.5 × 6.5 mm2. To minimize the amount of material crossed by the beam, the anode is made of a 50 μm kapton foil, with a deposit of 17 μm copper on each side. A very sensitive electronics is used for the readout, based on a dedicated chip. In this paper the construction of the chamber and the very positive results of the first beam tests are described.

  20. [Experimental investigation of the collection efficiency of a PTW Roos ionization chamber irradiated with pulsed beams at high pulse dose with different pulse lengths].

    PubMed

    Karsch, Leonhard; Richter, Christian; Pawelke, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    In gas-filled ionization chambers as radiation detectors, the collection of the charge carriers is affected by the recombination effect. In dosimetry this effect must be accounted for by the saturation correction factor k(S). The physical description of the correction factor by Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk for pulsed radiation is well established. However, this description is only accurate when the pulse length is short compared to the collection time of the ionization chamber. In this work experimental investigations of the saturation correction factor have been made for pulses of 4 μ s up to pulse doses of about 230 mGy, and the theory of Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk was again confirmed. For longer pulses, however, the correction factor decreases and at a pulse duration of about 200μs reaches 75% of the value valid for short pulses. This reduced influence of the ion recombination is interpreted by the reaction kinetics of ion recombination as a second-order reaction. This effect is negligible for PTW Roos chambers at clinical linear accelerators with 4 μ s pulse duration for pulse doses up to 120 mGy.

  1. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-01: Calculation of KQ for a Variety of Commercially Available Ionization Chambers in the Presence of An External Magnetic Field for MR-Linac Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    O’Brien, D J; Mathis, M V P; Ibbott, G; Sawakuchi, G O; Roberts, D A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The strong magnetic fields associated with MRI have a significant impact on the dosimetry of radiotherapy beams as well as on the response of the detectors used to measure it. In order to calibrate the dose delivered by these beams, it is necessary to correct for these effects when performing measurements with ionization chambers. Methods: Detailed models of 16 commercially-available ionization chambers were implemented in Geant4. To validate these models, calculations of the beam quality correction factor kQ (defined by TG-51) were performed using the spectrum from a 6 MV Elekta SL25. kQ values were then recalculated for each detector with a 1.5 T external magnetic field applied uniformly across the geometry. Chamber, beam and B-field were all orthogonal. Results: The comparison between the kQ calculations and TG-51 showed agreement within 1.4%. The B-field calculations indicate that the change in kQ values due to the B-field is strongly affected by the volume and material of the ionization chamber. All large volume (>0.5 cm {sup 3}) ionization chambers had lower kQ values when used in a B-field. The kQ values for small volume chambers were very sensitive to the chambers’ collecting volume and could be higher or lower when used in a B-field. Conclusions: Of the chambers tested, the PTW 30011 demonstrated the smallest correction of just 1.2%. The next step is to calculate kQ using the energy spectrum from an actual MR-linac. Further validation of these results against measurements will be paramount before they can be used. Funding provided by Elekta Limited. The MR-linac spectrum will be provided by Elekta Limited based on a machine they have designed.

  2. A general algorithm for calculation of recombination losses in ionization chambers exposed to ion beams.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jeppe Brage; Tölli, Heikki; Bassler, Niels

    2016-10-01

    Dosimetry with ionization chambers in clinical ion beams for radiation therapy requires correction for recombination effects. However, common radiation protocols discriminate between initial and general recombination and provide no universal correction method for the presence of both recombination types in ion beams of charged particles heavier than protons. The advent of multiple field optimization in ion beams, allowing for complex patterns of dose delivery in both temporal and spatial domains, results in new challenges for recombination correction where the resulting recombination depends on the plan delivered. Here, the authors present the open source code IonTracks version 1.0, where the combined initial and general recombination effects in principle can be predicted for any ion beam with arbitrary particle-energy spectrum and temporal structure. IonTracks uses track structure theory to distribute the charge carriers in ion tracks. The charge carrier movements are governed by a pair of coupled differential equations, based on fundamental physical properties as charge carrier drift, diffusion, and recombination, which are solved numerically while the initial and general charge carrier recombination is computed. A space charge screening of the electric field is taken into account and the algorithm furthermore allows an inclusion of a free-electron component. The algorithm is numerically stable and in accordance with experimentally validated theories for initial recombination in heavy ion tracks and general recombination in a proton beam. Given IonTracks' ability to handle arbitrary inputs, IonTracks can in principle be applied to any complex particle field in the spatial and temporal domain. IonTracks is validated against the Jaffé's and Boag's theory of recombination in pulsed beams of multiple ion species. IonTracks is able to calculate the correction factor for initial and general recombination losses in parallel-plate ionization chambers. Even if only few

  3. Determination of small-field correction factors for cylindrical ionization chambers using a semiempirical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Bak, Jino; Park, Sungho; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Suk Won

    2016-02-01

    A semiempirical method based on the averaging effect of the sensitive volumes of different air-filled ionization chambers (ICs) was employed to approximate the correction factors for beam quality produced from the difference in the sizes of the reference field and small fields. We measured the output factors using several cylindrical ICs and calculated the correction factors using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution; in the method, we modeled the variable and inhomogeneous energy fluence function within the chamber cavity. The parameters of the modeled function and the correction factors were determined by solving a developed system of equations as well as on the basis of the measurement data and the geometry of the chambers. Further, Monte Carlo (MC) computations were performed using the Monaco® treatment planning system to validate the proposed method. The determined correction factors (k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} ) were comparable to the values derived from the MC computations performed using Monaco®. For example, for a 6 MV photon beam and a field size of 1  ×  1 cm2, k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} was calculated to be 1.125 for a PTW 31010 chamber and 1.022 for a PTW 31016 chamber. On the other hand, the k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} values determined from the MC computations were 1.121 and 1.031, respectively; the difference between the proposed method and the MC computation is less than 2%. In addition, we determined the k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} values for PTW 30013, PTW 31010, PTW 31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13 chambers as well. We devised a method for determining k{{Q\\text{msr}},Q}{{f\\text{smf}}, {{f}\\text{ref}}} from both the measurement of the output factors and model-based mathematical computation. The proposed method can be useful in case the MC simulation would not be applicable for the clinical settings.

  4. Development and clinical evaluation of an ionization chamber array with 3.5 mm pixel pitch for quality assurance in advanced radiotherapy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Togno, M.; Wilkens, J. J.; Menichelli, D.; Oechsner, M.; Perez-Andujar, A.; Morin, O.

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To characterize a new air vented ionization chamber technology, suitable to build detector arrays with small pixel pitch and independence of sensitivity on dose per pulse. Methods: The prototype under test is a linear array of air vented ionization chambers, consisting of 80 pixels with 3.5 mm pixel pitch distance and a sensitive volume of about 4 mm{sup 3}. The detector has been characterized with {sup 60}Co radiation and MV x rays from different linear accelerators (with flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Sensitivity dependence on dose per pulse has been evaluated under MV x rays by changing both the source to detector distance and the beam quality. Bias voltage has been varied in order to evaluate the charge collection efficiency in the most critical conditions. Relative dose profiles have been measured for both flattened and unflattened distributions with different field sizes. The reference detectors were a commercial array of ionization chambers and an amorphous silicon flat panel in direct conversion configuration. Profiles of dose distribution have been measured also with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) patient plans. Comparison has been done with a commercial diode array and with Gafchromic EBT3 films. Results: Repeatability and stability under continuous gamma irradiation are within 0.3%, in spite of low active volume and sensitivity (∼200 pC/Gy). Deviation from linearity is in the range [0.3%, −0.9%] for a dose of at least 20 cGy, while a worsening of linearity is observed below 10 cGy. Charge collection efficiency with 2.67 mGy/pulse is higher than 99%, leading to a ±0.9% sensitivity change in the range 0.09–2.67 mGy/pulse (covering all flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Tissue to phantom ratios show an agreement within 0.6% with the reference detector up to 34 cm depth. For field sizes in the range 2 × 2 to 15 × 15 cm{sup 2}, the

  5. Development and clinical evaluation of an ionization chamber array with 3.5 mm pixel pitch for quality assurance in advanced radiotherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Togno, M; Wilkens, J J; Menichelli, D; Oechsner, M; Perez-Andujar, A; Morin, O

    2016-05-01

    To characterize a new air vented ionization chamber technology, suitable to build detector arrays with small pixel pitch and independence of sensitivity on dose per pulse. The prototype under test is a linear array of air vented ionization chambers, consisting of 80 pixels with 3.5 mm pixel pitch distance and a sensitive volume of about 4 mm(3). The detector has been characterized with (60)Co radiation and MV x rays from different linear accelerators (with flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Sensitivity dependence on dose per pulse has been evaluated under MV x rays by changing both the source to detector distance and the beam quality. Bias voltage has been varied in order to evaluate the charge collection efficiency in the most critical conditions. Relative dose profiles have been measured for both flattened and unflattened distributions with different field sizes. The reference detectors were a commercial array of ionization chambers and an amorphous silicon flat panel in direct conversion configuration. Profiles of dose distribution have been measured also with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) patient plans. Comparison has been done with a commercial diode array and with Gafchromic EBT3 films. Repeatability and stability under continuous gamma irradiation are within 0.3%, in spite of low active volume and sensitivity (∼200 pC/Gy). Deviation from linearity is in the range [0.3%, -0.9%] for a dose of at least 20 cGy, while a worsening of linearity is observed below 10 cGy. Charge collection efficiency with 2.67 mGy/pulse is higher than 99%, leading to a ±0.9% sensitivity change in the range 0.09-2.67 mGy/pulse (covering all flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Tissue to phantom ratios show an agreement within 0.6% with the reference detector up to 34 cm depth. For field sizes in the range 2 × 2 to 15 × 15 cm(2), the output factors are in agreement with a

  6. Consequences of air around an ionization chamber: Are existing solid phantoms suitable for reference dosimetry on an MR-linac?

    PubMed

    Hackett, S L; van Asselen, B; Wolthaus, J W H; Kok, J G M; Woodings, S J; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2016-07-01

    A protocol for reference dosimetry for the MR-linac is under development. The 1.5 T magnetic field changes the mean path length of electrons in an air-filled ionization chamber but has little effect on the electron trajectories in a surrounding phantom. It is therefore necessary to correct the response of an ionization chamber for the influence of the magnetic field. Solid phantoms are used for dosimetry measurements on the MR-linac, but air is present between the chamber wall and phantom insert. This study aimed to determine if this air influences the ion chamber measurements on the MR-linac. The absolute response of the chamber and reproducibility of dosimetry measurements were assessed on an MR-linac in solid and water phantoms. The sensitivity of the chamber response to the distribution of air around the chamber was also investigated. Measurements were performed on an MR-linac and replicated on a conventional linac for five chambers. The response of three waterproof chambers was measured with air and with water between the chamber and the insert to measure the influence of the air volume on absolute chamber response. The distribution of air around the chamber was varied indirectly by rotating each chamber about the longitudinal chamber axis in a solid phantom and a water phantom (waterproof chambers only) and measuring the angular dependence of the chamber response, and varied directly by displacing the chamber in the phantom insert using a paper shim positioned at different orientations between the chamber casing and the insert. The responses of the three waterproof chambers measured on the MR-linac were 0.7%-1.2% higher with water than air in the chamber insert. The responses of the chambers on the conventional linac changed by less than 0.3% when air in the insert was replaced with water. The angular dependence of the chambers ranged from 0.6% to 1.9% in the solid phantom on the MR-linac but was less than 0.5% in water on the MR-linac and less than 0.3% in

  7. Performance of a multi-axis ionization chamber array in a 1.5 T magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Smit, K; Kok, J G M; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-04-07

    At the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of an 8 MV Elekta linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips MRI system. This paper investigates the performance of the IC PROFILER™, a multi-axis ionization chamber array, in a 1.5 T magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field on the IC PROFILER™ reproducibility, dose response linearity, pulse rate frequency dependence, power to electronics, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape were investigated. The linearity, reproducibility, pulse rate frequency dependence, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape are unaffected by the magnetic field. When the measurements results are normalized to the centre reference chamber, the measurements can commence unaltered. Orientation of the ionization chambers in the magnetic field is of importance, therefore caution must be taken when comparing or normalizing results from several different axes. IC PROFILER™ dose profiles were compared with film dose profiles obtained simultaneously in the MR-linac. Deviation between the film and the IC PROFILER™ data was caused by the noise in the film, indicating correct performance of the IC PROFILER™ in the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field.

  8. [Theoretical investigation of the saturation correction for ionization chambers irradiated with pulsed beams of arbitrary pulse length].

    PubMed

    Karsch, Leonhard; Pawelke, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    In ionization chambers, not all released charge is collected due to the recombination of charge carriers. This effect is taken into account by the saturation correction factor kS. A physical description of the correction factor has been established for pulsed radiation. However, it is only accurate when the pulse length is short compared with the collection time of the ionization chamber. In this paper we develop a description of the saturation correction for radiation pulses of arbitrary length. For this, a system of partial differential equations is solved iteratively. The numerical solutions are verified experimentally for a Roos ionization chamber (PTW TM34001) exposed to a pulsed electron beam. The results of this iterative procedure describe the experimental data well. The calculations are also possible for beam structures which are experimentally hard to get and thereby contribute to a better understanding and correct description of the saturation correction at arbitrary pulse length. Among other things the pulse length dependent distributions of the charge carriers in the ionization chamber is calculated, inclusive of the transition to the conditions prevailing in the case of continuous irradiation. Furthermore is shown that the formula for kS established by Hochhäuser and Balk is applicable even at arbitrary pulse length, if pulse duration dependent effective values are used for the parameters a and p. These effective values have been determined for the Roos chamber at pulse lengths up to 300 μs.

  9. Performance of a multi-axis ionization chamber array in a 1.5 T magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, K.; Kok, J. G. M.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2014-04-01

    At the UMC Utrecht a prototype MR-linac has been installed. The system consists of an 8 MV Elekta linear accelerator and a 1.5 T Philips MRI system. This paper investigates the performance of the IC PROFILER™, a multi-axis ionization chamber array, in a 1.5 T magnetic field. The influence of the magnetic field on the IC PROFILER™ reproducibility, dose response linearity, pulse rate frequency dependence, power to electronics, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape were investigated. The linearity, reproducibility, pulse rate frequency dependence, panel orientation and ionization chamber shape are unaffected by the magnetic field. When the measurements results are normalized to the centre reference chamber, the measurements can commence unaltered. Orientation of the ionization chambers in the magnetic field is of importance, therefore caution must be taken when comparing or normalizing results from several different axes. IC PROFILER™ dose profiles were compared with film dose profiles obtained simultaneously in the MR-linac. Deviation between the film and the IC PROFILER™ data was caused by the noise in the film, indicating correct performance of the IC PROFILER™ in the transverse 1.5 T magnetic field.

  10. Long-term stability of liquid ionization chambers with regard to their qualification as local reference dosimeters for low dose-rate absorbed dose measurements in water.

    PubMed

    Bahar-Gogani, J; Grindborg, J E; Johansson, B E; Wickman, G

    2001-03-01

    The long-term sensitivity and calibration stability of liquid ionization chambers (LICs) has been studied at a local and a secondary standards dosimetry laboratory over a period of 3 years. The chambers were transported several times by mail between the two laboratories for measurements. The LICs used in this work are designed for absorbed dose measurements in the dose rate region of 0.1-100 mGy min(-1) and have a liquid layer thickness of 1 mm and a sensitive volume of 16.2 mm3. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers are mixtures of isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4) in different proportions (about 2 to 1). Operating at a polarizing voltage of 300 V the leakage current of the chambers was stable and never exceeded 3% of the observable current at a dose rate of about 1 mGy min(-1). The volume sensitivity of the chambers was measured to be of the order of 10(-9) C Gy(-1) mm3. No systematic changes in the absorbed dose to water calibration was observed for any of the chambers during the test period (sigma < 0.2%). Variations in chamber dose response with small changes in the polarizing voltage as well as sensitivity changes with accumulated absorbed dose were also investigated. Measurements showed that the LIC response varies by 0.15% per 1% change in applied voltage around 300 V. No significant change could be observed in the LIC sensitivity after a single absorbed dose of 15 kGy. The results indicate that the LIC can be made to serve as a calibration transfer instrument and a reference detector for absorbed dose to water determinations providing good precision and long-term reproducibility.

  11. Performance of a gas flow ionization detector filled with He-iso-C4H10 mixtures for STIM-T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. C.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Fonte, P.; Beasley, D. G.; Cruz, C.; Alves, L. C.; da Silva, R. C.

    2015-04-01

    A cylindrical gas flow ionization chamber has been developed for measuring particle energy in Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIM-T) experiments due to its ability to withstand the direct beam. The response of a He-iso-C4H10 filled ionization detector to 2 MeV H+ and He+ beams was studied. Different operating parameters, such as concentration of isobutane (in the range of 55-100%), anode voltage, amplifier shaping time, the geometry of the detector entrance canal and the solid angle of the detector, were investigated. The stable operating plateau and the anode voltage at which the best energy resolution is attained were also determined for every gas mixture. The best energy resolution achieved so far for 2 MeV H+ and He+ static beams was ∼1.3%, which is comparable to that of Si PIN diode detectors (in the range of 15-30 keV). Computed tomography (CT) was applied to a set of STIM projections acquired with the gas ionization chamber at the IST/CTN microprobe beam line in order to visualize the 3D-mass distribution in a test structure.

  12. The detector on the basis of drift chambers for inclined muon bundle investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadeba, E. A.; Ampilogov, N. V.; Barbashina, N. S.; Borisov, A. A.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kompaniets, K. G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Ovechkin, A. S.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Shutenko, V. V.; Volkov, N. S.; Vorobyev, V. S.; Yashin, I. I.

    2017-07-01

    The results of experiments of the last decades have shown that with the increase of energy of primary cosmic rays a clear excess of muon groups in comparison with the existing models of extensive air shower development (even assuming pure iron composition of PCR) appears. The problem is called 'muon puzzle' and it can be explained either by cosmo- or nuclear-physical reasons. One of the experiments in which the excess of muon groups was registered is a NEVOD-DECOR. The new large-scale coordinate-tracking detector of 254 m2 area based on drift chambers will increase the coverage of the side aperture of the Cherenkov water detector (CWD) NEVOD and significantly improve the resolution of close tracks. Multi-wire drift chambers TREK developed in IHEP for experiments at the neutrino channel of U-70 accelerator have large effective area (1.85 m2), a good coordinate and angular resolution with a small number of measuring channels. The first part of the detector named Coordinate-Tracking Unit based on the Drift Chambers (CTUDC) representing two coordinate planes of 8 drift chambers in each has been developed and mounted on the opposite sides of the CWD. It has the same principle of joint operation with NEVOD-DECOR triggering system so the main features of the TREK detector will be examined. Results of an examination of drift chambers at muon hodoscope URAGAN, a calibration of the CTUDC with DECOR and the first results of its joint operation with NEVOD triggering system are presented.

  13. Poster — Thur Eve — 21: Off-axis dose perturbation effects in water in a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} 18 MV photon beam for the PTW microLion and Exradin A1SL ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    O'Grady, K; Davis, S D; Papaconstadopoulos, P; Seuntjens, J

    2014-08-15

    A PTW microLion liquid ionization chamber and an Exradin A1SL air-filled ionization chamber have been modeled using the egs-chamber user code of the EGSnrc system to determine their perturbation effects in water in a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} 18 MV photon beam. A model of the Varian CL21EX linear accelerator was constructed using the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code, and was validated by comparing measured PDDs and profiles from the microLion and A1SL chambers to calculated results that included chamber models. Measured PDDs for a 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} field for the microLion chamber agreed with calculations to within 1.5% beyond a depth of 0.5 cm, and the A1SL PDDs agreed within 1.0% beyond 1.0 cm. Measured and calculated profiles at 10 cm depth agreed within 1.0% for both chambers inside the field, and within 4.0% near the field edge. Local percent differences increased up to 15% at 4 cm outside the field. The ratio of dose to water in the absence of the chamber relative to dose in the chamber's active volume as a function of off-axis distance was calculated using the egs-chamber correlated sampling technique. The dose ratio was nearly constant inside the field and consistent with the stopping power ratios of water to detector material, but varied up to 3.3% near the field edge and 5.2% at 4 cm outside the field. Once these perturbation effects are fully characterized for more field sizes and detectors, they could be applied to clinical water tank measurements for improved dosimetric accuracy.

  14. Smoke Emissions from Aircraft Interior Materials at Elevated Heat Flux Levels Using Modified NBS Smoke Chamber.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    time at each test condition was calculated and plotted at 0.1-minute interalonaHwetPcrd2O computer-plotter (appendix B). For 2.2 Btu/ft’ a piloted and...nospiloted tests and 5.0 Btu/ft 2 s piloted tests, three samples of every material were tested. In calculating specific optical density plots, the...grouping the materials into five usage categories. FABRICS. A smoke limit once considered for fabrics was Ds C 100 at 4 minutes for a 2.2 Btu/ft 2 s

  15. Comparison of pencil-type ionization chamber calibration results and methods between dosimetry laboratories.

    PubMed

    Hourdakis, Costas J; Büermann, Ludwig; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Csete, Istvan; Delis, Harry; Gomola, Igor; Persson, Linda; Novak, Leos; Petkov, Ivailo; Toroi, Paula

    2016-01-01

    A comparison of calibration results and procedures in terms of air kerma length product, PKL, and air kerma, K, was conducted between eight dosimetry laboratories. A pencil-type ionization chamber (IC), generally used for computed tomography dose measurements, was calibrated according to three calibration methods, while its residual signal and other characteristics (sensitivity profile, active length) were assessed. The results showed that the "partial irradiation method" is the preferred method for the pencil-type IC calibration in terms of PKL and it could be applied by the calibration laboratories successfully. Most of the participating laboratories achieved high level of agreement (>99%) for both dosimetry quantities (PKL and K). Estimated relative standard uncertainties of comparison results vary among laboratories from 0.34% to 2.32% depending on the quantity, beam quality and calibration method applied. Detailed analysis of the assigned uncertainties have been presented and discussed.

  16. A TPC (Time Projection Chamber) detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; Arthur, A.; Bieser, F.; Harnden, C.W.; Jones, R.; Klienfelder, S.; Lee, K.; Matis, H.S.; Nakamura, M.; McParland, C.; Nesbitt, D.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Pugh, H.G.; Ritter, H.G.; Symons, T.J.M.; Wieman, H.; Wright, M.; Wright, R. ); Rudge, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity ({approx} 200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. History of the bubble chamber and related active- and internal-target nuclear tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.

    2015-06-01

    Donald Glaser, 1960 Nobel laureate in Physics, recently passed away (2013), as have many of his colleagues who were involved with the early development of bubble chambers at the University of Michigan. In this paper I will review those early years and the subsequent wide-spread application of active-target (AT) bubble chambers that dominated high-energy physics (HEP) research for over thirty years. Some of the related, but more modern nuclear tracking detectors being used in HEP, neutrino astrophysics and dark-matter searches also will be discussed.

  18. Unexpected bias in NIST 4πγ ionization chamber measurements.

    PubMed

    Unterweger, M P; Fitzgerald, R

    2012-09-01

    In January of 2010, it was discovered that the source holder used for calibrations in the NIST 4πγ ionization chamber (IC) has not been stable. The positioning ring that determines the height of the sample in the reentrant tube of the IC has slowly shifted during 35 years of use. This has led to a slow change in the calibration factors for the various radionuclides measured by this instrument. The changes are dependent on γ-ray energy and the time the IC was calibrated for a given radionuclide. A review of the historic data with regard to when the calibrations were done has enabled us to approximate the magnitude of the changes with time. This requires a number of assumptions, and corresponding uncertainty components, including whether the changes in height were gradual or in steps as will be shown in drawings of sample holder. For calibrations the changes in calibration factors have been most significant for low energy gamma emitters such as (133)Xe, (241)Am, (125)I and (85)Kr. The corrections to previous calibrations can be approximated and the results corrected with an increase in the overall uncertainty. At present we are recalibrating the IC based on new primary measurements of the radionuclides measured on the IC. Likewise we have been calibrating a new automated ionization-chamber system. A bigger problem is the significant number of half-life results NIST has published over the last 35 years that are based on IC measurements. The effect on half-life is largest for long-lived radionuclei, especially low-energy γ-ray emitters. This presentation will review our results and recommend changes in values and/or uncertainties. Any recommendation for withdrawal of any results will also be undertaken. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. RESPONSE OF THE GREEK EARLY WARNING SYSTEM REUTER-STOKES IONIZATION CHAMBERS TO TERRESTRIAL AND COSMIC RADIATION EVALUATED IN COMPARISON WITH SPECTROSCOPIC DATA AND TIME SERIES ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Leontaris, F; Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Maltezos, A; Potiriadis, C; Kiriakopoulos, E; Guilhot, J

    2017-08-10

    The Telemetric Early Warning System Network of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission consists mainly of a network of 24 Reuter-Stokes high-pressure ionization chambers (HPIC) for gamma dose rate measurements and covers all Greece. In the present work, the response of the Reuter-Stokes HPIC to terrestrial and cosmic radiation was evaluated in comparison with spectroscopic data obtained by in situ gamma spectrometry measurements with portable hyper pure Germanium detectors (HPGe), near the Reuter-Stokes detectors and time series analysis. For the HPIC detectors, a conversion factor for the measured absorbed dose rate in air (in nGy h-1) to the total ambient dose equivalent rate Ḣ*(10), due to terrestrial and cosmic component, was deduced by the field measurements. Time series analysis of the mean monthly dose rate (measured by the Reuter-Stokes detector in Thessaloniki, northern Greece, from 2001 to 2016) was performed with advanced statistical methods (Fast Fourier Analysis and Zhao Atlas Marks Transform). Fourier analysis reveals several periodicities (periodogram). The periodogram of the absorbed dose rate in air values was compared with the periodogram of the values measured for the same period (2001-16) and in the same location with a NaI (Tl) detector which in principle is not sensitive to cosmic radiation. The obtained results are presented and discussed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Dependence with air density of the response of the PTW SourceCheck ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Tornero-López, Ana M.; Guirado, Damián; Ruiz-Arrebola, Samuel; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Simancas, Fernando; Lallena, Antonio M.; Gazdic-Santic, Maja

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Air-communicating well ionization chambers are commonly used to assess air kerma strength of sources used in brachytherapy. The signal produced is supposed to be proportional to the air density within the chamber and, therefore, a density-independent air kerma strength is obtained when the measurement is corrected to standard atmospheric conditions using the usual temperature and pressure correction factor. Nevertheless, when assessing low energy sources, the ionization chambers may not fulfill that condition and a residual density dependence still remains after correction. In this work, the authors examined the behavior of the PTW 34051 SourceCheck ionization chamber when measuring the air kerma strength of {sup 125}I seeds.Methods: Four different SourceCheck chambers were analyzed. With each one of them, two series of measurements of the air kerma strength for {sup 125}I selectSeed{sup TM} brachytherapy sources were performed inside a pressure chamber and varying the pressure in a range from 747 to 1040 hPa (560 to 780 mm Hg). The temperature and relative humidity were kept basically constant. An analogous experiment was performed by taking measurements at different altitudes above sea level.Results: Contrary to other well-known ionization chambers, like the HDR1000 PLUS, in which the temperature-pressure correction factor overcorrects the measurements, in the SourceCheck ionization chamber they are undercorrected. At a typical atmospheric situation of 933 hPa (700 mm Hg) and 20 °C, this undercorrection turns out to be 1.5%. Corrected measurements show a residual linear dependence on the density and, as a consequence, an additional density dependent correction must be applied. The slope of this residual linear density dependence is different for each SourceCheck chamber investigated. The results obtained by taking measurements at different altitudes are compatible with those obtained with the pressure chamber.Conclusions: Variations of the altitude and

  1. Monte Carlo aided design of an improved well-type ionization chamber for low energy brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bohm, Tim D.; Micka, John A.; De Werd, Larry A.

