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Sample records for ionization cooling experiment

  1. Ionization Cooling for Muon Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Prebys, E.

    2014-09-18

    Possible application for muon experiments such as mu2e is discussed of the initial part of the ionization cooling channel originally developed for muon collider. It is shown that with the FNAL Booster as the proton driver the mu2e sensitivity can be increased by two orders of magnitude compared to the presently considered experiment.

  2. Measurements of Beam Cooling in Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohayai, Tanaz; Snopok, Pavel; Rogers, Chris; Neuffer, David; Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Cooled muon beams are essential for production of high-flux neutrino beams at the Neutrino Factory and high luminosity muon beams at the Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment, MICE aims to demonstrate muon beam cooling through ionization energy loss of muons in material. The standard figure of merit for cooling in MICE is the transverse RMS emittance reduction and to measure this, the individual muon positions and momenta are reconstructed using scintillating-fiber tracking detectors, before and after a low-Z absorbing material. In this study, in addition to a preview on the standard measurement technique, an alternative technique is described, which is the measurement of phase-space density using the novel Kernel Density Estimation method. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE - AC05 - 06OR23100.

  3. Simulated Measurements of Cooling in Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mohayai, Tanaz; Rogers, Chris; Snopok, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Cooled muon beams set the basis for the exploration of physics of flavour at a Neutrino Factory and for multi-TeV collisions at a Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) measures beam emittance before and after an ionization cooling cell and aims to demonstrate emittance reduction in muon beams. In the current MICE Step IV configuration, the MICE muon beam passes through low-Z absorber material for reducing its transverse emittance through ionization energy loss. Two scintillating fiber tracking detectors, housed in spectrometer solenoid modules upstream and downstream of the absorber are used for reconstructing position and momentum of individual muons for calculating transverse emittance reduction. However, due to existence of non-linear effects in beam optics, transverse emittance growth can be observed. Therefore, it is crucial to develop algorithms that are insensitive to this apparent emittance growth. We describe a different figure of merit for measuring muon cooling which is the direct measurement of the phase space density.

  4. Lattice design and expected performance of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment demonstration of ionization cooling

    DOE PAGES

    Bogomilov, M.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; ...

    2017-06-19

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterized neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavor at a neutrino factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at a muon collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) aims to demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization-cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using rf cavities. The combinedmore » effect of energy loss and reacceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised experiment can deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with its predicted cooling performance.« less

  5. Lattice design and expected performance of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment demonstration of ionization cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomilov, M.; Tsenov, R.; Vankova-Kirilova, G.; Song, Y.; Tang, J.; Li, Z.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Chignoli, F.; Mazza, R.; Palladino, V.; de Bari, A.; Cecchet, G.; Orestano, D.; Tortora, L.; Kuno, Y.; Ishimoto, S.; Filthaut, F.; Jokovic, D.; Maletic, D.; Savic, M.; Hansen, O. M.; Ramberger, S.; Vretenar, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Blondel, A.; Drielsma, F.; Karadzhov, Y.; Charnley, G.; Collomb, N.; Dumbell, K.; Gallagher, A.; Grant, A.; Griffiths, S.; Hartnett, T.; Martlew, B.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Oates, A.; Owens, P.; Stokes, G.; Warburton, P.; White, C.; Adams, D.; Anderson, R. J.; Barclay, P.; Bayliss, V.; Boehm, J.; Bradshaw, T. W.; Courthold, M.; Francis, V.; Fry, L.; Hayler, T.; Hills, M.; Lintern, A.; Macwaters, C.; Nichols, A.; Preece, R.; Ricciardi, S.; Rogers, C.; Stanley, T.; Tarrant, J.; Tucker, M.; Wilson, A.; Watson, S.; Bayes, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Soler, F. J. P.; Gamet, R.; Barber, G.; Blackmore, V. J.; Colling, D.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Hunt, C.; Kurup, A.; Lagrange, J.-B.; Long, K.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Pasternak, J.; Uchida, M. A.; Cobb, J. H.; Lau, W.; Booth, C. N.; Hodgson, P.; Langlands, J.; Overton, E.; Robinson, M.; Smith, P. J.; Wilbur, S.; Dick, A. J.; Ronald, K.; Whyte, C. G.; Young, A. R.; Boyd, S.; Franchini, P.; Greis, J. R.; Pidcott, C.; Taylor, I.; Gardener, R. B. S.; Kyberd, P.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Palmer, M.; Witte, H.; Bross, A. D.; Bowring, D.; Liu, A.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Rubinov, P.; DeMello, A.; Gourlay, S.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.; Virostek, S.; Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Kaplan, D. M.; Mohayai, T. A.; Rajaram, D.; Snopok, P.; Suezaki, V.; Torun, Y.; Onel, Y.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Hanson, G. G.; Heidt, C.; MICE Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterized neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavor at a neutrino factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at a muon collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) aims to demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization-cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using rf cavities. The combined effect of energy loss and reacceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised experiment can deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with its predicted cooling performance.

  6. STATUS OF THE INTERNATIONAL MUON IONIZATION COOLING EXPERIMENT(MICE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-07-18

    An international experiment to demonstrate muon ionization cooling is scheduled for beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in 2007. The experiment comprises one cell of the Study II cooling channel [1], along with upstream and downstream detectors to identify individual muons and measure their initial and final 6D phase-space parameters to a precision of 0.1%. Magnetic design of the beam line and cooling channel are complete and portions are under construction. The experiment will be described, including cooling channel hardware designs, fabrication status, and running plans. Phase 1 of the experiment will prepare the beam line and provide detector systems, including time-of-flight, Cherenkov, scintillating-fiber trackers and their spectrometer solenoids, and an electromagnetic calorimeter. The Phase 2 system will add the cooling channel components, including liquid-hydrogen absorbers embedded in superconducting Focus Coil solenoids, 201-MHz normal-conducting RF cavities, and their surrounding Coupling Coil solenoids. The MICE Collaboration goal is to complete the experiment by 2010; progress toward this is discussed.

  7. The Reconstruction Software for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment Trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, A.; Long, K.; Santos, E.; Adey, D.; Hanlet, P.; Heidt, C.

    2014-01-01

    The international Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate the principle of muon ionization cooling, for application to a future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. In order to measure the change in emittance, MICE is equipped with a pair of high precision scintillating fibre trackers. The trackers are required to measure a 10% change in emittance to 1% accuracy (giving an overall precision of 0.1%). This paper describes the tracker reconstruction software, as a part of the overall MICE software framework, MAUS. Channel clustering is described, proceeding to the formation of space-points, which are then associated with particle tracks using pattern recognition algorithms. Finally a full custom Kalman track fit is performed, to account for energy loss and multiple scattering. Exemplar results are shown for Monte Carlo data.

  8. Phase space density as a measure of cooling performance for the international muon ionization cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment to demonstrate ionization cooling of a muon beam in a beamline that shares characteristics with one that might be used for a muon collider or neutrino factory. I describe a way to quantify cooling performance by examining the phase space density of muons, and determining how much that density increases. This contrasts with the more common methods that rely on the covariance matrix and compute emittances from that. I discuss why a direct measure of phase space density might be preferable to a covariance matrix method. I apply this technique to an early proposal for the MICE final step beamline. I discuss how matching impacts the measured performance.

  9. Status of the International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-02-02

    An international experiment to demonstrate muonionization cooling is scheduled for beam at RutherfordAppleton Laboratory (RAL) in 2007. The experimentcomprises one cell of the Study II cooling channel [1],along with upstream and downstream detectors to identifyindividual muons and measure their initial and final 6Dphase-space parameters to a precision of 0.1percent. Magneticdesign of the beam line and cooling channel are completeand portions are under construction. The experiment willbe described, including cooling channel hardware designs,fabrication status, and running plans. Phase 1 of theexperiment will prepare the beam line and providedetector systems, including time-of-flight, Cherenkov,scintillating-fiber trackers and their spectrometersolenoids, and an electromagnetic calorimeter. The Phase2 system will add the cooling channel components,including liquid-hydrogen absorbers embedded insuperconducting Focus Coil solenoids, 201-MHz normalconductingRF cavities, and their surrounding CouplingCoil solenoids. The MICE Collaboration goal is tocomplete the experiment by 2010; progress toward this isdiscussed.

  10. Comments on ionization cooling channels

    DOE PAGES

    Neuffer, David

    2017-09-25

    Ionization cooling channels with a wide variety of characteristics and cooling properties are being developed. These channels can produce cooling performances that are largely consistent with the linear ionization cooling theory developed previously. In this study, we review ionization cooling theory, discuss its application to presently developing cooling channels, and discuss criteria for optimizing cooling.

  11. Comments on ionization cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuffer, D.

    2017-09-01

    Ionization cooling channels with a wide variety of characteristics and cooling properties are being developed. These channels can produce cooling performances that are largely consistent with the linear ionization cooling theory developed previously. In this paper we review ionization cooling theory, discuss its application to presently developing cooling channels, and discuss criteria for optimizing cooling.

  12. Fabrication of the prototype 201.25 mhz cavity for a muon ionization cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.A.; Manning, S.; Manus, R.; Phillips, L.; Stirbet, M.; Worland, K.; Wu, G.; Li, D.; MacGill, R.; Staples, J.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.S.; Taminger, K.; Hafley, R.; Martin, R.; Summers, D.; Reep, M.

    2005-05-20

    We describe the fabrication and assembly of the first prototype 201. 25 MHz copper cavity for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE). This cavity was developed by the US MUCOOL collaboration and will be tested in the new MUCOOL Test Area at Fermilab. We outline the component and subassembly fabrication steps and the various metal forming and joining methods used to produce the final cavity shape. These include spinning, brazing, TIG welding, electron beam welding, electron beam annealing and deep drawing. Some of the methods developed for this cavity are novel and offer significant cost savings over conventional methods.

  13. Fabrication of the Prototype 201.25 MHz Cavity for a Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Rimmer; S. Manning; R. Manus; L. Phillips; M. Stirbet; K. Worland; G. Wu; D. Li; R. MacGill; J. Staples; S. Virostek; M. Zisman; K. Taminger; R. Hafley; R. Martin; D. Summers; M. Reep

    2005-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and assembly of the first prototype 201.25 MHz copper cavity for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE). This cavity was developed by the US MUCOOL collaboration and will be tested in the new MUCOOL Test Area at Fermilab. We outline the component and subassembly fabrication steps and the various metal forming and joining methods used to produce the final cavity shape. These include spinning, brazing, TIG welding, electron beam welding, electron beam annealing and deep drawing. Some of the methods developed for this cavity are novel and offer significant cost savings over conventional construction methods.

  14. A totally active scintillator calorimeter for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). Design and construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfandiyarov, Ruslan

    2013-12-01

    The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a totally active scintillator detector to be installed in the muon beam of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) [1] - the main R&D project for the future neutrino factory. It is aimed at measuring the properties of the low energy beam composed of muons, electrons and pions, performing the identification particle by particle. The EMR is made of 48 stacked layers alternately measuring the X- and the Y-coordinate. Each layer consists of 59 triangular scintillator bars. It is shown that the granularity of the detector permits to identify tracks and to measure particle ranges and shower shapes. The read-out is based on FPGA custom made electronics and commercially available modules. Currently it is being built at the University of Geneva.

  15. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bogomilov, M.; et al.

    2012-05-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  16. The MICE Demonstration of Muon Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste; Hunt, Christopher; Palladino, Vittorio; Pasternak, Jaroslaw

    2016-06-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate muon ionization cooling, the technique proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization-cooling channel, the muon beam traverses a material (the absorber) loosing energy, which is replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). The configuration of MICE required to deliver the demonstration of ionization cooling is being prepared in parallel to the execution of a programme designed to measure the cooling properties of liquid-hydrogen and lithium hydride. The design of the cooling-demonstration experiment will be presented together with a summary of the performance of each of its components and the cooling performance of the experiment.

  17. The MICE Demonstration of Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, J.; Blackmore, V.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Collomb, N.; Snopok, P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material (the absorber) in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect of energy loss and re-acceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised project plan, which has received the formal endorsement of the international MICE Project Board and the international MICE Funding Agency Committee, will deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling by September 2017. In the revised configuration a central lithium-hydride absorber provides the cooling effect. The magnetic lattice is provided by the two superconducting focus coils and acceleration is provided by two 201 MHz single-cavity modules. The phase space of the muons entering and leaving the cooling cell will be measured by two solenoidal spectrometers. All the superconducting magnets for the ionization cooling demonstration are available at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the first single-cavity prototype is under test in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with a summary of the performance of each of its components. The cooling performance of the revised configuration will also be presented.

  18. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-06-07

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  19. Epicyclic Twin-Helix Ionization Cooling Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliy Morozov, Yaroslav Derbenev, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson

    2011-04-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we earlier developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion. We now insert absorber plates with short energy-recovering units located next to them at the appropriate locations in the twin-helix channel. We first demonstrate conventional ionization cooling in such a system with the optics uncorrelated. We then adjust the correlated optics state and induce a parametric resonance to study ionization cooling under the resonant condition.

  20. The MICE demonstration of ionization cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overton, Edward; MICE Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    A Neutrino Factory has the potential to make precision neutrino oscillation measurements, which are aided by cooling the muon beam prior to acceleration and decay. The MICE demonstration of ionization cooling adds two accelerating cavities to the existing MICE apparatus in order to show that sustainable cooling is feasible. In order to accomplish this the cooling cell design has been carefully optimised and settings have been found which show a measurable cooling effect for each MICE momentum setting.

  1. Highly ionized atoms in cooling gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, R. J.; Chevalier, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    The ionization of low density gas cooling from a high temperature was calculated. The evolution during the cooling is assumed to be isochoric, isobaric, or a combination of these cases. The calculations are used to predict the column densities and ultraviolet line luminosities of highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. In a model for cooling of a hot galactic corona, it is shown that the observed value of N(N V) can be produced in the cooling gas, while the predicted value of N(Si IV) falls short of the observed value by a factor of about 5. The same model predicts fluxes of ultraviolet emission lines that are a factor of 10 lower than the claimed detections of Feldman, Brune, and Henry. Predictions are made for ultraviolet lines in cooling flows in early-type galaxies and clusters of galaxies. It is shown that the column densities of interest vary over a fairly narrow range, while the emission line luminosities are simply proportional to the mass inflow rate.

  2. SIMULATIONS OF PARAMETRIC-RESONANCE IONIZATION COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    David Newsham; Richard Sah; Alex Bogacz; Yu-Chiu Chao; Yaroslav Derbenev

    2007-06-01

    Parametric-resonance ionization cooling (PIC) is a muon-cooling technique that is useful for low-emittance muon colliders. This method requires a well-tuned focusing channel that is free of chromatic and spherical aberrations. In order to be of practical use in a muon collider, it also necessary that the focusing channel be as short as possible to minimize muon loss due to decay. G4Beamline numerical simulations are presented of a compact PIC focusing channel in which spherical aberrations are minimized by using design symmetry.

  3. Study of collective effect in ionization cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Roberts, T.J.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2009-09-01

    As a charged particle passes through a non-gaseous medium, it polarizes the medium and induces wake fields behind it. Same thing happens in ionization cooling. The interaction with wake fields perturbs the stopping power of beam particles. The perturbation strongly depends on the densities of both the incident beam and the medium. To understand this collective effect, detailed studies have been carried out. Both analytic and simulation results are obtained and compared.

  4. MUON COLLIDERS - IONIZATION COOLING AND SOLENOIDS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    1999-03-29

    For a muon collider, to obtain the needed luminosity, the phase space volume must be greatly reduced within the muon life time. The ionization cooling is the preferred method used to compress the phase space and reduce the emittance to obtain high luminosity muon beams. Alternating solenoid lattices has been proposed for muon colliders, where the emittance are huge. We present an overview, discuss formalism, transfer maps for solenoid magnets and beam dynamics.

  5. IONIZATION COOLING SCENARIO FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; PALMER, R.B.; LEBRUN, P.L.

    2001-06-18

    The neutrino factory program aims to produce well-characterized neutrino fluxes, orders of magnitude larger than those available from conventional beams. An important feature of the machine design is a cooling section for reducing the muon transverse emittance to a level that can be accepted by the downstream accelerators and be contained in the storage ring. We describe simulations of a high-performance ionization cooling channel for the front end of a neutrino factory. The design considered here consists of a solenoidal lattice with alternating polarity and 2.75 m and 1.65 m cell lengths. Simulations show that the cooling increases the phase space density into the acceptance of the following linac by a factor of 3.

  6. Stochastic processes in muon ionization cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errede, D.; Makino, K.; Berz, M.; Johnstone, C. J.; Van Ginneken, A.

    2004-02-01

    A muon ionization cooling channel consists of three major components: the magnet optics, an acceleration cavity, and an energy absorber. The absorber of liquid hydrogen contained by thin aluminum windows is the only component which introduces stochastic processes into the otherwise deterministic acceleration system. The scattering dynamics of the transverse coordinates is described by Gaussian distributions. The asymmetric energy loss function is represented by the Vavilov distribution characterized by the minimum number of collisions necessary for a particle undergoing loss of the energy distribution average resulting from the Bethe-Bloch formula. Examples of the interplay between stochastic processes and deterministic beam dynamics are given.

  7. Epicyclic helical channels for parametric resonance ionization cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Johson, Rolland Paul; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2015-08-23

    Proposed next-generation muon colliders will require major technical advances to achieve rapid muon beam cooling requirements. Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. In PIC, a half-integer parametric resonance causes strong focusing of a muon beam at appropriately placed energy absorbers while ionization cooling limits the beam’s angular spread. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics in this way should then allow much smaller final transverse muon beam sizes than conventional ionization cooling alone. One of the PIC challenges is compensation of beam aberrations over a sufficiently wide parameter range while maintaining the dynamical stability with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motion and dispersion. We explore use of a coupling resonance to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and to shift the dynamics away from non-linear resonances. PIC simulations are presented.

  8. Transpiration Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.; Ries, Heidi R.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Choi, Sang H.

    1997-01-01

    The transpiration cooling method was considered for a scram-jet engine to accommodate thermally the situation where a very high heat flux (200 Btu/sq. ft sec) from hydrogen fuel combustion process is imposed to the engine walls. In a scram-jet engine, a small portion of hydrogen fuel passes through the porous walls of the engine combustor to cool the engine walls and at the same time the rest passes along combustion chamber walls and is preheated. Such a regenerative system promises simultaneously cooling of engine combustor and preheating the cryogenic fuel. In the experiment, an optical heating method was used to provide a heat flux of 200 Btu/sq. ft sec to the cylindrical surface of a porous stainless steel specimen which carried helium gas. The cooling efficiencies by transpiration were studied for specimens with various porosity. The experiments of various test specimens under high heat flux have revealed a phenomenon that chokes the medium flow when passing through a porous structure. This research includes the analysis of the system and a scaling conversion study that interprets the results from helium into the case when hydrogen medium is used.

  9. The Effect of Extending the Length of the Coupling Coils in a Muon Ionization Cooling Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Michael A.

    2008-02-01

    RF cavities are used to re-accelerate muons that have been cooled by absorbers that are in low beta regions of a muon ionization cooling channel. A superconducting coupling magnet (or magnets) are around or among the RF cavities of a muon ionization-cooling channel. The field from the magnet guides the muons so that they are kept within the iris of the RF cavities that are used to accelerate the muons. This report compares the use of a single short coupling magnet with an extended coupling magnet that has one or more superconducting coils as part of a muon-cooling channel of the same design as the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE). Whether the superconducting magnet is short and thick or long and this affects the magnet stored energy and the peak field in the winding. The magnetic field distribution also affects is the muon beam optics in the cooling cell of a muon cooling channel.

  10. A Study of Muon Ionization Cooling at MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hideyuki

    2010-02-01

    A Neutrino Factory based on a high-energy muon storage-ring is proposed to study neutrino oscillation with high precision. An emittance reduction of muon beam by ionization cooling, which has never been demonstrated in practice, is one of the critical issues for Neutrino Factory. The international Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) is the first experiment to verify an effect of the ionization cooling with muons. MICE will measure a change in transverse emittance of approximately 10% with a precision of ±0.1%. In order to meet the requirements, muon trackers based on 350 μm diameter scintillating fibers have been proposed. The construction of such trackers is a very challenging task and some innovative techniques are needed to realize, since there have been no trackers made with such a small diameter of scintillating fibers in the world. Upstream and downstream SciFi trackers have been successfully constructed with the international collaboration of UK, US and Japan by 2008. Both of the trackers have been tested with cosmic-rays at the RAL by 2009, at which high tracking efficiencies more than 90% are measured for both trackers. It is also confirmed that by collecting the misalignments found in both of the trackers, the requirements for the emittance measurement is met.

  11. The Cool Flames Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard; Neville, Donna; Sheredy, William; Wu, Ming-Shin; Tornabene, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A space-based experiment is currently under development to study diffusion-controlled, gas-phase, low temperature oxidation reactions, cool flames and auto-ignition in an unstirred, static reactor. At Earth's gravity (1g), natural convection due to self-heating during the course of slow reaction dominates diffusive transport and produces spatio-temporal variations in the thermal and thus species concentration profiles via the Arrhenius temperature dependence of the reaction rates. Natural convection is important in all terrestrial cool flame and auto-ignition studies, except for select low pressure, highly dilute (small temperature excess) studies in small vessels (i.e., small Rayleigh number). On Earth, natural convection occurs when the Rayleigh number (Ra) exceeds a critical value of approximately 600. Typical values of the Ra, associated with cool flames and auto-ignitions, range from 104-105 (or larger), a regime where both natural convection and conduction heat transport are important. When natural convection occurs, it alters the temperature, hydrodynamic, and species concentration fields, thus generating a multi-dimensional field that is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to be modeled analytically. This point has been emphasized recently by Kagan and co-workers who have shown that explosion limits can shift depending on the characteristic length scale associated with the natural convection. Moreover, natural convection in unstirred reactors is never "sufficiently strong to generate a spatially uniform temperature distribution throughout the reacting gas." Thus, an unstirred, nonisothermal reaction on Earth does not reduce to that generated in a mechanically, well-stirred system. Interestingly, however, thermal ignition theories and thermokinetic models neglect natural convection and assume a heat transfer correlation of the form: q=h(S/V)(T(bar) - Tw) where q is the heat loss per unit volume, h is the heat transfer coefficient, S/V is the surface to

  12. Muon Dynamics and Ionization Cooling at Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1998-11-01

    Muon Dynamics and beam cooling methods for muon colliders are presented. Formulations and effects of Ionization cooling as the preferred method used to compress the phase space to reduce the emittance and to obtain high luminosity muon beams are also included.

  13. Ionization cooling in a low-energy proton storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David V.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    At the FFAG05 meeting, Mori and Okabe presented a scenario in which the lifetime of protons in a low-energy storage ring ({approx}10 MeV) is extended by energy-loss in a wedge foil, and this enables greater neutron production from the foil. The lifetime extension is due to the cooling effect of this energy loss. We have previously analyzed ionization cooling for muons at optimal cooling energies. The same equations, with appropriate adaptations, can be used to analyze the dynamic situation for proton-material interactions at low energies. In this note we discuss this extension and calculate cooling and heating effects at these very different parameters. The ring could provide a practical application of ionization cooling methods.

  14. Possible demonstration of ionization cooling using absorbers in a solenoidal field

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G.

    1995-12-01

    Ionization cooling may play an important role in reducing the phase space volume of muons for a future muon-muon collider. We describe a possible experiment to demonstrate transverse emittance cooling using a muon beam at the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The experiment uses device dimensions and parameters and beam conditions similar to what is expected in an actual muon-muon collider.

  15. Impact-Ionization Cooling in Laser-Induced Plasma Filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Filin, A.; Romanov, D. A.; Compton, R.; Levis, R. J.

    2009-04-17

    The ionization rates and subsequent electron dynamics for laser-induced plasma channels are measured for the noble gas series He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe at 1.0 atm. The cw fluorescence emission increases superlinearly in the series from He to Xe in agreement with Ammosov-Delone-Krainov tunnel ionization calculations. The electron temperature after laser-induced plasma formation, measured by four-wave mixing, evolves from >20 eV to <1 eV kinetic energies with time constants ranging from 1 ns for He to 100 ps for Xe in agreement with an impact-ionization cooling model.

  16. Helical FOFO snake for 6D ionization cooling of muons

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    A channel for 6D ionization cooling of muons is described which consists of periodically inclined solenoids of alternating polarity, liquid hydrogen absorbers placed inside solenoids and RF cavities between them. Important feature of such channel (called Helical FOFO snake) is that it can cool simultaneously muons of both signs. Theoretical considerations as well as results of simulations with G4Beamline are presented which show that 200MHz HFOFO snake has sufficient acceptance to be used for initial 6D cooling in muon colliders and neutrino factories.

  17. Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling in Twin-Helix.

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, Erdelyi. B., J.A. Maloney

    2011-09-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated optics. Wedge-shaped absorbers immediately followed by short rf cavities are placed into the twin-helix channel. Parametric resonances are induced in both planes using helical quadrupole harmonics. We demonstrate resonant dynamics and cooling with stochastic effects off using GEANT4/G4beamline. We illustrate compensation of spherical aberrations and benchmark COSY Infinity, a powerful tool for aberration analysis and compensation.

  18. Helical FOFO Snake for 6D Ionization Cooling of Muons

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.

    2010-03-30

    A channel for 6D ionization cooling of muons is described which consists of periodically inclined solenoids of alternating polarity, liquid hydrogen absorbers placed inside the solenoids and RF cavities between them. An important feature of such a channel (called Helical FOFO snake) is that it can cool simultaneously muons of both signs. Theoretical considerations as well as results of simulations with G4beamline are presented which show that a 200 MHz HFOFO snake has sufficient acceptance to be used for initial 6D cooling in muon colliders and neutrino factories.

  19. Twin-Helix Channel for Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    V. S. Morozov, A. Afanasev, Y. S. Derbenev, R. P. Johnson

    2010-11-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) [1–3] is envisioned as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. Implementing PIC imposes stringent constraints on the cooling channel's magnetic optics design. This paper presents a linear optics solution compatible with PIC. Our solution consists of a superposition of two opposite-helicity equal-period and equal-strength helical dipole harmonics and a straight normal quadrupole. We demonstrate that such a system can be adjusted to meet all of the PIC linear optics requirements while retaining large acceptance.

  20. Validity of the differential equations for ionization cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernow, R. C.; Gallardo, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    We examine the validity of the differential equations used to describe ionization cooling. We find that the simple heating term due to multiple scattering given by D. Neuffer is a good approximation to the expression obtained from a more rigorous derivation.

  1. Validity of the differential equations for ionization cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernow, R. C.; Gallardo, J. C.

    1995-03-01

    The authors examine the validity of the differential equations used to describe ionization cooling. They find that the simple heating term due to multiple scattering given by D. Neuffer is a good approximation to the expression obtained from a more rigorous derivation.

  2. Ionization cooling in FFAGs: progress since NuFact'01

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönauer, H.

    2003-08-01

    Although Japan's unique FFAG scenario for a neutrino factory does not rely on ionization cooling of the muon beam, moderate cooling in the first FFAG could be beneficial for the overall muon yield and, perhaps even more important, reduce the final emittances in the decay ring. Using basic cooling theory, one can show that this appears possible. In the Nufact'01 contribution on 'ionization cooling in FFAGs' [1], the addition of absorbers into the superconducting 0.3-1 GeV/c Japanese FFAG was investigated. The cooling absorbers were 7 mm beryllium sheets in the median plane of the RF cavities. Beryllium was chosen because Be windows are a known design to increase field strength and quality of large aperture cavities. Obviously metallic lithium or a sandwich of lithium hydride between thin metallic Be sheets is preferable to the cooling viewpoint. We have thus complemented the results for Be by equivalent inserts of pure lithium and lithium hydride. For each material two thicknesses were compared.

  3. High field – low energy muon ionization cooling channel

    DOE PAGES

    Sayed, Hisham Kamal; Palmer, Robert B.; Neuffer, David

    2015-09-04

    Muon beams are generated with large transverse and longitudinal emittances. In order to achieve the low emittances required by a muon collider, within the short lifetime of the muons, ionization cooling is required. Cooling schemes have been developed to reduce the muon beam 6D emittances to ≈ 300 μm–rad in transverse and ≈ 1–1.5 mm in longitudinal dimensions. The transverse emittance has to be further reduced to ≈ 50–25 μm–rad with an upper limit on the longitudinal emittance of ≈ 76 mm in order to meet the high-energy muon collider luminosity requirements. Earlier studies of the transverse cooling of lowmore » energy muon beams in high field magnets showed a promising performance, but did not include transverse or longitudinal matching between the stages. In this study we present the first complete design of the high field-low energy ionization cooling channel with transverse and longitudinal matching. The channel design was based on strong focusing solenoids with fields of 25–30 T and low momentum muon beam starting at 135 MeV/c and gradually decreasing. The cooling channel design presented here is the first to reach ≈ 50 micron scale emittance beam. As a result, we present the channel’s optimized design parameters including the focusing solenoid fields, absorber parameters and the transverse and longitudinal matching.« less

  4. Polymerization, shock cooling and ionization of liquid nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M; Rogers, F

    2005-07-21

    The trajectory of thermodynamic states passed through by the nitrogen Hugoniot starting from the liquid and up to 10{sup 6} GPa has been studied. An earlier report of cooling in the doubly shocked liquid, near 50 to 100 GPa and 7500 K, is revisited in light of the recent discovery of solid polymeric nitrogen. It is found that cooling occurs when the doubly shocked liquid is driven into a volume near the molecular to polymer transition and raising the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT). By increasing the shock pressure and temperature by an order of magnitude, theoretical calculations predict thermal ionization of the L shell drives the compression maxima to 5-6 fold compression at 10 Mbar (T {approx} 3.5 10{sup 5} K) and at 400 Mbar (T {approx} 2.3 10{sup 6} K) from K shell ionization. Near a pressure of 10{sup 6} GPa the K shell ionizes completely and the Hugoniot approaches the classical ideal gas compression fourfold limit.

  5. Progress on muon parametric-resonance ionization cooling channel development

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, B. Erdelyi, J.A. Maloney

    2012-07-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is intended as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. To implement PIC, a continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel was developed. A 6D cooling with stochastic effects off is demonstrated in a GEANT4/G4beamline model of a system where wedge-shaped Be absorbers are placed at the appropriate dispersion points in the twin-helix channel and are followed by short rf cavities. To proceed to cooling simulations with stochastics on, compensation of the beam aberrations from one absorber to another is required. Initial results on aberration compensation using a set of various-order continuous multipole fields are presented. As another avenue to mitigate the aberration effect, we optimize the cooling channel's period length. We observe a parasitic parametric resonance naturally occurring in the channel's horizontal plane due to the periodic beam energy modulation caused by the absorbers and rf. We discuss options for compensating this resonance and/or properly combining it with the induced half-integer parametric resonance needed for PIC.

  6. Highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. [in model for cooling of hot Galactic corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgar, Richard J.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    1986-01-01

    The ionization of low density gas cooling from a high temperature was calculated. The evolution during the cooling is assumed to be isochoric, isobaric, or a combination of these cases. The calculations are used to predict the column densities and ultraviolet line luminosities of highly ionized atoms in cooling gas. In a model for cooling of a hot galactic corona, it is shown that the observed value of N(N V) can be produced in the cooling gas, while the predicted value of N(Si IV) falls short of the observed value by a factor of about 5. The same model predicts fluxes of ultraviolet emission lines that are a factor of 10 lower than the claimed detections of Feldman, Bruna, and Henry. Predictions are made for ultraviolet lines in cooling flows in early-type galaxies and clusters of galaxies. It is shown that the column densities of interest vary over a fairly narrow range, while the emission line luminosities are simply proportional to the mass inflow rate.

  7. INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

    2012-07-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

  8. Coherent electron cooling demonstration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Fedotov, A.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Mahler, G.; Marusic, A.; Meng, W.; McIntyre, G.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Sheehy, B.; Tepikian, S.; Than, R.; Trbojevic, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G.; Poelker, M.; Rimmer, R.; Bruhwiler, D.; Abell, D.T.; Nieter, C.; Ranjbar, V.; Schwartz, B.; Kholopov M.; Shevchenko, O.; McIntosh, P.; Wheelhouse, A.

    2011-09-04

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using SRF linac. In this paper, we describe the setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC. We plan to complete the program in five years. During first two years we will build coherent electron cooler in IP2 of RHIC. In parallel we will develop complete package of computer simulation tools for the start-to-end simulation predicting exact performance of a CeC. The later activity will be the core of Tech X involvement into the project. We will use these tools to predict the performance of our CeC device. The experimental demonstration of the CeC will be undertaken in years three to five of the project. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the cooling of ion beam and to compare its measured performance with predictions made by us prior to the experiments.

  9. Nanogap experiments for laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stintz, Andreas; Epstein, Richard I.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor; Malloy, Kevin J.; Hasselbeck, Michael P.; Boyd, Stephen T. P.

    2008-02-01

    One of the challenges of laser cooling a semiconductor is its typically high index of refraction (greater than 3), which limits efficient light output of the upconverted photon. This issue is addressed with a novel concept of coupling the photon out via a thin, thermally insulating vacuum gap that allows light to pass efficiently by frustrated internal reflection. Although silicon technology is mature and inexpensive, the indirect nature of the bandgap of silicon makes it unsuitable for laser cooling. The material of choice is the binary compound semiconductor GaAs, which can be fabricated with high quality necessary for laser cooling experiments. Moreover, process technology exists that enables a relatively simple fabrication of a thin vacuum gap in this material system. This paper will present an investigation of heat transport and light transmission across a "nanogap" consisting of a thin epitaxial film supported over a substrate by an array of nanometer-sized posts. The structure is manufactured by crystal growth of a sacrificial Al 0.98Ga 0.02As layer on a single crystal GaAs substrate. After lithographically defining holes in the Al 0.98Ga 0.02As layer, the holes are filled with GaAs and a top GaAs layer is deposited. Lateral selective etching of the Al 0.98Ga 0.02As will create a nanogap between two GaAs layers separated by GaAs posts. We are demonstrating the successful fabrication of various size nanogaps in this material system, as well as their properties with respect to reduced heat transfer across the gap. We are also presenting data supporting that the interface quality is high enough to allow evanescent tunneling of light at angles otherwise forbidden by total internal reflection. The implications for semiconductor laser cooling will be discussed.

  10. High speed cooled CCD experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, C.R.; Albright, K.L.; Yates, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    Experiments were conducted using cooled and intensified CCD cameras. Two different cameras were identically tested using different Optical test stimulus variables. Camera gain and dynamic range were measured by varying microchannel plate (MCP) voltages and controlling light flux using neutral density (ND) filters to yield analog digitized units (ADU) which are digitized values of the CCD pixel`s analog charge. A Xenon strobe (5 {micro}s FWHM, blue light, 430 nm) and a doubled Nd.yag laser (10 ns FWHM, green light, 532 nm) were both used as pulsed illumination sources for the cameras. Images were captured on PC desktop computer system using commercial software. Camera gain and integration time values were adjusted using camera software. Mean values of camera volts versus input flux were also obtained by performing line scans through regions of interest. Experiments and results will be discussed.

  11. RF, Thermal and Structural Analysis of the 201.25 MHz MuonIonization Cooling Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, S.; Li, D.

    2005-05-10

    A finite element analysis has been carried out to characterize the RF, thermal and structural behavior of the prototype 201.25 MHz cavity for a muon ionization cooling channel. A single ANSYS model has been developed to perform all of the calculations in a multi-step process. The high-gradient closed-cell cavity is currently being fabricated for the MICE (international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment) and MUCOOL experiments. The 1200 mm diameter cavity is constructed of 6 mm thick copper sheet and incorporates a rounded pillbox-like profile with an open beam iris terminated by 420 mm diameter, 0.38 mm thick curved beryllium foils. Tuning is accomplished through elastic deformation of the cavity, and cooling is provided by external water passages. Details of the analysis methodology will be presented including a description of the ANSYS macro that computes the heat loads from the RF solution and applies them directly to the thermal model. The process and results of a calculation to determine the resulting frequency shift due to thermal and structural distortion of the cavity will also be presented.

  12. Experiences in solar cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.

    The results of performance evaluations for nine solar cooling systems are presented, and reasons fow low or high net energy balances are discussed. Six of the nine systems are noted to have performed unfavorably compared to standard cooling systems due to thermal storage losses, excessive system electrical demands, inappropriate control strategies, poor system-to-load matching, and poor chiller performance. A reduction in heat losses in one residential unit increased the total system efficiency by 2.5%, while eliminating heat losses to the building interior increased the efficiency by 3.3%. The best system incorporated a lithium bromide absorption chiller and a Rankine cycle compression unit for a commercial application. Improvements in the cooling tower and fan configurations to increase the solar cooling system efficiency are indicated. Best performances are expected to occur in climates inducing high annual cooling loads.

  13. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D. L.; DeMello, A. J.; Lambert, A. R.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Kaplan, D.; Palmer, R. B.

    2012-05-20

    The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) collaboration is working to develop an ionization cooling channel for muon beams. An ionization cooling channel requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF cavities in multi-Tesla solenoidal magnetic fields. However, experiments conducted at Fermilab?s MuCool Test Area (MTA) show that increasing the solenoidal field strength reduces the maximum achievable cavity gradient. This gradient limit is characterized by an RF breakdown process that has caused significant damage to copper cavity interiors. The damage may be caused by field-emitted electrons, focused by the solenoidal magnetic field onto small areas of the inner cavity surface. Local heating may then induce material fatigue and surface damage. Fabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigate this damage due to beryllium?s low density, low thermal expansion, and high electrical and thermal conductivity. We address the design and fabrication of a pillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate the performance of high-gradient cavities in strong magnetic fields.

  14. Circularly Inclined Solenoid Channel for 6D Ionization Cooling of Muons

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Ionization cooling is essential for realization of Muon Collider, muons beam based neutrino factories and other experiments involving muons. The simplest structure - absorber(s) immersed in alternating solenoidal magnetic field - provides only transverse cooling since the longitudinal motion in the most suitable momentum range (2-300MeV/c) is naturally anti-damped. To overcome this difficulty it is proposed to periodically tilt solenoids so that a rotating transverse magnetic field was created. By choosing the phase advance per period above a multiple of 2{pi} it is possible to ensure that muons with higher momentum make a longer path in the absorber (whether distributed or localized) thus providing longitudinal damping. Basic theory of such channel and results of tracking simulations are presented.

  15. Experiences in solar cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.; Oberoi, H. S.

    Six of the nine solar cooling systems discussed in this paper had negative energy savings. In several cases the solar cooling system used substantially more energy than a conventional system could have been expected to use. Two systems, however, had significant energy savings. These systems (1 residential and 1 commercial) obtained system thermal efficiencies of 12.0 to 12.4 percent. Their system overall efficiences averaged 11.2 and 5.2 percent respectively. The residential-sized system achieved an annual energy savings of about 16.8 GJ/year, or approximately .34 GJ/year.m2 of collector. The commercial system had equivalent values of 137 GJ/year or about .22 GJ/year/sq m of collector. It should be noted that these efficiencies re much lower than those of well-designed and properly controlled cooling systems in commercial sizes. However, with realistic system modifications and subsequent improvements in performance these solar cooling systems can be expected to achieve savings in nonrenewable energy sources of approximately 1.2 GJ/year/sq m of collector. These savings can be compared to those associated with solar space and domestic hot water heating systems of 2.2 and 2.5 GJ/year/sq m of collector, respectively.

  16. Neon dc glow discharge at cryogenic cooling: experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumova, V. V.; Polyakov, D. N.; Vasilyak, L. M.

    2017-10-01

    The results of the measurement and simulation of electrical characteristics of neon dc discharge are presented. These results have been obtained in the discharge cooled to the temperature of liquid nitrogen (77 K). The experiments were carried out at a neon pressure of 18–187 Pa and a discharge current of 0.01–3.5 mA. Cooling in the subnormal discharge mode at a constant value of discharge current led to a change in the discharge mode. When cooled, the electric field in the positive column and at the boundary of the transition to the normal discharge increased, and the reduced electric field decreased in all the investigated ranges of discharge current, pressure and neon concentration. The simulation of the positive column, based on the diffusion-drift (fluid) model, has shown that the input in the ionization of processes involving excited atoms increases with decreasing discharge temperature.

  17. A COMPLETE SCHEME FOR IONIZATION COOLING FOR A MUON COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    PALMER,R.B.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; KIRK, H.G.; ALEXAHIN, Y.; NEUFFER, D.; KAHN, S.A.; SUMMERS, D.

    2007-06-25

    A complete scheme for production and cooling a muon beam for three specified muon colliders is presented. Parameters for these muon colliders are given. The scheme starts with the front end of a proposed neutrino factory that yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Emittance exchange cooling in slow helical lattices reduces the longitudinal emittance until it becomes possible to merge the trains into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in all dimensions is applied to the single bunches in further slow helical lattices. Final transverse cooling to the required parameters is achieved in 50 T solenoids using high TC superconductor at 4 K. Preliminary simulations of each element are presented.

  18. Cooling of electronics in collider experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Richard P. Stanek et al.

    2003-11-07

    Proper cooling of detector electronics is critical to the successful operation of high-energy physics experiments. Collider experiments offer unique challenges based on their physical layouts and hermetic design. Cooling systems can be categorized by the type of detector with which they are associated, their primary mode of heat transfer, the choice of active cooling fluid, their heat removal capacity and the minimum temperature required. One of the more critical detector subsystems to require cooling is the silicon vertex detector, either pixel or strip sensors. A general design philosophy is presented along with a review of the important steps to include in the design process. Factors affecting the detector and cooling system design are categorized. A brief review of some existing and proposed cooling systems for silicon detectors is presented to help set the scale for the range of system designs. Fermilab operates two collider experiments, CDF & D0, both of which have silicon systems embedded in their detectors. A review of the existing silicon cooling system designs and operating experience is presented along with a list of lessons learned.

  19. Muon Tracking Studies in a Skew Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, Amy; Afanaciev, Andre; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Johnson, Rolland; Morozov, Vasiliy

    2015-09-01

    Skew Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (SPIC) is an extension of the Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) framework that has previously been explored as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. The addition of skew quadrupoles to the PIC magnetic focusing channel induces coupled dynamic behavior of the beam that is radially periodic. The periodicity of the radial motion allows for the avoidance of unwanted resonances in the horizontal and vertical transverse planes, while still providing periodic locations at which ionization cooling components can be implemented. A first practical implementation of the magnetic field components required in the SPIC channel is modeled in MADX. Dynamic features of the coupled correlated optics with and without induced parametric resonance are presented and discussed.

  20. Epicyclic Helical Channels for Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanaciev, Alex Bogacz, Yaroslav Derbenev, Kevin Beard, Valentin Ivanov, Rolland Johnson, Guimei Wang, Katsuya Yonehara

    2009-05-01

    In order to achieve cooling of muons in addition to 6D helical cooling channel (HCC) [1], we develop a technique based on a parametric resonance. The use of parametric resonances requires alternating dispersion, minimized at locations of thin absorbers, but maximized in between in order to compensate for chromatic aberrations [2]. These solutions can be combined in an Epicyclic Helical Cooling Channel (EHCC) that meets requirements of alternating dispersion of beam periodic orbit with best conditions for maintenance of stable beam transport in a continuous solenoid-type field [3]. We discuss here basic features and new simulation results for EHCC.

  1. Status of Studies of Achromat-based 6D Ionization Cooling Rings for Muons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X.; Kirk, H.; Cline, D.; Garren, A.A.; Berg, J.S.

    2011-09-04

    Six dimensional ionization cooling of muons is needed to achieve the necessary luminosity for a muon collider. If that cooling could occur over multiple turns in a closed ring, there would be significant cost savings over a single-pass cooling channel. We report on the status of a cooling ring with achromatic arcs. The achromatic design permits the design to easily switch between a closed ring and a snaking geometry on injection or extraction from the ring. The ring is designed with sufficient space in each superperiod for injection and extraction magnets. We describe the ring's lattice design, performance, and injection/extraction requirements.

  2. Skew-Quad Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling: Theory and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Afanaciev, Andre; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Morozov, Vasiliy; Sy, Amy; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2015-09-01

    Muon beam ionization cooling is a key component for the next generation of high-luminosity muon colliders. To reach adequately high luminosity without excessively large muon intensities, it was proposed previously to combine ionization cooling with techniques using a parametric resonance (PIC). Practical implementation of PIC proposal is a subject of this report. We show that an addition of skew quadrupoles to a planar PIC channel gives enough flexibility in the design to avoid unwanted resonances, while meeting the requirements of radially-periodic beam focusing at ionization-cooling plates, large dynamic aperture and an oscillating dispersion needed for aberration corrections. Theoretical arguments are corroborated with models and a detailed numerical analysis, providing step-by-step guidance for the design of Skew-quad PIC (SPIC) beamline.

  3. Studies of the Twin Helix Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling Channel with COSY INFINITY

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Maloney, K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, A. Afanasev, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, B. Erdelyi

    2012-07-01

    A primary technical challenge to the design of a high luminosity muon collider is an effective beam cooling system. An epicyclic twin-helix channel utilizing parametric-resonance ionization cooling has been proposed for the final 6D cooling stage. A proposed design of this twin-helix channel is presented that utilizes correlated optics between the horizontal and vertical betatron periods to simultaneously focus transverse motion of the beam in both planes. Parametric resonance is induced in both planes via a system of helical quadrupole harmonics. Ionization cooling is achieved via periodically placed wedges of absorbing material, with intermittent rf cavities restoring longitudinal momentum necessary to maintain stable orbit of the beam. COSY INFINITY is utilized to simulate the theory at first order. The motion of particles around a hyperbolic fixed point is tracked. Comparison is made between the EPIC cooling channel and standard ionization cooling effects. Cooling effects are measured, after including stochastic effects, for both a single particle and a distribution of particles.

  4. Experiments on Porous Flow With Cooling Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.

    2004-12-01

    Fluid migrations in geological problems (hydrothermal systems, magma migration, etc.) are not purely mechanical problems. They involve heat transfer and/or chemical reactions, which may cause the structural change of fluid paths. When the fluid flows into cooler regions, it may precipitate dissolved materials along its paths. Such a structural change affects the fluid flow and leads to a temporal change in flux. In order to understand the fluid migration with thermal and chemical processes, we have conducted experiments of porous flow with a cooling boundary. We employ packed nylon beads (D=0.4 mm, L=0.4 mm) and NH4Cl aqueous solution as a porous matrix and a fluid, respectively. The solubility of NH4Cl is very sensitive to the temperature. A small temperature drop makes a considerable amount of precipitation. Undersaturated NH4Cl solution is injected at a constant rate from the column of beads. The top part of the column is cooled from the outside, where NH4Cl can precipitate in pores to reduce the permeability. We change the temperature of the cooling boundary, the fluid injection rate, and the concentration of NH4Cl, and study the temporal change of the temperature of the fluid, the outflow rate, and the fluid pressure. We have observed three different types of temporal change. When the cooling of the fluid is not effective, the fluid does not precipitate dissolved NH4Cl. The outflow rate and the fluid pressure are kept constant. On the other hand, when the cooling is effective, the fluid precipitates NH4Cl. The fluid pressure increases to keep the outflow rate constant. The second case is subdivided into two types. When the cooling effect is strong, the precipitation makes a strong lid at the cooling boundary. The fluid pressure increases steadily. When the cooling effect is moderate, the elevated fluid pressure breaks the low permeability lid. The fluctuation of the fluid pressure is observed.

  5. The Effect of Extending the Length of the Coupling Coils in a MuonIonization Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2007-11-10

    RF cavities are used to re-accelerate muons that have beencooled by absorbers that are in low beta regions of a muon ionizationcooling channel. A superconducting coupling magnet (or magnets) arearound or among the RF cavities of a muon ionization-cooling channel. Thefield from the magnet guides the muons so that they are kept within theiris of the RF cavities that are used to accelerate the muons. Thisreport compares the use of a single short coupling magnet with anextended coupling magnet that has one or more superconducting coils aspart of a muon-cooling channel of the same design as the muon ionizationcooling experiment (MICE). Whether the superconducting magnet is shortand thick or long and this affects the magnet stored energy and the peakfield in the winding. The magnetic field distribution also affects is themuon beam optics in the cooling cell of a muon coolingchannel.

  6. Coulomb crystal as a detector in electron impact ionization experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klosowski, Lukasz; Piwinski, Mariusz; Wojtewicz, Szymon; Lisak, Daniel; Dziczek, Darek; Chwirot, Stanislaw

    2016-09-01

    Ensembles of ions in trap at sufficiently low temperature can form a structure called Coulomb crystal. Some species of such ions can be optically cooled and observed using CCD camera. Number of ions composing the crystal can be determined with high accuracy. Other, invisible species of ions can be sympathetically cooled and detected indirectly by observation of their influence on visible ones. Thus, the efficiency of ionization processes leading to Coulomb crystal formation can be determined. We present preliminary results for electron-impact-ionized molecules forming a multi-species Coulomb crystal in a linear segmented Paul trap together with atomic calcium ions.

  7. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.; Guzik, T. Gregory

    2001-01-01

    During grant NAG5-5064, Louisiana State University (LSU) led the ATIC team in the development, construction, testing, accelerator validation, pre-deployment integration and flight operations of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment. This involved interfacing among the ATIC collaborators (UMD, NRL/MSFC, SU, MSU, WI, SNU) to develop a new balloon payload based upon a fully active calorimeter, a carbon target, a scintillator strip hodoscope and a pixilated silicon solid state detector for a detailed investigation of the very high energy cosmic rays to energies beyond 10(exp 14) eV/nucleus. It is in this very high energy region that theory predicts changes in composition and energy spectra related to the Supernova Remnant Acceleration model for cosmic rays below the "knee" in the all-particle spectrum. This report provides a documentation list, details the anticipated ATIC science return, describes the particle detection principles on which the experiment is based, summarizes the simulation results for the system, describes the validation work at the CERN SPS accelerator and details the balloon flight configuration. The ATIC experiment had a very successful LDB flight from McMurdo, Antarctica in 12/00 - 1/01. The instrument performed well for the entire 15 days. Preliminary data analysis shows acceptable charge resolution and an all-particle power law energy deposition distribution not inconsistent with previous measurements. Detailed analysis is underway and will result in new data on the cosmic ray charge and energy spectra in the GeV - TeV energy range. ATIC is currently being refurbished in anticipation of another LDB flight in the 2002-03 period.

  8. Cooling tower plume - model and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizek, Jan; Gemperle, Jiri; Strob, Miroslav; Nozicka, Jiri

    The paper discusses the description of the simple model of the, so-called, steam plume, which in many cases forms during the operation of the evaporative cooling systems of the power plants, or large technological units. The model is based on semi-empirical equations that describe the behaviour of a mixture of two gases in case of the free jet stream. In the conclusion of the paper, a simple experiment is presented through which the results of the designed model shall be validated in the subsequent period.

  9. Rectilinear six-dimensional ionization cooling channel for a muon collider: A theoretical and numerical study

    DOE PAGES

    Stratakis, Diktys; Palmer, Robert B.

