Science.gov

Sample records for ionizing particles interacting

  1. Charged-Particle Impact Ionization of Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bartschat, Klaus; Guan Xiaoxu

    2008-08-08

    We have developed a hybrid method to treat charged-particle impact ionization of complex atoms and ions. The essential idea is to describe the interaction between a fast projectile and the target perturbatively, up to second order, while the initial bound state and the ejected-electron--residual-ion interaction can be handled via a convergent R-matrix with pseudo-states (close-coupling) expansion. Example results for ionization of the heavy noble gases (Ne-Xe) by positron and electron impact are presented. The general scheme for a distorted-wave treatment of ionization by heavy-particle impact is described.

  2. New results from the search for low-mass weakly interacting massive particles with the CDMS low ionization threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.

    2016-02-17

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Our results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg days, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. Furthermore, a fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. Lastly, new parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded forWIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV/c2.

  3. New results from the search for low-mass weakly interacting massive particles with the CDMS low ionization threshold experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Agnese, R.

    2016-02-17

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Our results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg days, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. Furthermore, a fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. Lastly, new parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded forWIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV/c2.

  4. Search for low-mass weakly interacting massive particles using voltage-assisted calorimetric ionization detection in the SuperCDMS experiment.

    PubMed

    Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Asai, M; Balakishiyeva, D; Basu Thakur, R; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Loer, B; Lopez Asamar, E; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nadeau, P; Nelson, R H; Page, K; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2014-01-31

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this Letter, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage-assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for ten live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of 170  eVee (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6  GeV/c2.

  5. A Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redi, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, Richard; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2014-01-27

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this Letter, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage-assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for ten live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV/c2.

  6. Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2014-01-01

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this paper, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage- assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for 10 live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of 170 eVee (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV/c2.

  7. Double ionization of helium by particle impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, Finn M.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are reviewed of the ratio, R sq., of double to single ionization of He by proton, antiproton, electron and positron impact in the energy range from 0.15 to about 10 MeV/amu. At high velocities (greater than 1 to 2 MeV/amu) values of R sq. caused by electron impact merge with those for the proton with the antiproton, electron values being up to a factor of 2 greater than that for the p, positron. At these velocities the single ionization cross sections caused by impact of any of these four particles are indistinguishable.

  8. Elementary particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Ward, B.F.L.; Close, F.E.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses freon bubble chamber experiments exposed to {mu}{sup +} and neutrinos, photon-proton interactions; shower counter simulations; SLD detectors at the Stanford Linear Collider, and the detectors at the Superconducting Super Collider; elementary particle interactions; physical properties of dielectric materials used in High Energy Physics detectors; and Nuclear Physics. (LSP)

  9. Ionizing particle detection based on phononic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aly, Arafa H. E-mail: arafa.hussien@science.bsu.edu.eg; Mehaney, Ahmed; Eissa, Mostafa F.

    2015-08-14

    Most conventional radiation detectors are based on electronic or photon collections. In this work, we introduce a new and novel type of ionizing particle detector based on phonon collection. Helium ion radiation treats tumors with better precision. There are nine known isotopes of helium, but only helium-3 and helium-4 are stable. Helium-4 is formed in fusion reactor technology and in enormous quantities during Big Bang nucleo-synthesis. In this study, we introduce a technique for helium-4 ion detection (sensing) based on the innovative properties of the new composite materials known as phononic crystals (PnCs). PnCs can provide an easy and cheap technique for ion detection compared with conventional methods. PnC structures commonly consist of a periodic array of two or more materials with different elastic properties. The two materials are polymethyl-methacrylate and polyethylene polymers. The calculations showed that the energies lost to target phonons are maximized at 1 keV helium-4 ion energy. There is a correlation between the total phonon energies and the transmittance of PnC structures. The maximum transmission for phonons due to the passage of helium-4 ions was found in the case of making polyethylene as a first layer in the PnC structure. Therefore, the concept of ion detection based on PnC structure is achievable.

  10. Ionizing particle detection based on phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Mehaney, Ahmed; Eissa, Mostafa F.

    2015-08-01

    Most conventional radiation detectors are based on electronic or photon collections. In this work, we introduce a new and novel type of ionizing particle detector based on phonon collection. Helium ion radiation treats tumors with better precision. There are nine known isotopes of helium, but only helium-3 and helium-4 are stable. Helium-4 is formed in fusion reactor technology and in enormous quantities during Big Bang nucleo-synthesis. In this study, we introduce a technique for helium-4 ion detection (sensing) based on the innovative properties of the new composite materials known as phononic crystals (PnCs). PnCs can provide an easy and cheap technique for ion detection compared with conventional methods. PnC structures commonly consist of a periodic array of two or more materials with different elastic properties. The two materials are polymethyl-methacrylate and polyethylene polymers. The calculations showed that the energies lost to target phonons are maximized at 1 keV helium-4 ion energy. There is a correlation between the total phonon energies and the transmittance of PnC structures. The maximum transmission for phonons due to the passage of helium-4 ions was found in the case of making polyethylene as a first layer in the PnC structure. Therefore, the concept of ion detection based on PnC structure is achievable.

  11. Interactive Terascale Particle Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Moran, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce an interactive visualization of a 2 TB computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data set using particle tracing (streaklines). We use the method introduced by Bruckschen et al. [2001] that pre-computes a large number of particles, stores them on disk using a space-filling curve ordering that minimizes seeks, and then retrieves and displays the particles according to the user's command. We describe how the particle computation can be performed using a PC cluster, how the algorithm can be adapted to work with a multi-block curvilinear mesh, and how the out-of-core visualization can be scaled to 296 billion particles while still achieving interactive performance on PG hardware. Compared to the earlier work, our data set size and total number of particles are an order of magnitude larger. We also describe a new compression technique that allows the lossless compression of the particles by 41% and speeds the particle retrieval by about 30%.

  12. ELEMENTARY PARTICLE INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    EFREMENKO, YURI; HANDLER, THOMAS; KAMYSHKOV, YURI; SIOPSIS, GEORGE; SPANIER, STEFAN

    2013-07-30

    The High-Energy Elementary Particle Interactions group at UT during the last three years worked on the following directions and projects: Collider-based Particle Physics; Neutrino Physics, particularly participation in “NOνA”, “Double Chooz”, and “KamLAND” neutrino experiments; and Theory, including Scattering amplitudes, Quark-gluon plasma; Holographic cosmology; Holographic superconductors; Charge density waves; Striped superconductors; and Holographic FFLO states.

  13. INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

    2012-07-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

  14. LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION OF ULTRAFINE AEROSOL PARTICLES. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On-line analysis of ultrafine aerosol particle in the 12 to 150 nm size range is performed by
    laser desorption/ionization. Particles are size selected with a differential mobility analyzer and then
    sent into a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer where they are ablated w...

  15. Detailed Investigations of Interactions between Ionizing Radiation and Neutral Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, Allen L

    2014-03-31

    We are investigating phenomena that stem from the many body dynamics associated with ionization of an atom or molecule by photon or charged particle. Our program is funded through the Department of Energy EPSCoR Laboratory Partnership Award in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. We are using variations on the well established COLTRIMS technique to measure ions and electrons ejected during these interactions. Photoionization measurements take place at the Advanced Light Source at LBNL as part of the ALS-COLTRIMS collaboration with the groups of Reinhard Dörner at Frankfurt and Ali Belkacem at LBNL. Additional experiments on charged particle impact are conducted locally at Auburn University where we are studying the dissociative molecular dynamics following interactions with either ions or electrons over a velocity range of 1 to 12 atomic units.

  16. Evaluation of a digital optical ionizing radiation particle track detector

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, S.R.

    1987-06-01

    An ionizing radiation particle track detector is outlined which can, in principle, determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of all the secondary electrons produced by the passage of ionizing radiation through a low-pressure (0.1 to 10 kPa) gas. The electrons in the particle track are excited by the presence of a high-frequency AC electric field, and two digital cameras image the optical radiation produced in electronic excitation collisions of the surroundings gas by the electrons. The specific requirements of the detector for neutron dosimetry and microdosimetry are outlined (i.e., operating conditions of the digital cameras, high voltage fields, gas mixtures, etc.) along with an estimate of the resolution and sensitivity achievable with this technique. The proposed detector is shown to compare favorable with other methods for obtaining the details of the track structure, particularly in the quality of the information obtainable about the particle track and the comparative simplicity and adaptability of the detector for measuring the secondary electron track structure for many forms of ionizing radiation over a wide range of energies.

  17. Interaction of Burning Metal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Berman, Charles H.; Hoffmann, Vern K.

    1999-01-01

    Physical characteristics of the combustion of metal particle groups have been addressed in this research. The combustion behavior and interaction effects of multiple metal particles has been studied using a microgravity environment, which presents a unique opportunity to create an "aerosol" consisting of relatively large particles, i.e., 50-300 m diameter. Combustion behavior of such an aerosol could be examined using methods adopted from well-developed single particle combustion research. The experiment included fluidizing relatively large (order of 100 m diameter) uniform metal particles under microgravity and igniting such an "aerosol" using a hot wire igniter. The flame propagation and details of individual particle combustion and particle interaction have been studied using a high speed movie and video-imaging with cameras coupled with microscope lenses to resolve individual particles. Interference filters were used to separate characteristic metal and metal oxide radiation bands from the thermal black body radiation. Recorded flame images were digitized and various image processing techniques including flame position tracking, color separation, and pixel by pixel image comparison were employed to understand the processes occurring in the burning aerosol. The development of individual particle flames, merging or separation, and extinguishment as well as induced particle motion have been analyzed to identify the mechanisms governing these processes. Size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of combustion products were characterized and used to link the observed in this project aerosol combustion phenomena with the recently expanded mechanism of single metal particle combustion.