    2007-04-15

    The determination of the air kerma strength of a brachytherapy seed is necessary for effective treatment planning. Well-type ionization chambers are used on site at therapy clinics to determine the air kerma strength of seeds. In this work, an improved well-type ionization chamber for low energy, low dose rate brachytherapy sources is designed using Monte Carlo transport calculations to aid in the design process. The design improvements are the elimination of the air density induced over-response effect seen in other air-communicating chambers for low energy photon sources, and a larger signal strength (response or current) for {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I based seeds. A prototype well chamber based on the Monte Carlo aided design but using graphite coated acrylic walls rather than the design basis air equivalent plastic (C-552) walls was constructed and experimentally evaluated. The prototype chamber produced an 85% stronger signal when measuring a commonly used {sup 103}Pd seed and a 26% stronger signal when measuring a commonly used {sup 125}I seed when compared to another commonly used well chamber. The normalized P{sub TP} corrected chamber response is, at most, 1.3% and 2.4% over unity for air densities/pressures corresponding to an elevation of 3048 m (10 000 feet) above sea level for the commonly used {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I based seeds respectively. Comparing calculated and measured chamber responses for common {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I based brachytherapy seeds show agreement within 0.6% and 0.2%, respectively. We conclude that Monte Carlo transport calculations accurately model the response of this new well chamber and in general can be used to predict the response of well chambers. The prototype chamber built in this work responds as predicted by the Monte Carlo calculations.

  2. Design and implementation of the detector control system for the BESIII drift chamber cosmic ray test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi-Hui; Xie, Xiao-Xi; Li, Xiao-Nan; Gao, Cui-Shan; Zhang, Yin-Hong; Nie, Zhen-Dong; Min, Jian; Xie, Yi-GANG

    2008-08-01

    After the construction of the BESIII drift chamber, a long period of cosmic rays test is necessary to verify its performance. This also provides a good opportunity to integrate the detector readout electronics and Detector Control System (DCS) into a unified working system. The goal of the DCS is to guarantee reliable physics data quality and the safe operation of the detector. It monitors and controls the HV, gas, VME crates and the environmental variables. The upper-level system is mainly developed from LabVIEW and the lower-level system mainly uses MCU and PLC technology. The system is designed to be highly flexible and scalable so that it can be applied to other detectors with little or no change. In the immediate future, it will be integrated into the entire BESIII Slow Control System.

  3. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs] in processed meat products using gas chromatography - flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Olatunde S; Fatoki, Olalekan S; Opeolu, Beatrice O; Ximba, Bhekumusa J

    2014-08-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in smoked, grilled and boiled meats were determined using gas chromatography - flame ionization detector (GC-FID). PAHs in the processed meats were extracted in n-hexane after hydrolysis with methanolic KOH. Clean-up was achieved using solid phase extraction in neutral-Si/basic-Si/acidic-Si/neutral-Si frits. The fractions, benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkP), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), indeno[123-cd]pyrene (IP) and benzo[ghi]perylene (BghiP) were separated and quantified using GC-FID. The method and instrument limits of detections were 0.1, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3μg/kg and 0.5, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5μg/kg, respectively, for BkP, BaP, IP and BghiP. The method's recovery and precision generally varied between 83.69% and 94.25% with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 3.18-15.60%; and 90.38-96.71% with relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.82-12.87% respectively. The concentration of BkP, BaP, IP and BghiP in smoked, grilled and boiled meat samples were ranged 0.64-31.54μg/kg, 0.07-7.04μg/kg, 0.09-15.03, 0.51-46.67μg/kg and 0.01-5.11μg/kg, respectively.

  4. Scintillation properties of N2 and CF4 and performances of a scintillating ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehaut, G.; Salvador, S.; Fontbonne, J.-M.; Lecolley, F.-R.; Perronnel, J.; Vandamme, Ch.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we studied the emission yields, decay times and coincidence resolving times (CRT) of two gases, nitrogen (N2) and tetrafluoromethane (CF4), used for particle detection in the context of fission products measurement. The set-up was made of an ionization chamber and two photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) placed front-to-front on each side of the active zone of the chamber. Using the photomultiplier tubes, the number of photoelectrons (phe) converted at the photocathodes from the scintillation processes in each gas was quantified and the scintillation time spectra were recorded. A scintillation emission yield of 24 phe MeV-1 with a decay time of τd = 2.5 ns in N2, and 225 phe MeV-1 with τd = 6.2 ns for CF4, has been measured. With our set-up, the coincidence resolving time (σ values) between the two PMTs have been measured using alpha particles at 1.4 ns and 0.34 ns for N2 and CF4, respectively.

  5. Fast-neutron spectrometry using a ³He ionization chamber and digital pulse shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Chichester, D L; Johnson, J T; Seabury, E H

    2012-08-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type (3)He ionization chamber to measure the fast-neutron spectra of a deuterium-deuterium electronic neutron generator, a bare (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron source, and of the transmitted fast neutron spectra of a (252)Cf source attenuated by water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, and magnesium. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common approach for analyzing n +(3)He→(1)H+(3)H ionization events and improved to account for wall-effect and pile-up events, increasing the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed of the different experimental arrangements and compared with the measurements, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA-processed fast-neutron spectra and predictions. The fast-neutron resonance features of the attenuation cross sections of the attenuating materials are clearly visible within the resolution limits of the electronics used for the measurements, and the potential applications of high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry for nuclear nonproliferation and safeguards measurements are discussed.

  6. Miniature triaxial metastable ionization detector for gas chromatographic trace analysis of extraterrestrial volatiles.

    PubMed

    Woeller, F H; Kojiro, D R; Carle, G C

    1984-04-01

    Gas chromatography has found highly successful application in NASA's flight programs. Gas chromatographs have been flown to both Mars and Venus where detailed compositional measurements were made. These instruments were quite small and relatively sensitive when compared to commercially available instruments; however, they do not appear adequate for future missions currently being planned. The earlier flight GC's had incorporated thermistor bead thermal conductivity cells as the detector. This detector requires very precise temperature control and only provides about 1 ppm sensitivity. Temperature stabilization causes the detector to be quite heavy, i.e., about 200 g. Greater sensitivity will be required for measurements of trace components in extraterrestrial environments. Review of other detector types revealed the metastable ionization detector as a likely candidate because of its superior thermal stability and high sensitivity. The metastable detector, first described by Lovelock as an argon ionization detector, has been studied and somewhat modified by others. The commercial design by Hartmann and Dimick was used for comparison purposes in our work. In the past, three features of the metastable detector are prominent: it has part-per-billion sensitivity, contamination must be carefully controlled, and anomalous response is common. Since it is an ionization detector, however, temperature instabilities do not cause the major perturbations experienced by the thermal conductivity detectors. This paper describes a miniature metastable ionization detector featuring an unconventional electrode configuration, whose performance characteristics parallel those of traditional design, while its weight is quite small. The prototype has been used in our laboratories routinely for 2 years, and the concept will be incorporated into a flight GC for use in the Space Shuttle.

  7. Fast transimpedance preamplifier for a boron-coated multiwire proportional chamber neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zhang; Haiyang, Yan; Jie, Zhang; Zhijia, Sun; Ping, Cao; Qi, An; Jian, Gong

    2016-10-01

    A low-noise and fast preamplifier is needed for the new boron-coated multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) neutron detector with a delay line readout system to improve position resolution. A transimpedance preamplifier with a rise time of 30ns, a signal-to-noise ratio higher than 40dB, and an automatic gain control function are designed to meet the aforementioned requirements. On the other hand, we also compare it to commercial preamplifiers. Then, the advantages and disadvantages of commercial and in-house preamplifiers are analyzed. The preamplifier is used and tested on a MWPC neutron detector, and results are presented.

  8. Experimental research on a boron-coated multi-wire proportional chamber neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yan-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Hu; Tu, Xiao-qing; Zhou, Jian-Rong; Yang, Bo; Sun, Zhi-Jia; Cao, Ping; An, Qi; Gong, Jian

    2017-06-01

    A boron-coated multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC) neutron detector coupled with a delay line readout system has been investigated to possibly replace the 3He neutron detector. MWPC worked on the gas flow mode with Ar/ CO2 (90%/10%) and its readout system was based on the time-to-digital converter. The detection efficiency for a neutron wavelength of 0.247 nm was approximately 3.5%, and the spatial resolution was 5 mm. Other experimental results, such as gain and counting rate plateau, were also obtained.

  9. Expert System for the LHC CMS Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapsevicius, Valdas; Juska, Evaldas

    2014-02-01

    Modern High Energy Physics experiments are of high demand for a generic and consolidated solution to integrate and process high frequency data streams by applying experts' knowledge and inventory configurations. In this paper we present the Expert System application that was built for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) aiming to support the detector operations and to provide integrated monitoring. The main building blocks are the integration platform, rule-based complex event processing engine, ontology-based knowledge base, persistent storage and user interfaces for results and control.

  10. A convolution model for obtaining the response of an ionization chamber in static non standard fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Castano, D. M.; Gonzalez, L. Brualla; Gago-Arias, M. A.; Pardo-Montero, J.; Gomez, F.; Luna-Vega, V.; Sanchez, M.; Lobato, R.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: This work contains an alternative methodology for obtaining correction factors for ionization chamber (IC) dosimetry of small fields and composite fields such as IMRT. The method is based on the convolution/superposition (C/S) of an IC response function (RF) with the dose distribution in a certain plane which includes chamber position. This method is an alternative to the full Monte Carlo (MC) approach that has been used previously by many authors for the same objective. Methods: The readout of an IC at a point inside a phantom irradiated by a certain beam can be obtained as the convolution of the dose spatial distribution caused by the beam and the IC two-dimensional RF. The proposed methodology has been applied successfully to predict the response of a PTW 30013 IC when measuring different nonreference fields, namely: output factors of 6 MV small fields, beam profiles of cobalt 60 narrow fields and 6 MV radiosurgery segments. The two-dimensional RF of a PTW 30013 IC was obtained by MC simulation of the absorbed dose to cavity air when the IC was scanned by a 0.6 x 0.6 mm{sup 2} cross section parallel pencil beam at low depth in a water phantom. For each of the cases studied, the results of the IC direct measurement were compared with the corresponding obtained by the C/S method. Results: For all of the cases studied, the agreement between the IC direct measurement and the IC calculated response was excellent (better than 1.5%). Conclusions: This method could be implemented in TPS in order to calculate dosimetry correction factors when an experimental IMRT treatment verification with in-phantom ionization chamber is performed. The miss-response of the IC due to the nonreference conditions could be quickly corrected by this method rather than employing MC derived correction factors. This method can be considered as an alternative to the plan-class associated correction factors proposed recently as part of an IAEA work group on nonstandard field dosimetry.

  11. Compact cosmic ray detector for unattended atmospheric ionization monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Aplin, K. L.; Harrison, R. G.

    2010-12-15

    Two vertical cosmic ray telescopes for atmospheric cosmic ray ionization event detection are compared. Counter A, designed for low power remote use, was deployed in the Welsh mountains; its event rate increased with altitude as expected from atmospheric cosmic ray absorption. Independently, Counter B's event rate was found to vary with incoming particle acceptance angle. Simultaneous co-located comparison of both telescopes exposed to atmospheric ionization showed a linear relationship between their event rates.

  12. Compact cosmic ray detector for unattended atmospheric ionization monitoring.

    PubMed

    Aplin, K L; Harrison, R G

    2010-12-01

    Two vertical cosmic ray telescopes for atmospheric cosmic ray ionization event detection are compared. Counter A, designed for low power remote use, was deployed in the Welsh mountains; its event rate increased with altitude as expected from atmospheric cosmic ray absorption. Independently, Counter B's event rate was found to vary with incoming particle acceptance angle. Simultaneous co-located comparison of both telescopes exposed to atmospheric ionization showed a linear relationship between their event rates.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Tseng-Te; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chen, Yen-Fu; Wu, Shu-Wei; Nievaart, Sander; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary 60Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the 60Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations reached 7

  14. Z-chamber of the CMD-3 detector in the reconstruction of the track longitudinal coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetshin, R. R.; Amirkhanov, A. N.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Banzarov, V. Sh.; Bashtovoy, N. S.; Berkaev, D. E.; Bondar, A. E.; Bragin, A. V.; Eidelman, S. I.; Epifanov, D. A.; Epshteyn, L. B.; Erofeev, A. L.; Fedotovich, G. V.; Gayazov, S. E.; Grebenuk, A. A.; Gribanov, S. S.; Grigoriev, D. N.; Ignatov, F. V.; Ivanov, V. L.; Karpov, S. V.; Kazanin, V. F.; Kasaev, A. S.; Koop, I. A.; Korobov, A. A.; Kozyrev, A. N.; Kozyrev, E. A.; Krokovny, P. P.; Kuzmenko, A. E.; Kuzmin, A. S.; Logashenko, I. B.; Lysenko, A. P.; Lukin, P. A.; Mikhailov, K. Yu.; Okhapkin, V. S.; Pestov, Yu. N.; Perevedentsev, E. A.; Popov, A. S.; Razuvaev, G. P.; Rogovsky, Yu. A.; Ruban, A. A.; Ryskulov, N. M.; Ryzhenenkov, A. E.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Shebalin, V. E.; Shemyakin, D. N.; Shwartz, B. A.; Shwartz, D. B.; Sibidanov, A. L.; Solodov, E. P.; Titov, V. M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Vorobiov, A. I.; Yudin, Yu. V.; CMD3 Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Since 2010 the CMD-3 detector has been collecting data at the e+e- collider VEPP-2000 in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. One of the main goals of experiments with CMD-3 detector is the precise measurement of the cross sections of the e+e- annihilation into hadrons. For a large number of processes the main source of systematic uncertainty in cross sections determination due to accuracy of polar angles determination of the tracks. Z-chamber is used for the reconstruction of the track longitudinal coordinate which is with low systematic uncertainty. The measurement of longitudinal coordinates is performed by the collecting of the charge which is induced on the strip cathodes of the Z-chamber. The algorithms of the reconstruction of cathodes clusters and calibration procedure are presented.

  15. Electrode configuration and signal subtraction technique for single polarity charge carrier sensing in ionization detectors

    DOEpatents

    Luke, P.

    1996-06-25

    An ionization detector electrode and signal subtraction apparatus and method provide at least one first conductive trace formed onto the first surface of an ionization detector. The first surface opposes a second surface of the ionization detector. At least one second conductive trace is also formed on the first surface of the ionization detector in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern with the at least one first conductive trace. Both of the traces are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. By forming the traces in a substantially interlaced and symmetric pattern, signals generated by a charge carrier are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the traces. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carrier moves to within close proximity of the traces and is received at the collecting trace. The measured signals are then subtracted and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge and to determine the position at which the charge carrier originated within the ionization detector. 9 figs.

  16. Electrode configuration and signal subtraction technique for single polarity charge carrier sensing in ionization detectors

    DOEpatents

    Luke, Paul

    1996-01-01

    An ionization detector electrode and signal subtraction apparatus and method provides at least one first conductive trace formed onto the first surface of an ionization detector. The first surface opposes a second surface of the ionization detector. At least one second conductive trace is also formed on the first surface of the ionization detector in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern with the at least one first conductive trace. Both of the traces are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. By forming the traces in a substantially interlaced and symmetric pattern, signals generated by a charge carrier are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the traces. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carrier moves to within close proximity of the traces and is received at the collecting trace. The measured signals are then subtracted and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge and to determine the position at which the charge carrier originated within the ionization detector.

  17. Developments in plastic wire chambers operated in the limited streamer mode (LSM detectors)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Mikko; Kurvinen, Kari; Orava, Risto

    1988-12-01

    We have calculated the photon detection efficiency of a wire chamber constructed with conductive nylon-66 plastic as cathode material in the photon energy range of 100 keV-1 MeV. The calculated results are compared with the results obtained with a Monte Carlo simulation using the FLUKA [1] transport code and with experimental results. We have also calculated the efficiency for copper and compared these two cathode materials. The comparison shows that wire chambers with nylon and copper cathodes are equally efficient in detecting the 100 keV-1 MeV photons. Furthermore, we have studied the different physical processes contributing to photon detection as well as the detection efficiency as a function of cathode thickness. Finally, we report some results from the first LSM detector operational tests performed with our new wire chamber testing device.

  18. A two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in pulsed beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tölli, Heikki; Sjögren, Rickard; Wendelsten, Mikael

    2010-08-01

    The correction for general recombination losses in liquid ionization chambers (LICs) is more complex than that in air-filled ionization chambers. The reason for this is that the saturation charge in LICs, i.e. the charge that escapes initial recombination, depends on the applied voltage. This paper presents a method, based on measurements at two different dose rates in a pulsed beam, for general recombination correction in LICs. The Boag theory for pulsed beams is used and the collection efficiency is determined by numerical methods which are equivalent to the two-voltage method used in dosimetry with air-filled ionization chambers. The method has been tested in experiments in water in a 20 MeV electron beam using two LICs filled with isooctane and tetramethylsilane. The dose per pulse in the electron beam was varied between 0.1 mGy/pulse and 8 mGy/pulse. The relative standard deviations of the collection efficiencies determined with the two-dose-rate method ranged between 0.1% and 1.5%. The dose-rate variations of the general recombination corrected charge measured with the LICs are in excellent agreement with the corresponding values obtained with an air-filled plane parallel ionization chamber.

  19. Source geometry factors for HDR ¹⁹²Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations.

    PubMed

    Shipley, D R; Sander, T; Nutbrown, R F

    2015-03-21

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated (192)Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR (192)Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, k(sg), is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR (192)Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR (192)Ir Flexisource k(sg) was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  20. Ion recombination and polarity corrections for small-volume ionization chambers in high-dose-rate, flattening-filter-free pulsed photon beams.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Megan A; Miller, Jessica R; Micka, John A; DeWerd, Larry A

    2017-02-01

    recombination and polarity behaviors seen in conventional pulsed and continuous photon beams trend accordingly in high-dose-rate FFF linac beams. Several models of small-volume ionization chambers used with a digital electrometer have been shown to meet reference-class requirements with respect to ion recombination and polarity, even in the high-dose-rate environment. For such chambers, a two-voltage technique agreed well with more rigorous methods of determining Pion . However, the results emphasize the need for careful reference detector selection, and indicate that ionization chambers ought to be extensively tested in each beam of interest prior to their use for reference dosimetry. © 2016 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. Correction factors for the INER-improved free-air ionization chambers calculated with the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Lin, Uei-Tyng; Chu, Chien-Hau

    2006-05-01

    Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the correction factors for electron loss and scattered photons for two improved cylindrical free-air ionization chambers (FACs) constructed at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan). The method is based on weighting correction factors for mono-energetic photons with X-ray spectra. The newly obtained correction factors for the medium-energy free-air chamber were compared with the current values, which were based on a least-squares fit to experimental data published in the NBS Handbook 64 [Wyckoff, H.O., Attix, F.H., 1969. Design of free-air ionization chambers. National Bureau Standards Handbook, No. 64. US Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, pp. 1-16; Chen, W.L., Su, S.H., Su, L.L., Hwang, W.S., 1999. Improved free-air ionization chamber for the measurement of X-rays. Metrologia 36, 19-24]. The comparison results showed the agreement between the Monte Carlo method and experimental data is within 0.22%. In addition, mono-energetic correction factors for the low-energy free-air chamber were calculated. Average correction factors were then derived for measured and theoretical X-ray spectra at 30-50 kVp. Although the measured and calculated spectra differ slightly, the resulting differences in the derived correction factors are less than 0.02%.

  2. Modeling ion recombination in liquid ionization chambers - Improvement and analysis of the two-dose-rate method.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Jonas; Tölli, Heikki

    2017-08-12

    The use of liquid ionization chambers can provide useful information to endeavors with radiation dosimetry for highly modulated beams. Liquid ionization chambers may be particularly suitable for computed tomography applications where conventional ionization chambers do not present a high enough sensitivity for the spatial resolution required to characterize common X-ray beams. Due to the sensitivity, which leads to high charge densities, liquid ionization chambers can suffer from large recombination losses leading to degradation in signal to dose rate linearity. To solve this problem, a two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction has been proposed for liquid ionization chambers. However, the valid range of recombination losses that the method can accurately account for has been found to vary depending on radiation quality. The present work provides an in-depth analysis of the performance of the two-dose-rate method. Furthermore, the soundness of applying gas theory to liquids is investigated by using the two-dose-rate method. In the present work, the two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction of liquid ionization chambers used in continuous beams is studied by employing theory for gas-filled ionization chambers. An approximate relation for the general collection efficiency containing a material-specific parameter that is traceable to liquids has been derived for theoretical and experimental investigation alongside existing theory. Furthermore, the disassociation between initial and general recombination in the method is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. The results indicate that liquids and gases share general recombination characteristics, where the liquids investigated (isooctane and tetramethylsilane) to a large extent mimic the behavior theoretically expected in gases. Furthermore, it is shown that the disassociation between initial and general recombination in the two-dose-rate method is an approximation that depends

  3. Investigating ion recombination effects in a liquid-filled ionization chamber array used for IMRT QA measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, Cory Snyder, Michael; Rakowski, Joseph T.; Burmeister, Jay; Zhuang, Ling; Matuszak, Martha

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: PTW’s Octavius 1000 SRS array performs IMRT quality assurance (QA) measurements with liquid-filled ionization chambers (LICs) to allow closer detector spacing and higher resolution, compared to air-filled QA devices. However, reduced ion mobility in LICs relative to air leads to increased ion recombination effects and reduced collection efficiencies that are dependent on Linac pulse frequency and pulse dose. These pulse parameters are variable during an IMRT delivery, which affects QA results. In this study, (1) 1000 SRS collection efficiencies were measured as a function of pulse frequency and pulse dose, (2) two methods were developed to correct changes in collection efficiencies during IMRT QA measurements, and the effects of these corrections on QA pass rates were compared. Methods: To obtain collection efficiencies, the OCTAVIUS 1000 SRS was used to measure open fields of varying pulse frequency, pulse dose, and beam energy with results normalized to air-filled chamber measurements. Changes in ratios of 1000 SRS to chamber measured dose were attributed to changing collection efficiencies, which were then correlated to pulse parameters using regression analysis. The usefulness of the derived corrections was then evaluated using 6 MV and 10FFF SBRT RapidArc plans delivered to the OCTAVIUS 4D system using a TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems) linear accelerator equipped with a high definition multileaf collimator. For the first correction, MATLAB software was developed that calculates pulse frequency and pulse dose for each detector, using measurement and DICOM RT Plan files. Pulse information is converted to collection efficiency, and measurements are corrected by multiplying detector dose by ratios of calibration to measured collection efficiencies. For the second correction the MU/min in the daily 1000 SRS calibration was chosen to match the average MU/min of the volumetric modulated arc therapy plan. Effects of the two corrections on QA results were

  4. Investigating ion recombination effects in a liquid-filled ionization chamber array used for IMRT QA measurements.

    PubMed

    Knill, Cory; Snyder, Michael; Rakowski, Joseph T; Zhuang, Ling; Matuszak, Martha; Burmeister, Jay

    2016-05-01

    PTW's Octavius 1000 SRS array performs IMRT quality assurance (QA) measurements with liquid-filled ionization chambers (LICs) to allow closer detector spacing and higher resolution, compared to air-filled QA devices. However, reduced ion mobility in LICs relative to air leads to increased ion recombination effects and reduced collection efficiencies that are dependent on Linac pulse frequency and pulse dose. These pulse parameters are variable during an IMRT delivery, which affects QA results. In this study, (1) 1000 SRS collection efficiencies were measured as a function of pulse frequency and pulse dose, (2) two methods were developed to correct changes in collection efficiencies during IMRT QA measurements, and the effects of these corrections on QA pass rates were compared. To obtain collection efficiencies, the OCTAVIUS 1000 SRS was used to measure open fields of varying pulse frequency, pulse dose, and beam energy with results normalized to air-filled chamber measurements. Changes in ratios of 1000 SRS to chamber measured dose were attributed to changing collection efficiencies, which were then correlated to pulse parameters using regression analysis. The usefulness of the derived corrections was then evaluated using 6 MV and 10FFF SBRT RapidArc plans delivered to the OCTAVIUS 4D system using a TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems) linear accelerator equipped with a high definition multileaf collimator. For the first correction, matlab software was developed that calculates pulse frequency and pulse dose for each detector, using measurement and DICOM RT Plan files. Pulse information is converted to collection efficiency, and measurements are corrected by multiplying detector dose by ratios of calibration to measured collection efficiencies. For the second correction the MU/min in the daily 1000 SRS calibration was chosen to match the average MU/min of the volumetric modulated arc therapy plan. Effects of the two corrections on QA results were examined by

  5. Investigation of electron-loss and photon scattering correction factors for FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2017-02-01

    The parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber termed FAC-IR-300 was designed at the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, AEOI. This chamber is used for low and medium X-ray dosimetry on the primary standard level. In order to evaluate the air-kerma, some correction factors such as electron-loss correction factor (ke) and photon scattering correction factor (ksc) are needed. ke factor corrects the charge loss from the collecting volume and ksc factor corrects the scattering of photons into collecting volume. In this work ke and ksc were estimated by Monte Carlo simulation. These correction factors are calculated for mono-energy photon. As a result of the simulation data, the ke and ksc values for FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber are 1.0704 and 0.9982, respectively.

  6. Low-energy ionization yield in liquid argon for a coherent neutrino-nucleus scatter detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foxe, Michael P.

    A mode of interaction predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics, but not yet observed, is coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS). CNNS results from the neutrino (or antineutrino) scattering coherently with the entire nucleus rather than a single nucleon. The leading challenge in detecting CNNS is the resulting sub-keV nuclear recoil energies, producing little ionization in the detector medium. In order to detect the CNNS interaction, it is beneficial to first measure the nuclear ionization yield for the chosen detector medium. The ionization yield represents the expected number of electrons produced by a nuclear recoil, and it depends both on the recoil energy and on the detector medium in which the recoil occurs. Additionally, the ionization yield depends on the applied electron drift electric field, and for this reason it should be measured directly in the detector type anticipated for future CNNS measurements. This dissertation is focused on making the prediction and measurement of the ionization yield in LAr using a dual-phase Ar detector. Due to the complexity of measuring the ionization yield at various energies, it is beneficial to also construct a predictive model for the ionization yield. In this dissertation, the prediction of the ionization yield is made on the basis of a simulation of a two-stage process. The number of ionizations generated from Ar recoil of a given energy is simulated using a Monte Carlo atomic collision model, along with the cross sections for ionization and excitation in Ar + Ar collisions. After the electrons are generated, a fraction of them recombine with the initially generated ion cloud. The electron recombination fraction is simulated by assigning the emitted electrons either 1 or 10 eV of initial kinetic energy and transporting the electrons under the influence of Coulomb forces of the ion cloud and an applied external electric field. The simulation predicts the energy dependent ionization yield, with a value of

  7. Assessment of ionization chamber correction factors in photon beams using a time saving strategy with PENELOPE code.

    PubMed

    Reis, C Q M; Nicolucci, P

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Monte Carlo-based perturbation and beam quality correction factors for ionization chambers in photon beams using a saving time strategy with PENELOPE code. Simulations for calculating absorbed doses to water using full spectra of photon beams impinging the whole water phantom and those using a phase-space file previously stored around the point of interest were performed and compared. The widely used NE2571 ionization chamber was modeled with PENELOPE using data from the literature in order to calculate absorbed doses to the air cavity of the chamber. Absorbed doses to water at reference depth were also calculated for providing the perturbation and beam quality correction factors for that chamber in high energy photon beams. Results obtained in this study show that simulations with phase-space files appropriately stored can be up to ten times shorter than using a full spectrum of photon beams in the input-file. Values of kQ and its components for the NE2571 ionization chamber showed good agreement with published values in the literature and are provided with typical statistical uncertainties of 0.2%. Comparisons to kQ values published in current dosimetry protocols such as the AAPM TG-51 and IAEA TRS-398 showed maximum percentage differences of 0.1% and 0.6% respectively. The proposed strategy presented a significant efficiency gain and can be applied for a variety of ionization chambers and clinical photon beams. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Coulomb crystal as a detector in electron impact ionization experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosowski, Lukasz; Piwinski, Mariusz; Wojtewicz, Szymon; Lisak, Daniel; Dziczek, Darek; Chwirot, Stanislaw

    2016-09-01

    Ensembles of ions in trap at sufficiently low temperature can form a structure called Coulomb crystal. Some species of such ions can be optically cooled and observed using CCD camera. Number of ions composing the crystal can be determined with high accuracy. Other, invisible species of ions can be sympathetically cooled and detected indirectly by observation of their influence on visible ones. Thus, the efficiency of ionization processes leading to Coulomb crystal formation can be determined. We present preliminary results for electron-impact-ionized molecules forming a multi-species Coulomb crystal in a linear segmented Paul trap together with atomic calcium ions.