    2015-03-06

    A Muon Collider requires a reduction of the six-dimensional emittance of the captured muon beam by several orders of magnitude. In this study, we describe a novel rectilinear cooling scheme that should meet this requirement. First, we present the conceptual design of our proposed scheme wherein we detail its basic features. Then, we establish the theoretical framework to predict and evaluate the performance of ionization cooling channels and discuss its application to our specific case. In conclusion, we present the first end-to-end simulation of 6D cooling for a Muon Collider and show a notable reduction of the 6D emittance bymore » five orders of magnitude. We find good agreement between simulation and theory.« less

  10. Guided ionization waves: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Ostrikov, K.

    2014-07-01

    This review focuses on one of the fundamental phenomena that occur upon application of sufficiently strong electric fields to gases, namely the formation and propagation of ionization waves-streamers. The dynamics of streamers is controlled by strongly nonlinear coupling, in localized streamer tip regions, between enhanced (due to charge separation) electric field and ionization and transport of charged species in the enhanced field. Streamers appear in nature (as initial stages of sparks and lightning, as huge structures-sprites above thunderclouds), and are also found in numerous technological applications of electrical discharges. Here we discuss the fundamental physics of the guided streamer-like structures-plasma bullets which are produced in cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jets. Plasma bullets are guided ionization waves moving in a thin column of a jet of plasma forming gases (e.g., He or Ar) expanding into ambient air. In contrast to streamers in a free (unbounded) space that propagate in a stochastic manner and often branch, guided ionization waves are repetitive and highly-reproducible and propagate along the same path-the jet axis. This property of guided streamers, in comparison with streamers in a free space, enables many advanced time-resolved experimental studies of ionization waves with nanosecond precision. In particular, experimental studies on manipulation of streamers by external electric fields and streamer interactions are critically examined. This review also introduces the basic theories and recent advances on the experimental and computational studies of guided streamers, in particular related to the propagation dynamics of ionization waves and the various parameters of relevance to plasma streamers. This knowledge is very useful to optimize the efficacy of applications of plasma streamer discharges in various fields ranging from health care and medicine to materials science and nanotechnology.

  11. Design of a Microgravity Spray Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysinger, Kerri M.; Yerkes, Kirk L.; Michalak, Travis E.; Harris, Richard J.; McQuillen, John

    2004-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study was conducted for the application of spray cooling in a microgravity and high-g environment. Experiments were carried out aboard the NASA KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft, which provided the microgravity and high-g environments. In reduced gravity, surface tension flow was observed around the spray nozzle, due to unconstrained liquid in the test chamber and flow reversal at the heat source. A transient analytical model was developed to predict the temperature and the spray heat transfer coefficient within the heated region. Comparison of the experimental transient temperature variation with analytical results showed good agreement for low heat input values. The transient analysis also verified that thermal equilibrium within the heated region could be reached during the 20-25s reduced gravity portion of the flight profile.

  12. Mysterious ionization in cooling flow filaments: a test with deep COS FUV spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant

    2013-10-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph is capable of unraveling a two decade old mystery regarding the filamentary emission line nebulae found in the brightest cluster galaxies {BCGs} of cool core {CC} clusters. These kpc-scale filaments are characterized by elevated H-alpha luminosities and puzzling ionization states that cannot be accounted for by recombination or photionization alone, and are instead excited by an unknown ionization mechanism. The most hotly debated proposed solutions invoke thermal conduction, shocks, or cosmic-ray heating, but progress toward consensus awaits unambiguous spectral discriminants between these models that can only be found in the FUV. We propose deep {9 orbit}, off-nuclear observations of two strategically selected BCGs in well-studied cool core clusters with cross-spectrum archival datasets. We also propose a shorter {5 orbit} on-nuclear observation for one of our targets to assess possible AGN contributions to the spectra. These proposed observations represent critical tests that can unambiguously discriminate between the various candidate ionziation models. Constraining the mechanisms by which CC BCG filaments are excited remains one of the most important roadblocks to a better understanding of cooling from hot ambient medium to cold star forming clouds and filaments, a process important for both galaxy and black hole growth. It is therefore important that, before HST ends its mission and we lose FUV capability, we advance our understanding of this decades old mystery.

  13. Capture and ionization detection of laser-cooled rubidium atoms with a charged suspended carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristroph, Trygve Gibbens

    The capture and ionization of neutral rubidium atoms with a positively charged suspended carbon nanotube is realized. The electric field surrounding the nanotube polarizes and pulls atoms into the highly singular attractive inverse square potential. Atoms are ionized by the nanotube, and Rb+ ions are ejected radially and subsequently detected individually. The entire process of capture, ionization, and ion-detection reveals a rich set of behavior, probing the dynamics of laser-cooled atoms as well as nanotube and ionization physics. When the device is used as an atom detector, the cold-atom ionization signal replicates time-dependent features in the instantaneous atom beam density on sub-millisecond time scales. This time resolution allows a time-of-flight measurement of atom velocity, corroborated with a laser absorption measurement. Position sensitivity on the 200 micron scale is demonstrated, as the detector is scanned to map out the atom beam transverse mode profile, a capability otherwise forbidden by the system's optical access. A measurement of the nanotube ionization cross-section as a function of atomic velocity and charging voltage shows the capture process is dominated by an inverse square potential energy. The cross-section reveals an inverse velocity scaling, consistent with the prediction. The analogous charging voltage measurement shows a linear scaling in voltage with measured and predicted slopes in agreement. Sending current through the nanotube changes the voltage offset of the cross-section versus voltage curve. This suggests that the ionization occurs in close proximity to the nanotube surface and is therefore sensitive to its electronic and mechanical properties. Theoretical foundations are developed to describe the capture and ionization physics involved in observing the quantization of atomic orbital angular momentum with the detector. For experimentally accessible parameters, the observation of the quantized conductance of neutral atoms is

  14. Spatially resolved protein hydrogen exchange measured by subzero-cooled chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Amon, Sabine; Trelle, Morten B; Jensen, Ole N; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2012-05-15

    Mass spectrometry has become a valuable method for studying structural dynamics of proteins in solution by measuring their backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics. In a typical exchange experiment one or more proteins are incubated in deuterated buffer at physiological conditions. After a given period of deuteration, the exchange reaction is quenched by acidification (pH 2.5) and cooling (0 °C) and the deuterated protein (or a digest thereof) is analyzed by mass spectrometry. The unavoidable loss of deuterium (back-exchange) that occurs under quench conditions is undesired as it leads to loss of information. Here we describe the successful application of a chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry top-down fragmentation approach based on cooling to subzero temperature (-15 °C) which reduces the back-exchange at quench conditions to very low levels. For example, only 4% and 6% deuterium loss for fully deuterated ubiquitin and β(2)-microglobulin were observed after 10 min of back-exchange. The practical value of our subzero-cooled setup for top-down fragmentation HDX analyses is demonstrated by electron-transfer dissociation of ubiquitin ions under carefully optimized mass spectrometric conditions where gas-phase hydrogen scrambling is negligible. Our results show that the known dynamic behavior of ubiquitin in solution is accurately reflected in the deuterium contents of the fragment ions.

  15. Cooling experiments using dummies covered by leaves.

    PubMed

    Althaus, L; Stückradt, S; Henssge, C; Bajanowski, T

    2007-03-01

    One main method to estimate the time of death is the measurement of the body temperature. The cooling of a corpse depends on a number of conditions including the surroundings. In cases where the cooling conditions differ from the defined standard, a corrective factor is used to characterise the influence of clothing, air movement, the properties of the supporting base and the humidity. Nothing is known about the significance of other circumstances, for example of a tegument by leaves or wet leaves. Therefore, the cooling of dummies which were placed on a 2-cm-thick layer of wet/dry leaves and covered by a 10-cm-thick layer of leaves was investigated. Corrective factors of 1.0 for wet leaves on the ground and of 1.3 and 1.5 for drier leaves were found. If the dummies were additionally covered, corrective factors ranged between 1.8 and 2.7.

  16. The Franck-Hertz Experiment and the Nature of Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gearhart, Clayton

    2013-04-01

    In 1914, James Franck and Gustav Hertz published their famous experiment in which they bombarded mercury atoms with slow electrons---the latest in a series of papers seeking both to measure the ionization potentials of different elements, and to understand the implications of the new quantum theory. They found peaks in the transmitted current separated by 4.9 volts, a result they interpreted as the ionization potential. But they also noticed that this voltage corresponded to a prominent resonance line in the ultraviolet spectrum of mercury, and immediately performed a second experiment that confirmed the presence of this spectral line. They concluded---surprisingly---that their collisions sometimes resulted in ionization, but other times in the excitation of an atomic electron that vibrated and emitted light at this wavelength. In 1914, Franck and Hertz did not know of Niels Bohr's new theory, which presented something close to our modern view of the relation between spectral terms and ionization potentials. In this paper, I will ask how Franck and Hertz, and other physicists, thought about ionization in the early years of quantum theory, before the advent of the Bohr model.

  17. Gear Lubrication and Cooling Experiment and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Akin, L. S.

    1983-01-01

    A gear tooth temperature analysis was performed using a finite element method combined with a calculated heat input, a calculated oil jet impingement depth, and estimated heat transfer coefficients for the different parts of the gear tooth that are oil cooled and air cooled. Experimental measurements of gear tooth average surface temperature and gear tooth instantaneous surface temperature were made with a fast response, infrared, radiometric microscope. Increasing oil pressure has a significant effect on both average surface temperature and peak surface temperature at loads above 1895 N/cm(1083 lb/in) and speeds of 10,000 and 7500 rpm. Both increasing speed (from 5000 to 10,000 rpm) at constant speed cause a significant rise in the average surface temperature and in the instantaneous peak surface temperatures on the gear teeth. The oil jet pressure required to provide the best cooling for gears is the pressure required to obtain full gear tooth impingement. Calculated results for gear tooth temperatures were close to experimental results for various oil jet impingement depths for identical operating conditions.

  18. Experimental assessment of on-chip liquid cooling through microchannels with de-ionized water and diluted ethylene glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Yonghyun; Kim, Sungdong; Eunkyung Kim, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    Recent progress in Si IC devices, which results in an increase in power density and decrease in device size, poses various thermal challenges owing to high heat dissipation. Therefore, conventional cooling techniques become ineffective and produce a thermal bottleneck. In this study, an on-chip liquid cooling module with microchannels and through Si via (TSV) was fabricated, and cooling characteristics were evaluated by IR measurements. Both the microchannels and TSVs were fabricated in a Si wafer by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and the wafer was bonded with a glass wafer by a anodic bonding. The fabricated liquid cooling sample was evaluated using two different coolants (de-ionized water and 70 wt % diluted ethylene glycol), and the effect of coolants on cooling characteristics was investigated.

  19. Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled Neutral and Ionized PAHs: Implications for Interstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Tan, X.; Biennier, L.; Cami, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present the gas-phase spectroscopy of neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) measured in the W-Visible-NIR range in an astrophysically relevant environment. These measurements provide data on PAHs and nanometer sized particles that can now be directly compared to astronomical observations. The harsh physical conditions of the IS medium - characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong VUV radiation fields - are simulated in the laborat'ory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature ($\\sim lOO$-K). The spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs are measured using the high sensitivity methods of cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) and multiplex integrated cavity output spectroscopy (MICOS). These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of free, cold large carbon molecules and ions in the gas phase. The electronic bands measured for ionized PAH are found to be intrinsically broad ($\\geq$20 cm$^{-l}$) while the bands associated with the neutral precursors are narrower (of the order of 2 - 10 cm$^{-l}$). The laboratory data are discussed and compared with recent astronomical spectra of large and narrow DIBs and with the spectra of circumstellar environments of selected carbon stars (see contribution of Cami et al.) and the implications for the interstellar PAH population are derived. Preliminary results also show that carbon nanoparticles are formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma. This finding holds great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar grains.

  20. Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled Neutral and Ionized PAHs: Implications for Interstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Tan, X.; Biennier, L.; Cami, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present the gas-phase spectroscopy of neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) measured in the W-Visible-NIR range in an astrophysically relevant environment. These measurements provide data on PAHs and nanometer sized particles that can now be directly compared to astronomical observations. The harsh physical conditions of the IS medium - characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong VUV radiation fields - are simulated in the laborat'ory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature ($\\sim lOO$-K). The spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs are measured using the high sensitivity methods of cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) and multiplex integrated cavity output spectroscopy (MICOS). These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of free, cold large carbon molecules and ions in the gas phase. The electronic bands measured for ionized PAH are found to be intrinsically broad ($\\geq$20 cm$^{-l}$) while the bands associated with the neutral precursors are narrower (of the order of 2 - 10 cm$^{-l}$). The laboratory data are discussed and compared with recent astronomical spectra of large and narrow DIBs and with the spectra of circumstellar environments of selected carbon stars (see contribution of Cami et al.) and the implications for the interstellar PAH population are derived. Preliminary results also show that carbon nanoparticles are formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma. This finding holds great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar grains.

  1. Survey of reinjection experience from groundwater cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, M.; Lee, C.H.

    1980-09-01

    The use of groundwater for cooling applications is a common practice throughout the country wherever an adequate supply of water exists. However, the reinjection of the cooling water to water-bearing strata is not as widely practiced. The literature pertaining to reinjection of heated water is not well documented. To fulfill the need for more information, a study was conducted to identify and document at least 30 sites where reinjection of grundwater from cooling applications was being (or had been) performed. The information obtained on each site was compiled and analyzed, the site described briefly and cooling and reinjection problems characterized. The end result of this study was to establish a data base of reinjection experience based on a variety of sites around the country with different hydrogeologic characteristics and cooling systems. These data are presented.

  2. First Results from the Ionization Gauge Experiment on TOMEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmons, J. H.; Hecht, J. H.; Larsen, M. F.; Liu, A. Z.

    2001-12-01

    The Turbulent Oxygen Mixing Experiment (TOMEX) consisted of a rocket launch from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico combined with sodium lidar measurements from the Starfire Optical Range in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The rocket payload included instrumentation to measure oxygen and OH airglow using zenith-looking photometers, neutral gas fluctuations using an ionization gauge, and winds using releases of tri-methyl aluminum (TMA). The measurements were conducted over the altitude range of 90-140 km. Reported here are the first results from the ionization gauge. Several pockets of enhanced fluctuations were observed. The profiles are presented and are interpreted in terms of the ambient temperature and wind conditions as measured by the lidar and TMA trails.

  3. SR90, strontium shaped-charge critical ionization velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, Eugene M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans; Swift, Daniel W.; Valenzuela, Arnoldo; Rees, David

    1990-01-01

    In May 1986 an experiment was performed to test Alfven's critical ionization velocity (CIV) effect in free space, using the first high explosive shaped charge with a conical liner of strontium metal. The release, made at 540 km altitude at dawn twilight, was aimed at 48 deg to B. The background electron density was 1.5 x 10(exp 4) cu cm. A faint field-aligned Sr(+) ion streak with tip velocity of 2.6 km/s was observed from two optical sites. Using two calibration methods, it was calculated that between 4.5 x 10(exp 20) and 2 x 10(exp 21) ions were visible. An ionization time constant of 1920 s was calculated for Sr from the solar UV spectrum and ionization cross section which combined with a computer simulation of the injection predicts 1.7 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions in the low-velocity part of the ion streak. Thus all the observed ions are from solar UV ionization of the slow (less than critical) velocity portion of the neutral jet. The observed neutral Sr velocity distribution and computer simulations indicate that 2 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions would have been created from the fast (greater than critical) part of the jet. They would have been more diffuse, and were not observed. Using this fact it was estimated that any CIV ions created were less than 10(exp 21). It was concluded that future Sr CIV free space experiments should be conducted below the UV shadow height and in much larger background plasma density.

  4. CHAMBER - IONIZATION - EXPERIMENT - GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-6 EQUIPMENT - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-12-10

    S65-61788 (For release: 11 Dec. 1965) --- Close-up view of equipment which will be used in the D-8 (Radiation in Spacecraft) experiment on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Gemini-6 spaceflight. This experiment is designed to make highly accurate measurements of the absorbed dose rate of radiation which penetrates the Gemini spacecraft, and determine the spatial distribution of dose levels inside the spacecraft particularly in the crew area. This is experimentation of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, N.M. LOWER LEFT: The second ionization chamber, this one is unshielded. This chamber can be removed from its bracket by the astronaut who will periodically take measurements at various locations in the spacecraft. Nearby is Passive Dosimeter Unit which is one of five small packets each containing a standard pocket ionization chamber, gamma electron sensitive film, glass needles and thermo luminescent dosimeters which are mounted at various locations in the cabin. UPPER LEFT: Photo illustrates how ionization chamber can be removed from bracket for measurements. LOWER RIGHT: Shield of bulb-shaped chamber will be removed (shown in photo) as the spacecraft passes through the South Atlantic anomaly, the area where the radiation belt dips closest to Earth's surface. UPPER RIGHT: Dome-shaped object is shield covering one of two Tissue Equivalent Ionization Chambers (sensors) which will read out continuously the instantaneous rate at which dose is delivered during the flight. This chamber is mounted permanently. The information will be recorded aboard the spacecraft, and will also be received directly by ground stations. This chamber is shielded to simulate the amount of radiation the crew members are receiving beneath their skin. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  5. Design of A Microgravity Spray Cooling Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    bubbles will coalesce into a large bubble on the surface of the heater in reduced gravity. During subcooled boiling , thermocapillary flows can...flights, and in-orbit experiments. Two-phase, one-component flow with heat transfer in microgravity is seen in many thermal management systems such...to predict the behavior of, and to design, prototypes for microgravity.2 Microgravity research on pool boiling with and without subcooling has been

  6. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  7. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  8. A data acquisition system for water heating and cooling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perea Martins, J. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a simple analogue waterproof temperature probe design and its electronic interfacing with a computer to compose a data acquisition system for water temperature measurement. It also demonstrates the system usage through an experiment to verify the water heating period with an electric heater and another to verify the Newton’s law of cooling

  9. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search low ionization-threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Basu Thakur, Ritoban

    2014-01-01

    Over 80 years ago we discovered the presence of Dark Matter in our universe. Endeavors in astronomy and cosmology are in consensus with ever improving precision that Dark Matter constitutes an essential 27% of our universe. The Standard Model of Particle Physics does not provide any answers to the Dark Matter problem. It is imperative that we understand Dark Matter and discover its fundamental nature. This is because, alongside other important factors, Dark Matter is responsible for formation of structure in our universe. The very construct in which we sit is defined by its abundance. The Milky Way galaxy, hence life, wouldn't have formed if small over densities of Dark Matter had not caused sufficient accretion of stellar material. Marvelous experiments have been designed based on basic notions to directly and in-directly study Dark Matter, and the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment has been a pioneer and forerunner in the direct detection field. Generations of the CDMS experiment were designed with advanced scientific upgrades to detect Dark Matter particles of mass O(100) GeV/c2. This mass-scale was set primarily by predictions from Super Symmetry. Around 2013 the canonical SUSY predictions were losing some ground and several observations (rather hints of signals) from various experiments indicated to the possibility of lighter Dark Matter of mass O(10) GeV/c2. While the SuperCDMS experiment was probing the regular parameter space, the CDMSlite experiment was conceived to dedicatedly search for light Dark Matter using a novel technology. "CDMSlite" stands for CDMS - low ionization threshold experiment. Here we utilize a unique electron phonon coupling mechanism to measure ionization generated by scattering of light particles. Typically signals from such low energy recoils would be washed under instrumental noise. In CDMSlite via generation of Luke-Neganov phonons we can detect the small ionization energies, amplified in phonon

  10. The cryogenic dark matter search low ionization-threshold experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu Thakur, Ritoban

    Over 80 years ago we discovered the presence of Dark Matter in our universe. Endeavors in astronomy and cosmology are in consensus with ever improving precision that Dark Matter constitutes an essential 27% of our universe. The Standard Model of Particle Physics does not provide any answers to the Dark Matter problem. It is imperative that we understand Dark Matter and discover its fundamental nature. This is because, alongside other important factors, Dark Matter is responsible for formation of structure in our universe. The very construct in which we sit is defined by its abundance. The Milky Way galaxy, hence life, wouldn't have formed if small over densities of Dark Matter had not caused sufficient accretion of stellar material. Marvelous experiments have been designed based on basic notions to directly and indirectly study Dark Matter, and the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment has been a pioneer and forerunner in the direct detection field. Generations of the CDMS experiment were designed with advanced scientific upgrades to detect Dark Matter particles of mass O(100) GeV/c2. This mass-scale was set primarily by predictions from Super Symmetry. Around 2013 the canonical SUSY predictions were losing some ground and several observations (rather hints of signals) from various experiments indicated to the possibility of lighter Dark Matter of mass O(10) GeV/c2. While the SuperCDMS experiment was probing the regular parameter space, the CDMSlite experiment was conceived to dedicatedly search for light Dark Matter using a novel technology. "CDMSlite" stands for CDMS - low ionization threshold experiment. Here we utilize a unique electron phonon coupling mechanism to measure ionization generated by scattering of light particles. Typically signals from such low energy recoils would be washed under instrumental noise.In CDMSlite via generation of Luke-Neganov phonons we can detect the small ionization energies, amplified in phonon modes during charge

  11. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF H{alpha} FILAMENTS IN COOL CORE CLUSTERS: KINEMATICS, REDDENING, AND SOURCES OF IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2012-02-20

    We have obtained deep, high spatial and spectral resolution, long-slit spectra of the H{alpha} nebulae in the cool cores of nine galaxy clusters. This sample provides a wealth of information on the ionization state, kinematics, and reddening of the warm gas in the cool cores of galaxy clusters. We find evidence for only small amounts of reddening in the extended, line-emitting filaments, with the majority of filaments having E(B - V) < 0.2. We find, in agreement with previous works, that the optical emission in cool core clusters has elevated low-ionization line ratios. The combination of [O III]/H{beta}, [N II]/H{alpha}, [S II]/H{alpha}, and [O I]/H{alpha} allow us to rule out collisional ionization by cosmic rays, thermal conduction, and photoionization by intracluster medium (ICM) X-rays and active galactic nuclei as strong contributors to the ionization in the bulk of the optical line-emitting gas in both the nuclei and filaments. The data are adequately described by a composite model of slow shocks and star formation. This model is further supported by an observed correlation between the line widths and low-ionization line ratios which becomes stronger in systems with more modest star formation activity based on far-ultraviolet observations. We find that the more extended, narrow filaments tend to have shallower velocity gradients and narrower line widths than the compact filamentary complexes. We confirm that the widths of the emission lines decrease with radius, from FWHM {approx}600 km s{sup -1} in the nuclei to FWHM {approx}100 km s{sup -1} in the most extended filaments. The variation of line width with radius is vastly different than what is measured from stellar absorption lines in a typical giant elliptical galaxy, suggesting that the velocity width of the warm gas may in fact be linked to ICM turbulence and, thus, may provide a glimpse into the amount of turbulence in cool cores. In the central regions (r < 10 kpc) of several systems the warm gas

  12. Progress of the MICE experiment at RAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, M.

    2013-04-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling of a muon beam. The demonstration comprises one cell of the US Neutrino Factory Study II cooling channel. Results obtained on the construction of the beamline and its instrumentation (STEP I) will be reviewed, together with progress towards final measurements of ionization cooling (STEP IV and VI).

  13. CIV experiments on ATLAS-1. [Critical Ionization Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Burch, J. L.; Choueiri, E. Y.; Kawashima, N.

    1993-01-01

    A test of the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) theory was made with neutral xenon releases from the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators hollow cathode plasma contactor onboard the Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis during the ATLAS-1 mission. The gas velocity perpendicular to the Earth's magnetic field was essentially the orbital velocity (7.5 km/s), and thus it exceeded the CIV for xenon. The releases were observed with onboard instrumentation. A factor of 60 enhancement was seen in the Langmuir probe current. Calculations confirmed that release conditions generally satisfied criteria for CIV and predicted a maximum factor of 20 increase in plasma density. Thus, CIV effects were likely to have occurred during the ATLAS-I experiments.

  14. A Laser-Cooled Ion Source to Sympathetically Cool Positrons in the ALPHA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sameed, Muhammed; Maxwell, Daniel; Madsen, Niels

    2016-10-01

    The ALPHA experiment at CERN studies the properties of antimatter by making precision measurements on antihydrogen. Antihydrogen atoms are produced by mixing a cloud of cold antiprotons with a dense positron plasma inside a magnetic trap. The formation of antihydrogen, of which only the coldest atoms remain trapped, depends principally on the kinetic energy of the constituent plasmas. Presently, the trapping rate is approximately two atoms in a seven minute cycle. During mixing, the antiprotons thermalize in the positron plasma prior to antihydrogen production. Colder positron temperatures would therefore result in an increased fraction of trapped antihydrogen atoms in the ALPHA mixing trap. At present, the positrons used for antihydrogen production in ALPHA reach energies of about 50 K. Much colder positron plasmas may be achieved by sympathetically cooling the positrons using laser-cooled beryllium ions. Preliminary results in the development of a low flux and low energy beryllium ion source using a pulsed ablation laser are presented. Precision ablation techniques coupled with laser-cooling can subsequently be used to effectively cool positrons. A provisional design of an ablation source is also presented for installation in the ALPHA apparatus in 2017. The authors would like to thank EPSRC for supporting this research.

  15. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS, IONIZED GAS, AND MOLECULAR HYDROGEN IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES OF COOL-CORE CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, Megan; Mark Voit, G.; Hoffer, Aaron; De Messieres, Genevieve E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; McNamara, Brian R.; Nulsen, Paul E. J. E-mail: voit@pa.msu.edu

    2011-05-01

    We present measurements of 5-25 {mu}m emission features of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) with strong optical emission lines in a sample of nine cool-core clusters of galaxies observed with the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. These systems provide a view of dusty molecular gas and star formation, surrounded by dense, X-ray-emitting intracluster gas. Past work has shown that BCGs in cool-core clusters may host powerful radio sources, luminous optical emission-line systems, and excess UV, while BCGs in other clusters never show this activity. In this sample, we detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), extremely luminous, rotationally excited molecular hydrogen line emission, forbidden line emission from ionized gas ([Ne II] and [Ne III]), and infrared continuum emission from warm dust and cool stars. We show here that these BCGs exhibit more luminous forbidden neon and H{sub 2} rotational line emission than star-forming galaxies with similar total infrared luminosities, as well as somewhat higher ratios of 70 {mu}m/24 {mu}m luminosities. Our analysis suggests that while star formation processes dominate the heating of the dust and PAHs, a heating process consistent with suprathermal electron heating from the hot gas, distinct from star formation, is heating the molecular gas and contributing to the heating of the ionized gas in the galaxies. The survival of PAHs and dust suggests that dusty gas is somehow shielded from significant interaction with the X-ray gas.

  16. A Modified Cooling Method and Its Application in "Drosophila" Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qu, Wen-hui; Zhu, Tong-bo; Yang, Da-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Chilling is a cost-effective and safe method of immobilising flies in "Drosophila" experiments. However, should condensation form on the plate, it would be fatal to the flies. Here we describe a modified cooling method using reusable commercial ice pack(s) (ca. 400 ml, 2-3 cm tall) rather than crushed ice. The ice pack is covered with a…

  17. A Modified Cooling Method and Its Application in "Drosophila" Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qu, Wen-hui; Zhu, Tong-bo; Yang, Da-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Chilling is a cost-effective and safe method of immobilising flies in "Drosophila" experiments. However, should condensation form on the plate, it would be fatal to the flies. Here we describe a modified cooling method using reusable commercial ice pack(s) (ca. 400 ml, 2-3 cm tall) rather than crushed ice. The ice pack is covered with a…

  18. Summary report on four foot septifoil cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, H.W.; Collins, S.L.; Verebelyi, D.T.; Foti, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Cooling parameters for some of the SRS reactor internal components are computed using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code, TRAC.'' In order to benchmark the code, the Safety Analysis Group of SRL requested an experiment to provide measurements of cooling parameters in a well defined physical system utilizing SRS reactor component(s). The experiment selected included a short length of septifoil with both top and bottom fittings containing five simulated control rods in an unseated'' configuration. Power level to be supplied to the rods was targeted at 2.5 kilowatts per foot. The septifoil segment was to be operated with no forced flow in order to evaluate thermal-hydraulic cooling. Parameters to be measured for comparison with code predictions were basic cooling phenomena, incidence of film boiling, thermal-hydraulic flow rate, pressure rise, and ratio of heat transfer through the wall of the assembly vs heat transfer to axial water flow through the assembly. Experimental apparatus was designed and assembled incorporating five simulated control rods four feet long, joule heated inside a five foot length of type Q'' septifoil. Water at 70 C was fed independently to the bottom inlet and along the outside of the septifoil. Water flowing along the outside of the septifoil was in confined flow and provided calorimetry to measure power flow through the septifoil housing. A shadowgraph technique was developed and used to monitor unforced flow of water pumped thermal-hydraulically through the septifoil. Electrical power of 10,000 to 70,000 watts was fed to the simulated rods from a dc power supply. Computer data acquisition was accomplished using LabView'' software programmed to match the configuration of the experiment along with scanning digital voltmeters and requisite signal sensors. Video camcorders were used to provide video records of six areas of the experiment.

  19. Summary report on four foot septifoil cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, H.W.; Collins, S.L.; Verebelyi, D.T.; Foti, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Cooling parameters for some of the SRS reactor internal components are computed using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code, ``TRAC.`` In order to benchmark the code, the Safety Analysis Group of SRL requested an experiment to provide measurements of cooling parameters in a well defined physical system utilizing SRS reactor component(s). The experiment selected included a short length of septifoil with both top and bottom fittings containing five simulated control rods in an ``unseated`` configuration. Power level to be supplied to the rods was targeted at 2.5 kilowatts per foot. The septifoil segment was to be operated with no forced flow in order to evaluate thermal-hydraulic cooling. Parameters to be measured for comparison with code predictions were basic cooling phenomena, incidence of film boiling, thermal-hydraulic flow rate, pressure rise, and ratio of heat transfer through the wall of the assembly vs heat transfer to axial water flow through the assembly. Experimental apparatus was designed and assembled incorporating five simulated control rods four feet long, joule heated inside a five foot length of type ``Q`` septifoil. Water at 70 C was fed independently to the bottom inlet and along the outside of the septifoil. Water flowing along the outside of the septifoil was in confined flow and provided calorimetry to measure power flow through the septifoil housing. A shadowgraph technique was developed and used to monitor unforced flow of water pumped thermal-hydraulically through the septifoil. Electrical power of 10,000 to 70,000 watts was fed to the simulated rods from a dc power supply. Computer data acquisition was accomplished using ``LabView`` software programmed to match the configuration of the experiment along with scanning digital voltmeters and requisite signal sensors. Video camcorders were used to provide video records of six areas of the experiment.

  20. Threshold ionization spectroscopic investigation of supersonic jet-cooled, laser-desorbed Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taherkhani, Mehran; Armentano, Antonio; Černý, Jiří; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) was studied by two-colour Photoionization Efficiency (PIE) and Mass Analysed Threshold Ionization (MATI) spectroscopy using a laser desorption apparatus. Conformer A of Trp was excited into the S1 state (34,878 cm-1) and the second laser was scanned around the D0 cation ground and the D1 excited state. No ionization signal into the D0 state could be found, but a clear threshold was observed for the D1 state with an ionization energy of 66,704 ± 3 cm-1 (8.27 eV). This observation is explained in terms of the electronic configurations of the S1 and cationic states.

  1. Fundamental heat transfer experiments of heat pipes for turbine cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Yamawaki, S.; Yoshida, T.; Taki, M.; Mimura, F.

    1998-07-01

    Fundamental heat transfer experiments were carried out for three kinds of heat pipes that may be applied to turbine cooling in future aero-engines. In the turbine cooling system with a heat pipe, heat transfer rate and start-up time of the heat pipe are the most important performance criteria to evaluate and compare with conventional cooling methods. Three heat pipes are considered, called heat pipe A, B, and C, respectively. All heat pipes have a stainless steel shell and nickel sintered powder metal wick. Sodium (Na) was the working fluid for heat pipes A and B; heat pipe C used eutectic sodium-potassium (NaK). Heat pipes B and C included noncondensible gas for rapid start-up. There were fins on the cooling section of heat pipes. In the experiments, an infrared image furnace supplied heat to the heat pipe simulating turbine blade surface conditions. In the results, heat pipe B demonstrated the highest heat flux of 17 to 20 W/cm{sup 2}. The start-up time was about 6 minutes for heat pipe B and about 6 minutes for heat pipe A. Thus, adding noncondensible gas effectively reduced start-up time. Although NaK is a liquid phase at room temperature, the start-up time of heat pipe C (about 7 to 8 minutes) was not shorter than the heat pipe B. The effect of a gravitational force on heat pipe performance was also estimated by inclining the heat pipe at an angle of 90 deg. There was no significant gravitational dependence on heat transport for heat pipes including noncondensible gas.

  2. RF ACCELERATING STRUCTURE FOR THE MUON COOLING EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT,J.; GREEN,M.; LI,D.; HOLTKAMP,N.; MORETTI,A.; KIRK,H.G.; PALMER,R.B.; ZHAO,Y.; SUMMERS,D.

    1999-03-29

    The ionization cooling of muons requires longitudinal acceleration of the muons after scattering in a hydrogen target. In order to maximize the accelerating voltage, we propose using linear accelerating structures with cells bounded by thin beryllium metal foils. This produces an on-axis field equivalent to the maximum surface field, whereas with beam-pipes the accelerating field is approximately half that of the peak surface field in the cavity. The muons interact only weakly with the thin foils. A {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure has been chosen, with alternate cells coupled together externally, and the two groups of cells fed in quadrature. At present they are considering an operating temperature of 77K to gain a factor of at least two in Q-value over room temperature. The authors describe the design of the {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure, design of an alternative {pi}-mode open structure, preliminary experimental results from a low-power test cavity, and plans for high-power testing.

  3. Cooling of 3D Granular Gases: Experiments in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, Kirsten; Wegner, Sandra; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    Granular gases are ensembles of macroscopic grains, which move randomly and interact through inelastic collisions. This non-equilibrium statistical system is easy to picture, but still insufficiently understood. Numerous theoretical treatments have been performed, favorably with spherical grains and periodic boundaries, starting from a homogeneous state. Experimentally, such a gas in 3D can only be realized with strong external forcing or in microgravity. We have recently demonstrated that the use of elongated grains facilitates the realization of 3D experiments beyond the Knudsen regime (1). Main findings in a sounding rocket experiment were non-Gaussian velocity distributions and a violation of the equipartition of kinetic energy in the steady state. Rotational degrees of freedom are under-excited. When the excitation is stopped, energy is dissipated, the granular gas is ''cooling''. We present the first quantitative study of the cooling of a granular gas, based on a 3D data evaluation, from drop tower experiments. The evolution of the kinetic energy in translational and rotational degrees of freedom is compared to Haff's law and recent numerical studies. Additionally, we analyze velocity and density distributions.(1) K. Harth et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 144102 (2013) This research was funded by German Aerospace Center DLR Grants 50WM1241 and 50WB1344 and by DFG Grant STA-425/34-1.

  4. Experiments on electron-impact excitation and ionization of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Phaneuf, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The present review covers some of the fundamental aspects of electron-impact ionization. Highlights are described of some of the important experimental results which have been produced since 1981. (MOW)

  5. Heat Transfer Experiments in the Internal Cooling Passages of a Cooled Radial Turbine Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Wagner, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted (1) to experimentally measure, assess and analyze the heat transfer within the internal cooling configuration of a radial turbine rotor blade and (2) to obtain heat transfer data to evaluate and improve computational fluid dynamics (CFD) procedures and turbulent transport models of internal coolant flows. A 1.15 times scale model of the coolant passages within the NASA LERC High Temperature Radial Turbine was designed, fabricated of Lucite and instrumented for transient beat transfer tests using thin film surface thermocouples and liquid crystals to indicate temperatures. Transient heat transfer tests were conducted for Reynolds numbers of one-fourth, one-half, and equal to the operating Reynolds number for the NASA Turbine. Tests were conducted for stationary and rotating conditions with rotation numbers in the range occurring in the NASA Turbine. Results from the experiments showed the heat transfer characteristics within the coolant passage were affected by rotation. In general, the heat transfer increased and decreased on the sides of the straight radial passages with rotation as previously reported from NASA-HOST-sponsored experiments. The heat transfer in the tri-passage axial flow region adjacent to the blade exit was relatively unaffected by rotation. However, the heat transfer on one surface, in the transitional region between the radial inflow passage and axial, constant radius passages, decreased to approximately 20 percent of the values without rotation. Comparisons with previous 3-D numerical studies indicated regions where the heat transfer characteristics agreed and disagreed with the present experiment.

  6. Bent solenoid simulations for the muon cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.M.; Kenney, S.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.

    1999-07-09

    The muon collider captures pions using solenoidal fields. The pion are converted to muons as they are bunched in an RF phase rotation system. Solenoids are used to focus the muons as their emitance is reduced during cooling. Bent solenoids are used to sort muons by momentum. This report describes a bent solenoid system that is part of a proposed muon cooling experiment. The superconducting solenoid described in this report consists of a straight solenoid that is 1.8 m long, a bent solenoid that is 1.0 m to 1.3 m long and a second straight solenoid that is 2.6 m long. The bent solenoid bends the muons over an angle of 57.3 degrees (1 radian). The bent solenoid has a minor coil radius (to the center of the coil) that is 0.24 m and a major radius (of the solenoid axis) of 1.0 m. The central induction along the axis is 3.0 T There is a dipole that generates an induction of 0.51 T, perpendicular to the plane of the bend, when the induction on the bent solenoid axis is 3.0 T.

  7. The cryogenic helium cooling system for the Tokamak physics experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, B.; Slack, D.S.; Wendland, C.R.

    1995-09-29

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will use supercritical helium to cool all the magnets and supply helium to the Vacuum cryopumping subsystem. The heat loads will come from the standard steady state conduction and thermal radiation sources and from the pulsed loads of the nuclear and eddy currents caused by the Central Solenoid Coils and the plasma positioning coils. The operations of the TPX will begin with pulses of up to 1000 seconds in duration every 75 minutes. The helium system utilizes a pulse load leveling scheme to buffer out the effects of the pulse load and maintain a constant cryogenic plant operation. The pulse load leveling scheme utilizes the thermal mass of liquid and gaseous helium stored in a remote dewar to absorb the pulses of the tokamak loads. The mass of the stored helium will buffer out the temperature pulses allowing 5 K helium to be delivered to the magnets throughout the length of the pulse. The temperature of the dewar will remain below 5 K with all the energy of the pulse absorbed. This paper will present the details of the heat load sources, of the pulse load leveling scheme operations, a partial helium schematic, dewar temperature as a function of time, the heat load sources as a function of time and the helium temperature as a function of length along the various components that will be cooled.

  8. Cooling water for SSC experiments: Supplemental Conceptual Design Report (SCDR)

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, R.E.

    1989-10-20

    This paper discusses the following topics on cooling water design on the superconducting super collider; low conductivity water; industrial cooling water; chilled water systems; and radioactive water systems. (LSP)

  9. Epicyclic Twin-helix Magnetic Structure for Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

    2010-05-01

    Para­met­ric-res­o­nance Ion­iza­tion Cool­ing (PIC) is en­vi­sioned as the final 6D cool­ing stage of a high-lu­mi­nos­i­ty muon col­lid­er. Im­ple­ment­ing PIC im­pos­es strin­gent con­straints on the cool­ing chan­nel's mag­net­ic op­tics de­sign. This paper pre­sents a lin­ear op­tics so­lu­tion com­pat­i­ble with PIC. Our so­lu­tion con­sists of a su­per­po­si­tion of two op­po­site-he­lic­i­ty equal-pe­ri­od and equal-strength he­li­cal dipole har­mon­ics and a straight nor­mal quadrupole. We demon­strate that such a sys­tem can be ad­just­ed to meet all of the PIC lin­ear op­tics re­quire­ments while re­tain­ing large ac­cep­tance.

  10. Fuel assembly cooling experience at the FFTF IEM cell

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, P.W.

    1985-11-01

    To date, 13 fuel assemblies requiring forced cooling have been processed through the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) interim examination and maintenance (IEM) cell. Of these, two assemblies experienced overtemperature conditions due to inadequate forced cooling. Both of the occurrences have contributed significantly to the process of learning how to operate a fuel assembly cooling system remotely in an argon atmosphere hot cell. Many innovations have been made to the cooling system to enhance safety and increase productivity, and are briefly described.

  11. Superconducting helical solenoid systems for muon cooling experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir S.; Andreev, Nikolai; Johnson, Rolland P.; Kashikhin, Vadim V.; Lamm, Michael J.; Romanov, Gennady; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zlobin, Alexander V.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    Novel configurations of superconducting magnet system for Muon Beam Cooling Experiment is under design at Fermilab. The magnet system has to generate longitudinal and transverse dipole and quadrupole helical magnetic fields providing a muon beam motion along helical orbit. It was found that such complicated field configuration can be formed by a set of circular coils shifted in transverse directions in such a way that their centers lay on the center of the helical beam orbit. Closed beam orbit configurations were also proposed and investigated. This paper describes the magnetic and mechanical designs and parameters of such magnetic system based on a NbTi Rutherford type cable. The helical solenoid fabrication, assembly and quench protection issues are presented.

  12. Cooling System for the Merit High-Power Target Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, F.; Pereira, H.; Silva, P.; Pezzetti, M.; Pavlov, O.; Pirotte, O.; Metselaar, J.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Lettry, J.; Kirk, H. G.; McDonald, K. T.; Titus, P.; Bennett, J. R. J.

    2010-04-01

    MERIT is a proof-of-principle experiment of a target station suitable as source for future muon colliders or neutrino factories. When installed at the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) PS (Proton Synchrotron) complex fast-extracted high-intensity proton beams intercepted a free mercury jet inside a normal-conducting, pulsed 15-T capture solenoid magnet cooled with liquid nitrogen. Up to 25 MJ of Joule heat was dissipated in the magnet during a pulse. The fully automated, remotely controlled cryogenic system of novel design permitted the transfer of nitrogen by the sole means of differential pressures inside the vessels. This fast cycling system permitted several hundred tests in less than three weeks during the 2007 data taking campaign.

  13. IONIZED ABSORBERS AS EVIDENCE FOR SUPERNOVA-DRIVEN COOLING OF THE LOWER GALACTIC CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Fraternali, Filippo; Marasco, Antonino; Binney, James

    2013-02-20

    We show that the ultraviolet absorption features, newly discovered in Hubble Space Telescope spectra, are consistent with being formed in a layer that extends a few kpc above the disk of the Milky Way. In this interface between the disk and the Galactic corona, high-metallicity gas ejected from the disk by supernova feedback can mix efficiently with the virial-temperature coronal material. The mixing process triggers the cooling of the lower corona down to temperatures encompassing the characteristic range of the observed absorption features, producing a net supernova-driven gas accretion onto the disk at a rate of a few M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We speculate that this mechanism explains how the hot mode of cosmological accretion feeds star formation in galactic disks.

  14. Fuel assembly cooling experience at the FFTF/IEM cell

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    In the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), sodium wetted irradiated fuel assemblies are discharged to the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell for disassembly and post-irradiation examination in an inert argon atmosphere. While in the IEM Cell, fuel assemblies are cooled by the IEM Cell Subassembly Cooling System. This paper describes the cooling system design, performance, and lessons learned, including a discussion of two overtemperature incidents. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  15. First-Principles Investigation to Ionization of Argon Under Conditions Close to Typical Sonoluminescence Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wei; Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Q. F.; He, Xian-Tu

    2016-01-01

    Mott effect, featured by a sharp increase of ionization, is one of the unique properties of partially ionized plasmas, and thus of great interest to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Recent experiments of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) revealed that strong ionization took place at a density two orders lower than usual theoretical expectation. We show from the perspective of electronic structures that the strong ionization is unlikely the result of Mott effect in a pure argon plasma. Instead, first-principles calculations suggest that other ion species from aqueous environments can energetically fit in the gap between the continuum and the top of occupied states of argon, making the Mott effect possible. These results would help to clarify the relationship between SBSL and Mott effect, and further to gain an better understanding of partially ionized plasmas. PMID:26853107

  16. First-Principles Investigation to Ionization of Argon Under Conditions Close to Typical Sonoluminescence Experiments.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wei; Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Q F; He, Xian-Tu

    2016-02-08

    Mott effect, featured by a sharp increase of ionization, is one of the unique properties of partially ionized plasmas, and thus of great interest to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Recent experiments of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) revealed that strong ionization took place at a density two orders lower than usual theoretical expectation. We show from the perspective of electronic structures that the strong ionization is unlikely the result of Mott effect in a pure argon plasma. Instead, first-principles calculations suggest that other ion species from aqueous environments can energetically fit in the gap between the continuum and the top of occupied states of argon, making the Mott effect possible. These results would help to clarify the relationship between SBSL and Mott effect, and further to gain an better understanding of partially ionized plasmas.

  17. Simulations of laser propagation and ionization in l'OASIS experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, D.A.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Leemans, W.; Esarey, E.; Catravas, P.; Toth, C.; Shadwick, B.; Cary, J.R.; Giacone, R.

    2002-06-30

    We have conducted particle-in-cell simulations of laser pulse propagation through neutral He, including the effects of tunneling ionization, within the parameter regime of the l'OASIS experiments [1,2] at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The simulations show the theoretically predicted [3] blue shifting of the laser frequency at the leading edge of the pulse. The observed blue shifting is in good agreement with the experimental data. These results indicate that such computations can be used to accurately simulate a number of important effects related to tunneling ionization for laser-plasma accelerator concepts, such as steepening due to ionization-induced pump depletion, which can seed and enhance instabilities. Our simulations show self-modulation occurring earlier when tunneling ionization is included then for a pre-ionized plasma.

  18. Ghost peaks observed after atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization experiments may disclose new ionization mechanism of matrix-assisted hypersonic velocity impact ionization.

    PubMed

    Moskovets, Eugene

    2015-08-30

    Understanding the mechanisms of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) promises improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of many established applications in the field of mass spectrometry. This paper reports a serendipitous observation of a significant ion yield in a post-ionization experiment conducted after the sample had been removed from a standard atmospheric pressure (AP)-MALDI source. This post-ionization is interpreted in terms of collisions of microparticles moving with a hypersonic velocity into a solid surface. Calculations show that the thermal energy released during such collisions is close to that absorbed by the top matrix layer in traditional MALDI. The microparticles, containing both the matrix and analytes, could be detached from a film produced inside the inlet capillary during the sample ablation and accelerated by the flow rushing through the capillary. These observations contribute some new perspective to ion formation in both laser and laser-less matrix-assisted ionization. An AP-MALDI ion source hyphenated with a three-stage high-pressure ion funnel system was utilized for peptide mass analysis. After the laser had been turned off and the MALDI sample removed, ions were detected during a gradual reduction of the background pressure in the first funnel. The constant-rate pressure reduction led to the reproducible appearance of different singly and doubly charged peptide peaks in mass spectra taken a few seconds after the end of the MALDI analysis of a dried-droplet spot. The ion yield as well as the mass range of ions observed with a significant delay after a completion of the primary MALDI analysis depended primarily on the background pressure inside the first funnel. The production of ions in this post-ionization step was exclusively observed during the pressure drop. A lower matrix background and significant increase in relative yield of double-protonated ions are reported. The observations were partially consistent

  19. Cavity Cooling of Nanoparticles: Towards Matter-Wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millen, James; Kuhn, Stefan; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Levitated systems are a fascinating addition to the world of optically-controlled mechanical resonators. It is predicted that nanoparticles can be cooled to their c.o.m. ground state via the interaction with an optical cavity. By freeing the oscillator from clamping forces dissipation and decoherence is greatly reduced, leading to the potential to produce long-lived, macroscopically spread, mechanical quantum states, allowing tests of collapse models and any mass limit of quantum physics. Reaching the low pressures required to cavity-cool to the ground state has proved challenging. Our approach is to cavity cool a beam of nanoparticles in high vacuum. We can cool the c.o.m. motion of nanospheres a few hundred nanometers in size. Looking forward, we will utilize novel microcavities to enhance optomechanical cooling, preparing particles in a coherent beam ideally suited to ultra-high mass interferometry at 107 a.m.u.

  20. Bent Superconducting Solenoids for the Muon Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenney, S.; Miller, J. R.; Prestemon, S.; Wang, S.T.

    1999-03-18

    This report describes some solenoid design work done for the cooling experiment for the muon collider collaboration. This report describes an analysis section of superconducting solenoids that have a center line induction of 3.0 T. The section is bent in the shape of an S. Each bend in the S bends the muon beam one radian (57.3 degrees). The warm bore diameter of the solenoid bent solenoid is 300 to 320 mm. The radius of the bend at the solenoid center line is 1000 mm. This report shows the results of three dimensional field calculations and presents a solenoid design that will include four TPC detectors that are 240 mm in diameter and 550 mm long as well as a 1300 mm long section of 1300 MHz RF cavities. The TPC sections need a solenoid wann bore diameter of about 300 320 mm while RF cavities require a warm bore diameter of 440 mm. The superconducting solenoid design must take into account the varying warm bore diameter requirements for the magnet string yet meet the stringent solenoidal field uniformity requirements within the active volume of the four TPCs.

  1. Rod Bundle Heat Transfer: Steady-State Steam Cooling Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Spring, J.P.; McLaughlin, D.M.

    2006-07-01

    Through the joint efforts of the Pennsylvania State University and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, an experimental rod bundle heat transfer (RBHT) facility was designed and built. The rod bundle consists of a 7 x 7 square pitch array with spacer grids and geometry similar to that found in a modern pressurized water reactor. From this facility, a series of steady-state steam cooling experiments were performed. The bundle inlet Reynolds number was varied from 1 400 to 30 000 over a pressure range from 1.36 to 4 bars (20 to 60 psia). The bundle inlet steam temperature was controlled to be at saturation for the specified pressure and the fluid exit temperature exceeded 550 deg. C in the highest power tests. One important quantity of interest is the local convective heat transfer coefficient defined in terms of the local bulk mean temperature of the flow, local wall temperature, and heat flux. Steam temperatures were measured at the center of selected subchannels along the length of the bundle by traversing miniaturized thermocouples. Using an analogy between momentum and energy transport, a method was developed for relating the local subchannel centerline temperature measurement to the local bulk mean temperature. Wall temperatures were measured using internal thermocouples strategically placed along the length of each rod and the local wall heat flux was obtained from an inverse conduction program. The local heat transfer coefficient was calculated from the data at each rod thermocouple location. The local heat transfer coefficients calculated for locations where the flow was fully developed were compared against several published correlations. The Weisman and El-Genk correlations were found to agree best with the RBHT steam cooling data, especially over the range of turbulent Reynolds numbers. The effect of spacer grids on the heat transfer enhancement was also determined from instrumentation placed downstream of the spacer grid locations. The local

  2. Methods of beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    Diverse methods which are available for particle beam cooling are reviewed. They consist of some highly developed techniques such as radiation damping, electron cooling, stochastic cooling and the more recently developed, laser cooling. Methods which have been theoretically developed, but not yet achieved experimentally, are also reviewed. They consist of ionization cooling, laser cooling in three dimensions and stimulated radiation cooling.

  3. Cooling of 3D granular gases in microgravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, Kirsten; Trittel, Torsten; Wegner, Sandra; Stannarius, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    Granular gases are a most peculiar state, superficially similar to molecular gases: They are loose ensembles of moving grains, rarely interacting with each other and with container walls. The most investigated scenario is the "granular cooling", the collective loss of energy from an initially excited state. We present an experimental study of the cooling of a 3D granular gas of rodlike grains in micro-gravity. Driven steady states of non-spherical grains are characterized by a lack of energy equipartition between the degrees of freedom of translation and rotation. Excitation by vibrating walls additionally introduces strong gradients in the direction and magnitude of translational velocities. We show that the degrees of freedom equilibrate during granular cooling in the homogeneous cooling state. The energy loss follows a t-2 scaling. In addition, the alignment of the rod axes with the excitation direction and with the instantaneous velocities are altered during this process.