  18. Interaction of Burning Metal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Berman, Charles H.; Hoffmann, Vern K.

    1999-01-01

    Physical characteristics of the combustion of metal particle groups have been addressed in this research. The combustion behavior and interaction effects of multiple metal particles has been studied using a microgravity environment, which presents a unique opportunity to create an "aerosol" consisting of relatively large particles, i.e., 50-300 micrometer diameter. Combustion behavior of such an aerosol could be examined using methods adopted from well-developed single particle combustion research. The experiment included fluidizing relatively large (order of 100 micrometer diameter) uniform metal particles under microgravity and igniting such an "aerosol" using a hot wire igniter. The flame propagation and details of individual particle combustion and particle interaction have been studied using a high speed movie and video-imaging with cameras coupled with microscope lenses to resolve individual particles. Interference filters were used to separate characteristic metal and metal oxide radiation bands form the thermal black body radiation. Recorded flame images were digitized and employed to understand the processes occurring in the burning aerosol. The development of individual particle flames, merging or separation, and extinguishing as well as induced particle motion have been analyzed to identify the mechanisms governing these processes. Size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of combustion products were characterized and used to link the observed in this project aerosol combustion phenomena with the recently expanded mechanism of single metal particle combustion.

  19. Asymmetric particle fluxes from drifting ionization zones in sputtering magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjan, Matjaž; Franz, Robert; Anders, André

    2014-04-01

    Electron and ion fluxes from direct current and high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (dcMS and HiPIMS) plasmas were measured in the plane of the target surface. Biased collector probes and a particle energy and mass analyzer showed asymmetric emission of electrons and of singly and doubly charged ions. For both HiPIMS and dcMS discharges, higher fluxes of all types of particles were observed in the direction of the electrons' E × B drift. These results are put in the context with ionization zones that drift over the magnetron's racetrack. The measured currents of time-resolving collector probes suggest that a large fraction of the ion flux originates from drifting ionization zones, while energy-resolving mass spectrometry indicates that a large fraction of the ion energy is due to acceleration by an electric field. This supports the recently proposed hypothesis that each ionization zone is associated with a negative-positive-negative space charge structure, thereby producing an electric field that accelerates ions from the location where they were formed.

  20. Ionizing Energy Depositions After Fast Neutron Interactions in Silicon

    DOE PAGES

    Bergmann, Benedikt; Pospisil, Stanislav; Caicedo, Ivan; ...

    2016-06-01

    In our study we present the ionizing energy depositions in a 300 μm thick silicon layer after fast neutron impact. With the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique, the ionizing energy deposition spectra of recoil silicons and secondary charged particles were assigned to (quasi-)monoenergetic neutron energies in the range from 180 keV to hundreds of MeV. We also show and interpret representative measured energy spectra. By separating the ionizing energy losses of the recoil silicon from energy depositions by products of nuclear reactions, the competition of ionizing (IEL) and non-ionizing energy losses (NIEL) of a recoil silicon within the silicon lattice was investigated.more » Furthermore, the data give supplementary information to the results of a previous measurement and are compared with different theoretical predictions.« less

  1. Ionizing Energy Depositions After Fast Neutron Interactions in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, Benedikt; Pospisil, Stanislav; Caicedo, Ivan; Kierstead, James; Takai, Helio; Frojdh, Erik

    2016-06-01

    In our study we present the ionizing energy depositions in a 300 μm thick silicon layer after fast neutron impact. With the Time-of-Flight (ToF) technique, the ionizing energy deposition spectra of recoil silicons and secondary charged particles were assigned to (quasi-)monoenergetic neutron energies in the range from 180 keV to hundreds of MeV. We also show and interpret representative measured energy spectra. By separating the ionizing energy losses of the recoil silicon from energy depositions by products of nuclear reactions, the competition of ionizing (IEL) and non-ionizing energy losses (NIEL) of a recoil silicon within the silicon lattice was investigated. Furthermore, the data give supplementary information to the results of a previous measurement and are compared with different theoretical predictions.

  2. Ionization of multielectron atoms by fast charged particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.; Kyle, H. L.; Sullivan, E. C.

    1972-01-01

    Using plane waves to describe the incident and scattered particles, and screened hydrogenic and Coulomb functions to describe the atomic electrons before and after ejections, we have calculated the differential and total ionization cross sections of 11 atoms and one ion by electron impact, and ionization of helium by proton impact. The effective charges of the screened hydrogenic functions are fixed by the Hartree-Fock calculations. Calculations have been carried out for the atomic s, p, and d electrons. For low atomic numbers, we find reasonable agreement with the experimental data. For intermediate atomic numbers, we expect our results to overestimate the actual cross sections, since our choice of a unit charge for the Coulomb function of the ejected electrons will overestimate the atomic dipole potential strength, and in turn the high-energy cross sections. The advantage of the method presented here is that the ionization amplitude is given in analytic form. This may allow further analysis on this amplitude, and facilitates extension of the numerical integration for the cross section to high impact energies.

  3. Elementary Particles and Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, T. D.; Yang, C. N.

    1957-01-01

    Some general patterns of interactions between various elementary particles are reviewed and some general questions concerning the symmetry properties of these particles are studied. Topics are included on the theta-tau puzzle, experimental limits on the validity of parity conservation, some general discussions on the consequences due to possible non-invariance under P, C, and T, various possible experimental tests on invariance under P, C, and T, a two-component theory of the neutrino, a possible law of conservation of leptons and the universal Fermi interactions, and time reversal invariance and Mach's principle. (M.H.R.)

  4. Ionization-cluster distributions of alpha-particles in nanometric volumes of propane: measurement and calculation.

    PubMed

    De Nardo, L; Colautti, P; Conte, V; Baek, W Y; Grosswendt, B; Tornielli, G

    2002-12-01

    The probability of the formation of ionization clusters by primary alpha-particles at 5.4 MeV in nanometric volumes of propane was studied experimentally and by Monte Carlo simulation, as a function of the distance between the center line of the particle beam and the center of the target volume. The volumes were of cylindrical shape, 3.7 mm in diameter and height. As the investigations were performed at gas pressures of 300 Pa and 350 Pa, the dimensions of the target volume were equivalent to 20.6 nm or 24.0 nm in a material of density 1.0 g/cm(3). The dependence of ionization-cluster formation on distance was studied up to values equivalent to about 70 nm. To validate the measurements, a Monte Carlo model was developed which allows the experimental arrangement and the interactions of alpha-particles and secondary electrons in the counter gas to be properly simulated. This model is supplemented by a mathematical formulation of cluster size formation in nanometric targets. The main results of our study are (i) that the mean ionization-cluster size in the delta-electron cloud of an alpha-particle track segment, decreases as a function of the distance between the center line of the alpha-particle beam and the center of the sensitive target volume to the power of 2.6, and (ii) that the mean cluster size in critical volumes and the relative variance of mean cluster size due to delta-electrons are invariant at distances greater than about 20 nm. We could imagine that the ionization-cluster formation in nanometric volumes might in future provide the physical basis for a redefinition of radiation quality.

  5. Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Heterogeneous Particles: Implications for Applications to Complex Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longin, T.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Wingen, L. M.; Lyster, K.; Anderson, C.; Kumbhani, S.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) is a direct, real time technique for obtaining mass spectra of gases, liquid droplets, solid particles, and aerosols with little sample processing. EESI-MS involves the interaction of charged electrospray droplets with a separate spray containing the analyte of interest, but the exact mechanism by which the solvent droplets extract analyte from the sample is unclear. Possible mechanisms include complete coalescence of the sample particle with the solvent droplet in which all of the analyte is incorporated into the solvent or a more temporary interaction such that only some of the analyte is transferred to the solvent. Previous studies of the mechanism of EESI-MS on homogeneous particles indicate that both mechanisms are possible. We studied the behavior of EESI-MS toward heterogeneous particles created by coating NaCl particles with various thicknesses of organic diacids. Our results indicate that the signal strength depends on the solubility of the organic acid in the electrospray solvent, in agreement with previous studies, and also that the outer 10-15 nm of the particles are most susceptible to extraction into the electrospray droplets. Our results combined with those of previous studies suggest that the mass spectra obtained with EESI will not necessarily reflect the overall particle composition, especially for particles that are spatially inhomogeneous, and hence caution in interpretation of the data is advised for application to complex atmospheric aerosol.

  6. Dielectrophoretic particle-particle interaction under AC electrohydrodynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doh-Hyoung; Yu, Chengjie; Papazoglou, Elisabeth; Farouk, Bakhtier; Noh, Hongseok M

    2011-09-01

    We used the Maxwell stress tensor method to understand dielectrophoretic particle-particle interactions and applied the results to the interpretation of particle behaviors under alternating current (AC) electrohydrodynamic conditions such as AC electroosmosis (ACEO) and electrothermal flow (ETF). Distinct particle behaviors were observed under ACEO and ETF. Diverse particle-particle interactions observed in experiments such as particle clustering, particles keeping a certain distance from each other, chain and disc formation and their rotation, are explained based on the numerical simulation data. The improved understanding of particle behaviors in AC electrohydrodynamic flows presented here will enable researchers to design better particle manipulation strategies for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  7. Detecting weakly interacting massive particles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drukier, A. K.; Gelmini, G. B.