  9. Comparison of dose measurements in CT using a novel semiconductor detector and a small ion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Paschoal, Cinthia M. M.; Ferreira, Fernanda Carla L.; Santos, Luiz A. P.; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2015-07-01

    The advance of multislice computed tomography (CT) has become inadequate the currently dosimetric protocol used in CT. Instead of dosimetry based on the measurement of CTDI using a pencil ion chamber of 100 m of length, it was proposed the use of a small ion chamber (IC) and the calculating the dose equilibrium (Deq) at the location of the chamber. The objective of this work was to compare the performance of a short IC and a commercial photodiode to measure the accumulated dose at the center of the scan length L, DL(0), and to obtain the equilibrium dose Deq using the two detectors. The result for L=100 mm was compared with the result of a pencil chamber. The results indicate that the commercial photodiode is suitable to measure the accumulated dose at the center of the scan length L as compared with the ion chambers. This methodology allows measurements of the accumulated dose for any desired scan length, allowing measuring the equilibrium dose Deq if the phantom is long enough to allow it. (authors)

  10. Front-End electronics development for the new Resistive Plate Chamber detector of HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A.; Belver, D.; Cabanelas, P.; Díaz, J.; Garzón, J. A.; González-Díaz, D.; Koenig, W.; Lange, J. S.; Marín, J.; Montes, N.; Skott, P.; Traxler, M.

    2007-11-01

    In this paper we present the new RPC wall, which is being installed in the HADES detector at Darmstadt GSI. It consists of time-of-flight (TOF) detectors used for both particle identification and triggering. Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) detectors are becoming widely used because of their excellent TOF capabilities and reduced cost. The wall will contain 1024 RPC modules, covering an active area of around 7 m2, replacing the old TOFino detector at the low polar angle region. The excellent TOF and good charge resolutions of the new detector will improve the time resolution to values better than 100 ps. The Front-End electronics for the readout of the RPC signals is implemented with two types of boards to satisfy the space constraints: the Daughterboards are small boards that amplify the low level signals from the detector and provide fast discriminators for time of flight measurements, as well as an integrator for charge measurements. The Motherboard provides stable DC voltages and a stable ground, threshold DACs for the discriminators, multiplicity trigger and impedance matched paths for transfer of time window signals that contain information about time and charge. These signals are sent to a custom TDC board that label each event and send data through Ethernet to be conveniently stored.

  11. Measurement of the directional sensitivity of Dark Matter Time Projection Chamber detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deaconu, Cosmin; Leyton, Michael; Corliss, Ross; Druitt, Gabriela; Eggleston, Richard; Guerrero, Natalia; Henderson, Shawn; Lopez, Jeremy; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter

    2017-06-01

    The dark matter time projection chamber (DMTPC) is a direction-sensitive detector designed to measure the direction of recoiling F 19 and C 12 nuclei in low-pressure CF4 gas using optical and charge readout systems. In this paper, we employ measurements from two DMTPC detectors, with operating pressures of 30-60 torr, to develop and validate a model of the directional response and performance of such detectors as a function of recoil energy. Using our model as a benchmark, we formulate the necessary specifications for a scalable directional detector with sensitivity comparable to that of current-generation counting (nondirectional) experiments, which measure only recoil energy. Assuming the performance of existing DMTPC detectors, as well as current limits on the spin-dependent WIMP-nucleus cross section, we find that a 10-20 kg scale direction-sensitive detector is capable of correlating the measured direction of nuclear recoils with the predicted direction of incident dark matter particles and providing decisive (3 σ ) confirmation that a candidate signal from a nondirectional experiment was indeed induced by elastic scattering of dark matter particles off of target nuclei.

  12. Pulsed discharge helium ionization detector with multiple combined bias/collecting electrodes for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huamin; Stearns, Stanley D

    2013-04-05

    A pulsed discharge ionization detector (PDHID) with multiple combined bias/collecting electrodes (MC-PDHID) has been developed. Unlike most ionization detector designs with only one collecting electrode, the MC-PDHID builds multiple electrodes inside the detector cell. Each electrode serves as both a bias and a collecting electrode, thus gathering more information from the detector cell and improving PDHIP performance. The advantages of the MC-PDHID are: (1) sensitivity is increased by a factor of 2-3 times as compared with a single collecting electrode PDHID; (2) peak symmetry is improved, especially for narrow peaks; (3) it is possible to use a lower helium flow rate without compromising peak tailing; (4) linear dynamic range is increased by an order of magnitude through the calibration of electron and ion response factors; (5) certain groups of compounds can be identified. For example, if a trace amount of water is used as a dopant, the detector can identify alcohols and compounds with a hydrogen bond, since these compounds interact with the water coated on the wall in the detector cell which makes them stay in the detector cell longer than other compounds. In this research, the detector is characterized with different detector temperatures, flow rates, bias electrical potential arrangements, and bias potential polarities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Determinations of the correction factors for small fields in cylindrical ionization chambers based on measurement and numerical calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwangwoo; Choi, Wonhoon; Park, Sungho; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Bak, Jino

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the volume averaging effect for air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers to determine the correction factors in a small photon field for a given chamber. We measured output factors with several cylindrical ionization chambers, and by using a mathematical method similar to deconvolution, we modeled the non-constant and inhomogeneous exposure function in the cavity of the chamber. The parameters in the exposure function and the correction factors were determined by solving a system of equations that we had developed by using the measured data and the geometry of the given chamber. The correction factors (CFs) were very similar to those obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. For example, the CFs in this study were found to be 1.116 for PTW31010 and 1.0225 for PTW31016 while the CFs obtained from MC simulations were reported as being approximately between 1.17 and 1.20 for PTW31010 and between 1.02 and 1.06 for PTW31016 in a 6-MV photon beam of 1 × 1 cm2. Furthermore, the method of deconvolution combined with the MC result for the chamber's response function showed a similar CF for PTW 30013, which was reported as 2.29 and 1.54 for a 1 × 1 cm2 and a 1.5 × 1.5 cm2 field size, respectively. The CFs from our method were similar, 2.42 and 1.54. In addition, we report CFs for PTW30013, PTW31010, PTW31016, IBA FC23-C, and IBA CC13. As a consequence, we suggest the use of our method to measure the correct output factor by using the fact that an inhomogeneous exposure causes a volume averaging effect in the cavity of air-filled cylindrical ionization chamber. The result obtained by using our method is very similar to that obtained from MC simulations. The method we developed can easily be applied in clinics.

  14. High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Winefordner, James D.; Matveev, Oleg I.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    1999-01-01

    A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

  15. The forward drift chamber system for the GlueX detector

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Simon

    2007-10-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is planning an upgrade of the existing electron beam energy from 6 GeV to 12 GeV. The program calls for the construction of a new experimental hall - Hall D - and a new Tagger hall in which the electron beam will be converted to a photon beam that interacts with a target at the center of the GlueX detector housed in Hall D. The detector is based on a solenoidal design with drift chambers and a lead-scintillator calorimeter inside the bore of the magnet and sets of time- of-flight scintillators and lead-glass crystals in the downstream direction outside of the magnet. The Forward Drift Chambers will measure the paths of charged particles travelling in the forward direction downstream of the target. Each chamber unit will consist of a wire plane flanked on either side by cathode planes divided into strips. The combination of wire and cathode readout allows for reconstruction of "space points" at several positions along

  16. Development of thin gaseous ionization detectors for measurements of high-energy hadron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyong Sei; Hong, Byungsik; Lee, Kisoo; Park, Sung Keun; Yu, Jaehee; Kim, Sang Yeol

    2014-04-01

    Thin gaseous ionization detectors have been developed based on a current-integration mode for measurements of high-energy hadron beams. In the present detector R&D, two different types of prototype detectors with an active area of 16 × 16 cm2, each equipped with 256-signal processing channels, were manufactured and tested with 43-MeV protons provided by the MC50 proton cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS). The first one was equipped with a single gas electron multiplier (GEM), and the second one was a thin-plane ionization detector without the GEM foil loaded. The linearities of the detector responses for both detectors were examined for various proton-beam intensities. The quantitative accuracies for the channel-response data and for the total detector responses measured for 43-MeV protons were 0.4% and 0.34%, respectively. We conclude from the beam test that operating both types of detectors in the current-integration mode will allow quality measurements of dynamic-mode hadron beams to be performed with accuracies of better than 1%.

  17. Liquid ionization chamber initial recombination dependence on LET for electrons and photons.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Erik; Andersson, Jonas; Johansson, Lennart; Tölli, Heikki

    2013-06-21

    The possibility of indirect measurements of linear energy transfer (LET) with a liquid ionization chamber (LIC) has been investigated by studying initial recombination losses at different applied voltages. A linear fit is made to the voltage-signal curve and the intersection point of the fit and the voltage-axis is shown to correlate with LET. The LIC applied voltages were 100-700 V, which corresponds to electric field strengths between 0.3 and 2.0 MV m(-1). Several different photon and electron beams have been studied, and by using MCNPX™ the respective LET spectra have been determined. The beam qualities in this study were found to have a fluence averaged LET between 0.17 and 1.67 keV µm(-1) and a corresponding dose averaged LET between 0.97 and 4.62 keV µm(-1). For the experimental data in this study the linear fit method yields consistent results with respect to Monte Carlo simulated LET values. A calibration curve for LET determination is provided for the LIC used in the present work.

  18. Extended virtual detector theory for strong-field atomic ionization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Tian, Justin; Eberly, J H

    2013-06-14

    For time-dependent strong-field atomic ionization a new theoretical approach is described that combines the numerical time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) and the numerical time-dependent Newtonian equation (TDNE). This approach keeps both the accuracy of quantum calculations and the speed of classical calculations. It does not use approximate tunneling formulas. It is applied to a recent experimental result, and we show its successful comparison to extensive TDSE calculations made under exactly the same conditions.

  19. Comparison of community based smoke detector distribution methods in an urban community

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, M. R.; Mallonee, S.; Istre, G.

    1998-01-01

    Objectives—Various methods of soliciting participation for a large smoke detector giveaway program were tested to determine the most effective method of distributing smoke detectors to a high risk urban population. Setting—The target area was a 24 square mile (62 km2) section on the south side of Oklahoma City where 16% (73 301) of the city's population resided in 16% (34 845) of the dwellings (excluding apartments). Of the 66 persons in Oklahoma City who were injured in residential fires from September 1987 to April 1990, 45% (30) were in the target area. Of the target area injuries, 47% resulted from fires started by children playing with fire (fireplay). Methods—The number of homes without detectors was estimated by telephone survey. Four different methods of soliciting participants were used, including notifying residents by mail; placing flyers on the doors of every habitable residence; and displaying flyers at public places (grocery stores, convenience stores, restaurants, etc). Each of these methods alerted residents that free smoke detectors were available at specific fire stations. The fourth method was distributing detectors door-to-door (canvassing). Results—The canvassing method resulted in significantly more smoke detectors being distributed to homes without detectors (107%) than any of the three other methods (18%) (p< 0.00001). The canvassing method distributed detectors to 31% of the total target homes, compared with 5% with the other methods (p < 0.00001). Canvassing also resulted in the lowest estimated cost per detector distributed ($1.96) (all other methods, $3.95), and in the largest number distributed per volunteer hour (5.9 v 3.1 detectors per hour by other methods). Conclusions—Distributing smoke detectors directly to homes (canvassing) was the most effective and cost efficient method to reach high risk urban residents. PMID:9595328

  20. DEPOSITS ON FLAME IONIZATION DETECTORS WITH SILICONE GUM RUBBER COLUMNS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    During the preparative gas chromatography of some organophosphorus esters using a silicone gum rubber column, a copious white deposit was formed on...detector deposits were mainly silicon phosphate (2SiO2.P2O5), and the injection port samples were alpha cristobalite (SiO2).

  1. Effect of the calibration in water and the build-up cap on the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber measurements.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Hyvönen, H; Uusi-Simola, J; Jokelainen, I; Kosunen, A; Kortesniemi, M; Seppälä, T; Auterinen, I; Savolainen, S

    2011-12-01

    Magnesium-walled argon gas flow ionization chamber (Mg(Ar)) is used for photon dose measurements in the epithermal neutron beam of FiR 1 reactor in Finland. In this study, the photon dose measurements were re-evaluated against calculations applying a new chamber calibration factor defined in water instead of in air. Also, effect of the build-up cap on the measurements was investigated. The new calibration factor provides improved agreement between measured and calculated photon dose. Use of the build-up cap does not affect the measured signal in water in neutron beam. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Acoustic studies for alpha background rejection in dark matter bubble chamber detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bou-Cabo, M.; Felis, I.; Ardid, M.; Collaboration: COUPP Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics) is an experiment with bubble chambers able to detect dark matter directly either with Spin-Dependent or with Spin-Independent interactions. The target material is a superheated liquid (usually CF3I) that can be bubble nucleated due to nuclear recoils produced by elastic collisions of dark matter particles. The bubble growth inside the chamber is accompanied with an acoustic signature. The acoustic technique has been successfully used to have a good alpha discrimination (about 99%). In this paper, we present different studies and results related with the characterization of the acoustic properties of the detector and the different phenomena involved in the acoustic measurements of the bubble growth, such as sound generation, sound transmission and optimization of piezoelectric transducers.

  3. Polarization of silicon detectors by minimum ionizing particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezillie, B.; Eremin, V.; Li, Z.; Verbitskaya, E.

    2000-10-01

    This work presents quantitative predictions of the properties of highly irradiated (e.g. by high-energy particles, up to an equivalent fluence of 1×10 14 n cm -2) silicon detectors operating at cryogenic temperature. It is shown that the exposure to the Minimum Ionising Particle (MIP) with counting rates of about 10 6 cm -2 s -1 can influence the electric field distribution in the detector's sensitive volume. This change in the electric field distribution and its effect on the charge collection efficiency are discussed in the frame of a model based on trapping of carriers generated by MIPs. The experiment was performed at 87 K with an infrared (1030 nm) laser to simulate MIPs.

  4. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.267 - Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. 1065.267 Section 1065.267 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Hydrocarbon...

  7. Using Ionizing Radiation Detectors. Module 11. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on using ionizing radiation detectors. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming and telling the function…

  8. SU-E-T-414: Experimental Correction of High-Z Electrode Effect in Mini-Ionization Chambers for Small Beam Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Larraga-Gutierrez, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To correct for the over-response of mini-ionization chambers with high-Z central electrodes. The hypothesis is that by applying a negative/reverse voltage, it is possible to suppress the signal generated in the high-Z central electrode by low-energy photons. Methods: The mini-ionization chambers used in the experiments were a PTW-31014, PTW-31006 and IBA-CC01. The PTW-31014 has an aluminum central electrode while the PTW-31006 and IBA-CC01 have a steel one. Total scatter factors (Scp) were measured for a 6 MV photon beam down to a square field size of 0.5 cm. The measurements were performed in water at 10 cm depth with SAD of 100 cm. The Scp were measured with the dosimeters with +400V bias voltage. In the case of the PTW-31006 and IBA-CC01, the measurements were repeated with −400V bias voltage. Also, the field factors in water were calculated with Monte Carlo simulations for comparison. Results: The measured Scp at +400V with the PTW-31006 and IBA-CC01 detectors were in agreement within 0.2% down to a field size of 1.5 cm. Both dosimeters shown a systematic difference about 2.5% with the Scp measured with the PTW-31014 and the Monte Carlo calculated field factors. The measured Scp at −400V with the PTW-31006 and IBA-CC01 detectors were in close agreement with the PTW-31014 measured Scp and the field factors within 0.3 and 1.0%, respectively. In the case of the IBA-CC01 it was found a good agreement (1%) down to field size of 1.0 cm. All the dosimeters shown differences up to 17% between the measured Scp and the field factor for the 0.5 cm field size. Conclusion: By applying a negative/reverse voltage to the mini-ionization chambers with high-Z central electrode it was possible to correct for their over-response to low energy photons.

  9. Physical packaging and organization of the drift chamber electronics system for the Stanford Large Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.M.; Freytag, M.L.; Mazaheri, G.; Olsen, J.; Paffrath, L.

    1990-10-01

    In this paper the logical organization, physical packaging, and operation of the drift chamber electronics for the SLD at SLAC is described. The system processes signals from approximately 7000 drift wires and is unusual in that most electronic functions are packaged on printed circuit boards within the detector. The circuits reside on signal-processing motherboards, controller boards, signal-transition boards, power-distribution boards, and fiber-optics-to-electrical conversion boards. The interaction and interconnection of these boards with respect to signal and control flow are presented. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Aging study for resistive plate chambers of the CMS muon trigger detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Colaleo, A.; Iaselli, G.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Altieri, S.; Belli, G.; Bruno, G.; Guida, R.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.

    2003-12-01

    A long-term aging test of a Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was carried out with an intense gamma 137Cs source. The detector was operated in avalanche mode and had the bakelite surface treated with linseed oil. After the irradiation the estimated dose, charge and fluence were approximately equal to the expected values after 10 years of operation in the CMS barrel region. During and after the irradiation, the RPC performance was monitored with cosmic muons and showed no relevant aging effects. Moreover, no variation of the bakelite resistance was observed.

  11. A xenon ionization detector for scanned projection radiography: 95-channel prototype evaluation.

    PubMed

    Drost, D J; Fenster, A

    1984-01-01

    We have designed, constructed, and tested a 95-channel prototype xenon ionization detector for use in scanned projection radiography (SPR). This detector has higher spatial resolution, is more dose efficient, and is easier to construct than computed tomography (CT) xenon ionization detectors. It consists of two parallel plates separated by a 2-mm gap filled with xenon gas at 2 MPa (20 atm). One plate is a high-voltage electrode while the other is a circuit board etched to form an array of metal collector strips focused on the x-ray source. The resulting detector channels are 0.5 mm wide and 6 cm long. In this paper we present results from measurements of system noise and detector channel calibration. We compared the detector system to a screen/film system and found that it allows the detection of structures with 0.17% radiographic contrast compared to 2% contrast required for detection with screen/film when tested by imaging a 10-cm-thick Lucite phantom with a 10 X 10(-6) C/kg exposure. From images of resolution test patterns, the limiting resolution of the detector is 2.0 1p/mm at 1.6 magnification. Images of reduction mammoplasty tissue samples, obtained with 1/17 the exposure of screen/film images, had the same low-contrast sensitivity but contained less high-contrast detail than the film images.

  12. Determination of the thermal neutron flux in a fast neutron beam by use of a boron-coated ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, L; Matzen, T; Matzke, M; Schmidt, R; Scobel, W

    1995-11-01

    The thermal neutron distribution in slow and fast neutron beams is usually determined using the foil activation method. In this work a small magnesium walled ionization chamber, in which the inner surface of the wall has been coated with 10B to increase the sensitivity for thermal neutrons, is used to estimate the thermal neutron component of the beam. After calibration and determination of the directional response in a thermal neutron beam a comparison with foil activation at different depths in water was performed to investigate the reliability of the ionization measurements. The chamber was used in a computer controlled water phantom to measure the depth and lateral distribution of the thermal neutron dose. With this arrangement two-dimensional scans of the thermal neutrons could be performed quickly and with high accuracy.

  13. Field correction factors for a PTW-31016 Pinpoint ionization chamber for both flattened and unflattened beams. Study of the main sources of uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Puxeu-Vaqué, Josep; Duch, Maria A; Nailon, William H; Cruz Lizuain, M; Ginjaume, Mercè

    2017-05-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine correction factors, kQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr for a PTW-31016 ionization chamber on field sizes from 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm to 2 cm × 2 cm for both flattened (FF) and flattened filter-free (FFF) beams produced in a TrueBeam clinical accelerator. The secondary objective was the determination of field output factors, ΩQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr over this range of field sizes using both Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and measurements. kQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr for the PTW-31016 chamber were calculated by MC simulation for field sizes of 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm, 1 cm × 1 cm, and 2 cm × 2 cm. MC simulations were performed with the PENELOPE code system for the 10 MV FFF Particle Space File from a TrueBeam linear accelerator (LINAC) provided by the manufacturer (Varian Medical Systems, Inc. Palo Alto, CA, USA). Simulations were repeated taking into account chamber manufacturing tolerances and accelerator jaw positioning in order to assess the uncertainty of the calculated correction factors. Output ratios were measured on square fields ranging from 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm to 10 cm × 10 cm for 6 MV and 10 MV FF and FFF beams produced by a TrueBeam using a PTW-31016 ionization chamber; a Sun Nuclear Edge detector (SunNuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL, USA) and TLD-700R (Harshaw, Thermo Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA). The validity of the proposed correction factors was verified using the calculated correction factors for the determination of ΩQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr using a PTW-31016 at the four TrueBeam energies and comparing the results with both TLD-700R measurements and MC simulations. Finally, the proposed correction factors were used to assess the correction factors of the SunNuclear Edge detector. The present work provides a set of MC calculated correction factors for a PTW-31016 chamber used on a TrueBeam FF and FFF mode. For the 0.5 cm × 0.5 cm square field size, kQclin,Qmsrfclin,fmsr is equal to 1.17 with a combined uncertainty of 2% (k = 1). A detailed

  14. Resistive Plate Chambers with Gd-coated electrodes as thermal neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Mongelli, T.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlov, B.; Ranieri, A.; Trentadue, R.; Vankov, P.

    2004-11-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are wide spread, cheap, easy-to-build and large size detectors, used mainly to reveal ionising particles in high-energy physics experiments. Here a technique, consisting in coating the inner surface of the bakelite electrodes with a mixture of linseed oil and Gd2O3 is reported. This allows to make RPCs sensitive also to thermal neutrons, making them suitable to be employed for industrial, medical or de-mining applications. Thermal neutron-sensitive RPCs can be operated at atmospheric pressure, are lightweighted, have low γ-ray sensitivity and are easy to handle even when large areas have to be covered. This paper reports the results of the first test of this detector, performed at the Geel Linear Accelerator (GELINA) in Belgium.

  15. Wall correction factors for calibration of plane-parallel ionization chambers with high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Araki, F; Ikeda, R; Shirakawa, Y; Shimonobou, T; Moribe, N; Takada, T; Takahashi, M; Oura, H; Matoba, M

    2000-09-01

    Most dosimetry protocols recommend that calibration of plane-parallel ionization chambers be performed in an electron beam of sufficiently high energy by comparison with cylindrical chambers. For various plane-parallel chambers, the 1997 IAEA TRS-381 protocol includes an overall perturbation factor pQ for electron beams, a wall correction factor p(wall) for a 60Co beam and the product of two wall corrections k(att)k(m) for 60Co in-air calibration. The recommended values of p(wall) for plane-parallel chambers, however, are limited to certain phantom materials and a 60Co beam, and are not given for other phantom materials and x-ray beams. In this work, the p(wall) values of the commercially available NACP, PTW/Markus and PTW/Roos plane-parallel chambers in a solid water phantom have been determined with 60Co and 4 and 10 MV photon beams. The k(att)k(m) values for the NACP and PTW/Markus chambers have also been obtained. The wall correction factors p(wall) and k(att)k(m) have been determined by intercomparison with a calibrated Farmer chamber. The average value of p(wall) for these plane-parallel chambers was 1.005 +/- 0.1% (1 SD) for 60Co beams and 1.007 +/- 0.2% (1 SD) for both 4 MV and 10 MV photons. The k(att)k(m) values for the NACP and PTW/Markus chambers were about 1.5% lower than other published data.

  16. Large-area field-ionization detector for the study of Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. C. L.; Piñeiro, A. M.; Roeder, E. E.; Rutbeck-Goldman, H. J.; Tom, H. W. K.; Mills, A. P.

    2016-11-01

    We describe here the development and characterization of a micro-channel plate (MCP) based detector designed for the efficient collection and detection of Rydberg positronium (Ps) atoms for use in a time-of-flight apparatus. The designed detector collects Rydberg atoms over a large area (˜4 times greater than the active area of the MCP), ionizing incident atoms and then collecting and focusing the freed positrons onto the MCP. Here we discuss the function, design, and optimization of the device. The detector has an efficiency for Rydberg Ps that is two times larger than that of the γ-ray scintillation detector based scheme it has been designed to replace, with half the background signal. In principle, detectors of the type described here could be readily employed for the detection of any Rydberg atom species, provided a sufficient field can be applied to achieve an ionization rate of ≥108/s. In such cases, the best time resolution would be achieved by collecting ionized electrons rather than the positive ions.

  17. Development of a Bioaerosol single particle detector (BIO IN) for the Fast Ice Nucleus CHamber FINCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, U.; Reimann, B.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Bingemer, H.

    2010-02-01

    In this work we present the setup and first tests of our new BIO IN detector. This detector was constructed to classify atmospheric ice nuclei (IN) for their biological content. It is designed to be coupled to the Fast Ice Nucleus CHamber FINCH. If one particle acts as an ice nucleus, it will be at least partly covered with ice at the end of the development section of the FINCH chamber. The device combines an auto-fluorescence detector and a circular depolarization detector for simultaneous detection of biological material and discrimination between water droplets, ice crystals and non activated large aerosol particles. The excitation of biological material with UV light and analysis of auto-fluorescence is a common principle used for flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, spectroscopy and imaging. The detection of auto-fluorescence of airborne single particles demands some more experimental effort. However, expensive commercial sensors are available for special purposes, e.g. size distribution measurements. But these sensors will not fit the specifications needed for the FINCH IN counter (e.g. high sample flow of up 10 LPM). The newly developed -low cost- BIO IN sensor uses a single high-power UV LED for the electronic excitation instead of much more expensive UV lasers. Other key advantages of the new sensor are the low weight, compact size, and the little effect on the aerosol sample, which allows it to be coupled with other instruments for further analysis. The instrument will be flown on one of the first missions of the new German research aircraft "HALO" (High Altitude and LOng range).

  18. A Bubble Chamber Revival: Superheated Liquid Detectors for Dark Matter Searches and Other Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenschein, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    Bubble chambers were recently deemed to be obsolete, of interest only to historians, but a few new applications have unexpectedly emerged in nuclear and particle astrophysics. These include the search for WIMP dark matter and the measurement of a few otherwise intractable nuclear cross sections. The new bubble chambers exploit features of the bubble nucleation process that were unappreciated or irrelevant in the 1950s-1970s when the technology was known for its capability to provide fine-grained tracking of high energy particles in a dense target medium. By carefully tuning the temperature and pressure, a liquid can be made selectively sensitive to particles on the basis of their specific rate of energy loss, enabling a high degree of background rejection power when searching for rare heavily-ionizing tracks. Surprisingly, additional information on the microstructure of particle tracks can be extracted from the acoustic noise produce by bubble nucleation. Other novel features of the new bubble chambers include the use of digital photography, self-triggering, and the achievement of nearly continuous sensitivity by the avoidance of bubble nucleation on internal wetted surfaces.