  4. Ghost peaks observed after AP-MALDI experiment may disclose new ionization mechanism of matrix assisted hypersonic velocity impact ionization

    PubMed Central

    Moskovets, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE Understanding the mechanisms of MALDI promises improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of many established applications in the field of mass spectrometry. This paper reports a serendipitous observation of a significant ion yield in a post-ionization experiment conducted after the sample has been removed from a standard atmospheric pressure (AP)-MALDI source. This post-ionization is interpreted in terms of collisions of microparticles moving with a hypersonic velocity into a solid surface. Calculations show that the thermal energy released during such collisions is close to that absorbed by the top matrix layer in traditional MALDI. The microparticles, containing both the matrix and analytes, could be detached from a film produced inside the inlet capillary during the sample ablation and accelerated by the flow rushing through the capillary. These observations contribute some new perspective to ion formation in both laser and laserless matrix-assisted ionization. METHODS An AP-MALDI ion source hyphenated with a three-stage high-pressure ion funnel system was utilized for peptide mass analysis. After the laser was turned off and MALDI sample was removed, ions were detected during a gradual reduction of the background pressure in the first funnel. The constant-rate pressure reduction led to the reproducible appearance of different singly- and doubly-charged peptide peaks in mass spectra taken a few seconds after the end of the MALDI analysis of a dried-droplet spot. RESULTS The ion yield as well as the mass range of ions observed with a significant delay after a completion of the primary MALDI analysis depended primarily on the background pressure inside the first funnel. The production of ions in this post-ionization step was exclusively observed during the pressure drop. A lower matrix background and significant increase in relative yield of double-protonated ions are reported. CONCLUSIONS The observations were partially consistent with a model of

  5. Miniature metastable ionization detectors for exobiology flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    The Metastable Ionization Detector (MID) is three orders of magnitude more sensitive than the thermal conductivity detectors used on previous flight instruments. The miniature MID provides scientists with a much smaller and highly sensitive detector for flight gas chromatographs. A miniature MID featuring an unconventional triaxial electrode configuration was developed and used routinely in the laboratory. Although much smaller and lighter than the commercial MID, its performance characteristics parallel those of the traditional design. The detector is compatible with the modulated voltage circuitry, also developed here, and thus can perform over an expanded response range of more than 7 orders magnitude. A micro volume version of a miniature MID, with an internal volume of less than 8 microliter, was recently designed is now being tested. The micro volume MID uses carrier gas flow rates of approx. 2cc/min thus eliminating the need for makeup gas when capillary columns are used.

  6. Simulation of ionization effects for high-density positron drivers in future plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, D.L.; Dimitrov, D.A.; Cary, J.R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-05-12

    The plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) concept has been proposed as a potential energy doubler for present or future electron-positron colliders. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the self-fields of the required electron beam driver can tunnel ionize neutral Li, leading to plasma wake dynamics differing significantly from that of a preionized plasma. It has also been shown, for the case of a preionized plasma, that the plasma wake of a positron driver differs strongly from that of an electron driver. We will present new PIC simulations, using the OOPIC code, showing the effects of tunneling ionization on the plasma wake generated by high-density positron drivers. The results will be compared to previous work on electron drivers with tunneling ionization and positron drivers without ionization. Parameters relevant to the energy doubler and the upcoming E-164x experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center will be considered.

  7. Cooling Rates of Humans in Air and in Water: An Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohren, Craig F.

    2012-12-01

    In a previous article I analyzed in detail the physical factors resulting in greater cooling rates of objects in still water than in still air, emphasizing cooling of the human body. By cooling rate I mean the rate of decrease of core temperature uncompensated by metabolism. I concluded that the "correct ratio for humans is closer to 2 than to 10." To support this assertion I subsequently did experiments, which I report following a digression on hypothermia.

  8. Chernobyl experience: biological indicators of exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Baranov, A E; Guskova, A K; Nadejina, N M; Nugis VYu

    1995-05-01

    Using the Chernobyl accident as an example, an attempt is made to consider the possibility of using the biological markers of exposure and effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in relation to biology dosimetry, and to predict early and late nonstochastic and stochastic radiation consequences. The biological dosimetry was based on the three markers: chromosome aberrations of peripheral blood lymphocytes, dynamics of blood cell (lymphocytes, neutrophils) counts and electron spin resonance (ESR) of tooth enamel. The first two methods can be applied in a short period of time (days or weeks) after exposure and only after high doses (> 0.5-1 Gy) of acute total body irradiation (TBI). The ESR tooth enamel method possesses dosimetric value at all conditions of uniform gamma TBI (acute, prolonged, chronic and high as well as low level of doses) and at any time after exposure. The low limit of sensitivity of the ESR test is about 0.1 Gy. The use of biological markers of effects of radiation exposure as early diagnostic signs was limited to clinical significant disorders of hemopoietic, immune systems and skin in conditions of acute high-dose irradiation. In cases of acute or prolonged irradiation in low doses, many changes on the cellular as well as organism level were discovered. However, there were not enough data on radiation specificity or dose dependence of these changes. Hence they cannot be considered as the indicators of clinically significant early and late nonstochastic effects. The role of biological markers of stochastic effects in clinical practice is discussed herein.

  9. Blast furnace lining and cooling technology: experiences at Corus IJmuiden

    SciTech Connect

    Stokman, R.; van Stein Cellenfels, E.; van Laar, R.

    2004-11-01

    This article describes the blast furnace lining and cooling concept as originally developed and applied by Hoogovens (Corus IJmuiden). The technology has also been applied by Danieli Corus in all its blast furnace projects executed in the last 25 years. The technology has helped Corus increase its PCI rate to over 200 kg/thm. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Ionization thresholds of small carbon clusters: tunable VUV experiments and theory.

    PubMed

    Belau, Leonid; Wheeler, Steven E; Ticknor, Brian W; Ahmed, Musahid; Leone, Stephen R; Allen, Wesley D; Schaefer, Henry F; Duncan, Michael A

    2007-08-22

    Small carbon clusters (Cn, n = 2-15) are produced in a molecular beam by pulsed laser vaporization and studied with vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry. The required VUV radiation in the 8-12 eV range is provided by the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Mass spectra at various ionization energies reveal the qualitative relative abundances of the neutral carbon clusters produced. By far the most abundant species is C3. Using the tunability of the ALS, ionization threshold spectra are recorded for the clusters up to 15 atoms in size. The ionization thresholds are compared to those measured previously with charge-transfer bracketing methods. To interpret the ionization thresholds for different cluster sizes, new ab initio calculations are carried out on the clusters for n = 4-10. Geometric structures are optimized at the CCSD(T) level with cc-pVTZ (or cc-pVDZ) basis sets, and focal point extrapolations are applied to both neutral and cation species to determine adiabatic and vertical ionization potentials. The comparison of computed and measured ionization potentials makes it possible to investigate the isomeric structures of the neutral clusters produced in this experiment. The measurements are inconclusive for the n = 4-6 species because of unquenched excited electronic states. However, the data provide evidence for the prominence of linear structures for the n = 7, 9, 11, 13 species and the presence of cyclic C10.

  11. Cool in the Kitchen: Radiation, Conduction, and the Newton "Hot Block" Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Mark P.; Silverman, Christopher R.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the history of the development of Newton's Law of Cooling. Describes an experiment conducted in the kitchen that is designed to test the rate of cooling of a hot block of iron. Finds that Newton's law does not represent very well the mechanism of heat loss. (Contains over 10 references.) (WRM)

  12. Interpretation of the electric fields measured in an ionospheric critical ionization velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenning, N.; Faelthammar, C.-G.; Marklund, G.; Haerendel, G.; Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R.

    1991-01-01

    The quasi-dc electric fields measured in the CRIT I ionospheric release experiment are studied. In the experiment, two identical barium shaped charges were fired toward a main payload, and three-dimensional measurements of the electric field inside the streams were made. The relevance of proposed mechanisms for electron heating in the critical ionization velocity (CIV) mechanism is addressed. It is concluded that both the 'homogeneous' and the 'ionizing front' models probably are valid, but in different parts of the streams. It is also possible that electrons are directly accelerated by a magnetic field-aligned component of the electric field. The coupling between the ambient ionosphere and the ionized barium stream is more complicated that is usually assumed in CIV theories, with strong magnetic-field-aligned electric fields and probably current limitation as important processes.

  13. Atomic physics experiments with stored cooled heavy ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, S.

    1986-01-01

    The wide ranging interest in the development of heavy ion synchrotrons with electron beam cooling is evident from the number of projects presently under way. Although much of the initial motivation for these rings stemmed from nuclear and particle physics, a considerable amount of atomic physics experimentation is planned. This paper surveys some of the new opportunities in atomic physics which may be made available with storage ring systems. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. SRF photoinjector for proof-of-principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kayran D.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; et al

    2012-05-20

    Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) based on Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier promises to be a very good way to cool protons and ions at high energies. A proof of principle experiment to demonstrate cooling at 40 GeV/u is under construction at BNL. One of possible sources to provide sufficient quality electron beam for this experiment is a SRF photoinjector. In this paper we discuss design and simulated performance of the photoinjector based on existing 112 MHz SRF gun and newly designed single-cavity SRF linac operating at 704 MHz.

  15. Cooling crystallization experiments observed by in situ scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipp, S.; Lacmann, R.

    1996-03-01

    The change in surface morphology of potassium nitrate and potassium alum has been studied in situ by means of scanning force microscopy. The supersaturation and undersaturation were varied in a cooling crystallizer under flow conditions. To keep the crystal growth rate of potassium nitrate low, the specific additive DOW FAX 3B2 had been used in different concentrations. The crystal growth rate of both systems could be determined and the growth and dissolution surface morphologies of potassium alum exhibited structures similar to those of microscopic measurements.

  16. Ionization rates relevant to laser cooling of hydrogen. Final report, 1 August 1987-31 January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, R.S.

    1988-06-01

    Laser cooling of atomic hydrogen has practical importance is a wide variety of applications ranging from relativistic neutral-particle beam weapons to atomic clocks and exotic fuels. A laser beam suitable for atomic hydrogen cooling needs to be high-intensity, narrow-band, coherent, and broadly tunable in the region around Lyman-alpha (1216 A). The author produced a source meeting these criteria. He studied, characterized, and optimized this source for conditions important to laser cooling. In an introductory section, he discusses the physics and potential practical applications of laser cooling and tunable VUV sources. Specific results obtained during the six months of this contract.

  17. Coupling thin-layer chromatography with vibrational cooling matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry for the analysis of ganglioside mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ivleva, Vera B; Elkin, Yuri N; Budnik, Bogdan A; Moyer, Susanne C; O'Connor, Peter B; Costello, Catherine E

    2004-11-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC), which is widely used for separation of glycolipids, oligosaccharides, lipids, and compounds of environmental and pharmaceutical interest, can be readily coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometers, but this arrangement usually compromises mass spectral resolution due to the irregularity of the TLC surface. However, TLC can be coupled to an external ion source MALDI-Fourier transform (FT) MS instrument without compromising mass accuracy and resolution of the spectra. Furthermore, when the FTMS has a vibrationally cooled MALDI ion source, fragile glycolipids can be desorbed from TLC plates without fragmentation, even to the point that desorption of intact molecules from "hot"matrixes such as alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid is possible. In this work, whole brain gangliosides are separated using TLC; the TLC plates are attached directly to the MALDI target, where the gangliosides are desorbed, ionized, and detected in the FTMS with >70 000 resolving power.

  18. A high-performance matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer with collisional cooling.

    PubMed

    Loboda, A V; Ackloo, S; Chernushevich, I V

    2003-01-01

    A high-performance orthogonal time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer was developed specifically for use in combination with a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) source. The MALDI source features an ionization region containing a buffer gas with variable pressure. The source is interfaced to the TOF section via a collisional focusing ion guide. The pressure in the source influences the rate of cooling and allows control of ion fragmentation. The instrument provides uniform resolution up to 18,000 FWHM (full width at half maximum). Mass accuracy routinely achieved with a single-point internal recalibration is below 2 ppm for protein digest samples. The instrument is also capable of recording spectra of samples containing compounds with a broad range of masses while using one set of experimental conditions and without compromising resolution or mass accuracy.

  19. Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization and Uv-Uv Hole-Burning Spectroscopic Studies of Jet-Cooled Acetanilide Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ceol Joo; Min, Ahreum; Ahn, Ahreum; Lee, Seung Jun; Choi, Myong Yong; Kim, Seong Keun

    2013-06-01

    Conformational investigations and photochemistry of jet-cooled methacetine (MA) and phenacetine (PA) using one color resonant two-photon ionization (REMPI), UV-UV hole-burning and IR-dip spectroscopy are presented. MA and PA are derivatives of acetanilide, substituted by methoxyl, ethoxyl group in the para position of acetanilide, respectively. Moreover, we have investigated conformational information of the acetanilide derivatives (AAP, MA and PA)-water. In this work, we will present and discuss the solvent effects of the hydroxyl group of acetanilide derivatives in the excited state.

  20. Effect of ion radiative cooling on Jeans instability of partially ionized dusty plasma with dust charge fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prerana; Patidar, Archana

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of ion radiative cooling on the gravitational instability of dusty plasma is studied, incorporating dust charge fluctuation with dust-neutral, neutral-ion, and ion-neutral collisions. The basic equations are linearized using normal mode analysis to obtain a general dispersion relation. The general dispersion relation is analytically and numerically discussed to explain the role of ion radiative cooling in the structure formation through gravitational instability. The Jeans collapse criteria are found to be modified due to ion and electron radiative cooling, dust charge fluctuations, and collisions effects. It is determined from the analytical and numerical calculations that the support of radiative cooling of ions drives thermal fluctuations and gives instability to the system. The electron cooling effect remains dominating over ion cooling effect, and thus, it enhances the collapse more efficiently than ion cooling effect. Although the radiative cooling is slow, it may precede the collapse in molecular cloud, which further leads to the structure formation. The present work is relevance for the structure formation in the molecular cloud.

  1. Profit from latest experience with air-cooled condensers

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, R.

    1994-06-01

    This article examines the project design and development benefits of air-cooled technology (AC) condenser. Plant operators must understand and prepare for seasonal challenges, among others, if it is to continue being a long-term performance asset. Inability to hold condenser vacuum during hot weather can significantly lower plant efficiency and capacity and may even lead to forced outages. When summer ends and winter blows in, freezing problems can shut down a fully loaded plant within hours, and, if tubes are ruptured, can keep that plant down for weeks. Mechanical and electrical problems might also be introduced by the massive size or sheer number of fans and gear boxes. Even if the system is running well, AC condensers may exact an operations and maintenance (O M) toll in cleaning heat-exchanger surfaces or monitoring air leakage into the condenser tubes. Both the performance and the O M challenges can have a particularly significant impact on peaking-type facilities.

  2. Charge exchange contamination of CRIT-II barium CIV experiment. [critical ionization velocity in ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Meyerott, R. E.; Rairden, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments have been recently performed which attempted to confirm critical ionization velocity (CIV) ionization by deploying chemicals at high velocity in the ionosphere. Specifically, the CRIT-II rocket performed a barium release in the ionosphere, where observations of Ba(+) resonant emissions following the release are believed to have resulted from the CIV process. Calculations are presented which suggest a significant fraction (if not all) of the Ba(+) observed likely resulted from charge exchange with the thermosphere ions and not through CIV processes. The results presented here are pertinent to other CIV experiments performed in the ionosphere. It is recommended that laboratory measurements should be made of the charge exchange cross section between O(+) and Ba as well as other metal vapors used in CIV experiments.

  3. Vertical sampling flights in support of the 1981 ASCOT cooling tower experiments: field effort and data

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, G.T.

    1982-03-01

    During the month of August 1981, three nights of experimental sampling of tracers released into the cooling tower plume of a geothermal power plant were conducted. In these experiments a tethered balloon was used to lift a payload so as to obtain vertical profiles of the cooling tower plume and the entrained tracers. A description of the equipment used, the field effort and the data acquired are presented here.

  4. Nanogap experiments for laser cooling: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Ryan P.; Velten, Josef; Stintz, Andreas; Malloy, Kevin J.; Epstein, Richard I.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor; Hasselbeck, Michael P.; Imangholi, Babak; Boyd, S. T. P.; Bauer, Todd M.

    2007-02-01

    One of the challenges of laser cooling a semiconductor is the typically high index of refraction (greater than 3), which limits efficient light output of the upconverted photon. This challenge is proposed to be met with a novel concept of coupling the photon out via a thin, thermally insulating vacuum gap that allows light to pass efficiently by frustrated total internal reflection. This study has the goal of producing a test structure that allows investigation of heat transport across a 'nanogap' consisting of a thin film supported over a substrate by an array of nanometer-sized posts. The nanogap is fabricated monolithically by first creating a film of SiO II on a silicon substrate, lithographically defining holes in the SiO II, and covering this structure including the holes with silicon. Selective lateral etching will then remove the SiO II, leaving behind a thin gap between two Si layers spaced apart by nanometer-scale Si posts. Demonstration of this final step by successfully undercutting the a-Si upper layer due to the hydrophobic nature of silicon and the slow etch rate of buffered oxide etch in the small gap has proved to be problematic. Arriving at a feasible solution to this conundrum is the current objective of this project in order to begin investigating the thermal conductivity properties of the structure.

  5. Experiment Study on Corrosion Control Using Coking Wastewater as Circulating Cooling Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huanzhen; Dong, Changqing; Bian, Lei; Zhao, Qian

    The coking wastewater drainage will bring severe water environmental pollution, so it is necessary to change the coking wastewater into resource. The reuse of pre-treated coking wastewater as make-up water for circulating cooling system is an important way. To prevent the circulating cooling system corrosion, the characteristic and the corrosion control technology and the effect of the classic corrosion inhibitors in the circulating cooling water system were studied by static experiment and dynamic experiment based on water quality stabilization theory. The results indicate that the corrosion in circulating cooling system is mainly spot corrosion caused by pollutants in coking wastewater, and the corrosion inhibition technology on the model of precipitated membrane based on phosphor series should be preferred. The mixed corrosion inhibitors HEDP and Zn 2+ optimally selected by experiment can form a firm corrosion inhibition membrane on heat transfer surface, and the corrosion inhibition rate could reach 85.6%. The corrosion rate of common carbon steel is 0.105 mm/a, which could satisfy the criterion of > Design criterion of the industrial circulating cooling water treatment > (GB 50050-95). The practical application to the circulating cooling system shows that the mixed corrosion inhibitors HEDP and Zn 2+ can control the corrosion in the system economically when the concentration multiple is 2-2.2, which opens up a feasible way for changing the coking wastewater into resource.

  6. Electron Acceleration and Ionization Production in High-Power Heating Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.; Pedersen, T.

    2012-12-01

    Recent ionospheric modification experiments with the 3.6 MW transmitter at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska led to discovery of artificial ionization descending from the nominal interaction altitude in the background F-region ionosphere by ~60-80 km. Artificial ionization production is indicated by significant 427.8 nm emissions from the 1st negative band of N2+ and the appearance of transmitter-induced bottomside traces in ionosonde data during the periods of most intense optical emissions. However, the exact mechanisms producing the artificial plasmas remain to be determined. Yet the only existing theoretical models explain the development of artificial plasma as an ionizing wavefront moving downward due to ionization by electrons accelerated by HF-excited strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) generated near the plasma resonance, where the pump frequency matches the plasma frequency. However, the observations suggest also the significance of interactions with upper hybrid and electron Bernstein waves near multiples of the electron gyrofrequency. We describe recent observations and discuss suitable acceleration mechanisms.

  7. Optical observations on the CRIT-II Critical Ionization Velocity Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Haerendel, G.; Valenzuela, A.

    1990-01-01

    A rocket borne Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV0 experiment was carried out from Wallops Island at dusk on May 4, 1989. Two barium shaped charges were released below the solar terminator (to prevent photoionization) at altitudes near 400 km. The ambient ionospheric electron density was 50,000/cu cm. The neutral barium jet was directed upward and at an angle of nominally 45 degrees to B which gives approximately 3 x 10 to the 23rd neutrals with super critical velocity. Ions created by a CIV process in the region of the neutral jet would travel up along B into sunlight where they can be detected optically. Well defined ion clouds (max. brightness 750 R) were observed in both releases. An ionization rate of 0.8 percent/sec (125 sec ionization time constant) can account for the observed ion cloud near the release field line, but the ionization rate falls off with increasing distance from the release. It is concluded that a CIV process was present in the neutral jet out to about 50 km from the release, which is significantly further than allowed by current theories.

  8. Cooled microwave ablation of thyroid nodules: Initial experience.

    PubMed

    Korkusuz, Yücel; Mader, Oscar Maximilian; Kromen, Wolfgang; Happel, Christian; Ahmad, Shadi; Gröner, Daniel; Koca, Mithat; Mader, Alexander; Grünwald, Frank; Korkusuz, Hüdayi

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate if internally cooled microwave ablation (cMWA) is a safe and effective method for treatment of benign and malign thyroid nodules. 9 patients with 11 symptomatic cold benign thyroid nodules and 1 recurrent thyroid carcinoma ranging in volume from 9.1 to 197ml (mean size 52± 57ml) were treated with cMWA. The mean age of the patients was 59 years. Pain during the treatment was measured on a 10-point scale. Side effects revealed by ultrasound or patients' complaints were documented. Periablative efficacy was measured 24h after cMWA as change (Δ) in serum thyreoglobulin (Tg). Nodule elasticity was measured on a 4-point scale, blood circulation and echogenicity on a 3-point scale. All patients tolerated cMWA well. Median pain intensity averaged 2.1±0.8 (range: 1-3). Postablative hematoma was observed in all cases. In no cases ablation led to hoarseness, superficial burns, nodule ruptures, vagal reactions or dysphagia. cMWA lead to a significant decrease of blood circulation, nodule echogenicity and a significant increase of elasticity (Δ = 1.1 ± 0.33; 0.8 ± 0.4 and 1.1 ± 0.6 points)(p<0.05). An average increase of 4495ng/ml Tg was measured (p<0.05). cMWA is an effective and secure method for treatment of thyroid nodules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Tomographic Ionized-Carbon Mapping Experiment (TIME) CII Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniszewski, Z.; Bock, J. J.; Bradford, C. M.; Brevik, J.; Cooray, A.; Gong, Y.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; O'Brient, R.; Santos, M.; Shirokoff, E.; Silva, M.; Zemcov, M.

    2014-09-01

    The Tomographic Ionized-Carbon Mapping Experiment (TIME) and TIME-Pilot are proposed imaging spectrometers to measure reionization and large scale structure at redshifts 5-9. We seek to exploit the 158 restframe emission of [CII], which becomes measurable at 200-300 GHz at reionization redshifts. Here we describe the scientific motivation, give an overview of the proposed instrument, and highlight key technological developments underway to enable these measurements.

  10. Zirconium carbide coating for corium experiments related to water-cooled and sodium-cooled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plevacova, K.; Journeau, C.; Piluso, P.; Zhdanov, V.; Baklanov, V.; Poirier, J.

    2011-07-01

    Since the TMI and Chernobyl accidents the risk of nuclear severe accident is intensively studied for existing and future reactors. In case of a core melt-down accident in a nuclear reactor, a complex melt, called corium, forms. To be able to perform experiments with prototypic corium materials at high temperature, a coating which resists to different corium melts related to Generation I and II Water Reactors and Generation IV sodium fast reactor was researched in our experimental platforms both in IAE NNC in Kazakhstan and in CEA in France. Zirconium carbide was selected as protective coating for graphite crucibles used in our induction furnaces: VCG-135 and VITI. The method of coating application, called reactive wetting, was developed. Zirconium carbide revealed to resist well to the (U x, Zr y)O 2-z water reactor corium. It has also the advantage not to bring new elements to this chemical system. The coating was then tested with sodium fast reactor corium melts containing steel or absorbers. Undesirable interactions were observed between the coating and these materials, leading to the carburization of the corium ingots. Concerning the resistance of the coating to oxide melts without ZrO 2, the zirconium carbide coating keeps its role of protective barrier with UO 2-Al 2O 3 below 2000 °C but does not resist to a UO 2-Eu 2O 3 mixture.

  11. [Database on effects of ionizing radiation in plants: experience and application perspectives].

    PubMed

    Udalova, A A; Geras'kin, S A; Dubynina, M A

    2012-01-01

    Information available in the literature about the effects of ionizing radiation on flora and fauna species is a basis for the development of a methodology for radiation protection of the environment. International experience in the creation of databases of radiation effects in biota is discussed. Here presented and described are the structure and the content of the database "Biological effects of radiation in plants" which at present contains more than 5000 datasets and about 19000 "radiation impact-biological effect" pairs of data. Experience and perspectives of applying the database management systems in radiobiology and radiation protection are discussed.

  12. Studies of Flow in Ionized Gas: Historical Perspective, Contemporary Experiments, and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2007-04-23

    Since the first observations that a very small ionized fraction (order of 1 ppm) could strongly affect the gas flow, numerous experiments with partially or fully wall-free discharges have demonstrated the dispersion of shock waves, the enhancement of lateral forces in the flow, the prospects of levitation, and other aerodynamic effects with vast potential of application. A review of physical effects and observations are given along with current status of their interpretation. Special attention will be given to the physical problems of energy efficiency in generating wall-free discharges and the phenomenology of filamentary discharges. Comments and case examples are given on the current status of availability of necessary data for modelling and simulation of the aerodynamic phenomena in weakly ionized gas.

  13. Producing spin-polarized photoelectrons by using the momentum gate in strong-field ionization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kunlong; Renziehausen, Klaus; Barth, Ingo

    2017-06-01

    The ionization of the prealigned nitric oxide molecule by strong circularly polarized laser fields is studied via theoretical simulations of the spin-resolved photoelectron momentum distributions by solving numerically the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Due to the spin-orbit entanglement in the ground state of nitric oxide and the sensitivity of the tunnel ionization of its doubly degenerate valence 2 π± orbitals carrying opposite electron ring currents to the sense of the laser-field rotation, the momentum-resolved spin-polarized photoelectrons are produced. We show that the spin polarization exhibits strong dependence on the kinetic energy as well as the emitting angle of the photoelectron. In addition to the laser control, the momentum gate in strong-field experiments would enable full control of the spin polarization.

  14. The Cool Surge Following Flux Emergence in a Radiation-MHD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nóbrega-Siverio, D.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Martínez-Sykora, J.

    2016-05-01

    Cool and dense ejections, typically Hα surges, often appear alongside EUV or X-ray coronal jets as a result of the emergence of magnetized plasma from the solar interior. Idealized numerical experiments explain those ejections as being indirectly associated with the magnetic reconnection taking place between the emerging and preexisting systems. However, those experiments miss basic elements that can importantly affect the surge phenomenon. In this paper we study the cool surges using a realistic treatment of the radiation transfer and material plasma properties. To that end, the Bifrost code is used, which has advanced modules for the equation of state of the plasma, photospheric and chromospheric radiation transfer, heat conduction, and optically thin radiative cooling. We carry out a 2.5D experiment of the emergence of magnetized plasma through (meso) granular convection cells and the low atmosphere to the corona. Through detailed Lagrange tracing we study the formation and evolution of the cool ejection and, in particular, the role of the entropy sources; this allows us to discern families of evolutionary patterns for the plasma elements. In the launch phase, many elements suffer accelerations well in excess of gravity; when nearing the apex of their individual trajectories, instead, the plasma elements follow quasi-parabolic trajectories with accelerations close to {g}⊙ . We show how the formation of the cool ejection is mediated by a wedge-like structure composed of two shocks, one of which leads to the detachment of the surge from the original emerged plasma dome.

  15. Columnar joint morphology and cooling rate: A starch-water mixture experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toramaru, A.; Matsumoto, T.

    2004-02-01

    An analogue experiment using a starch-water mixture has been carried out in order to understand the effect of cooling rate on the morphological characteristics of a basalt columnar joint. If the contraction of material is essential for the formation of columnar joint structure, the water loss rate by desiccation (hereafter referred to as desiccation rate) in the experiment is analogous to the cooling rate in solidifying basalt. In the experiment the desiccation rate is controlled by varying the distance between the starch-water mixture and a lamp used as the heat source. We find that there are three regimes in the relation between joint formation and desiccation rate: (1) At desiccation rates higher than ˜1.4 × 10-2 (g cm-2 h-1) (normal columnar joint regime), the average cross-sectional area S of a column is inversely proportional to the average desiccation rate, (i.e., S ∝ -δ, with δ = 1). (2) Between that desiccation rate and a critical desiccation rate, 0.8 × 10-2 (g/cm2h), S approaches infinity as decreases close to a critical desiccation rate (i.e., exponent δ monotonically increases from unity to infinity) (critical regime). (3) Below the critical desiccation rate, no columnar structure forms (no columnar joint regime forms). Applying the present experimental result to the formation of basalt column, the basalt columnar cross-sectional area is inversely proportional to the cooling rate with factors including elasticity, crack growth coefficient, thermal expansion, glass transition temperature, and crack density ratio at stress maximum. Also, it can be predicted that there exists a critical cooling rate below which the columnar joint does not form; the presence of a critical regime between the normal columnar jointing and no columnar jointing during a certain cooling rate range can also be predicted. We find that at higher cooling rate the preferred column shape is a pentagon, whereas at lower cooling rate it is a hexagon.

  16. Development of an experiment for measuring film cooling performance in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqbool, Daanish

    This thesis describes the development of an experiment for acquiring supersonic film cooling performance data in canonical configurations suitable for code validation. A methodology for selecting appropriate experimental conditions is developed and used to select test conditions in the UMD atmospheric pressure wind tunnel that are relevant to film cooling conditions encountered in the J-2X rocket engine. A new technique for inferring wall heat flux with 10% uncertainty from temperature-time histories of embedded sensors is developed and implemented. Preliminary heat flux measurements on the uncooled upper wall and on the lower wall with the film cooling flow turned off suggest that RANS solvers using Menter's SST model are able to predict heat flux within 15% in the far-field (> 10 injection slot heights) but are very inaccurate in the near-field. However, more experiments are needed to confirm this finding. Preliminary Schlieren images showing the shear layer growth rate are also presented.

  17. Thermal fatigue experiment of screw cooling tube under one-sided heating condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Suzuki, Satoshi; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Akiba, Masato

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the results of thermal fatigue experiments of a cooling tube with a helical triangular fin on its inner cooling surface, namely a screw tube. The screw tube is directly machined in a CuCrZr heat sink bar with slits at its heated side. The thermal fatigue experiments are carried out at 20 and 30 MW/m 2. Water leakages from fatigue cracks, found at the slit of the heat sink, occurred at around 4500th and 1400th cycles at 20 and 30 MW/m 2, respectively. These results show good agreement with lifetime predictions using Manson-Coffin's law based on finite element analyses. Fractographic observations show the fatigue cracks starting from the outer heated surface at the slit region of the cooling channel and propagating toward its inner surface.

  18. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  19. Timonium Elementary School Solar Energy Heating and Cooling Augmentation Experiment. Final Engineering Report. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AAI Corp., Baltimore, MD.

    This report covers a two-year and seven-month solar space heating and cooling experiment conducted at the Timonium Elementary School, Timonium, Maryland. The system was designed to provide a minimum of 50 percent of the energy required during the heating season and to determine the feasibility of using solar energy to power absorption-type…

  20. Timonium Elementary School Solar Energy Heating and Cooling Augmentation Experiment. Final Engineering Report. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AAI Corp., Baltimore, MD.

    This report covers a two-year and seven-month solar space heating and cooling experiment conducted at the Timonium Elementary School, Timonium, Maryland. The system was designed to provide a minimum of 50 percent of the energy required during the heating season and to determine the feasibility of using solar energy to power absorption-type…

  1. Electron-impact ionization of helium: A comprehensive experiment benchmarks theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X.; Pflueger, T.; Senftleben, A.; Xu, S.; Dorn, A.; Ullrich, J.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D.V.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M.S.

    2011-05-15

    Single ionization of helium by 70.6-eV electron impact is studied in a comprehensive experiment covering a major part of the entire collision kinematics and the full 4{pi} solid angle for the emitted electron. The absolutely normalized triple-differential experimental cross sections are compared with results from the convergent close-coupling (CCC) and the time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) theories. Whereas excellent agreement with the TDCC prediction is only found for equal energy sharing, the CCC calculations are in excellent agreement with essentially all experimentally observed dynamical features, including the absolute magnitude of the cross sections.

  2. Investigations and experiments of a new multi-layer complex liquid-cooled mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuling; Cheng, Zuhai; Zhang, Yaoning; Sun, Feng; Yu, Wenfeng

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes a new multi-layer complex liquid-cooled Si mirror with 3 cooling ducts in Archimedes spirals. Utilizing the ANSYS program, the structure of the mirror is optimized and the thermal deformation model of the mirror is simulated. The simulation results show that the mirror has the following advantages: very small amount of surface deformation, uniform distribution of temperature and surface deformation, and fast surface shape restoration. The results of the experiments of thermal deformation and the surface restoration are accurately mapped to the simulation results.

  3. Proof-of-Principle Experiment for FEL-based Coherent Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V; Bengtsson, J; Fedotov, A V; Hao, Y; Kayran, D; Mahler, G J; Meng, W; Roser, T; Sheehy, B; Than, R; Tuozzolo, J E; Wang, G; Webb, S D; Yakimenko, V; Bell, G I; Bruhwiler, D L; Schwartz, B T; Hutton, A; Krafft, G A; Poelker, M; Rimmer, R A

    2011-03-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders*. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using one of JLab’s SRF cryo-modules. In this paper, we describe the experimental setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC.

  4. Igneous cooling history of olivine-phyric shergottite Yamato 980459 constrained by dynamic crystallization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    First, Emily; Hammer, Julia

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic crystallization experiments were performed on a liquid having the bulk composition of olivine-phyric shergottite Yamato 980459, to constrain the igneous thermal history of this meteorite. Key characteristics of the meteorite's mineralogy and texture, including several morphologically distinct olivine and pyroxene crystal populations and a glassy mesostasis devoid of plagioclase, were replicated upon cooling from 1435 to 909 °C at 1 atmosphere under reducing conditions. Three sequential cooling ramps are required to produce synthetic samples with textures and compositions matching Yamato 980459. Olivine phenocrysts formed at <1 °C h-1, presumably at depth in the Martian crust. Pyroxene phenocrysts formed mainly at ~10 °C h-1, consistent with crystallization within a lava flow at depths of 25-45 cm. Increased cooling rate (~100 °C h-1) in a third stage suppressed the formation of plagioclase and produced groundmass crystals, consistent with crystallization at lava flow depths of 5-7 cm. Although Y 980459 is unique among Martian meteorites (i.e., preserving a primary glassy mesostasis), its emplacement did not require unique physical conditions. Rather, the second and third cooling stages may reflect cooling within the core of a pāhoehoe-like flow and subsequent breakout on the surface of Mars.

  5. Water cooling system leak proofing strategy for the Plasma Couette Experiment Upgrade (PCX-U)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Mike; Flanagan, Ken; Hernandez, Wilson; Jaeger, Austin; Laufman-Wollitzer, Lauren; Nikolau, Ethan; Tabbutt, Megan; Waleffe, Roger; Wallace, John; Xu, Yufan; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    An improved system for water cooling several experimental components has been installed for the Plasma Couette Experiment Upgrade (PCX-U). The most important aspect of the upgrade was to cool the new SmCo permanent magnet cage array. Many methods of connecting water cooling pipes, tubes, and fittings were employed balancing several factors. These factors included ease of assembly/disassembly, reliability, operating pressure, operating temperature, chemical reactivity, and cost. The actions taken to develop the water cooling system will be discussed and illustrated. A focus will be made on sealing cooling water leaks from the inside out on small diameter metal passages (including extrusions, tubing, and fittings). These passages were located inside a vacuum environment, and only the ends of each passage were accessible to do the work. The vacuum vessel of PCX-U is a 1 meter diameter, 1 meter tall cylinder comprised of 0.25'' thick stainless steel. PCX-U has one removable end. Rings of SmCo magnets attached to a removable frame create a cusp field to contain the plasma and provide a resonance surface for the RF. This work is supported by the NSF.

  6. Superconducting magnet system for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Johnson, R.P.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Novitski, I.; Yonehara, K.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    A helical cooling channel has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. A novel superconducting magnet system for a muon beam cooling experiment is being designed at Fermilab. The inner volume of the cooling channel is filled with liquid helium where passing muon beam can be decelerated and cooled in a process of ionization energy loss. The magnet parameters are optimized to match the momentum of the beam as it slows down. The results of 3D magnetic analysis for two designs of magnet system, mechanical and quench protection considerations are discussed.

  7. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  8. Study of thermosiphon cooling scheme for the production solenoid of the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanaraj, N.; Kashikhin, V.; Peterson, T.; Pronskikh, V.; Nicol, T.

    2014-01-29

    A thermosiphon cooling scheme is envisioned for the Production Solenoid of the Mu2e experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The thermosiphon cooling is achieved by indirect cooling with helium at 4.7 K. The siphon tubes are welded to the solenoid outer structure. The anticipated heat loads in the solenoid is presented as well as the cooling scheme design. A thermal model using ANSYS to simulate the temperature gradient is presented. The thermal analysis also makes provisions for including the heat load generated in the coils and structures by the secondary radiation simulated using the MARS 15 code. The impact of the heat loads from supports on the solenoid cooling is studied. The thermosiphon cooling scheme is also validated using pertinent correlations to study flow reversals and the cooling regime.

  9. Experiment attributes to establish tube with twisted tape insert performance cooling plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Emily; Ramirez, Emilio; Ruggles, Art E.; Griffard, Cory

    2015-08-18

    The modeling capability for tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with reference to the application of cooling plasma facing components in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The history of experiments examining the cooling performance of tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with emphasis on the manner of heating, flow stability limits and the details of the test section and fluid delivery system. Models for heat transfer, burnout, and onset of net vapor generation in straight tube flows and tube with twisted tape are compared. As a result, the gaps in knowledge required to establish performance limits of the plasma facing components are identified and attributes of an experiment to close those gaps are presented.

  10. Experiment attributes to establish tube with twisted tape insert performance cooling plasma facing components

    DOE PAGES

    Clark, Emily; Ramirez, Emilio; Ruggles, Art E.; ...

    2015-08-18

    The modeling capability for tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with reference to the application of cooling plasma facing components in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The history of experiments examining the cooling performance of tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with emphasis on the manner of heating, flow stability limits and the details of the test section and fluid delivery system. Models for heat transfer, burnout, and onset of net vapor generation in straight tube flows and tube with twisted tape are compared. As a result, the gaps in knowledge required to establish performance limits of the plasmamore » facing components are identified and attributes of an experiment to close those gaps are presented.« less

  11. Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of jet cooled benzo[a]pyrene from resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Harthcock, Colin; Han, Fangyuan; Kong, Wei

    2011-12-01

    We report zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) via resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). Our analysis concentrates on the vibrational modes of the first excited state (S1) and those of the ground cationic state (D0). Similar to pyrene, another peri-condensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon we have investigated, the first two electronically excited states of BaP exhibit extensive configuration interactions. However, the two electronic states are of the same symmetry, hence vibronic coupling does not introduce any out-of-plane modes in the REMPI spectrum, and Franck-Condon analysis is qualitatively satisfactory. The ZEKE spectra from the in-plane modes observed in the REMPI spectrum demonstrate strong propensity in preserving the vibrational excitation of the intermediate state. Although several additional bands in combination with the vibrational mode of the intermediate state are identifiable, they are much lower in intensity. This observation implies that the molecular structure of BaP has a tremendous capability to accommodate changes in charge density. All observed bands of the cation are IR active, establishing the role of ZEKE spectroscopy in mapping out far infrared bands for astrophysical applications.

  12. Status of Proof-of-principle Experiment for Coherent Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev, I; Ben-Zvi, I; Bengtsson, J; Elizarov, A; Fedotov, A V; Gassner, D M; Hao, Y; Kayran, D; Litvinenko, V; Mahler, G J; Meng, W; Roser, T; Sheehy, B; Than, R; Tuozzolo, J E; Wang, G; Webb, S D; Yakimenko, V; Bell, G I; Bruhwiler, D L; Ranjbar, V H; Schwartz, B T; Hutton, A; Krafft, G A; Poelker, M; Rimmer, R A; Kholopov, M A; Vobly, P

    2012-07-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron colliders. To verify the concept we conduct proof-of-the-principle experiment at RHIC. In this paper, we describe the current experimental setup to be installed into 2 o'clock RHIC interaction regions. We present current design, status of equipment acquisition and estimates for the expected beam parameters.

  13. Geometry and mass model of ionizing radiation experiments on the LDEF satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colborn, B. L.; Armstrong, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive measurements related to ionizing radiation environments and effects were made on the LDEF satellite during its mission lifetime of almost 6 years. These data, together with the opportunity they provide for evaluating predictive models and analysis methods, should allow more accurate assessments of the space radiation environment and related effects for future missions in low Earth orbit. The LDEF radiation dosimetry data is influenced to varying degrees by material shielding effects due to the dosimeter itself, nearby components and experiments, and the spacecraft structure. A geometry and mass model is generated of LDEF, incorporating sufficient detail that it can be applied in determining the influence of material shielding on ionizing radiation measurements and predictions. This model can be used as an aid in data interpretation by unfolding shielding effects from the LDEF radiation dosimeter responses. Use of the LDEF geometry/mass model, in conjunction with predictions and comparisons with LDEF dosimetry data currently underway, will also allow more definitive evaluations of current radiation models for future mission applications.

  14. Cryogenic systems for proof of the principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuenian; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Lederle, Dewey; Orfin, Paul; Skaritka, John; Soria, Victor; Tallerico, Thomas; Than, Roberto

    2014-01-29

    The Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) Proof of Principle (PoP) experiment is proposed to be installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to demonstrate proton and ion beam cooling with this new technique that may increase the beam luminosity in certain cases, by as much as tenfold. Within the scope of this project, a 112 MHz, 2MeV Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) electron gun and a 704 MHz 20MeV 5-cell SRF cavity will be installed at IP2 in the RHIC ring. The superconducting RF electron gun will be cooled in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity will be cooled in a super-fluid helium bath at 2.0 K. This paper discusses the cryogenic systems designed for both cavities. For the 112 MHz cavity cryogenic system, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger is used to isolate the cavity helium bath from pressure pulses and microphonics noise sources. For the 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity, a heat exchanger is also used to isolate the SRF cavity helium bath from noise sources in the sub-atmospheric pumping system operating at room temperature. Detailed designs, thermal analyses and discussions for both systems will be presented in this paper.

  15. A Technology Demonstration Experiment for Laser Cooled Atomic Clocks in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Seidel, D. J.; Thompson, R. J.; Maleki, L.; Gibble, K.

    2000-01-01

    We have been developing a laser-cooling apparatus for flight on the International Space Station (ISS), with the intention of demonstrating linewidths on the cesium clock transition narrower than can be realized on the ground. GLACE (the Glovebox Laser- cooled Atomic Clock Experiment) is scheduled for launch on Utilization Flight 3 (UF3) in 2002, and will be mounted in one of the ISS Glovebox platforms for an anticipated 2-3 week run. Separate flight definition projects funded at NIST and Yale by the Micro- gravity Research Division of NASA as a part of its Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program will follow GLACE. Core technologies for these and other LCAP missions are being developed at JPL, with the current emphasis on developing components such as the laser and optics subsystem, and non-magnetic vacuum-compatible mechanical shutters. Significant technical challenges in developing a space qualifiable laser cooling apparatus include reducing the volume, mass, and power requirements, while increasing the ruggedness and reliability in order to both withstand typical launch conditions and achieve several months of unattended operation. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  16. A Technology Demonstration Experiment for Laser Cooled Atomic Clocks in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Seidel, D. J.; Thompson, R. J.; Maleki, L.; Gibble, K.

    2000-01-01

    We have been developing a laser-cooling apparatus for flight on the International Space Station (ISS), with the intention of demonstrating linewidths on the cesium clock transition narrower than can be realized on the ground. GLACE (the Glovebox Laser- cooled Atomic Clock Experiment) is scheduled for launch on Utilization Flight 3 (UF3) in 2002, and will be mounted in one of the ISS Glovebox platforms for an anticipated 2-3 week run. Separate flight definition projects funded at NIST and Yale by the Micro- gravity Research Division of NASA as a part of its Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program will follow GLACE. Core technologies for these and other LCAP missions are being developed at JPL, with the current emphasis on developing components such as the laser and optics subsystem, and non-magnetic vacuum-compatible mechanical shutters. Significant technical challenges in developing a space qualifiable laser cooling apparatus include reducing the volume, mass, and power requirements, while increasing the ruggedness and reliability in order to both withstand typical launch conditions and achieve several months of unattended operation. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  17. Proof-of-principle experiment for FEL-based coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Fedotov, A.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Mahler, G.; Marusic, A.; Meng, W.; McIntyre, G.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Sheehy, B.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Poelker, M.; Hutton, A.; Kraft, G.; Rimmer, R.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Abell, D.T.; Nieter, C.; Ranjbar, V.; Schwartz, B.T.; Vobly, P.; Kholopov, M.; Shevchenko, O.; Mcintosh, P.; Wheelhouse, A.

    2011-08-21

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using SRF linac. In this paper, we describe the setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC. We plan to complete the program in five years. During first two years we will build coherent electron cooler in IP2 of RHIC. In parallel we will develop complete package of computer simulation tools for the start-to-end simulation predicting exact performance of a CeC. The later activity will be the core of Tech X involvement into the project. We will use these tools to predict the performance of our CeC device. The experimental demonstration of the CeC will be undertaken in years three to five of the project. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the cooling of ion beam and to compare its measured performance with predictions made by us prior to the experiments.

  18. Study On Numerical Simulation And Experiment Of Fabrication Magnesium Semisolid Slurry By Damper Cooling Tube Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shuisheng; Huang, Guojie; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Haoqiang

    2007-05-01

    Damper Cooling Tube (DCT) Method to fabricate the semi-solid metal slurry has been studied in this paper. Firstly, numerical simulation is adopted to investigate the flow process in order to optimize the technical parameters. The temperature effects on the rheological properties of the slurries are also considered. The effects of technical parameters on the slurry properties are studied in detail. Then the experiment was carried out with AZ91 magnesium alloy in order to examine the numerical simulation results. The results of numerical simulation are consistent with the experimental results. According to the numerical and experiment results, the DCT device can fabricate fine semisolid slurry with primary globular phase.

  19. Experiments With Radiatively Cooled Supersonic Plasma Jets Generated in Conical Wire Array Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, S. V.; Ampleford, D. J.; Bland, S. N.; Chittenden, J. P.; Ciardi, A.; Naz, N.; Haines, M. G.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E.; Gardiner, T.

    2002-12-01

    We present results of astrophysically relevant experiments where highly supersonic plasma jets are generated via conically convergent plasma flows in a conical wire array Z-pinch. Stagnation of plasma flow on the axis of symmetry forms a standing conical shock effectively collimating the flow in the axial direction. This scenario is essentially similar to that discussed by Canto and collaborators [1] as a purely hydrodynamic mechanism for jet formation in astrophysical systems. Experiments using different materials (Al, Fe and W) show that a hypersonic (M ~ 20), well-collimated jet is generated when the radiative cooling rate of the plasma is significant.

  20. Ionization, Charging and Electric Field Effects on Cloud Particles in the CLOUD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichman, L.; Järvinen, E.; Wagner, R.; Dorsey, J.; Dias, A. M.; Ehrhart, S.; Kirkby, J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Saunders, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Ice crystals and frozen droplets play an important role in atmospheric charging and electrification processes, particularly by collision and aggregation. The dynamics of charged particles in the atmosphere can be modulated by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). High electric fields also affect the alignment of charged particles, allowing more time for interactions. The CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) experiment at CERN has the ability to conduct ionization, charging and high electric field experiments on liquid or ice clouds created in the chamber by adiabatic pressure reductions. A pion secondary beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron is used to ionize the molecules in the chamber, and Ar+ Corona Ion Generator for Atmospheric Research (CIGAR) is used to inject unipolar charged ions directly into the chamber. A pressurized airgun provides rapid pressure shocks inside the chamber and induces charged ice nucleation. The cloud chamber is accompanied by a variety of analysing instruments e.g. a 3View Cloud Particle Imager (3V-CPI) coupled with an induction ring, a Scattering Intensity Measurements for the Optical detection of icE (SIMONE) and a Nano-aerosol and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS). Using adiabatic expansion and high electric fields we can replicate the ideal conditions for adhesion, sintering and interlocking between ice crystals. Charged cloud particles produced measurable variations in the total induced current pulse on the induction ring. The most influential factors comprised initial temperature, lapse rate and charging mechanism. The ions produced in the chamber may deposit onto larger particles and form dipoles during ice nucleation and growth. The small ion concentration was monitored by the NAIS during these runs. Possible short-term aggregates or alignment of particles were observed in-situ with the SIMONE. These and future chamber measurements of charging and aggregation could shed more light on the ambient conditions and dynamics for electrification

  1. Cooling Properties of the Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit: Results of an Environmental Chamber Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Gillis, David; Bue, Grant; Son, Chan; Norcross, Jason; Kuznetz, Larry; Chapman, Kirt; Chhipwadia, Ketan; McBride, Tim

    2008-01-01

    The shuttle crew wears the Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit (ACES) to protect themselves from cabin decompression and to support bail out during landing. ACES is cooled by a liquid-cooled garment (LCG) that interfaces to a heat exchanger that dumps heat into the cabin. The ACES outer layer is made of Gore-Tex(Registered TradeMark), permitting water vapor to escape while containing oxygen. The crew can only lose heat via insensible water losses and the LCG. Under nominal landing operations, the average cabin temperature rarely exceeds 75 F, which is adequate for the ACES to function. Problem A rescue shuttle will need to return 11 crew members if the previous mission suffers a thermal protection system failure, preventing it from returning safely to Earth. Initial analysis revealed that 11 crew members in the shuttle will increase cabin temperature at wheel stop above 80 F, which decreases the ACES ability to keep crew members cool. Air flow in the middeck of the shuttle is inhomogeneous and some ACES may experience much higher temperatures that could cause excessive thermal stress to crew members. Methods A ground study was conducted to measure the cooling efficiency of the ACES at 75 F, 85 F, and 95 F at 50% relative humidity. Test subjects representing 5, 50, and 95 percentile body habitus of the astronaut corps performed hand ergometry keeping their metabolic rate at 400, 600, and 800 BTU/hr for one hour. Core temperature was measured by rectal probe and skin, while inside and outside the suit. Environmental chamber wall and cooling unit inlet and outlet temperatures were measured using high-resolution thermistors ( 0.2 C). Conclusions Under these test conditions, the ACES was able to protect the core temperature of all test subjects, however thermal stress due to high insensible losses and skin temperature and skin heat flow may impact crew performance. Further research should be performed to understand the impact on cognitive performance.

  2. Cooling Properties of the Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit: Results of an Environmental Chamber Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Gillis, David; Bue, Grant; Son, Chan; Norcross, Jason; Kuznetz, Larry; Chapman, Kirt; Chhipwadia, Ketan; McBride, Tim

    2008-01-01

    The shuttle crew wears the Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit (ACES) to protect themselves from cabin decompression and to support bail out during landing. ACES is cooled by a liquid-cooled garment (LCG) that interfaces to a heat exchanger that dumps heat into the cabin. The ACES outer layer is made of Gore-Tex(Registered TradeMark), permitting water vapor to escape while containing oxygen. The crew can only lose heat via insensible water losses and the LCG. Under nominal landing operations, the average cabin temperature rarely exceeds 75 F, which is adequate for the ACES to function. Problem A rescue shuttle will need to return 11 crew members if the previous mission suffers a thermal protection system failure, preventing it from returning safely to Earth. Initial analysis revealed that 11 crew members in the shuttle will increase cabin temperature at wheel stop above 80 F, which decreases the ACES ability to keep crew members cool. Air flow in the middeck of the shuttle is inhomogeneous and some ACES may experience much higher temperatures that could cause excessive thermal stress to crew members. Methods A ground study was conducted to measure the cooling efficiency of the ACES at 75 F, 85 F, and 95 F at 50% relative humidity. Test subjects representing 5, 50, and 95 percentile body habitus of the astronaut corps performed hand ergometry keeping their metabolic rate at 400, 600, and 800 BTU/hr for one hour. Core temperature was measured by rectal probe and skin, while inside and outside the suit. Environmental chamber wall and cooling unit inlet and outlet temperatures were measured using high-resolution thermistors ( 0.2 C). Conclusions Under these test conditions, the ACES was able to protect the core temperature of all test subjects, however thermal stress due to high insensible losses and skin temperature and skin heat flow may impact crew performance. Further research should be performed to understand the impact on cognitive performance.

  3. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; ...

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed formore » $$^{12}C$$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $$\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$$ and $$^{12}C$$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $$^{12}C$$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.« less

  4. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; Lu, Hai -Jiang; Zhu, Peng -Jia; Jiang, Feng -Jian

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$ and $^{12}C$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.

  5. Effects of side cooling on temperature, humidity and water recycling efficiency in a culture vessel for a space experiment--results of ground experiment.