    The growing synergy between astrophysics, particle physics, and low background experiments strengthens the possibility of detecting astrophysical non-baryonic matter. The idea of direct detection is that an incident, massive weakly interacting particle could collide with a nucleus and transfer an energy that could be measured. The present low levels of background achieved by the PNL/USC Ge detector represent a new technology which yields interesting bounds on Galactic cold dark matter and on light bosons emitted from the Sun. Further improvements require the development of cryogenic detectors. The authors analyse the practicality of such detectors, their optimalization and background suppression using the "annual modulation effect".

  8. Matter and Interactions: A Particle Physics Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    In classical mechanics, matter and fields are completely separated; matter interacts with fields. For particle physicists this is not the case; both matter and fields are represented by particles. Fundamental interactions are mediated by particles exchanged between matter particles. In this article we explain why particle physicists believe in…

  9. Cardiovascular risks associated with low dose ionizing particle radiation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xinhua; Sasi, Sharath P; Gee, Hannah; Lee, JuYong; Yang, Yongyao; Mehrzad, Raman; Onufrak, Jillian; Song, Jin; Enderling, Heiko; Agarwal, Akhil; Rahimi, Layla; Morgan, James; Wilson, Paul F; Carrozza, Joseph; Walsh, Kenneth; Kishore, Raj; Goukassian, David A

    2014-01-01

    Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton ((1)H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV) and iron ion ((56)Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon) irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in (56)Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, (56)Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.

  10. Cardiovascular Risks Associated with Low Dose Ionizing Particle Radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Xinhua; Sasi, Sharath P.; Gee, Hannah; ...

    2014-10-22

    Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton (1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV) and iron ion (56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon) irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initiallymore » improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in 56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, 56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Finally, understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.« less

  11. Cardiovascular Risks Associated with Low Dose Ionizing Particle Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xinhua; Sasi, Sharath P.; Gee, Hannah; Lee, JuYong; Yang, Yongyao; Mehrzad, Raman; Onufrak, Jillian; Song, Jin; Enderling, Heiko; Agarwal, Akhil; Rahimi, Layla; Morgan, James; Wilson, Paul F.; Carrozza, Joseph; Walsh, Kenneth; Kishore, Raj; Goukassian, David A.

    2014-10-22

    Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton (1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV) and iron ion (56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon) irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in 56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, 56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Finally, understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy.

  12. Cardiovascular Risks Associated with Low Dose Ionizing Particle Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xinhua; Sasi, Sharath P.; Gee, Hannah; Lee, JuYong; Yang, Yongyao; Mehrzad, Raman; Onufrak, Jillian; Song, Jin; Enderling, Heiko; Agarwal, Akhil; Rahimi, Layla; Morgan, James; Wilson, Paul F.; Carrozza, Joseph; Walsh, Kenneth; Kishore, Raj; Goukassian, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous epidemiologic data demonstrate that cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality may occur decades after ionizing radiation exposure. With increased use of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy and concerns about space radiation exposures to astronauts on future long-duration exploration-type missions, the long-term effects and risks of low-dose charged particle irradiation on the CV system must be better appreciated. Here we report on the long-term effects of whole-body proton (1H; 0.5 Gy, 1 GeV) and iron ion (56Fe; 0.15 Gy, 1GeV/nucleon) irradiation with and without an acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) event in mice. We show that cardiac function of proton-irradiated mice initially improves at 1 month but declines by 10 months post-irradiation. In AMI-induced mice, prior proton irradiation improved cardiac function restoration and enhanced cardiac remodeling. This was associated with increased pro-survival gene expression in cardiac tissues. In contrast, cardiac function was significantly declined in 56Fe ion-irradiated mice at 1 and 3 months but recovered at 10 months. In addition, 56Fe ion-irradiation led to poorer cardiac function and more adverse remodeling in AMI-induced mice, and was associated with decreased angiogenesis and pro-survival factors in cardiac tissues at any time point examined up to 10 months. This is the first study reporting CV effects following low dose proton and iron ion irradiation during normal aging and post-AMI. Understanding the biological effects of charged particle radiation qualities on the CV system is necessary both for the mitigation of space exploration CV risks and for understanding of long-term CV effects following charged particle radiotherapy. PMID:25337914

  13. In situ mass analysis of particles by surface ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lassiter, W. S.; Moen, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    A qualitative study of the application of surface ionization and mass spectrometry to the in situ detection and constituent analysis of atmospheric particles was conducted. The technique consists of mass analysis of ions formed as a result of impingement of a stream of particles on a hot filament where, it is presumed, surface ionization takes place. Laboratory air particles containing K, Ca, and possibly hydrocarbons were detected. Other known particles such as Al2O3, Pb(NO3)2, and Cr2O3 were analyzed by detecting the respective metal atoms making up the particles. In some cases, mass numbers indicative of compounds making up the particles were detected showing surface ionization of particles sometimes leads to chemical analysis as well as to elemental analysis. Individual particles were detected, and it was shown that the technique is sensitive to Al2O3 particles with a mass of a few nanograms.

  14. Ionization, Charging and Electric Field Effects on Cloud Particles in the CLOUD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichman, L.; Järvinen, E.; Wagner, R.; Dorsey, J.; Dias, A. M.; Ehrhart, S.; Kirkby, J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Saunders, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Ice crystals and frozen droplets play an important role in atmospheric charging and electrification processes, particularly by collision and aggregation. The dynamics of charged particles in the atmosphere can be modulated by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). High electric fields also affect the alignment of charged particles, allowing more time for interactions. The CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) experiment at CERN has the ability to conduct ionization, charging and high electric field experiments on liquid or ice clouds created in the chamber by adiabatic pressure reductions. A pion secondary beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron is used to ionize the molecules in the chamber, and Ar+ Corona Ion Generator for Atmospheric Research (CIGAR) is used to inject unipolar charged ions directly into the chamber. A pressurized airgun provides rapid pressure shocks inside the chamber and induces charged ice nucleation. The cloud chamber is accompanied by a variety of analysing instruments e.g. a 3View Cloud Particle Imager (3V-CPI) coupled with an induction ring, a Scattering Intensity Measurements for the Optical detection of icE (SIMONE) and a Nano-aerosol and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS). Using adiabatic expansion and high electric fields we can replicate the ideal conditions for adhesion, sintering and interlocking between ice crystals. Charged cloud particles produced measurable variations in the total induced current pulse on the induction ring. The most influential factors comprised initial temperature, lapse rate and charging mechanism. The ions produced in the chamber may deposit onto larger particles and form dipoles during ice nucleation and growth. The small ion concentration was monitored by the NAIS during these runs. Possible short-term aggregates or alignment of particles were observed in-situ with the SIMONE. These and future chamber measurements of charging and aggregation could shed more light on the ambient conditions and dynamics for electrification

  15. Interacting particle systems on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Vishal

    In this dissertation, the dynamics of socially or biologically interacting populations are investigated. The individual members of the population are treated as particles that interact via links on a social or biological network represented as a graph. The effect of the structure of the graph on the properties of the interacting particle system is studied using statistical physics techniques. In the first chapter, the central concepts of graph theory and social and biological networks are presented. Next, interacting particle systems that are drawn from physics, mathematics and biology are discussed in the second chapter. In the third chapter, the random walk on a graph is studied. The mean time for a random walk to traverse between two arbitrary sites of a random graph is evaluated. Using an effective medium approximation it is found that the mean first-passage time between pairs of sites, as well as all moments of this first-passage time, are insensitive to the density of links in the graph. The inverse of the mean-first passage time varies non-monotonically with the density of links near the percolation transition of the random graph. Much of the behavior can be understood by simple heuristic arguments. Evolutionary dynamics, by which mutants overspread an otherwise uniform population on heterogeneous graphs, are studied in the fourth chapter. Such a process underlies' epidemic propagation, emergence of fads, social cooperation or invasion of an ecological niche by a new species. The first part of this chapter is devoted to neutral dynamics, in which the mutant genotype does not have a selective advantage over the resident genotype. The time to extinction of one of the two genotypes is derived. In the second part of this chapter, selective advantage or fitness is introduced such that the mutant genotype has a higher birth rate or a lower death rate. This selective advantage leads to a dynamical competition in which selection dominates for large populations

  16. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Raman Laser Amplification in Ionizing Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Clark; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2003-06-27

    By using the amplifying laser pulse in a plasma-based backward Raman laser amplifier to generate the plasma by photo-ionization of a gas simultaneous with the amplification process, possible instabilities of the pumping laser pulse can be avoided. Particle-in-cell simulations are used to study this amplification mechanism, and earlier results using more elementary models of the Raman interaction are verified [D.S. Clark and N.J. Fisch, Phys. Plasmas, 9 (6): 2772-2780, 2002]. The effects (unique to amplification in ionizing plasmas and not included in previous simulations) of blue-shifting of the pump and seed laser pulses and the generation of a wake are observed not significantly to impact the amplification process. As expected theoretically, the peak output intensity is found to be limited to I {approx} 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} by forward Raman scattering of the amplifying seed. The integrity of the ionization front of the seed pulse against the development of a possible transverse modulation instability is also demonstrated.