  19. SU-E-T-377: Evaluation of a Novel Transmission Detector as a Reference Chamber for Use in Beam Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, D; Shekel, E; Levin, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a new transmission chamber for use as a reference chamber in measurements of beam data Methods: We assessed the performance of a new transmission detector, the Stealth Chamber, manufactured by IBA (IBA Dosimetry). The chamber has an active volume of 249 cm{sup 3}, with an attenuation equivalent of <0.5mm Al. We mounted the chamber to a TrueBeam linac (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) such that the active area is perpendicular to the beam direction. We performed PDD and profile measurements on field sizes from 1×1 cm{sup 2} to 10×10 cm{sup 2}, as well as for a 4 mm cone. The field detector was either a CC-13 chamber (IBA Dosimetry) with an active volume of 0.13 cm{sup 3} or an Edge Detector (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) with an active volume of 0.019 cm{sup 3}. For comparison we repeated all measurements using a CC-13 or CC-01 (active volume 0.01 cm{sup 3} ) chamber as reference detectors (IBA Dosimetry).All scans were acquired using a Blue Phantom2 (IBA Dosimetry) and IBA OmniPro-Accept v7.4.24 software. Results: All measurements with the Stealth Chamber were identical to those with ion reference chambers. For both regular and filter free 6MV beams there was agreement in PDDs and profiles, including the penumbra region, for all field sizes. This was true for the 4mm cone measurement, as well. The deviation between the Stealth and ion chamber measurements was on average 0.3%. Conclusion: The Stealth Chamber gives identical beam data as a conventional ion chamber for all field sizes. The advantage of the Stealth chamber over ion chambers is its efficiency. Once mounted, there is no need to reposition the chamber with varying field sizes. This translates into a huge savings in measurement time, as well as a reduction in potential errors due to reference chamber mispositioning.

  20. Experimental derivation of wall correction factors for ionization chambers used in high dose rate 192Ir source calibration.

    PubMed

    Maréchal, M H; de Almeida, C E; Ferreira, I H; Sibata, C H

    2002-01-01

    At present there are no specific primary standards for 192Ir high dose rate sources used in brachytherapy. Traceability to primary standards is guaranteed through the method recommended by the AAPM that derives the air kerma calibration factor for the 192Ir gamma rays as the average of the air kerma calibration factors for x-rays and 137Cs gamma-rays or the Maréchal et al. method that uses the energy-weighted air kerma calibration factors for 250 kV x rays and 60Co gamma rays as the air kerma calibration factor for the 192Ir gamma rays. In order to use these methods, it is necessary to use the same buildup cap for all energies and the appropriate wall correction factor for each chamber. This work describes experimental work used to derive the A(W) for four different ionization chambers and different buildup cap materials for the three energies involved in the Maréchal et al. method. The A(W) for the two most common ionization chambers used in hospitals, the Farmer NE 2571 and PTW N30001 is 0.995 and 0.997, respectively, for 250 kV x rays, 0.982 and 0.985 for 192Ir gamma rays, and 0.979 and 0.991 for 60Co gamma rays, all for a PMMA build-up cap of 0.550 gm cm(-2). A comparison between the experimental values and Monte Carlo calculations shows an agreement better than 0.9%. Availability of the A(W) correction factors for all commercial chambers allows users of the in-air calibration jig, provided by the manufacturer, to alternatively use the Maréchal et al. method. Calibration laboratories may also used this method for calibration of a well-type ionization chamber with a comparable accuracy to the AAPM method.

  1. Calibration of the Sweeper Chamber Charged-Particle Detectors for the LISA Commissioning Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, J.; Grovom, A.; Rogers, W.; MoNA Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The new LISA (Large-area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array) neutron detector array, designed to be used in conjunction with MoNA (Modular Neutron Array) was recently commissioned at the NSCL in an experiment designed to investigate excited states of neutron-rich Oxygen isotopes near the neutron drip-line. Charged fragments resulting from the neutron decays were swept out of the beam direction by the Sweeper Magnet after which they passed through a series of charged-particle detectors for fragment trajectory and energy determination. In order to achieve isotope separation and identification at the focal plane, which is then used to reconstruct the invariant mass of the unbound states, precise determinations of the fragment and neutron energies and trajectories are required. To correct for time-drifts in the charge-particle detectors that develop over the entire length of the experiment, Root C++ macros were developed to analyze and precisely correct for these detector drifts to within few tenths of a nanosecond. Root macros were also developed to position calibrate the ion chamber and CRDC's. Results for the LISA commissioning run will be presented. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-1101745.

  2. The stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber electronic portal imaging devices for dosimetry purposes.

    PubMed

    Louwe, R J W; Tielenburg, R; van Ingen, K M; Mijnheer, B J; van Herk, M B

    2004-04-01

    This study was performed to determine the stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber (LiFi-type) electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) for dosimetric purposes. The short- and long-term stability of the response was investigated, as well as the importance of factors influencing the response (e.g., temperature fluctuations, radiation damage, and the performance of the electronic hardware). It was shown that testing the performance of the electronic hardware as well as the short-term stability of the imagers may reveal the cause of a poor long-term stability of the imager response. In addition, the short-term stability was measured to verify the validity of the fitted dose-response curve immediately after beam startup. The long-term stability of these imagers could be considerably improved by correcting for room temperature fluctuations and gradual changes in response due to radiation damage. As a result, the reproducibility was better than 1% (1 SD) over a period of two years. The results of this study were used to formulate recommendations for a quality control program for portal dosimetry. The effect of such a program was assessed by comparing the results of portal dosimetry and in vivo dosimetry using diodes during the treatment of 31 prostate patients. The improvement of the results for portal dosimetry was consistent with the deviations observed with the reproducibility tests in that particular period. After a correction for the variation in response of the imager, the average difference between the measured and prescribed dose during the treatment of prostate patients was -0.7%+/-1.5% (1 SD), and -0.6%+/-1.1% (1 SD) for EPID and diode in vivo dosimetry, respectively. It can be concluded that a high stability of the response can be achieved for this type of EPID by applying a rigorous quality control program.

  3. Toward single electron resolution phonon mediated ionization detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabolfathi, Nader; Harris, H. Rusty; Mahapatra, Rupak; Sundqvist, Kyle; Jastram, Andrew; Serfass, Bruno; Faiez, Dana; Sadoulet, Bernard

    2017-05-01

    Experiments seeking to detect rare event interactions such as dark matter or coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering are striving for large mass detectors with very low detection threshold. Using Neganov-Luke phonon amplification effect, the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is reaching unprecedented RMS resolutions of ∼14 eVee. CDMSlite is currently the most sensitive experiment to WIMPs of mass ∼5 GeV/c2 but is limited in achieving higher phonon gains due to an early onset of leakage current into Ge crystals. The contact interface geometry is particularly weak for blocking hole injection from the metal, and thus a new design is demonstrated that allows high voltage bias via vacuum separated electrode. With an increased bias voltage and a×2 Luke phonon gain, world best RMS resolution of sigma ∼7 eVee for 0.25 kg (d=75 mm, h=1 cm) Ge detectors was achieved. Since the leakage current is a function of the field and the phonon gain is a function of the applied voltage, appropriately robust interface blocking material combined with thicker substrate (25 mm) will reach a resolution of ∼2.8 eVee. In order to achieve better resolution of ∼ eV, we are investigating a layer of insulator between the phonon readout surface and the semiconductor crystals.

  4. The effect of air cavity size in cylindrical ionization chambers on the measurements in high-energy radiotherapy photon beams—an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanpalmer, John; Johansson, Karl-Axel

    2012-07-01

    The present investigation is a continuation of a previous study on the effect of the diameter of the air cavity in cylindrical ionization chambers on perturbation correction factors. Measurements were made using high-energy radiotherapy photon beams (4, 6 and 15 MV) in a water phantom. Two different pairs of cylindrical ionization chambers were used. The chambers in each pair had identical materials and construction but different air cavity diameters. The same methods were employed as in our previous investigation. The diameter of the air cavity in cylindrical ionization chambers influences the mass ionization (the measured ionization expressed per unit mass of air in the chamber air cavity) at the depth where the maximum ionization is observed and a normalization at this depth is therefore not correct. The corrections obtained at depths of 50 and 100 mm in the phantom showed that the air cavity diameter in cylindrical ionization chambers has a greater effect on the perturbation effects than the photon beam quality. The corrections found at depths of 50 and 100 mm are smaller than those currently used in dosimetry protocols.

  5. Direct measurement of absorbed dose to water in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy: Water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Kawrakow, Iwan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Gafchromic film and ionometric calibration procedures for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources in terms of dose rate to water are presented and the experimental results are compared to the TG-43 protocol as well as with the absolute dose measurement results from a water calorimetry-based primary standard. Methods: EBT-1 Gafchromic films, an A1SL Exradin miniature Shonka thimble type chamber, and an SI HDR 1000 Plus well-type chamber (Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI) with an ADCL traceable S{sub k} calibration coefficient (following the AAPM TG-43 protocol) were used. The Farmer chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were performed directly in water. All results were compared to direct and absolute absorbed dose to water measurements from a 4 deg. C stagnant water calorimeter. Results: Based on water calorimetry, the authors measured the dose rate to water to be 361{+-}7 {mu}Gy/(h U) at a 55 mm source-to-detector separation. The dose rate normalized to air-kerma strength for all the techniques agree with the water calorimetry results to within 0.83%. The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43 dose rate measurement amounts to 1.90%, 1.44%, 1.78%, and 2.50%, respectively. Conclusions: This work allows us to build a more realistic uncertainty estimate for absorbed dose to water determination using the TG-43 protocol. Furthermore, it provides the framework necessary for a shift from indirect HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy dosimetry to a more accurate, direct, and absolute measurement of absorbed dose to water.

  6. Beam quality conversion factors for parallel-plate ionization chambers in MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the behavior of plane-parallel ion chambers in high-energy photon beams through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Ten plane-parallel ion chamber types were obtained from the major ion chamber manufacturers. Absorbed dose-to-water calibration coefficients are measured for these chambers and k{sub Q} factors are determined. In the process, the behaviors of the chambers are characterized through measurements of leakage currents, chamber settling in cobalt-60, polarity and ion recombination behavior, and long-term stability. Monte Carlo calculations of the absorbed dose to the air in the ion chamber and absorbed dose to water are obtained to calculate k{sub Q} factors. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors are investigated by varying material properties and chamber dimensions. Results: Chamber behavior was variable in MV photon beams, especially with regard to chamber leakage and ion recombination. The plane-parallel chambers did not perform as well as cylindrical chambers. Significant differences up to 1.5% were observed in calibration coefficients after a period of eight months although k{sub Q} factors were consistent on average within 0.17%. Chamber-to-chamber variations in k{sub Q} factors for chambers of the same type were at the 0.2% level. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors ranged between 0.34% and 0.50% depending on the chamber type. Average percent differences between measured and calculated k{sub Q} factors were - 0.02%, 0.18%, and - 0.16% for 6, 10, and 25 MV beams, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent agreement is observed on average at the 0.2% level between measured and Monte Carlo calculated k{sub Q} factors. Measurements indicate that the behavior of these chambers is not adequate for their use for reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams without a more extensive QA program than currently used for cylindrical reference-class ion chambers.

  7. Beam quality conversion factors for parallel-plate ionization chambers in MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R; Rogers, D W O

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the behavior of plane-parallel ion chambers in high-energy photon beams through measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Ten plane-parallel ion chamber types were obtained from the major ion chamber manufacturers. Absorbed dose-to-water calibration coefficients are measured for these chambers and k(Q) factors are determined. In the process, the behaviors of the chambers are characterized through measurements of leakage currents, chamber settling in cobalt-60, polarity and ion recombination behavior, and long-term stability. Monte Carlo calculations of the absorbed dose to the air in the ion chamber and absorbed dose to water are obtained to calculate k(Q) factors. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k(Q) factors are investigated by varying material properties and chamber dimensions. Chamber behavior was variable in MV photon beams, especially with regard to chamber leakage and ion recombination. The plane-parallel chambers did not perform as well as cylindrical chambers. Significant differences up to 1.5% were observed in calibration coefficients after a period of eight months although k(Q) factors were consistent on average within 0.17%. Chamber-to-chamber variations in k(Q) factors for chambers of the same type were at the 0.2% level. Systematic uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculated k(Q) factors ranged between 0.34% and 0.50% depending on the chamber type. Average percent differences between measured and calculated k(Q) factors were - 0.02%, 0.18%, and - 0.16% for 6, 10, and 25 MV beams, respectively. Excellent agreement is observed on average at the 0.2% level between measured and Monte Carlo calculated k(Q) factors. Measurements indicate that the behavior of these chambers is not adequate for their use for reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams without a more extensive QA program than currently used for cylindrical reference-class ion chambers.

  8. A xenon ionization detector for scanned projection radiography: Xenon/Freon 13B1 comparison.

    PubMed

    Drost, D J; Mehuys, D; Fenster, A

    1984-01-01

    In a companion paper, we reported on the construction and testing of a xenon gas ionization detector for use in line scanned projection radiography. Experimental results indicate that the detector has sufficient resolution for chest radiography, but higher resolution is required for mammography. Theoretical analysis suggested that a detector pressurized with Freon 13B1 would have better resolution and higher x-ray energy efficiency than a xenon-filled detector for energies below 60 keV. In this paper we compared, theoretically and experimentally, Freon 13B1 to xenon as the detector gas. For a 120-kVp x-ray spectrum, the detector filled with 2.0 MPa of xenon had less channel-to-channel crosstalk, a higher quantum efficiency (QE), and twice the output signal than the detector filled with 1.4 MPa of Freon (highest possible pressure at room temperature), while for a 60-kVp spectrum, crosstalk is the same, but the detector has slightly higher QE and 1.4 times the energy efficiency when filled with Freon instead of xenon. We conclude that xenon is better for high-kVp imaging, while Freon at a lower pressure is slightly better for low-kVp imaging.

  9. A sensitive gas chromatography detector based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Ansgar T; Last, Torben; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2017-02-03

    In this work, we present a novel concept for a gas chromatography detector utilizing an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization which is initialized by a dielectric barrier discharge. In general, such a detector can be simple and low-cost, while achieving extremely good limits of detection. However, it is non-selective apart from the use of chemical dopants. Here, a demonstrator manufactured entirely from fused silica capillaries and printed circuit boards is shown. It has a size of 75×60×25mm(3) and utilizes only 2W of power in total. Unlike other known discharge detectors, which require high-purity helium, this detector can theoretically be operated using any gas able to form stable ion species. Here, purified air is used. With this setup, limits of detection in the low parts-per-billion range have been obtained for acetone.

  10. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers for high-energy photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanxiao; Willomitzer, Christian; Zakaria, Golam Abu; Hartmann, Guenther H

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of depth-dose curves in water phantom using a cylindrical ionization chamber require that its effective point of measurement is located at the measuring depth. Recommendations for the position of the effective point of measurement with respect to the central axis valid for high-energy electron and photon beams are given in dosimetry protocols. According to these protocols, the use of a constant shift P(eff) is currently recommended. However, this is still based on a very limited set of experimental results. It is therefore expected that an improved knowledge of the exact position of the effective point of measurement will further improve the accuracy of dosimetry. Recent publications have revealed that the position of the effective point of measurement is indeed varying with beam energy, field size and also with chamber geometry. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the shift of P(eff) can be taken to be constant and independent from the beam energy. An experimental determination of the effective point of measurement is presented based on a comparison between cylindrical chambers and a plane-parallel chamber using conventional dosimetry equipment. For electron beams, the determination is based on the comparison of halfvalue depth R(50) between the cylindrical chamber of interest and a well guarded plane-parallel Roos chamber. For photon beams, the depth of dose maximum, d(max), the depth of 80% dose, d(80), and the dose parameter PDD(10) were used. It was again found that the effective point of measurement for both, electron and photon beams Dosimetry, depends on the beam energy. The deviation from a constant value remains very small for photons, whereas significant deviations were found for electrons. It is therefore concluded that use of a single upstream shift value from the centre of the cylindrical chamber as recommended in current dosimetry protocols is adequate for photons, however inadequate for accurate electron beam dosimetry.

  11. Measurements of neutron energy using a recoil-proton telescope and a high-pressure ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Folkard, M; Makrigiorgos, G; Roper, M J; Waker, A J; Michael, B D

    1989-04-01

    Two very different techniques for measuring the energy of neutrons in the energy range 0.1-10 MeV are presented and compared. A recoil-proton spectrometer is used to determine the energy spectra of neutrons produced by the d(4)-Be and p(4)-Be reactions down to the low-energy threshold of 0.7 MeV. The same radiation fields are also measured with a recently developed method using a high-pressure ionization chamber that can be used to determine the mean energy of the neutrons in a mixed neutron-gamma radiation field provided the gamma-ray absorbed dose fraction is determined independently. An intercomparison of the two methods shows that the high-pressure ionization chamber compares well and supplements the established recoil-proton spectrometer technique. The almost isotropic response of the chamber has enabled measurements to be made of the variation of mean neutron energy with depth in water for the two radiation fields.

  12. Direct reference air-kerma rate calibration of 192Ir for a thimble-type ionization chamber in a cylindrical solid phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaulich, Theodor W.; Quast, Ulrich; Bamberg, Michael; Selbach, Hans-Joachim

    2012-10-01

    International and national reports strongly recommend experimental verification of the calibration of new HDR 192Ir sources prior to their clinical application for afterloading brachytherapy. To guarantee traceability, calibrated transfer standards are used, e.g. the recommended well-type ionization chambers (WIC) or certain detector-phantom arrangements (DPA) consisting of a thimble-type ionization chamber with a solid phantom. In Germany, direct calibrations for 192Ir were only provided for WICs. In June 2010, the PTB directly calibrated a DPA-transfer standard in the quantity reference air-kerma rate (RAKR) for 192Ir photons for the University Hospital Tübingen. This direct calibration provides the advantage that the comprehensive RAKR 192Ir calibration coefficient already takes all influence quantities into account—their correction factors are thus unified—except for the air-density correction kρ. The DPA-transfer standard described above and a WIC used as a reference were compared for acceptance tests of three GammaMedplus HDR 192Ir afterloading sources. The measurement uncertainty of the WIC and of the DPA-transfer standard were ±2.6%(k = 2) and ±2.8%(k = 2) respectively. A strong correlation was found between these measurement results with a coefficient of determination of r2 = 0.9998. Determining the RAKR of an HDR 192Ir afterloading source is as simple with the DPA as it is with WIC. The direct 192Ir calibrated DPA-transfer standard can therefore be used alternatively in future with the same measurement uncertainty if no WIC is available.

  13. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife® unit reference field using ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Aragón-Martínez, Nestor Massillon-JL, Guerda; Gómez-Muñoz, Arnulfo

    2014-11-07

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian® iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism{sup 1}. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm × 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm × 10 cm and 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife® conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm × 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife® conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  14. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife® unit reference field using ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragón-Martínez, Nestor; Gómez-Muñoz, Arnulfo; Massillon-JL, Guerda

    2014-11-01

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian® iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism1. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm × 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm × 10 cm and 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife® conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm × 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife® conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  15. Combination of olfactometer and flame ionization detector to determine increases in exhaust odors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, H.; Homans, W. J.

    1980-08-01

    The combination of a flame ionization detector and olfactometer for the assessment of odor-intensive exhaust air was tested in practice in industrial plants and extractor systems. The tests under field conditions confirm the evidence found in laboratory tests regarding the variance of the individual results; there are 95 per cent confidence intervals in each case. Besides the TO4 olfactometer, the further-developed TO5 system was examined and used in parallel tests.

  16. Virtual detector methods for efficiently computing momentum-resolved dissociation and ionization spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Alex; Thumm, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    We discuss a class of window-transform-based ``virtual detector'' methods for computing momentum-resolved dissociation and ionization spectra by numerically analyzing the motion of nuclear or electronic quantum-mechanical wavepackets at the periphery of their numerical grids. While prior applications of such surface-flux methods considered semi-classical limits to derive ionization and dissociation spectra, we systematically include quantum-mechanical corrections and extensions to higher dimensions, discussing numerical convergence properties and the computational efficiency of our method in comparison with alternative schemes for obtaining momentum distributions. Using the example of atomic ionization by co- and counter-rotating circularly polarized laser pulses, we scrutinize the efficiency of common finite-difference schemes for solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in virtual detection and standard Fourier-transformation methods for extracting momentum spectra. Supported by the DoE, NSF, and Alexander von Humboldt foundation.

  17. Characterization of 2 MeV, 4 MeV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV buildup caps for use with a 0.6 cubic centimeter thimble ionization chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, R.L.; VanDenburg, J.W.; Prinja, A.K.; Kirby, T.; Busch, R.; Hong-Nian Jow

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV and 6 MeV buildup caps, and to determine if a buildup cap can be made for the 0.6 cm{sup 3} thimble ionization chamber that will accurately measure exposures in a high-energy photon radiation field. Two different radiation transport codes were used to computationally characterize existing 2 MeV, 4 MeV, and 6 MeV buildup caps for a 0.6 cm{sup 3} active volume thimble ionization chamber: ITS, The Integrated TIGER Series of Coupled Electron-Photon Monte Carlo Transport Codes; and CEPXS/ONEDANT, A One-Dimensional Coupled Electron-Photon Discrete Ordinates Code Package. These codes were also used to determine the design characteristics of a buildup cap for use in the 18 MeV photon beam produced by the 14 TW pulsed power HERMES-III electron accelerator. The maximum range of the secondary electron, the depth at which maximum dose occurs, and the point where dose and collision kerma are equal have been determined to establish the validity of electronic equilibrium. The ionization chamber with the appropriate buildup cap was then subjected to a 4 MeV and a 6 MeV bremmstrahlung radiation spectrum to determine the detector response.

  18. Development of TOF-PET detectors based on the Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, U.; Borghi, G.; Bucciantonio, M.; Kieffer, R.; Samarati, J.; Sauli, F.; Watts, D.

    2015-04-01

    We describe the development, construction and preliminary results obtained with medium-size Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chambers prototypes designed to detect and localize 511 keV photons for Positron Emission Tomography imaging applications. The devices are intended for in-beam monitoring of the treatment plans throughout deep tumor therapy with hadron beams; emphasis is put on achieving coincidence time resolutions of few hundred ps, in order to exploit optimized reconstruction algorithm and reduce the heavy non-correlated background contributions distinctive of this operation. Using technologies developed for high energy physics experiments, the detectors can be built for covering large areas, thus leading the way to the conception of full-body PET systems at low cost.

  19. An experimental study of recombination and polarity effect in a set of customized plane parallel ionization chambers.

    PubMed

    Kron, T; McNiven, A; Witruk, B; Kenny, M; Battista, J

    2006-12-01

    Plane parallel ionization chambers are an important tool for dosimetry and absolute calibration of electron beams used for radiotherapy. Most dosimetric protocols require corrections for recombination and polarity effects, which are to be determined experimentally as they depend on chamber design and radiation quality. Both effects were investigated in electron beams from a linear accelerator (Varian 21CD) for a set of four tissue equivalent plane parallel ionization chambers customized for the present research by Standard Imaging (Madison WI). All four chambers share the same design and air cavity dimensions, differing only in the diameter of their collecting electrode and the corresponding width of the guard ring. The diameters of the collecting electrodes were 2 mm, 4 mm, 10 mm and 20 mm. Measurements were taken using electron beams of nominal energy 6 to 20 MeV in a 10 cm x 10 cm field size with a SSD of 100 cm at various depths in a Solid Water slab phantom. No significant variation of recombination effect was found with radiation quality, depth of measurement or chamber design. However, the polarity effect exceeded 5% for the chambers with small collecting electrode for an effective electron energy below 4 MeV at the point of measurement. The magnitude of the effect increased with decreasing electron energy in the phantom. The polarity correction factor calculated following AAPM protocol TG51 ranged from approximately 1.00 for the 20.0 mm chamber to less than 0.95 for the 2 mm chamber at 4.1 cm depth in a electron beam of nominally 12 MeV. By inverting the chamber it could be shown that the polarity effect did not depend on the polarity of the electrode first traversed by the electron beam. Similarly, the introduction of an air gap between the overlying phantom layer and the chambers demonstrated that the angular distribution of the electrons at the point of measurement had a lesser effect on the polarity correction than the electron energy itself. The

  20. Study of the influence of phantom material and size on the calibration of ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water.

    PubMed

    Arib, Mehenna; Medjadj, Toufik; Boudouma, Youcef

    2006-08-24

    In the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) code of practice (TRS 398) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine's dosimetry protocol (TG-51), full-scatter water phantoms are recommended for the determination of the absorbed dose for both photon and electron beams and, consequently, for the calibration of the user's ionization chambers. This procedure is applied in the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory, where the calibration is performed on a 60Co gamma beam, in comparison with reference chambers whose absorbed dose-to-water calibration coefficients, ND,w, are known. In this work, we present the results of the calibration of 10 Farmer-like ionization chambers calibrated in three water phantoms (sizes 20 x 20 x 15 cm3, 30 x 30 x 30 cm3, and 35 x 35 x 37 cm3) and two plastic phantoms (size 20 x 20 x 20 cm3) polymethyl methacrlyate (PMMA) and polystyrene). Calibrations are performed by the substitution method using an ionization chamber whose ND,w has been supplied by the IAEA's reference laboratory. It is shown that the results, expressed as the percentage ratio of the calibration coefficient in a given phantom to that of the standard IAEA phantom, is less than 0.35% for all investigated chambers, and that the standard deviation of the mean of the ND,w calibration coefficients determined in all five phantoms is less than 0.06%, except for one nylon-walled ionization chamber, where the observed 0.34% value could be explained by the hygroscopic properties of nylon. Furthermore, a chamber-to-chamber dependence of the calibration coefficient has been shown to vary by up to 2.8%. These results emphasize that the phantom dimensions and its material are not sensitive criteria for the calibration of cylindrical ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water. The results also show that generic calibration coefficients could not be considered for a given type of chamber.

  1. Patient specific quality assurance of RapidArc pre treatment plans using semiflex 0.125 cc ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. A. Syam; Vivekanandan, Nagarajan

    2017-01-01

    Patient specific pre-treatment quality assurance for RapidArc plans were analyzed for hundred patients for different sites. Verification plan was created for each treatment plan in Eclipse 8.6 treatment planning system with the semiflex ionization chamber and the octavius phantom. Absolute point dose were measured for head and neck, thorax and abdomen cases using semiflex (0.125 cc) ionization chamber. Positive absolute mean dose variation of 0.56% was observed with thorax cases with a standard deviation (SD) of ±1.13 between the plans with a range of -1.78% to 2.70%. Negative percentage dose errors were found with head and neck and abdomen cases, with a mean variation of -0.43% (SD±1.50), (range -3.25% to 2.85%) and -0.35% (SD±1.48), (range -3.10% to 2.65%) for head and neck and abdomen cases respectively. Evaluation has been done using PTW verisoft software by keeping the passing criteria as 3 mm DTA, 3% DD, for 95% of the evaluated dose points. The maximum percentage value failed in gamma analysis was found to be 4.95, 4.75, and 4.88 for head and neck, thorax, and abdomen cases respectively. In all the cases analyzed the percentage dose points failed the gamma criteria is less than 5%. On the basis of the studies performed it can be concluded that the semiflex ionization chamber having a volume of 0.125 cc can be used efficiently for measuring the pre-treatment quality assurance of RapidArc plans for all the sites.