    PubMed

    Tani, A; Seino, K

    2000-06-01

    Seed-to-seed experiments using dwarf plants will be conducted in Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) set up in the International Space Station (ISS). Development of a simple system to recycle water transpired by plants is necessary to save space and electrical power. A cooling system using a cooling plate that cools one side of the ventilated culture vessel to enhance water vapor condensation was developed. Effects of side cooling on air temperature, relative humidity and water recycling efficiency in the culture vessel were investigated on the ground. Decreasing the cooling plate temperature lowered temperatures of cooled side and inside air. Cooling treatment also decreased relative humidity inside the vessel less than 90% and lowered the amount of water vapor lost from the vessel through ventilation filters. This seemed to be due to the increased water vapor condensation onto the cooled side. To investigate the effect of increases in outside humidity on water recycling efficiency in the culture vessel, a water vapor transfer model was established. The calculation results indicate that an increase in relative humidity around the vessel can decrease water vapor loss from the vessel, increase water condensation onto the cooled side, and therefore, enhance water recycling efficiency in the vessel. The side cooling system seems to be useful for the CBEF in ISS because relative humidity in the CBEF is controllable.

  6. TARGET AND HORN COOLING FOR THE VERY LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    BELLAVIA, S.; KAHN, S.; KIRK, H.; LUDEWIG, H.; RAPARIA, D.; SIMOS, N.

    2005-05-16

    Thermodynamic studies have been performed for the beam target and focusing horn system to be used in a very long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment [1]. A 2mm rms beam spot with power deposition of over 18 KW presents challenging material and engineering solutions to this project. Given that the amount of heat transferred by radiation alone from the target to the horn is quite small, the primary mechanism is heat removal by forced convection in the annular space between the target and the horn. The key elements are the operating temperature of the target, the temperature of the cooling fluid and the heat generation rate in the volume of the target that needs to be removed. These working parameters establish the mass flow rate and velocity of the coolant necessary to remove the generated heat. Several cooling options were explored using a carbon-carbon target and aluminum horn. Detailed analysis, trade studies and simulations were performed for cooling the horn and target with gaseous helium as well as water.

  7. Method for analysis of showerhead film cooling experiments on highly curved surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, G.; Schneider, E.; Ott, P.; von Wolfersdorf, J.; Weigand, B.

    2007-02-15

    The transient liquid crystal technique has been extensively used for measuring the heat transfer characteristics in gas turbine applications. Thereby, the time evolution of the surface temperature is usually evaluated using the model of a semi-infinite flat plate. For experiments on cylinders, Wagner et al. [G. Wagner, M. Kotulla, P. Ott, B. Weigand, J. von Wolfersdorf, The transient liquid crystal technique: influence of surface curvature and finite wall thickness, ASME Paper GT2004-53553, 2004] showed, that curvature and finite thickness effects can have an influence on the obtained heat transfer coefficients. The aim of this study is to develop a time effective data reduction method that accounts for curvature and that is applicable to film cooling experiments with time varying adiabatic wall temperatures. To verify this method, transient liquid crystal experiments have been carried out on a blunt body model with showerhead film cooling. The experimental data was evaluated with the traditional semi-infinite flat plate approach and with the curvature correction using regression analysis. (author)

  8. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; et al.,

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  9. Arduino-based laboratory instruments for an undergraduate laser cooling experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Timothy; Tiber, Gage; Brooke, Robert W. A.; Gillis, Julie M.; Zaccagnini, Christopher A.; Corcovilos, Theodore A.

    2015-05-01

    Arduino is an inexpensive open-source microcontroller platform designed for quick development turn-around and easy interfacing, making it ideal for novice programmers and instrument designers. Based on Atmel ATMEGA microcontroller chips, the Arduino boards are programmed with standard C/C++ code and contain sufficient inputs and outputs (both digital and analog) for basic data acquisition and device control. Here we present home-built Arduino-based instruments commonly used in laser-cooling experiments, such as a wavelength meter and temperature controller. We describe the design and performance of these instruments.

  10. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, D.; Adey, D.; Alekou, A.; Apollonio, M.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Back, J.; Barber, G.; Barclay, P.; de Bari, A.; Bayes, R.; Bayliss, V.; Bertoni, R.; Blackmore, V. J.; Blondel, A.; Blot, S.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C. N.; Bowring, D.; Boyd, S.; Bradshaw, T. W.; Bravar, U.; Bross, A. D.; Capponi, M.; Carlisle, T.; Cecchet, G.; Charnley, G.; Cobb, J. H.; Colling, D.; Collomb, N.; Coney, L.; Cooke, P.; Courthold, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; DeMello, A.; Dick, A. J.; Dobbs, A.; Dornan, P.; Fayer, S.; Filthaut, F.; Fish, A.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Fletcher, R.; Forrest, D.; Francis, V.; Freemire, B.; Fry, L.; Gallagher, A.; Gamet, R.; Gourlay, S.; Grant, A.; Graulich, J. S.; Griffiths, S.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, O. M.; Hanson, G. G.; Harrison, P.; Hart, T. L.; Hartnett, T.; Hayler, T.; Heidt, C.; Hills, M.; Hodgson, P.; Hunt, C.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Kafka, G.; Kaplan, D. M.; Karadzhov, Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Kolev, D.; Kuno, Y.; Kyberd, P.; Lau, W.; Leaver, J.; Leonova, M.; Li, D.; Lintern, A.; Littlefield, M.; Long, K.; Lucchini, G.; Luo, T.; Macwaters, C.; Martlew, B.; Martyniak, J.; Middleton, S.; Moretti, A.; Moss, A.; Muir, A.; Mullacrane, I.; Nebrensky, J. J.; Neuffer, D.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, R.; Nugent, J. C.; Onel, Y.; Orestano, D.; Overton, E.; Owens, P.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R. B.; Pasternak, J.; Pastore, F.; Pidcott, C.; Popovic, M.; Preece, R.; Prestemon, S.; Rajaram, D.; Ramberger, S.; Rayner, M. A.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Roberts, T. J.; Robinson, M.; Rogers, C.; Ronald, K.; Rubinov, P.; Rucinski, R.; Rusinov, I.; Sakamoto, H.; Sanders, D. A.; Santos, E.; Savidge, T.; Smith, P. J.; Snopok, P.; Soler, F. J. P.; Stanley, T.; Summers, D. J.; Takahashi, M.; Tarrant, J.; Taylor, I.; Tortora, L.; Torun, Y.; Tsenov, R.; Tunnell, C. D.; Vankova, G.; Verguilov, V.; Virostek, S. P.; Vretenar, M.; Walaron, K.; Watson, S.; White, C.; Whyte, C. G.; Wilson, A.; Wisting, H.; Zisman, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/ c, have emittances of approximately 1.2-2.3 π mm-rad horizontally and 0.6-1.0 π mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90-190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/ c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  11. Investigating two-photon double ionization of D{sub 2} by XUV-pump-XUV-probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y. H.; Kurka, M.; Kuehnel, K. U.; Toppin, M.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Rudenko, A.; Foucar, L.; Perez-Torres, J. F.; Plesiat, E.; Morales, F.; Martin, F.; Herrwerth, O.; Lezius, M.; Kling, M. F.; Jahnke, T.; Doerner, R.; Sanz-Vicario, J. L.; Tilborg, J. van; Belkacem, A.

    2010-05-15

    We used a split-mirror setup attached to a reaction microscope at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) to perform an XUV-pump-XUV-probe experiment by tracing the ultrafast nuclear wave-packet motion in the D{sub 2}{sup +}(1s{sigma}{sub g}) with <10 fs time resolution. Comparison with time-dependent calculations shows excellent agreement with the measured vibrational period of 22{+-}4 fs in D{sub 2}{sup +}, points to the importance of accurately knowing the internuclear distance-dependent ionization probability, and paves the way to control sequential and nonsequential two-photon double-ionization contributions.

  12. Infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization orthogonal-time-of-flight mass spectrometry employing a cooling stage and water ice as a matrix.

    PubMed

    Pirkl, Alexander; Soltwisch, Jens; Draude, Felix; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2012-07-03

    Although water ice has been utilized in the past as a matrix for infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (IR-MALDI-MS), it has not found a wider use due to limitations in the analytical performance and technical demands on the employment of the necessary cooling stage. Here, we developed a temperature-controlled sample stage for use with an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-o-TOF-MS). The stage utilizes a combination of liquid nitrogen cooling and counterheating with a Peltier element. It allows adjustment of the sample temperature between ~-120 °C and room temperature. To identify optimal irradiation conditions for IR-MALDI with the water ice matrix, we first investigated the influence of excitation wavelength, varied between 2.7 and 3.1 μm, and laser fluence on the signal intensities of molecular substance P ions. These data suggest the involvement of transient melting of the ice during the laser pulse and primary energy deposition into liquid water. As a consequence, the best analytical performance is obtained at a wavelength corresponding to the absorption maximum of liquid water of about 2.94 μm. The current data significantly surpass the previously reported analytical features. The particular softness of the method is, for example, exemplified by the analysis of noncovalently bound holo-myoglobin and of ribonuclease B. This is also the first report demonstrating the analysis of an IgG monoclonal antibody (MW ~ 150 kDa) from a water ice matrix. Untypical for MALDI-MS, high charge states of multiply protonated species were moreover observed for some of the investigated peptides and even for lacto-N-fucopentaose II oligosaccharides. Using water ice as matrix is of particular interest for MALDI MS profiling and imaging applications since matrix-free spectra are produced. The MS and tandem MS analysis of metabolites directly from frozen food samples is demonstrated with the example of a strawberry fruit.

  13. Stabilities of nanohydrated thymine radical cations: insights from multiphoton ionization experiments and ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Rahul; Lalande, Mathieu; Ryszka, Michal; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Mason, Nigel J.; Poully, Jean-Christophe; Eden, Samuel

    2017-07-01

    Multi-photon ionization experiments have been carried out on thymine-water clusters in the gas phase. Metastable H2O loss from T+(H2O)n was observed at n ≥ 3 only. Ab initio quantum-chemical calculations of a large range of optimized T+(H2O)n conformers have been performed up to n = 4, enabling binding energies of water to be derived. These decrease smoothly with n, consistent with the general trend of increasing metastable H2O loss in the experimental data. The lowest-energy conformers of T+(H2O)3 and T+(H2O)4 feature intermolecular bonding via charge-dipole interactions, in contrast with the purely hydrogen-bonded neutrals. We found no evidence for a closed hydration shell at n = 4, also contrasting with studies of neutral clusters. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Dynamics of Systems at the Nanoscale", edited by Andrey Solov'yov and Andrei Korol.

  14. Molecular-weight distributions of coal and petroleum asphaltenes from laser desorption/ionization experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ana R. Hortal; Paola Hurtado; Bruno Martinez-Haya; Oliver C. Mullins

    2007-09-15

    Molecular-weight distributions (MWDs) of asphaltenes extracted from coal and petroleum have been measured in laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric experiments. The dried-droplet and solvent-free sample preparation methods are compared. The coal asphaltenes have a relatively narrow MWD (full width 150 amu) with an average molecular weight of 340 amu. The petroleum asphaltenes display a broader MWD (full width 300 amu) and are heavier on average (680 amu). The LDI spectra also provide evidence for the formation of noncovalent clusters of the two types of asphaltenes during the desorption process. Petroleum and coal asphaltenes exhibit aggregation as do large model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with five or more fused rings also included in the study. Smaller PAHs (pyrene) exhibit less aggregation, especially when alkane-chain substituents are incorporated to the molecular structure. This indicates that asphaltenes possess large PAHs and, according to the relatively small molecular weights observed, that there is a preponderance of asphaltene molecules with only a single fused ring system. The coal asphaltenes present a significantly smaller propensity toward aggregation than their crude oil counterparts. This finding, coupled with the fact that (1) alkanes inhibit aggregation in LDI and (2) petroleum asphaltenes possess much more alkane carbon, indicates that coal asphaltenes have smaller PAHs on average than petroleum asphaltenes. This is further corroborated by the stronger ultraviolet absorbance of the coal asphaltenes at wavelengths shorter than 400 nm. 32 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Single-photon single ionization of W+ ions: experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Hellhund, J.; Holste, K.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Phaneuf, R. A.; Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2015-10-08

    Experimental and theoretical results are reported for photoionization of Ta-like (W+) tungsten ions. Absolute cross sections were measured in the energy range 16-245 eV employing the photon-ion merged-beam setup at the advanced light source in Berkeley. Detailed photon-energy scans at 100 meV bandwidth were performed in the 16-108 eV range. In addition, the cross section was scanned at 50 meV resolution in regions where fine resonance structures could be observed. Theoretical results were obtained from a Dirac-Coulomb R-matrix approach. Photoionization cross section calculations were performed for singly ionized atomic tungsten ions in their J = 1/2, ground level and the associated excited metastable levels with J = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2 and 9/2. Since the ion beams used in the experiments must be expected to contain long-lived excited states also from excited configurations, additional cross-section calculations were performed for the second-lowest term, J = 5/2, and for the 4 F term, with J = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2 and 9/2. Given the complexity of the electronic structure of W + the calculations reproduce the main features of the experimental cross section quite well.

  16. Single-photon single ionization of W+ ions: experiment and theory

    DOE PAGES

    Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Hellhund, J.; ...

    2015-10-08

    Experimental and theoretical results are reported for photoionization of Ta-like (W+) tungsten ions. Absolute cross sections were measured in the energy range 16-245 eV employing the photon-ion merged-beam setup at the advanced light source in Berkeley. Detailed photon-energy scans at 100 meV bandwidth were performed in the 16-108 eV range. In addition, the cross section was scanned at 50 meV resolution in regions where fine resonance structures could be observed. Theoretical results were obtained from a Dirac-Coulomb R-matrix approach. Photoionization cross section calculations were performed for singly ionized atomic tungsten ions in their J = 1/2, ground level and themore » associated excited metastable levels with J = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2 and 9/2. Since the ion beams used in the experiments must be expected to contain long-lived excited states also from excited configurations, additional cross-section calculations were performed for the second-lowest term, J = 5/2, and for the 4 F term, with J = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2 and 9/2. Given the complexity of the electronic structure of W + the calculations reproduce the main features of the experimental cross section quite well.« less

  17. The cooling of particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    A review is given of the various methods which can be employed for cooling particle beams. These methods include radiation damping, stimulated radiation damping, ionization cooling, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, laser cooling, and laser cooling with beam coupling. Laser Cooling has provided beams of the lowest temperatures, namely 1 mK, but only for ions and only for the longitudinal temperature. Recent theoretical work has suggested how laser cooling, with the coupling of beam motion, can be used to reduce the ion beam temperature in all three directions. The majority of this paper is devoted to describing laser cooling and laser cooling with beam coupling.

  18. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor.

  19. In-situ surface contamination removal and cool-down process of the DEAP-3600 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampa, Pietro; DEAP Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The DEAP-3600 experiment is a single-phase detector that uses 3600 Kg of liquid argon to search for Dark Matter at SNOLAB, Sudbury, Canada, 6800 ft. underground. The projected sensitivity to the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section is 10-46 cm2 for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV. A key experimental requirement is the reduction of any possible source of background that would mimic a Dark Matter signal This document will review how radiogenic surface backgrounds were reduced in-situ by removing 500 microns of acrylic from the innermost part of the detector with a resurfacing robot. Furthermore it will review the transient cool-down process of the experiment, necessary to reach cryogenic operating temperature.

  20. Rb atomic magnetometer toward EDM experiment with laser cooled francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Asahi, Koichiro; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield. We prepared the cell coated with an anti-relaxation material and measured the relaxation time. A degauss of the shield was performed to eliminate the residual field. We will report the present status of the magnetometer. A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield

  1. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kafka, Gene

    2015-05-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with signi cant exibility in mind, but without compromising cost e ciency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of di erent variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of- ight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  2. Analytical model for calibrating laser intensity in strong-field-ionization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Le, Anh-Thu; Jin, Cheng; Wang, Xu; Lin, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of an intense laser pulse with atoms and molecules depends extremely nonlinearly on the laser intensity. Yet experimentally there still exists no simple reliable methods for determining the peak laser intensity within the focused volume. Here we present a simple method, based on an improved Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev model, that would allow the calibration of laser intensities from the measured ionization signals of atoms or molecules. The model is first examined by comparing ionization probabilities (or signals) of atoms and several simple diatomic molecules with those from solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We then show the possibility of using this method to calibrate laser intensities for atoms, diatomic molecules as well as large polyatomic molecules, for laser intensities from the multiphoton ionization to tunneling ionization regimes.

  3. Combining the Strong Drive Regime with Evaporative Cooling to Control Plasma Parameters in the ALPHA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruth, Celeste; Fajans, Joel; Alpha Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    To make antihydrogen at the ALPHA experiment at CERN, we need to produce antiproton and positron plasmas with consistent plasma parameters. We developed a technique that allows us to eliminate initial variations in the density and the number of particles by combining evaporative cooling and the strong drive regime. The strong drive regime is a non-neutral plasma regime driven by a rotating electric field, where the drive frequency synchronizes with the plasma rotation frequency; this controls the density. Evaporative cooling is a space-charge dominated effect where a potential well is completely filled with the space charge of a plasma and one side is lowered, which sets the on-axis potential. For cold non-neutral plasmas, the density and on-axis potential give a unique solution to the plasma parameters, so we want to simultaneously combine these two techniques. Experimental results using electron plasmas show this combination of techniques does an excellent job at producing plasmas with the same number of particles and densities from a wide range of initial conditions. Special thanks to the United States Department of Energy and to the ALPHA collaboration for supporting this research.

  4. ECOKATS-2: A Large Scale Experiment on Melt Spreading and Subsequent Cooling by Top Flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Alsmeyer, H.; Cron, T.; Messemer, G.; Haefner, W.

    2004-07-01

    Spreading of a melt and subsequent top flooding are investigated in a large scale experiment, using a 2 m by 2 m concrete cavity that is filled with 3200 kg high temperature steel and oxide melt. During the first phase of intense concrete erosion, the surface of the spread melt is flooded with coolant water. The interaction of melt and coolant water is mild and does not produce energetic interactions. A closed surface crust is formed that is strictly anchored to the concrete sidewalls. Efficient cooling through formation of an upper crust with high porosity is restricted to the upper 4 cm of the original melt. The contribution of volcanic eruptions to coolability is small, as no loose particles were ejected. The bulk of the oxide melt and the iron layer at the bottom are not cooled by water ingression from the top. With respect to reactor application it is concluded that top flooding alone is unlikely to stop concrete erosion through deeper corium melts. (authors)

  5. Experiments on FTU with an actively water cooled liquid lithium limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Crescenzi, F.; Iannone, F.; Maddaluno, G.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Roccella, S.; Reale, M.; Viola, B.; Lyublinski, I.; Vertkov, A.

    2015-08-01

    In order to prevent the overheating of the liquid Li surface and the consequent Li evaporation for T > 500 °C, an advanced version of the liquid lithium limiter has been realized and installed on FTU. This new system, named Cooled Lithium Limiter (CLL), has been optimized to demonstrate the lithium limiter capability to sustain thermal loads as high as 10 MW/m2 with up to 5 s of plasma pulse duration. The CLL operates with an actively cooled system with water circulation at the temperature of about 200 °C, for heating lithium up to the melting point and for the heat removal during the plasma discharges. To characterize CLL during discharges, a fast infrared camera and the spectroscopic signals from Li and D atom emission have been used. The experiments analyzed so far and simulated by ANSYS code, point out that heat loads as high as 2 MW/m2 for 1.5 s have been withstood without problems.

  6. TASK 2.5.7 FIELD EXPERIMENTS TO EVALUATE COOL-COLORED ROOFING

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William A; Cherry, Nigel J; Allen, Richard Lowell; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen; Ronnen, Levinson; Akbari, Hashem; Berhahl, Paul

    2010-03-01

    counter battens, providing a nailing surface for the concrete tile. This double batten construction forms an inclined air channel running from the soffit to the ridge. The bottom surface of the channel is formed by the roof decking and is relatively flat and smooth. The top surface is created by the underside of the roofing tiles, and is designed to be an air permeable covering to alleviate the underside air pressure and minimize wind uplift on the tiles. The resulting air flows also have a cooling influence which further complicates prediction of the heat penetrating through the deck because an accurate measure of the airflow is required to predict the heat transfer. Measured temperatures and heat flows at the roof surface, within the attic and at the ceiling of the houses are discussed as well as the power usage to help gauge the benefit of cool-pigmented reflective roof products fitted with and without ventilation above the roof deck. Ventilation occurring above the deck is an inherent feature for tile roof assemblies, and is formed by an air space between the exterior face of the roof sheathing and the underside of the tile. The greater the tile s profile the greater is the effect of the ventilation which herein is termed above-sheathing ventilation (ASV). However, because of the complexity of the thermally induced flow, little credit is allowed by state and federal building codes. ASHRAE (2005) provides empirical data for the effective thermal resistance of plane air spaces. A -in. (0.0191-m) plane air space inclined at 45 with the horizontal has an RUS-0.85 (RSI-0.15) . Our intent is to help further deploy cool color pigments in roofs by conducting field experiments to evaluate the new cool-colored roofing materials in the hot climate of Southern California. The collected data will be used to showcase and market the performance of new cool-roof products and also to help formulate and validate computer codes capable of calculating the heat transfer occurring within

  7. RCCS Experiments and Validation for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Goon C. Park

    2007-09-01

    A reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS), an air-cooled helical coil RCCS unit immersed in the water pool, was proposed to overcome the disadvantages of the weak cooling ability of air-cooled RCCS and the complex structure of water-cooled RCCS for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). An experimental apparatus was constructed to investigate the various heat transfer phenomena in the water pool type RCCS, such as the natural convection of air inside the cavity, radiation in the cavity, the natural convection of water in the water pool and the forced convection of air in the cooling pipe. The RCCS experimental results were compared with published correlations. The CFX code was validated using data from the air-cooled portion of the RCCS. The RELAP5 code was validated using measured temperatures from the reactor vessel and cavity walls.

  8. Interaction mechanisms of Ionizable Organic Pollutants with Aromatized Biochar: Adsorption Experiments and DFT Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Chen, Baoliang

    2017-04-01

    The molecular interaction between biochars and ionizable organic pollutants (IOPs) are of great concern in natural environments, however the underlying mechanisms and their quantification under different pH range are not vivid. The adsorption of IOPs onto high temperature biochars derived from bamboo wood biomass (BW700) was conducted to quantify the various interactions between sorbent surface and IOPs under different pH conditions. The aromatized surface of BW700 were characterized by Fourier Transformed Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) specific surface area with N2 and CHN elemental compositions. Seven IOPs were selected as model sorbates, and batch sorption experiments were conducted to quantify the ratio of π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding interactions. The pH-dependent adsorption curves and the adsorption isotherms not only indicated that the adsorption capacity was related with species of IOPs, but also showed the presence of adsorbing peak owing some of the other mechanisms when taking the ice-like adlayer into consideration. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) calculations provided a possible structure of the complex combined with ice-like adlayer with aromatic substrate of BW700, and indicated that the formation of extra adsorption sites originated from the X-H ... O-H ... π interactions. The contribution of π-π interactions, hydrogen bonding interactions and X-H ... O-H ... π interactions were distinguished by the pKa value of IOPs owing to their species. Our findings provide new insight for distinction and quantification of various interactions under different pH conditions, and it is the first time to put forward the X-H ... O-H ... π interactions for the interaction mechanism of IOPs with biochar.

  9. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xin-Hu; Ye, Yun-Xiu; Chen, Jian-Ping; Lu, Hai-Jiang; Zhu, Peng-Jia; Jiang, Feng-Jian

    2015-07-01

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at the Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed for 12C elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio \\frac{{Δ p}}{p} and 12C elastic cross section are compared without and with radiative energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for 12C elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275083), US Department of Energy contract DE-AC05-84ER-40150 under which Jefferson Science Associates operates the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Natural Science Foundation of An'hui Educational Committee (KJ2012B179)

  10. Low-noise wide-band amplifiers for stochastic beam cooling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovar, B.; Lo, C. C.

    1982-09-01

    Noise characteristics of the continuous wave broadband amplifier systems for stochastic beam cooling experiments are presented. The noise performance, bandwidth capability and gain stability of components used in these amplifiers are summarized and compared in the 100 MHz to 40 GHz frequency range. This includes bipolar and field effect transistors, parametric amplifier, Schottky diode mixer and maser. Measurements of the noise characteristics and scattering parameters of variety GaAs FETs as a function of ambient temperature are also given. Performance data and design information are presented on a broadband 150-500 MHz preamplifier with noise temperature of approximately 350 K at ambient temperature of 200 K. Preamplifier stability based on scattering parameters concept is analyzed.

  11. Cryo-Cooled Sapphire Oscillator for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1997-01-01

    We present features for an ultra-stable sapphire cryogenic oscillator which has been designed to support the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment. The design of this standard is new in several respects. It is cooled by a commercial cryocooler instead of liquid cryogens to increase operating time, and it uses a technology to adjust the temperature turn-over point to extend the upper operating temperature limit and to enable construction of multiple units with uniform operating characteristics. Objectives are 3 x 10(exp -15) stability for measuring times 1 second less than or equal to (tau) less than or equal to 100 seconds, phase noise of -85 dBc/Hz from offset frequencies of 1 Hz to 1000 Hz at 10 GHz carrier frequency, and a one year continuous operating period.

  12. The trigger system for the external target experiment in the HIRFL cooling storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Jin-Xin; Lu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-08-01

    A trigger system was designed for the external target experiment in the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Considering that different detectors are scattered over a large area, the trigger system is designed based on a master-slave structure and fiber-based serial data transmission technique. The trigger logic is organized in hierarchies, and flexible reconfiguration of the trigger function is achieved based on command register access or overall field-programmable gate array (FPGA) logic on-line reconfiguration controlled by remote computers. We also conducted tests to confirm the function of the trigger electronics, and the results indicate that this trigger system works well. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079003), the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-YW-N27), and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP).

  13. A compact and efficient strontium oven for laser-cooling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schioppo, M.; Poli, N.; Prevedelli, M.; Falke, St.; Lisdat, Ch.; Sterr, U.; Tino, G. M.

    2012-10-01

    Here we describe a compact and efficient strontium oven well suited for laser-cooling experiments. Novel design solutions allowed us to produce a collimated strontium atomic beam with a flux of 1.0 × 1013 s-1 cm-2 at the oven temperature of 450 °C, reached with an electrical power consumption of 36 W. The oven is based on a stainless-steel reservoir, filled with 6 g of metallic strontium, electrically heated in a vacuum environment by a tantalum wire threaded through an alumina multi-bore tube. The oven can be hosted in a standard DN40CF cube and has an estimated continuous operation lifetime of 10 years. This oven can be used for other alkali and alkaline earth metals with essentially no modifications.

  14. A compact and efficient strontium oven for laser-cooling experiments.

    PubMed

    Schioppo, M; Poli, N; Prevedelli, M; Falke, St; Lisdat, Ch; Sterr, U; Tino, G M

    2012-10-01

    Here we describe a compact and efficient strontium oven well suited for laser-cooling experiments. Novel design solutions allowed us to produce a collimated strontium atomic beam with a flux of 1.0 × 10(13) s(-1) cm(-2) at the oven temperature of 450 °C, reached with an electrical power consumption of 36 W. The oven is based on a stainless-steel reservoir, filled with 6 g of metallic strontium, electrically heated in a vacuum environment by a tantalum wire threaded through an alumina multi-bore tube. The oven can be hosted in a standard DN40CF cube and has an estimated continuous operation lifetime of 10 years. This oven can be used for other alkali and alkaline earth metals with essentially no modifications.

  15. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Monte Carlo Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Critical Ionization Velocity Experiments in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Biasca, R.; Liewer, P. C.

    1996-01-01

    Although the existence of the critical ionization velocity (CIV) is known from laboratory experiments, no agreement has been reached as to whether CIV exists in the natural space environment. In this paper we move towards more realistic models of CIV and present the first fully three-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulations of typical space-based CIV experiments. In our model, the released neutral gas is taken to be a spherical cloud traveling across a magnetized ambient plasma. Simulations are performed for neutral clouds with various sizes and densities. The effects of the cloud parameters on ionization yield, wave energy growth, electron heating, momentum coupling, and the three-dimensional structure of the newly ionized plasma are discussed. The simulations suggest that the quantitative characteristics of momentum transfers among the ion beam, neutral cloud, and plasma waves is the key indicator of whether CIV can occur in space. The missing factors in space-based CIV experiments may be the conditions necessary for a continuous enhancement of the beam ion momentum. For a typical shaped charge release experiment, favorable CIV conditions may exist only in a very narrow, intermediate spatial region some distance from the release point due to the effects of the cloud density and size. When CIV does occur, the newly ionized plasma from the cloud forms a very complex structure due to the combined forces from the geomagnetic field, the motion induced emf, and the polarization. Hence the detection of CIV also critically depends on the sensor location.

  16. Recent RF results from the MuCool test area

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Bross, A.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Huang, D.; Torun, Y.; Rimmer, R.; Li, D.; Zisman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-06-01

    The MuCool Experiment has been continuing to take data with 805 and 201 MHz cavities in the MuCool Test Area (MTA). The system uses rf power sources from the Fermilab Linac. Although the experimental program is primarily aimed at the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), we have been studying the dependence of rf limits on frequency, cavity material, high magnetic fields, gas pressure, coatings, etc. with the general aim of understanding the basic mechanisms involved. The 201 MHz cavity, essentially a prototype for the MICE experiment, was made using cleaning techniques similar to those employed for superconducting cavities and operates at its design field with very little conditioning.

  17. Recent RF Results from the MuCool Test Area

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Bross, A.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Huang, D.; Torun,Y.; Rimmer, R.; Li, D.; Zisman, M.

    2007-06-18

    The MuCool Experiment has been continuing to take data with805 and 201 MHz cavities in the MuCool Test Area. The system uses rfpower sources from the Fermilab Linac. Although the experimental programisprimarily aimed at the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), wehave been studying the dependence of rf limits on frequency, cavitymaterial, high magnetic fields, gas pressure, coatings, etc. with thegeneral aim of understanding the basic mechanisms involved. The 201 MHzcavity, essentially a prototype for the MICE experiment, was made usingcleaning techniques similar to those employed for superconductingcavities and operates at its design field with very littleconditioning.

  18. Extending the applicability of an open-ring trap to perform experiments with a single laser-cooled ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, J. M.; Colombano, M.; Doménech, J.; Block, M.; Delahaye, P.; Rodríguez, D.

    2015-10-01

    A special ion trap was initially built up to perform β-ν correlation experiments with radioactive ions. The trap geometry is also well suited to perform experiments with laser-cooled ions, serving for the development of a new type of Penning trap, in the framework of the project TRAPSENSOR at the University of Granada. The goal of this project is to use a single 40Ca+ ion as detector for single-ion mass spectrometry. Within this project and without any modification to the initial electrode configuration, it was possible to perform Doppler cooling on 40Ca+ ions, starting from large clouds and reaching single ion sensitivity. This new feature of the trap might be important also for other experiments with ions produced at radioactive ion beam facilities. In this publication, the trap and the laser system will be described, together with their performance with respect to laser cooling applied to large ion clouds down to a single ion.

  19. Characterization of weakly ionized argon flows for radio blackout mitigation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, L.; Koch, U.; Esser, B.; Gülhan, A.

    2017-06-01

    For reproducing the so-called E × B communication blackout mitigation scheme inside the L2K arc heated facility of the DLR in weakly ionized argon §ows, a §at plate model has been equipped with a superconducting magnet, electrodes, and a setup comprising microwave plasma transmission spectroscopy (MPTS). A thorough characterization of the weakly ionized argon §ow has been performed including the use of microwave interferometry (MWI), Langmuir probe measurements, Pitot probe pro¦les, and spectroscopic methods like diode laser absorption spectroscopy (DLAS) and emission spectroscopy.

  20. Crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspars in cooling and decompression-induced crystallization experiments in trachytic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Carroll, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    Cooling and decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic melts in order to investigate crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspar, the effect of the degree of undercooling ( ΔT = T liquidus - T experimental) and time on nucleation and crystal growth process. This experimental work gives us new data about crystallization kinetics of trachytic melts, and it that will be useful to better understand the natural system of Campi Flegrei volcanoes. Experiments have been conducted using cold seal pressure vessel apparatus, at pressure between 30 and 200 MPa, temperature between 750 and 855 °C, time between 7,200 and 57,600 s and redox condition close to the NNO +0.8 buffer. These conditions are ideal to reproducing pre- and syn-eruptive conditions of the Campi Flegrei volcanoes, where the "conditions" pertain to the complete range of pressures, temperatures and time at which the experiments were performed. Alkali feldspar is the main phase present in this trachyte, and its abundance can strongly vary with small changes in pressure, temperature and water content in the melt, implying appreciable variations in the textures and in the crystallization kinetics. The obtained results show that crystallization kinetics are strictly related to ΔT, time, final pressure, superheating (- ΔT) and water content in the melt. ΔT is the driving force of the crystallization, and it has a strong influence on nucleation and growth processes. In fact, the growth process dominates crystallization at small ΔT, whereas the nucleation dominates crystallization at large ΔT. Time also is an important variable during crystallization process, because long experiment durations involve more nucleation events of alkali feldspar than short experiment durations. This is an important aspect to understand magma evolution in the magma chamber and in the conduit, which in turn has strong effects on magma rheology.

  1. Status of proof-of-principle experiment for coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Bengtsson, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Elizarov, A. et al

    2012-05-20

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron colliders. To verify the concept we conduct proof-of-the-principle experiment at RHIC. In this paper, we describe the current experimental setup to be installed into 2 o'clock RHIC interaction regions. We present current design, status of equipment acquisition and estimates for the expected beam parameters. We use a dogleg to merge the electron and ion beams. The ions 'imprint' their distribution into the electron beam via a space charge density modulation. The modulation is amplified in an FEL comprised of a 7-m long helical wiggler. The ions are co-propagating with electron beam through the FEL. The ion's average velocity is matched to the group velocity of the wave-packet of e-beam density modulation in the FEL. A three-pole wiggler at the exit of the FEL tune the phase of the wave-packet so the ion with the central energy experience the maximum of the e-beam density modulation, where electric field is zero. The time-of-flight dependence on ion's provides for the electrical field caused by the density modulation to reduce energy spread of the ion beam. The used electron beam is bent off the ion path and damped.

  2. Investigating two-photon double ionization of D2 by XUV-Pump -- XUV-Probe experiments at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    FLASH Collaboration; Jiang, Y.; Rudenko, A.; Perez-Torres, J.; Foucar, L.; Kurka, M.; Kuhnel, K.; Toppin, M.; Plesiat, E.; Morales, F.; Martin, F.; Herrwerth, O.; Lezius, M.; Kling, M.; Jahnke, T.; Dorner, R.; Sanz-Vicario, J.; van Tilborg, J.; Belkacem, A.; Schulz, M.; Ueda, K.; Zouros, T.; Dusterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Schroter, C.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2010-08-02

    Using a novel split-mirror set-up attached to a Reaction Microscope at the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) we demonstrate an XUV-pump -- XUV-probe ((hbar omega = 38 eV) experiment by tracing the ultra-fast nuclear wave-packet motion in the D2+ (1s sigma g-state) with<10 fs time resolution. Comparison with time-dependent calculations yields excellent agreement with the measured vibrational period of 22+-4 fs in D2+, points to the importance of the inter-nuclear distance dependent ionization probability and paves the way to control sequential and non-sequential two-photon double ionization contributions.

  3. Cooling rate effects in sodium silicate glasses: Bridging the gap between molecular dynamics simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Song, Weiying; Yang, Kai; Krishnan, N. M. Anoop; Wang, Bu; Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Mauro, John C.; Sant, Gaurav; Balonis, Magdalena; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2017-08-01

    Although molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are commonly used to predict the structure and properties of glasses, they are intrinsically limited to short time scales, necessitating the use of fast cooling rates. It is therefore challenging to compare results from MD simulations to experimental results for glasses cooled on typical laboratory time scales. Based on MD simulations of a sodium silicate glass with varying cooling rate (from 0.01 to 100 K/ps), here we show that thermal history primarily affects the medium-range order structure, while the short-range order is largely unaffected over the range of cooling rates simulated. This results in a decoupling between the enthalpy and volume relaxation functions, where the enthalpy quickly plateaus as the cooling rate decreases, whereas density exhibits a slower relaxation. Finally, we show that, using the proper extrapolation method, the outcomes of MD simulations can be meaningfully compared to experimental values when extrapolated to slower cooling rates.

  4. On the Lower Limit of Chondrule Cooling Rates: The Significance of Iron Loss in Dynamic Crystallization Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paque, Julie M.; Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    Lofgren (1989) and the further analysis of Lofgren's 1989 experiments by Jones and Lofgren (1993) established that cooling rates as slow as 5 C/hour produced analog textures and major and minor element zoning profiles in minerals, implying that a lower limit on chondrule cooling rate may be approximately 5 C/hour These results, however, are in conflict with those reported by Radomsky and Hewins (1990). In their paper, Radomsky and Hewins (1990) established a lower limit on chondrule cooling rates of I 100 C/hour a factor of 20 higher than that suggested by Jones and Lofgren (1993). The higher cooling rates suggested by Radomsky and Hewins (1990) have gained considerable favor within the meteoritic community largely because it appears more consistent with the preservation of Na in chondrules, which tends to volatilize at the slower cooling rates. In their study, however, Radomsky and Hewins (1990) did not use Pt hang wires that were coated or saturated with Fe. The lack of such techniques likely facilitated Fe loss from their experimental chondrules to the hang wire during formation (Jones and Lofgren, 1993). The effect of Fe loss could produce an inaccurate determination of cooling rates since these rates are largely determined by the Mg-Fe distributions in individual crystals.

  5. Droplet Impact Sub-cavity Histories and PDPA Spray Experiments for Spray Cooling Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillen, Nicholas Lee

    Spray cooling is a topic of current interest for its ability to uniformly remove high levels of waste heat from densely packed microelectronics. It has demonstrated the ability to achieve very high heat fluxes, up to 500 W/cm2 with water as the coolant, making it an attractive active thermal management tool. Full Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations of spray cooling are infeasible due to the complexity of the spray (drops fluxes of 106 drops/cm2-sec) and heater surface physics requiring impractical resources. Thus a Monte-Carlo (MC) spray cooling simulation model based on empirical data is under development to serve as a cost effective design tool. The initial MC model shows promise, but it lacks additional physics necessary to predict accurate heat fluxes based on nozzle conditions and heated surface geometry. This work reports spray and single drop experiments with the goal of computing the volume beneath a droplet impact cavity (the sub-cavity volume) created by a single impinging droplet on an initial liquid layer. A Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) was utilized to characterize a spray of interest in terms of integrated global Weber, Reynolds, and Froude numbers for varying flow conditions. Results showed that the spray droplet diameters decreased and velocities increased with increasing nozzle gage pressure. A relevant test plan for the single drop experiments has been created from the measured PDPA spray profiles combined with residual spray film thickness measurements from literature resulting in: 140≤We≤1,000, 1,200≤ Re≤3,300, and 0.2≤h0*≤1.0. Froude numbers were not able to be matched for the current single drop experiments (spray: 32,800≤Fr≤275,000). Liquid film thicknesses under the cavity formed by a single droplet have been measured versus radius and time via a non-contact optical thickness sensor for the selected range of dimensionless numbers (We, Re, and h0*). Sub-cavity radius histories have also been analyzed

  6. Capillary-Driven Heat Transfer Experiment: Keeping It Cool in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekan, Jack F.; Allen, Jeffrey S.

    1998-01-01

    Capillary-pumped loops (CPL's) are devices that are used to transport heat from one location to another--specifically to transfer heat away from something. In low-gravity applications, such as satellites (and possibly the International Space Station), CPL's are used to transfer heat from electrical devices to space radiators. This is accomplished by evaporating one liquid surface on the hot side of the CPL and condensing the vapor produced onto another liquid surface on the cold side. Capillary action, the phenomenon that causes paper towels to absorb spilled liquids, is used to "pump" the liquid back to the evaporating liquid surface (hot side) to complete the "loop." CPL's require no power to operate and can transfer heat over distances as large as 30 ft or more. Their reliance upon evaporation and condensation to transfer heat makes them much more economical in terms of weight than conventional heat transfer systems. Unfortunately, they have proven to be unreliable in space operations, and the explanation for this unreliability has been elusive. The Capillary-Driven Heat Transfer (CHT) experiment is investigating the fundamental fluid physics phenomena thought to be responsible for the failure of CPL's in low-gravity operations. If the failure mechanism can be identified, then appropriate design modifications can be developed to make capillary phase-change heat-transport devices a more viable option in space applications. CHT was conducted onboard the Space Shuttle Columbia during the first Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1) mission, STS-94, which flew from July 1 to 17, 1997. The CHT glovebox investigation, which was conceived by Dr. Kevin Hallinan and Jeffrey Allen of the University of Dayton, focused on studying the dynamics associated with the heating and cooling at the evaporating meniscus within a capillary phase-change device in a low-gravity environment. The CHT experimental hardware was designed by a small team of engineers from Aerospace Design

  7. Muon Cooling R&D Progress in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Derun

    2008-02-01

    Muon ionization cooling R&D is important for a neutrino factory and future muon collider. In addition to theoretical studies, much progress has been made in muon cooling channel hardware R&D since NuFact-2006. This paper reports the progress on hardware R&D that includes experimental RF test programs using 805-MHz RF cavity, superconducting (SC) solenoids (coupling coils), 201-MHz RF cavity, liquid hydrogen absorber and MUCOOL Test Area (MTA) experiment preparation for beam tests.

  8. Electric breakdown and ionization detection in normal liquid and superfluid 4He for the SNA nEDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcz, Maciej

    Helium throughout the pressure-temperature phase space, between 1 bar and the saturation curve and between 4.2 K and 1.7 K. A new breakdown hysteresis in liquid helium was discovered and is attributed to the suppression of heterogeneous nucleation sites inside the liquid. A phenomenological model involving the Townsend breakdown mechanism and Paschen's Law in liquid helium is proposed. In addition, the many challenges faced by efficient scintillation detection in the cryogenic environment of the nEDM experiment motivated additional studies at CEEM. To test the effect of an electric field on scintillation in superfluid, a SF test cell was constructed inside a dilution refrigerator and it was found that the scintil- lation intensity from a 241Am source in the cell, is reduced at high electric fields. Alternatives to scintillation detection for the nEDM experiment were also explored and the test cell was reconfigured to operate as a superfluid ionization chamber. The superfluid ionization chamber was tested with 241Am in pulse mode and current mode configurations. While the pulse mode in superfluid, which relies on the drift velocity of charges, is hindered by quasi-particle excitations in superfluid, results of current mode measurements appear promising. To further explore the prospect of cryogenic ionization detection, a detector cryo-stat capable of detecting neutrons using a 10B converter was also constructed at CEEM and tested at the Indiana University Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS). The neutron detector cryostat has the benefit of being able to modulate the ioniza- tion source which was not possible with the superfluid ionization chamber. Tests with argon gas led to the development of more efficient boron targets. The cryogenic test of ionization detection in current mode will be discussed.

  9. Plate impact experiments on DC745U cooled to ~ -60 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, Richard L.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Bartram, Brian Douglas; Gibson, Lloyd Lee; Jones, Justin Daniel; Goodbody, Austin Bernard

    2016-08-11

    Using gas-gun driven plate impact experiments, we have measured the US - up Hugoniot of the silicone elastomer DC745U cooled to -60 °C. In summary, the initial density changes from p0 (23°C) = 1.312 ± 0.010 g/cm3 to p0 (-60°C) = 1.447 ± 0.011 g/cm3. The linear US - up Hugoniot changes from US = 1.62 + 1.74up km/s at +23°C, to US = 2.03 ± 0.06 + (2.03 ± 0.06) up km/s at -60°C. DC745U, therefore is much stiffer at -60°C than at +23°C, probably due to the crystallization that occurs at ~ -50°C. Caveats/deficiencies: 1) This report does not provide an adequate pedigree of the DC745U used. 2) References to unpublished room temperature shock compression data on the elastomer are inadequate. 3) The report has not been fact checked by a DC745 subject matter expert.

  10. Experiments on solar photovoltaic power generation using concentrator and liquid cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, B. H.; Hansen, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    Calculations and experimental data are presented leading to the development of a practical, economical solar photovoltaic power supply. The concept involves concentration of sunlight up to about 100 times normal solar intensity in a solar tracking collector and directing this to an array of solar cells. The cells are immersed in water circulated from a thermal reservoir which limits cell temperature rise to about 20 C above ambient during the day and which cools to ambient temperature during the night. Experiments were conducted on solar cells using a Fresnel lens for magnification, a telescope equatorial mount with clock drive, and tap water circulated through the solar cell holder cavity. Test results show that cells operate satisfactorily under these conditions. Power outputs achieved experimentally with cell optimized for 25 suns were linear with concentration to about 15 suns. Cells optimized for 100 suns were not available, but a corresponding linear relation of power output with concentration is anticipated. Test results have been used in a design analysis of the cost of systems utilizing this technique.

  11. Diffusion cooling of thermal neutrons in basic rock minerals by Monte Carlo simulation of the pulsed neutron experiments.

    PubMed

    Drozdowicz, K; Krynicka, E; Dabrowska, J

    2003-06-01

    The pulsed neutron experiment (the variable geometric buckling experiment) in spherical geometry has been simulated using the MCNP code. The time decay of the thermal neutron flux has been observed as a function of the sample size. The thermal neutron diffusion cooling coefficient C with the correction F has been determined for three basic rock minerals (quartz, calcite, dolomite) at the given specific densities. The corresponding density-removed parameters have also been obtained.

  12. On the Lower Limit of Chondrule Cooling Rates: The Significance of Iron Loss in Dynamic Crystallization Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paque, Julie M.; Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    1998-01-01

    It is unlikely that the presence of chondrules, and thus their formation, within the protoplanetary nebula would be predicted if it were not for their ubiquitous presence in most chondritic meteorites. The study of these enigmatic, igneous objects has a direct influence on how meteoritic and solar system researchers model the processes operating and the materials present within our protoplanetary nebula. Key to understanding chondrule formation is a determination of constraints on their thermal histories. The three important variables in this history are their peak melting temperatures, the duration of their melting at peak temperatures, and the rate at which these object cool. Although these three variables are interdependent, it is cooling rate that provides the most powerful constraint. Cooling rate has a direct affect on the development of both crystal morphology and the elemental distributions within these grains. To date, experiments have indicated that chondrule cooling rates are in the range of 10's to 100's of degrees per hour for porphyritic chondrules (the most abundant type). The cooling rate for radial and barred chondrules is thought to be more rapid. To generate these cooling rates (rapid relative to the cooling of the nebula as a whole, but slow compared to simple black body radiation) the environment of chondrule formation must have been localized, and the abundance of solid materials must have been greatly enhanced above a gas of solar composition. Thus accurate determinations of chondrule cooling rates is critical in understanding both their formation and the nebular environment in which they formed. In a quest to more accurately determine the lower limit on cooling rates and to determine in more detail the effects of Fe loss from a molten sample to Pt wire loops, Weinbruch et al. have explored this issue experimentally and reevaluated the findings of Radomsky and Hewins in light of their new results. The basic conclusions of their paper are an

  13. New Results from the Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with the CDMS Low Ionization Threshold Experiment.

    PubMed

    Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Aramaki, T; Asai, M; Baker, W; Balakishiyeva, D; Barker, D; Basu Thakur, R; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Calkins, R; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Ghaith, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jardin, D; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Leder, A; Loer, B; Lopez Asamar, E; Lukens, P; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Mast, N; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Morales Mendoza, J D; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Roberts, A; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Toback, D; Underwood, R; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wilson, J S; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2016-02-19

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg day, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. A fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded for WIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5  GeV/c^{2}.

  14. New results from the search for low-mass weakly interacting massive particles with the CDMS low ionization threshold experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Agnese, R.

    2016-02-17

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Our results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg days, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. Furthermore, a fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. Lastly, new parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded forWIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV/c2.

  15. New Results from the Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with the CDMS Low Ionization Threshold Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Aramaki, T.; Asai, M.; Baker, W.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Ghaith, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Mast, N.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Underwood, R.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg day, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. A fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded for WIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV /c2 .

  16. Theoretical analysis of the projectile and target coherence in COLTRIMS experiments on atomic ionization by fast ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.

    2017-03-01

    Possible effects of the so-called projectile and target coherence in the ion-atom ionizing collisions studied with COLTRIMS are examined by means of quantum scattering theory of wave packets. The projectile-coherence effects are shown to have no serious influence on the measured fully differential cross sections. It is demonstrated that in the discussed experiments the effects of the target center-of-mass wave packet might be of greater importance. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces", edited by A.N. Grum-Grzhimailo, E.V. Gryzlova, Yu V. Popov, and A.V. Solov'yov.

  17. New results from the search for low-mass weakly interacting massive particles with the CDMS low ionization threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.

    2016-02-17

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Our results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg days, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. Furthermore, a fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. Lastly, new parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded forWIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV/c2.

  18. Battery-powered pulsed high density inductively coupled plasma source for pre-ionization in laboratory astrophysics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.; Bellan, Paul M.

    2015-07-01

    An electrically floating radiofrequency (RF) pre-ionization plasma source has been developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and to access new experimental regimes in the Caltech laboratory astrophysics experiments. The source uses a customized 13.56 MHz class D RF power amplifier that is powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 3-6 kV with the electrodes of the high voltage pulsed power experiments. The amplifier, which is capable of 3 kW output power in pulsed (<1 ms) operation, couples electrical energy to the plasma through an antenna external to the 1.1 cm radius discharge tube. By comparing the predictions of a global equilibrium discharge model with the measured scalings of plasma density with RF power input and axial magnetic field strength, we demonstrate that inductive coupling (rather than capacitive coupling or wave damping) is the dominant energy transfer mechanism. Peak ion densities exceeding 5 × 1019 m-3 in argon gas at 30 mTorr have been achieved with and without a background field. Installation of the pre-ionization source on a magnetohydrodynamically driven jet experiment reduced the breakdown time and jitter and allowed for the creation of hotter, faster argon plasma jets than was previously possible.

  19. Battery-powered pulsed high density inductively coupled plasma source for pre-ionization in laboratory astrophysics experiments.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Vernon H; Bellan, Paul M

    2015-07-01

    An electrically floating radiofrequency (RF) pre-ionization plasma source has been developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and to access new experimental regimes in the Caltech laboratory astrophysics experiments. The source uses a customized 13.56 MHz class D RF power amplifier that is powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 3-6 kV with the electrodes of the high voltage pulsed power experiments. The amplifier, which is capable of 3 kW output power in pulsed (<1 ms) operation, couples electrical energy to the plasma through an antenna external to the 1.1 cm radius discharge tube. By comparing the predictions of a global equilibrium discharge model with the measured scalings of plasma density with RF power input and axial magnetic field strength, we demonstrate that inductive coupling (rather than capacitive coupling or wave damping) is the dominant energy transfer mechanism. Peak ion densities exceeding 5 × 10(19) m(-3) in argon gas at 30 mTorr have been achieved with and without a background field. Installation of the pre-ionization source on a magnetohydrodynamically driven jet experiment reduced the breakdown time and jitter and allowed for the creation of hotter, faster argon plasma jets than was previously possible.