  17. Kinetic analysis of competition between aerosol particle removal and generation by ionization air purifiers.

    PubMed

    Alshawa, Ahmad; Russell, Ashley R; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2007-04-01

    Ionization air purifiers are increasingly used to remove aerosol particles from indoor air. However, certain ionization air purifiers also emit ozone. Reactions between the emitted ozone and unsaturated volatile organic compounds (VOC) commonly found in indoor air produce additional respirable aerosol particles in the ultrafine (<0.1 microm) and fine (<2.5 microm) size domains. A simple kinetic model is used to analyze the competition between the removal and generation of particulate matter by ionization air purifiers under conditions of a typical residential building. This model predicts that certain widely used ionization air purifiers may actually increase the mass concentration of fine and ultrafine particulates in the presence of common unsaturated VOC, such as limonene contained in many household cleaning products. This prediction is supported by an explicit observation of ultrafine particle nucleation events caused by the addition of D-limonene to a ventilated office room equipped with a common ionization air purifier.

  18. Charge cluster distribution in nanosites traversed by a single ionizing particle An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pszona, S.; Bantsar, A.; Kula, J.

    2008-11-01

    A method for modeling charge cluster formation by a single ionizing particle in nanoelectronic structures of few nanometres size is presented. The method is based on experimental modeling of charge formation in the equivalent gaseous nanosites irradiated by single charged particles and the subsequent scaling procedure to a needed medium. Propane irradiated by alpha particles is presented as an example.

  19. Ionization front interactions and the formation of globules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, P. W. J. L.

    1981-10-01

    It is assumed that an H II region has evolved inside a molecular cloud. The interactions that result from the expanding shell of compressed molecular gas reaching the edge of the cloud are calculated, and the instability of the ionization front to the formation of globules is investigated. The rarefaction wave which is reflected from the contact discontinuity as the leading shock passes through the edge of the cloud accelerates the ionization front, and since conditions at the front satisfy Capriotti's criterion for instability, the shell breaks up. The size of the fragment so created is determined by the thickness of the compressed shell. If the shell phase of H II region evolution has proceeded significantly, then globules of up to a fraction of a solar mass may be formed in an H II region caused by a star with an ionizing luminosity of 10 to the 49th photons/sec in a molecular cloud of density 1000/cu cm. These globules may survive the ionizing flux from the star, and will be driven from the cloud by the rocket effect.

  20. Hydrodynamic particle focusing design using fluid-particle interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Teng; Liu, Zhenyu; Wu, Yihui; Deng, Yongbo; Liu, Yongshun; Liu, Geng

    2013-01-01

    For passive sheathless particles focusing in microfluidics, the equilibrium positions of particles are typically controlled by micro channels with a V-shaped obstacle array (VOA). The design of the obstacles is mainly based on the distribution of flow streamlines without considering the existence of particles. We report an experimentally verified particle trajectory simulation using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) fluid-particle interaction method. The particle trajectory which is strongly influenced by the interaction between the particle and channel wall is systematically analyzed. The numerical experiments show that the streamline is a good approximation of particle trajectory only when the particle locates on the center of the channel in depth. As the advantage of fluid-particle interaction method is achieved at a high computational cost and the streamline analysis is complex, a heuristic dimensionless design objective based on the Faxen's law is proposed to optimize the VOA devices. The optimized performance of particle focusing is verified via the experiments and ALE method.

  1. Influence of dust particles on ionization and excitation in neon dc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumova, V. V.; Polyakov, D. N.; Vasilyak, L. M.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of dust particles on the concentration of metastable neon atoms and ionization was investigated using the developed drift/diffusion model for plasma of positive column of glow discharge. The detailed de-excitation in neon was considered. In addition to usual plasma losses in dusty plasmas, the quenching of metastable atoms on dust particle surface was considered. The strong influence of dust particles on the ionization rate and concentration of metastable neon atoms in a positive column of glow discharge is shown to result from the change in the longitudinal electric field strength.

  2. Interactions between Janus particles and membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hong-Ming; Ma, Yu-Qiang

    2012-02-01

    Understanding how nanoparticles interact with cell membranes is of great importance in drug/gene delivery. In this paper, we investigate the interactions between Janus particles and membranes by using dissipative particle dynamics, and find that there exist two different modes (i.e., insertion and engulfment) in the Janus particle-membrane interactions. The initial orientation and properties of Janus particles have an important impact on the interactions. When the hydrophilic part of the particle is close to the membrane or the particle has a larger section area and higher hydrophilic coverage, the particle is more likely to be engulfed by the membrane. We also provide insights into the interactions between Janus particles and membranes containing lipid rafts, and find that a Janus particle could easily detach from a membrane after it is engulfed by the raft. The present study suggests a potential way to translocate Janus particles through membranes, which may give some significant suggestions on future nanoparticle design for drug delivery.

  3. Construction of a fast ionization chamber for high-rate particle identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Ahn, S.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chipps, K. A.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Peters, W. A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Smith, M. S.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2014-07-01

    A new gas-filled ionization chamber for high count rate particle identification has been constructed and commissioned at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). To enhance the response time of the ionization chamber, a design utilizing a tilted entrance window and tilted electrodes was adopted, which is modified from an original design by Kimura et al. [1]. A maximum counting rate of 700 , 000 particles per second has been achieved. The detector has been used for several radioactive beam measurements performed at the HRIBF.

  4. Investigation of plasma particle interactions with variable particle sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    In dusty plasmas, the dust particles are subjected to many forces of different origins. Both the gas and plasma directly affect the dust particles through electric fields, neutral drag, ion drag and thermophoretic forces, while the particles themselves interact with one another through a screened coulomb potential, which can be influenced by flowing ions. Recently, micron sized particles have been used as probes to analyze the electric fields in the plasma directly. A proper analysis of the resulting data requires a full understanding of the manner in which these forces couple to the dust particles. In most cases each of the forces exhibit unique characteristics, many of which are partially dependent on the particle size. In this study, five different particle sizes are used to investigate the forces resident in the sheath above the lower electrode of a GEC RF reference cell. The particles are tracked using a high-speed camera, yielding two-dimensional force maps allowing the force on the particles to be described as a polynomial series. It will be shown that the data collected can be analyzed to reveal information about the origins of the various forces. Support from the NSF and the DOE (award numbers PHY-1262031 and PHY-1414523) is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Particle-Vortex Interaction in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenghi, Carlo F.

    2008-11-01

    The application of the classical Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique in liquid helium has opened the way to better visualization of superfluid turbulence. To interpret the data, it is necessary to understand the interaction between micron-size tracer particles and vortex lines. This talk summarizes current understanding of this interaction resulting from theoretical and numerical calculations. In collaboration with Yuri A. Sergeev, Newcastle University.

  6. Thermoelectricity of interacting particles: a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shunda; Wang, Jiao; Casati, Giulio; Benenti, Giuliano

    2015-09-01

    A method for computing the thermopower in interacting systems is proposed. This approach, which relies on Monte Carlo simulations, is illustrated first for a diatomic chain of hard-point elastically colliding particles and then in the case of a one-dimensional gas with (screened) Coulomb interparticle interaction. Numerical simulations up to N>10^{4} particles confirm the general theoretical arguments for momentum-conserving systems and show that the thermoelectric figure of merit increases linearly with the system size.

  7. Shock Interaction with Random Spherical Particle Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Chris; Mehta, Yash; Salari, Kambiz; Jackson, Thomas L.; Balachandar, S. "Bala"; Thakur, Siddharth

    2016-11-01

    In this talk we present results on fully resolved simulations of shock interaction with randomly distributed bed of particles. Multiple simulations were carried out by varying the number of particles to isolate the effect of volume fraction. Major focus of these simulations was to understand 1) the effect of the shockwave and volume fraction on the forces experienced by the particles, 2) the effect of particles on the shock wave, and 3) fluid mediated particle-particle interactions. Peak drag force for particles at different volume fractions show a downward trend as the depth of the bed increased. This can be attributed to dissipation of energy as the shockwave travels through the bed of particles. One of the fascinating observations from these simulations was the fluctuations in different quantities due to presence of multiple particles and their random distribution. These are large simulations with hundreds of particles resulting in large amount of data. We present statistical analysis of the data and make relevant observations. Average pressure in the computational domain is computed to characterize the strengths of the reflected and transmitted waves. We also present flow field contour plots to support our observations. U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  8. Cross-platform, multi-language libraries for ionization and surface interaction effects in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoltz, Peter; Sides, Scott; Sizemore, Nate; Veitzer, Seth; Furman, Miguel; Vay, Jean-Luc

    2006-10-01

    We are developing a library of numerical algorithms for modeling plasma effects such as ionization, secondary electron production, and ion-surface interaction. The goal is to make this library accessible to a large number of researchers by making it available on multiple computing platforms (Linux, Windows, Mac OS X) and available in multiple computing languages (Fortran, C, Python, Java). We discuss our use of the GNU autotools and the Babel utility to accomplish this cross-platform, multi-language interface. We then discuss application of this library within the WARP particle-in-cell code for modeling effects of ion-induced electrons in the High Current Experiment and within the VORPAL particle-in-cell code for modeling kinetic effects in hollow cathode discharges.

  9. Treatment of Electronic Energy Level Transition and Ionization Following the Particle-Based Chemistry Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark

    2010-01-01

    A new method of treating electronic energy level transitions as well as linking ionization to electronic energy levels is proposed following the particle-based chemistry model of Bird. Although the use of electronic energy levels and ionization reactions in DSMC are not new ideas, the current method of selecting what level to transition to, how to reproduce transition rates, and the linking of the electronic energy levels to ionization are, to the author s knowledge, novel concepts. The resulting equilibrium temperatures are shown to remain constant, and the electronic energy level distributions are shown to reproduce the Boltzmann distribution. The electronic energy level transition rates and ionization rates due to electron impacts are shown to reproduce theoretical and measured rates. The rates due to heavy particle impacts, while not as favorable as the electron impact rates, compare favorably to values from the literature. Thus, these new extensions to the particle-based chemistry model of Bird provide an accurate method for predicting electronic energy level transition and ionization rates in gases.