  2. [The development of the ionization chamber and the researching of its characteristics for automatic exposure controlling in the X-ray diagnosis machine].

    PubMed

    Weng, P; Liu, S; Wang, H; Cao, Y; Wang, X; Li, Y

    1999-01-01

    An ionization chamber for automatic exposure controlling used in X ray diagnosis machine was developped, and its characteristics were measured and researched. The electrodes of measuring field were made of carbon, such couldn't leave it's imaging on the film. In order to increase the ionization efficiency and decrease the thickness and electric capacity between electrodes, the chamber was constructed in multilayers. The chamber we developed can be fixed in different x ray machines convenientlly, there is a fine linearity between it's signal output and the exposures, the beam quality response is uniform and output-timing response is also good.

  3. Derivation of a formula describing the saturation correction of plane-parallel ionization chambers in pulsed fields with arbitrary repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Karsch, Leonhard

    2016-04-21

    Gas-filled ionization chambers are widely used radiation detectors in radiotherapy. A quantitative description and correction of the recombination effects exists for two cases, for continuous radiation exposure and for pulsed radiation fields with short single pulses. This work gives a derivation of a formula for pulsed beams with arbitrary pulse rate for which the prerequisites of the two existing descriptions are not fulfilled. Furthermore, an extension of the validity of the two known cases is investigated. The temporal evolution of idealized charge density distributions within a plane parallel chamber volume is described for pulsed beams of vanishing pulse duration and arbitrary pulse repetition rate. First, the radiation induced release, movement and collection of the charge carriers without recombination are considered. Then, charge recombination is calculated basing on these simplified charge distributions and the time dependent spatial overlap of positive and negative charge carrier distributions. Finally, a formula for the calculation of the saturation correction factor is derived by calculation and simplification of the first two terms of a Taylor expansion for small recombination. The new formula of saturation correction contains the two existing cases, descriptions for exposure by single pulses and continuous irradiation, as limiting cases. Furthermore, it is possible to determine the pulse rate range for which each of the three descriptions is applicable by comparing the dependencies of the new formula with the two existing cases. As long as the time between two pulses is lower than one third of the collection time of the chamber, the formalism for a continuous exposure can be used. The known description for single pulse irradiation is only valid if the repetition rate is less than 1.2 times the inverse collection time. For all other repetition rates in between the new formula should be used. The experimental determination by Jaffe diagrams can be

  4. The U.S. experience with smoke detectors: who has them? How well do they work? When don't they work?

    PubMed

    Hall, J R

    1994-01-01

    From 1975 to 1984, the United States experienced remarkable growth in the use of home smoke detectors, making the home smoke detector the fire safety success story of the decade. As of 1993, only 1 home in 12 remained unprotected.

  5. A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas using a Frisch-grid ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Huaiyong; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Luyu; Chen, Jinxiang; Zhang, Guohui

    2016-12-01

    A method for measuring the electron drift velocity in working gas is proposed. Based on the cathode and the anode signal waveforms of the Frisch-grid ionization chamber, the electron drift velocity is extracted. With this method, the electron drift velocities in Ar + 10% CH4, Ar + 3.5% CO2 and Kr + 2.7% CO2 gases have been measured and the results are compared with the existing measurements and the simulating results. Using this method, the electron drift velocity can be monitored throughout the experiment of charged particle without bothering the measurement of other parameters, such as the energy and orientation.

  6. Dosimetric Verification and Validation of Conformal and IMRT Treatments Fields with an Ionization Chamber 2D-Array

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelina, Figueroa M.; Gabriel, Resendiz G.; Miguel, Perez P.

    2008-08-11

    A three-dimensional treatment planning system requires comparisons of calculated and measured dose distributions. It is necessary to confirm by means of patient specific QA that the dose distributions are correctly calculated, and that the patient data is correctly transferred to and delivered by the treatment machine. We used an analysis software for bi-dimensional dosimetric verification of conformal treatment and IMRT fields using as objective criterion the gamma index. An ionization chamber bi-dimensional array was used for absolute dose measurement in the complete field area.

  7. Discovery of multiple, ionization-created CS{sub 2} anions and a new mode of operation for drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Snowden-Ifft, Daniel P.

    2014-01-15

    This paper focuses on the surprising discovery of multiple species of ionization-created CS{sub 2} anions in gas mixtures containing electronegative CS{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, identified by their slightly different drift velocities. Data are presented to understand the formation mechanism and identity of these new anions. Regardless of the micro-physics, however, this discovery offers a new, trigger-less mode of operation for the drift chambers. A demonstration of trigger-less operation is presented.

  8. Direct determination of k Q for Farmer-type ionization chambers in a clinical scanned carbon ion beam using water calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Osinga-Blättermann, J-M; Brons, S; Greilich, S; Jäkel, O; Krauss, A

    2017-03-21

    Until now, the dosimetry of carbon ions with ionization chambers has not reached the same level of accuracy as that of high-energy photons. This is mainly caused by the approximately threefold larger uncertainty of the k Q factor of ionization chambers, which, due to the lack of experimental data, is still derived by calculations. Measurements of absorbed dose to water, D w, by means of water calorimetry have now been performed in the entrance channel of a scanned 6 cm  ×  6 cm radiation field of 429 MeV/u carbon ions, allowing the direct calibration of ionization chambers and thus the experimental determination of k Q. Within this work, values for k Q have been determined for the Farmer-type ionization chambers FC65-G and TM30013. A detailed investigation of the radiation field enabled the accurate determination of correction factors needed for both calorimetric and ionometric measurements. Finally, a relative standard measurement uncertainty of 0.8% (k  =  1) could be achieved for the experimental k Q values. For both chambers, the experimental k Q factors were found to be about 1% larger than those tabulated in the German DIN 6801-1 protocol, whereas compared to the theoretical values stated in the TRS-398 protocol, the experimental k Q value agrees within 0.4% for the TM30013 chamber but is about 1% lower in the case of the FC65-G chamber.

  9. Direct determination of k Q for Farmer-type ionization chambers in a clinical scanned carbon ion beam using water calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinga-Blättermann, J.-M.; Brons, S.; Greilich, S.; Jäkel, O.; Krauss, A.

    2017-03-01

    Until now, the dosimetry of carbon ions with ionization chambers has not reached the same level of accuracy as that of high-energy photons. This is mainly caused by the approximately threefold larger uncertainty of the k Q factor of ionization chambers, which, due to the lack of experimental data, is still derived by calculations. Measurements of absorbed dose to water, D w, by means of water calorimetry have now been performed in the entrance channel of a scanned 6 cm  ×  6 cm radiation field of 429 MeV/u carbon ions, allowing the direct calibration of ionization chambers and thus the experimental determination of k Q. Within this work, values for k Q have been determined for the Farmer-type ionization chambers FC65-G and TM30013. A detailed investigation of the radiation field enabled the accurate determination of correction factors needed for both calorimetric and ionometric measurements. Finally, a relative standard measurement uncertainty of 0.8% (k  =  1) could be achieved for the experimental k Q values. For both chambers, the experimental k Q factors were found to be about 1% larger than those tabulated in the German DIN 6801-1 protocol, whereas compared to the theoretical values stated in the TRS-398 protocol, the experimental k Q value agrees within 0.4% for the TM30013 chamber but is about 1% lower in the case of the FC65-G chamber.

  10. The calibration of parallel-plate electron ionization chambers at NPL for use with the IPEM 2003 code of practice: summary data.

    PubMed

    Bass, Graham; Thomas, Russell; Pearce, Julia

    2009-04-21

    The most recent electron dosimetry code of practice for radiotherapy written by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine was published in 2003 and is based on the NPL electron absorbed dose to water calibration service. NPL has calibrated many Scanditronix type NACP-02 and PTW Roos type 34001 parallel plate ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water, for use with the code of practice. The results of the calibrations of these chamber types summarized here include the absorbed dose to water sensitivity, where the mean calibration factor standard deviations are 5.8% for NACP-02 chambers and 1.1% for PTW Roos chambers. The correction for the polarity effect is shown to be small (less than 0.2% for all beam qualities) but with a discernible beam quality dependence. The correction for recombination is shown to be consistent and reproducible, and an analysis of these results suggests that the plate separation of the NACP-02 chambers is more variable from chamber to chamber than with the PTW Roos chambers. The calibration of these chambers is shown to be repeatable within +/-0.2% over 2-3 years. It is also shown that check source measurements can be repeated within +/-0.3% over several years. The results justify the use of NACP-02 and PTW 34001 chambers as secondary standards, but also indicate that the PTW 34001 chambers show less variation from chamber to chamber.

  11. NOTE: The calibration of parallel-plate electron ionization chambers at NPL for use with the IPEM 2003 code of practice: summary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Graham; Thomas, Russell; Pearce, Julia

    2009-04-01

    The most recent electron dosimetry code of practice for radiotherapy written by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine was published in 2003 and is based on the NPL electron absorbed dose to water calibration service. NPL has calibrated many Scanditronix type NACP-02 and PTW Roos type 34001 parallel plate ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water, for use with the code of practice. The results of the calibrations of these chamber types summarized here include the absorbed dose to water sensitivity, where the mean calibration factor standard deviations are 5.8% for NACP-02 chambers and 1.1% for PTW Roos chambers. The correction for the polarity effect is shown to be small (less than 0.2% for all beam qualities) but with a discernible beam quality dependence. The correction for recombination is shown to be consistent and reproducible, and an analysis of these results suggests that the plate separation of the NACP-02 chambers is more variable from chamber to chamber than with the PTW Roos chambers. The calibration of these chambers is shown to be repeatable within ±0.2% over 2-3 years. It is also shown that check source measurements can be repeated within ±0.3% over several years. The results justify the use of NACP-02 and PTW 34001 chambers as secondary standards, but also indicate that the PTW 34001 chambers show less variation from chamber to chamber.

  12. The iQID Camera: An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Barber, Bradford H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-06-11

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detectors response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The detector’s response to a broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. Individual particles are identified and their spatial position (to sub-pixel accuracy) and energy are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, high sensitivity, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discrimate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is single-particle, real-time digital autoradiography. In conclusion, we present the latest results and discuss potential applications.

  13. The iQID Camera: An Ionizing-Radiation Quantum Imaging Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; ...

    2014-06-11

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detectors response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The detector’s response to a broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier andmore » then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. Individual particles are identified and their spatial position (to sub-pixel accuracy) and energy are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, high sensitivity, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discrimate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is single-particle, real-time digital autoradiography. In conclusion, we present the latest results and discuss potential applications.« less

  14. The iQID camera: An ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian W; Gregory, Stephanie J; Fuller, Erin S; Barrett, Harrison H; Barber, H Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R

    2014-12-11

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detector's response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The confirmed response to this broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated by particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. The spatial location and energy of individual particles are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, excellent detection efficiency for charged particles, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discriminate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is real-time, single-particle digital autoradiography. We present the latest results and discuss potential applications.

  15. The iQID camera: An ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Bradford Barber, H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detector's response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The confirmed response to this broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated by particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. The spatial location and energy of individual particles are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, excellent detection efficiency for charged particles, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discriminate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is real-time, single-particle digital autoradiography. We present the latest results and discuss potential applications.

  16. The coordinate-tracking detector based on the drift chambers for ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadeba, E. A.; Ampilogov, N. V.; Barbashina, N. S.; Bogdanov, A. G.; Borisov, A. A.; Chernov, D. V.; Dushkin, L. I.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Khohlov, S. S.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Kompaniets, K. G.; Kozhin, A. S.; Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Selyakov, V. A.; Shutenko, V. V.; Yashin, I. I.

    2014-08-01

    The project of the tracking detector designed for a joint operation with Cherenkov water detector NEVOD and based on the drift chambers from the neutrino experiment at the IHEP accelerator U-70 is presented. The project is aimed at solving a problem called `muon puzzle' — growing with energy excess of muon content in EAS in comparison with contemporary models of their development, which was registered in various experiments. Joint operation of the coordinate-tracking detector and Cherenkov water calorimeter will allow to measure energy of muon groups and to answer the question about the reasons of the muon flux excess.

  17. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Software alignment of the BESIII main drift chamber using the Kalman Filter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-Ke; Mao, Ze-Pu; Bian, Jian-Ming; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chen, Shen-Jian; Deng, Zi-Yan; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Gao, Yuan-Ning; He, Kang-Lin; He, Miao; Hua, Chun-Fei; Huang, Bin; Huang, Xing-Tao; Ji, Xiao-Bin; Li, Fei; Li, Hai-Bo; Li, Wei-Dong; Liang, Yu-Tie; Liu, Chun-Xiu; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Suo; Liu, Ying-Jie; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Mao, Ya-Jun; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Pan, Ming-Hua; Pang, Cai-Ying; Ping, Rong-Gang; Qin, Ya-Hong; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Sun, Yong-Zhao; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wen, Shuo-Pin; Wu, Ling-Hui; Xie, Yu-Guang; Xu, Min; Yan, Liang; You, Zheng-Yun; Yuan, Chang-Zheng; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Bing-Yun; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Yang-Heng; Zhu, Ke-Jun; Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Zhu, Zhi-Li; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2009-03-01

    Software alignment is quite important for a tracking detector to reach its ultimate position accuracy and momentum resolution. We developed a new alignment algorithm for the BESIII Main Drift Chamber using the Kalman Filter method. Two different types of data which are helix tracks and straight tracks are used to test this algorithm, and the results show that the design and implementation is successful.

  18. Predicting the yield performances of multicomponent oil smokes confined in closed chambers. Technical report Jan-Nov 80

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, G.O.

    1983-06-01

    A semiempirical model is developed to predict the yield performances of multicomponent oil smokes confined in closed chambers. The model employs vapor pressure-percent mass evaporated correlations, which were derived from oil droplet evaporation studies, to predict the saturation requirements of fog, oil, PEG 200 and No. 2 diesel fuel. Comparison of model predictions and experiment indicates good agreement for fog oil and PEG 200 vaporization/condensation yield tests. Both model and experiment demonstrate the inferior yield performance of No. 2 diesel fuel, possessing a yield less than half that of either fog oil or PEG 200. The lower yield performance of No. 2 diesel fuel is due to the high volatility of diesel fuel as compared to fog oil or PEG 200. The model also illustrates the dependency of multicomponent oil yield performances on chamber volume. As a result, while fog oil and PEG200 will be characterized by similar yields at a specific chamber volume, the yield equivalency will not hold at larger chamber volumes. Implications on the liquid smoke-open atmosphere persistency characteristics are discussed. Finally, the hygroscopic nature of PEG 200 is discussed and a model is developed for the prediction of the yield performance of PEG 200 as a function of relative humidity. It is also shown the yield of PEG 200 can exceed that of fog oil under high-relative humidity conditions.

  19. Home Fire Safety Practices and Smoke Detector Program Awareness in an Urban Pediatric Emergency Department Population.

    PubMed

    Wood, Rachel Lynn; Teach, Stephen J; Rucker, Alexandra; Lall, Ambika; Chamberlain, James M; Ryan, Leticia Manning

    2016-11-01

    Risk factors for residential fire death (young age, minority race/ethnicity, and low socioeconomic status) are common among urban pediatric emergency department (ED) patients. Community-based resources are available in our region to provide free smoke detector installation. The objective of our study was to describe awareness of these resources and home fire safety practices in this vulnerable population. In this cross-sectional study, a brief survey was administered to a convenience sample of caregivers accompanying patients 19 years of age or younger in an urban pediatric ED in Washington, DC. Survey contents focused on participant knowledge of available community-based resources and risk factors for residential fire injury. Five hundred eleven eligible caregivers were approached, and 401 (78.5%) agreed to participate. Patients accompanying the caregivers were 48% male, 77% African American, and had a mean (SD) age of 6.5 (5.9) years. Of study participants, 256 (63.8%) lived with children younger than 5 years. When asked about available community-based resources for smoke detectors, 240 (59.9%) were unaware of these programs, 319 (79.6%) were interested in participating, and 221 (55.1%) enrolled. Presence of a home smoke detector was reported by 396 respondents (98.7%); however, 346 (86.3%) reported testing these less often than monthly. Two hundred fifty-six 256 (63.8%) lacked a carbon monoxide detector, and 202 (50.4%) had no fire escape plan. Sixty-five (16%) reported indoor smoking, and 92 (22.9%) reported space heater use. In this urban pediatric ED population, there is limited awareness of community-based resources but high rates of interest in participating once informed. Whereas the self-reported prevalence of home smoke detectors is high in our study population, other fire safety practices are suboptimal.

  20. Pulsed discharge helium ionization detector : a new sensitive space detector for gas chromatography ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, C.; Cabane, M.; Coscia, D.; Coll, P.; Eugenie, J.; Brun, J. F.; Israel, G.

    2003-04-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a powerful analytical technique which has been widely used in the exploration of other planetary atmospheres and surfaces. It was part of the scientific payloads devoted to in situ chemical analysis of the soil of Mars, the atmosphere of Venus, and it is currently present in the Huygens probe en route to explore Titan’s atmosphere as well as in the Rosetta lander probe to investigate a cometary nucleus. Obviously, since it was first used in a Viking probe (1976), space GC was improved to fulfil the more and more constraining scientific and space instrumental requirements. More particularly, the separation part, composed of chromatographic columns, was the subject of transformations which contributed to significantly improve the efficiency and the sensitivity of the technique. But on the other hand, space GC detectors remained relatively rudimentary systems, if one except the introduction of mass spectrometry coupled to GC, and they became the limiting factor to a better sensitivity of the whole instrument. In other words, much more sensitive space GC is now required to investigate the composition in organics of hostile environments, as can be the soil of Mars where concentration in organics could be limited to trace levels. That is the reason why, in order to overcome this limitation, we are currently leading a research and development program funded by the space French agency to develop a new type of space chromatographic detector which could meet the objectives of the future space GC : the pulsed discharge helium ionisation detector (PDHID). The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the compatibility of the analytical performances of PDHID with space exploration requirements, by presenting the results of a series of experiments led with a commercial version of PDHID. These results made us starting a program of miniaturisation of this type of detector to build a version compatible with space instrumentation requirements in terms of mass

  1. General collection efficiency for liquid isooctane and tetramethylsilane used as sensitive media in a parallel-plate ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Johansson, B; Wickman, G

    1997-01-01

    The general collection efficiency has been measured in liquid isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4) used as the sensitive media in a parallel-plate ionization chamber, with an electrode distance of 1 mm, intended for photon and electron dosimetry applications. The liquid ionization chamber was irradiated at different dose rates by 140 keV photons from the decay of radioactive 99mTc. The measurements were made at potential differences of 50, 100, 200 and 500 V. Measurements were performed for each liquid and electric field strength, with the decay rate of 99mTc used as the dose-rate reference. The maximum dose rate was about 150 mGy min-1 in each experiment. When the measured general collection efficiency values are compared with the theoretical predictions for collection efficiency in gases, it is found that the latter also describe the general collection efficiency in the two liquids within 1% of the saturation current for collection efficiencies down to 60% when using experimentally determined recombination rate constants and on mobilities characteristic of each of the liquids.

  2. Influence of solvothermal synthesis conditions in BiSI nanostructures for application in ionizing radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, I.; Mombrú, M.; Pérez Barthaburu, M.; Bentos Pereira, H.; Fornaro, L.

    2016-02-01

    BiSI belongs to the A V B VI C VII chalcohalides group of compounds. These compounds show several interesting properties such as ferroelectricity, piezoelectricity along the c axis, and photoconductivity. Moreover, BiSI is a potential semiconductor material for room-temperature gamma and x-ray detection, given its band gap of 1.57 eV and its high density, 6.41 g cm-3. In this work we present BiSI nanostructures synthesized by the solvothermal method with the intention of using them for ionizing radiation detection. The solvent was varied to study its influence in morphology, particle size and size distribution. Three different conditions were tested, using either water, monoethylene glycol and a mixture of both solvents. Nanostructures were characterized by XRD to determine the phase obtained and reaction completeness; TEM was used to observe nanostructures morphology, size, size distribution and crystallinity; and finally FT-IR diffuse reflectance was used to study monoethylene glycol presence in the samples. Nanorods in the range of 100-200 nm width were obtained in all samples, but round nanoparticles of around 10 nm in diameter were also detected in samples synthesized only with monoethylene glycol. Samples synthesized in monoethylene glycol were used to fabricate pellets to construct detectors. The detectors responded to ionizing radiation and a resistivity in the order of 1013 Ω cm was estimated. This work proposes, to our knowledge, the first study of BiSI for its application in ionizing radiation detection.

  3. Current-voltage relation for a field ionizing He beam detector

    SciTech Connect

    DePonte, D. P.; Elliott, Greg S.; Kevan, S. D.

    2009-02-15

    Emerging interest in utilizing the transverse coherence properties of thermal energy atomic and molecular beams motivates the development of ionization detectors with near unit detection efficiency and adequate spatial resolution to resolve interference fringes of submicron dimension. We demonstrate that a field ionization tip coupled to a charged particle detector meets these requirements. We have systematically studied the current-voltage relationship for field ionization of helium using tungsten tips in diffuse gas and in a supersonic helium beam. For all 16 tips used in this study, the dependence of ion current on voltage for tips of fixed radius was found to differ from that for tips held at constant surface electric field. A scaling analysis is presented to explain this difference. Ion current increased on average to the 2.8 power of voltage for a tip at fixed field and approximately fifth power of voltage for fixed radius for a liquid nitrogen cooled tip in room temperature helium gas. For the helium beam, ion current increased as 2.2 power of voltage with constant surface field. The capture region of the tips was found to be up to 0.1 {mu}m{sup 2} for diffuse gas and 0.02 {mu}m{sup 2} in the beam. Velocity dependence and orientation of tip to beam were also studied.

  4. Experimental investigation of the effect of air cavity size in cylindrical ionization chambers on the measurements in 60Co radiotherapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanpalmer, John; Johansson, Karl-Axel

    2011-11-01

    In the late 1970s, Johansson et al (1978 Int. Symp. National and International Standardization of Radiation Dosimetry (Atlanta 1977) vol 2 (Vienna: IAEA) pp 243-70) reported experimentally determined displacement correction factors (pdis) for cylindrical ionization chamber dosimetry in 60Co and high-energy photon beams. These pdis factors have been implemented and are currently in use in a number of dosimetry protocols. However, the accuracy of these factors has recently been questioned by Wang and Rogers (2009a Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1609-20), who performed Monte Carlo simulations of the experiments performed by Johansson et al. They reported that the inaccuracy of the pdis factors originated from the normalization procedure used by Johansson et al. In their experiments, Johansson et al normalized the measured depth-ionization curves at the depth of maximum ionization for each of the different ionization chambers. In this study, we experimentally investigated the effect of air cavity size of cylindrical ionization chambers in a PMMA phantom and 60Co γ-beam. Two different pairs of air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers were used. The chambers in each pair had identical construction and materials but different air cavity volume (diameter). A 20 MeV electron beam was utilized to determine the ratio of the mass of air in the cavity of the two chambers in each pair. This ratio of the mass of air in each pair was then used to compare the ratios of the ionizations obtained at different depths in the PMMA phantom and 60Co γ-beam using the two pairs of chambers. The diameter of the air cavity of cylindrical ionization chambers influences both the depth at which the maximum ionization is observed and the ionization per unit mass of air at this depth. The correction determined at depths of 50 mm and 100 mm is smaller than the correction currently used in many dosimetry protocols. The results presented here agree with the findings of Wang and Rogers' Monte Carlo

  5. Investigation and performance tests of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with double sensitive volume for measuring diagnostic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, B.; Zamani Zeinali, H.; Soltani, J.; Negarestani, A.; Shahvar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Medical diagnostic equipment, like diagnostic radiology and mammography require a dosimeter with high accuracy for dosimetry of the diagnostic X-ray beam. Ionization chambers are suitable instruments for dosimetry of diagnostic-range X-ray beams because of their appropriate response and high reliability. This work introduces the design and fabrication of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with a PMMA body, graphite-coated PMMA windows (0.5 mm thick) and a graphite-foil central electrode (0.1 mm thick, 0.7 g/cm3 dense). This design improves upon the response characteristics of existing designs through the specific choice of materials as well as the appropriate size and arrangement of the ionization chamber components. The results of performance tests conducted at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry laboratory in Karaj-Iran demonstrated the short and long-term stability, the low leakage current, the low directional dependence, and the high ion collection efficiency of the design. Furthermore, the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations confirmed the low effect of central electrode on this new ionization chamber response. The response characteristics of the parallel plate ionization chamber presented in this work makes the instrument suitable for use as a standard dosimeter in laboratories.

  6. Numeric estimation of the possibilities of ionizing detectors for monitoring SR beam space parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemiev, A. N.; Artemiev, N. A.; Ioudin, L. I.; Mikhailov, V. G.; Moryakov, V. P.; Odintsov, D. G.; Rezvov, V. A.; Cerenius, Y.; Svensson, A.

    2000-06-01

    An ionizing detector for on-line registration and representation of the geometric SR beam parameters was developed in RRC KI. The detector analyses the products of the residual gas ionization, which was done by the investigated beam. Special electrostatic optics and open image converter tube (ICT) form optical image of the real beam on the screen of ICT. The detector was checked on SR beams of the next storage rings: DCI (LURE, Orsey, France), KSRS (RRC KI, Moscow, Russia) and MAX-2 (MAX-lab, Lund, Sweden). The codes for TV image processing give a possibility for numeric estimation of the beam size, the width of its horizontal and vertical profiles and position of the beam gravity. Statistic processing of the beam gravity center using big amount of TV frames gives uncertainty in the beam position of about 2 μm while the width of the beam is about 2 mm. Summation of big amount of TV frames was used. This method significantly increases signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Air density dependence of the response of the PTW SourceCheck 4pi ionization chamber for (125)I brachytherapy seeds.

    PubMed

    Torres Del Río, J; Tornero-López, A M; Guirado, D; Pérez-Calatayud, J; Lallena, A M

    2017-06-01

    To analyze the air density dependence of the response of the new SourceCheck 4pi ionization chamber, manufactured by PTW. The air density dependence of three different SourceCheck 4pi chambers was studied by measuring (125)I sources. Measurements were taken by varying the pressure from 746.6 to 986.6hPa in a pressure chamber. Three different HDR 1000 Plus ionization chambers were also analyzed under similar conditions. A linear and a potential-like function of the air density were fitted to experimental data and their achievement in describing them was analyzed. SourceCheck 4pi chamber response showed a residual dependence on the air density once the standard pressure and temperature factor was applied. The chamber response was overestimated when the air density was below that under normal atmospheric conditions. A similar dependence was found for the HDR 1000 Plus chambers analyzed. A linear function of the air density permitted a very good description of this residual dependence, better than with a potential function. No significant variability between the different specimens of the same chamber model studied was found. The effect of overestimation observed in the chamber responses once they are corrected for the standard pressure and temperature may represent a non-negligible ∼4% overestimation in high altitude cities as ours (700m AMSL). This overestimation behaves linearly with the air density in all cases analyzed. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluating analytical ionization quenching correction models for 3D liquid organic scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsanea, F.; Beddar, S.

    2017-05-01

    Proton therapy offers dosimetric advantage over conventional photon therapy due to the finite range of the proton beam, which improves dose conformity. However, one of the main challenges of proton beam therapy is verification of the complex treatment plans delivered to a patient. Thus, 3D measurements are needed to verify the complex dose distribution. A 3D organic scintillator detector is capable of such measurements. However, organic scintillators exhibit a non-linear relation to the ionization density called ionization quenching. The ionization quenching phenomenon in organic scintillators must be accounted for to obtain accurate dose measurements. We investigated the energy deposition by secondary electrons (EDSE) model to explain ionization quenching in 3D liquid organic scintillator when exposed to proton beams. The EDSE model was applied to volumetric scintillation measurement of proton pencil beam with energies of 85.6, 100.9, 144.9 and 161.9 MeV. The quenching parameter in EDSE model ρq was determined by plotting the total light output vs the initial energy of the ion. The results were compared to the Birks semi-empirical formula of scintillation light emission.