  20. Intravascular Cooling in the Treatment of Stroke (ICTuS): early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Lyden, Patrick D; Allgren, Robin L; Ng, Ken; Akins, Paul; Meyer, Brett; Al-Sanani, Fahmi; Lutsep, Helmi; Dobak, John; Matsubara, Bradley S; Zivin, Justin

    2005-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the safety and feasibility of mild therapeutic hypothermia using an endovascular temperature management system in awake acute ischemic stroke patients. The Intravascular Cooling in the Treatment of Stroke (ICTuS) study was an uncontrolled, multicenter development and feasibility study of conscious patients (n = 18) presenting within 12 hours of onset of an acute ischemic stroke at 5 clinical sites in the United States. Enrolled patients were to undergo core temperature management using an endovascular cooling system to induce and maintain mild, therapeutic hypothermia (target temperature of 33.0 degrees C) for a period of either 12 or 24 hours, followed by controlled rewarming to 36.5 degrees C over the subsequent 12-hour period. Nine patients underwent 12 hours of cooling followed by 12 hours of controlled rewarming, and 6 patients underwent 24 hours of cooling followed by 12 hours of controlled rewarming. Three patients underwent <1.5 hours of hypothermia due to clinical or technical issues. We also developed an antishivering regimen using buspirone and meperidine administered prophylactically to suppress shivering. The endovascular cooling catheter was well tolerated, with acceptable adverse event rates. Increasing the duration of hypothermia administration from 12 hours to 24 hours did not appear to increase the incidence or severity of adverse effects. Endovascular cooling with a proactive antishivering regimen can be accomplished in awake stroke patients. Further studies are needed to establish the safety and efficacy of this approach.

  1. The Cold Mass Support System and the Helium Cooling System for theMICE Focusing Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Stephanie Q.; Green, Michael A.; Lau, Wing W.; Senanayake,Rohan S.; Witte, Holger

    2006-08-10

    The heart of the absorber focus coil (AFC) module for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) is the two-coil superconducting solenoid that surrounds the muon absorber. The superconducting magnet focuses the muons that are cooled using ionization cooling, in order to improve the efficiency of cooling. The coils of the magnet may either be run in the solenoid mode (both coils operate at the same polarity) or the gradient (the coils operate at opposite polarity). The AFC magnet cold mass support system is designed to carry a longitudinal force up to 700 kN. The AFC module will be cooled using three pulse tube coolers that produce 1.5 W of cooling at 4.2 K. One of the coolers will be used to cool the liquid (hydrogen or helium) absorber used for ionization cooling. The other two coolers will cool the superconducting solenoid. This report will describe the MICE AFC magnet. The cold mass supports will be discussed. The reasons for using a pulsed tube cooler to cool this superconducting magnet will also be discussed.

  2. Cold air in laser therapy: first experiences with a new cooling system.

    PubMed

    Raulin, C; Greve, B; Hammes, S

    2000-01-01

    Analgesic cooling technologies are firmly established in dermatologic laser therapy. We present cold air as a novel method of cooling and compare it with those methods that are already in use. We treated 166 patients with the diagnoses hypertrichosis, port wine stains, hemangioma, essential telangiectasias, and tattoos with different laser systems (long-pulsed alexandrite laser [LPIR], pulsed dye laser, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, Q-switched ruby laser). In a prospective study, we collected data about the analgesia of the cooling method and the thermal protection of the epidermis (reduction of the extent and duration of erythema, purpura, blisters, hyper-/hypopigmentations, edemas, crusting), compared with the cooling method with ice gel. Additionally, we measured air and skin temperatures with an infrared thermometer at different application modalities. Three percent of the treated patients refused the cold air therapy altogether. Eleven percent found that it was as good as the other cooling methods; 86% clearly preferred the cold air therapy. Leaving out the perinasal area, the percentage rises to 97%. On average, the analgesic effect was by 37% better than through cooling with ice gel. The increased thermal protection of the epidermis made it possible to use laser energy levels that were higher by 15-30% and, at the same time, to reduce the rate of side effects (in 63% of the patients erythema persisted for a shorter period, in 70% the purpura was reduced, 83% had less crusting). In dermatologic laser therapy, the use of cold air in analgesia can be considered as an effective, inexpensive, and well-accepted (by both patients and doctors) alternative to currently applied cooling methods. Nevertheless, further prospective studies are necessary to determine whether treatment results can really be improved by using higher laser energy levels.

  3. Automated monitoring of phosphatidylcholine biosyntheses in Plasmodium falciparum by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry through stable isotope labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Enjalbal, Christine; Roggero, Rodolphe; Cerdan, Rachel; Martinez, Jean; Vial, Henri; Aubagnac, Jean-Louis

    2004-08-01

    The metabolic pathways contributing to phosphatidylcholine biosyntheses in Plasmodium falciparum, the malaria-causing parasite, was explored by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Phosphatidylcholine produced by the CDP-choline pathway and by the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine was identified and quantified through isotopic labeling experiments. A straightforward method based on cone voltage directed in-source fragmentations and relative abundance measurement of endogenous versus deuterated specific fragment ions was developed for simple and rapid automated data acquisition. Such high-throughput analytical protocol allowed us to measure the relative contribution of two different metabolic pathways leading to phosphatidylcholine without performing technically more demanding and time-consuming MS/MS or LC/MS experiments.

  4. Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.; Alsharo'a, Mohammad; Hanlet, Pierrick M.; Hartline, Robert; Kuchnir, Moyses; Paul, Kevin; Roberts, Thomas J.; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Barzi, Emanuela; Del Frate, Licia; Gonin, Ivan; Moretti, Alfred; Neuffer, David; Popovic, Milorad; Romanov, Gennady; Turrioni, Daniele; Yarba, Victor; Beard, Kevin; Bogacz, S. Alex; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2006-03-20

    Eight new ideas are being developed under SBIR/STTR grants to cool muon beams for colliders, neutrino factories, and muon experiments. Analytical and simulation studies have confirmed that a six-dimensional (6D) cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas can provide effective beam cooling. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, helical quadrupole, and helical sextupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange and achieve 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m segment. Four such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse physical dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost five orders of magnitude. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, then can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that can be used as MANX, an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  5. Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Rolland P. Johnson; Mohammad Alsharo'a; Charles Ankenbrandt; Emanuela Barzi; Kevin Beard; S. Alex Bogacz; Yaroslav Derbenev; Licia Del Frate; Ivan Gonin; Pierrick M. Hanlet; Robert Hartline; Daniel M. Kaplan; Moyses Kuchnir; Alfred Moretti; David Neuffer; Kevin Paul; Milorad Popovic; Thomas J. Roberts; Gennady Romanov; Daniele Turrioni; Victor Yarba; and Katsuya Yonehara

    2006-03-01

    Eight new ideas are being developed under SBIR/STTR grants to cool muon beams for colliders, neutrino factories, and muon experiments. Analytical and simulation studies have confirmed that a six-dimensional (6D) cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas can provide effective beam cooling. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, helical quadrupole, and helical sextupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange and achieve 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m segment. Four such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse physical dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost five orders of magnitude. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, then can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that can be used as MANX, an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  6. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-02ER86145 Pressurized RF Cavities for Muon Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Rolland Johnson

    2006-07-13

    This project was to design and build an RF test cell (TC), which could be operated at 800 MHz, filled with high pressure gases including hydrogen, at temperatures down to that of liquid nitrogen, in strong magnetic fields, in a strong radiation environment, and with interchangeable electrodes, in order to examine the use of high-pressure RF cavities for muon beam cooling.

  7. Electron Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Timothy J. P.

    1991-08-01

    Electron cooling is a method of reducing the 6 -dimensional phase space volume of a stored ion beam. The technique was invented by Budker and first developed by him and his colleagues at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk. Further studies of electron cooling were subsequently performed at CERN and Fermilab. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) an electron cooling system was designed, built, and commissioned in 1988. This was the highest energy system built to date (270 keV for cooling 500 MeV protons) and the first such system to be used as an instrument for performing nuclear and atomic physics experiments. This dissertation summarizes the design principles; measurements of the longitudinal drag rate (cooling force), equilibrium cooled beam properties and effective longitudinal electron beam temperature. These measurements are compared with theory and with the measured performance of other cooling systems. In addition the feasibility of extending this technology to energies an order of magnitude higher are discussed.

  8. The Cooling of a Liquid Absorber using a Small Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Liggins, N.

    2005-08-24

    This report discusses the use of small cryogenic coolers for cooling the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) liquid cryogen absorbers. Since the absorber must be able contain liquid helium as well liquid hydrogen, the characteristics of the available 4.2 K coolers are used here. The issues associated with connecting two-stage coolers to liquid absorbers are discussed. The projected heat flows into an absorber and the cool-down of the absorbers using the cooler are presented. The warm-up of the absorber is discussed. Special hydrogen safety issues that may result from the use of a cooler on the absorbers are also discussed.

  9. Extending the applicability of an open-ring trap to perform experiments with a single laser-cooled ion

    SciTech Connect

    Cornejo, J. M.; Colombano, M.; Doménech, J.; Rodríguez, D.; Block, M.; Delahaye, P.

    2015-10-15

    A special ion trap was initially built up to perform β-ν correlation experiments with radioactive ions. The trap geometry is also well suited to perform experiments with laser-cooled ions, serving for the development of a new type of Penning trap, in the framework of the project TRAPSENSOR at the University of Granada. The goal of this project is to use a single {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion as detector for single-ion mass spectrometry. Within this project and without any modification to the initial electrode configuration, it was possible to perform Doppler cooling on {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions, starting from large clouds and reaching single ion sensitivity. This new feature of the trap might be important also for other experiments with ions produced at radioactive ion beam facilities. In this publication, the trap and the laser system will be described, together with their performance with respect to laser cooling applied to large ion clouds down to a single ion.

  10. Experiments on the Recovery of Waste Heat in Cooling Ducts, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Abe

    1939-01-01

    Tests have been conducted in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel to investigate the partial recovery of the heat energy which is apparently wasted in the cooling of aircraft engines. The results indicate that if the radiator is located in an expanded duct, a part of the energy lost in cooling is recovered; however, the energy recovery is not of practical importance up to airplane speeds of 400 miles per hour. Throttling of the duct flow occurs with heated radiators and must be considered in designing the duct outlets from data obtained with cold radiators in the ducts.

  11. Mm-Wave Spectroscopy and Determination of the Radiative Branching Ratios of 11BH for Laser Cooling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truppe, Stefan; Holland, Darren; Hendricks, Richard James; Hinds, Ed; Tarbutt, Michael

    2014-06-01

    We aim to slow a supersonic, molecular beam of 11BH using a Zeeman slower and subsequently cool the molecules to sub-millikelvin temperatures in a magneto-optical trap. Most molecules are not suitable for direct laser cooling because the presence of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom means there is no closed-cycle transition which is necessary to scatter a large number of photons. As was pointed out by Di Rosa, there exists a class of molecules for which the excitation of vibrational modes is suppressed due to highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors. Furthermore, Stuhl et al. showed that angular momentum selection rules can be used to suppress leakage to undesired rotational states. Here we present a measurement of the radiative branching ratios of the A^1Π→ X^1Σ transition in 11BH - a necessary step towards subsequent laser cooling experiments. We also perform high-resolution mm-wave spectroscopy of the J'=1← J=0 rotational transition in the X^1Σ (v=0) state near 708 GHz. From this measurement we derive new, accurate hyper fine constants and compare these to theoretical descriptions. The measured branching ratios suggest that it is possible to laser cool 11BH molecules close to the recoil temperature of 4 μK using three laser frequencies only. M. D. Di Rosa, The European Physical Journal D, 31, 395, 2004 B. K. Stuhl et al., Physical Review Letters, 101, 243002, 2008

  12. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Quinn, Ronald J.

    2016-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase ( PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each.

  13. Results from a Pre-Ionization Study of a 30 kW RMF-FRC Experiment for Space Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Carrie; Uchizono, Nolan; Holmes, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Field-Reversed-Configuration (FRC) plasma thrusters are an attractive concept for in-space propulsion. These thrusters operate in a quasi-steady manner by expelling successive bursts of FRC plasmoids on the order of the neutral-gas refill rate. Pre-ionization (PI) of the seed gas is a challenge for these repetitive systems as the starting mix is a combination of the hot remnants from the recently-departed FRC and the cold refill gas. Pre-ionization of this mixture is critical to the RMF current drive and energy coupling of the system and therefore must be optimized to maximize performance. An empirical PI study was conducted on a 30-kW RMF-FRC benchtop experiment to examine how coil geometry and initial plasma distribution affects the plasmoid formation and acceleration processes. Three different inductively-coupled PI coil geometries were investigated. Their effectiveness was monitored by recording the downstream plasma velocity distribution, density, and energy coupling to the RMF antennas. The initial seed plasma created by these sources was also mapped in limited regions to compare the starting conditions for the FRC plasmoid in each case.

  14. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase (PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Solar Heating and Cooling Experiment for a School in Atlanta. Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Falls Church, VA.

    This report documents the performance and conclusions of a 13-month period of monitoring the performance of the experimental solar heating and cooling system installed in the George A. Towns Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia. The objectives of the project were to (1) make a significant contribution to solar design, technology, and acceptability;…

  16. Solar Heating and Cooling Experiment for a School in Atlanta. Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Falls Church, VA.

    This report documents the performance and conclusions of a 13-month period of monitoring the performance of the experimental solar heating and cooling system installed in the George A. Towns Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia. The objectives of the project were to (1) make a significant contribution to solar design, technology, and acceptability;…

  17. Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, X. K.; Zheng, S. X.; Bradshaw, Thomas; Baynham, Elwyn; Cobb, John; Lau, Wing; Lau, Peter; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2009-09-09

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) consists of a target, a beam line, a pion decay channel, the MICE cooling channel. Superconducting magnets are used in the pion decay channel and the MICE cooling channel. This report describes the MICE cooling channel magnets and the progress in the design and fabrication of these magnets. The MICE cooling channel consists of three types of superconducting solenoids; the spectrometer solenoids, the coupling solenoids and the focusing solenoids. The three types of magnets are being fabricated in he United States, China, and the United Kingdom respectively. The spectrometer magnets are used to analyze the muon beam before and after muon cooling. The coupling magnets couple the focusing sections and keep the muon beam contained within the iris of the RF cavities that re used to recover the muon momentum lost during ionization cooling. The focusing magnets focus the muon beam in the center of a liquid hydrogen absorber. The first of the cooling channel magnets will be operational in MICE in the spring of 2010.

  18. Electrical conductivity and velocity of highly ionized plasma flows - Theory and experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vendell, E. W.; Park, C.; Posch, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Use of an immersible, three-coil, magnetic-induction probe, previously tested in a low-density supersonic argon jet, to measure electrical conductivity and velocity profiles of a highly ionized high-density nitrogen jet in the continuum flow regime where effects due to probe bow shocks and boundary layers might not be negligible. Measured centerline values of electrical conductivity and velocity were compared with predictions based on a theoretical analysis previously developed to study the gas as it expanded adiabatically and inviscidly from an equilibrium sonic state to the nozzle exit. The resulting numerical exit plane values for electron density and electron temperature were then substituted into the Spitzer-Haerm conductivity formula to compute a theoretical conductivity which agreed within 40% of the measured conductivity, while the calculated and experimental velocity values differed by as much as 50%. The lack of agreement was attributed to the possible use of invalid assumptions and boundary conditions in the computer analysis or to the unknown effects of shocks on the probe data.

  19. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  20. Electron-impact ionization of neon at low projectile energy: an internormalized experiment and theory for a complex target.

    PubMed

    Pflüger, Thomas; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Senftleben, Arne; Ren, Xueguang; Ullrich, Joachim; Dorn, Alexander

    2013-04-12

    As a fundamental test for state-of-the-art theoretical approaches, we have studied the single ionization (2p) of neon at a projectile energy of 100 eV. The experimental data were acquired using an advanced reaction microscope that benefits from high efficiency and a large solid-angle acceptance of almost 4π. We put special emphasis on the ability to measure internormalized triple-differential cross sections over a large part of the phase space. The data are compared to predictions from a second-order hybrid distorted-wave plus R-matrix model and a fully nonperturbative B-spline R-matrix (BSR) with pseudostates approach. For a target of this complexity and the low-energy regime, unprecedented agreement between experiment and the BSR model is found. This represents a significant step forward in the investigation of complex targets.

  1. Anisotropic stress accumulation in cooling lava flows and resulting fracture patterns: Insights from starch-water desiccation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodge, Robert W. D.; Lescinsky, David T.

    2009-09-01

    Desiccation of starch-water slurries is a useful analog for the production of polygonal fractures/columnar joints in cooling lava flows. When left to dry completely, a simple mixture of 1:1 starch and water will produce columns that appear remarkably similar to natural columnar joints formed in cooled lava flows. Columns form when the accumulation of isotropic stress exceeds the tensile strength of a material, at which point a fracture forms and advances through the material perpendicular to the desiccating surface. Individual fractures will initially form orthogonal to the desiccation surface but will quickly evolve into a hexagonal fracture network that advances incrementally through the material. However, some fracture patterns found within natural lava flows are not hexagonal ( Lodge and Lescinsky, 2009-this issue), but rather have fracture lengths that are much longer than the distance to adjacent fractures. These fractures are commonly found at lava flows that have interacted with glacial ice during emplacement. The purpose of this study is to utilize starch analog experiments to better understand the formation of these fractures and the stress regimes responsible for their non-hexagonal patterns. To simulate anisotropic conditions during cooling, the starch slurry was poured into a container with a movable wall that was attached to a screw-type jack. The jack was then set to slowly extend or retract while the slurry desiccated. This resulted in either a decrease or increase in the chamber cross-sectional area thus creating compressional or extensional regimes. Decreasing chamber area (DCA) experiments resulted in fractures with larger lengths parallel to the direction of wall movement (also direction of compression). It also caused localized thrust faulting and curved column development. Increasing chamber area (ICA) experiments produced a zone of horizontal column development along the expanding margin (produced when the wall detached from the sample

  2. First atomic physics experiments with cooled stored ion beams at the Heidelberg heavy-ion ring TSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.; Balykin, V.; Baumann, W.; Berger, J.; Bisoffi, G.; Blatt, P.; Blum, M.; Faulstich, A.; Friedrich, A.; Gerhard, M.; Geyer, C.; Grieser, M.; Grieser, R.; Habs, D.; Heyng, H.W.; Hochadel, B.; Holzer, B.; Huber, G.; Jaeschke, E.; Jung, M.; Karafillidis, A.; Kilgus, G.; Klein, R.; Kraemer, D.; Krause, P.; Krieg, M.; Kuehl, T.; Matl, K.; Mueller, A.; Music, M.; Neumann, R.; Neureither, G.; Ott, W.; Petrich, W.; Povh, B.; Repnow, R.; Schroeder, S.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Sigray, P.; Steck, M.; Stokstad, R.; Szmola, E.; Wagner, M.; Wanner, B.; Welti, K.; Zwickler, S. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg Manne Siegbahn Institute , Stockholm Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung , Darmstadt (Fed

    1990-06-01

    An overview of atomic physics experiments at the heavy ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) is given. Highly charged ions up to fully stripped silicon have been stored at energies between 4 and 12 MeV/u. The enhancement of the beam intensity by stacking, the beam lifetime, and electron cooling of these ion beams are discussed. Radiative and state-selective dielectronic recombination rates of hydrogen-like oxygen ions with free electrons from the electron cooler were measured. Beam noise spectra are being investigated with regard to collective effects caused by the Coulomb interaction in the cold ion beams. Resonance fluorescence from stored single-charged ions was observed using tunable narrow-band lasers. First indications of laser cooling in a storage ring were seen.

  3. Ionization of H atoms in a strong (static + microwave) field: Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, E.; Koch, P.; Smith, L.; Zelazny, S.

    1998-05-01

    A beam (typically E_b=14 keV) of H atoms with one n-value between 40-70 flew through a cylindrical, brass cavity: L=2.758 cm; D=6.501 cm; 2 mm dia. axial holes in each 6.4 mm thick, electrically isolated endcap, biased to produce collinear static and microwave electric fields (amplitudes Fs and F_ω, respectively) for the TM_0p0 modes used (8.105 GHz, p=2; 12.701 GHz, p=3). By designfootnote http://www-laacg.atdiv.lanl.gov/services/possup/html the ``flat top" pulse shapes of Fs and F_ω were very close. We measured the surviving atom probability P_surv vs. Fs (up to 300 V/cm, much larger than in (P.M. Koch and K.A.H. van Leeuwen, Phys. Rep. 255), 289 (1995)) at various fixed F_ω, though either field alone was too weak to cause ionization. Changing Eb varied the interaction time. Our data reveal abundant features, including (i) sharp resonances that can involve a whole n-manifold of Stark substates, and, at relatively large F_ω, (ii) striking oscillatory structure with a small number of Fourier peaks. We demonstrate that (i) can be used to resolve adjacent values of n_0. This will lead to a practical, n-sensitive detector for ``3d" H atoms that will be widely useful.

  4. Adaptation of an existing cosmic ray ionization spectrometer experiment to Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, U. R.; Stahle, C. V.; Ormes, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    This paper examines the technique of adapting an existing experiment to a Shuttle sortie mission. A sample cosmic-ray balloon experiment was studied to determine the feasibility of this cost-saving technique, which is applicable to a large spectrum of existing experiments, and to determine the programmatic impact and key problems. The main areas investigated include the determination of required modifications, steps in integration to the Spacelab/Shuttle, and the impact on orbital support and operations. One of the main problems in equipment adaptation is the acoustical loading during Shuttle boost; an environmental cover design presented herein shows a potential method to attain the required acoustic attenuation.

  5. Observations of formic and acetic acid by chemical ionization mass spectrometry in the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treadaway, V.; McNeill, A.; Heikes, B.; O'Sullivan, D. W.; Silwal, I.

    2013-12-01

    Formic (HFo) and acetic acid (HAc) are part of the atmospheric processing of carbon and their measurement is relevant to defining oxygenated volatile organic carbon (OVOC) emissions, to examining photochemical processing of volatile organic carbon (VOC) and OVOCs, and to the photochemical processing of organic aerosol. Further, they can serve as photochemical tracers of convective transport, cloud chemical processes, and precipitation scavenging. The addition of HFo and HAc measurements to the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) is relevant to the DC3 science objectives and complements the suite of chemicals already observed during DC3. The peroxide chemical ionization mass spectrometer (PCIMS) was flown aboard the NCAR Gulfstream-V platform in DC3 and while its primary function was to observe hydrogen peroxide and methylhydroperoxide it recorded signals attributed to iodide cluster ions of HFo and HAc at mass-charge ratios of 173 and 187, respectively. Post-mission laboratory experiments were performed to determine the CIMS instrument's sensitivity to these acids under the varying water vapor and sample flow conditions encountered during DC3 flights. The results of field measurements, laboratory experiments and the HFo and HAc recovery process are reported and HFo and HAc measurement quality assessed. The resultant HFo and HAc data are presented and interpreted with respect to atmospheric chemistry within measurement constraints. The DC3 observations were made in May and June 2012 and extended from the surface to 13 km over the central United States.

  6. Heat transfer characteristics in film cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licu, Dragos Nicolae

    1998-11-01

    The leading edge region of gas turbine blades and vanes experiences high thermal and mechanical stresses and has to be properly cooled. External cooling of the leading edge region is typically achieved by a film cooling technique. An investigation into the film cooling effectiveness of three different large scale leading edge geometries is presented in this study. One of the geometries investigated represents an original design and is an example of an improved film cooling layout. AD geometries used have four rows of cooling holes placed symmetrically about the geometrical leading edge, but the layout of the cooling holes is different from one leading edge geometry to another. A broad range of variables is considered including mass flow ratio, coolant density, and jet Reynolds number. Film cooling effectiveness measurements were made in a low speed wind tunnel environment using a flame ionization detector technique and the mass/heat transfer analogy. These measurements significantly extend the insight into the effects of hole geometry on the film cooling characteristics of the leading edge of turbine blades and provide new data for design purposes. The effect of geometry is more important for the case of double row injection where spanwise-averaged film cooling effectiveness is improved by the use of compound angle holes. The spanwise-averaged film cooling effectiveness is higher at lower mass flow ratios and decreases typically as the mass flow ratio increases. At higher mass flow ratios, the newly designed leading edge geometry produces higher spanwise-averaged film cooling effectiveness than the other two geometries investigated thus providing the necessary backflow margin at operating conditions more relevant to gas turbine use. For the case of single row injection, the effects of geometry scale reasonably well when the local mass flow ratio is used in the analysis of the spanwise-averaged film cooling effectiveness immediately downstream of the injection holes

  7. Microgravity experiments on boiling and applications: research activity of advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichi; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Research and development on advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices has been carried out as the Project of Fundamental Technology Development for Energy Conservation, promoted by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO). Based on the microgravity experiments on boiling heat transfer, the following useful results have obtained for the cooling of electronic devices. In subcooled flow boiling in a small channel, heat flux increases considerably more than the ordinary critical heat flux with microbubble emission in transition boiling, and dry out of the heating surface is disturbed. Successful enhancement of heat transfer is achieved by a capillary effect from grooved surface dual subchannels on the liquid supply. The critical heat flux increases 30-40 percent more than for ordinary subchannels. A self-wetting mechanism has been proposed, following investigation of bubble behavior in pool boiling of binary mixtures under microgravity. Ideas and a new concept have been proposed for the design of future cooling system in power electronics.

  8. Argon retentivity of hornblendes: A field experiment in a slowly cooled metamorphic terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstott, T. C.; Peacock, M. W.

    1987-11-01

    Hornblende from samples of amphibolite and granitic gneiss, collected within a single outcrop in the central Adirondacks, yield significantly different 40Ar ∗/39Ar k dates of 948 ± 5 and 907 ± 5 Ma. Assuming that this terrane cooled slowly following high-grade metamorphism and that the samples have experienced the same thermal history, the difference in dates apparently reflects a corresponding difference in blocking temperature for diffusion of radiogenic argon in these hornblende samples. The Fe/(Fe + Mg + Mn) of the hornblende samples are 0.8 and 0.6, the higher ratio corresponding to the younger 40Ar ∗/39Ar k date. Transmission electron microscopy observations indicate that both hornblende samples are homogeneous and devoid of any exsolution, but contain zones of fibrous phyllosilicates ~0.1 to 2 μm wide parallelling (100) and (110). These alteration zones probably formed during post-metamorphic cooling as a result of the migration of fluids through the hornblendes, and are obvious pathways for argon escape from hornblende. As these features are more abundant in the hornblende sample with the younger 40Ar /39Ar date and higher Fe/(Fe + Mg + Mn), they may influence the argon blocking temperature by effectively partitioning the hornblende grains into diffusion domains of varying size. Biotite from the granitic gneiss yields an 40Ar ∗/39Ar k date of 853 ± 2 Ma, with a mildly discordant stepheating spectrum that in part reflects the degassing of submicroscopic inclusions precipitated during alteration of the host biotite. Plagioclase from the amphibolite yields a 40Ar ∗/39Ar k integrated date of 734 ± 3 Ma. All the 40Ar /39Ar data are consistent with postmetamorphic cooling rates of 1° to 5°C/Ma.

  9. Handbook of experiences in the design and installation of solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, D.S.; Oberoi, H.S.

    1980-07-01

    A large array of problems encountered are detailed, including design errors, installation mistakes, cases of inadequate durability of materials and unacceptable reliability of components, and wide variations in the performance and operation of different solar systems. Durability, reliability, and design problems are reviewed for solar collector subsystems, heat transfer fluids, thermal storage, passive solar components, piping/ducting, and reliability/operational problems. The following performance topics are covered: criteria for design and performance analysis, domestic hot water systems, passive space heating systems, active space heating systems, space cooling systems, analysis of systems performance, and performance evaluations. (MHR)

  10. Helium-cooled balloon-borne infrared experiment for measurements of stratospheric trace gas emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rippel, H.; Kampf, D.; Hilbert, L.; Jarisch, M.; Offermann, D.

    1987-08-01

    A helium-cooled IR spectrometer with a diffraction-limited telescope was launched on Sept. 23, 1983, from Aire-sur-l'Adour (France) as part of the MAP/Globus 1983 campaign. The float altitude of the balloon was 38 km. Limb scan measurements of atmospheric emissions were taken in the 5.5-19 micron wavelength region. The measurements were performed at about 1 h before sunrise. From several spectral features volume mixing ratios of NO2, H2O, CH4, HNO3, O3, and N2O were derived.

  11. Characterization of a cryogenically cooled high-pressure gas jet for laser/cluster interaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. A.; Ditmire, T.; Tisch, J. W. G.

    1998-11-01

    We have developed and carried out detailed characterization of a cryogenically cooled (34-300 K), high-pressure (55 kTorr) solenoid driven pulsed valve that has been used to produce dense jets of atomic clusters for high intensity laser interaction studies. Measurements including Rayleigh scattering and short pulse interferometry show that clusters of controlled size, from a few to >104 atoms/cluster can be produced from a broad range of light and heavy gases, at average atomic densities up to 4×1019 atoms/cc. Continuous temperature and pressure control of the valve allows us to vary mean cluster size while keeping the average atomic density constant, and we find that many aspects of the valves behavior are consistent with ideal gas laws. However, we also show that effects including the build up of flow on milliseconds time scales, the cooling of gas flowing into the valve, and condensation of gas inside the valve body at temperatures well above the liquefaction point need to be carefully characterized in order to decouple the operation of the jet from the laser interaction physics.

  12. The eye (and brain) as ionizing particle detector? First results from the ALTEA - space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narici, Livio

    The first part of ALTEA-Space experiments have been performed on the ISS (USLab) between August 2006 and July 2007. The ALTEA hardware features 6 particle telescopes each with 6 striped 8 x 16 cm2 silicon planes arranged alternately in the x and y direction. These detectors are hold by helmet shaped holder. ALTEA features also a light tight visual stimulation unit, a 32 channel EEG cap and electronics, a 3-buttons pushbutton. Two different experiment modalities were run: DOSI and CNSM. The former is the study of the radiation environment of the USLab, and results from these measurements are mostly covered by other papers in this conference; the latter is the study of the electrophysiological activity in coincidence with particle traveling through the eye/brain of the astronaut, with specific reference to the observed light flashes. In this paper we will present first results from these measurements and discuss, within this panorama, the amount of the measured radiation in the brain/eye. Seven CNSM sessions have been performed (on three astronauts), with a total of 20 light flashes perceived. Comparisons with previous measurements in Low Earth Orbit and during the flights to the Moon will be also shown

  13. Ras Labs.-CASIS-ISS NL experiment for synthetic muscle: resistance to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Sandberg, Eric; Albers, Leila N.; Rodriguez, Simone; Gentile, Charles A.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Hitchner, Robert; Taylor, James; Hoffman, Dan; Cylinder, David; Moy, Leon; Mark, Patrick S.; Prillaman, Daniel L.; Nordarse, Robert; Menegus, Michael J.; Ratto, Jo Ann; Thellen, Christopher; Froio, Danielle; Furlong, Cosme; Razavi, Payam; Valenza, Logan; Hablani, Surbhi; Fuerst, Tyler; Gallucci, Sergio; Blocher, Whitney; Liffland, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    In anticipation of deep space travel, new materials are being explored to assist and relieve humans in dangerous environments, such as high radiation, extreme temperature, and extreme pressure. Ras Labs Synthetic Muscle - electroactive polymers (EAPs) that contract and expand at low voltages - which mimic the unique gentle-yet-strong nature of human tissue, is a potential asset to manned space travel through protective gear and human assist robotics and for unmanned space exploration through deep space. Generation 3 Synthetic Muscle was proven to be resistant to extreme temperatures, and there were indications that these materials may also be radiation resistant. The purpose of the Ras Labs-CASIS-ISS Experiment is to test the radiation resistivity of the third and fourth generation of these EAPs, as well as to make them even more radiation resistant or radiation hardened. On Earth, exposure of the Generation 3 and Generation 4 EAPs to a Cs-137 radiation source for 47.8 hours with a total dose of 305.931 kRad of gamma radiation was performed at the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) at Princeton University, followed by pH, peroxide, Shore Hardness Durometry, and electroactivity testing to determine the inherent radiation resistivity of these contractile EAPs and to determine whether the EAPs could be made even more radiation resistant through the application of appropriate additives and coatings. The on Earth preliminary tests determined that selected Ras Labs EAPs were not only inherently radiation resistant, but with the appropriate coatings and additives, could be made even more radiation resistant. Gforce testing to over 10 G's was performed at US Army's ARDEC Labs, with excellent results, in preparation for space flight to the International Space Station National Laboratory (ISS-NL). Selected samples of Generation 3 and Generation 4 Synthetic Muscle™, with various additives and coatings, were launched to the ISS-NL on April

  14. Progress in the construction of the MICE cooling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Vittorio

    2012-03-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, aims to build and test one cell of a a realistic ionization cooling channel lattice. This comprises three Absorber--Focus-Coil (AFC) modules and two RF--Coupling-Coil (RFCC) modules. Both are technically challenging. The Focus Coils are dual-coil superconducting solenoids, in close proximity, wound on a common mandrel. Each pair of coils is run in series, but can be configured with the coil polarities in the same (``solenoid mode'') or opposite (``gradient mode''). At the center of each FC there is a 20-L liquid-hydrogen absorber, operating at about 14 K, to serve as the energy loss medium for the ionization cooling process. The longitudinal beam momentum is restored in the RFCC modules, each of which houses four 201.25-MHz RF cavities whose irises are closed with 42-cm diameter thin Be windows. To contain the muon beam, each RFCC module also has a 1.4-m diameter superconducting coupling solenoid surrounding the cavities. Both types of magnet are cooled with multiple 2-stage cryo-coolers, each delivering 1.5 W of cooling at 4 K. Designs for all components are complete and fabrication is under way. Descriptions of the various components, design requirements, and construction status will be described.

  15. Progress in the construction of the MICE cooling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Gail G.; MICE Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, aims to build and test one cell of a realistic ionization cooling channel lattice. This comprises three Absorber—Focus-Coil (AFC) modules and two RF— Coupling-Coil (RFCC) modules; both are technically challenging. The Focus Coils are dual-coil superconducting solenoids, in close proximity, wound on a common mandrel. Each pair of coils is run in series, but can be configured with the coil polarities the same ("solenoid mode") or opposite ("gradient mode"). At the center of each FC there is a 20-L liquid-hydrogen absorber, operating at about 14 K, to serve as the energy loss medium for the ionization cooling process. The longitudinal beam momentum is restored in the RFCC modules, each of which houses four 201.25-MHz RF cavities whose irises are closed with 42-cm diameter thin beryllium windows. To contain the muon beam, each RFCC module also has a 1.4-m diameter superconducting coupling solenoid surrounding the cavities. Both types of magnet are cooled with multiple two-stage cryo-coolers, each delivering 1.5 W of cooling at 4 K. Designs for all components are complete and fabrication is under way. Descriptions of the various components, design requirements, and construction status will be described.

  16. Traveling-wave tube amplifier characteristics study for stochastic beam-cooling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovar, B.; Lo, C. C.

    1982-03-01

    The characteristics of continuous wave wideband traveling wave tube amplifiers was experimentally investigated over a frequency range of 1.5 to 4.5 GHz. Measurements of characteristics important for stochastic beam cooling systems that are generally not available from manufacturers' data sheets are presented. The amplifiers measured include models 1177 H01 and 1277 H01 having output power capabilities of 10 to 20 W, respectively, at frequencies of 2 to 4 GHz. The power transfer characteristics, the phase-shift characteristics as functions of frequency and the input power level, the voltage standing wave ratio, noise drive transfer characteristics, harmonics and intermodulation products content were accurately measured and are discussed. Measurement procedures and description of measuring systems, which include measuring system error corrections, are given in detail. Also several approaches are discussed for the reduction of harmonics and intermodulation products.

  17. Barriers and enablers to implementing scalp cooling in Australia: a qualitative study of health professionals' attitudes to and experience with scalp cooling.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Joanne M; O'Brien, Jane; Chua, Susan; De Boer, Richard; Dear, Rachel; Murray, Nicholas; Boyle, Fran

    2017-08-29

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a common and distressing adverse event for patients. Scalp cooling to reduce this alopecia has been available in Europe for more than a decade, but only recently introduced in Australia. The aim of this study was to qualitatively explore health professionals' perceptions of the barriers and enablers to the implementation of scalp cooling in Australian cancer centres. Using a qualitative methodology, telephone interviews were conducted with 21 health professionals working in a tumour stream where chemotherapy-induced alopecia is an adverse event of treatment. Participants were recruited from five centres in Australia where scalp cooling is currently available and one centre without access to the technology. Four interrelated themes were identified: (1) health professional attitudes, (2) concerns for patient equity, (3) logistical considerations and (4) organisational support. This qualitative study provides the first methodological exploration of Australian health professionals' perceptions of barriers and enablers to scalp cooling uptake. The results highlighted health professional support drives the introduction of scalp cooling. Integration of the technology requires adjustments to nursing practice to manage the increased time, workload and change in patient flow. Strategies to manage the change in practice and organisational support for change in work flow are essential for successful implementation into routine care.

  18. Argon retentivity of hornblendes: A field experiment in a slowly cooled metamorphic terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Onstott, T.C.; Peacock, M.W. )

    1987-11-01

    Hornblende from samples of amphibolite and granitic gneiss, collected within a single outcrop in the central Adirondacks, yield significantly different {sup 40}Ar*/{sup 39}Ark{sub K} dates of 948 {plus minus} 5 and 907 {plus minus} 5 Ma. Assuming that this terrane cooled slowly following high-grade metamorphism and that the samples have experienced the same thermal history, the difference in dates apparently reflects a corresponding difference in blocking temperature for diffusion of radiogenic argon in these hornblende samples. The Fe/(Fe + Mg + Mn) of the hornblende samples are 0.8 and 0.6, the higher ratio corresponding to the younger {sup 40}Ar*/{sup 39}Ar{sub k} date. Transmission electron microscopy observations indicate that both hornblende samples are homogeneous and devoid of any exsolution, but contain zones of fibrous phyllosilicates {approximately} 0.1 to 2 {mu}m wide parallelling (100) and (110). These alteration zones probably formed during post-metamorphic cooling as a result of the migration of fluids through the hornblendes, and are obvious pathways for argon escape from hornblende. As these features are more abundant in the hornblende sample with the younger {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar date and higher Fe/(Fe + Mg + Mn), they may influence the argon blocking temperature by effectively partitioning the hornblende grains into diffusion domains of varying size. Biotite from the granitic gneiss yields an {sup 40}Ar*/{sup 39}Ar{sub k} date of 853 {plus minus} 2 Ma, with a mildly discordant step-heating spectrum that in part reflects the degassing of submicroscopic inclusions precipitated during alteration of the host biotite. Plagioclase from the amphibolite yields a {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar{sub k} integrated date of 734 {plus minus} 3 Ma.

  19. Ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of single-core and multi-core polyaromatic hydrocarbons under variable conditions of collisional cooling: insights into the generation of molecular ions, fragments and oligomers.

    PubMed

    Gámez, Francisco; Hortal, Ana R; Martínez-Haya, Bruno; Soltwisch, Jens; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    The ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been investigated under different background pressures of an inert gas (up to 1.2 mbar of N2) in the ion source of a hybrid, orthogonal-extracting time-of-flight mass spectrometer (oTOF-MS). The study includes an ensemble of six model PAHs with isolated single polyaromatic cores and four ones with multiple cross-linked aromatic and polyaromatic cores. In combination with a weak ion extraction field, the variation of the buffer gas pressure allowed to control the degree of collisional cooling of the desorbed PAHs and, thus, to modulate their decomposition into fragments. The dominant fragmentation channels observed are related to dehydrogenation of the PAHs, in most cases through the cleavage of even numbers of C-H bonds. Breakage of C-C bonds leading to the fragmentation of rings, side chains and core linkages is also observed, in particular, at low buffer gas pressures. The precise patterns of the combined fragmentation processes vary significantly between the PAHs. The highest abundances of molecular PAH ions and cleanest mass spectra were consistently obtained at the highest buffer gas pressure of 1.2 mbar. The effective quenching of the fragmentation pathways at this elevated pressure improves the sensitivity and data interpretation for analytical applications, although the fragmentation of side chains and of bonds between (poly)aromatic cores is not completely suppressed in all cases. Moreover, these results suggest that the detected fragments are generated through thermal equilibrium processes rather than as a result of rapid photolysis. This assumption is further corroborated by a laser desorption/ionization post-source decay analysis using an axial time-of-flight MS. In line with these findings, covalent oligomers of the PAHs, which are presumably formed by association of two or more dehydrogenated fragments, are detected with higher abundances at the lower buffer gas

  20. First Flight of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, G.; Ellison, S.; Gould, R.; Granger, D.; Guzik, T. G.; Isbert, J.; Price, B.; Stewart, M.; Wefel, J. P.; Mock, L.; hide

    2001-01-01

    The ATILT instrument is designed to measure the composition and energy spectra of Z = 1 to 28 cosmic rays over the energy range -10 GeV - 100 TeV. ATIC was launched as a long duration test balloon flight on 12/28/00 local time from McMurdo, Antarctica. The operations preceding and during launch went very smoothly. During the first -20 hr while the instrument remained within line of sight (LOS), a full system check out was conducted, the experiment was operated in several test configurations, and all major tuning was completed. Preliminary analysis of the science data indicates that the overall detector system is functioning as expected. With our fully functioning analysis software we were able to monitor the data in nearly real time. Each event was reconstructed event-by-event to confirm the detector performance. The shower profiles indicate that the shower maximum location is deeper in the calorimeter for higher energy events, as expected. The energy spectra of protons, Helium nuclei, and "all particles" appear to follow power laws. Both the Si matrix and top scintillator layer of the charge module show clear charge separation for p and He. As the statistics increase, heavy nuclei charge separation will be evaluated. We will present preliminary results of the LOS data, as well as other data that will be available from the flight-data hard disk,

  1. Ionization of small molecules induced by H+, H e+ , and N+ projectiles: Comparison of experiment with quantum and classical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, S. T. S.; Herczku, P.; Juhász, Z.; Sarkadi, L.; Gulyás, L.; Sulik, B.

    2016-07-01

    We report the energy and angular distribution of ejected electrons from C H4 and H2O molecules impacted by 1 MeV H+, H e+ , and 650 keV N+ ions. Spectra were measured at different observation angles, from 2 to 2000 eV. The obtained absolute double-differential electron-emission cross sections (DDCSs) were compared with the results of classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) and continuum distorted wave, eikonal initial state (CDW-EIS) calculations. For the bare H+ projectile both theories show remarkable agreement with the experiment at all observed angles and energies. The CTMC results are in similarly good agreement with the DDCS spectra obtained for impact by dressed H e+ and N+ ions, where screening effects and electron loss from the projectile gain importance. The CDW-EIS calculations slightly overestimate the electron loss for 1 MeV H e+ impact, and overestimate both the target and projectile ionization at low emitted electron energies for 650 keV N+ impact. The contribution of multiple electron scattering by the projectile and target centers (Fermi shuttle) dominates the N+-impact spectra at higher electron energies, and it is well reproduced by the nonperturbative CTMC calculations. The contributions of different processes in medium-velocity collisions of dressed ions with molecules are determined.

  2. Some preliminary matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging experiments on maternal and fetal sides of human placenta.

    PubMed

    Roverso, Marco; Lapolla, Annunziata; Cosma, Chiara; Seraglia, Roberta; Galvan, Elisa; Visentin, Silvia; Cosmi, Eric; Desoye, Gernot; Traldi, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    An investigation on placenta proteins has been carried out by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion imaging (II) experiments. This was performed by laser irradiation of the maternal and fetal sides of placenta tissue. To investigate the possible changes in protein profile due to the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), five placenta samples from GDM patients and five placenta samples from healthy pregnant women were analyzed. An extensive optimization of the tissue slice treatment and of the matrix deposition method was performed. As already observed in MALDI spectra of placenta homogenates, and also in the MALDI-II condition, the most abundant peaks are due to hemoglobin α chain, hemoglobin β chain and hemoglobin γ chain. However, higher molecular weight protein species were detected in the m/z range 20,000-47,000. The species at m/z 30335, m/z 31235 and m/z 32000 show some differences in their abundance in the maternal and fetal sides of the tissue in both classes of subjects under investigation. Comparison with the literature data suggest that they can result from the presence of mitochondrial proteins at tissue level.

  3. Calculation and experimental test of the cooling factor of tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütterich, T.; Neu, R.; Dux, R.; Whiteford, A. D.; O'Mullane, M. G.; Summers, H. P.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-02-01

    The cooling factor of W is evaluated using state of the art data for line radiation and an ionization balance which has been benchmarked with experiment. For the calculation of line radiation, level-resolved calculations were performed with the Cowan code to obtain the electronic structure and excitation cross sections (plane-wave Born approximation). The data were processed by a collisional radiative model to obtain electron density dependent emissions. These data were then combined with the radiative power derived from recombination rates and bremsstrahlung to obtain the total cooling factor. The effect of uncertainties in the recombination rates on the cooling factor was studied and was identified to be of secondary importance. The new cooling factor is benchmarked, by comparisons of the line radiation with spectral measurements as well as with a direct measurement of the cooling factor. Additionally, a less detailed calculation using a configuration averaged model was performed. It was used to benchmark the level-resolved calculations and to improve the prediction on radiation power from line radiation for ionization stages which are computationally challenging. The obtained values for the cooling factor validate older predictions from the literature. Its ingredients and the absolute value are consistent with the existing experimental results regarding the value itself, the spectral distribution of emissions and the ionization equilibrium. A table of the cooling factor versus electron temperature is provided. Finally, the cooling factor is used to investigate the operational window of a fusion reactor with W as intrinsic impurity. The minimum value of nTτE, for which a thermonuclear burn is possible, is increased by 20% for a W concentration of 3.0 × 10-5 compared with a plasma without any impurities, except for the He ash which is considered in both cases.

  4. Cooling of Stored Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.

    1986-06-10

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.

  5. Development of a Single-Pass Amplifier for an Optical Stochastic Cooling Proof-of-Principle Experiment at Fermilab's IOTA Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Andorf, M. B.; Lebedev, V. A.; Piot, P.

    2015-06-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is a method of beam cooling which is expected to provide cooling rates orders of magnitude larger than ordinary stochastic cooling. Light from an undulator (the pickup) is amplified and fed back onto the particle beam via another undulator (the kicker). Fermilab is currently exploring a possible proof-of-principle experiment of the OSC at the integrable-optics test accelerator (IOTA) ring. To implement effective OSC a good correction of phase distortions in the entire band of the optical amplifier is required. In this contribution we present progress in experimental characterization of phase distortions associated to a Titanium Sapphire crystal laser-gain medium (a possible candidate gain medium for the OSC experiment to be performed at IOTA). We also discuss a possible option for a mid-IR amplifier

  6. Vibronic spectra of jet-cooled 2-aminopurine·H2O clusters studied by UV resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajeev K; Lobsiger, Simon; Trachsel, Maria; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2011-06-16

    For understanding the major- and minor-groove hydration patterns of DNAs and RNAs, it is important to understand the local solvation of individual nucleobases at the molecular level. We have investigated the 2-aminopurine·H(2)O monohydrate by two-color resonant two-photon ionization and UV/UV hole-burning spectroscopies, which reveal two isomers, denoted A and B. The electronic spectral shift δν of the S(1) ← S(0) transition relative to bare 9H-2-aminopurine (9H-2AP) is small for isomer A (-70 cm(-1)), while that of isomer B is much larger (δν = -889 cm(-1)). B3LYP geometry optimizations with the TZVP basis set predict four cluster isomers, of which three are doubly H-bonded, with H(2)O acting as an acceptor to a N-H or -NH2 group and as a donor to either of the pyrimidine N sites. The "sugar-edge" isomer A is calculated to be the most stable form with binding energy D(e) = 56.4 kJ/mol. Isomers B and C are H-bonded between the -NH2 group and pyrimidine moieties and are 2.5 and 6.9 kJ/mol less stable, respectively. Time-dependent (TD) B3LYP/TZVP calculations predict the adiabatic energies of the lowest (1)ππ* states of A and B in excellent agreement with the observed 0(0)(0) bands; also, the relative intensities of the A and B origin bands agree well with the calculated S(0) state relative energies. This allows unequivocal identification of the isomers. The R2PI spectra of 9H-2AP and of isomer A exhibit intense low-frequency out-of-plane overtone and combination bands, which is interpreted as a coupling of the optically excited (1)ππ* state to the lower-lying (1)nπ* dark state. In contrast, these overtone and combination bands are much weaker for isomer B, implying that the (1)ππ* state of B is planar and decoupled from the (1)nπ* state. These observations agree with the calculations, which predict the (1)nπ* above the (1)ππ* state for isomer B but below the (1)ππ* for both 9H-2AP and isomer A.

  7. Battery-Powered RF Pre-Ionization System for the Caltech Magnetohydrodynamically-Driven Jet Experiment: RF Discharge Properties and MHD-Driven Jet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.

    This thesis describes investigations of two classes of laboratory plasmas with rather different properties: partially ionized low pressure radiofrequency (RF) discharges, and fully ionized high density magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven jets. An RF pre-ionization system was developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and create hotter, faster jets in the Caltech MHD-Driven Jet Experiment. The RF plasma source used a custom pulsed 3 kW 13.56 MHz RF power amplifier that was powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 4-6 kV with the cathode of the jet experiment. The argon RF discharge equilibrium and transport properties were analyzed, and novel jet dynamics were observed. Although the RF plasma source was conceived as a wave-heated helicon source, scaling measurements and numerical modeling showed that inductive coupling was the dominant energy input mechanism. A one-dimensional time-dependent fluid model was developed to quantitatively explain the expansion of the pre-ionized plasma into the jet experiment chamber. The plasma transitioned from an ionizing phase with depressed neutral emission to a recombining phase with enhanced emission during the course of the experiment, causing fast camera images to be a poor indicator of the density distribution. Under certain conditions, the total visible and infrared brightness and the downstream ion density both increased after the RF power was turned off. The time-dependent emission patterns were used for an indirect measurement of the neutral gas pressure. The low-mass jets formed with the aid of the pre-ionization system were extremely narrow and collimated near the electrodes, with peak density exceeding that of jets created without pre-ionization. The initial neutral gas distribution prior to plasma breakdown was found to be critical in determining the ultimate jet structure. The visible radius of the dense central jet column was several times narrower than the axial current channel

  8. Beam cooling: Principles and achievements

    SciTech Connect

    Mohl, Dieter; Sessler, Andrew M.

    2003-05-18

    After a discussion of Liouville's theorem, and its implications for beam cooling, a brief description is given of each of the various methods of beam cooling: stochastic, electron, radiation, laser, ionization, etc. For each, we present the type of particle for which it is appropriate, its range of applicability, and the currently achieved degree of cooling. For each method we also discuss the present applications and, also, possible future developments and further applications.

  9. Reanalysis of the gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility proteus - Spectral indices

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2012-07-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) concept was investigated experimentally in the PROTEUS zero power facility at the Paul Scherrer Inst. during the 1970's. The experimental program was aimed at neutronics studies specific to the GCFR and at the validation of nuclear data in fast spectra. A significant part of the program used thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasi-homogeneously in the reference PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. Experimental results obtained at the time are still of high relevance in view of the current consideration of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a Generation-IV nuclear system, as also of the renewed interest in the thorium cycle. In this context, some of the experiments have been modeled with modern Monte Carlo codes to better account for the complex PROTEUS whole-reactor geometry and to allow validating recent continuous neutron cross-section libraries. As a first step, the MCNPX model was used to test the JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 libraries against spectral indices, notably involving fission and capture of {sup 232}Th and {sup 237}Np, measured in GFR-like lattices. (authors)

  10. Bilogical effects of ionizing radiation: epidemiological surveys and laboratory animal experiments. Implications for risk evaluation and decision processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-04-01

    General background is given for an understanding of the potential health effects in populations exposed to low-level ionizing radiations. The discussion is within the framework of the scientific deliberations and controversies that arose during preparation of the current report of the committee on the biological effects of ionizing radiation of the National Academy of Science - National Research Council (1980 Beir-III Report). (ACR)

  11. Prehospital cooling of severe burns: Experience of the Emergency Department at Edendale Hospital, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Fiandeiro, D; Govindsamy, J; Maharaj, R C

    2015-06-01

    Early cooling with 10 - 20 minutes of cool running water up to 3 hours after a burn has a direct impact on the depth of the burn and therefore on the clinical outcome of the injury. An assessment of the early cooling of burns is essential to improve this aspect of burns management. To assess the rates and adequacy of prehospital cooling received by patients with severe burns before presentation to the Emergency Department (ED) at Edendale Hospital, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Patients with inadequate prehospital cooling who presented to the ED within 3 hours were also identified. A retrospective reviewof the burns database for all the patients with severe burns admitted from the ED at Edendale Hospital from September 2012 to August 2013 was undertaken. Demographic details, characteristics and timing of the burns, and presentation were correlated with burn cooling. Ninety patients were admitted with severe burns. None received sufficient cooling of their burns, 25.6% received cooling of inadequate duration, and 32.3% arrived at the ED within 3 hours after the burn with either inadequate or no cooling. The median time to presentation to the ED after the burn was 260 minutes. Appropriate cooling of severe burns presenting to Edendale Hospital is inadequate. Education of the community and prehospital healthcare workers about the iiportance of early appropriate cooling of severe burns is required. Many patients would benefit from cooling of their burns in the ED, and facilities should be provided for this vital function.