  10. Polarization of silicon detectors by minimum ionizing particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezillie, B.; Eremin, V.; Li, Z.; Verbitskaya, E.

    2000-10-01

    This work presents quantitative predictions of the properties of highly irradiated (e.g. by high-energy particles, up to an equivalent fluence of 1×10 14 n cm -2) silicon detectors operating at cryogenic temperature. It is shown that the exposure to the Minimum Ionising Particle (MIP) with counting rates of about 10 6 cm -2 s -1 can influence the electric field distribution in the detector's sensitive volume. This change in the electric field distribution and its effect on the charge collection efficiency are discussed in the frame of a model based on trapping of carriers generated by MIPs. The experiment was performed at 87 K with an infrared (1030 nm) laser to simulate MIPs.

  11. Charged particle therapy: the physics of interaction.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Antony J

    2009-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long and distinguished history with more than 50,000 patients having been treated, mainly with high-energy proton therapy. Particularly, for proton therapy, there is an increasing interest in exploiting the physical characteristics of charged particles for further improving the potential of radiation therapy. In this article, we review the most important interactions of charged particles with matter and describe the basic physical principles that underlie why particle beams behave the way they do and why such a behavior could bring many benefits in radiation therapy.

  12. The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, G.H.; Hill, B.W.; Brown, N.A.; Babcock, R.C.; Martono, H.; Carey, D.C. |

    1997-02-01

    The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory (PBO Lab) is an educational software concept to aid students and professionals in learning about charged particle beams and particle beam optical systems. The PBO Lab is being developed as a cross-platform application and includes four key elements. The first is a graphic user interface shell that provides for a highly interactive learning session. The second is a knowledge database containing information on electric and magnetic optics transport elements. The knowledge database provides interactive tutorials on the fundamental physics of charged particle optics and on the technology used in particle optics hardware. The third element is a graphical construction kit that provides tools for students to interactively and visually construct optical beamlines. The final element is a set of charged particle optics computational engines that compute trajectories, transport beam envelopes, fit parameters to optical constraints and carry out similar calculations for the student designed beamlines. The primary computational engine is provided by the third-order TRANSPORT code. Augmenting TRANSPORT is the multiple ray tracing program TURTLE and a first-order matrix program that includes a space charge model and support for calculating single particle trajectories in the presence of the beam space charge. This paper describes progress on the development of the PBO Lab. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, George H.; Hill, Barrey W.; Brown, Nathan A.; Babcock, R. Chris; Martono, Hendy; Carey, David C.

    1997-02-01

    The Particle Beam Optics Interactive Computer Laboratory (PBO Lab) is an educational software concept to aid students and professionals in learning about charged particle beams and particle beam optical systems. The PBO Lab is being developed as a cross-platform application and includes four key elements. The first is a graphic user interface shell that provides for a highly interactive learning session. The second is a knowledge database containing information on electric and magnetic optics transport elements. The knowledge database provides interactive tutorials on the fundamental physics of charged particle optics and on the technology used in particle optics hardware. The third element is a graphical construction kit that provides tools for students to interactively and visually construct optical beamlines. The final element is a set of charged particle optics computational engines that compute trajectories, transport beam envelopes, fit parameters to optical constraints and carry out similar calculations for the student designed beamlines. The primary computational engine is provided by the third-order TRANSPORT code. Augmenting TRANSPORT is the multiple ray tracing program TURTLE and a first-order matrix program that includes a space charge model and support for calculating single particle trajectories in the presence of the beam space charge. This paper describes progress on the development of the PBO Lab.

  14. MATRIX-ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION OF SIZE AND COMPOSITION SELECTED AEROSOL PARTICLES. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) was performed on individual,
    size-selected aerosol particles in the 2-8 mu m diameter range, Monodisperse aerosol droplets
    containing matrix, analyte, and solvent were generated and entrained in a dry stream of air, The dr...

  15. Ionizing radiation induces heritable disruption of epithelial cell interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Catherine C.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Talhouk, Rabih; Parvin, Bahram; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a known human breast carcinogen. Although the mutagenic capacity of IR is widely acknowledged as the basis for its action as a carcinogen, we and others have shown that IR can also induce growth factors and extracellular matrix remodeling. As a consequence, we have proposed that an additional factor contributing to IR carcinogenesis is the potential disruption of critical constraints that are imposed by normal cell interactions. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether IR affected the ability of nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo tissue-specific morphogenesis in culture by using confocal microscopy and imaging bioinformatics. We found that irradiated single HMEC gave rise to colonies exhibiting decreased localization of E-cadherin, beta-catenin, and connexin-43, proteins necessary for the establishment of polarity and communication. Severely compromised acinar organization was manifested by the majority of irradiated HMEC progeny as quantified by image analysis. Disrupted cell-cell communication, aberrant cell-extracellular matrix interactions, and loss of tissue-specific architecture observed in the daughters of irradiated HMEC are characteristic of neoplastic progression. These data point to a heritable, nonmutational mechanism whereby IR compromises cell polarity and multicellular organization.

  16. Ionizing radiation induces heritable disruption of epithelial cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Catherine C.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Talhouk, Rabih; Parvin, Bahram; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2003-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is a known human breast carcinogen. Although the mutagenic capacity of IR is widely acknowledged as the basis for its action as a carcinogen, we and others have shown that IR can also induce growth factors and extracellular matrix remodeling. As a consequence, we have proposed that an additional factor contributing to IR carcinogenesis is the potential disruption of critical constraints that are imposed by normal cell interactions. To test this hypothesis, we asked whether IR affected the ability of nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo tissue-specific morphogenesis in culture by using confocal microscopy and imaging bioinformatics. We found that irradiated single HMEC gave rise to colonies exhibiting decreased localization of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and connexin-43, proteins necessary for the establishment of polarity and communication. Severely compromised acinar organization was manifested by the majority of irradiated HMEC progeny as quantified by image analysis. Disrupted cell–cell communication, aberrant cell–extracellular matrix interactions, and loss of tissue-specific architecture observed in the daughters of irradiated HMEC are characteristic of neoplastic progression. These data point to a heritable, nonmutational mechanism whereby IR compromises cell polarity and multicellular organization. PMID:12960393

  17. Current models of the intensely ionizing particle environment in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Effects on MicroElectronics (CREME) model that is currently in use to estimate single event effect rates in spacecraft is described. The CREME model provides a description of the radiation environment in interplanetary space near the orbit of the earth that contains no major deficiencies. The accuracy of the galactic cosmic ray model is limited by the uncertainties in solar modulation. The model for solar energetic particles could be improved by making use of all the data that has been collected on solar energetic particle events. There remain major uncertainties about the environment within the earth's magnetosphere, because of the uncertainties over the charge states of the heavy ions in the anomalous component and solar flares, and because of trapped heavy ions. The present CREME model is valid only at 1 AU, but it could be extended to other parts of the heliosphere. There is considerable data on the radiation environment from 0.2 to 35 AU in the ecliptic plane. This data could be used to extend the CREME model.

  18. Strong field ionization rates simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction and an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Sonk, Jason A.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-05-07

    Ionization rates of molecules have been modeled with time-dependent configuration interaction simulations using atom centered basis sets and a complex absorbing potential. The simulations agree with accurate grid-based calculations for the ionization of hydrogen atom as a function of field strength and for charge resonance enhanced ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} as the bond is elongated. Unlike grid-based methods, the present approach can be applied to simulate electron dynamics and ionization in multi-electron polyatomic molecules. Calculations on HCl{sup +} and HCO{sup +} demonstrate that these systems also show charge resonance enhanced ionization as the bonds are stretched.

  19. Search for lightly ionizing particles using CDMS-II data and fabrication of CDMS detectors with improved homogeneity in properties

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental particles are always observed to carry charges which are integral multiples of one-third charge of electron, e/3. While this is a well established experimental fact, the theoretical understanding for the charge quantization phenomenon is lacking. On the other hand, there exist numerous theoretical models that naturally allow for existence of particles with fractional electromagnetic charge. These particles, if existing, hint towards existence of physics beyond the standard model. Multiple high energy, optical, cosmological and astrophysical considerations restrict the allowable mass-charge parameter space for these fractional charges. Still, a huge unexplored region remains. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II), located at Soudan mines in northern Minnesota, employs germanium and silicon crystals to perform direct searches for a leading candidate to dark matter called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Alternately, the low detection threshold allows search for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent with corresponding \\signatures" resulting from the passage of a fractionally charged particle. In this dissertation, the CDMS-II data is analyzed to search for LIPs, with an expected background of 0.078 0.078 events. No candidate events are observed, allowing exclusion of new parameter space for charges between e/6 and e/200.