  9. SU-D-19A-01: Can Farmer-Type Ionization Chambers Be Used to Improve the Accuracy of Low-Energy Electron Beam Reference Dosimetry?

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B R; McEwen, M R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of cylindrical Farmer-type ionization chambers to improve the accuracy of low-energy electron beam calibration. Historically, these chamber types have not been used in beams with incident energies less than 10 MeV (R{sub 5} {sub 0} < 4.3 cm) because early investigations suggested large (up to 5 %) fluence perturbation factors in these beams, implying that a significant component of uncertainty would be introduced if used for calibration. More recently, the assumptions used to determine perturbation corrections for cylindrical chambers have been questioned. Methods: Measurements are made with cylindrical chambers in Elekta Precise 4, 8 and 18 MeV electron beams. Several chamber types are investigated that employ graphite walls and aluminum electrodes with very similar specifications (NE2571, NE2505/3, FC65-G). Depth-ionization scans are measured in water in the 8 and 18 MeV beams. To reduce uncertainty from chamber positioning, measurements in the 4 MeV beam are made at the reference depth in Virtual Water™. The variability of perturbation factors is quantified by comparing normalized response of various chambers. Results: Normalized ion chamber response varies by less than 0.7 % for similar chambers at average electron energies corresponding to that at the reference depth from 4 or 6 MeV beams. Similarly, normalized measurements made with similar chambers at the reference depth in the 4 MeV beam vary by less than 0.4 %. Absorbed dose calibration coefficients derived from these results are stable within 0.1 % on average over a period of 6 years. Conclusion: These results indicate that the uncertainty associated with differences in fluence perturbations for cylindrical chambers with similar specifications is only 0.2 %. The excellent long-term stability of these chambers in both photon and electron beams suggests that these chambers might offer the best performance for all reference dosimetry applications.

  10. SMOKE: Characterization of Smoke Particulate for Spacecraft Fire Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Mulholland, G.; Yuan, Z. G.; Yang, J.; Cleary, T.

    2001-01-01

    'Smoke' is a flight definition investigation whose purpose is to characterize the smoke particulate from microgravity smoke sources to enable improved design of future space-craft smoke detectors. In the earliest missions (Mercury, Gemini and Apollo), the crew quarters were so cramped that it was considered reasonable that the astronauts would rapidly detect any fire. The Skylab module, however, included approximately 30 UV-sensing fire detectors. The Space Shuttle Orbiter has nine particle-ionization smoke detectors in the mid-deck and flight deck. The detectors for the US segments of the International Space Station (ISS) are laser-diode, forward-scattering, smoke detectors. Current plans for the ISS call for two detectors in the open area of the module, and detectors in racks that have cooling air-flow. Due to the complete absence of microgravity data, all three of these detector systems were designed based upon 1-g test data and experience. As planned mission durations and complexity increase and the volume of spacecraft increases, the need for and importance of effective, crew-independent, fire detection will grow significantly, necessitating more research into microgravity fire phenomena. In 1997 the Comparative Soot Diagnostics Experiment (CSD) flew in the Orbiter Middeck as a Glovebox payload. The CSD experiment was designed to produce small quantities of smoke from several sources to obtain particulate samples and to determine the response of the ISS and Orbiter smoke detectors to these sources. Marked differences in the performance of the detectors compared to their behavior in 1-g were observed. In extreme cases, the detector used in the orbiter was completely blind to easily visible smoke from sources that were readily detected in 1-g. It is hypothesized but as yet unverified that this performance difference was due to enhanced growth of liquid smoke droplets in low-g. These CSD results clearly demonstrate that spacecraft smoke detector design cannot be

  11. The iQID camera: An ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Barber, H. Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detector’s response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The confirmed response to this broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated by particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. The spatial location and energy of individual particles are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, excellent detection efficiency for charged particles, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discriminate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is real-time, single-particle digital autoradiography. We present the latest results and discuss potential applications. PMID:26166921

  12. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams.

    PubMed

    Zink, K; Czarnecki, D; Looe, H K; von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Harder, D

    2014-11-01

    The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known "inscattering effect," whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the in-out balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the in-out balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the first time. The influences of both the

  13. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, K.; Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von; Looe, H. K.; Harder, D.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known “inscattering effect,” whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the in–out balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the in–out balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the

  14. Pulse-Shape Analysis of Ionization Signals in Cryogenic Ge Detectors for Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foerster, N.; Broniatowski, A.; Eitel, K.; Marnieros, S.; Paul, B.; Piro, M.-C.; Siebenborn, B.

    2016-08-01

    The detectors of the direct dark matter search experiment EDELWEISS consist of high-purity germanium crystals operated at cryogenic temperatures (mathrm {{<}20 mK}) and low electric fields (mathrm {{<}1 V/cm}). The surface discrimination is based on the simultaneous measurement of the charge amplitudes on different sets of electrodes. As the rise time of a charge signal strongly depends on the location of an interaction in the crystal, a time-resolved measurement can also be used to identify surface interactions. This contribution presents the results of a study of the discrimination power of the rise time parameter from a hot carrier transport simulation in combination with time-resolved measurements using an EDELWEISS-type detector in a test cryostat at ground level. We show the setup for the time-resolved ionization signal read-out in the EDELWEISS-III experiment and first results from data taking in the underground laboratory of Modane.

  15. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310... for radiation detectors. Radiation detectors, radiation sensors, electron tube devices, or ionization chambers, herein referred to as “radiation detectors,” that contain only Division 2.2 gases, are...

  16. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310... for radiation detectors. Radiation detectors, radiation sensors, electron tube devices, or ionization chambers, herein referred to as “radiation detectors,” that contain only Division 2.2 gases, are excepted...

  17. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310... for radiation detectors. Radiation detectors, radiation sensors, electron tube devices, or ionization chambers, herein referred to as “radiation detectors,” that contain only Division 2.2 gases, are excepted...

  18. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310... for radiation detectors. Radiation detectors, radiation sensors, electron tube devices, or ionization chambers, herein referred to as “radiation detectors,” that contain only Division 2.2 gases, are excepted...

  19. 49 CFR 173.310 - Exceptions for radiation detectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exceptions for radiation detectors. 173.310... for radiation detectors. Radiation detectors, radiation sensors, electron tube devices, or ionization chambers, herein referred to as “radiation detectors,” that contain only Division 2.2 gases, are excepted...

  20. Study of timing response and charge spectra of glass based Resistive Plate Chamber detectors for INO-ICAL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, A.; Kumar, A.; Naimuddin, Md.

    2017-03-01

    Resistive Plate chambers (RPCs) are robust and affordable gaseous detectors that combine low cost with excellent timing, good spatial resolution and fast response to the incoming particles. The India Based Neutrino Observatory is an approved project aimed at building a magnetised Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector to study Neutrino physics and related issues. The ICAL experiment will utilize about 29000 RPC's as active detector elements, sandwiched between alternate plates of thick iron. The RPC detectors will be used to detect muons produced from the atmospheric neutrinos interaction with an iron target. The spatial information of the muons will be extracted from the two dimensional readout and the hit position in the respective layers. The up going and down going directionality will be obtained using the time stamp of hits in the active detectors. The charge induced by the particle and its behaviour with respect to the applied voltage play a significant role in designing the readout electronics for the detector. In this paper, we present the timing and charge measurement of single gap glass based RPC detectors. We will also report about studies on the dependence of the timing and charge response of these RPC detectors as a function of the gas composition.

  1. Investigation of particle and vapor wall-loss effects on controlled wood-smoke smog-chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; May, A. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    Smog chambers are extensively used to study processes that drive gas and particle evolution in the atmosphere. A limitation of these experiments is that particles and gas-phase species may be lost to chamber walls on shorter timescales than the timescales of the atmospheric processes being studied in the chamber experiments. These particle and vapor wall losses have been investigated in recent studies of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, but they have not been systematically investigated in experiments of primary emissions from combustion. The semi-volatile nature of combustion emissions (e.g. from wood smoke) may complicate the behavior of particle and vapor wall deposition in the chamber over the course of the experiments due to the competition between gas/particle and gas/wall partitioning. Losses of vapors to the walls may impact particle evaporation in these experiments, and potential precursors for SOA formation from combustion may be lost to the walls, causing underestimates of aerosol yields. Here, we conduct simulations to determine how particle and gas-phase wall losses contributed to the observed evolution of the aerosol during experiments in the third Fire Lab At Missoula Experiment (FLAME III). We use the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics algorithm coupled with the organic volatility basis set (VBS) and wall-loss formulations to examine the predicted extent of particle and vapor wall losses. We limit the scope of our study to the dark periods in the chamber before photo-oxidation to simplify the aerosol system for this initial study. Our model simulations suggest that over one third of the initial particle-phase organic mass (36%) was lost during the experiments, and roughly half of this particle organic mass loss was from direct particle wall loss (56% of the loss) with the remainder from evaporation of the particles driven by vapor losses to the walls (44% of the loss). We perform a series of sensitivity tests to understand

  2. Investigation of particle and vapor wall-loss effects on controlled wood-smoke smog-chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; May, A. A.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-10-01

    Smog chambers are extensively used to study processes that drive gas and particle evolution in the atmosphere. A limitation of these experiments is that particles and gas-phase species may be lost to chamber walls on shorter timescales than the timescales of the atmospheric processes being studied in the chamber experiments. These particle and vapor wall losses have been investigated in recent studies of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, but they have not been systematically investigated in experiments of primary emissions from combustion. The semi-volatile nature of combustion emissions (e.g. from wood smoke) may complicate the behavior of particle and vapor wall deposition in the chamber over the course of the experiments due to the competition between gas/particle and gas/wall partitioning. Losses of vapors to the walls may impact particle evaporation in these experiments, and potential precursors for SOA formation from combustion may be lost to the walls, causing underestimations of aerosol yields. Here, we conduct simulations to determine how particle and gas-phase wall losses contributed to the observed evolution of the aerosol during experiments in the third Fire Lab At Missoula Experiment (FLAME III). We use the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics algorithm coupled with the organic volatility basis set (VBS) and wall-loss formulations to examine the predicted extent of particle and vapor wall losses. We limit the scope of our study to the dark periods in the chamber before photo-oxidation to simplify the aerosol system for this initial study. Our model simulations suggest that over one-third of the initial particle-phase organic mass (41 %) was lost during the experiments, and over half of this particle-organic mass loss was from direct particle wall loss (65 % of the loss) with the remainder from evaporation of the particles driven by vapor losses to the walls (35 % of the loss). We perform a series of sensitivity tests to understand

  3. A radiation quality correction factor k for well-type ionization chambers for the measurement of the reference air kerma rate of (60)Co HDR brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Schüller, Andreas; Meier, Markus; Selbach, Hans-Joachim; Ankerhold, Ulrike

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ can be determined in order to measure the reference air kerma rate of (60)Co high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy sources with acceptable uncertainty by means of a well-type ionization chamber calibrated for (192)Ir HDR sources. The calibration coefficients of 35 well-type ionization chambers of two different chamber types for radiation fields of (60)Co and (192)Ir HDR brachytherapy sources were determined experimentally. A radiation quality correction factor kQ was determined as the ratio of the calibration coefficients for (60)Co and (192)Ir. The dependence on chamber-to-chamber variations, source-to-source variations, and source strength was investigated. For the PTW Tx33004 (Nucletron source dosimetry system (SDS)) well-type chamber, the type-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ is 1.19. Note that this value is valid for chambers with the serial number, SN ≥ 315 (Nucletron SDS SN ≥ 548) onward only. For the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well-type chambers, the type-specific correction factor kQ is 1.05. Both kQ values are independent of the source strengths in the complete clinically relevant range. The relative expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of kQ is UkQ = 2.1% for both chamber types. The calibration coefficient of a well-type chamber for radiation fields of (60)Co HDR brachytherapy sources can be calculated from a given calibration coefficient for (192)Ir radiation by using a chamber-type-specific radiation quality correction factor kQ. However, the uncertainty of a (60)Co calibration coefficient calculated via kQ is at least twice as large as that for a direct calibration with a (60)Co source.

  4. Atmospheric measurements by Medipix-2 and Timepix Ionizing Radiation Imaging Detectors on BEXUS stratospheric balloon campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbar, Jaroslav; Scheirich, Jan; Jakubek, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Results of the first two experiments using semiconductor pixel detectors of the Medipix family for cosmic ray imaging in the stratospheric environment are presented. The original detecting device was based on the hybrid pixel detectors of Medipix-2 and Timepix developed at CERN with USB interface developed at Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics of Czech Technical University in Prague. The detectors were used in tracking mode allowing them to operate as an "active nuclear emulsion". The actual flight time of BEXUS7 with Medipix-2 on 8th October 2008 was over 4 hours, with 2 hours at stable floating altitude of 26km. BEXUS9 measurements of similar duration by Timepix, Medipix-2 and ST-6 Geiger telescope instruments took place in arctic atmosphere below 24km altitude on 11th October 2009. This balloon platform is quite ideal for such in-situ measurements. Not only because of the high altitudes reached, but also due to its slow ascent velocity for statistically relevant sampling of the ambient environment for improving cosmic ray induced ionisation rate model inputs. The flight opportunity for BEXUS student projects was provided by Education department of the European Space Agency (ESA) and Eurolaunch - Collaboration of Swedish National Space Board (SNSB) and German Space Agency (DLR). The scientific goal was to check energetic particle type altitudinal dependencies, also testing proper detector calibration by detecting fluxes of ionizing radiation, while evaluating instrumentation endurance and performance.

  5. Development of a Mesoscale Pulsed Discharge Helium Ionization Detector for Portable Gas Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Mowry, Curtis D; Pimentel, Adam S; Mangan, Michael A; Moorman, Matthew W; Sparks, Elizabeth S; Allen, Amy; Achyuthan, Komandoor E

    2015-01-01

    Miniaturization of gas chromatography (GC) instrumentation enables field detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for chembio-applications such as clandestine human transport and disease diagnostics. We fabricated a mesoscale pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (micro-PDHID) for integrating with our previously described mini-GC hardware. Stainless steel electrodes fabricated by photochemical etching and electroforming facilitated rapid prototyping and enabled nesting of inter-electrode insulators for self-alignment of the detector core during assembly. The prototype was ∼10 cm(3) relative to >400 cm(3) of a commercial PDHID, but with a comparable time to sweep a VOC peak from the detector cell (170 ms and 127 ms, respectively). Electron trajectory modeling, gas flow rate, voltage bias, and GC outlet location were optimized for improving sensitivity. Despite 40-fold miniaturization, the micro-PDHID detected 18 ng of the human emanation, 3-methyl-2-hexenoic acid with <3-fold decrease in sensitivity relative to the commercial detector. The micro-PDHID was rugged and operated for 9 months without failure.

  6. A high rate proportional chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, R.; Fraszer, W.; Openshaw, R.; Sheffer, G.; Salomon, M.; Dew, S.; Marans, J.; Wilson, P.

    1987-02-01

    Gas mixtures with high specific ionization allow the use of small interelectrode distances while still maintaining full efficiency. With the short electron drift distances the timing resolution is also improved. The authors have built and operated two 25 cm/sup 2/ chambers with small interelectrode distances. Also single wire detector cells have been built to test gas mixture lifetimes. Various admixtures of CF/sub 4/, DME, Isobutane, Ethane and Argon have been tested. Possible applications of such chambers are as beam profile monitors, position tagging of rare events and front end chambers in spectrometers.

  7. Ultra-thin plasma radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Peter S.

    2017-01-24

    A position-sensitive ionizing-radiation counting detector includes a radiation detector gas chamber having at least one ultra-thin chamber window and an ultra-thin first substrate contained within the gas chamber. The detector further includes a second substrate generally parallel to and coupled to the first substrate and defining a gas gap between the first substrate and the second substrate. The detector further includes a discharge gas between the substrates and contained within the gas chamber, where the discharge gas is free to circulate within the gas chamber and between the first and second substrates at a given gas pressure. The detector further includes a first electrode coupled to one of the substrates and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first electrode. The detector further includes a first discharge event detector coupled to at least one of the electrodes for detecting a gas discharge counting event in the electrode.

  8. Diagnostic potential of the pulsed discharged helium ionization detector (PDHID) for pathogenic Mycobacterial volatile biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Manginell, Ronald P; Pimentel, Adam S; Mowry, Curtis D; Mangan, Michael A; Moorman, Matthew W; Allen, Amy; Schares, Elizabeth S; Achyuthan, Komandoor E

    2013-09-01

    Pathogenic Mycobacteria cause diseases in animals and humans with significant economic and societal consequences. Current methods for Mycobacterial detection relies upon time- and labor-intensive techniques such as culturing or DNA analysis. Using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, four volatile compounds (methyl phenylacetate, methyl p-anisate, methyl nicotinate and o-phenyl anisole) were recently proposed as potential biomarkers for Mycobacteria. We demonstrate for the first time the capabilities of a field-deployable, pulsed discharge helium ionization detector (PDHID) for sensing these volatiles. We determined the analytical performance of the PDHID toward these Mycobacterial volatiles. Detector performance was moderately affected over the temperature range of 150 to 350 °C. The linear dynamic range for all four analytes exceeded three orders of magnitude. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) were calculated as 150 and 450 pg respectively, for all compounds, except methyl phenylacetate (LOD and LOQ, 90 and 270 pg, respectively). Control charts revealed that the PDHID detection system was generally stable, and deviations could be traced to common causes and excluded special causes. Grob tests and ionization potential data suggest that the PDHID is capable of detecting Mycobacterial volatiles in a complex milieu such as culture headspace or breath samples from tuberculosis patients. The diagnostic potential of the PDHID is critical to our goal of a handheld, field-deployable 'sniffer' system for biological pathogens and chemical warfare agents.

  9. Computation of the electron beam quality [Formula: see text] factors for the NE2571, NE2571A and NE2581A thimble ionization chambers using PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Erazo, F; Brualla, L; Lallena, A M

    2017-06-01

    The quality correction factor [Formula: see text] for electron beams was calculated for three thimble ionization chambers, namely, NE2571, NE2571A and NE2581A. The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to estimate the overall correction factor fc,Q of these chambers for electron beams with nominal energies ranging between 6 and 22MeV, corresponding to a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D. A (60)Co beam was used as reference quality Q0. Also eight monoenergetic electron beams reproducing the quality index R50 of the Clinac beams were considered. The [Formula: see text] factors were calculated as the ratio between fc,Q and [Formula: see text] . Those obtained for the NE2571 ionization chamber show a nice agreement with those calculated by Muir and Rogers with EGSnrc. As it occurred to other ionization chambers analyzed in previous works, the [Formula: see text] factors found for the monoenergetic beams are larger (smaller) than those corresponding to the Clinac beams at low (high) R50 values, the differences being slightly above 0.5%. Finally, the [Formula: see text] factors obtained in the case of the NE2571A chamber are systematically ∼0.5% below those of its predecessor chamber, the NE2571. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Simulation of the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber currents by different Monte Carlo codes in benchmark gamma fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Nievaart, Sander; Chen, Yen-Fu; Wu, Shu-Wei; Chou, Wen-Tsae; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2011-10-01

    High energy photon (over 10 MeV) and neutron beams adopted in radiobiology and radiotherapy always produce mixed neutron/gamma-ray fields. The Mg(Ar) ionization chambers are commonly applied to determine the gamma-ray dose because of its neutron insensitive characteristic. Nowadays, many perturbation corrections for accurate dose estimation and lots of treatment planning systems are based on Monte Carlo technique. The Monte Carlo codes EGSnrc, FLUKA, GEANT4, MCNP5, and MCNPX were used to evaluate energy dependent response functions of the Exradin M2 Mg(Ar) ionization chamber to a parallel photon beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV. For the sake of validation, measurements were carefully performed in well-defined (a) primary M-100 X-ray calibration field, (b) primary 60Co calibration beam, (c) 6-MV, and (d) 10-MV therapeutic beams in hospital. At energy region below 100 keV, MCNP5 and MCNPX both had lower responses than other codes. For energies above 1 MeV, the MCNP ITS-mode greatly resembled other three codes and the differences were within 5%. Comparing to the measured currents, MCNP5 and MCNPX using ITS-mode had perfect agreement with the 60Co, and 10-MV beams. But at X-ray energy region, the derivations reached 17%. This work shows us a better insight into the performance of different Monte Carlo codes in photon-electron transport calculation. Regarding the application of the mixed field dosimetry like BNCT, MCNP with ITS-mode is recognized as the most suitable tool by this work.

  11. Smoke control in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Meland, O; Skåret, E

    1986-02-01

    Full scale fire tests have been carried out in order to study the influence of different ventilating principles on the time point of fire detection and the smoke filling of a four-bed room. Using conventional mechanical ventilating systems as "smoke exhaust systems" the time difference left for evacuation of the fire room can be positively influenced. With the conventional ventilating system operating there is a significant difference between time points of detection of the ionization and optical smoke detectors, for both flaming and smoldering fire. Using the "low momentum displacement ventilation" this difference is reduced, resulting in possibilities for the ionization smoke detector to be optimized for both flaming and smoldering fires.

  12. Investigation of the response variability of ionization chambers for the standard transfer of SIR-Spheres(®).

    PubMed

    Thiam, C; Bobin, C; Lourenço, V; Chisté, V; Amiot, M-N; Mougeot, X; Lacour, D; Rigoulay, F; Ferreux, L

    2016-03-01

    The present paper addresses the calibration of well-type ionization chambers (ICs) used at LNE-LNHB as standard transfer instruments to calibrate hospitals in the case of SIR-Spheres(®)(90)Y resin microspheres (Sirtex, Australia). Developed for interventional oncology, this radiopharmaceutical is directly injected in the liver for cancer treatment via a selective internal radiation therapy. The present work was carried out in the framework of the European project "Metrology for molecular radiotherapy" (MetroMRT). As commonly performed in radionuclide metrology for radiopharmaceuticals, the objective is to ensure the metrological traceability of SIR-Spheres(®) to hospitals. Preceding studies were focused on primary measurements of SIR-Spheres(®) based on the TDCR (Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio) method, applied after the dissolution of the (90)Y-labeled resin microspheres. As (90)Y is a high-energy β(-)-emitter, the IC response strongly depends on the transport of electrons in the radioactive solution and surroundings (vial, chamber liners and materials). The variability of the IC-response due to the geometry dependence is investigated by means of measurements and Monte Carlo simulations in the case of a Vinten IC. The aim of the present study was also to propose a reliable uncertainty for ICs calibrations for the standard transfer of SIR-Spheres(®) to hospitals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurement of the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid argon using a two-phase detector with electroluminescence gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, A.; Buzulutskov, A.; Dolgov, A.; Grishnyaev, E.; Nosov, V.; Oleynikov, V.; Polosatkin, S.; Shekhtman, L.; Shemyakina, E.; Sokolov, A.

    2017-05-01

    A measurement of ionization yields in noble-gas liquids is relevant to the energy calibration of nuclear recoil detectors for dark matter search and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments. In this work we further study the ionization yield of nuclear recoils in liquid Ar, using a two-phase detector with an electroluminescence gap and DD neutron generator. The ionization yields of nuclear recoils in liquid Ar were measured at 233 keV and electric fields of 0.56 and 0.62 kV/cm; their values amounted to 5.9 ± 0.8 and 7.4 ± 1 e-/keV, respectively. The characteristic dependences of the ionization yield on energy and electric field were determined, while comparing the results obtained to those at lower energies and higher fields.

  14. Electron beam quality kQ,Q0 factors for various ionization chambers: a Monte Carlo investigation with penelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erazo, F.; Brualla, L.; Lallena, A. M.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we calculate the beam quality correction factor {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} for various plane-parallel ionization chambers. A set of Monte Carlo calculations using the code penelope/penEasy have been carried out to calculate the overall correction factor fc,Q for eight electron beams corresponding to a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D, with nominal energies ranging between 6 MeV and 22 MeV, for a 60Co beam, that has been used as the reference quality Q0 and also for eight monoenergetic electron beams reproducing the quality index R50 of the Clinac beams. Two field sizes, 10 × 10 cm2 and 20 × 20 cm2 have been considered. The {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} factors have been calculated as the ratio between fc,Q and {{f}\\text{c,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} . Values for the Exradin A10, A11, A11TW, P11, P11TW, T11 and T11TW ionization chambers, manufactured by Standard Imaging, as well as for the NACP-02 have been obtained. The results found with the Clinac beams for the two field sizes analyzed show differences below 0.6%, even in the case of the higher energy electron beams. The {{k}\\text{Q,{{\\text{Q}}0}}} values obtained with the Clinac beams are 1% larger than those found with the monoenergetic beams for the higher energies, above 12 MeV. This difference can be ascribed to secondary photons produced in the linac head and the air path towards the phantom. Contrary to what was quoted in a previous work (Sempau et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4427-44), the beam quality correction factors obtained with the complete Clinac geometries and with the monoenergetic beams differ significantly for energies above 12 MeV. Material differences existing between chambers that have the same geometry produce non-negligible modifications in the value of these correction factors.

  15. The response of smoke detectors to pyrolysis and combustion products from aircraft interior materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckee, R. G.; Alvares, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    The following projects were completed as part of the effort to develop and test economically feasible fire-resistant materials for interior furnishings of aircraft as well as detectors of incipient fires in passenger and cargo compartments: (1) determination of the sensitivity of various contemporary gas and smoke detectors to pyrolysis and combustion products from materials commonly used in aircraft interiors and from materials that may be used in the future, (2) assessment of the environmental limitations to detector sensitivity and reliability. The tests were conducted on three groups of materials by exposure to the following three sources of exposure: radiant and Meeker burner flame, heated coil, and radiant source only. The first test series used radiant heat and flame exposures on easily obtainable test materials. Next, four materials were selected from the first group and exposed to an incandescent coil to provide the conditions for smoldering combustion. Finally, radiant heat exposures were used on advanced materials that are not readily available.

  16. Radiation dosimetry in magnetic fields with Farmer-type ionization chambers: determination of magnetic field correction factors for different magnetic field strengths and field orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spindeldreier, C. K.; Schrenk, O.; Bakenecker, A.; Kawrakow, I.; Burigo, L.; Karger, C. P.; Greilich, S.; Pfaffenberger, A.

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this work was to determine magnetic field correction factors that are needed for dosimetry in hybrid devices for MR-guided radiotherapy for Farmer-type ionization chambers for different magnetic field strengths and field orientations. The response of six custom-built Farmer-type chambers irradiated at a 6 MV linac was measured in a water tank positioned in a magnet with magnetic field strengths between 0.0 T and 1.1 T. Chamber axis, beam and magnetic field were perpendicular to each other and both magnetic field directions were investigated. EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations were compared to the measurements and simulations with different field orientations were performed. For all geometries, magnetic field correction factors, kBQ , and perturbation factors were calculated. A maximum increase of 8.8% in chamber response was measured for the magnetic field perpendicular to chamber and beam axis. The measured chamber response could be reproduced by adjusting the dead volume layer near the chamber stem in the Monte Carlo simulations. For the magnetic field parallel to the chamber axis or parallel to the beam, the simulated response increased by 1.1% at maximum for field strengths up to 1.1 T. A complex dependence of the response was found on chamber radius, magnetic field strength and orientation of beam, chamber axis and magnetic field direction. Especially for magnetic fields perpendicular to beam and chamber axis, the exact sensitive volume has to be considered in the simulations. To minimize magnetic field correction factors and the influence of dead volumes on the response of Farmer chambers, a measurement set-up with the magnetic field parallel to the chamber axis or parallel to the beam is recommended for dosimetry.