  12. Experiences of the first 16 hospitals using copper-silver ionization for Legionella control: implications for the evaluation of other disinfection modalities.

    PubMed

    Stout, Janet E; Yu, Victor L

    2003-08-01

    Hospital-acquired legionnaires' disease can be prevented by disinfection of hospital water systems. This study assessed the long-term efficacy of copper-silver ionization as a disinfection method in controlling Legionella in hospital water systems and reducing the incidence of hospital-acquired legionnaires' disease. A standardized, evidence-based approach to assist hospitals with decision making concerning the possible purchase of a disinfection system is presented. The first 16 hospitals to install copper-silver ionization systems for Legionella disinfection were surveyed. Surveys conducted in 1995 and 2000 documented the experiences of the hospitals with maintenance of the system, contamination of water with Legionella, and occurrence of hospital-acquired legionnaires' disease. All were acute care hospitals with a mean of 435 beds. All 16 hospitals reported cases of hospital-acquired legionnaires' disease prior to installing the copper-silver ionization system. Seventy-five percent had previously attempted other disinfection methods including superheat and flush, ultraviolet light, and hyperchlorination. By 2000, the ionization systems had been operational from 5 to 11 years. Prior to installation, 47% of the hospitals reported that more than 30% of distal water sites yielded Legionella. In 1995, after installation, 50% of the hospitals reported 0% positivity, and 43% still reported 0% in 2000. Moreover, no cases of hospital-acquired legionnaires' disease have occurred in any hospital since 1995. This study represents the final step in a proposed 4-step evaluation process of disinfection systems that includes (1) demonstrated efficacy of Legionella eradication in vitro using laboratory assays, (2) anecdotal experiences in preventing legionnaires' disease in individual hospitals, (3) controlled studies in individual hospitals, and (4) validation in confirmatory reports from multiple hospitals during a prolonged time (5 to 11 years in this study). Copper

  13. Towards Laser Cooling Trapped Ions with Telecom Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Kristina; Becker, Patrick; Donoghue, Liz; Liu, Jackie; Olmschenk, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Quantum information has many potential applications in communication, atomic clocks, and the precision measurement of fundamental constants. Trapped ions are excellent candidates for applications in quantum information because of their isolation from external perturbations, and the precise control afforded by laser cooling and manipulation of the quantum state. For many applications in quantum communication, it would be advantageous to interface ions with telecom light. We present progress towards laser cooling and trapping of doubly-ionized lanthanum, which should require only infrared, telecom-compatible light. Additionally, we present progress on optimization of a second-harmonic generation cavity for laser cooling and trapping barium ions, for future sympathetic cooling experiments. This research is supported by the Army Research Office, Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Denison University.

  14. Simulation of Electron Beam Dynamics in the 22 MeV Accelerator for a Coherent Electron Cooling Proof of Principle Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Justin

    2013-12-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CeC) offers a potential new method of cooling hadron beams in colliders such as the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) or the future electron ion collider eRHIC. A 22 MeV linear accelerator is currently being built as part of a proof of principle experiment for CeC at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In this thesis we present a simulation of electron beam dynamics including space charge in the 22 MeV CeC proof of principle experiment using the program ASTRA (A Space charge TRacking Algorithm).

  15. Investigation Into the Utilization of 3D Printing in Laser Cooling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazlett, Eric

    With the advancement of 3D printing new opportunities are abound in many different fields, but with the balance between the precisions of atomic physics experiments and the material properties of current 3D printers the benefit of 3D printing technology needs to be investigated. We report on the progress of two investigations of 3D printing of benefit to atomic physics experiments: laser feedback module and the other being an optical chopper. The first investigation looks into creation of a 3D printed laser diode feedback module. This 3D printed module would allow for the quick realization of an external cavity diode laser that would have an adjustable cavity distance. We will report on the first tests of this system, by looking at Rb spectroscopy and mode-hop free tuning range as well as possibilities of using these lasers for MOT generation. We will also discuss our investigation into a 3D-printed optical chopper that utilizes an Arduino and a computer hard drive motor. By implementing an additional Arduino we create a low cost way to quickly measure laser beam waists

  16. Investigation Into the Utilization of 3D Printing in Laser Cooling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazlett, Eric; Nelson, Brandon; de Leon, Sam Diaz; Shaw, Jonah

    2016-05-01

    With the advancement of 3D printing new opportunities are abound in many different fields, but with the balance between the precisions of atomic physics experiments and the material properties of current 3D printers the benefit of 3D printing technology needs to be investigated. We report on the progress of two investigations of 3D printing of benefit to atomic physics experiments: laser feedback module and the other being an optical chopper. The first investigation looks into creation of a 3D printed laser diode feedback module. This 3D printed module would allow for the quick realization of an external cavity diode laser that would have an adjustable cavity distance. We will report on the first tests of this system, by looking at Rb spectroscopy and mode-hop free tuning range as well as possibilities of using these lasers for MOT generation. We will also discuss our investigation into a 3D-printed optical chopper that utilizes an Arduino and a computer hard drive motor. By implementing an additional Arduino we create a low cost way to quickly measure laser beam waists.

  17. Small helium-cooled infrared telescope experiment for Spacelab-2 (IRT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    1990-01-01

    The Infrared Telescope (IRT) experiment, flown on Spacelab-2, was used to make infrared measurements between 2 and 120 microns. The objectives were multidisciplinary in nature with astrophysical goals of mapping the diffuse cosmic emission and extended infrared sources and technical goals of measuring the induced Shuttle environment, studying properties of superfluid helium in space, and testing various infrared telescope system designs. Astrophysically, new data were obtained on the structure of the Galaxy at near-infrared wavelengths. A summary of the large scale diffuse near-infrared observations of the Galaxy by the IRT is presented, as well as a summary of the preliminary results obtained from this data on the structure of the galactic disk and bulge. The importance of combining CO and near-infrared maps of similar resolution to determine a 3-D model of galactic extinction is demonstrated. The IRT data are used, in conjunction with a proposed galactic model, to make preliminary measurements of the global scale parameters of the Galaxy. During the mission substantial amounts of data were obtained concerning the induced Shuttle environment. An experiment was also performed to measure spacecraft glow in the IR.

  18. Global Optimization of the IR Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (IR MALDESI) Source for Mass Spectrometry Using Statistical Design of Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Jeremy A.; Muddiman, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Design of experiments (DOE) is a systematic and cost-effective approach to system optimization by which the effects of multiple parameters and parameter interactions on a given response can be measured in few experiments. Herein, we describe the use of statistical DOE to improve a few of the analytical figures of merit of the infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization (IR-MALDESI) source for mass spectrometry. In a typical experiment, bovine cytochrome c (~12 kDa) was ionized via electrospray, and equine cytochrome c (~12 kDa) was desorbed and ionized by IR-MALDESI such that the ratio of equine:bovine was used as a measure of the ionization efficiency of IR-MALDESI. This response was used to rank the importance of seven source parameters including flow rate, laser fluence, laser repetition rate, ESI emitter to mass spectrometer inlet distance, sample stage height, sample plate voltage, and the sample to mass spectrometer inlet distance. A screening fractional factorial DOE was conducted to designate which of the seven parameters induced the greatest amount of change in the response. These important parameters (flow rate, stage height, sample to mass spectrometer inlet distance, and laser fluence) were then studied at higher resolution using a full factorial DOE to obtain the globally optimized combination of parameter settings. The optimum combination of settings was then compared with our previously determined settings to quantify the degree of improvement in detection limit. The limit of detection for the optimized conditions was approximately 10 attomoles compared with 100 femtomoles for the previous settings, which corresponds to a four order of magnitude improvement in the detection limit of equine cytochrome c. PMID:22095501

  19. Laboratory experiments in a baroclinic annulus with heating and cooling on the horizontal boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. L.; Fowlis, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments have been performed in a cylindrical annulus with horizontal temperature gradients imposed upon the horizontal boundaries and in which the vertical depth was smaller than the width of the annulus. Qualitative observations were made by the use of small, suspended, reflective flakes in the liquid (water). Four basic regimes of flow were observed: (1) axisymmetric flow, (2) deep cellular convection, (3) boundary layer convective rolls, and (4) baroclinic waves. In some cases there was a mix of baroclinic and convective instabilities present. As a 'mean' interior Richardson number was decreased from a value greater than unity to one less than zero, axisymmetric baroclinic instability of the Solberg type was never observed. Rather, the transition was from non-axisymmetric baroclinic waves, to a mix of baroclinic and convective instability, to irregular cellular convection.

  20. Self-Pressurization and Spray Cooling Simulations of the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) Ground-Based Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartuzova, O.; Kassemi, M.; Agui, J.; Moder, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) model for simulating the self-pressurization of a large scale liquid hydrogen storage tank. In this model, the kinetics-based Schrage equation is used to account for the evaporative and condensing interfacial mass flows. Laminar and turbulent approaches to modeling natural convection in the tank and heat and mass transfer at the interface are compared. The flow, temperature, and interfacial mass fluxes predicted by these two approaches during tank self-pressurization are compared against each other. The ullage pressure and vapor temperature evolutions are also compared against experimental data obtained from the MHTB (Multipuprpose Hydrogen Test Bed) self-pressurization experiment. A CFD model for cooling cryogenic storage tanks by spraying cold liquid in the ullage is also presented. The Euler- Lagrange approach is utilized for tracking the spray droplets and for modeling interaction between the droplets and the continuous phase (ullage). The spray model is coupled with the VOF (volume of fluid) model by performing particle tracking in the ullage, removing particles from the ullage when they reach the interface, and then adding their contributions to the liquid. Droplet ullage heat and mass transfer are modeled. The flow, temperature, and interfacial mass flux predicted by the model are presented. The ullage pressure is compared with experimental data obtained from the MHTB spray bar mixing experiment. The results of the models with only droplet/ullage heat transfer and with heat and mass transfer between the droplets and ullage are compared.

  1. Ionizing radiation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter gives a comprehensive review on ionizing irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables. Topics include principles of ionizing radiation, its effects on pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, shelf-life, sensory quality, nutritional and phytochemical composition, as well as physiologic and...

  2. Performance characteristics of a low temperature cell for collisional cooling experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, C.D.; Lucia, F.C. De; Risal, D.; Ruch, A.; Sheng, H.; Abebe, Y.; Farina, P.A.; Mantz, A.W.

    1996-12-31

    The authors fabricated and tested a low temperature cell which is mounted directly on the second stage of a CTI-Cryogenics Model 22C CRYODYNE{reg_sign} CRYOCOOLER. The vacuum system consists of a room temperature vacuum shroud, a radiation shield maintained at 77K and the cell which is mounted directly to the second stage of the cryocooler. The ultimate cell temperature is 12.4 Kelvin, and the low temperature limit increases at a rate of 5.6 Kelvin/Watt. The authors achieve a cell temperature of 22 Kelvin under typical experimental conditions of approximately 29 milli Torr helium, slow flowing gas, and a heated injector. The absorption path length of the cell is 3.35 cm, and the window clear aperture is 1.27 cm. The authors performed a series of experiments in which they determined the translational temperatures of vibration-rotation transitions in the (1-0) band of CO for different cell temperatures. The results of the tests are discussed in this paper.

  3. Evaluation of combined matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry experiments for peptide mass fingerprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, David; Wasselin, Thierry; Carré, Vincent; Chaimbault, Patrick; Bezdetnaya, Lina; Maunit, Benoît; Muller, Jean-François

    2011-07-15

    Peptide Mass Fingerprinting (PMF) is still of significant interest in proteomics because it allows a large number of complex samples to be rapidly screened and characterized. The main part of post-translational modifications is generally preserved. In some specific cases, PMF suffers from ambiguous or unsuccessful identification. In order to improve its reliability, a combined approach using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICRMS) was evaluated. The study was carried out on bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. The influence of several important parameters (the matrix, the sample preparation method, the amount of the analyte) on the MOWSE score and the protein sequence coverage were evaluated to allow the identification of specific effects. A careful investigation of the sequence coverage obtained by each kind of experiment ensured the detection of specific peptides for each experimental condition. Results highlighted that DHB-FTICRMS and DHB- or CHCA-TOFMS are the most suited combinations of experimental conditions to achieve PMF analysis. The association (convolution) of the data obtained by each of these techniques ensured a significant increase in the MOWSE score and the protein sequence coverage.

  4. Developing Young Researchers: 15 Years of Authentic Science Experiences for K-12 with NASA's S'COOL Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Crecelius, S.; Rogerson, T.; Lewis, P. M.; Moore, S.; Madigan, J. J.; Deller, C.; Taylor, J.

    2012-12-01

    In late 1996, members of the Atmospheric Science Directorate at NASA's Langley Research Center decided that there had to be a better way to share the excitement of our research than black and white, text-heavy Fact Sheets. We invited a group of local teachers to a half-day session on Center to help guide an improved approach. We suggested a variety of approaches to them, and asked for feedback. They were eager for anything other than black and white Fact Sheets! Fortunately, one local middle school science teacher took us up on the offer to stick around and talk over lunch. In that conversation, she said that anything that would connect the science her kids studied in the classroom to the outside world - especially to NASA! - would be very motivating to her students. From that conversation was born the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL Project), now a nearly 16-year experiment in K-12 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) engagement. S'COOL is the Education and Public Outreach (EPO) arm of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project, and involves K-12 students as a source of ground truth for satellite cloud retrievals. It was designed from the beginning as a 2-way project, with communication of information from the students to NASA, but also from NASA back to the students. With technology evolution since the project began, we have continued to enhance this focus on 2-way interaction. S'COOL involves students with observation skills, math skills (to compute cloud cover from multiple observers or convert units), geography skills (locating their school on a map and comparing to satellite imagery), and exposes them to cutting edge engineering in the form of a series of NASA satellites. As a priority Earth Observing Instrument, CERES currently flies on Terra, Aqua and NPP, with an additional instrument in development for JPSS. Students are involved in occasional Intensive Observing Periods (as with the launch of NPP), and are

  5. Plasma Production via Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-01-02

    Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  6. Time-dependent Cooling in Photoionized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnat, Orly

    2017-02-01

    I explore the thermal evolution and ionization states in gas cooling from an initially hot state in the presence of external photoionizing radiation. I compute the equilibrium and nonequilibrium cooling efficiencies, heating rates, and ion fractions for low-density gas cooling while exposed to the ionizing metagalactic background radiation at various redshifts (z = 0 ‑ 3), for a range of temperatures (108–104 K), densities (10‑7–103 cm‑3), and metallicities (10‑3–2 times solar). The results indicate the existence of a threshold ionization parameter, above which the cooling efficiencies are very close to those in photoionization equilibrium (so that departures from equilibrium may be neglected), and below which the cooling efficiencies resemble those in collisional time-dependent gas cooling with no external radiation (and are thus independent of density).

  7. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  8. Thermal and hydrodynamic studies for micro-channel cooling for large area silicon sensors in high energy physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaschel, Nils; Ariza, Dario; Díez, Sergio; Gerboles, Marta; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Jorda, Xavier; Mas, Roser; Quirion, David; Tackmann, Kerstin; Ullan, Miguel

    2017-08-01

    Micro-channel cooling initially aiming at small-sized high-power integrated circuits is being transferred to the field of high energy physics. Today's prospects of micro-fabricating silicon opens a door to a more direct cooling of detector modules. The challenge in high energy physics is to save material in the detector construction and to cool large areas. In this paper, we are investigating micro-channel cooling as a candidate for a future cooling system for silicon detectors in a generic research and development approach. The work presented in this paper includes the production and the hydrodynamic and thermal testing of a micro-channel equipped prototype optimized to achieve a homogeneous flow distribution. Furthermore, the device was simulated using finite element methods.

  9. Familiarity, opinions, experiences and knowledge about scalp cooling: a Dutch survey among breast cancer patients and oncological professionals

    PubMed Central

    Peerbooms, Mijke; van den Hurk, Corina JG; Breed, Wim PM

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Scalp cooling (SC) is applied to reduce chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA). The aim of this study was to investigate patients’ familiarity and opinions and oncological professionals’ attitude and knowledge about SC in the Netherlands. Methods: Ex breast cancer patients, nurses and medical oncologists (MDs) from SC and non-SC hospitals filled out questionnaires. Results: The majority of MDs and nurses were satisfied with the results of SC, as were SC patients. Over 33% of MDs and nurses perceived their knowledge level insufficient to inform patients about effectiveness, which was over 43% for information about safety. MDs main reason to not apply SC was doubt about effectiveness and safety. Nurses generally offered SC to a minority of eligible patients. Patients were frequently unfamiliar with SC before diagnosis. Seventy percent of SC patients with insufficient results (20/52) reported to mind it very much. With expected success rates of 35% and 50%, respectively, 36% and 54% of patients would use SC again. Conclusion: Room for improvement has been shown for both patients’ familiarity and oncological professionals’ knowledge about SC. Sharing knowledge about results, safety and patients’ experiences will improve patient counseling and SC availability. The results of this survey led to the development of a national standard on CIA and SC. PMID:27981090

  10. The design of double electrostatic-lens optics for resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron imaging experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Zehua; Li, Chunsheng; Qin, Zhengbo E-mail: xfzheng@mail.ahnu.edu.cn; Zheng, Xianfeng E-mail: xfzheng@mail.ahnu.edu.cn; Yao, Guanxin; Zhang, Xianyi; Cui, Zhifeng

    2015-06-15

    Compared to single ion/electron-optics for velocity-map imaging, a double-focusing lens assembly designed not only allows for mapping velocity imaging of photoelectrons but also allows for investigating the vibrational structure of the intermediate states of neutral species in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra. In this presentation, in order to record REMPI and photoelectron spectra separately, we have constructed a compact photoelectron velocity-map imaging (VMI) apparatus combined with an opposite linear Wiley-Mclaren time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). A mass resolution (m/Δm) of ∼1300 for TOFMS and electron energy resolution (ΔE/E) of 2.4% for VMI have been achieved upon three-photon ionization of Xe atom at 258.00 nm laser wavelength. As a benchmark, in combination of one-color (1 + 1) REMPI and photoelectron imaging of benzene via 6{sup 1} and 6{sup 1}1{sup 1} vibronic levels in the S{sub 1} state, the vibrational structures of the cation and photoelectron angular anisotropy are unraveled. In addition, two-color (1 + 1′) REMPI and photoelectron imaging of aniline was used to complete the accurate measurement of ionization potential (62 271 ± 3 cm{sup −1}). The results suggest that the apparatus is a powerful tool for studying photoionization dynamics in the photoelectron imaging using vibrational-state selected excitation to the intermediate states of neutrals based on REMPI technique.

  11. The design of double electrostatic-lens optics for resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron imaging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zehua; Li, Chunsheng; Qin, Zhengbo; Zheng, Xianfeng; Yao, Guanxin; Zhang, Xianyi; Cui, Zhifeng

    2015-06-01

    Compared to single ion/electron-optics for velocity-map imaging, a double-focusing lens assembly designed not only allows for mapping velocity imaging of photoelectrons but also allows for investigating the vibrational structure of the intermediate states of neutral species in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra. In this presentation, in order to record REMPI and photoelectron spectra separately, we have constructed a compact photoelectron velocity-map imaging (VMI) apparatus combined with an opposite linear Wiley-Mclaren time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). A mass resolution (m/Δm) of ˜1300 for TOFMS and electron energy resolution (ΔE/E) of 2.4% for VMI have been achieved upon three-photon ionization of Xe atom at 258.00 nm laser wavelength. As a benchmark, in combination of one-color (1 + 1) REMPI and photoelectron imaging of benzene via 61 and 6111 vibronic levels in the S1 state, the vibrational structures of the cation and photoelectron angular anisotropy are unraveled. In addition, two-color (1 + 1') REMPI and photoelectron imaging of aniline was used to complete the accurate measurement of ionization potential (62 271 ± 3 cm-1). The results suggest that the apparatus is a powerful tool for studying photoionization dynamics in the photoelectron imaging using vibrational-state selected excitation to the intermediate states of neutrals based on REMPI technique.

  12. Summary Results of the Neptun Boil-Off Experiments to Investigate the Accuracy and Cooling Influence of LOFT Cladding-Surface Thermocouples (System 00)

    SciTech Connect

    E. L. Tolman S. N. Aksan

    1981-10-01

    Nine boil-off experiments were conducted in the Swiss NEPTUN Facility primarily to obtain experimental data for assessing the perturbation effects of LOFT thermocouples during simulated small-break core uncovery conditions. The data will also be useful in assessing computer model capability to predict thermal hydraulic response data for this type of experiment. System parameters that were varied for these experiments included heater rod power, system pressure, and initial coolant subcooling. The experiments showed that the LOFT thermocouples do not cause a significant cooling influence in the rods to which they are attached. Furthermore, the accuracy of the LOFT thermocouples is within 20 K at the peak cladding temperature zone.

  13. Oxygen Absorption in Cooling Flows.

    PubMed

    Buote

    2000-04-01

    The inhomogeneous cooling flow scenario predicts the existence of large quantities of gas in massive elliptical galaxies, groups, and clusters that have cooled and dropped out of the flow. Using spatially resolved, deprojected X-ray spectra from the ROSAT PSPC, we have detected strong absorption over energies approximately 0.4-0.8 keV intrinsic to the central approximately 1&arcmin; of the galaxy NGC 1399, the group NGC 5044, and the cluster A1795. These systems have among the largest nearby cooling flows in their respective classes and low Galactic columns. Since no excess absorption is indicated for energies below approximately 0.4 keV, the most reasonable model for the absorber is warm, collisionally ionized gas with T=105-106 K in which ionized states of oxygen provide most of the absorption. Attributing the absorption only to ionized gas reconciles the large columns of cold H and He inferred from Einstein and ASCA with the lack of such columns inferred from ROSAT and also is consistent with the negligible atomic and molecular H inferred from H i and CO observations of cooling flows. The prediction of warm ionized gas as the product of mass dropout in these and other cooling flows can be verified by Chandra and X-Ray Multimirror Mission.

  14. Electron-impact ionization cross sections out of the ground and excited states of cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Lukomski, M.; Sutton, S.; Kedzierski, W.; Reddish, T. J.; Bartschat, K.; Bartlett, P. L.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.; McConkey, J. W.

    2006-09-15

    An atom trapping technique for determining absolute, total ionization cross sections (TICS) out of an excited atom is presented. The unique feature of our method is in utilizing Doppler cooling of neutral atoms to determine ionization cross sections. This fluorescence-monitoring experiment, which is a variant of the 'trap loss' technique, has enabled us to obtain the experimental electron impact ionization cross sections out of the Cs state between 7 eV and 400 eV. CCC, RMPS, and Born theoretical results are also presented for both the ground and excited states of cesium and rubidium. In the low energy region (<11 eV) where best agreement between these excited state measurements and theory might be expected, a discrepancy of approximately a factor of five is observed. Above this energy there are significant contributions to the TICS from both autoionization and multiple ionization.

  15. Hydrogen film cooling investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Ewen, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Effects of flow turning, flow acceleration, and supersonic flow on film cooling were determined experimentally and correlated in terms of an entrainment film cooling model. Experiments were conducted using thin walled metal test sections, hot nitrogen mainstream gas, and ambient hydrogen or nitrogen as film coolants. The entrainment film cooling model relates film cooling effectiveness to the amount of mainstream gases entrained with the film coolant in a mixing layer. The experimental apparatus and the analytical model used are described in detail and correlations for the entrainment fraction and film coolant-to-wall heat transfer coefficient are presented.

  16. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Air. Part I: Experiments; Part II: Separate Effects Tests and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Corradin, Michael; Anderson, M.; Muci, M.; Hassan, Yassin; Dominguez, A.; Tokuhiro, Akira; Hamman, K.

    2014-10-15

    This experimental study investigates the thermal hydraulic behavior and the heat removal performance for a scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) with air. A quarter-scale RCCS facility was designed and built based on a full-scale General Atomics (GA) RCCS design concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR). The GA RCCS is a passive cooling system that draws in air to use as the cooling fluid to remove heat radiated from the reactor pressure vessel to the air-cooled riser tubes and discharged the heated air into the atmosphere. Scaling laws were used to preserve key aspects and to maintain similarity. The scaled air RCCS facility at UW-Madison is a quarter-scale reduced length experiment housing six riser ducts that represent a 9.5° sector slice of the full-scale GA air RCCS concept. Radiant heaters were used to simulate the heat radiation from the reactor pressure vessel. The maximum power that can be achieved with the radiant heaters is 40 kW with a peak heat flux of 25 kW per meter squared. The quarter-scale RCCS was run under different heat loading cases and operated successfully. Instabilities were observed in some experiments in which one of the two exhaust ducts experienced a flow reversal for a period of time. The data and analysis presented show that the RCCS has promising potential to be a decay heat removal system during an accident scenario.

  17. Atmospheric Ionization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Thomas; Mayes, Riley

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of atmospheric ionization is a largely unexplored science that potentially holds the key to better understanding many different geophysical phenomena through this new and valuable source of data. Through the LaACES program, which is funded by NASA through the Louisiana Space Consortium, students at Loyola University New Orleans have pursued the goal of measuring high altitude ionization for nearly three years, and were the first to successfully collect ionization data at altitudes over 30,000 feet using a scientific weather balloon flown from the NASA Columbia Scientific Ballooning Facility in Palestine, TX. In order to measure atmospheric ionization, the science team uses a lightweight and highly customized sensor known as a Gerdien condenser. Among other branches of science the data is already being used for, such as the study of aerosol pollution levels in the atmosphere, the data may also be useful in meteorology and seismology. Ionization data might provide another variable with which to predict weather or seismic activity more accurately and further in advance. Thomas Slack and Riley Mayes have served as project managers for the experiment, and have extensive knowledge of the experiment from the ground up. LaSPACE Louisiana Space Consortium.

  18. Benchmark experiment for electron-impact ionization of argon: Absolute triple-differential cross sections via three-dimensional electron emission images

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Xueguang; Senftleben, Arne; Pflueger, Thomas; Dorn, Alexander; Ullrich, Joachim; Bartschat, Klaus

    2011-05-15

    Single ionization of argon by 195-eV electron impact is studied in an experiment, where the absolute triple-differential cross sections are presented as three-dimensional electron emission images for a series of kinematic conditions. Thereby a comprehensive set of experimental data for electron-impact ionization of a many-electron system is produced to provide a benchmark for comparison with theoretical predictions. Theoretical models using a hybrid first-order and second-order distorted-wave Born plus R-matrix approach are employed to compare their predictions with the experimental data. While the relative shape of the calculated cross section is generally in reasonable agreement with experiment, the magnitude appears to be the most significant problem with the theoretical treatment for the conditions studied in the present work. This suggests that the most significant challenge in the further development of theory for this process may lie in the reproduction of the absolute scale rather than the angular dependence of the cross section.

  19. Influence of released surface electrons on the pre-ionization of helium barrier discharges: laser photodesorption experiment and 1D fluid simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschiersch, R.; Nemschokmichal, S.; Meichsner, J.

    2017-07-01

    The presented work highlights the role of residual weakly-bound surface electrons acting as an effective seed electron reservoir that favors the pre-ionization of diffuse barrier discharges (BDs). A glow-like BD was operated in helium at a pressure of 500 {mbar} in between two plane electrodes each covered with float glass at a distance of 3 {mm}. The change in discharge development due to laser photodesorption of surface electrons was studied by electrical measurements and optical emission spectroscopy. Moreover, a 1D numerical fluid model of the diffuse discharge allowed the simulation of the laser photodesorption experiment, the estimation of the released surface electrons, and the understanding of their impact on the reaction kinetics in the volume. The breakdown voltage is clearly reduced when the laser beam at photon energy of 2.33 {eV} hits the cathodic dielectric that is charged with residual electrons during the discharge pre-phase. According to the adapted simulation, the laser releases only a small amount of surface electrons in the order of 10 {pC}. Nevertheless, this significantly supports the pre-ionization. Using a lower photon energy of 1.17 {eV}, the transition from the glow mode to the Townsend mode is induced due to a much higher electron yield up to 1 {nC}. In this case, both experiment and simulation indicate a retarded stepwise release of surface electrons initiated by the low laser photon energy.

  20. Cool Down Experiences with the SST-1 Helium Cryogenics System before and after Current Feeders System Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R.; Panchal, P.; Panchal, R.; Tank, J.; Mahesuriya, G.; Sonara, D.; Srikanth, G. L. N.; Garg, A.; Bairagi, N.; Christian, D.; Patel, K.; Shah, P.; Nimavat, H.; Sharma, R.; Patel, J. C.; Gupta, N. C.; Prasad, U.; Sharma, A. N.; Tanna, V. L.; Pradhan, S.

    The SST-1 machine comprises a superconducting magnet system (SCMS), which includes TF and PF magnets. In order to charge the SCMS, we need superconducting current feeders consisting of SC feeders and vapor cooled current leads (VCCLs). We have installed all 10 (+/-) pairs of VCCLs for the TF and PF systems. While conducting initial engineering validation of the SST-1 machine, our prime objective was to produce circular plasma using only the TF system. During the SST-1 campaign I to VI, we have to stop the PF magnets cooling in order to get the cryo- stable conditions for current charging of the TF magnets system. In that case, the cooling of the PF current leads is not essential. It has been also observed that after aborting the PF system cooling, there was a limited experimental window of TF operation. Therefore, in the recent SST-1 campaign-VII, we removed the PF current leads (9 pairs) and kept only single (+/-) pair of the 10,000 A rated VCCLs to realize the charging of the TF system for the extended window of operation. We have observed a better cryogenic stability in the TF magnets after modifications in the CFS. In this paper, we report the comparison of the cool down performance for the SST-1 machine operation before and after modifications of the current feeders system.

  1. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  2. The CIV processes in the CRIT experiments. [reconciliation of Critical Ionization Velocity hypothesis with sounding rocket observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    1992-01-01

    A qualitative analysis is conducted to reconcile the experimental data from critical ionization velocity (CIV) studies with CIV theories. The experimental data are reviewed demonstrating that: (1) the wave frequency is variable and low; (2) the wave polarization is almost isotropic; (3) electron energization is not easily reconciled with the observed wave spectrum; and (4) ambient electron density plays a role in determining CIV triggering conditions. Analytical treatment is given to the dispersion relation of the lower hybrid wave (LWH) instability driven by the streaming of an ion beam generated by the interaction of the neutral cloud with the ambient atmosphere. By incorporating the LWH instabilities of strong turbulence and finite-size effects into theoretical CIV relationships, the observations can be interpreted. The issues raised by the experimental data are understood within the context of a hypothesis of backward propagating nonlinearly collapsing wavepackets.

  3. Internal-liquid-film-cooling Experiments with Air-stream Temperatures to 2000 Degrees F. in 2- and 4-inch-diameter Horizontal Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, George R; Abramson, Andrew E; Sloop, John L

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to determine the effectiveness of liquid-cooling films on the inner surfaces of tubes containing flowing hot air. Experiments were made in 2- and 4-inch-diameter straight metal tubes with air flows at temperatures from 600 degrees to 2000 degrees F. and diameter Reynolds numbers from 2.2 to 14 x 10(5). The film coolant, water, was injected around the circumference at a single axial position on the tubes at flow rates from 0.02 to .24 pound per second per foot of tube circumference (0.8 to 12 percent of the air flow). Liquid-coolant films were established and maintained around and along the tube wall in concurrent flow with the hot air. The results indicated that, in order to film cool a given surface area with as little coolant flow as possible, it may be necessary to limit the flow of coolant introduced at a single axial position and to introduce it at several axial positions. The flow rate of inert coolant required to maintain liquid-film cooling over a given area of tube surface can be estimated when the gas-flow conditions are known by means of a generalized plot of the film-cooling data.

  4. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionization energy loss in pp collisions at s=13TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; ...

    2016-06-28

    This study presents a search for massive charged long-lived particles produced in pp collisions at √s = 13TeV at the LHC using the ATLAS experiment. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb–1. Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of massive charged long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons. These massive particles are expected to be produced with a velocity significantly below the speed of light, and therefore to have a specific ionization higher than any Standard Model particle of unit charge at high momenta. The Pixel subsystem of the ATLAS detector is used tomore » measure the ionization energy loss of reconstructed charged particles and to search for such highly ionizing particles. The search presented here has much greater sensitivity than a similar search performed using the ATLAS detector in the √s = 8TeV data set, thanks to the increase in expected signal cross section due to the higher center-of-mass energy of collisions, to an upgraded detector with a new silicon layer close to the interaction point, and to analysis improvements. No significant deviation from Standard Model background expectations is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadron production cross sections and masses are set. Gluino R-hadrons with lifetimes above 0.4 ns and decaying to qq¯ plus a 100 GeV neutralino are excluded at the 95% confidence level, with lower mass limit ranging between 740 and 1590 GeV. In the case of stable R-hadrons the lower mass limit at the 95% confidence level is 1570 GeV.« less

  5. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionization energy loss in p p collisions at √{s }=13 TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, Bh; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a search for massive charged long-lived particles produced in p p collisions at √{s }=13 TeV at the LHC using the ATLAS experiment. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1. Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of massive charged long-lived particles, such as R -hadrons. These massive particles are expected to be produced with a velocity significantly below the speed of light, and therefore to have a specific ionization higher than any Standard Model particle of unit charge at high momenta. The Pixel subsystem of the ATLAS detector is used to measure the ionization energy loss of reconstructed charged particles and to search for such highly ionizing particles. The search presented here has much greater sensitivity than a similar search performed using the ATLAS detector in the √{s }=8 TeV data set, thanks to the increase in expected signal cross section due to the higher center-of-mass energy of collisions, to an upgraded detector with a new silicon layer close to the interaction point, and to analysis improvements. No significant deviation from Standard Model background expectations is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R -hadron production cross sections and masses are set. Gluino R -hadrons with lifetimes above 0.4 ns and decaying to q q ¯ plus a 100 GeV neutralino are excluded at the 95% confidence level, with lower mass limit ranging between 740 and 1590 GeV. In the case of stable R -hadrons the lower mass limit at the 95% confidence level is 1570 GeV.

  6. Rectlinear cooling scheme for bright muon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-05-03

    A fast cooling technique is described that simultaneously reduces all six phase-space dimensions of a charged particle beam. In this process, cooling is accomplished by reducing the beam momentum through ionization energy loss in absorbers and replenishing the momentum loss only in the longitudinal direction rf cavities. In this work we review its main features and describe the main results.

  7. State Machine Operation of the MICE Cooling Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The cooling channel for MICE has between 12 and 18 superconductnig solenoid coils in 3 to 7 magnets, depending on the staged development of the experiment. The magnets are coaxial and in close proximity which requires coordinated operation of the magnets when ramping, responding to quench conditions, and quench recovery. To reliably manage the operation of the magnets, MICE is implementing state machines for each magnet and an over-arching state machine for the magnets integrated in the cooling channel. The state machine transitions and operating parameters are stored/restored to/from the configuration database and coupled with MICE Run Control. Proper implementation of the state machines will not only ensure safe operation of the magnets, but will help ensure reliable data quality. A description of MICE, details of the state machines, and lessons learned from use of the state machines in recent magnet training tests will be discussed.

  8. A Laboratory Experiment To Measure Henry's Law Constants of Volatile Organic Compounds with a Bubble Column and a Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shan-Hu; Mukherjee, Souptik; Brewer, Brittany; Ryan, Raphael; Yu, Huan; Gangoda, Mahinda

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory experiment is described to measure Henry's law constants of organic compounds using a bubble column and gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). This experiment is designed for upper-division undergraduate laboratory courses and can be implemented in conjunction with physical chemistry, analytical…

  9. A Laboratory Experiment To Measure Henry's Law Constants of Volatile Organic Compounds with a Bubble Column and a Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shan-Hu; Mukherjee, Souptik; Brewer, Brittany; Ryan, Raphael; Yu, Huan; Gangoda, Mahinda

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory experiment is described to measure Henry's law constants of organic compounds using a bubble column and gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). This experiment is designed for upper-division undergraduate laboratory courses and can be implemented in conjunction with physical chemistry, analytical…

  10. Cooling Rates of Chondrules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Hewins, R. H.; Eiben, B. A.

    1995-09-01

    Cooling rates for chondrules are among many aspects of chondrule forming events currently under debate and estimates by different authors vary considerably. Calculations based on radiation from isolated chondrules yield an extremely high cooling rate of ~10^5 degrees C/hr [1]. The cooling rates derived from previous petrological and experimental studies are much lower but inconsistent, ranging from 5 - 100 degrees C/hr [2] to ~1000 degrees C/hr [3]. Since cooling rates bear important information about the chondrule-forming environment, they need to be more tightly constrained. Here we re-evaluate the chondrule cooling rates based on the results of our recent flash heating experiments, mainly the volatile loss data, as well as textures, and olivine zoning profiles of the chondrule analog materials. Linear cooling vs. cooling curves. Many previous studies either assumed or used linear cooling rates for chondrules [2,3]. In reality, even with simple radiative cooling, the cooling rates should have followed a non-linear path, according to the Stefan- Boltzmann law. We used non-linear cooling rates throughout our experiments, and our observations show that the initial cooling rate at the high temperature end of a specific cooling curve affects chondrule properties most. Volatile loss results. Our Na and S loss experiments [4] have shown that to reproduce the very high Na contents [5,6] and primary sulfide [7] found in some natural chondrules, heating has to be brief, but fast cooling and relatively high fO2 are also essential. With an fO2 of ~10^(-10) atm, for a type II chondrule flash heated to its liquidus temperature, cooling curves beginning at ~2500 degrees C/hr are necessary to retain >90% of its original Na content or part of its S, unless the ambient gas is very enriched in these elements [8]. Under lower fO2, or for type I chondrule composition, even higher cooling rates are required. Textures and olivine zoning with ~10^1 - ~10^3 degrees C/hr initial cooling

  11. Cooling rate correction and Detection of mineralogical evolution during Thellier-Thellier's experiments on baked clays. Applications to French protohistoric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanos, P.; Hervé, G.; Chauvin, A.; Perron d'Arc, M.

    2011-12-01

    Archaeointensity protocols have been considerably improved since the last years to better detect multidomain (MD) grains effects or mineralogical evolutions during Thellier's experiments. Current published data respect more strict criteria and take into account the anisotropy of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM). However the effect of the cooling rate on the intensity of the TRM acquired during cooling, which depends on the type of the ferromagnetic grains, remains difficult to precisely quantify. The main problem is to estimate the true cooling rate of the archeological structures and usually a 24 hours cooling is assumed. An experimental study of 35 small bricks baked in two kilns during summer 2007 and 2008 (in Sallèles d'Aude, southern France) gives new elements about the cooling rate correction. The used kilns are of two different sizes, similar to classical archaeological structures. Intensity of the geomagnetic field (43 μT) in the kilns and the temperature decrease during the cooling (around 12 hours for the small kiln and 70 hours for the other one) were measured. Discrepancies between the TRM intensity after fast (1.5 hour in the laboratory) and low cooling of 24 hours are over a very wide range between -5 and +30%. The use of the true cooling rate of the kilns (respectively 12 and 72 hours) gives mean archaeointensities (43.8±1.8 μT and 42.7±2.2 μT) corresponding to the intensity of the field measured within them. By applying the usual cooling of 24 hours, the intensity of the field is underestimated by 3 μT in the small kiln and is overestimated by 3 μT in the bigger kiln. Consequently, a wrong cooling rate correction may explain the dispersion between archaeointensities. The second aspect of the presentation corresponds to the detection of mineralogical evolution during successive heatings of the Thellier-Thellier's protocol. This problem is particularly important for the millennia BC in Europe, as very well heated structures are less common

  12. Search for low-mass weakly interacting massive particles using voltage-assisted calorimetric ionization detection in the SuperCDMS experiment.

    PubMed

    Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Asai, M; Balakishiyeva, D; Basu Thakur, R; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Loer, B; Lopez Asamar, E; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nadeau, P; Nelson, R H; Page, K; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-31

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this Letter, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage-assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for ten live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of 170  eVee (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6  GeV/c2.

  13. Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2014-01-01

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this paper, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage- assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for 10 live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of 170 eVee (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV/c2.

  14. A Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redi, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, Richard; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2014-01-27

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this Letter, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage-assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for ten live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV/c2.

  15. Development of a stabilized low temperature infrared absorption cell for use in low temperature and collisional cooling experiments.

    PubMed

    Valentin, A; Henry, A; Claveau, C; Camy-Peyret, C; Hurtmans, D; Mantz, A W

    2004-12-01

    We have constructed a stabilized low temperature infrared absorption cell cooled by an open cycle refrigerator, which can run with liquid nitrogen from 250 to 80K or with liquid helium from 80K to a few kelvin. Several CO infrared spectra were recorded at low temperature using a tunable diode laser spectrometer. These spectra were analyzed taking into account the detailed effects of collisions on the line profile when the pressure increases. We also recorded spectra at very low pressure to accurately model the diode laser emission. Spectra of the R(2) line in the fundamental band of 13CO cooled by collisions with helium buffer gas at 10.5K and at pressures near 1 Torr have been recorded. The He-pressure broadening parameter (gamma(0) = 0.3 cm(-1) atm(-1)) has been derived from the simultaneous analysis of four spectra at different pressures.

  16. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  17. Cool & Connected

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Cool & Connected planning assistance program helps communities develop strategies and an action plan for using broadband to promote environmentally and economically sustainable community development.

  18. Electron-impact ionization cross sections out of the ground and 6P2 excited states of cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łukomski, M.; Sutton, S.; Kedzierski, W.; Reddish, T. J.; Bartschat, K.; Bartlett, P. L.; Bray, I.; Stelbovics, A. T.; McConkey, J. W.

    2006-09-01

    An atom trapping technique for determining absolute, total ionization cross sections (TICS) out of an excited atom is presented. The unique feature of our method is in utilizing Doppler cooling of neutral atoms to determine ionization cross sections. This fluorescence-monitoring experiment, which is a variant of the “trap loss” technique, has enabled us to obtain the experimental electron impact ionization cross sections out of the Cs 6P3/22 state between 7eV and 400eV . CCC, RMPS, and Born theoretical results are also presented for both the ground and excited states of cesium and rubidium. In the low energy region (<11eV) where best agreement between these excited state measurements and theory might be expected, a discrepancy of approximately a factor of five is observed. Above this energy there are significant contributions to the TICS from both autoionization and multiple ionization.

  19. Cooled Ion Frequency Standard.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    experiments 1. Laser cooled atomic clock . We have completed work on the first frequency standard based on laser cooled atoms . This work which was...inaccuracy essentially equal to the U.S. best Cesium atomic clock with a clear direction for improvement and (2) this system facilitates studies of generic...problems are (1) to suppress second order and residual first order Doppler shifts in atomic frequency standards in a fundamental way--by substantially

  20. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  1. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  2. Fragmentation dynamics of argon clusters (Arn, n =2 to 11) following electron-impact ionization: Modeling and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonhommeau, David; Halberstadt, Nadine; Viel, Alexandra

    2006-05-01

    The fragmentation dynamics of argon clusters ionized by electron impact is investigated for initial cluster sizes up to n =11 atoms. The dynamics of the argon atoms is modeled using a mixed quantum-classical method in which the nuclei are treated classically and the transitions between electronic states quantum mechanically. The potential-energy surfaces are derived from a diatomics-in-molecules model with the addition of the induced dipole-induced dipole and spin-orbit interactions. The results show extensive and fast fragmentation. The dimer is the most abundant ionic fragment, with a proportion increasing from 66% for n =2 to a maximum of 95% for n =6 and then decreasing down to 67% for n =11. The next abundant fragment is the monomer for n <7 and the trimer otherwise. The parent ion dissociation lifetimes are all in the range of 1ps. Long-lived trajectories appear for initial cluster sizes of seven and higher, and favor the formation of the larger fragments (trimers and tetramers). Our results show quantitative agreement with available experimental results concerning the extensive character of the fragmentation: Ar+ and Ar2+ are the only ionic fragments for sizes up to five atoms; their overall proportion is in quantitative agreement for all the studied sizes; Ar2+ is the main fragment for all sizes; stable Ar3+ fragments only appear for n ⩾5, and their proportion increases smoothly with cluster size from there. However, the individual ionic monomer and dimer fragment proportions differ. The experimental ones exhibit oscillations with initial cluster size, with a slight tendency to decrease on average for the monomer. In contrast our results show a monotonic, systematic evolution, similar to what was found in our earlier studies on neon and krypton clusters. Several hypotheses are discussed in order to find the origin of this discrepancy. Finally, the metastable II(1/2)u and II(1/2)g states of Ar2+ are found to decay with a lifetime of 3.5 and 0.1ps

  3. The Mice Focusing Solenoids and their Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Barr, G.; Lau, W.; Senanayake, R.S.; Yang, S.Q.

    2004-05-07

    This report describes the focusing solenoid for the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) [1]. The focusing solenoid consists of a pair of superconducting solenoids that are on a common bobbin. The two coils, which have separate leads, may be operated in the same polarity or at opposite polarity. This report discusses the superconducting magnet design and the cryostat design for the MICE focusing module. Also discussed is how this superconducting magnet can be integrated with a pair of small 4.2 K coolers.

  4. Field ionization of free helium atoms: Correlation between the kinetic energy of ionized atoms and probability of their field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskur, J.; Borg, L.; Stupnik, A.; Leisch, M.; Ernst, W. E.; Holst, B.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper the correlation between the kinetic energy of helium atoms and the probability of field ionization is investigated by exploiting the narrow velocity distribution of supersonic molecular beams. Field ionization measurements were carried out on supersonic helium beams at 298 K and 95 K corresponding to energies of about 65 meV and 20 meV, respectively, for the individual atoms. The field ionization was performed with a tungsten tip, radius of curvature 12 nm, kept at room temperature. The ionization probability was found to increase by about a factor 10 when the beam was cooled from 298 K to 95 K. The results presented in this paper are of importance for improving the understanding of field ionization and for the development of a new detector for helium and other molecular beams.

  5. Dynamics of the O((3)P) + C2H2 reaction from crossed molecular beam experiments with soft electron ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Leonori, Francesca; Balucani, Nadia; Capozza, Giovanni; Segoloni, Enrico; Volpi, Gian Gualberto; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2014-06-07

    The reaction between ground state oxygen atoms, O((3)P), and the acetylene molecule, C2H2, has been investigated in crossed molecular beam experiments with mass-spectrometric detection and time-of-flight analysis at three different collision energies, Ec = 34.4, 41.1 and 54.6 kJ mol(-1). From product angular and velocity distribution measurements of the HCCO and CH2 products in the laboratory frame, product angular and translational energy distributions in the center-of-mass frame were determined. Measurements on the CH2 product were made possible by employing for product detection the recently implemented soft electron-ionization (EI) technique with low-energy, tunable electrons, which has permitted suppressing interference coming from the dissociative ionization of reactants, products and background gases. It has been found that the title reaction leads only to two competing channels: H + HCCO (ketenyl) and CO + CH2 (triplet methylene). The branching ratio of cross sections between the two competing channels has been determined to be σ(HCCO)/[σ(HCCO) + σ(CH2)] = 0.79 ± 0.05, independent of collision energy within the experimental uncertainty. This value is in line with that obtained in the most recent and accurate kinetics determination at room temperature as well as with that predicted from recent theoretical calculations based on statistical rate theory and weak-collision master equation analysis and on dynamics surface-hopping quasiclassical trajectory calculations on-the-fly on coupled triplet/singlet ab initio potential energy surfaces. The firm assessment of the branching ratio as a function of translational energy for this important reaction, besides its fundamental significance, is of considerable relevance for the implementation of theoretical models of hydrocarbon combustion.

  6. Investigating cryoinjury using simulations and experiments: 2. TF-1 cells during graded freezing (interrupted slow cooling without hold time).

    PubMed

    Ross-Rodriguez, L U; Elliott, J A W; McGann, L E

    2010-08-01

    Cryopreservation plays a key role in the long-term storage of native and engineered cells and tissues for research and clinical applications. The survival of cells and tissues after freezing and thawing depends on the ability of the cells to withstand a variety of stresses imposed by the cryopreservation protocol. A better understanding of the nature and kinetics of cellular responses to temperature-induced conditions is required to minimize cryoinjury. An interrupted freezing procedure that allows dissection of cryoinjury was used to investigate the progressive damage that occurs to cells during cryopreservation using slow cooling. Simulations of cellular osmotic responses were used to provide interpretation linking states of the cell with events during the freezing procedure. Simulations of graded freezing (interrupted slow cooling without hold time) were correlated with cell recovery results of TF-1 cells. Calculated intracellular supercooling and osmolality, were used as indicators of the probability of cryoinjury due to intracellular ice formation and solution effects, providing direct links of cellular conditions to events in the freezing process. Using simulations, this study demonstrated that both intracellular supercooling and osmolality are necessary to explain graded freezing results. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ionizing radiation promotes protozoan reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Luckey, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    This experiment was performed to determine whether ionizing radiation is essential for maximum growth rate in a ciliated protozoan. When extraneous ionizing radiation was reduced to 0.15 mrad/day, the reproduction rate of Tetrahymena pyriformis was significantly less (P less than 0.01) than it was at near ambient levels, 0.5 or 1.8 mrad/day. Significantly higher growth rates (P less than 0.01) were obtained when chronic radiation was increased. The data suggest that ionizing radiation is essential for optimum reproduction rate in this organism.

  8. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  9. The influence of cooling on the advance of lava flows: insights from analogue experiments on the feedbacks between flow dynamics and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2012-12-01

    During an effusive volcanic eruption, the crisis management is mainly based on the prediction of lava flows advance and its velocity. The spreading of a lava flow, seen as a gravity current, depends on its "effective rheology" and the eruptive mass flux. These two parameters are not known a priori during an eruption and a key question is how to evaluate them in near real-time (rather than afterwards.) There is no generic macroscopic model for the rheology of an advancing lava flow, and analogue modelling is a precious tool to empirically estimate the rheology of a complex flow. We investigate through laboratory experiments the simultaneous spreading and cooling of horizontal currents fed at constant rate from a point source. The materials used are silicone oil (isoviscous), and poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) wax injected in liquid state and solidiying during its advance. In the isoviscous case, the temperature field is a passive tracer of the flow dynamics, whereas in the PEG experiments there is a feedback between the cooling of the flow and its effective rheology. We focus on the evolution of the current area and of the surface thermal structure, imaged with an infrared camera, to assess how the thermal structure can be related to the flow rate. The flow advance is continuous in the viscous case, and follows the predictions of Huppert (1982); in that case the surface temperature become steady after a transient time and the radiated heat flux is shown to be proportional to the input rate. For the PEG experiments, the spreading occurs through an alternation of stagnation and overflow phases, with a mean spreading rate decreasing as the experiment goes on. As in the case of lava flows, these experiments can exhibit a compound flow field, solid levees, thermal erosion, liquid overflows and channelization. A key observation is that the effective rheology of the solifying PEG material depends on the input flow rate, with high input rates yielding a rheology closer to the

  10. Research Proposal for the Design and Engineering Phase of a Solar Heating and Cooling System Experiment at the Warner Robins Public Library, Warner Robins, Georgia. Submitted to the United States Energy Research and Development Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Warren H.; And Others

    A number of reasons are advanced to include a solar heating and cooling experiment in a library building. The unique aspects of the experiment are to be a seasonally adjustable collector tilt and testing of a new generation of absorption air conditioners. After a brief description of the proposed experiment, the proposal contains forms filed by…

  11. Copper fine-structure K-shell electron impact ionization cross sections for fast-electron diagnostic in laser-solid experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Batani, D.