  20. Interactive methods for exploring particle simulation data

    SciTech Connect

    Co, Christopher S.; Friedman, Alex; Grote, David P.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Bethel, E. Wes; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2004-05-01

    In this work, we visualize high-dimensional particle simulation data using a suite of scatter plot-based visualizations coupled with interactive selection tools. We use traditional 2D and 3D projection scatter plots as well as a novel oriented disk rendering style to convey various information about the data. Interactive selection tools allow physicists to manually classify ''interesting'' sets of particles that are highlighted across multiple, linked views of the data. The power of our application is the ability to correspond new visual representations of the simulation data with traditional, well understood visualizations. This approach supports the interactive exploration of the high-dimensional space while promoting discovery of new particle behavior.

  1. Capillary interactions between anisotropic colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Loudet, J C; Alsayed, A M; Zhang, J; Yodh, A G

    2005-01-14

    We report on the behavior of micron-sized prolate ellipsoids trapped at an oil-water interface. The particles experience strong, anisotropic, and long-ranged attractive capillary interactions which greatly exceed the thermal energy k(B)T. Depending on surface chemistry, the particles aggregate into open structures or chains. Using video microscopy, we extract the pair interaction potential between ellipsoids and show it exhibits a power law behavior over the length scales probed. Our observations can be explained using recent calculations, if we describe the interfacial ellipsoids as capillary quadrupoles.

  2. Internal waves interacting with particles in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micard, Diane

    2016-04-01

    Internal waves are produced as a consequence of the dynamic balance between buoy- ancy and gravity forces when a particle of fluid is vertically displaced in a stable stratified environment. Geophysical systems such as ocean and atmosphere are naturally stratified and therefore suitable for internal waves to propagate. Furthermore, these two environ- ments stock a vast amount of particles in suspension, which present a large spectrum of physical properties (size, density, shape), and can be organic, mineral or pollutant agents. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect that internal waves will have an active effect over the dynamics of these particles. In order to study the interaction of internal waves and suspended particles, an ide- alized experimental setup has been implemented. A linear stratification is produced in a 80×40×17 cm3 tank, in which two dimensional plane waves are created thanks to the inno- vative wave generator GOAL. In addition, a particle injector has been developed to produce a vertical column of particles within the fluid, displaying the same two-dimensional sym- metry as the waves. The particle injector allows to control the volumic fraction of particles and the size of the column. The presence of internal waves passing through the column of particles allowed to observe two main effects: The column oscillates around an equilibrium position (which is observed in both, the contours an the interior of the column), and the column is displaced as a whole. The column is displaced depending on the characteristics of the column, the gradient of the density, and the intensity and frequency of the wave. When displaced, the particles within the column are sucked towards the source of waves. The direction of the displacement of the column is explained by computing the effect of the Lagrangian drift generated by the wave over the time the particles stay in the wave beam before settling.

  3. Energetic particles and ionization in the nighttime middle and low latitude ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, H. D.; Smith, L. G.

    1977-01-01

    Seven Nike Apache rockets, each equipped with an energetic particle spectrometer (12 E 80 keV) and electron-density experiments, were launched from Wallops Island, Virginia and Chilca, Peru, under varying geomagnetic conditions near midnight. At Wallops Island the energetic particle flux (E 40 keV) is found to be strongly dependent on Kp. The pitch-angle distribution is asymmetrical about a peak at 90 D signifying a predominately quasi-trapped flux and explaining the linear increase of count rate with altitute in the altitude region 120 to 200 km. The height-averaged ionization rates derived from the electron-density profiles are consistent with the rates calculated from the observed total particle flux for magnetic index Kp 3. In the region 90 to 110 km it is found that the nighttime ionization is primarily a result of Ly-beta radiation from the geocorona and interplanetary hydrogen for even very disturbed conditions. Below 90 km during rather disturbed conditions energetic electrons can be a significant ionization source. Two energetic particle precipitation zones have been identified at midlatitudes.

  4. Wave-particle Interactions In Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-01-11

    Wave-particle interactions in E×B rotating plasmas feature an unusual effect: particles are diffused by waves in both potential energy and kinetic energy. This wave-particle interaction generalizes the alpha channeling effect, in which radio frequency waves are used to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. In rotating plasmas, the alpha particles may be removed at low energy through the loss cone, and the energy lost may be transferred to the radial electric field. This eliminates the need for electrodes in the mirror throat, which have presented serious technical issues in past rotating plasma devices. A particularly simple way to achieve this effect is to use a high azimuthal mode number perturbation on the magnetic field. Rotation can also be sustained by waves in plasmas without a kinetic energy source. This type of wave has been considered for plasma centrifuges used for isotope separation. Energy may also be transferred from the electric field to particles or waves, which may be useful for ion heating and energy generation.

  5. Dissipative particle dynamics with attractive and repulsive particle-particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Meakin; Moubin Liu; Hai Huang

    2006-01-01

    In molecular dynamics simulations, a combination of short-range repulsive and long-range attractive interactions allows the behavior of gases, liquids, solids, and multiphase systems to be simulated. We demonstrate that dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations with similar pairwise particle-particle interactions can also be used to simulate the dynamics of multiphase fluids. In these simulations, the positive, short-range, repulsive part of the interaction potentials were represented by polynomial spline functions such as those used as smoothing functions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics, and the negative long-range part of the interaction has the same form but a different range and amplitude. If a single spline function corresponding to a purely repulsive interaction is used, the DPD fluid is a gas, and we show that the Poiseuille flow of this gas can be described accurately by the Navier-Stokes equation at low Reynolds numbers. In a two-component system in which the purely repulsive interactions between different components are substantially larger than the purely repulsive intracomponent interactions, separation into two gas phases occurs, in agreement with results obtained using DPD simulations with standard repulsive particle-particle interactions. Finally, we show that a combination of short-range repulsive interactions and long-range attractive interactions can be used to simulate the behavior of liquid drops surrounded by a gas. Similar models can be used to simulate a wide range of processes such as multiphase fluid flow through fractures and porous media with complex geometries and wetting behaviors.

  6. High energy interactions of cosmic ray particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of seven sessions of the Conference dealing with high energy interactions of cosmic rays are discussed. High energy cross section measurements; particle production-models of experiments; nuclei and nuclear matter; nucleus-nucleus collision; searches for magnetic monopoles; and studies of nucleon decay are covered.

  7. Modeling of particle interactions in magnetorheological elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Biller, A. M. Stolbov, O. V. Raikher, Yu. L.

    2014-09-21

    The interaction between two particles made of an isotropic linearly polarizable magnetic material and embedded in an elastomer matrix is studied. In this case, when an external field is imposed, the magnetic attraction of the particles, contrary to point dipoles, is almost wraparound. The exact solution of the magnetic problem in the linear polarization case, although existing, is not practical; to circumvent its use, an interpolation formula is proposed. One more interpolation expression is developed for the resistance of the elastic matrix to the field-induced particle displacements. Minimization of the total energy of the pair reveals its configurational bistability in a certain field range. One of the possible equilibrium states corresponds to the particles dwelling at a distance, the other—to their collapse in a tight dimer. This mesoscopic bistability causes magnetomechanical hysteresis which has important implications for the macroscopic behavior of magnetorheological elastomers.

  8. From interacting particles to equilibrium statistical ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilievski, Enej; Quinn, Eoin; Caux, Jean-Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    We argue that a particle language provides a conceptually simple framework for the description of anomalous equilibration in isolated quantum systems. We address this paradigm in the context of integrable models, which are those where particles scatter completely elastically and are stable against decay. In particular, we demonstrate that a complete description of equilibrium ensembles for interacting integrable models requires a formulation built from the mode occupation numbers of the underlying particle content, mirroring the case of noninteracting particles. This yields an intuitive physical interpretation of generalized Gibbs ensembles, and reconciles them with the microcanonical ensemble. We explain how previous attempts to identify an appropriate ensemble overlooked an essential piece of information, and provide explicit examples in the context of quantum quenches.

  9. Identifying Carbohydrate Ligands of a Norovirus P Particle using a Catch and Release Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ling; Kitova, Elena N.; Tan, Ming; Jiang, Xi; Klassen, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs), the major cause of epidemic acute gastroenteritis, recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs), which are present as free oligosaccharides in bodily fluid or glycolipids and glycoproteins on the surfaces of cells. The subviral P particle formed by the protruding (P) domain of the NoV capsid protein serves as a useful model for the study NoV-HBGA interactions. Here, we demonstrate the application of a catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay for screening carbohydrate libraries against the P particle to rapidly identify NoV ligands and potential inhibitors. Carbohydrate libraries of 50 and 146 compounds, which included 18 and 24 analogs of HBGA receptors, respectively, were screened against the P particle of VA387, a member of the predominant GII.4 NoVs. Deprotonated ions corresponding to the P particle bound to carbohydrates were isolated and subjected to collision-induced dissociation to release the ligands in their deprotonated forms. The released ligands were identified by ion mobility separation followed by mass analysis. All 13 and 16 HBGA ligands with intrinsic affinities >500 M-1 were identified in the 50 and the 146 compound libraries, respectively. Furthermore, screening revealed interactions with a series of oligosaccharides with structures found in the cell wall of mycobacteria and human milk. The affinities of these newly discovered ligands are comparable to those of the HBGA receptors, as estimated from the relative abundance of released ligand ions.

  10. Alfvén ionization in an MHD-gas interactions code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. D.; Diver, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical model of partially ionized plasmas is developed in order to capture their evolving ionization fractions as a result of Alfvén ionization (AI). The mechanism of, and the parameter regime necessary for, AI is discussed and an expression for the AI rate based on fluid parameters, from a gas-MHD model, is derived. This AI term is added to an existing MHD-gas interactions' code, and the result is a linear, 2D, two-fluid model that includes momentum transfer between charged and neutral species as well as an ionization rate that depends on the velocity fields of both fluids. The dynamics of waves propagating through such a partially ionized plasma are investigated, and it is found that AI has a significant influence on the fluid dynamics as well as both the local and global ionization fraction.