  17. On the effect of temperature and the width of the turbulent combustion zone on the ionization detector readings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikin, A. P.; Galiev, I. R.

    2016-08-01

    We have considered the functional dependence of the ionization detector readings (ion current) on the composition of the fuel-air mixture, adiabatic temperature, and the turbulent combustion zone width. Experiments on the engine show that, for an air excess factor of 0.75-1.15, the coincidence of the calculated and experimental data exceeds 90%. Our results can be used to predict and monitor the adiabatic temperature of the flame and the width of the turbulent combustion zone in the combustion changer of the internal combustion engine using the ionization detector.

  18. Fast-Neutron Spectrometry Using a 3He Ionization Chamber and Digital Pulse Shape Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; J. T. Johnson; E. H. Seabury

    2010-05-01

    Digital pulse shape analysis (dPSA) has been used with a Cuttler-Shalev type 3He proportional counter to measure the fast neutron spectra of bare 252Cf and 241AmBe neutron sources. Measurements have also been made to determine the attenuated fast neutron spectra of 252Cf shielded by several materials including water, graphite, liquid nitrogen, magnesium, and tungsten. Rise-time dPSA has been employed using the common rise-time approach for analyzing n +3He ? 1H + 3H ionization events and a new approach has been developed to improve the fidelity of these measurements. Simulations have been performed for the different experimental arrangements and are compared, demonstrating general agreement between the dPSA processed fast neutron spectra and predictions.

  19. Analysis of primary aromatic amines in the mainstream waterpipe smoke using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Jens; Kappenstein, Oliver; Luch, Andreas; Schulz, Thomas G

    2011-08-19

    In recent years waterpipe smoking has spread worldwide and emerged as global health issue. Yet only little is known on the composition of waterpipe smoke. Here, we present a study on the identification and quantification of primary aromatic amines (PAAs) in this complex environmental matrix. Smoking of the waterpipe was conducted with a smoking machine and particulate matter was collected on glass fiber pads. We developed a fast, simple and specific liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approach to simultaneously detect 31 different PAAs in this matrix. The detection limits comprised a range of 0.45-4.50 ng per smoking session, represented by 2-aminobiphenyl and 3,4,5-trichloroaniline, respectively. Intra- and inter-day precision were determined and proved excellent. We detected 31.3 ± 2.2 ng aniline and 28.0 ± 1.6 ng 4,4'-oxydianiline in the smoke of one waterpipe session. The water in the bowl exerted a small but considerable filter effect on PAAs. The method worked-out showed excellent sensitivity and specificity and is thus highly suited for the determination of PAAs in mainstream waterpipe smoke.

  20. Dosimetry for the MRI accelerator: the impact of a magnetic field on the response of a Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Meijsing, I; Raaymakers, B W; Raaijmakers, A J E; Kok, J G M; Hogeweg, L; Liu, B; Lagendijk, J J W

    2009-05-21

    The UMC Utrecht is constructing a 1.5 T MRI scanner integrated with a linear accelerator (Lagendijk et al 2008 Radiother. Oncol. 86 25-9). The goal of this device is to facilitate soft-tissue contrast based image-guided radiotherapy, in order to escalate the dose to the tumour while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Dosimetry for the MRI accelerator has to be performed in the presence of a magnetic field. This paper investigates the feasibility of using a Farmer NE2571 ionization chamber for absolute dosimetry. The impact of the mcagnetic field on the response of this ionization chamber has been measured and simulated using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. Two orientations of the ionization chamber with respect to the incident beam and the magnetic field which are feasible in the MRI accelerator configuration are taken into account. Measurements are performed using a laboratory magnet ranging from 0 to 1.2 T. In the simulations a range from 0 to 2 T is used. For both orientations, the measurements and simulations agreed within the uncertainty of the measurements and simulations. In conclusion, the response of the ionization chamber as a function of the magnetic field is understood and can be simulated using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Dose measurement using Al2O3 dosimeter in comparison to LiF:Mg,Ti dosimeter and ionization chamber at low and high energy x-ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Yahya, Muhammad Hadzmi; Rosnan, Muhammad Syazwan; Abdullah, Reduan; Kadir, Ahmad Bazlie Abdul

    2017-01-01

    The dose measurement using Al2O3 OSL dosimeter (OSLD) was carried out at low and high energy x-ray. The dose at low energy x-ray was measured at 40, 71 and 125 kVp x-ray energies. The dose ar high energy x-ray was measured at 6 and 10 MV x-ray energies measured at the depth of maximum dose (Zmax). The results were compared to that in ionization chamber and LiF: Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD100). The results showed that the dose of OSLD were less in agreement to ionization chamber compared to that in TLD100. The dose of OSLD however was in good agreement to that in ionization chamber at high energy x-ray. The dose measured using OSLD were found to be more consistence at high energy x-ray shown by the standard deviation of the readings. The measurement of x2 showed that the readings of OSLD were close to that in ionization chamber with values of 2.21 and 4.63 for 6 and 10 MV respectively. The results indicated that OSLD is more suitable for dose measurement at high energy x-ray.

  2. Ionisation chamber containing boron as a neutron detector in medical accelerator fields.

    PubMed

    Zielczynski, M; Gryzinski, M A; Golnik, N; Tulik, P

    2007-01-01

    A combination of the recombination principle of H(10) measurements with the use of the ionisation chambers containing boron has been presented, in order to increase the relative sensitivity of the chamber to neutrons by a factor close to the radiation quality factor of photoneutrons. Three types of the chambers were investigated. Two of them were filled with BF(3) and the third one contained electrodes covered with B(4)C. All the chambers were placed in paraffin moderators. The response of the chambers was investigated, depending on gas pressure and polarising voltage. The results showed that it was possible to obtain nearly the same response of the chamber to H(10) for photons and neutrons in a restricted energy range; however, further investigations are needed to make an optimum design.

  3. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge.

  4. The detection of dissolved gases in transformer oil by gas chromatography with helium ionization detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xian-qin; Fang, Hua; Li, Min-xian

    2017-07-01

    The GC-PDD with the technology of valve cutting and helium ionization detector was used to analyze the dissolved gases in ultra-high voltage(UHV) and extra-high voltage(EHV) transformer oil. The detection limit(DL) reached ppb grade, especially for the featuring gas—C2H2 and H2, whose DL could reach 5ppb and 11ppb respectively. The test reproducibility of the instrument was about 1% and the correlation coefficient of standard curve-r is greater or equal to 0.99, which showed obvious advantage compared with normal GC. In addition, the auxiliary gas of H2 was not used in this instrument, which completely improved the safety performance. Thus, the application of GC-PDD has significant meaning in warning potential malfunction inside the ultra-high voltage transformer in advance.

  5. A pyroloysis technique for determining microamounts of hydrogen in lunar soil using the helium ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bustin, R.

    1983-01-01

    A method has been developed which will determine hydrogen in sub-milligram samples of lunar soil. It consists of heating the sample in a pyroprobe followed by the gas chromatographic determination of hydrogen using the helium ionization detector. Using a 7 foot, 1/8 OD stainless steel column packed with Carbosieve S, 120/140 mesh, hydrogen was well-separated from the other gases released from lunar soil. Standards of hydrogen in helium were used for calibration. The limit to detection under the conditions used was about 2 ng. The method was linear from 2 ng to 270 ng. The method was checked using some actual lunar samples. Results were typical of those obtained for lunar soils using other methods.

  6. A rapid multidimensional GC-flame-ionization detector method for determination of fatty acid methyl esters.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Jiang; Zhang, Jianbing

    2014-02-01

    Fatty acids play important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases. In order to investigate a wide spectrum of fatty acids in biological matrix, we developed an approach for quantitative analysis of fatty acids based on a heart-cutting 2D gas chromatographic-flame ionization detector system. This system uses a Dean Switch interface between the primary polar and secondary nonpolar capillary column. Most of the standards were separated by the primary column. Unresolved components are selectively transferred to the secondary column, where they are completely separated. This method was further evaluated using plasma obtained from 11 healthy and 11 chronic coronary artery disease patients. Our results prove that this approach is sensitive, precise and specific, capable of measuring 37 specific fatty acids. It indicates that this approach offers a reliable and sensitive technical platform for comprehensive quantification of fatty acids.

  7. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates a plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examined.

  8. Determination of the recombination correction factor kS for some specific plane-parallel and cylindrical ionization chambers in pulsed photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Bruggmoser, G; Saum, R; Schmachtenberg, A; Schmid, F; Schüle, E

    2007-01-21

    It has been shown from an evaluation of the inverse reading of the dosemeter (1/M) against the inverse of the polarizing voltage (1/V), obtained with a number of commercially available ionization chambers, using dose per pulse values between 0.16 and 5 mGy, that a linear relationship between the recombination correction factor kS and dose per pulse (DPP) can be found. At dose per pulse values above 1 mGy the method of a general equation with coefficients dependent on the chamber type gives more accurate results than the Boag method. This method was already proposed by Burns and McEwen (1998, Phys. Med. Biol. 43 2033) and avoids comprehensive and time-consuming measurements of Jaffé plots which are a prerequisite for the application of the multi-voltage analysis (MVA) or the two-voltage analysis (TVA). We evaluated and verified the response of ionization chambers on the recombination effect in pulsed accelerator beams for both photons and electrons. Our main conclusions are: (1) The correction factor k(S) depends only on the DPP and the chamber type. There is no influence of radiation type and energy. (2) For all the chambers investigated there is a linear relationship between kS and DPP up to 5 mGy/pulse, and for two chambers we could show linearity up to 40 mGy/pulse. (3) A general formalism, such as that of Boag, characterizes chambers exclusively by the distance of the electrodes and gives a trend for the correction factor, and therefore (4) a general formalism has to reflect the influence of the chamber construction on the recombination by the introduction of chamber-type dependent coefficients.

  9. SU-E-T-225: Correction Matrix for PinPoint Ionization Chamber for Dosimetric Measurements in the Newly Released Incise™ Multileaf Collimator Shaped Small Field for CyberKnife M6™ Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Li, T; Heron, D; Huq, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For small field dosimetry, such as measurements of output factors for cones or MLC-shaped irregular small fields, ion chambers often Result in an underestimation of the dose, due to both the volume averaging effect and the lack of lateral charged particle equilibrium. This work presents a mathematical model for correction matrix for a PTW PinPoint ionization chamber for dosimetric measurements made in the newly released Incise™ Multileaf collimator fields of the CyberKnife M6™ machine. Methods: A correction matrix for a PTW 0.015cc PinPoint ionization chamber was developed by modeling its 3D dose response in twelve cone-shaped circular fields created using the 5mm, 7.5mm, 10mm, 12.5mm, 15mm, 20mm, 25mm, 30mm, 35mm, 40mm, 50mm, 60mm cones in a CyberKnife M6™ machine. For each field size, hundreds of readings were recorded for every 2mm chamber shift in the horizontal plane. The contribution of each dose pixel to a measurement point depended on the radial distance and the angle to the chamber axis. These readings were then compared with the theoretical dose as obtained with Monte Carlo calculation. A penalized least-square optimization algorithm was developed to generate the correction matrix. After the parameter fitting, the mathematical model was validated for MLC-shaped irregular fields. Results: The optimization algorithm used for parameter fitting was stable and the resulted response factors were smooth in spatial domain. After correction with the mathematical model, the chamber reading matched with the calculation for all the tested fields to within 2%. Conclusion: A novel mathematical model has been developed for PinPoint chamber for dosimetric measurements in small MLC-shaped irregular fields. The correction matrix is dependent on detector, treatment unit and the geometry of setup. The model can be applied to non-standard composite fields and provides an access to IMRT point dose validation.

  10. NOTE: Radiological thickness measurement using a liquid ionization chamber electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Philip M.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Partridge, Mike; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Garton, Andrew; Mubata, Cephas

    1999-06-01

    We present a method of calibrating the Portal Vision electronic portal imaging device to obtain radiological thickness maps for compensator design. In this method, coefficients are derived to describe the relationship between intensity and thickness for a set of water-equivalent blocks. The effects of four parameters were studied: (a) The dose response of the system was measured and found to be describable by a square-root function. (b) The calibration data and images were taken with a wedge in situ. The effects of using different wedges and different wedge orientations were investigated. The intrinsic accuracy of the accelerator/imager system was found to be 1.9 mm, for both 15° and 30° wedges. Changing the wedge orientation between calibration and imaging and rotating the calibration coefficients accordingly led to an error of 3.5 mm. (c) The variation in detector response with gantry angle was measured and corrected. The residual error in this process was 2.4 mm. (d) The use of a model to correct the effects of imaging with different field sizes was investigated and found to yield a residual error of 2.9 mm. The overall error in image calibrations was approx 4 mm or 2% in dose. This is considered to be sufficiently small for the intended use of designing compensators for tangential breast irradiation.

  11. Study of (α , p) and (α , n) reactions with a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, M. L.; Rehm, K. E.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Dickerson, C.; Hoffman, C. R.; Jiang, C. L.; Kay, B. P.; Lai, J.; Nusair, O.; Pardo, R. C.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.; Talwar, R.; Ugalde, C.

    2017-07-01

    A large number of (α , p) and (α , n) reactions are known to play a fundamental role in nuclear astrophysics. This work presents a novel technique to study these reactions with the active target system MUSIC whose segmented anode allows the investigation of a large energy range of the excitation function with a single beam energy. In order to verify the method, we performed direct measurements of the previously measured reactions 17O (α , n) 20Ne, 23Na (α , p) 26Mg, and 23Na (α , n) 26Al. These reactions were investigated in inverse kinematics using 4He gas in the detector to study the excitation functions in the energy range of about 2-6 MeV in the center of mass. We found good agreement between the cross sections of the 17O (α , n) 20Ne reaction measured in this work and previous measurements. Furthermore we have successfully performed a simultaneous measurement of the 23Na (α , p) 26Mg and 23Na (α , n) 26Al reactions.

  12. Experimental analysis of general ion recombination in a liquid-filled ionization chamber in high-energy photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eunah; Seuntjens, Jan; Davis, Stephen

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To study experimentally the general ion recombination effect in a liquid-filled ionization chamber (LIC) in high-energy photon beams. Methods: The general ion recombination effect on the response of a micro liquid ion chamber (microLion) was investigated with a 6 MV photon beam in normal and SRS modes produced from a Varian{sup Registered-Sign} Novalis Tx{sup TM} linear accelerator. Dose rates of the linear accelerator were set to 100, 400, and 1000 MU/min, which correspond to pulse repetition frequencies of 60, 240, and 600 Hz, respectively. Polarization voltages applied to the microLion were +800 and +400 V. The relative collection efficiency of the microLion response as a function of dose per pulse was experimentally measured with changing polarization voltage and pulse repetition frequencies and was compared with the theoretically calculated value. Results: For the 60 Hz pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency was not different from the theoretical one for a pulsed beam more than 0.3% for both polarization voltages. For a pulsed radiation beam with a higher pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency converged to the theoretically calculated efficiency for continuous beams. This result indicates that the response of the microLion tends toward the response to a continuous beam with increasing pulse repetition frequency of a pulsed beam because of low ion mobility in the liquid. Conclusions: This work suggests an empirical method to correct for differences in general ion recombination of a LIC between different radiation fields. More work is needed to quantitatively explain the LIC general ion recombination behavior in pulsed beams generated from linear accelerators.

  13. Experimental analysis of general ion recombination in a liquid-filled ionization chamber in high-energy photon beams.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eunah; Davis, Stephen; Seuntjens, Jan

    2013-06-01

    To study experimentally the general ion recombination effect in a liquid-filled ionization chamber (LIC) in high-energy photon beams. The general ion recombination effect on the response of a micro liquid ion chamber (microLion) was investigated with a 6 MV photon beam in normal and SRS modes produced from a Varian(®) Novalis Tx(TM) linear accelerator. Dose rates of the linear accelerator were set to 100, 400, and 1000 MU∕min, which correspond to pulse repetition frequencies of 60, 240, and 600 Hz, respectively. Polarization voltages applied to the microLion were +800 and +400 V. The relative collection efficiency of the microLion response as a function of dose per pulse was experimentally measured with changing polarization voltage and pulse repetition frequencies and was compared with the theoretically calculated value. For the 60 Hz pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency was not different from the theoretical one for a pulsed beam more than 0.3% for both polarization voltages. For a pulsed radiation beam with a higher pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency converged to the theoretically calculated efficiency for continuous beams. This result indicates that the response of the microLion tends toward the response to a continuous beam with increasing pulse repetition frequency of a pulsed beam because of low ion mobility in the liquid. This work suggests an empirical method to correct for differences in general ion recombination of a LIC between different radiation fields. More work is needed to quantitatively explain the LIC general ion recombination behavior in pulsed beams generated from linear accelerators.

  14. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs [1, 2]. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions [see 3 for a review]. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique [4] and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examinedReferences[1] F. Salama, E. Bakes, L.J. Allamandola, A.G.G.M. Tielens, Astrophys. J., 458 (1996) p.621[2] F. Salama, The ISO Revolution, EDP Sciences, Les Ulis, France (1999) p.65[3] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press,4, S251,(2008), p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[4

  15. Crystal growth and characterization of europium doped lithium strontium iodide scintillator as an ionizing radiation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uba, Samuel

    High performance detectors used in the detection of ionizing radiation is critical to nuclear nonproliferation applications and other radiation detectors applications. In this research we grew and tested Europium doped Lithium Strontium Iodide compound. A mixture of lithium iodide, strontium iodide and europium iodide was used as the starting materials for this research. Congruent melting and freezing temperature of the synthesized compound was determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) using a Setaram Labsys Evo DSC-DTA instrument. The melting temperatures were recorded at 390.35°C, 407.59°C and freezing temperature was recorded at 322.84°C from a graph of heat flow plotted against temperature. The synthesized material was used as the charge for the vertical Bridgeman growth, and a 6.5 cm and 7.7cm length boule were grown in a multi-zone transparent Mullen furnace. A scintillating detector of thickness 2.53mm was fabricated by mechanical lapping in mineral oil, and scintillating response and timing were obtained to a cesium source using CS-137 isotope. An energy resolution (FWHM over peak position) of 12.1% was observed for the 662keV full absorption peak. Optical absorption in the UV-Vis wavelength range was recorded for the grown crystal using a U-2900 UV/VIS Spectrophotometer. Absorption peaks were recorded at 194nm, 273nm, and 344nm from the absorbance spectrum, various optical parameters such as absorption coefficient, extinction coefficient, refractive index, and optical loss were derived. The optical band gap energy was calculated using Tauc relation expression at 1.79eV.

  16. On the interpretation of current-voltage curves in ionization chambers using the exact solution of the Thomson problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridenti, M. A.; Pascholati, P. R.; Gonçalves, J. A. C.; Bueno, C. C.

    2015-09-01

    The I - ΔV characteristic curve of a well type ionization chamber irradiated with 192Ir sources (0.75 Ci-120 Ci) was fitted using the exact solution of the Thomson problem. The recombination coefficient and saturation current were estimated using this new approach. The saturation current was compared with the results of the conventional method based on Boag-Wilson formula. It was verified that differences larger than 1% between both methods only occurred at activities higher than 55 Ci. We concluded that this new approach is recommended for a more accurate estimate of the saturation current when it is not possible to measure currents satisfying the condition I /Isat > 0.95. From the calibration curve the average value of pairs of carriers created per unit volume was estimated to be equal to η = 8.1 ×10-3cm-3s-1 Bq-1 and from that value it was estimated that ~ 17 pairs were created on average per second for each decay of the source.

  17. Commissioning of a PTW 34070 large-area plane-parallel ionization chamber for small field megavoltage photon dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kupfer, Tom; Lehmann, Joerg; Butler, Duncan J; Ramanathan, Ganesan; Bailey, Tracy E; Franich, Rick D

    2017-10-04

    This study investigates a large-area plane-parallel ionization chamber (LAC) for measurements of dose-area product in water (DAPw ) in megavoltage (MV) photon fields. Uniformity of electrode separation of the LAC (PTW34070 Bragg Peak Chamber, sensitive volume diameter: 8.16 cm) was measured using high-resolution microCT. Signal dependence on angle α of beam incidence for square 6 MV fields of side length s = 20 cm and 1 cm was measured in air. Polarity and recombination effects were characterized in 6, 10, and 18 MV photons fields. To assess the lateral setup tolerance, scanned LAC profiles of a 1 × 1 cm(2) field were acquired. A 6 MV calibration coefficient, ND,w,LAC , was determined in a field collimated by a 5 cm diameter stereotactic cone with known DAPw . Additional calibrations in 10 × 10 cm(2) fields at 6, 10, and 18 MV were performed. Electrode separation is uniform and agrees with specifications. Volume-averaging leads to a signal increase proportional to ~1/cos(α) in small fields. Correction factors for polarity and recombination range between 0.9986 to 0.9996 and 1.0007 to 1.0024, respectively. Off-axis displacement by up to 0.5 cm did not change the measured signal in a 1 × 1 cm(2) field. ND,w,LAC was 163.7 mGy cm(-2) nC(-1) and differs by +3.0% from the coefficient derived in the 10 × 10 cm(2) 6 MV field. Response in 10 and 18 MV fields increased by 1.0% and 2.7% compared to 6 MV. The LAC requires only small correction factors for DAPw measurements and shows little energy dependence. Lateral setup errors of 0.5 cm are tolerated in 1 × 1 cm(2) fields, but beam incidence must be kept as close to normal as possible. Calibration in 10 × 10 fields is not recommended because of the LAC's over-response. The accuracy of relative point-dose measurements in the field's periphery is an important limiting factor for the accuracy of DAPw measurements. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on

  18. SU-E-T-561: Development of Depth Dose Measurement Technique Using the Multilayer Ionization Chamber for Spot Scanning Method

    SciTech Connect

    Takayanagi, T; Fujitaka, S; Umezawa, M; Ito, Y; Nakashima, C; Matsuda, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a measurement technique which suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and with a water phantom. Methods: The developed technique multiplies the raw MLIC data by a correction factor that depends on the initial beam range and water equivalent depth. The correction factor is derived based on a Bragg curve calculation formula considering range straggling and fluence loss caused by nuclear reactions. Furthermore, the correction factor is adjusted based on several integrated depth doses measured with a water phantom and the MLIC. The measured depth dose profiles along the central axis of the proton field with a nominal field size of 10 by 10 cm were compared between the MLIC using the new technique and the water phantom. The spread out Bragg peak was 20 cm for fields with a range of 30.6 cm and 6.9 cm. Raw MLIC data were obtained with each energy layer, and integrated after multiplying by the correction factor. The measurements were performed by a spot scanning nozzle at Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Japan. Results: The profile measured with the MLIC using the new technique is consistent with that of the water phantom. Moreover, 97% of the points passed the 1% dose /1mm distance agreement criterion of the gamma index. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the new technique suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with the MLIC and with the water phantom. It was concluded that this technique is useful for depth dose measurement in proton spot scanning method.

  19. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi; Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki; Kawamura, Shinji

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43 protocol

  20. Improved gas chromatography-flame ionization detector analytical method for the analysis of epoxy fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Mubiru, Edward; Shrestha, Kshitij; Papastergiadis, Antonios; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2013-11-29

    In this study an improved method for analysis of epoxy fatty acids is reported. Data obtained from analysis of polar fatty acids has previously been presented, but due to the high number of compounds that co-elute in the polar fraction, the resultant chromatograms are complex which may lead to compromising the accuracy of the data. A three steps separation of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) by solid-phase extraction (SPE) on a silica gel column to remove hydroxy fatty acid interferences was proposed. This approach is opposed to a two step separation procedure that has been often used to prevent analytical interferences caused by non-altered fatty acids. A gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID) equipped with a polar CP-Sil 88™ column was used. Quantification was based on the use of methyl nonadecanoate (C19:0), as an internal standard. Individual mono epoxy fatty acids were well separated without co-eluting compounds. The optimized method was finally applied to screen epoxy fatty acids in 37 fresh oil samples. Results obtained for the total epoxy fatty acids were in the range 0.03-2mgg(-1) of oil with repeatability coefficient of variation (CV) ranging from 2.8 to 9.9% for duplicate analysis showing that the results obtained are repeatable.

  1. Data-driven exploration of the ionization-phonon partitioning in scintillating radiation detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ferris, Kim F.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Jordan, David V.; Jones, Dumont M.

    2008-06-01

    An information-based approach to scintillating materials development has been applied to ranking the alkali halide and alkali earth halide series in terms of their energy conversion efficiency. The efficiency of scintillating radiation detection materials can be viewed as the product of a consecutive series of electronic processes (energy conversion, transfer, and luminescence) as outlined by Lempicki and others. Relevant data are relatively sparse, but sufficient for the development of forward mapping of materials properties through materials signatures. These mappings have been used to explore the limits of the K ratio in the Lempicki model with chemical composition, and examine its relationship with another common design objective, density. The alkali halides and alkali earth halide compounds separate themselves into distinct behavior classes favoring heavier cations and anions for improved K ratio. While the coupling of ionization is strongly related to the optical phonon modes, both dielectric and band gap contributions cannot be ignored. When applied within a candidate screen, the resulting model for K imposes design rules—simple structural restrictions—on scintillating radiation detector materials.

  2. Analytical solutions of minimum ionization particle induced current shapes of silicon detectors and simulation of charge collection properties

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, V.; Chen, W.; Li, Z.

    1993-11-01

    A new analytical, one dimensional method to obtain the induced current shapes and simulation of chasrge shapes for p{sup +} {minus}n{minus}n{sup +} silicon detectors in the case of minimum ionization particle has been developed here. jExact solutions have been found for both electron and hole current shapes. Simulations of induced charge shapes of detectors have also been given. The results of this work are consistent with the earlier work where a semi-analytical method had been used.