    2015-03-15

    The K-shell electron impact ionization (EII) cross section, along with the K-shell fluorescence yield, is one of the key atomic parameters for fast-electron diagnostic in laser-solid experiments through the K-shell emission cross section. In addition, copper is a material that has been often used in those experiments because it has a maximum total K-shell emission yield. Furthermore, in a campaign dedicated to the modeling of the K lines of astrophysical interest (Palmeri et al., 2012), the K-shell fluorescence yields for the K-vacancy fine-structure atomic levels of all the copper isonuclear ions have been calculated. In this study, the K-shell EII cross sections connecting the ground and the metastable levels of the parent copper ions to the daughter ions K-vacancy levels considered in Palmeri et al. (2012) have been determined. The relativistic distorted-wave (DW) approximation implemented in the FAC atomic code has been used for the incident electron kinetic energies up to 10 times the K-shell threshold energies. Moreover, the resulting DW cross sections have been extrapolated at higher energies using the asymptotic form proposed by Davies et al. (2013)

  12. Multiphoton ionization of ions, neutrals, and clusters. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1991-06-28

    Scientific results are summarized from a three year research program on multiphoton ionization in aromatic molecules, clusters, and their ions. As originally proposed, the studies elucidated a new cluster ionization mechanism, characterized properties of long range intermolecular interactions, and investigated electronic transitions of aromatic cations cooled in a supersonic beam. The studies indicate that the new cluster ionization mechanism is highly efficient and dominates conventional 1 + 1 resonant ionization. In the case of the dimer of the large aromatic molecule fluorene, the results suggest that excimer formation competes with a direct ionization process. Highly selective excitonic spectra have been identified for several cluster species.

  13. Bunch beam cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryzgunov, M. I.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Li, J.; Mao, L. J.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Reva, V. B.; Yang, X. D.; Zhao, H.

    2017-07-01

    Electron cooling is used for damping both transverse and longitudinal oscillations of heavy particle. The cooling of bunch ion beam (with RF voltage on) is important part of experiments with inner target, ion collision system, stacking and RF manipulation. The short length of an ion bunch increases the peak luminosity, gives a start-time point for using of the time-of-flight methods and obtains a short extraction beam pulse. This article describes the review of last experiments with electron cooling carried out on the CSRm, CSRe (China) and COSY (Germany) storage rings. The accumulated experience may be used for the project of electron cooler on 2.5 MeV (NICA) and 0.5 MeV HIAF for obtaining high luminosity, depressing beam-beam effects and RF manipulation.

  14. Cool Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    ILC, Dover Division's lightweight cooling garment, called Cool Vest was designed to eliminate the harmful effects of heat stress; increases tolerance time in hot environments by almost 300 percent. Made of urethane-coated nylon used in Apollo, it works to keep the body cool, circulating chilled water throughout the lining by means of a small battery-powered pump. A pocket houses the pump, battery and the coolant which can be ice or a frozen gel, a valve control allows temperature regulation. One version is self-contained and portable for unrestrained movement, another has an umbilical line attached to an external source of coolant, such as standard tap water, when extended mobility is not required. It is reported from customers that the Cool Vest pays for itself in increased productivity in very high temperatures.

  15. Cool School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Suzanne

    1980-01-01

    The design for Floyd Elementary School in Miami (Florida) seeks to harness solar energy to provide at least 70 percent of the annual energy for cooling needs and 90 percent for hot water. (Author/MLF)

  16. Large area space qualified thermoelectrically (TE) cooled HgCdTe MW photovoltaic detectors for the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, P. W.; Zimmermann, P. H.; Briggs, R. J.; Hartle, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    Large-area, HgCdTe MW photovoltaic detectors have been developed for the NASA-HALOE instrument scheduled for operation on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite. The photodiodes will be TE-cooled and were designed to operate in the 5.1-5.4 micron band at 185 K to measure nitric oxide concentrations in the atmosphere. The active area required 15 micron thick devices and a full backside common contact. Reflections from the backside contact doubled the effective thickness of the detectors. Optical interference from reflections was eliminated with a dual layer front surface A/R coating. Bakeout reliability was optimized by having Au metallization for both n and p interconnects. Detailed performance data and a model for the optical stack are presented.

  17. Large area space qualified thermoelectrically (TE) cooled HgCdTe MW photovoltaic detectors for the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, P. W.; Zimmermann, P. H.; Briggs, R. J.; Hartle, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    Large-area, HgCdTe MW photovoltaic detectors have been developed for the NASA-HALOE instrument scheduled for operation on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite. The photodiodes will be TE-cooled and were designed to operate in the 5.1-5.4 micron band at 185 K to measure nitric oxide concentrations in the atmosphere. The active area required 15 micron thick devices and a full backside common contact. Reflections from the backside contact doubled the effective thickness of the detectors. Optical interference from reflections was eliminated with a dual layer front surface A/R coating. Bakeout reliability was optimized by having Au metallization for both n and p interconnects. Detailed performance data and a model for the optical stack are presented.

  18. Experimental Tests of Cooling: Expectations and Additional Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S

    2008-09-24

    Cooling is a critical aspect for a high-performance Neutrino Factory or a MuonCollider. For this reason, considerable effort is being put toward theexperimental verification of this technique. The international Muon IonizationCooling Experiment, MICE, was approved to operate at Rutherford AppletonLaboratory (RAL) in the UK and beam line commissioning commenced in March, 2008. The MICE collaboration comprises about 130 scientists and engineers from Asia, Europe, and the U.S. In this paper we present the motivation and goals for thisexperiment and describe its present status. MICE is scheduled for completion in2011. We will also indicate the prospects for a future 6D muon coolingexperiment and discuss its possible time schedule.

  19. Quench Protection for the MICE Cooling Channel Coupling Magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xing Long; Xu, Feng Yu; Wang, Li; Green, Michael A.; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Liu, X.K.; Jia, Lin Xiang; Amm, Kathleen

    2008-08-02

    This paper describes the passive quench protection system selected for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) cooling channel coupling magnet. The MICE coupling magnet will employ two methods of quench protection simultaneously. The most important method of quench protection in the coupling magnet is the subdivision of the coil. Cold diodes and resistors are put across the subdivisions to reduce both the voltage to ground and the hot-spot temperature. The second method of quench protection is quench-back from the mandrel, which speeds up the spread of the normal region within the coils. Combining quench back with coil subdivision will reduce the hot spot temperature further. This paper explores the effect on the quench process of the number of coil sub-divisions, the quench propagation velocity within the magnet, and the shunt resistance.

  20. Grackle: Chemistry and radiative cooling library for astrophysical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Britton D.; Bryan, Greg L.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Goldbaum, Nathan J.; Turk, Matthew J.; Regan, John; Wise, John H.; Schive, Hsi-Yu; Abel, Tom; Emerick, Andrew; O'Shea, Brian W.; Anninos, Peter; Hummels, Cameron B.; Khochfar, Sadegh

    2016-12-01

    The chemistry and radiative cooling library Grackle provides options for primordial chemistry and cooling, photo-heating and photo-ionization from UV backgrounds, and support for user-provided arrays of volumetric and specific heating rates for astrophysical simulations and models. The library provides functions to update chemistry species; solve radiative cooling and update internal energy; and calculate cooling time, temperature, pressure, and ratio of specific heats (gamma), and has interfaces for C, C++, Fortran, and Python codes.

  1. Helical muon beam cooling channel engineering design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland

    2015-08-07

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet. The first phase of this project saw the development of a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb3Sn-based HS test section. Two very novel ideas are required to realize the design. The first idea is the use of dielectric inserts in the RF cavities to make them smaller for a given frequency so that the cavities and associated plumbing easily fit inside the magnet cryostat. Calculations indicate that heat loads will be tolerable, while RF breakdown of the dielectric inserts will be suppressed by the pressurized hydrogen gas. The second new idea is the use of a multi-layer Nb3Sn helical solenoid. The technology demonstrations for the two aforementioned key components of a 10T, 805 MHz HCC were begun in this project. The work load in the Fermilab Technical Division made it difficult to test a multi-layer Nb3Sn solenoid as originally planned. Instead, a complementary

  2. Ras Labs-CASIS-ISS NL experiment for synthetic muscle returned to Earth: resistance to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Albers, Leila N.; Rodriguez, Simone; Gentile, Charles; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Hitchner, Robert; Taylor, James; Hoffman, Dan; Cylinder, David; Gaza, Ramona; Moy, Leon; Mark, Patrick S.; Prillaman, Daniel L.; Nodarse, Robert; Menegus, Michael J.; Ratto, Jo Ann; Thellen, Christopher T.; Froio, Danielle; Valenza, Logan; Poirier, Catherine; Sinkler, Charles; Corl, Dylan; Hablani, Surbhi; Fuerst, Tyler; Gallucci, Sergio; Blocher, Whitney; Liffland, Stephanie

    2017-04-01

    In anticipation of deep space travel, new materials are being explored to assist and relieve humans in dangerous environments, such as high radiation, extreme temperature, and extreme pressure. Ras Labs Synthetic Muscle™ - electroactive polymers (EAPs) that contract and expand at low voltages - which mimic the unique gentle-yet-strong nature of human tissue, is a potential asset to manned space travel through protective gear and human assist robotics and for unmanned space exploration through deep space. Gen 3 Synthetic Muscle™ was proven to be resistant to extreme temperatures, and there were indications that these materials would also be radiation resistant. The purpose of the Ras Labs-CASIS-ISS Experiment was to test the radiation resistivity of the third and fourth generation of these EAPs, as well as to make them even more radiation resistant. On Earth, exposure of the Generation 3 and Generation 4 EAPs to a Cs-137 radiation source for 47.8 hours with a total dose of 305.931 kRad of gamma radiation was performed at the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) at Princeton University, followed by pH, peroxide, Shore Hardness durometer, and electroactivity testing to determine the inherent radiation resistivity of these contractile EAPs, and to determine whether the EAPs could be made even more radiation resistant through the application of appropriate additives and coatings. The on Earth preliminary tests determined that selected Ras Labs EAPs were not only inherently radiation resistant, but with the appropriate coatings and additives, could be made even more radiation resistant. G-force testing to over 10 G's was performed at US Army's ARDEC Labs, with excellent results, in preparation for space flight to the International Space Station National Laboratory (ISS-NL). Selected samples of Generation 3 and Generation 4 Synthetic Muscle™, with various additives and coatings, were launched to the ISS-NL on April 14, 2015 on the

  3. Particles decorated by an ionizable thermoresponsive polymer brush in water: experiments and self-consistent field modeling.

    PubMed

    Alves, S P C; Pinheiro, J P; Farinha, J P S; Leermakers, F A M

    2014-03-20

    We have synthesized anionic multistimuli responsive core-shell polymer nanoparticles with low size dispersity composed of glassy poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) cores of ca. 40 nm radius and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) anionic brush-like shells with methacrylic acid comonomers. Using dynamic light scattering, we observed a volume phase transition upon an increase in temperature and this response was pH and ionic strength dependent. Already at room temperature we observed a pronounced polyelectrolyte effect, that is, a shift of the apparent pKa extracted from the degree of dissociation of the acids as a function of the pH. The multiresponsive behavior of the hydrophobic polyelectrolyte brush has been modeled using the Scheutjens-Fleer self-consistent field (SF-SCF) approach. Using a phenomenological relation between the Flory-Huggins χ parameter and the temperature, we confront the predicted change in the brush height with the observed change of the hydrodynamic radius and degree of dissociation and obtain estimates for the average chain lengths (number of Kuhn segments) of the corona chains, the grafting density and charge density distributions. The theory reveals a rich internal structure of the hydrophobic polyelectrolyte brush, especially near the collapse transition, where we find a microphase segregated structure. Considering this complexity, it is fair to state that the theoretical predictions follow the experimental data semiquantitatively, and it is attractive to attribute the observed disparity between theory and experiments to the unknown polydispersity of the chains, the unknown distribution of the charges, or other experimental complications. More likely, however, the deviations point to significant problems of the mean field theory, which focuses solely on the radial distributions and ignores the possibility of the formation of lateral (local) inhomogeneities in partially collapsed polyelectrolyte brushes. We argue that the PNIPAM brush at

  4. Hydrogen peroxide and methylhydroperoxide observations by chemical ionization mass spectrometry on the GV during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, D. W.; Silwal, I.; Treadaway, V.; McNeill, A.; Heikes, B.

    2013-12-01

    Airborne gas phase measurements of hydrogen peroxide and methylhydroperoxide were made on 22 research flights on the NCAR Gulfstream-V using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy (CIMS) during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry Experiment (DC3) in May and June 2012. A multi-reagent ion CIMS method, using O2- and CO4- reagent ions, and standard additions of hydrogen peroxide and methylhydroperoxide was developed to identify and quantify hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and methylhydroperoxide (CH3OOH) in ambient air. The DC3 field program characterized a number of active convective systems in three different regions, Colorado, Oklahoma, and Alabama with observations extending from the surface to 13 km. A few flights were also flown to characterize the photochemical aging of lofted chemicals and lightning generated oxides of nitrogen. Peroxide observations will be used to examine transport efficiency and removal in isolated convective storms and larger scale multiple convective systems. Differences in peroxide storm input and transport process will be compared across the three regions. Peroxide observations coupled with other in situ chemical species observations and meteorological parameters will be used to assess the contribution of convective transport to the photochemical budget of hydrogen peroxide and methylhydroperoxide in the upper troposphere over the United States.

  5. Vanadium fine-structure K-shell electron impact ionization cross sections for fast-electron diagnostic in laser–solid experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Batani, D.

    2015-09-15

    The K-shell electron impact ionization (EII) cross section, along with the K-shell fluorescence yield, is one of the key atomic parameters for fast-electron diagnostic in laser–solid experiments through the K-shell emission cross section. In addition, in a campaign dedicated to the modeling of the K lines of astrophysical interest (Palmeri et al. (2012)), the K-shell fluorescence yields for the K-vacancy fine-structure atomic levels of all the vanadium isonuclear ions have been calculated. In this study, the K-shell EII cross sections connecting the ground and the metastable levels of the parent vanadium ions to the daughter ions K-vacancy levels considered in Palmeri et al. (2012) have been determined. The relativistic distorted-wave (DW) approximation implemented in the FAC atomic code has been used for the incident electron kinetic energies up to 20 times the K-shell threshold energies. Moreover, the resulting DW cross sections have been extrapolated at higher energies using the asymptotic behavior of the modified relativistic binary encounter Bethe model (MRBEB) of Guerra et al. (2012) with the density-effect correction proposed by Davies et al. (2013)

  6. Reanalysis of the Gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility Proteus - Spectral indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2013-03-01

    PROTEUS is a zero power reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute which has been employed during the 1970's to study experimentally the physics of the gas-cooled fast reactor. Reaction rate distributions, flux spectrum and reactivity effects have been measured in several configurations featuring PuO2/UO2 fuel, absorbers, large iron shields, and thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasihomogeneously in the reference PuO2/UO2 lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. This papers focus on the spectral indices - including fission and capture in 232Th and 237Np - measured in the reference PuO2/UO2 lattices and their predictions with an MCNPX model specially developed for the PROTEUS-GCFR core. Predictions were obtained with JEFF-3.1 and -3.11, ENDF/B-VII.0 and VII.1, and JENDL-3.3 and -4.0. A general good agreement was demonstrated. The ratio of 232Th fission to 239Pu fission, however, was under-predicted by 8.7±2.1% and 6.5±2.1% using ENDF/B-VII.0 and VII.1, respectively. Finally, the capture rates in 237Np tended to be underpredicted by the JEFF and JENDL libraries, although the new cross section in JEFF-3.1.1 slightly improved the 237Np capture to 239Pu fission results (3.4±2.4%).

  7. Liquid cooling of aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidinger, Hanns

    1931-01-01

    This report presents a method for solving the problem of liquid cooling at high temperatures, which is an intermediate method between water and air cooling, by experiments on a test-stand and on an airplane. A utilizable cooling medium was found in ethylene glycol, which has only one disadvantage, namely, that of combustibility. The danger, however is very slight. It has one decided advantage, that it simultaneously serves as protection against freezing.

  8. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  9. Cooling Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Because quadriplegics are unable to perspire below the level of spinal injury, they cannot tolerate heat stress. A cooling vest developed by Ames Research Center and Upjohn Company allows them to participate in outdoor activities. The vest is an adaptation of Ames technology for thermal control garments used to remove excess body heat of astronauts. The vest consists of a series of corrugated channels through which cooled water circulates. Its two outer layers are urethane coated nylon, and there is an inner layer which incorporates the corrugated channels. It can be worn as a backpack or affixed to a wheelchair. The unit includes a rechargeable battery, mini-pump, two quart reservoir and heat sink to cool the water.

  10. Newton's Law of Cooling Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The cooling of objects is often described by a law, attributed to Newton, which states that the temperature difference of a cooling body with respect to the surroundings decreases exponentially with time. Such behaviour has been observed for many laboratory experiments, which led to a wide acceptance of this approach. However, the heat transfer…

  11. Newton's Law of Cooling Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, M.

    2009-01-01

    The cooling of objects is often described by a law, attributed to Newton, which states that the temperature difference of a cooling body with respect to the surroundings decreases exponentially with time. Such behaviour has been observed for many laboratory experiments, which led to a wide acceptance of this approach. However, the heat transfer…

  12. PVLAS experiment, star cooling and big bang nucleosynthesis constraints: Possible interpretation with temperature dependent gauge symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jihn E.

    2007-09-01

    It is known that the kinetic mixing of a photon and another U(1){sub ex} gauge boson can introduce millicharged particles. Millicharged particles f of mass 0.1 eV can explain the PVLAS experiment. I suggest a temperature dependent gauge symmetry breaking of U(1){sub ex} for this idea to be consistent with astrophysical and cosmological constraints.

  13. Cooling vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, J.; Kane, J.; Coverdale, J.

    1977-01-01

    Inexpensive vest of heat-sealable urethane material, when strapped to person's body, presents significant uncomplicated cooling system for environments where heavy accumulation of metabolic heat exists. Garment is applicable to occupations where physical exertion is required under heavy protective clothing.

  14. Cool Andromeda

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-28

    In this new view of the Andromeda, also known as M31, galaxy from the Herschel space observatory, cool lanes of forming stars are revealed in the finest detail yet. M31 is the nearest major galaxy to our own Milky Way at a distance of 2.5 million light-ye

  15. Focusing solenoids for the MICE cooling channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Baynham, E.; Barr, G.; Lau, W.; Rochford, J.H.; Yang, S.

    2003-09-15

    This report describes a design for focusing solenoids for the low beta sections for the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). There are three focusing solenoid pairs that will be around the muon absorbers for MICE. The two solenoid coils have an inside diameter of 510 mm, a length of 180 mm, and a thickness of 100 mm. A distance of 260 mm separates the two coils in the pair. The coils are designed to operate at opposite polarity, in order to create a gradient field in the low beta sections of the MICE cooling channel. As result, the force pushing the coil pair apart approaches 270 metric tons when the coils operate close to the short sample current for the superconductor. The forces between the coils will be carried by a support structure that is both on the inside and the outside the coils. During some modes of operation for MICE, the coils may operate at the same polarity, which means that the force between the coils pushes them together. The focusing magnet must be designed for both modes of operation. This support structure for the coils will be part of the focusing magnet quench protection system.

  16. Focusing Solenoids for the Mice Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Baynham, E.; Rochford, J.H.; Barr, G.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.

    2004-06-23

    This report describes a design for focusing solenoids for the low beta sections for the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). There are three focusing solenoid pairs that will be around the muon absorbers for MICE. The two solenoid coils have an inside diameter of 510 mm, a length of 180 mm, and a thickness of 100 mm. A distance of 260 mm separates the two coils in the pair. The coils are designed to operate at opposite polarity, in order to create a gradient field in the low beta sections of the MICE cooling channel. As result, the force pushing the coil pair apart approaches 270 metric tons when the coils operate close to the short sample current for the superconductor. The forces between the coils will be carried by a support structure that is both on the inside and the outside the coils. During some modes of operation for MICE, the coils may operate at the same polarity, which means that the force between the coils pushes them together. The focusing magnet must be designed for both modes of operation. This support structure for the coils will be part of the focusing magnet quench protection system.

  17. Spectroscopic Study of ThCl+ by Two-Photon Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Joshua; VanGundy, Robert A.; Heaven, Michael; Peterson, Kirk

    2016-06-01

    Despite the irreplaceable role experimental data plays for evaluating the performance of computational predictions, diatomic actinide species have not received much spectroscopic attention. As an early actinide element, thorium-containing species are ideal candidates for these types of studies. The electronic structure is expected to be relatively simple compared to later actinides, and therefore allows straightforward assessment of calculations. Here, we have studied ThCl+ for the first time via resonant two-photon ionization of jet-cooled ThCl produced by laser ablation of the metal reacted with dilute Cl2. Laser-induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectra have been recorded for the neutral molecule from 16000 - 23500 cm-1 in search of a suitable intermediate state for subsequent two-photon ionization experiments. Monochromator dispersion of the fluorescence has recovered the ground state vibration and anharmonic constants of ThCl. Resonant Two-Photon Ionization (R2PI) within a time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to confirm ThCl production, and Pulsed Field Ionization Zero Kinetic Energy photoelectron spectroscopy (PFI-ZEKE) has been performed to identify the ionization energy as well as several of the low-lying states of the ThCl+ molecule. These constants have been predicted at the CASPT2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory, and a discussion of the calculations' performance will be presented alongside the recorded spectra.

  18. Calculating the Muon Cooling within a MICE Solid and LiquidAbsorber

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Stephanie Q.; Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2006-06-10

    The key elements of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) cooling channel are the absorbers that are a part of the MICE absorber focus coil modules (AFC modules). The boundaries of room temperature solid absorbers are well defined. The density of most solid absorber materials is also well understood. The properties of solid absorber are most certainly understood to 0.3 percent. The MICE liquid absorbers are different in that their dimensions are a function of the absorber temperature and the fluid pressure within the absorber. The second element in the liquid absorber is the variability of the liquid density with temperature and pressure. While one can determine the absorber boundary within 0.3 percent, the determination of the liquid density within 0.3 percent is more difficult (particularly with liquid helium in the absorber). This report presents a method of calculating absorber boundary and the cooling performance of the MICE absorbers as a function of fluid temperature and pressure.

  19. How cool is Uchimizu?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solcerova, Anna; van Emmerik, Tim; Hilgersom, Koen; van de Ven, Frans; van de Giesen, Nick

    2017-04-01

    The Urban Heat Island (UHI) was first described 200 years ago, but ways to mitigate heat in urban areas reach much further into the past. Uchimizu is a 17th century Japanese tradition, in which water is sprinkled around houses, temples, and in gardens to cool the ground surface and the air, and to settle the dust. Nowadays, megacities such as Tokyo are aiming to revive the - by modern technology suppressed - method, and uchimizu is promoted by local authorities as a "clever way to feel cool". Unfortunately, the number of published studies that have quantified the cooling effects of uchimizu is limited, and only uses measurements of the surface temperature, or air temperature at a single height, as a measure of the cooling effect. In this research a dense 3D Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) setup was used to measure air temperature within once cubic meter of air above an urban surface with high spatial and temporal resolution. Six experiments were performed to systematically study the effect of (1) applied water amount, (2) initial surface temperature, and (3) shading on the cooling effect of uchimizu. We present the results and the subsequent analyses of these experiments, done during summer in Delft, The Netherlands. We show that this simple water sprinkling method has the potential to decrease extreme temperatures in impervious and paved parts of urban areas considerably. Besides mitigating the UHI, uchimizu practice is also an opportunity to increase awareness among citizens, and stimulate citizen participation in solving heat stress problems and energy saving. By providing refreshing insights on the cooling effect of uchimizu, we aim to contribute to the modern revival of this old tradition.

  20. Cool Sportswear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  1. Cooling technique

    DOEpatents

    Salamon, Todd R; Vyas, Brijesh; Kota, Krishna; Simon, Elina

    2017-01-31

    An apparatus and a method are provided. Use is made of a wick structure configured to receive a liquid and generate vapor in when such wick structure is heated by heat transferred from heat sources to be cooled off. A vapor channel is provided configured to receive the vapor generated and direct said vapor away from the wick structure. In some embodiments, heat conductors are used to transfer the heat from the heat sources to the liquid in the wick structure.

  2. Heterotrophic respiration in drained tropical peat is greatly affected by temperature—a passive ecosystem cooling experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauhiainen, Jyrki; Kerojoki, Otto; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Limin, Suwido; Vasander, Harri

    2014-10-01

    Vast areas of deforested tropical peatlands do not receive noteworthy shading by vegetation, which increases the amount of solar radiation reaching the peat surface. Peat temperature dynamics and heterotrophic carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) fluxes were monitored under four shading conditions, i.e. unshaded, 28%, 51% and 90% shading at experiment sites established on reclaimed fallow agricultural- and degraded sites in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Groundwater tables on the sites were at about 50 cm depth, the sites were maintained vegetation free and root ingrowth to gas flux monitoring locations was prevented. Half of the four shading areas received NPK-fertilization 50 kg ha-1 for each of N, P and K during the experiment and the other half was unfertilized. Increases in shading created a lasting decrease in peat temperatures, and decreased diurnal temperature fluctuations, in comparison to less shaded plots. The largest peat temperature difference in the topmost 50 cm peat profile was between the unshaded and 90% shaded surface, where the average temperatures at 5 cm depth differed up to 3.7 °C, and diurnal temperatures at 5 cm depth varied up to 4.2 °C in the unshaded and 0.4 °C in the 90% shaded conditions. Highest impacts on the heterotrophic CO2 fluxes caused by the treatments were on agricultural land, where 90% shading from the full exposure resulted in a 33% lower CO2 emission average on the unfertilized plots and a 66% lower emission average on the fertilized plots. Correlation between peat temperature and CO2 flux suggested an approximately 8% (unfertilized) and 25% (fertilized) emissions change for each 1 °C temperature change at 5 cm depth on the agricultural land. CO2 flux responses to the treatments remained low on degraded peatland. Fertilized conditions negatively correlated with N2O efflux with increases in temperature, suggesting a 12-36% lower efflux for each 1 °C increase in peat temperature (at 5 cm depth) at

  3. Final muon cooling for a muon collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta Castillo, John Gabriel

    To explore the new energy frontier, a new generation of particle accelerators is needed. Muon colliders are a promising alternative if muon cooling can be made to work. Muons are 200 times heavier than electrons, so they produce less synchrotron radiation, and they behave like point particles. However, they have a short lifetime of 2.2 mus and the beam is more difficult to cool than an electron beam. The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) was created to develop concepts and technologies required by a muon collider. An important effort has been made in the program to design and optimize a muon beam cooling system. The goal is to achieve the small beam emittance required by a muon collider. This work explores a final ionization cooling system using magnetic quadrupole lattices with a low enough beta* region to cool the beam to the required limit with available low Z absorbers.

  4. Ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Doran M; Iddins, Carol J; Sugarman, Stephen L

    2014-02-01

    Although the spectrum of information related to diagnosis and management of radiation injuries and illnesses is vast and as radiation contamination incidents are rare, most emergency practitioners have had little to no practical experience with such cases. Exposures to ionizing radiation and internal contamination with radioactive materials can cause significant tissue damage and conditions. Emergency practitioners unaware of ionizing radiation as the cause of a condition may miss the diagnosis of radiation-induced injury or illness. This article reviews the pertinent terms, physics, radiobiology, and medical management of radiation injuries and illnesses that may confront the emergency practitioner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of Temperature Programmable Split/Splitless and Cool On-Column Inlets for the Determination of Glycerol and Glycerides in Biodiesel by Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detection

    PubMed Central

    Giardina, Matthew; McCurry, James D.

    2016-01-01

    The European Standard EN 14105:2011-07 is an analysis method for quantifying free glycerol and residual mono-, di- and triacylglycerides impurities in biodiesel by gas chromatography. The method specifies an “on-column injector or equivalent device” as the means of sample introduction. Cool on-column (COC) would appear to be an ideal choice, particularly for quantifying triacylglycerides, as it provides high quantitative accuracy and precision with minimal mass discrimination. However, there are a few drawbacks in using COC for this application. The relatively high concentration of the biodiesel in the prepared samples impedes solvent focusing of early eluting compounds such as glycerol, causing band broadening and shifts in retention time compared with the external calibration standards. More problematic is method robustness when using a metal retention gap. Repeated injections onto the retention gap cause the method control specification to fail within relatively few injections. As an alternative, a temperature programmable split/splitless (TPSS) inlet was investigated for performance equivalency. The results demonstrate that the TPSS yields concentration measurements indistinguishable from the COC inlet at the 95% confidence level. In addition, the robustness of the TPSS far exceeds that of the COC inlet by eliminating the performance control failure and providing solvent focusing for the early eluting peaks. PMID:26921893

  6. Analysis of Phospholipid Mixtures from Biological Tissues by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eibisch, Mandy; Fuchs, Beate; Schiller, Jurgen; Sub, Rosmarie; Teuber, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is increasingly used to investigate the phospholipid (PL) compositions of tissues and body fluids, often without previous separation of the total mixture into the individual PL classes. Therefore, the questions of whether all PL classes are detectable…

  7. Analysis of Phospholipid Mixtures from Biological Tissues by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eibisch, Mandy; Fuchs, Beate; Schiller, Jurgen; Sub, Rosmarie; Teuber, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is increasingly used to investigate the phospholipid (PL) compositions of tissues and body fluids, often without previous separation of the total mixture into the individual PL classes. Therefore, the questions of whether all PL classes are detectable…

  8. Cooling device

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, L.

    1984-02-21

    A cooling device is claimed for coal dust comprising a housing, a motor-driven conveyor system therein to transport the coal dust over coolable trays in the housing and conveyor-wheel arms of spiral curvature for moving the coal dust from one or more inlets to one or more outlets via a series of communicating passages in the trays over which the conveyor-wheel arms pass under actuation of a hydraulic motor mounted above the housing and driving a vertical shaft, to which the conveyor-wheel arms are attached, extending centrally downwardly through the housing.

  9. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  10. Ion energies in high power impulse magnetron sputtering with and without localized ionization zones

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuchen; Tanaka, Koichi; Liu, Jason; Anders, André

    2015-03-23

    High speed imaging of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges has revealed that ionization is localized in moving ionization zones but localization disappears at high currents for high yield targets. This offers an opportunity to study the effect ionization zones have on ion energies. We measure that ions have generally higher energies when ionization zones are present, supporting the concept that these zones are associated with moving potential humps. We propose that the disappearance of ionization zones is caused by an increased supply of atoms from the target which cools electrons and reduces depletion of atoms to be ionized.

  11. The SPES surface ionization source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzolaro, M.; D'Agostini, F.; Monetti, A.; Andrighetto, A.

    2017-09-01

    Ion sources and target systems play a crucial role in isotope separation on line facilities, determining the main characteristics of the radioactive ion beams available for experiments. In the context of the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility, a 40 MeV, 200 μA proton beam directly impinges a uranium carbide target, generating approximately 1013 fissions per second. The radioactive isotopes produced by the 238U fissions are delivered to the 1+ ion source by means of a tubular transfer line. Here they can be ionized and subsequently accelerated toward the experimental areas. In this work, the characterization of the surface ionization source currently adopted for the SPES facility is presented, taking as a reference ionization efficiency and transversal emittance measurements. The effects of long term operation at high temperature are also illustrated and discussed.

  12. Single ionization of molecular iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Dale L.; Tagliamonti, Vincent; Dragan, James; Gibson, George N.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a study of the single ionization of iodine, I2 over a range of wavelengths. Single ionization of I2 is unexpectedly found to have a contribution from inner molecular orbitals involving the 5 s electrons. The I+I+ dissociation channel was recorded through velocity map imaging, and the kinetic-energy release of each channel was determined with two-dimensional fitting of the images. Most of the measured kinetic-energy data were inconsistent with ionization to the X , A , and B states of I2 + , implying ionization from deeper orbitals. A pump-probe Fourier transform technique was used to look for modulation at the X - and A -state vibrational frequencies to see if they were intermediate states in a two-step process. X - and A -state modulation was seen only for kinetic-energy releases below 0.2 eV, consistent with dissociation through the B state. From these results and intensity-, polarization-, and wavelength-dependent experiments we found no evidence of bond softening, electron rescattering, or photon mediation through the X or A states to higher-energy single-ionization channels.

  13. Ionization potentials of seaborgium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.; Pershina, V.; Fricke, B.

    1999-10-21

    Multiconfiguration relativistic Dirac-Fock values were calculated for the first six ionization potentials of seaborgium and of the other group 6 elements. No experimental ionization potentials are available for seaborgium. Accurate experimental values are not available for all of the other ionization potentials. Ionic radii for the 4+ through 6+ ions of seaborgium are also presented. The ionization potentials and ionic radii obtained will be used to predict some physiochemical properties of seaborgium and its compounds.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians on the floor watch as a tray is extended from inside the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-24

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, technicians on the floor watch as a tray is extended from inside the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata (left) works with a tray extended from inside the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-24

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata (left) works with a tray extended from inside the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata (right) works with a tray extended from inside the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-24

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata (right) works with a tray extended from inside the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata looks over the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-24

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata looks over the Pressurized Module, or PM, part of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). The PM provides a shirt-sleeve environment in which astronauts on the International Space Station can conduct microgravity experiments. There are a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks, inside the PM providing a power supply, communications, air conditioning, hardware cooling, water control and experiment support functions.

  18. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  19. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  20. Brain cooling therapy.

    PubMed

    Gancia, P; Pomero, G

    2010-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (whole body or selective head cooling) is becoming standard of care for brain injury in infants with perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Brain cooling reduces the rate of apoptosis and early necrosis, reduces cerebral metabolic rate and the release of nitric oxide and free radicals. Animal models of perinatal brain injury show histological and functional improvement due to of early hypothermia. The brain protection depends on the temperature and time delay between insult and beginning of treatment (more effective with cooling to 33 +/- 0.5 degrees C, and less than 6 hours after hypoxic-ischemic insult). Recent meta-analyses and systematic reviews in human neonates show reduction in mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental disability at 12-24 months of age, with more favourable effects in the less severe forms of HIE. The authors describe their experience in 53 term newborns with moderate-severe HIE treated with whole body cooling between 2001 and 2009, and studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and general movements (GMs) assessment. The creation of a network connecting the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with the level I-II hospitals of the reference area, as part of regional network, is of paramount importance to enroll potential candidates and to start therapeutic hypothermia within optimal time window.

  1. Cooling Function in Wide Range of Density and Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye; Ferland, G. J.

    2013-06-01

    This work focuses on how the plasma cooling function changes with density and metallicity over a wide range of temperature (104 Kionization equilibrium (CIE). We first review some important cooling processes and investigate the effects of density and metallicity on the level of ionization. We found that high densities enhance the ionization of elements such as hydrogen until they reach local thermodynamic equilibrium. The metallicity (mainly the abundance of Mg) changes the ionization of hydrogen when H is partially ionized. This is due to charge transfer, in which Mg0 neutralizes H+, and H0 neutralizes other elements like oxygen. This dependence of metallicity changes the electron density for temperatures where H is partially ionized, T<2×104 K. We find that the cooling function’s dependence on density and metallicity is coupled and very complex at low temperature (T<2×104 K), but, above this temperature, the metallicity and density dependence can be treated separately. We second separate the metallicity dependence and the density dependence for the low-density solar abundance cooling function. Increased metallicity enhances the bremsstrahlung and other cooling due to the electrons provided by metals. High densities strongly suppress the cooling for (104 Kionization. We develop a series of correction functions for T>2×104 K that describe the different dependencies and can be applied to other cooling functions. We finally present our fitting results that can be used in hydrodynamics code easily, along with tables that can be used when greater precision is used.

  2. Towards XUV pump-probe experiments in the femtosecond to sub-femtosecond regime: New measurement of the helium two-photon ionization cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barillot, T. R.; Matia-Hernando, P.; Greening, D.; Walke, D. J.; Witting, T.; Frasinski, L. J.; Marangos, J. P.; Tisch, J. W. G.

    2017-09-01

    Non-linear photoionization of molecules in the 10-50 eV range is a prerequisite for pump-probe measurements with sub-femtosecond resolution, but hitherto has been limited to femtosecond resolution, low repetition rate and high photon flux laser systems. We demonstrate two-photon single ionization of helium atoms using 100 pJ, 1.34 fs pulses (main peak FWHM = 680 as) at 1 kHz repetition rate with a central photon energy of 19.6 eV. We obtained an exponent of 2.27 ± 0.21 for the intensity dependence of the signal and a two-photon ionization cross-section of 5.0 ± 0.5 × 10 -50 cm4 s. Our work opens the possibility of attosecond pump-probe measurements of ultrafast molecular processes.

  3. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. II. DUST-INDUCED COLLISIONAL IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Helling, Ch.; Jardine, M.; Mokler, F.

    2011-08-10

    Observations have shown that continuous radio emission and also sporadic H{alpha} and X-ray emission are prominent in singular, low-mass objects later than spectral class M. These activity signatures are interpreted as being caused by coupling of an ionized atmosphere to the stellar magnetic field. What remains a puzzle, however, is the mechanism by which such a cool atmosphere can produce the necessary level of ionization. At these low temperatures, thermal gas processes are insufficient, but the formation of clouds sets in. Cloud particles can act as seeds for electron avalanches in streamers that ionize the ambient gas, and can lead to lightning and indirectly to magnetic field coupling, a combination of processes also expected for protoplanetary disks. However, the precondition is that the cloud particles are charged. We use results from DRIFT-PHOENIX model atmospheres to investigate collisional processes that can lead to the ionization of dust grains inside clouds. We show that ionization by turbulence-induced dust-dust collisions is the most efficient kinetic process. The efficiency is highest in the inner cloud where particles grow quickly and, hence, the dust-to-gas ratio is high. Dust-dust collisions alone are not sufficient to improve the magnetic coupling of the atmosphere inside the cloud layers, but the charges supplied either on grains or within the gas phase as separated electrons can trigger secondary nonlinear processes. Cosmic rays are likely to increase the global level of ionization, but their influence decreases if a strong, large-scale magnetic field is present as on brown dwarfs. We suggest that although thermal gas ionization declines in objects across the fully convective boundary, dust charging by collisional processes can play an important role in the lowest mass objects. The onset of atmospheric dust may therefore correlate with the anomalous X-ray and radio emission in atmospheres that are cool, but charged more than expected by pure

  4. Improvements in Ionized Cluster-Beam Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D. J.; Compton, L. E.; Pawlik, E. V.

    1986-01-01

    Lower temperatures result in higher purity and fewer equipment problems. In cluster-beam deposition, clusters of atoms formed by adiabatic expansion nozzle and with proper nozzle design, expanding vapor cools sufficiently to become supersaturated and form clusters of material deposited. Clusters are ionized and accelerated in electric field and then impacted on substrate where films form. Improved cluster-beam technique useful for deposition of refractory metals.

  5. Two-Color Laser Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy of Zirconium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Shuichi; Nagamoto, Daisuke

    2017-10-01

    We have performed two-color laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of zirconium atoms to measure the energies of excited states below the third ionization limit. The number of intermediate states that we observed is 19, and energies deduced from the experiments agree with previous data. Complex ionization spectra of the excited states were observed through the intermediate states. The values of the first, second, and third ionization limits were derived from the Rydberg series of the spectra with quantum defect theory.

  6. Relativistic Coupled Cluster Calculations with Variational Quantum Electrodynamics Resolve the Discrepancy between Experiment and Theory Concerning the Electron Affinity and Ionization Potential of Gold.

    PubMed

    Pašteka, L F; Eliav, E; Borschevsky, A; Kaldor, U; Schwerdtfeger, P

    2017-01-13

    The first ionization potential (IP) and electron affinity (EA) of the gold atom have been determined to an unprecedented accuracy using relativistic coupled cluster calculations up to the pentuple excitation level including the Breit and QED contributions. We reach meV accuracy (with respect to the experimental values) by carefully accounting for all individual contributions beyond the standard relativistic coupled cluster approach. Thus, we are able to resolve the long-standing discrepancy between experimental and theoretical IP and EA of gold.

  7. Relativistic Coupled Cluster Calculations with Variational Quantum Electrodynamics Resolve the Discrepancy between Experiment and Theory Concerning the Electron Affinity and Ionization Potential of Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pašteka, L. F.; Eliav, E.; Borschevsky, A.; Kaldor, U.; Schwerdtfeger, P.

    2017-01-01

    The first ionization potential (IP) and electron affinity (EA) of the gold atom have been determined to an unprecedented accuracy using relativistic coupled cluster calculations up to the pentuple excitation level including the Breit and QED contributions. We reach meV accuracy (with respect to the experimental values) by carefully accounting for all individual contributions beyond the standard relativistic coupled cluster approach. Thus, we are able to resolve the long-standing discrepancy between experimental and theoretical IP and EA of gold.

  8. An Alternative to Laser Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Laser cooling has been the standard approach for over thirty years for cooling the translational motion of atoms. While laser cooling is an extremely successful method, it has been limited to a small set of elements in the periodic table. The performance of laser cooling for those elements has saturated in terms of flux of ultra-cold atoms, density, and phase-space density. I report our progress towards the development of an alternative to laser cooling. Our approach relies on magnetic stopping of supersonic beams, an atomic coilgun. A recent advance is the experimental realization of an adiabatic coilgun which preserves phase-space density. Further cooling was demonstrated with a one-way wall, realizing the historic thought experiment of Maxwell's Demon. More recently, we showed how to apply this method to compress atomic phase space with almost no loss of atom number. Our approach is fundamentally different than laser cooling as it does not rely on the momentum of the photon, but rather the photon entropy. I will report on our experimental progress towards this goal, and describe future experiments that will be enabled by this work.

  9. Astatine and Yttrium Resonant Ionization Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teigelhoefer, Andrea

    Providing intense, contamination-free beams of rare isotopes to experiments is a challenging task. At isotope separator on-line facilities such as ISAC at TRIUMF, the choice of production target and ion source are key to the successful beam delivery. Due to their element-selectivity, high efficiency and versatility, resonant ionization laser ion sources (RILIS) gain increasingly in importance. The spectroscopic data available are typically incomplete in the region of excited- and autoionizing atomic states. In order to find the most efficient ionization scheme for a particular element, further spectroscopy is often required. The development of efficient laser resonant ionization schemes for yttrium and astatine is presented in this thesis. For yttrium, two ionization schemes with comparable relative intensities were found. Since for astatine, only two transitions were known, the focus was to provide data on atomic energy levels using resonance ionization spectroscopy. Altogether 41 previously unknown astatine energy levels were found.

  10. Inner-orbital ionization of iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, George; Smith, Dale; Tagliamonti, Vincent; Dragan, James

    2016-05-01

    Many coincidence techniques exist to study multiple ionization of molecules by strong laser fields. However, the first ionization step is critical in many experiments, although it is more difficult to obtain information about this initial step. We studied the single electron ionization of I2, as it presents interesting opportunities in that it is heavy and does not expand significantly during the laser pulse. Moreover, there are several distinct low-lying valence orbitals from which the electron may be removed. Most importantly, the kinetic energy release of the I+ + I dissociation channel can be measured and should correspond to well-known valence levels and separated atom limits. As it turns out, we must invoke deep valence orbits, built from the 5s electrons, to explain our data. Ionization from deep orbitals may be possible, as they have a smaller critical internuclear separation for enhanced ionization. We would like to acknowledge support from the NSF under Grant No. PHY-1306845.

  11. Self pumping magnetic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, V.; Wang, Z.; Ray, A.; Sridhar, I.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    Efficient thermal management and heat recovery devices are of high technological significance for innovative energy conservation solutions. We describe a study of a self-pumping magnetic cooling device, which does not require external energy input, employing Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles suspended in water. The device performance depends strongly on magnetic field strength, nanoparticle content in the fluid and heat load temperature. Cooling (ΔT) by ~20 °C and ~28 °C was achieved by the application of 0.3 T magnetic field when the initial temperature of the heat load was 64 °C and 87 °C, respectively. These experiments results were in good agreement with simulations performed with COMSOL Multiphysics. Our system is a self-regulating device; as the heat load increases, the magnetization of the ferrofluid decreases; leading to an increase in the fluid velocity and consequently, faster heat transfer from the heat source to the heat sink.

  12. Cooling options for Astromag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maytal, B. Z.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison of the various cooling options for the Astromag particle physics experiment is presented. The baseline design for the cryogenic system involves using a natural circulation fountain-effect driven flow loop (Hofmann type). The present paper considers two alternative options for cooling. The first design involves a thermal strap made of a high-conductivity metal, e.g., high-purity aluminum or copper, which connects the coil to the helium reservoir. Venting helium vapor can also be used to minimize the temperature of the magnet and recover from a quench. The second design is based on an He II heat pipe concept where steady state heat transport is by counterflow. Cavitation is prevented by use of a porous plug. Forced flow He II is also available but only during extraordinary operating conditions.

  13. Renewable Heating and Cooling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  14. Determination of ionization energies of CnN (n=4-12): Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization experiments and theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Zhou, Jia; Sun, Bian Jian; Lie, Jie Shiuan; Chang, Agnes H.H.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-06-10

    Results from single photon vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of astrophysically relevant CnN clusters, n = 4 - 12, in the photon energy range of 8.0 eV to 12.8 eV are presented. The experimental photoionization efficiency curves, combined with electronic structure calculations, provide improved ionization energies of the CnN species. A search through numerous nitrogen-terminated CnN isomers for n=4-9 indicates that the linear isomer has the lowest energy, and therefore should be the most abundant isomer in the molecular beam. Comparison with calculated results also shed light on the energetics of the linear CnN clusters, particularly in the trends of the even-carbon and the odd-carbon series. These results can help guide the search of potential astronomical observations of these neutral molecules together with their cations in highly ionized regions or regions with a high UV/VUV photon flux (ranging from the visible to VUV with flux maxima in the Lyman- region) in the interstellar medium.

  15. Determination of ionization energies of CnN (n=4-12): Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization experiments and theoretical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Zhou, Jia; Sun, Bian Jian; Lie, Jie Shiuan; Chang, Agnes H.H.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-02

    Results from single photon vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of astrophysically relevant CnN clusters, n = 4 - 12, in the photon energy range of 8.0 eV to 12.8 eV are presented. The experimental photoionization efficiency curves, combined with electronic structure calculations, provide improved ionization energies of the CnN species. A search through numerous nitrogen-terminated CnN isomers for n=4-9 indicates that the linear isomer has the lowest energy, and therefore should be the most abundant isomer in the molecular beam. Comparison with calculated results also shed light on the energetics of the linear CnN clusters, particularly in the trends of the even-carbon and the odd-carbon series. These results can help guide the search of potential astronomical observations of these neutral molecules together with their cations in highly ionized regions or regions with a high UV/VUV photon flux (ranging from the visible to VUV with flux maxima in the Lyman-a region) in the interstellar medium.

  16. Analytical instruments, ionization sources, and ionization methods

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.; Mottishaw, Paul

    2006-04-11

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous vaporization and ionization of a sample in a spectrometer prior to introducing the sample into the drift tube of the analyzer are disclosed. The apparatus includes a vaporization/ionization source having an electrically conductive conduit configured to receive sample particulate which is conveyed to a discharge end of the conduit. Positioned proximate to the discharge end of the conduit is an electrically conductive reference device. The conduit and the reference device act as electrodes and have an electrical potential maintained between them sufficient to cause a corona effect, which will cause at least partial simultaneous ionization and vaporization of the sample particulate. The electrical potential can be maintained to establish a continuous corona, or can be held slightly below the breakdown potential such that arrival of particulate at the point of proximity of the electrodes disrupts the potential, causing arcing and the corona effect. The electrical potential can also be varied to cause periodic arcing between the electrodes such that particulate passing through the arc is simultaneously vaporized and ionized. The invention further includes a spectrometer containing the source. The invention is particularly useful for ion mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers.

  17. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  18. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  19. Advance in MEIC cooling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuhong; Derbenev, Ya.; Douglas, D.; Hutton, A.; Kimber, A.; Li, R.; Nissen, E.; Tennant,; Zhang, H.

    2013-06-01

    Cooling of ion beams is essential for achieving a high luminosity for MEIC at Jefferson Lab. In this paper, we present the design concept of the electron cooling system for MEIC. In the design, two facilities are required for supporting a multi-staged cooling scheme; one is a 2 MeV DC cooler in the ion pre-booster; the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) ERL-circulator cooler in the collider ring. The simulation studies of beam dynamics in an ERL-circulator cooler are summarized and followed by a report on technology development for this cooler. We also discuss two proposed experiments for demonstrating high energy cooling with a bunched electron beam and the ERL-circulator cooler.

  20. Chemi-ionization for Enhanced Plasma Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ard, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Air Force has long considered ways of creating enhanced plasma density as a method of mitigating the detrimental effects of ionospheric density irregularities. Numerous easily photo-ionizable molecules have been released for study in this regard, yet this approach is inherently limited to daytime use. Recently attention has turned towards chemi-ionization. Several lanthanide metal oxides have bond strengths greater than their IP, such that M + O → MO+ + e- becomes energetically accessible. In 2013 the Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) mission released vaporized samarium in the lower ionosphere to study its potential as a chemi-ionization agent with atomic oxygen. While successful at producing enhanced densities, several results created questions about the underlying chemistry. This talk will focus on our lab's efforts supporting these releases, both in analysis of the principal thermochemistry and its effects on assessment of previous results, as well as ongoing experiments considering the potential of other chemi-ionization systems for future experiments.

  1. Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Urban Heat-island Effects: Findings from an India Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem; Xu, Tengfang; Taha, Haider; Wray, Craig; Sathaye, Jayant; Garg, Vishal; Tetali, Surekha; Babu, M. Hari; Reddy, K. Niranjan

    2011-05-25

    Cool roofs, cool pavements, and urban vegetation reduce energy use in buildings, lower local air pollutant concentrations, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions from urban areas. This report summarizes the results of a detailed monitoring project in India and related simulations of meteorology and air quality in three developing countries. The field results quantified direct energy savings from installation of cool roofs on individual commercial buildings. The measured annual energy savings potential from roof-whitening of previously black roofs ranged from 20-22 kWh/m2 of roof area, corresponding to an air-conditioning energy use reduction of 14-26% in commercial buildings. The study estimated that typical annual savings of 13-14 kWh/m2 of roof area could be achieved by applying white coating to uncoated concrete roofs on commercial buildings in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, corresponding to cooling energy savings of 10-19%. With the assumption of an annual increase of 100,000 square meters of new roof construction for the next 10 years in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, the annual cooling energy savings due to whitening concrete roof would be 13-14 GWh of electricity in year ten alone, with cumulative 10-year cooling energy savings of 73-79 GWh for the region. The estimated savings for the entire country would be at least 10 times the savings in Hyderabad, i.e., more than 730-790 GWh. We estimated that annual direct CO2 reduction associated with reduced energy use would be 11-12 kg CO2/m2 of flat concrete roof area whitened, and the cumulative 10-year CO2 reduction would be approximately 0.60-0.65 million tons in India. With the price of electricity estimated at seven Rupees per kWh, the annual electricity savings on air-conditioning would be approximately 93-101 Rupees per m2 of roof. This would translate into annual national savings of approximately one billion Rupees in year ten, and cumulative 10-year savings of over five billion Rupees for cooling

  2. Triple coincidence experiment to explore the two-electron continuum states of the projectile resulting from mutual ionization in 100-keV He0 + He collisions.

    PubMed

    Sarkadi, László; Orbán, Andrea

    2008-04-04

    The existence of the two-electron cusp in atomic collisions, i.e., the enhanced emission of two electrons in the forward direction with velocities equal to that of the projectile, has been investigated experimentally. Using a time-of-flight technique, the energies of the two electrons resulting from the simultaneous target and projectile ionization in 100-keV He(0)+He collisions have been measured by detecting triple coincidence between the electrons and the outgoing He(+) ion. The coincidence yield clearly shows a peak as a function of the electron energies at the expected cusp position. Furthermore, a strong correlation was found between the energies of the two electrons, which is traced back to an angular correlation of 180 degrees in the projectile-centered reference system.