  11. (Research in elementary particles and interactions). [1992

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Schmidt, M.

    1992-05-01

    Research of the Yale University groups in the areas of elementary particles and their interactions are outlined. Work on the following topics is reported: development of CDF trigger system; SSC detector development; study of heavy flavors at TPL; search for composite objects produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions; high-energy polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; rare K{sup +} decays; unpolarized high-energy muon scattering; muon anomalous magnetic moment; theoretical high-energy physics including gauge theories, symmetry breaking, string theory, and gravitation theory; study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions with the SLD detector at SLAC; and the production and decay of particles containing charm and beauty quarks.

  12. Depinning of interacting particles in random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapperi, Stefano; Andrade, José S., Jr.; Mendes Filho, Josué

    2000-06-01

    We study the overdamped motion of interacting particles in a random medium using the model introduced by Pla and Nori [Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 919 (1991)]. We investigate the associated depinning transition by numerical integration of the equation of motion and show evidence that the model is in the same universality class of a driven elastic chain on a rough substrate. We discuss the implications of these results for flux line motion in type-II superconductors.

  13. Interactions between phospholipids and titanium dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Le, Quoc-Chon; Ropers, Marie-Hélène; Terrisse, Hélène; Humbert, Bernard

    2014-11-01

    A systematic study was carried out on monolayer films and lipid vesicles to elucidate the interactions between membrane lipids and commercial particles of titanium dioxide TiO2 (TiO2-P25). Pressure-area isotherms of lipids at various pH values were recorded on a Langmuir trough with or without TiO2-P25 and NaCl in the subphase. Electrophoretic mobilities of lipid vesicles and TiO2-P25 particles were measured to identify the pH range where attractive electrostatic interactions between lipids and TiO2-P25 could take place. The results show that (i) the surface of TiO2-P25 particles interacts only with some phospholipids, (ii) the driving forces are electrostatic and (iii) non-electrostatic interactions were also observed, depending on the molecular structure. More precisely, the phospholipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate monosodium salt (DMPA), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-1-glycerol (DMPG) and 1',3'-bis[1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho]-sn-glycerol (TMCL) interacted strongly with the TiO2-P25 surface through electrostatic interactions, providing they were oppositely charged, i.e. for pH between 2 and 6.6. For TMCL and DMPG, interactions with the surface of TiO2-P25 in non-favourable electrostatic conditions, suggested another kind of binding, probably through the hydroxyl groups of the terminal glycerol. Weaker attractive interactions were demonstrated for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine (DMPS) and the synthetic lipid dihexadecyl phosphate (DHP). For DMPS, the carboxylate group is involved in the adsorption onto TiO2. The other membrane lipids such as 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DMPE) and sphingomyelin (SM) did not interact with TiO2-P25 regardless of pH.

  14. Ionization states of helium in He-3-rich solar energetic particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Moebius, E.; Scholer, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    Results of a systematic study of the ionic charge state of helium in the energy range 0.6-1.0 MeV/nucleon for He-3-rich solar energetic particle events during the time period August 1978 to October 1979 are reported. The data have been obtained with the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland experiment on ISEE-3. Whereas for solar energetic particle events with no enrichment of He-3 relative to He-4 surprisingly large abundances of singly ionized helium have been reported recently, He-3-rich solar energetic particle events do not show significant abundances of He-3(+). This result is consistent with current theories explaining large compositional anomalies by mass per charge dependent selective heating of the minor ion species.

  15. Femtosecond laser ablation particle introduction to a liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Carado, Anthony J.; Quarles, C. Derrick; Duffin, Andrew M.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Russo, Richard E.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Eiden, Gregory C.; Koppenaal, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the use of a compact, liquid sampling – atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) ionization source to ionize metal particles within a laser ablation aerosol. Mass analysis was performed with a Thermo Scientific Exactive Mass Spectrometer which utilizes an orbitrap mass analyzer capable of producing mass resolution exceeding M/ΔM > 160,000. The LS-APGD source generates a low-power plasma between the surface of an electrolytic solution flowing at several µl min-1 through a fused silica capillary and a counter electrode consisting of a stainless steel capillary employed to deliver the laser ablation particles into the plasma. Sample particles of approximately 100 nm were generated with an Applied Spectra femtosecond laser located remotely and transported through 25 meters of polyurethane tubing by means of argon carrier gas. Samples consisted of an oxygen free copper shard, a disk of solder, and a one-cent U.S. coin. Analyte signal onset was readily detectable relative to the background signal produced by the carrier gas alone. The high mass resolution capability of the orbitrap mass spectrometer was demonstrated on the solder sample with resolution exceeding 90,000 for Pb and 160,000 for Cu. In addition, results from a laser ablation depth-profiling experiment of a one cent coin revealed retention of the relative locations of the ~10 µm copper cladding and zinc rich bulk layers.

  16. Information propagation for interacting-particle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, Norbert; Harrison, Sarah K.; Osborne, Tobias J.; Eisert, Jens

    2011-09-15

    We study the speed at which information propagates through systems of interacting quantum particles moving on a regular lattice and show that for a certain class of initial conditions there exists a maximum speed of sound at which information can propagate. Our argument applies equally to quantum spins, bosons such as in the Bose-Hubbard model, fermions, anyons, and general mixtures thereof, on arbitrary lattices of any dimension. It also pertains to dissipative dynamics on the lattice, and generalizes to the continuum for quantum fields. Our result can be seen as an analog of the Lieb-Robinson bound for strongly correlated models.

  17. Laser desorption ionization of small molecules assisted by tungsten oxide and rhenium oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Matthew C; Wysocki, Vicki H; Dagan, Shai

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic metal oxides have shown potential as matrices for assisting in laser desorption ionization with advantages over the aromatic acids typically used. Rhenium and tungsten oxides are attractive options due to their high work functions and relative chemical inertness. In this work, it is shown that ReO3 and WO3 , in microparticle (μP) powder forms, can efficiently facilitate ionization of various types of small molecules and provide minimized background contamination at analyte concentrations below 1 ng/µL. This study shows that untreated inorganic WO3 and ReO3 particles are valid matrix options for detection of protonatable, radical, and precharged species under laser desorption ionization. Qualitatively, the WO3 μP showed improved detection of apigenin, sodiated glucose, and precharged analyte choline, while the ReO3 μP allowed better detection of protonated cocaine, quinuclidine, ametryn, and radical ions of polyaromatic hydrocarbons at detection levels as low as 50 pg/µL. For thermometer ion survival yield experiments, it was also shown that the ReO3 powder was significantly softer than α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnaminic acid. Furthermore, it provided higher intensities of cocaine and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, at laser flux values equal to those used with α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnaminic acid.

  18. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. ); Vaughan, A.T.M. )

    1993-01-01

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the organization of the DNA in chromosomes plays an important role in radiation responses. In this paper, a model is proposed which suggests that these DNA unwinding alterations reflect differences in the attachment of DNA to the nuclear matrix. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure might exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and influencing the rate and nature of DNA double-strand break rejoining.

  19. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Vaughan, A.T.M. . Dept. of Radiotherapy)

    1993-01-01

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the DNA-nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) plays an important role in radiation response. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure may exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and maintaining DNA ends in close proximity for more rapid and accurate rejoining. In addition, the open configuration at these matrix attachment sites may serve to facilitate rapid DNA processing of breaks by providing (1) sites for repair proteins to collect and (2) energy to drive enzymatic reactions.

  20. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.L. |; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1993-03-01

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the DNA-nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) plays an important role in radiation response. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure may exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and maintaining DNA ends in close proximity for more rapid and accurate rejoining. In addition, the open configuration at these matrix attachment sites may serve to facilitate rapid DNA processing of breaks by providing (1) sites for repair proteins to collect and (2) energy to drive enzymatic reactions.

  1. Charge Identification of Highly Ionizing Particles in Desensitized Nuclear Emulsion Using High Speed Read-Out System

    SciTech Connect

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Kanazawa, M.; Kanematsu, N.; Komori, M.; Sato, S.; Asai, M.; /Nagoya U. /Aichi U. of Education /Gunma U., Maebashi /JAXA, Sagamihara /KEK, Tsukuba /Kobe U. /Chiba, Natl. Inst. Rad. Sci. /SLAC /Toho U.

    2006-05-10

    We performed an experimental study of charge identification of heavy ions from helium to carbon having energy of about 290 MeV/u using an emulsion chamber. Emulsion was desensitized by means of forced fading (refreshing) to expand a dynamic range of response to highly charged particles. For the track reconstruction and charge identification, the fully automated high speed emulsion read-out system, which was originally developed for identifying minimum ionizing particles, was used without any modification. Clear track by track charge identification up to Z=6 was demonstrated. The refreshing technique has proved to be a powerful technique to expand response of emulsion film to highly ionizing particles.

  2. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter.

    PubMed

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S

    2016-03-11

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01M_{p} is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter.

  3. Planckian Interacting Massive Particles as Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garny, Mathias; Sandora, McCullen; Sloth, Martin S.