  3. SU-D-213-04: Accounting for Volume Averaging and Material Composition Effects in An Ionization Chamber Array for Patient Specific QA

    SciTech Connect

    Fugal, M; McDonald, D; Jacqmin, D; Koch, N; Ellis, A; Peng, J; Ashenafi, M; Vanek, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study explores novel methods to address two significant challenges affecting measurement of patient-specific quality assurance (QA) with IBA’s Matrixx Evolution™ ionization chamber array. First, dose calculation algorithms often struggle to accurately determine dose to the chamber array due to CT artifact and algorithm limitations. Second, finite chamber size and volume averaging effects cause additional deviation from the calculated dose. Methods: QA measurements were taken with the Matrixx positioned on the treatment table in a solid-water Multi-Cube™ phantom. To reduce the effect of CT artifact, the Matrixx CT image set was masked with appropriate materials and densities. Individual ionization chambers were masked as air, while the high-z electronic backplane and remaining solid-water material were masked as aluminum and water, respectively. Dose calculation was done using Varian’s Acuros XB™ (V11) algorithm, which is capable of predicting dose more accurately in non-biologic materials due to its consideration of each material’s atomic properties. Finally, the exported TPS dose was processed using an in-house algorithm (MATLAB) to assign the volume averaged TPS dose to each element of a corresponding 2-D matrix. This matrix was used for comparison with the measured dose. Square fields at regularly-spaced gantry angles, as well as selected patient plans were analyzed. Results: Analyzed plans showed improved agreement, with the average gamma passing rate increasing from 94 to 98%. Correction factors necessary for chamber angular dependence were reduced by 67% compared to factors measured previously, indicating that previously measured factors corrected for dose calculation errors in addition to true chamber angular dependence. Conclusion: By comparing volume averaged dose, calculated with a capable dose engine, on a phantom masked with correct materials and densities, QA results obtained with the Matrixx Evolution™ can be significantly

  4. SU-E-T-105: The LET Dependence of Liquid Ionization Chambers (LICs) in High-LET Beams.

    PubMed

    Tegami, S; Gomez, F; Gónzales-Castaño, D; Jaekel, O; Pardo-Montero, J; Holzscheiter, M

    2012-06-01

    LICs are novel detectors for radiotherapy: the higher density of the medium allows to build them with a smaller sensitive volume, making them appealing in particle therapy. With RBE varying along the depth dose curve (DDC) and with the rising interest in dose/LET-painting, verifying the LET is becoming more important. Nevertheless, while the LET distributions for different ionizing particles have been calculated, they have never been directly measured in realistic therapeutic beams. Our interest in LICs is based on the characterization of the beam quality in terms of LET. It has been shown in earlier works that the extrapolation of the linear portion of the voltage curve yields an intercept with the x-axis that depends on LET. The quantitative establishment of this method, however, depends on how accurately recombination effects are taken into account. Due to the higher density of charge carriers produced in the liquid, LICs have high recombination effects: general recombination effects, involving pairs belonging to different tracks (dose rate dependent), and initial recombination between ion-electron pairs belonging to the same incident particle event (LET dependent). To perform this study we propose a two-dimensional array of LICs, composed by a 16×8 matrix of 2×2 mm(2) pixels, which gives a fine spatial resolution on the plane. Voltage curves have been measured for proton, carbon and oxygen beams available at the HIT facility in Heidelberg for different energies and dose rates. After correcting the curves for general recombination losses using the Three Voltage Method, we have indications of dose rate independence, indicating successful correction. Further investigations are foreseen to quantify the LET dependence along the DDC, where different LET values are expected. A comparison with simulated dose averaged LET values will give quantitative information about 2D LET distributions for different beam species. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in

  5. SU-E-T-174: Synopsis of the Experimental and Monte Carlo Calculated Values of the Radial EPOM Shift of Cylindrical Ionization Chambers for Photon-Beam Dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Harder, D; Looe, H; Poppe, B

    2012-06-01

    According to the concept of the effective point of measurement (EPOM), the values of depth z serving as the variable of photon-beam depth dose distributions in water measured with cylindrical ionization chambers are commonly corrected according to the formula zeff=zR+▵z, were zeff is the depth of the EPOM, zR the depth of the reference point of the chamber, i.e. of its symmetry axis, and Az the EPOM shift. Agreed-upon values of the EPOM shift are for instance ▵z=-0.6r (IAEA TRS 398, 2000) and ▵z=-0.5r (DIN6800-2,2008) with r=radius of the air-filled volume. The EPOM concept holds in the falling as well as in the rising curve branch. The Az versus r relationship is currently reviewed. Measurements of the EPOM shift of cylindrical ionization chambers for 6/15 MV photons had been based upon a comparison with depth dependent dose distributions in water measured with the Roos chamber (PTW Freiburg). Its EPOM position (1.5 mm below the front face) had been determined by comparison with radiochrome films. (Looe et al, Phys.Med.Biol. 2011;56:4267-4290). Available are also the experimental EPOM shift values by Huang et al, Physica Medica 2010;26:126-131 and the classical value of Johansson et al, IAEA -SM-222/35,243-270(1978). Accurate Monte Carlo values had been supplied by Tessier and Kawrakow, Med.Phys. 2010;37:96-107. As shown by the graphical display of Az versus r, the relationship is nonlinear, shaped as a hockey stick, with values around -0.2 mm for the "pinpoint" chambers and with values near -1.4 mm for the often-used chambers with radii near 3 mm. For r ranging from 1 to 4 mm, the relationship can be approximated by ▵z = -(2.25 mm)×[1-exp(-0.0122 r̂4)] with r in mm. Time has come for a nonlinear updating of the EPOM shift versus radius relationship of cylindrical ionization chambers applied in photon-beam dosimetry. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS Study of low momentum track reconstruction for the BESIII main drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lu-Kui; Mao, Ze-Pu; Li, Wei-Dong; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Deng, Zi-Yan; He, Kang-Lin; Liu, Chun-Yan; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Qiu-Guang; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Tian, Hao-Lai; Wang, Ji-Ke; Wu, Ling-Hui; Yuan, Ye; Zang, Shi-Lei; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Yao; Zhu, Kai; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2010-12-01

    In order to overcome the difficulty brought by the circling charged tracks with transverse momentum less than 120 MeV in the BESIII Main Drift Chamber (MDC), a specialized method called TCurlFinder was developed. This tracking method focuses on the charged track reconstruction under 120 MeV and possesses a special mechanism to reject background noise hits. The performance of the package has been carefully checked and tuned by both Monte Carlo data and real data. The study shows that this tracking method could obviously enhance the reconstruction efficiency in the low transverse momentum region, providing physics analysis with more and reliable data.

  7. Development of a bioaerosol single particle detector (BIO IN) for the fast ice nucleus chamber FINCH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundke, U.; Reimann, B.; Nillius, B.; Jaenicke, R.; Bingemer, H.

    2009-10-01

    In this work we present the setup and first tests of our new BIO IN detector. This detector is designed to classify atmospheric ice nuclei (IN) for their biological content. Biological material is identified via its auto-fluorescence (intrinsic fluorescence) after irradiation with UV radiation. Ice nuclei are key substances for precipitation development via the Bergeron-Findeisen process. The level of scientific knowledge regarding origin and climatology (temporal and spatial distribution) of IN is very low. Some biological material is known to be active as IN even at relatively high temperatures of up to -2°C (e.g. pseudomonas syringae bacteria). These biological IN could have a strong influence on the formation of clouds and precipitation. We have designed the new BIO IN sensor to analyze the abundance of IN of biological origin. The instrument will be flown on one of the first missions of the new German research aircraft ''HALO'' (High Altitude and LOng Range).

  8. Internally heated membrane interfaced to a gas chromatography flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Kanu, A Bakarr; Thomas, C L P

    2013-07-15

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) mixtures in aqueous solutions have been investigated using a simple and efficient all-in-one on-line sampling, isolation, enrichment and pre-concentration internally heated membrane connected to a gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). In our previous study with the internally heated membrane, no GC column was used in the instrument. In this new study, we introduce a GC column in the instrument design and this makes it possible for mixtures to be investigated. This new experimental design enabled high resolution separation of analyte mixtures capable of being adsorbed, diffused, and desorbed from the device for detection with an FID. With the new design we present data from investigation of competitive adsorption effects on the membrane. The data showed that analyte adsorption and diffusion onto the membrane can be affected when mixtures of analytes are introduced. The application of multiple linear regressions approach to the data enabled us to correct for the problem of competitive adsorption. Analyte adsorption and diffusion was affected by the diffusion coefficients of the analytes; the higher the diffusion coefficient the better the extraction from the membrane. Increasing the sampling time from 1 to 4 min increases the response by 77%. The sampling time responses were linear up to 4 min sampling time. Above 4 min sampling time, the data deviate from linearity. The effect of adding salt to standards has no effect on analyte absorption onto the membrane. The detection limits for key VOCs studied with an internal standard calibration ranged from 0.2 to 194 ng cm(-3).

  9. SU-E-T-645: Qualification of a 2D Ionization Chamber Array for Beam Steering and Profile Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, S; Balter, P; Rose, M; Simon, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Establish a procedure for beam steering and profile measurement using a 2D ionization chamber array and show equivalence to a water scanning system. Methods: Multiple photon beams (30×30cm{sup 2} field) and electron beams (25×25cm{sup 2} cone) were steered in the radial and transverse directions using Sun Nuclear’s IC PROFILER (ICP). Solid water was added during steering to ensure measurements were beyond the buildup region. With steering complete, servos were zeroed and enabled. Photon profiles were collected in a 30×30cm{sup 2} field at dmax and 2.9 cm depth for flattened and FFF beams respectively. Electron profiles were collected with a 25×25cm{sup 2} cone and effective depth (solid water + 0.9 cm intrinsic buildup) as follows: 0.9 cm (6e), 1.9 cm (9e), 2.9 cm (12e, 16e, 20e). Profiles of the same energy, field size and depth were measured in water with Sun Nuclear’s 3D SCANNER (3DS). Profiles were re-measured using the ICP after the in-water scans. Profiles measured using the ICP and 3DS were compared by (a) examining the differences in Varian’s “Point Difference Symmetry” metric, (b) visual inspection of the overlaid profile shapes and (c) calculation of point-by-point differences. Results: Comparing ICP measurements before and after water scanning showed very good agreement indicating good stability of the linac and measurement system. Comparing ICP Measurements to water phantom measurements using Varian’s symmetry metric showed agreement within 0.5% for all beams. The average magnitude of the agreement was within 0.2%. Comparing ICP Measurements to water phantom measurements using point-by-point difference showed agreement within 0.5% inside of 80% area of the field width. Conclusion: Profile agreement to within 0.5% was observed between ICP and 3DS after steering multiple energies with the ICP. This indicates that the ICP may be used for steering electron beams, and both flattened and FFF photon beams. Song Gao: Sun Nuclear

  10. SU-E-T-134: Patient Specific Quality Assurance of RapidArc Pre Treatment Plans Using Semiflex 0.125 Cc Ionization Chamber.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sa Syam; Prabakar, S; Sriram, P; Vivekanandan, N

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the Patient specific pre-treatment quality assurance for hundred RapidArc plans using semiflex (0.125cc) ionization chambers. Absolute point dose were measured for head and neck, thorax and abdomen cases using semiflex (0.125 cc) ionization chamber. Verification plan was created for each treatment plan in eclipse 8.6 treatment planning system with the semiflex ionization chamber and the octavius phantom. Measurements were performed on a Varian Clinac2100C/D linear accelerator equipped with a millennium 120 leaf collimator. All the results were compared with the fluence measurements using 2D Seven29 ion chamber array combined with octavius phantom. Positive absolute mean dose variation of 0.56 % was observed with thorax cases with a standard deviation (SD) of ± 1.13 between the plans with a range of -1.78% to 2.70%. Negative percentage dose errors were found with head and neck and abdomen cases, with a mean variation of -0.43 % (SD ± 1.50), (range -3.25 % to 2.85 %) and -0.35 % (SD ± 1.48), (range -3.10 % to 2.65 %) for head and neck and abdomen cases respectively. Relative dose measurements with 2D array agreed well with the TPS calculate for all the cases. The maximum percentage value failed in gamma analysis was found to be 4.95, 4.75, and 4.88 for head and neck, thorax, and abdomen cases respectively. In all the cases analysed the percentage dose points failed the gamma criteria was less than 5%. On the basis of the studies performed it can be concluded that the semiflex ionization chamber having a volume of 0.125cc can be used efficiently for measuring the pre-treatment quality assurance of RapidArc plans for all the sites. The results provide an overall accuracy when compared to fluence measurement done using 2D array seven29. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Simulation of Low Gain Avalanche Detector characteristics based on the concept of negative feedback in irradiated silicon detectors with carrier impact ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbitskaya, E.; Eremin, V.; Zabrodskii, A.; Luukka, P.

    2016-12-01

    In this study the main characteristics of silicon Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD), the dependencies of the collected charge versus bias voltage and fluence, are calculated to fit experimental data. The calculations are based on two previously developed Ioffe Institute models of radiation degradation in Si detectors: 1) a model of two effective energy levels of radiation-induced defects, and 2) a mechanism of internal negative feedback responsible for the gain degradation in irradiated Si detectors originating from the avalanche multiplication at the detector junction. The combination of these models describes well the properties of irradiated p-i-n detectors in a wide range of fluences. For simulating the LGAD characteristics the models are adapted to its n+-pbi-p-p+ structure, where the built-in boron-doped layer pbi produces high electric field sufficient for carrier impact ionization. It is shown that the developed models give adequate quantitative description of the experimental results for the LGADs up to the fluence of 2×1015 n/cm2 including the detector pulse response; however, additional boron removal from the pbi layer is required to have the best correlation with the experimental data. Similar to the physical model developed for silicon strip detectors operated at high voltage, the results are interpreted in terms of the internal negative feedback mechanism. It is shown that in irradiated LGADs this feedback leads to the transfer of a significant fraction of the potential drop from the built-in layer toward the p+ contact. It initiates two negative effects, which both cause the gain degradation with irradiation: the lowering of the electric field in the n+-pbi region that reduces the multiplication probability, and the increase of the collection time and trapping-related charge losses.

  12. Headspace stir bar sorptive extraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry characterization of the diluted vapor phase of cigarette smoke delivered to an in vitro cell exposure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navneet; Cabral, Jean-Louis; Morin, André; Waldron, Karen C

    2011-01-14

    Advanced smoke generation systems, such as the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) smoking machine used in combination with the BAT exposure chamber, allow for the generation, dilution and delivery of fresh cigarette smoke to cell or tissue cultures for in vitro cell culture analyses. Recently, our group confirmed that the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) is a reliable tool to generate and deliver repeatable and reproducible exposure concentrations of whole smoke to in vitro cultures. However, the relationship between dose and diluted smoke components found within the exposure chamber has not been characterized. The current study focused on the development of a headspace stir bar sorptive extraction (HSSE) method to chemically characterize some of the vapor phase components of cigarette smoke generated by the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) and collected within a cell culture exposure chamber. The method was based on passive sampling within the chamber by HSSE using a Twister™ stir bar. Following exposure, sorbed analytes were recovered using a thermal desorption unit and a cooled injection system coupled to gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry for identification and quantification. Using the HSSE method, sixteen compounds were identified. The desorption parameters were assessed using ten reference compounds and the following conditions led to the maximal response: desorption temperature of 200°C for 2 min with cryofocussing temperature of -75°C. During transfer of the stir bars to the thermal desorption system, significant losses of analytes were observed as a function of time; therefore, the exposure-to-desorption time interval was kept at the minimum of 10±0.5 min. Repeatability of the HSSE method was assessed by monitoring five reference compounds present in the vapor phase (10.1-12.9% RSD) and n-butyl acetate, the internal standard (18.5% RSD). The smoke dilution precision was found to be 17.2, 6.2 and 11.7% RSD for exposure concentrations of 1, 2 and 5% (v/v) cigarette vapor phase in air

  13. Absolute dose measurements by means of a small cylindrical ionization chamber for very high dose per pulse high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Karaj, E.; Righi, S.; Di Martino, F.

    2007-03-15

    Very high dose per pulse (3-13 cGy/pulse) high energy electron beams are currently produced by special linear accelerators (linac) dedicated to Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). The electron beams produced by such linacs are collimated by special Perspex applicators of various size and cylindrically shaped. The biggest problems from the dosimetric point of view are caused by the high dose-per-pulse values and the use of inclined applicators. In this work measurements of absolute dose for the inclined applicators were done by using a small cylindrical ionization chamber, type CC01 (Wellhofer), a parallel plane ionization chamber type Markus (PTW 23343) and radiochromic films type EBT. We show a method which allows calculating the quality correction factors for CC01 chamber with an uncertainty of 1% and the absolute dose value for the inclined applicators using CC01 with an uncertainty of 3.1% for electron beams of energy of 6 and 7 MeV produced by the linac dedicated to IORT Novac7.

  14. Physics studies with ICARUS and a hybrid ionization and scintillation fiber detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the physics possibilities for the ICARUS detector currently being tested at CERN. The physics potential goes from a massive proton decay detector to the study of solar neutrinos. In addition, the detection of [nu][sub [mu

  15. Effect of electron beam irradiation on the microstructure, optical and electrical properties of glass resistive plate chamber detector material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aneeshkumar, K. V.; Krishnaveni, S.; Ranganathaiah, C.; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2017-08-01

    The glass resistive plate chamber (RPC) detector materials were exposed to 8 MeV electron beam from 20 to 100 kGy in steps of 20 kGy. In order to study the electron beam irradiation-induced effects in glass RPC detector material, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic investigations were carried out. PALS analysis at lower electron doses indicates the increased void size with the creation of additional sites in the glass network. This is attributed to the breakage of Si-O bonds at the regular tetrahedral sites of Si-O-Si up to 40 kGy. The reduced void size at higher irradiation doses indicates the increased chemical bonding between the tetrahedral sites of Si-O-Si and hence increases the short-range order in the silica glass. These changes are complement with the XRD, FTIR results and the measured electrical conductivity. The variation of AC conductivity with frequency obeys Jonscher power law in all the electron irradiation doses at room temperature. The variation in optical band gap energy from the ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectra inferred the elimination of defects accumulation at higher irradiation doses due to the glass network close packing.

  16. Smoking

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body. Cigarette smoking causes 87 percent of lung cancer deaths. ... of the same problems as smokers do. E-cigarettes often look like cigarettes, but they work differently. ...

  17. Multichannel detectors for profile measurements in clinical proton fields

    SciTech Connect

    Nichiporov, Dmitri; Solberg, Keith; Hsi Wen; Wolanski, Mark; Mascia, Anthony; Farr, Jonathan; Schreuder, Andries

    2007-07-15

    Two beam profile measurement detectors have been developed at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility to address the need for a tool to efficiently verify dose distributions created with active methods of clinical proton beam delivery. The multipad ionization chamber (MPIC) has 128 ionization chambers arranged in one plane and is designed to measure lateral profiles in fields up to 38 cm in diameter. The MPIC pads have a 5 mm pitch for fields up to 20 cm in diameter and a 7 mm pitch for larger fields, providing the accuracy of field size determination about 0.5 mm. The multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) detector contains 122 small-volume ionization chambers stacked at a 1.82 mm step (water-equivalent) for depth-dose profile measurements. The MLIC detector can measure profiles up to 20 cm in depth, and determine the 80% distal dose fall-off with about 0.1 mm precision. Both detectors can be connected to the same set of electronics modules, which comprise the detectors' data acquisition system. The detectors have been tested in clinical proton fields produced with active methods of beam delivery such as uniform scanning and energy stacking. This article describes detector performance tests and discusses their results. The test results indicate that the MPIC and MLIC detectors can be used for dosimetric characterization of clinical proton fields. The detectors offer significant time savings during measurements in actively delivered beams compared with traditional measurements using a water phantom.

  18. Photoneutron production of a Siemens Primus linear accelerator studied by Monte Carlo methods and a paired magnesium and boron coated magnesium ionization chamber system.

    PubMed

    Becker, J; Brunckhorst, E; Schmidt, R

    2007-11-07

    When radiotherapy with photon energies greater than 10 MV is performed neutrons contaminate the photon beam. In this paper the neutron contamination of the 15 MV photon mode of the Siemens Primus accelerator was studied. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used for the description of the treatment head and treatment room. The Monte Carlo results were verified by studying the photon depth dose curve and beam profiles in a water phantom. After these verifications the locations of neutron production were studied and the neutron source spectrum and strength were calculated. The neutron response of the paired Mg/Ar and MgB/Ar ionization chamber system was calculated and experimentally verified for two experimental set-ups. The paired chamber system allowed us to measure neutrons inside the field borders and allowed rapid and point wise measurement in contrast to other methods of neutron detection.

  19. CORRECTION FACTORS FOR ATTENUATION AND SCATTERING OF THE WALL OF A CYLINDRICAL IONIZATION CHAMBER IN THE 6-7 MeV HIGH-ENERGY PHOTON REFERENCE FIELD.

    PubMed

    Kowatari, M; Zutz, H; Hupe, O

    2017-06-07

    In high-energy photon reference fields the value of the air kerma rate is determined by using ionization chambers (ICs). From the charge collected inside the IC the dose can be calculated using a set of calibration and correction factors according to ISO 4037-2. A crucial parameter is the correction for the attenuation and scattering of the primary radiation due to the chamber wall. This parameter can be determined using Monte Carlo calculations. The evaluation of the factor was performed for a commercially available IC of the type Victoreen 550-3 under different build-up conditions. The results were verified by measurements in the R-F high-energy photon fields according to ISO 4037-1 at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. (18)F primary standard at ENEA-INMRI by three absolute techniques and calibration of a well-type IG11 ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Capogni, Marco; Carconi, Pierluigi; De Felice, Pierino; Fazio, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    A new (18)F primary standardization carried out at ENEA-INMRI by three different absolute techniques, i.e. 4πγNaI(Tl)γ high-efficiency counting, TDCR and 4πβ(LS)-γ[NaI(Tl)] coincidence counting method, allowed the calibration of a fixed well-reentrant IG11 ionization chamber (IC), with an uncertainty lower than 1%, and to check the calibration factor of a portable well-type IC NPL-CRC model, previously calibrated. By the new standard the ENEA-INMRI was linked to the BIPM International Reference System (SIR) through the BIPM SIR Transfer Instrument (SIRTI).

  1. Instantaneous and continuous measurement of /sup 14/C-labeled substrate oxidation to /sup 14/CO2 by minute tissue specimens: an ionization chamber method

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, W.D.; Klein, K.L.; Kurokawa, K.; Soll, A.H.

    1981-06-01

    The vibrating reed electrometer and ionization chamber have been adapted for the instantaneous and continuous measurement of /sup 14/C-labeled substrate oxidation to /sup 14/CO2 by minute quantities of isolated tissues. This modified technique, utilizing a ''closed'' circulation incubation system, is 10-50 times as sensitive as the previously described ''open'' circulation techniques. Substrate oxidation curves are described for human erythrocytes and polymorphonuclear leucocytes, canine parietal cells and isolated segments of the rat nephron. This apparatus should prove to be a useful tool for metabolic studies of small quantities of isolated tissue.

  2. Quantification of biogenic volatile organic compounds with a flame ionization detector using the effective carbon number concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Erickson, M. H.; Fricaud, V. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2012-08-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere by plants and include isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their oxygenated derivatives. These BVOCs are among the principal factors influencing the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere in forested regions. BVOC emission rates are often measured by collecting samples onto adsorptive cartridges in the field and then transporting these samples to the laboratory for chromatographic analysis. One of the most commonly used detectors in chromatographic analysis is the flame ionization detector (FID). For quantitative analysis with an FID, relative response factors may be estimated using the effective carbon number (ECN) concept. The purpose of this study was to determine the ECN for a variety of terpenoid compounds to enable improved quantification of BVOC measurements. A dynamic dilution system was developed to make quantitative gas standards of VOCs with mixing ratios from 20-55 ppb. For each experiment using this system, one terpene standard was co-injected with an internal reference, n-octane, and analyzed via an automated cryofocusing system interfaced to a gas chromatograph flame ionization detector and mass spectrometer (GC/MS/FID). The ECNs of 16 compounds (14 BVOCs) were evaluated with this approach, with each test compound analyzed at least three times. The difference between the actual carbon number and measured ECN ranged from -24% to -2%. The difference between theoretical ECN and measured ECN ranged from -22% to 9%. Measured ECN values were within 10% of theoretical ECN values for most terpenoid compounds.

  3. Quantification of biogenic volatile organic compounds with a flame ionization detector using the effective carbon number concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faiola, C. L.; Erickson, M. H.; Fricaud, V. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2012-03-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere by plants and include isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their oxygenated derivatives. These BVOCs are among the principal factors influencing the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere in forested regions. BVOC emission rates are often measured by collecting samples onto adsorptive cartridges in the field and then transporting these samples to the laboratory for chromatographic analysis. One of the most commonly used detectors in chromatographic analysis is the flame ionization detector (FID). For quantitative analysis with an FID, relative response factors may be estimated using the effective carbon number (ECN) concept. The purpose of this study was to determine the ECN for a variety of terpenoid compounds to enable improved quantification of BVOC measurements. A dynamic dilution system was developed to make quantitative gas standards of VOCs with mixing ratios from 20-55 ppb. For each experiment using this system, one terpene standard was co-injected with an internal reference, n-octane, and analyzed via an automated cryofocusing system interfaced to a gas chromatograph flame ionization detector and mass spectrometer (GC/MS/FID). The ECNs of 16 compounds (14 BVOCs) were evaluated with this approach, with each test compound analyzed at least three times. The difference between the actual carbon number and measured ECN ranged from -24% to -2%. The difference between theoretical ECN and measured ECN ranged from -22% to 9%. Measured ECN values were within 10% of theoretical ECN values for most terpenoid compounds.

  4. Quantification of biogenic volatile organic compounds with a flame ionization detector using the effective carbon number concept

    SciTech Connect

    Faiola, C. L.; Erickson, M. H.; Fricaud, V. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2012-08-10

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere by plants and include isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their oxygenated derivatives. These BVOCs are among the principal factors influencing the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere in forested regions. BVOC emission rates are often measured by collecting samples onto adsorptive cartridges in the field and then transporting these samples to the laboratory for chromatographic analysis. One of the most commonly used detectors in chromatographic analysis is the flame ionization detector (FID). For quantitative analysis with an FID, relative response factors may be estimated using the effective carbon number (ECN) concept. The purpose of this study was to determine the ECN for a variety of terpenoid compounds to enable improved quantification of BVOC measurements. A dynamic dilution system was developed to make quantitative gas standards of VOCs with mixing ratios from 20–55 ppb. For each experiment using this system, one terpene standard was co-injected with an internal reference, n-octane, and analyzed via an automated cryofocusing system interfaced to a gas chromatograph flame ionization detector and mass spectrometer (GC/MS/FID). The ECNs of 16 compounds (14 BVOCs) were evaluated with this approach, with each test compound analyzed at least three times. The difference between the actual carbon number and measured ECN ranged from -24% to -2%. Furthermore, the difference between theoretical ECN and measured ECN ranged from -22% to 9%. Measured ECN values were within 10% of theoretical ECN values for most terpenoid compounds.

  5. Quantification of biogenic volatile organic compounds with a flame ionization detector using the effective carbon number concept

    DOE PAGES

    Faiola, C. L.; Erickson, M. H.; Fricaud, V. L.; ...

    2012-08-10

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere by plants and include isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their oxygenated derivatives. These BVOCs are among the principal factors influencing the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere in forested regions. BVOC emission rates are often measured by collecting samples onto adsorptive cartridges in the field and then transporting these samples to the laboratory for chromatographic analysis. One of the most commonly used detectors in chromatographic analysis is the flame ionization detector (FID). For quantitative analysis with an FID, relative response factors may be estimated using the effective carbon number (ECN) concept. Themore » purpose of this study was to determine the ECN for a variety of terpenoid compounds to enable improved quantification of BVOC measurements. A dynamic dilution system was developed to make quantitative gas standards of VOCs with mixing ratios from 20–55 ppb. For each experiment using this system, one terpene standard was co-injected with an internal reference, n-octane, and analyzed via an automated cryofocusing system interfaced to a gas chromatograph flame ionization detector and mass spectrometer (GC/MS/FID). The ECNs of 16 compounds (14 BVOCs) were evaluated with this approach, with each test compound analyzed at least three times. The difference between the actual carbon number and measured ECN ranged from -24% to -2%. Furthermore, the difference between theoretical ECN and measured ECN ranged from -22% to 9%. Measured ECN values were within 10% of theoretical ECN values for most terpenoid compounds.« less

  6. SIGN, a WIMP detector based on high pressure gaseous neon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. T.; Gao, J.; Maxin, J.; Miller, J.; Salinas, G.; Wang, H.

    A new WIMP detector concept based on the measurement of Scintillation and Ionization in Gaseous Neon (SIGN) is presented. The detector employs room temperature gaseous neon at a pressure of ≥100 bars as the WIMP target. The ionization is readout using either charge gain or electrofluorescence or both in a modified cylindrical proportional chamber geometry. The primary scintillation is detected by placing a CsI photocathode on the inside wall of the cylindrical chamber. The neon is doped with xenon (≤0.5%) for signal enhancement. Theoretical considerations suggest that the measurement of both scintillation and ionization will provide discrimination between nuclear and electron recoils in this gas mixture.

  7. The effective point of measurement of ionization chambers and the build-up anomaly in MV x-ray beams.

    PubMed

    McEwen, M R; Kawrakow, I; Ross, C K

    200