  3. Reduction of plasma density in the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductance experiment by using a helicon pre-ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Hossack, Aaron C.; Jarboe, Thomas R.; Victor, Brian S.; Firman, Taylor; Prager, James R.; Ziemba, Timothy; Wrobel, Jonathan S.

    2013-10-15

    A helicon based pre-ionization source has been developed and installed on the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductance (HIT-SI) spheromak. The source initiates plasma breakdown by injecting impurity-free, unmagnetized plasma into the HIT-SI confinement volume. Typical helium spheromaks have electron density reduced from (2–3) × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3} to 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. Deuterium spheromak formation is possible with density as low as 2 × 10{sup 18} m{sup −3}. The source also enables HIT-SI to be operated with only one helicity injector at injector frequencies above 14.5 kHz. A theory explaining the physical mechanism driving the reduction of breakdown density is presented.

  4. The Tevatron Ionization Profile Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, A.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bowie, K.; Kwarciany, R.; Lundberg, C.; Slimmer, D.; Valerio, L.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    In designing an ionization profile monitor system for the Tevatron some novel approaches were taken, in particular for the readout electronics. This was motivated by the desire to resolve the individual bunches in both beams simultaneously. For this purpose, custom made electronics originally developed for Particle Physics experiments was used to provide a fast charge integration with very low noise. The various parts of the read-out electronics have been borrowed or adapted from the KTev, CMS, MINOS and BTev experiments. The detector itself also had to be modified to provide clean signals with sufficient bandwidth. The system design will be described along with the initial results.

  5. Efficacy and tolerance of a scalp-cooling system for prevention of hair loss and the experience of breast cancer patients treated by adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Protière, Christel; Evans, Katrin; Camerlo, Jacques; d'Ingrado, Marie-Pierre; Macquart-Moulin, Geneviève; Viens, Patrice; Maraninchi, Dominique; Genre, Dominique

    2002-10-01

    The applicability and efficacy of a scalp cooling system were studied in 105 breast cancer patients receiving four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with mitoxantrone + cyclophosphamide (NC chemotherapy). Women accepting the scalp-cooling system were compared for alopecia both against those who refused and against a "reference" group of 109 patients similarly treated but without being offered a scalp-cooling system. Hair loss in the 105 study patients was evaluated by nurses using World Health Organization (WHO) criteria at each cycle of chemotherapy. Concomitantly, tolerance and side-effects of the helmet were also recorded in 48 accepting patients. Similarly to reference group patients, a subsample of 27 accepting patients self-assessed hair loss using a specific questionnaire measuring its frequency and severity and the distress associated with this symptom. Nurses' ratings ( n = 105) indicated that hair loss frequency was constantly lower, at each cycle of chemotherapy, in study patients with scalp-cooling system ( n = 77) than in those without ( n = 28). Differences between the two groups were statistically significant at cycles 1 and 3 ( P < 0.05). When compared with those reported by reference group patients ( n = 109), study patients' self-measures of alopecia frequency ( n = 27) provided even more marked results than those achieved by nurses (cycles 1-3: P < 0.01; cycle 4: P < 0.05). Tolerance was generally good and no scalp metastasis was observed among the 77 accepting patients followed up. This study demonstrates that scalp cooling was an effective method of protection against hair loss caused by NC chemotherapy. Its routine use as part of adjuvant chemotherapy, especially in cancers with low prevalences of scalp metastasis, should be seriously considered.

  6. Comparison of burnout characteristics in jet impingement cooling and stray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, C. S. K.; Wu, K.

    Characteristics of spray cooling and jet impingement methods were investigated. The jet impingement cooling method created a large dry area on the test surface when the burnout heat flux was approached. In the spray cooling method, a liquid film with nucleate boiling was maintained for the entire experiment until a burnout was occurred. The spray cooling method produced a higher burnout heat flux than the jet impingement cooling method for the same liquid flow rate. In the spray cooling method, sprayed droplet velocity was a parameter for determining the burnout heat flux. The burnout heat flux in jet impingement cooling also showed dependency on the liquid jet velocity. Results of two methods for cooling the surface area were compared and correlated with the Weber number.

  7. Development of cooling strategy for an air cooled lithium-ion battery pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongguang; Dixon, Regan

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes a cooling strategy development method for an air cooled battery pack with lithium-ion pouch cells used in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV). The challenges associated with the temperature uniformity across the battery pack, the temperature uniformity within each individual lithium-ion pouch cell, and the cooling efficiency of the battery pack are addressed. Initially, a three-dimensional battery pack thermal model developed based on simplified electrode theory is correlated to physical test data. An analytical design of experiments (DOE) approach using Optimal Latin-hypercube technique is then developed by incorporating a DOE design model, the correlated battery pack thermal model, and a morphing model. Analytical DOE studies are performed to examine the effects of cooling strategies including geometries of the cooling duct, cooling channel, cooling plate, and corrugation on battery pack thermal behavior and to identify the design concept of an air cooled battery pack to maximize its durability and its driving range.

  8. Laser-induced ionization of Na vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.C.Y.; Judge, D.L.; Roussel, F.; Carre, B.; Breger, P.; Spiess, G.

    1982-01-01

    The production of Na/sub 2//sup +/ ions by off-resonant laser excitation in the 5800-6200A region mainly results from two-photon absorption by the Na/sub 2/ molecule to highly excited gerade states followed by (a) direct ionization by absorbing a third photon or (b) coupling to the molecular Na/sub 2/ D/sup 1/PI..mu.. Rydberg state which is subsequently ionized by absorbing a third photon. This mechanism, i.e., a two-photon resonance three photon ionization process, explains a recent experimental observation of Roussel et al. It is suggested that the very same mechanism is also responsible for a similar observation reported by Polak-Dingels et al in their work using two crossed Na beams. In the latter two studies the laser-induced associative ionization processes were reported to be responsible for producing the Na/sub 2//sup +/ ion. From the ratio of molecular to atomic concentration in the crossed beam experiment of Polak-Dingels et al we estimate that the cross section for producing Na/sub 2//sup +/ through laser-induced associative ionization is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than ionization through the two-photon resonance three photon ionization process in Na/sub 2/ molecules.

  9. Laser-induced ionization of Na vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. Y. Robert; Judge, D. L.; Roussel, F.; Carré, B.; Breger, P.; Spiess, G.

    1982-09-01

    The production of Na2+ ions by off-resonant laser excitation in the 5800-6200Å region mainly results from two-photon absorption by the Na2 molecule to highly excited gerade states followed by (a) direct ionization by absorbing a third photon or (b) coupling to the molecular Na2 D1Πu Rydberg state which is subsequently ionized by absorbing a third photon. This mechanism, i.e., a two-photon resonance three photon ionization process, explains a recent experimental observation of Roussel et al. It is suggested that the very same mechanism is also responsible for a similar observation reported by Polak-Dingels et al in their work using two crossed Na beams. In the latter two studies the laser-induced associative ionization processes were reported to be responsible for producing the Na2+ ion. From the ratio of molecular to atomic concentration in the crossed beam experiment of Polak-Dingels et al. we estimate that the cross section for producing Na2+ through laser-induced associative ionization is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than ionization through the two-photon resonance three photon ionization process in Na2 molecules.

  10. Ionization Rates Relevant to Laser Cooling of Hydrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    Study conducted by R. L. Forward𔃼 pointed out the potential benefits of developing propulsion devices that utilize solid antihydrogen as an energy...source. The low mass-to- energy ratio of this fuel makes it attractive for propulsion in space environments where the transportation cost per gram of fuel... antimatter would react so quickly with the walls of a container made from normal materials. Since the interaction of photons with hydrogen and antihydrogen

  11. Laser cooling by collisional redistribution of radiation.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Ulrich; Weitz, Martin

    2009-09-03

    The general idea that optical radiation may cool matter was put forward 80 years ago. Doppler cooling of dilute atomic gases is an extremely successful application of this concept. More recently, anti-Stokes cooling in multilevel systems has been explored, culminating in the optical refrigeration of solids. Collisional redistribution of radiation has been proposed as a different cooling mechanism for atomic two-level systems, although experimental investigations using moderate-density gases have not reached the cooling regime. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of an atomic gas based on collisional redistribution of radiation, using rubidium atoms in argon buffer gas at a pressure of 230 bar. The frequent collisions in the ultradense gas transiently shift a highly red-detuned laser beam (that is, one detuned to a much lower frequency) into resonance, whereas spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed atomic resonance frequency. During each excitation cycle, kinetic energy of order k(B)T-that is, the thermal energy (k(B), Boltzmann's constant; T, temperature)-is extracted from the dense atomic sample. In a proof-of-principle experiment with a thermally non-isolated sample, we demonstrate relative cooling by 66 K. The cooled gas has a density more than ten orders of magnitude greater than the typical values used in Doppler-cooling experiments, and the cooling power reaches 87 mW. Future applications of the technique may include supercooling beyond the homogeneous nucleation temperature and optical chillers.

  12. Quench cooling under reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Chatain, D; Mariette, C; Nikolayev, V S; Beysens, D

    2013-07-01

    We report quench cooling experiments performed with liquid O(2) under different levels of gravity, simulated with magnetic gravity compensation. A copper disk is quenched from 300 to 90 K. It is found that the cooling time in microgravity is very long in comparison with any other gravity level. This phenomenon is explained by the insulating effect of the gas surrounding the disk. A weak gas pressurization (which results in subcooling of the liquid with respect to the saturation temperature) is shown to drastically improve the heat exchange, thus reducing the cooling time (about 20 times). The effect of subcooling on the heat transfer is analyzed at different gravity levels. It is shown that this type of experiment cannot be used for the analysis of the critical heat flux of the boiling crisis. The film boiling heat transfer and the minimum heat flux of boiling are analyzed as functions of gravity and subcooling.

  13. Physical conditions in the cool parts of prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landman, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    A spectral analysis of the cool parts of seven prominences reported by Shin-Huei (1961) and Yakovkin and Zel'dina (1964) is presented. The analysis requires only measurements of the Na and Sr(+) resonance lines and the middle H Balmer lines, all of which are optically thin, and uses the Na and Sr(+) statistical equilibrium solutions of Landman (1983). It is shown that the Na/H integrated intensity ratios alone are sufficient to determine the degree of H ionization. The major result of this investigation is that the degree of H ionization in the cool prominence parts is very low and the total gas pressure very high.

  14. Physical conditions in the cool parts of prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landman, D. A.

    1983-07-01

    A spectral analysis of the cool parts of seven prominences reported by Shin-Huei (1961) and Yakovkin and Zel'dina (1964) is presented. The analysis requires only measurements of the Na and Sr(+) resonance lines and the middle H Balmer lines, all of which are optically thin, and uses the Na and Sr(+) statistical equilibrium solutions of Landman (1983). It is shown that the Na/H integrated intensity ratios alone are sufficient to determine the degree of H ionization. The major result of this investigation is that the degree of H ionization in the cool prominence parts is very low and the total gas pressure very high.

  15. Ionization Front Instabilities in Primordial H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Daniel; Norman, Michael L.

    2008-02-01

    Radiative cooling by metals in shocked gas mediates the formation of ionization front instabilities in the galaxy today that are responsible for a variety of phenomena in the interstellar medium, from the morphologies of nebulae to triggered star formation in molecular clouds. An important question in early reionization and chemical enrichment of the intergalactic medium is whether such instabilities arose in the H II regions of the first stars and primeval galaxies, which were devoid of metals. We present three-dimensional numerical simulations that reveal both shadow and thin-shell instabilities readily formed in primordial gas. We find that the hard UV spectra of Population III stars broadened primordial ionization fronts, causing H2 formation capable of inciting violent thin-shell instabilities in D-type fronts, even in the presence of intense Lyman-Werner flux. The high postfront gas temperatures associated with He ionization sustained and exacerbated shadow instabilities, unaided by molecular hydrogen cooling. Our models indicate that metals eclipsed H2 cooling in I-front instabilities at modest concentrations, from 1 × 10-3 to 1 × 10-2 Z⊙. We conclude that ionization front instabilities were prominent in the H II regions of the first stars and galaxies, influencing the escape of ionizing radiation and metals into the early universe.

  16. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    DOEpatents

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  17. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  18. Influence of plasma loading in a hybrid muon cooling channel

    SciTech Connect

    Freemire, B.; Stratakis, D.; Yonehara, K.

    2015-05-03

    In a hybrid 6D cooling channel, cooling is accomplished by reducing the beam momentum through ionization energy loss in wedge absorbers and replenishing the momentum loss in the longitudinal direction with gas-filled rf cavities. While the gas acts as a buffer to prevent rf breakdown, gas ionization also occurs as the beam passes through the pressurized cavity. The resulting plasma may gain substantial energy from the rf electric field which it can transfer via collisions to the gas, an effect known as plasma loading. In this paper, we investigate the influence of plasma loading on the cooling performance of a rectilinear hybrid channel. With the aid of numerical simulations we examine the sensitivity in cooling performance and plasma loading to key parameters such as the rf gradient and gas pressure.

  19. Hydrogen-filled RF Cavities for Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    CHARLES, Ankenbrandt

    2009-04-17

    Ionization cooling requires low-Z energy absorbers immersed in a strong magnetic field and high-gradient, large-aperture RF cavities to be able to cool a muon beam as quickly as the short muon lifetime requires. RF cavities that operate in vacuum are vulnerable to dark-current- generated breakdown, which is exacerbated by strong magnetic fields, and they require extra safety windows that degrade cooling, to separate RF regions from hydrogen energy absorbers. RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas will be developed that use the same gas volume to provide the energy absorber and the RF acceleration needed for ionization cooling. The breakdown suppression by the dense gas will allow the cavities to operate in strong magnetic fields. Measurements of the operation of such a cavity will be made as functions of external magnetic field and charged particle beam intensity and compared with models to understand the characteristics of this technology and to develop mitigating strategies if necessary.

  20. Microwave reflectometer ionization sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seals, Joseph; Fordham, Jeffrey A.; Pauley, Robert G.; Simonutti, Mario D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of the Microwave Reflectometer Ionization Sensor (MRIS) Instrument for use on the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) spacecraft is described. The instrument contract was terminated, due to cancellation of the AFE program, subsequent to testing of an engineering development model. The MRIS, a four-frequency reflectometer, was designed for the detection and location of critical electron density levels in spacecraft reentry plasmas. The instrument would sample the relative magnitude and phase of reflected signals at discrete frequency steps across 4 GHz bandwidths centered at four frequencies: 20, 44, 95, and 140 GHz. The sampled data would be stored for later processing to calculate the distance from the spacecraft surface to the critical electron densities versus time. Four stepped PM CW transmitter receivers were located behind the thermal protection system of the spacecraft with horn antennas radiating and receiving through an insulating tile. Techniques were developed to deal with interference, including multiple reflections and resonance effects, resulting from the antenna configuration and operating environment.

  1. Ionization and positronium formation in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J.P.; Sullivan, J.P.; Surko, C.M.

    2005-02-01

    Absolute measurements are presented for the positron-impact cross sections for direct ionization and positronium formation of noble gas atoms in the range of energies from threshold to 90 eV. The experiment uses a cold, trap-based positron beam and the technique of studying positron scattering in a strong magnetic field. The current data show generally good, quantitative agreement with previous measurements taken using a qualitatively different method. However, significant differences in the cross sections for both direct ionization and positronium formation are also observed. An analysis is presented that yields another, independent measurement of the direct ionization and positronium formation cross sections that is in agreement with the present, direct measurements to within {+-}10% for argon, krypton, and xenon. Comparison with available theoretical predictions yields good quantitative agreement for direct ionization cross sections, and qualitative agreement in the case of positronium formation.

  2. Investigating cryoinjury using simulations and experiments. 1: TF-1 cells during two-step freezing (rapid cooling interrupted with a hold time).

    PubMed

    Ross-Rodriguez, L U; Elliott, J A W; McGann, L E

    2010-08-01

    There is significant interest in designing a cryopreservation protocol for hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) which does not rely on dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) as a cryoprotectant. Computer simulations that describe cellular osmotic responses during cooling and warming can be used to optimize the viability of cryopreserved HSC; however, a better understanding of cellular osmotic parameters is required for these simulations. As a model for HSC, the erythroleukemic human cell line TF-1 was used in this study. Simulations, based on the osmotic properties of TF-1 cells and on the solution properties of the intra- and extracellular compartments, were used to interpret cryoinjury associated with a two-step cryopreservation protocol. Calculated intracellular supercooling was used as an indicator of cryoinjury related to intracellular ice formation. Simulations were applied to the two-step cooling protocol (rapid cooling interrupted with a hold time) for TF-1 cells in the absence of Me(2)SO or other cryoprotectants and optimized by minimizing the indicator of cryoinjury. A comparison of simulations and experimental measurements of membrane integrity supports the concept that, for two-step cooling, increasing intracellular supercooling is the primary contributor to potential freezing injury due to the increase in the likelihood of intracellular ice formation. By calculating intracellular supercooling for each step separately and comparing these calculations with cell recovery data, it was demonstrated that it is not optimal simply to limit overall supercooling during two-step freezing procedures. More aptly, appropriate limitations of supercooling differ from the first step to the second step. This study also demonstrates why high cell recovery after cryopreservation could be achieved in the absence of traditional cryoprotectants. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

  4. Helium-cooled high temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Trauger, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Experience with several helium cooled reactors has been favorable, and two commercial plants are now operating. Both of these units are of the High Temperature Graphite Gas Cooled concept, one in the United States and the other in the Federal Republic of Germany. The initial helium charge for a reactor of the 1000 MW(e) size is modest, approx.15,000 kg.

  5. Spatially-selective optical pumping cooling and Two-Isotope Collision-Assisted Zeeman cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rebekah Ferrier

    hyperfine-changing collisions to be a significant limitation for the 85/87Rb gas mixture. Possible improvements to this experiment will be discussed as well as the prospects for improved cooling performance using an atom without hyperfine structure as the optically pumped atom.

  6. The characteristic of evaporative cooling magnet for ECRIS.

    PubMed

    Xiong, B; Ruan, L; Gu, G B; Lu, W; Zhang, X Z; Zhan, W L

    2016-02-01

    Compared with traditional de-ionized pressurized-water cooled magnet of ECRIS, evaporative cooling magnet has some special characteristics, such as high cooling efficiency, simple maintenance, and operation. The analysis is carried out according to the design and operation of LECR4 (Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4, since July 2013), whose magnet is cooled by evaporative cooling technology. The insulation coolant replaces the de-ionized pressurized-water to absorb the heat of coils, and the physical and chemical properties of coolant remain stable for a long time with no need for purification or filtration. The coils of magnet are immersed in the liquid coolant. For the higher cooling efficiency of coolant, the current density of coils can be greatly improved. The heat transfer process executes under atmospheric pressure, and the temperature of coils is lower than 70 °C when the current density of coils is 12 A/mm(2). On the other hand, the heat transfer temperature of coolant is about 50 °C, and the heat can be transferred to fresh air which can save cost of water cooling system. Two years of LECR4 stable operation show that evaporative cooling technology can be used on magnet of ECRIS, and the application advantages are very obvious.

  7. The characteristic of evaporative cooling magnet for ECRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, B.; Ruan, L.; Gu, G. B.; Lu, W.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhan, W. L.

    2016-02-01

    Compared with traditional de-ionized pressurized-water cooled magnet of ECRIS, evaporative cooling magnet has some special characteristics, such as high cooling efficiency, simple maintenance, and operation. The analysis is carried out according to the design and operation of LECR4 (Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4, since July 2013), whose magnet is cooled by evaporative cooling technology. The insulation coolant replaces the de-ionized pressurized-water to absorb the heat of coils, and the physical and chemical properties of coolant remain stable for a long time with no need for purification or filtration. The coils of magnet are immersed in the liquid coolant. For the higher cooling efficiency of coolant, the current density of coils can be greatly improved. The heat transfer process executes under atmospheric pressure, and the temperature of coils is lower than 70 °C when the current density of coils is 12 A/mm2. On the other hand, the heat transfer temperature of coolant is about 50 °C, and the heat can be transferred to fresh air which can save cost of water cooling system. Two years of LECR4 stable operation show that evaporative cooling technology can be used on magnet of ECRIS, and the application advantages are very obvious.

  8. The characteristic of evaporative cooling magnet for ECRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, B.; Ruan, L.; Gu, G. B.; Lu, W.; Zhang, X. Z.; Zhan, W. L.

    2016-02-15

    Compared with traditional de-ionized pressurized-water cooled magnet of ECRIS, evaporative cooling magnet has some special characteristics, such as high cooling efficiency, simple maintenance, and operation. The analysis is carried out according to the design and operation of LECR4 (Lanzhou Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source No. 4, since July 2013), whose magnet is cooled by evaporative cooling technology. The insulation coolant replaces the de-ionized pressurized-water to absorb the heat of coils, and the physical and chemical properties of coolant remain stable for a long time with no need for purification or filtration. The coils of magnet are immersed in the liquid coolant. For the higher cooling efficiency of coolant, the current density of coils can be greatly improved. The heat transfer process executes under atmospheric pressure, and the temperature of coils is lower than 70 °C when the current density of coils is 12 A/mm{sup 2}. On the other hand, the heat transfer temperature of coolant is about 50 °C, and the heat can be transferred to fresh air which can save cost of water cooling system. Two years of LECR4 stable operation show that evaporative cooling technology can be used on magnet of ECRIS, and the application advantages are very obvious.

  9. Solar heating and cooling.

    PubMed

    Duffie, J A; Beckman, W A

    1976-01-16

    We have adequate theory and engineering capability to design, install, and use equipment for solar space and water heating. Energy can be delivered at costs that are competitive now with such high-cost energy sources as much fuel-generated, electrical resistance heating. The technology of heating is being improved through collector developments, improved materials, and studies of new ways to carry out the heating processes. Solar cooling is still in the experimental stage. Relatively few experiments have yielded information on solar operation of absorption coolers, on use of night sky radiation in locations with clear skies, on the combination of a solar-operated Rankine engine and a compression cooler, and on open cycle, humidification-dehumidification systems. Many more possibilities for exploration exist. Solar cooling may benefit from collector developments that permit energy delivery at higher temperatures and thus solar operation of additional kinds of cycles. Improved solar cooling capability can open up new applications of solar energy, particularly for larger buildings, and can result in markets for retrofitting existing buildings. Solar energy for buildings can, in the next decade, make a significant contribution to the national energy economy and to the pocketbooks of many individual users. very large-aggregate enterprises in manufacture, sale, and installation of solar energy equipment can result, which can involve a spectrum of large and small businesses. In our view, the technology is here or will soon be at hand; thus the basic decisions as to whether the United States uses this resource will be political in nature.

  10. Analysis of the Mortality Experience amongst U.S. Nuclear Power Industry Workers after Chronic Low-Dose Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Geoffrey R.; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Fix, Jack J.; Egel, John N.; Buchanan, Jeffrey A.

    2004-11-01

    Workers employed in 15 utilities that generate nuclear power in the United States have been followed for up to 18 years between 1979 and 1997. Their cumulative dose from whole-body ionizing radiation has been determined from the dose records maintained by the facilities themselves and the REIRS and REMS systems maintained by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy, respectively. Mortality in the cohort from a number of causes has been analyzed with respect to individual radiation doses. The cohort displays a very substantial healthy worker effect, i.e. considerably lower cancer and noncancer mortality than the general population. Based on 26 and 368 deaths, respectively, positive though statistically nonsignificant associations were seen for mortality from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and all solid cancers combined, with excess relative risks per sievert of 5.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.56, 30.4) and 0.596 (95% CI -2.01, 4.64), respectively. These estimates are very similar to those from the atomic bomb survivors study, though the wide confidence intervals are also consistent with lower or higher risk estimates. A strong positive and statistically significant association between radiation dose and deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease including coronary heart disease was also observed in the cohort, with an ERR of 8.78 (95% CI 2.10, 20.0). While associations with heart disease have been reported in some other occupational studies, the magnitude of the present association is not consistent with them and therefore needs cautious interpretation and merits further attention. At present, the relatively small number of deaths and the young age of the cohort (mean age at end of follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up and the inclusion of the present data in an ongoing IARC combined analysis of nuclear workers from 15 countries will have greater power for testing the main hypotheses

  11. Electron ionization of acetylene.

    PubMed

    King, Simon J; Price, Stephen D

    2007-11-07

    Relative partial ionization cross sections and precursor specific relative partial ionization cross sections for fragment ions formed by electron ionization of C2H2 have been measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with a 2D ion-ion coincidence technique. We report data for the formation of H+, H+2, C2+, C+/C2+ 2, CH+/C2H+2, CH+2, C+2, and C2H+ relative to the formation of C2H+2, as a function of ionizing electron energy from 30-200 eV. While excellent agreement is found between our data and one set of previously published absolute partial ionization cross sections, some discrepancies exist between the results presented here and two other recent determinations of these absolute partial ionization cross sections. We attribute these differences to the loss of some translationally energetic fragment ions in these earlier studies. Our relative precursor-specific partial ionization cross sections enable us, for the first time, to quantify the contribution to the yield of each fragment ion from single, double, and triple ionization. Analysis shows that at 50 eV double ionization contributes 2% to the total ion yield, increasing to over 10% at an ionizing energy of 100 eV. From our ion-ion coincidence data, we have derived branching ratios for charge separating dissociations of the acetylene dication. Comparison of our data to recent ab initio/RRKM calculations suggest that close to the double ionization potential C2H2+2 dissociates predominantly on the ground triplet potential energy surface (3Sigma*g) with a much smaller contribution from dissociation via the lowest singlet potential energy surface (1Delta g). Measurements of the kinetic energy released in the fragmentation reactions of C2H2+2 have been used to obtain precursor state energies for the formation of product ion pairs, and are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data and with theory.

  12. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  13. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  14. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  15. Ionized carbon (CII) in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, F. P.; Maloney, P. R.

    We present preliminary results of recently obtained observations of the important cooling line of singly ionized carbon in the Magellanic Clouds. Three large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and six HII region/CO cloud complexes have been detected and mapped. Comparison shows that the strength and distribution of (CII) regions is well-correlated with those of dust complexes emitting far-infrared radiation, but not with molecular cloud complexes traced by CO emission. The results confirm that photo-dissociation processes are of relatively greater importance in Magellanic Cloud star formation regions than in Galactic regions.

  16. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  17. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA grant NAGW-4577, "Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)". This grant covered a joint project between LSU and the University of Maryland for a Concept Study of a new type of fully active calorimeter to be used to measure the energy spectra of very high energy cosmic rays, particularly Hydrogen and Helium, to beyond 1014 eV. This very high energy region has been studied with emulsion chamber techniques, but never investigated with electronic calorimeters. Technology had advanced to the point that a fully active calorimeter based upon Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillating crystals appeared feasible for balloon flight (and eventually space) experiments.

  18. Laser cooling without spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Corder, Christopher; Arnold, Brian; Metcalf, Harold

    2015-01-30

    This Letter reports the demonstration of laser cooling without spontaneous emission, and thereby addresses a significant controversy. It works by restricting the atom-light interaction to a time short compared to a cycle of absorption followed by natural decay. It is achieved by using the bichromatic force on an atomic transition with a relatively long excited state lifetime and a relatively short cooling time so that spontaneous emission effects are minimized. The observed width of the one-dimensional velocity distribution is reduced by ×2 thereby reducing the "temperature" by ×4. Moreover, our results comprise a compression in phase space because the spatial expansion of the atomic sample is limited. This accomplishment is of interest to direct laser cooling of molecules or in experiments where working space or time is limited.

  19. Turbopump thermodynamic cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, T. C.; Mckee, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    System for cooling turbopumps used in cryogenic fluid storage facilities is described. Technique uses thermodynamic propellant vent to intercept pump heat at desired conditions. Cooling system uses hydrogen from outside source or residual hydrogen from cryogenic storage tank.

  20. Liquid-Cooled Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-cooled bra, offshoot of Apollo moon suit technology, aids the cancer-detection technique known as infrared thermography. Water flowing through tubes in the bra cools the skin surface to improve resolution of thermograph image.

  1. Liquid cooled garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Liquid cooled garments employed in several applications in which severe heat is encountered are discussed. In particular, the use of the garments to replace air line cooling units in a variety of industrial processing situations is discussed.

  2. Metamaterial enhances natural cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-03-01

    A new metamaterial film that uses passive radiative cooling to dissipate heat from an object and provides cooling without a power input has been developed by a team at the University of Colorado Boulder in the US.

  3. Cooling Water Intakes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Industries use large volumes of water for cooling. The water intakes pull large numbers of fish and other organisms into the cooling systems. EPA issues regulations on intake structures in order to minimize adverse environmental impacts.

  4. Resonant effects in above-threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertlein, Marcus P.

    2000-09-01

    The ionization of noble gases in high intensity laser fields produces an electron spectrum with characteristic peaks corresponding to atomic levels of the atom. While many of the features in the low energy part of the spectrum have been explained qualitatively, current models are incomplete and are not able to account for the recurrence of ionization probability for higher energy electrons. In particular, one of the basic questions arising is the importance of multiple ionization in these spectra. While the light intensities are in the regime where multiple ionization is known to occur, it was not clear whether the higher energy (or plateau) electrons are a result of this, and whether multiple ionization even leaves a signature in the electron spectrum. In this dissertation, we use several experimental techniques to explore this problem in argon. Our results show that although multiple ionization occurs, electrons from this process do not appear in the observed electron spectrum. Furthermore, the appearance intensities of the peaks visible in the plateau region of the electron spectrum and of the resonance peaks in the well- understood low energy part show a strong correlation, suggestion a common origin of production. Accurate computer simulations of the process, using a single- active-electron model, reproduce all essential features of the experimental spectra. Our results support the conclusion that all high energy electrons observed in our experiments can be explained with single-electron effects.

  5. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  6. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  7. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

    2009-05-04

    After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

  8. Electronic Spectra of the Jet-Cooled Acetaminophen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Min, Ahreum; Kim, Yusic; Choi, Myong Yong; Chang, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang Hak; Kim, Seong Keun

    2010-06-01

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI), laser induced fluorescence (LIF) and UV-UV double resonance spectra of the jet-cooled acetaminophen, widely used as a pain reliever and fever reducer, were obtained in the gas phase. Conformational characterizations for acetaminophen will be presented with an aid of spectroscopic techniques and DFT B3LYP calculations.

  9. Vacuum ultraviolet mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy of methylcyclohexane in the supersonic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Songhee; Yoo, Hyun Sik; Ahn, Doo-Sik; Choi, Young S.; Kim, Sang Kyu

    2011-12-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectrum of supersonically cooled methylcyclohexane has been obtained to give the precise adiabatic ionization energy of 9.6958 ± 0.0025 eV for the chair equatorial conformer. Vibrationally resolved MATI spectrum has been analyzed with the aid of density functional theory and Franck-Condon calculations. The MATI spectrum reflects the structural change upon ionization and its origin is discussed by inspecting the shapes of the valence orbitals involved in the ionization process. The spectroscopic implication of the structural interconversion above the certain energy level is discussed with theoretical calculations of molecular structures and energetics.

  10. Search for a permanent EDM with laser cooled radioactive atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    To explore the mechanism for the generation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, the study on fundamental symmetry violation using the trapped radioactive atoms with laser cooling techniques is being promoted. An Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) of the elementary particle is a good prove to observe the phenomena beyond the Standard Model. A finite value of EDM means the violation of the time reversal symmetry, and the CP violation under the CPT invariance. In paramagnetic atoms, an electron EDM results in an atomic EDM enhanced by the factor of the 3rd power of the charge of the nucleus due the relativistic effects. A heaviest alkali element francium (Fr), which is the radioactive atom, has the largest enhancement factor K ~ 895 in atomic system. Then, we are developing a high intensity laser cooled Fr factory at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University to search for the EDM of Fr with the accuracy of 10-29 e cm. To overcome the current accuracy limit of the EDM, it is necessary to realize the high intensity Fr source and to reduce the systematic error due to the motional magnetic field and inhomogeneous applied field. To reduce the dominant component of the systematic errors mentioned above, we will confine the Fr atoms in the small region with the Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) and optical lattice using the laser cooling and trapping techniques. The construction of the experimental apparatus is making progress, and the new thermal ionizer already produces the Fr of ~ 10 6 ions/s with the primary beam intensity 200 nA. The extracted Fr ion beam is transported to the neutralizer, which is located 10 m downstream, and the produced neutral Fr atoms are introduced into the MOT to load the next trapping system such as the optical dipole force trap and optical lattice. The coherence time will be increased in the laser trapping system, and the present status of the experiment will be reported.

  11. Complete Sensitivity/Uncertainty Analysis of LR-0 Reactor Experiments with MSRE FLiBe Salt and Perform Comparison with Molten Salt Cooled and Molten Salt Fueled Reactor Models

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Mueller, Don; Patton, Bruce W.

    2016-12-01

    In September 2016, reactor physics measurements were conducted at Research Centre Rez (RC Rez) using the FLiBe (2 7LiF + BeF2) salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) in the LR-0 low power nuclear reactor. These experiments were intended to inform on neutron spectral effects and nuclear data uncertainties for advanced reactor systems using FLiBe salt in a thermal neutron energy spectrum. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in collaboration with RC Rez, performed sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analyses of these experiments as part of the ongoing collaboration between the United States and the Czech Republic on civilian nuclear energy research and development. The objectives of these analyses were (1) to identify potential sources of bias in fluoride salt-cooled and salt-fueled reactor simulations resulting from cross section uncertainties, and (2) to produce the sensitivity of neutron multiplication to cross section data on an energy-dependent basis for specific nuclides. This report provides a final report on the S/U analyses of critical experiments at the LR-0 Reactor relevant to fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) and liquid-fueled molten salt reactor (MSR) concepts. In the future, these S/U analyses could be used to inform the design of additional FLiBe-based experiments using the salt from MSRE. The key finding of this work is that, for both solid and liquid fueled fluoride salt reactors, radiative capture in 7Li is the most significant contributor to potential bias in neutronics calculations within the FLiBe salt.

  12. Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A.; Hydomako, R.; Jonsell, S.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wilding, D.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2010-07-01

    We report the application of evaporative cooling to clouds of trapped antiprotons, resulting in plasmas with measured temperature as low as 9 K. We have modeled the evaporation process for charged particles using appropriate rate equations. Good agreement between experiment and theory is observed, permitting prediction of cooling efficiency in future experiments. The technique opens up new possibilities for cooling of trapped ions and is of particular interest in antiproton physics, where a precise CPT test on trapped antihydrogen is a long-standing goal.

  13. Cooling water distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  14. Fundamentals of Biomolecule Analysis by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinecke, Andrea; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique that allows transfer of fragile biomolecules directly from solution into the gas phase. An instrumental analysis laboratory experiment is designed that would introduce the students to the ESI technique, major parameters of the ion trap mass spectrometers and some caveats in…

  15. Fundamentals of Biomolecule Analysis by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinecke, Andrea; Ryzhov, Victor

    2005-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is a soft ionization technique that allows transfer of fragile biomolecules directly from solution into the gas phase. An instrumental analysis laboratory experiment is designed that would introduce the students to the ESI technique, major parameters of the ion trap mass spectrometers and some caveats in…

  16. Postexercise Cooling Rates in 2 Cooling Jackets

    PubMed Central

    Brade, Carly; Dawson, Brian; Wallman, Karen; Polglaze, Ted

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Cooling jackets are a common method for removing stored heat accumulated during exercise. To date, the efficiency and practicality of different types of cooling jackets have received minimal investigation. Objective: To examine whether a cooling jacket containing a phase-change material (PC17) results in more rapid postexercise cooling than a gel cooling jacket and a no-jacket (control) condition. Design: Randomized, counterbalanced design with 3 experimental conditions. Setting: Participants exercised at 75% V̇o2max workload in a hot climate chamber (temperature  =  35.0 ± 1.4°C, relative humidity  =  52 ± 4%) for 30 minutes, followed by postexercise cooling for 30 minutes in cool laboratory conditions (ambient temperature  =  24.9 ± 1.8°C, relative humidity  =  39% ± 10%). Patients or Other Participants: Twelve physically active men (age  =  21.3 ± 1.1 years, height  =  182.7 ± 7.1 cm, body mass  =  76.2 ± 9.5 kg, sum of 6 skinfolds  =  50.5 ± 6.9 mm, body surface area  =  1.98 ± 0.14 m2, V̇o2max  =  49.0 ± 7.0 mL·kg−1·min−1) participated. Intervention(s): Three experimental conditions, consisting of a PC17 jacket, a gel jacket, and no jacket. Main Outcome Measure(s): Core temperature (TC), mean skin temperature (TSk), and TC cooling rate (°C/min). Results: Mean peak TC postexercise was 38.49 ± 0.42°C, 38.57 ± 0.41°C, and 38.55 ± 0.40°C for the PC17 jacket, gel jacket, and control conditions, respectively. No differences were observed in peak TC cooling rates among the PC17 jacket (0.038 ± 0.007°C/min), gel jacket (0.040 ± 0.009°C/min), and control (0.034 ± 0.010°C/min, P > .05) conditions. Between trials, no differences were calculated for mean TSk cooling. Conclusions: Similar cooling rates for all 3 conditions indicate that there is no benefit associated with wearing the PC17 or gel jacket. PMID:20210620

  17. Assessment of Alphamagnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Upper Experiment Structural Configuration Shielding Effectiveness Associated with Change from Cryo-Cooled Magnet to Permanent Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert

    2012-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer 2 (AMS-02) underwent a series of system level electromagnetic interference control measurements, followed by thermal vacuum testing. Shortly after completion of the thermal vacuum testing, the project decided to remove the cryogenically cooled superconducting magnet, and replace it with the original permanent magnet design employed in the earlier AMS- 01 assembly. Doing so necessitated several structural changes, as well as removal or modification of numerous electronic and thermal control devices and systems. At this stage, the project was rapidly approaching key milestone dates for hardware completion and delivery for launch, and had little time for additional testing or assessment of any impact to the electromagnetic signature of the AMS-02. Therefore, an analytical assessment of the radiated emissions behavioural changes associated with the system changes was requested.

  18. Modeling of Ionization Physics with the PIC Code OSIRIS

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Tsung, F.; Lee, S.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; O'Connell, C.; Dodd, E.; Decker, F.J.; Huang, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Hemker, R.; Iverson, R.H.; Joshi, C.; Ren, C.; Raimondi, P.; Wang, S.; Walz, D.; /Southern California U. /UCLA /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    When considering intense particle or laser beams propagating in dense plasma or gas, ionization plays an important role. Impact ionization and tunnel ionization may create new plasma electrons, altering the physics of wakefield accelerators, causing blue shifts in laser spectra, creating and modifying instabilities, etc. Here we describe the addition of an impact ionization package into the 3-D, object-oriented, fully parallel PIC code OSIRIS. We apply the simulation tool to simulate the parameters of the upcoming E164 Plasma Wakefield Accelerator experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). We find that impact ionization is dominated by the plasma electrons moving in the wake rather than the 30 GeV drive beam electrons. Impact ionization leads to a significant number of trapped electrons accelerated from rest in the wake.

  19. Collisional Cooling of Light Ions by Cotrapped Heavy Atoms.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sourav; Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S A

    2017-03-17

    We experimentally demonstrate cooling of trapped ions by collisions with cotrapped, higher-mass neutral atoms. It is shown that the lighter ^{39}K^{+} ions, created by ionizing ^{39}K atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), when trapped in an ion trap and subsequently allowed to cool by collisions with ultracold, heavier ^{85}Rb atoms in a MOT, exhibit a longer trap lifetime than without the localized ^{85}Rb MOT atoms. A similar cooling of trapped ^{85}Rb^{+} ions by ultracold ^{133}Cs atoms in a MOT is also demonstrated in a different experimental configuration to validate this mechanism of ion cooling by localized and centered ultracold neutral atoms. Our results suggest that the cooling of ions by localized cold atoms holds for any mass ratio, thereby enabling studies on a wider class of atom-ion systems irrespective of their masses.

  20. The effect of water vapor on the release of fission gas from the fuel elements of high temperature, gas-cooled reactors: A preliminary assessment of experiments HRB-17, HFR-B1, HFR-K6 and KORA

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    The effect of water vapor on the release of fission gas from the fuel elements of high temperature, gas-cooled reactors has been measured in different laboratories under both irradiation and post irradiation conditions. The data from experiments HRB-17, HFR-B1, HFR-K6, and in the KORA facility are compared to assess their consistency and complimentarily. The experiments are consistent under comparable experimental conditions and reveal two general mechanisms involving exposed fuel kernels embedded in carbonaceous materials. One is manifest as a strong dependence of fission gas release on the partial pressure of water vapor below 1 kPa and the other, as a weak dependence above 1 kPa.

  1. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  2. Theoretical studies of chromospheres and winds in cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    Calculated radiative losses from H, H-, Ca II, and Mg II show that cooling for the chromosphere of the supergiant epsilon Gem do not differ greatly from the solar law, although there are differences at approximately 6000K due to ionization effects. With a rough standard law for computation of stellar winds using the Hartmann-MacGregor theory and standard stellar evolutionary calculations, the wind velocities and temperatures in the HR diagram were systematically explored. Results show that cool winds with tempratures 1,000,00K are not possible for log g or = 2. Predicted wind velocities are approximately 1.5 to 2 x larger than observed, particularly for the most luminous cool stars. The ionization balance for the wind of alpha ORI and the hydrogen profile lines for T Tauri stars were computed using the PANDORA computer program.

  3. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

    2012-05-20

    The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

  4. Accreditation of ionizing radiation protection programs

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Swinth, K.L.; Selby, J.M.

    1991-10-01

    There are over one million workers in the United States who have the potential to be exposed to ionizing radiation. Therefore, it is necessary to determine accurately the quantity of radiation to which they may have been exposed. This quantity if measured by personnel dosimeters that are carried by individuals requiring radiation monitoring. Accreditation of the organizations which evaluate this quantity provides official recognition of the competence of these organizations. Accreditation programs in the field of ionizing radiation protection have been in operation for a number of years, and their experience has demonstrated that such programs can help to improve performance.

  5. Femtosecond multiphoton ionization of ammonia clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S.; Purnell, J.; Buzza, S.A.; Stanley, R.J.; Castleman, A.W. Jr. )

    1992-12-15

    Herein, we report on femtosecond time-resolved experiments in ammonia clusters. The mechanisms of their ionization and the subsequent formation of the protonated ammonia cluster ions are studied using a femtosecond pump-probe technique at 620 nm. It is found that an intermediate corresponding to [ital C][prime] states of the monomer is responsible for the ionization of ammonia clusters. Femtosecond pump--probe studies show that the lifetime of the intermediate to the formation of the protonated cluster ions (NH[sub 3])[sub [ital n

  6. Ionizing radiation and life.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a ubiquitous feature of the Cosmos, from exogenous cosmic rays (CR) to the intrinsic mineral radioactivity of a habitable world, and its influences on the emergence and persistence of life are wide-ranging and profound. Much attention has already been focused on the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation on organisms and the complex molecules of life, but ionizing radiation also performs many crucial functions in the generation of habitable planetary environments and the origins of life. This review surveys the role of CR and mineral radioactivity in star formation, generation of biogenic elements, and the synthesis of organic molecules and driving of prebiotic chemistry. Another major theme is the multiple layers of shielding of planetary surfaces from the flux of cosmic radiation and the various effects on a biosphere of violent but rare astrophysical events such as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. The influences of CR can also be duplicitous, such as limiting the survival of surface life on Mars while potentially supporting a subsurface biosphere in the ocean of Europa. This review highlights the common thread that ionizing radiation forms between the disparate component disciplines of astrobiology. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  7. Microchip sonic spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Kauppila, Tiina J; Haapala, Markus; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2007-05-01

    The first microchip version of sonic spray ionization (SSI) as an atmospheric pressure ionization source for mass spectrometry (MS) is presented. The microchip used for SSI has recently been developed in our laboratory, and it has been used before as an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source. Now the ionization is achieved simply by applying high (sonic) speed nebulizer gas, without heat, corona discharge, or high voltage. The microchip SSI was applied to the analysis of tetra-N-butylammonium, verapamil, testosterone, angiotensin I, and ibuprofen. The limits of detection were in the range of 15 nM to 4 microM. The technique was found to be highly dependent on the position of the chip toward the mass spectrometer inlet, and on the gas and the sample solution flow rates. The microchip SSI provided dynamic linearity following a pattern similar to that used with electrospray, good quantitative repeatability (RSD=16%), and long-term signal stability.

  8. Ionizing radiation from tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Westin, J.B.

    1987-04-24

    Accidents at nuclear power facilities seem inevitably to bring in their wake a great deal of concern on the part of both the lay and medical communities. Relatively little attention, however, is given to what may be the largest single worldwide source of effectively carcinogenic ionizing radiation: tobacco. The risk of cancer deaths from the Chernobyl disaster are tobacco smoke is discussed.

  9. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  10. Metallic Glass Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A sample of advanced metallic glass alloy cools down during an experiment with the TEMPUS furnace on STS-94, July 7, 1997, MET:5/23:35 (approximate). The sequence shows the sample glowing, then fading to black as scientists began the process of preserving the liquid state, but lowering the temperature below the normal solidification temperature of the alloy. This process is known as undercooling. (10 second clip covering approximately 50 seconds.) TEMPUS (stands for Tiegelfreies Elektromagnetisches Prozessiere unter Schwerelosigkeit (containerless electromagnetic processing under weightlessness). It was developed by the German Space Agency (DARA) for flight aboard Spacelab. The DARA project scientist was Igon Egry. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). DARA and NASA are exploring the possibility of flying an advanced version of TEMPUS on the International Space Station. (354KB JPEG, 2700 x 2038 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300189.html.

  11. Cooling by Thermodynamic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitsas, S. N.

    2017-03-01

    A method is described for cooling conductive channels to below ambient temperature. The thermodynamic induction principle dictates that the electrically biased channel will cool if the electrical conductance decreases with temperature. The extent of this cooling is calculated in detail for both cases of ballistic and conventional transport with specific calculations for carbon nanotubes and conventional metals, followed by discussions for semiconductors, graphene, and metal-insulator transition systems. A theorem is established for ballistic transport stating that net cooling is not possible. For conventional transport, net cooling is possible over a broad temperature range, with the range being size-dependent. A temperature clamping scheme for establishing a metastable nonequilibrium stationary state is detailed and followed with discussion of possible applications to on-chip thermoelectric cooling in integrated circuitry and quantum computer systems.

  12. NASA Microclimate Cooling Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this outline form presentation is to present NASA's challenges in microclimate cooling as related to the spacesuit. An overview of spacesuit flight-rated personal cooling systems is presented, which includes a brief history of cooling systems from Gemini through Space Station missions. The roles of the liquid cooling garment, thermal environment extremes, the sublimator, multi-layer insulation, and helmet visor UV and solar coatings are reviewed. A second section is presented on advanced personal cooling systems studies, which include heat acquisition studies on cooling garments, heat rejection studies on water boiler & radiators, thermal storage studies, and insulation studies. Past and present research and development and challenges are summarized for the advanced studies.

  13. Gas turbine cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Bancalari, Eduardo E.

    2001-01-01

    A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

  14. Cooling by Thermodynamic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitsas, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    A method is described for cooling conductive channels to below ambient temperature. The thermodynamic induction principle dictates that the electrically biased channel will cool if the electrical conductance decreases with temperature. The extent of this cooling is calculated in detail for both cases of ballistic and conventional transport with specific calculations for carbon nanotubes and conventional metals, followed by discussions for semiconductors, graphene, and metal-insulator transition systems. A theorem is established for ballistic transport stating that net cooling is not possible. For conventional transport, net cooling is possible over a broad temperature range, with the range being size-dependent. A temperature clamping scheme for establishing a metastable nonequilibrium stationary state is detailed and followed with discussion of possible applications to on-chip thermoelectric cooling in integrated circuitry and quantum computer systems.

  15. Ion microscopy based on laser-cooled cesium atoms.

    PubMed

    Viteau, M; Reveillard, M; Kime, L; Rasser, B; Sudraud, P; Bruneau, Y; Khalili, G; Pillet, P; Comparat, D; Guerri, I; Fioretti, A; Ciampini, D; Allegrini, M; Fuso, F

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a prototype of a Focused Ion Beam machine based on the ionization of a laser-cooled cesium beam and adapted for imaging and modifying different surfaces in the few-tens nanometer range. Efficient atomic ionization is obtained by laser promoting ground-state atoms into a target excited Rydberg state, then field-ionizing them in an electric field gradient. The method allows obtaining ion currents up to 130pA. Comparison with the standard direct photo-ionization of the atomic beam shows, in our conditions, a 40-times larger ion yield. Preliminary imaging results at ion energies in the 1-5keV range are obtained with a resolution around 40nm, in the present version of the prototype. Our ion beam is expected to be extremely monochromatic, with an energy spread of the order of the eV, offering great prospects for lithography, imaging and surface analysis.

  16. Laboratory simulation of cometary neutral gas ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tsuey-Fen; Rahman, H. U.; White, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    The laboratory simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with a comet is used to study the cometary neural gas ionization. The experiment is carried out in the UCR T-1 facility with an ice ball as the comet model. Photographs and data are taken with a variety of values of the solar wind velocity, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and comet configurations. The results show that the cometary neutral gas ionization depends on both the velocity of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field. The plasma cloud surrounding the comet is visible only when the solar wind velocity and IMF are both above certain minimum values. This velocity dependent phenomena is explained by Alfven's critical ionization velocity effect. The critical magnetic field may be explained by assuming two stream lower hybrid instability as a triggering mechanism for the ionization of the neutral gas by plasma flow. Critical upper and lower limits for the magnetic field, required by anomalous ionization, are also derived that satisfy the experimental observations.

  17. Modulated voltage metastable ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Kojiro, D. R.; Humphrey, D. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The output current from a metastable ionization detector (MID) is applied to a modulation voltage circuit. An adjustment is made to balance out the background current, and an output current, above background, is applied to an input of a strip chart recorder. For low level concentrations, i.e., low detected output current, the ionization potential will be at a maximum and the metastable ionization detector will operate at its most sensitive level. When the detected current from the metastable ionization detector increases above a predetermined threshold level, a voltage control circuit is activated which turns on a high voltage transistor which acts to reduce the ionization potential. The ionization potential applied to the metastable ionization detector is then varied so as to maintain the detected signal level constant. The variation in ionization potential is now related to the concentration of the constituent and a representative amplitude is applied to another input of said strip chart recorder.

  18. Inductive cooling in quantum magnetomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Sanchez, Erick; Twamley, Jason; Bowen, Warwick P.; Vanner, Michael R.

    Coupling to light or microwave fields allows quantum control of the motion of a mechanical oscillator, and offers prospects for precision sensing, quantum information systems, and tests of fundamental physics. In cavity electromechanics ground state cooling has been achieved using resolved sideband cooling. Here we present an alternative approach based on a magnetomechanical system that inductively couples an LC resonator to a mechanical oscillator. The experimental setup consists of a micro cantilever with a pyramidal magnetic tip attached at the end of the beam. The sharp end of the magnetic tip is positioned close to the planar microfabricated inductor of the LC resonator. The displacement in the position of the end of the cantilever generates a change in flux through the coil inducing an electromotive force in the circuit. The current in the LC resonator generates a magnetic field, and then a force between the tip and the coil. When they are strongly coupled and the mechanical resonance frequency ωm exceeds the electrical decay rate of the resonator γe, resolved sideband cooling can be used to cool the mechanics. We present estimations for the coupling rates and the experimental parameters required for these experiments. E. Romero acknowledges to CONACyT.

  19. Coherent electron cooling.

    PubMed

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Derbenev, Yaroslav S

    2009-03-20

    Cooling intense high-energy hadron beams poses a major challenge for modern accelerator physics. The synchrotron radiation emitted from such beams is feeble; even in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) operating with 7 TeV protons, the longitudinal damping time is about 13 hours. None of the traditional cooling methods seem able to cool LHC-class protons beams. In this Letter, we present a novel method of coherent electron cooling based on a high-gain free-electron laser (FEL). This technique could be critical for reaching high luminosities in hadron and electron-hadron colliders.

  20. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Stewart, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.