    2016-03-01

    The standard model could be self-consistent up to the Planck scale according to the present measurements of the Higgs boson mass and top quark Yukawa coupling. It is therefore possible that new physics is only coupled to the standard model through Planck suppressed higher dimensional operators. In this case the weakly interacting massive particle miracle is a mirage, and instead minimality as dictated by Occam's razor would indicate that dark matter is related to the Planck scale, where quantum gravity is anyway expected to manifest itself. Assuming within this framework that dark matter is a Planckian interacting massive particle, we show that the most natural mass larger than 0.01 Mp is already ruled out by the absence of tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This also indicates that we expect tensor modes in the CMB to be observed soon for this type of minimal dark matter model. Finally, we touch upon the Kaluza-Klein graviton mode as a possible realization of this scenario within UV complete models, as well as further potential signatures and peculiar properties of this type of dark matter candidate. This paradigm therefore leads to a subtle connection between quantum gravity, the physics of primordial inflation, and the nature of dark matter.

  4. Dynamics of two interacting active Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, Parvin; Najafi, Ali

    2016-04-01

    Starting from a microscopic model for a spherically symmetric active Janus particle, we study the interactions between two such active motors. The ambient fluid mediates a long range hydrodynamic interaction between two motors. This interaction has both direct and indirect hydrodynamic contributions. The direct contribution is due to the propagation of fluid flow that originated from a moving motor and affects the motion of the other motor. The indirect contribution emerges from the re-distribution of the ionic concentrations in the presence of both motors. Electric force exerted on the fluid from this ionic solution enhances the flow pattern and subsequently changes the motion of both motors. By formulating a perturbation method for very far separated motors, we derive analytic results for the translation and rotational dynamics of the motors. We show that the overall interaction at the leading order modifies the translational and rotational speeds of motors which scale as O (" separators=" [ 1 / D ] 3 ) and O (" separators=" [ 1 / D ] 4 ) with their separation, respectively. Our findings open up the way for studying the collective dynamics of synthetic micro-motors.

  5. Entropic Ratchet transport of interacting active Brownian particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Bao-Quan; He, Ya-Feng; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2014-11-21

    Directed transport of interacting active (self-propelled) Brownian particles is numerically investigated in confined geometries (entropic barriers). The self-propelled velocity can break thermodynamical equilibrium and induce the directed transport. It is found that the interaction between active particles can greatly affect the ratchet transport. For attractive particles, on increasing the interaction strength, the average velocity first decreases to its minima, then increases, and finally decreases to zero. For repulsive particles, when the interaction is very weak, there exists a critical interaction at which the average velocity is minimal, nearly tends to zero, however, for the strong interaction, the average velocity is independent of the interaction.

  6. Evaluation of an electrostatic particle ionization technology for decreasing airborne pathogens in pigs.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Carmen; Raynor, Peter C; Davies, Peter R; Morrison, Robert B; Torremorell, Montserrat

    Influenza A virus (IAV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and Staphylococcus aureus are important swine pathogens capable of being transmitted via aerosols. The electrostatic particle ionization system (EPI) consists of a conductive line that emits negative ions that charge particles electrically resulting in the settling of airborne particles onto surfaces and potentially decreasing the risk of pathogen dissemination. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of the EPI system on the quantity and viability of IAV, PRRSV, PEDV and S. aureus in experimentally generated aerosols and in aerosols generated by infected animals. Efficiency at removing airborne particles was evaluated as a function of particle size (ranging from 0.4 to 10 µm), distance from the source of ions (1, 2 and 3 m) and relative air humidity (RH 30 vs. 70 %). Aerosols were sampled with the EPI system "off" and "on." Removal efficiency was significantly greater for all pathogens when the EPI line was the closest to the source of aerosols. There was a greater reduction for larger particles ranging between 3.3 and 9 µm, which varied by pathogen. Overall airborne pathogen reduction ranged between 0.5 and 1.9 logs. Viable pathogens were detected with the EPI system "on," but there was a trend to reducing the quantity of viable PRRSV and IAV. There was not a significant effect on the pathogens removal efficiency based on the RH conditions tested. In summary, distance to the source of ions, type of pathogen and particle size influenced the removal efficiency of the EPI system. The reduction in infectious agents in the air by the EPI technology could potentially decrease the microbial exposure for pigs and people in confinement livestock facilities.

  7. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  8. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of laser interaction with weakly ionized helium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li Huayu; Ki, Hyungson

    2010-07-15

    This paper presents a lattice Boltzmann method for laser interaction with weakly ionized plasmas considering electron impact ionization and three-body recombination. To simulate with physical properties of plasmas, the authors' previous work on the rescaling of variables is employed and the electromagnetic fields are calculated from the Maxwell equations by using the finite-difference time-domain method. To calculate temperature fields, energy equations are derived separately from the Boltzmann equations. In this way, we attempt to solve the full governing equations for plasma dynamics. With the developed model, the continuous-wave CO{sub 2} laser interaction with helium is simulated successfully.

  9. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of laser interaction with weakly ionized helium plasmas.

    PubMed

    Li, Huayu; Ki, Hyungson

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a lattice Boltzmann method for laser interaction with weakly ionized plasmas considering electron impact ionization and three-body recombination. To simulate with physical properties of plasmas, the authors' previous work on the rescaling of variables is employed and the electromagnetic fields are calculated from the Maxwell equations by using the finite-difference time-domain method. To calculate temperature fields, energy equations are derived separately from the Boltzmann equations. In this way, we attempt to solve the full governing equations for plasma dynamics. With the developed model, the continuous-wave CO2 laser interaction with helium is simulated successfully.

  10. On the turbulent heating and the threshold condition in the critical ionization velocity interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebius, E.; Papadopoulos, K.; Piel, A.

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of the nonlinear treatment of the ion beam instability and the modified two-stream instability, threshold conditions for the critical ionization velocity interaction are derived. There are three different regimes of interaction: (1) additional ionization for relative velocities smaller than the critical velocity, (2) the self-sustained discharge for velocities greater than the critical velocity which indeed turns out as a sharp threshold, and (3) an explosive growth regime for velocities exceeding 1.5 times the critical velocity. Additional charge exchange collisions of ions and energy loss of electrons due to excitation do not change the basic threshold behavior but modify the value of the critical velocity.

  11. Monte Carlo approach to calculate ionization dynamics of hot solid-density plasmas within particle-in-cell simulations.

    PubMed

    Wu, D; He, X T; Yu, W; Fritzsche, S

    2017-02-01

    A physical model based on a Monte Carlo approach is proposed to calculate the ionization dynamics of hot-solid-density plasmas within particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and where the impact (collision) ionization (CI), electron-ion recombination (RE), and ionization potential depression (IPD) by surrounding plasmas are taken into consideration self-consistently. When compared with other models, which are applied in the literature for plasmas near thermal equilibrium, the temporal relaxation of ionization dynamics can also be simulated by the proposed model. Besides, this model is general and can be applied for both single elements and alloys with quite different compositions. The proposed model is implemented into a PIC code, with (final) ionization equilibriums sustained by competitions between CI and its inverse process (i.e., RE). Comparisons between the full model and model without IPD or RE are performed. Our results indicate that for bulk aluminium at temperature of 1 to 1000 eV, (i) the averaged ionization degree increases by including IPD; while (ii) the averaged ionization degree is significantly over estimated when the RE is neglected. A direct comparison from the PIC code is made with the existing models for the dependence of averaged ionization degree on thermal equilibrium temperatures and shows good agreements with that generated from Saha-Boltzmann model and/or FLYCHK code.

  12. Monte Carlo approach to calculate ionization dynamics of hot solid-density plasmas within particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D.; He, X. T.; Yu, W.; Fritzsche, S.

    2017-02-01

    A physical model based on a Monte Carlo approach is proposed to calculate the ionization dynamics of hot-solid-density plasmas within particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, and where the impact (collision) ionization (CI), electron-ion recombination (RE), and ionization potential depression (IPD) by surrounding plasmas are taken into consideration self-consistently. When compared with other models, which are applied in the literature for plasmas near thermal equilibrium, the temporal relaxation of ionization dynamics can also be simulated by the proposed model. Besides, this model is general and can be applied for both single elements and alloys with quite different compositions. The proposed model is implemented into a PIC code, with (final) ionization equilibriums sustained by competitions between CI and its inverse process (i.e., RE). Comparisons between the full model and model without IPD or RE are performed. Our results indicate that for bulk aluminium at temperature of 1 to 1000 eV, (i) the averaged ionization degree increases by including IPD; while (ii) the averaged ionization degree is significantly over estimated when the RE is neglected. A direct comparison from the PIC code is made with the existing models for the dependence of averaged ionization degree on thermal equilibrium temperatures and shows good agreements with that generated from Saha-Boltzmann model and/or FLYCHK code.

  13. Shock Particle Interaction - Fully Resolved Simulations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Yash; Neal, Chris; Jackson, Thomas L.; Balachandar, S. "Bala"; Thakur, Siddharth

    2016-11-01

    Currently there is a substantial lack of fully resolved data for shock interacting with multiple particles. In this talk we will fill this gap by presenting results of shock interaction with 1-D array and 3-D structured arrays of particles. Objectives of performing fully resolved simulations of shock propagation through packs of multiple particles are twofold, 1) To understand the complicated physical phenomena occurring during shock particle interaction, and 2) To translate the knowledge from microscale simulations in building next generation point-particle models for macroscale simulations that can better predict the motion (forces) and heat transfer for particles. We compare results from multiple particle simulations against the single particle simulations and make relevant observations. The drag history and flow field for multiple particle simulations are markedly different from those of single particle simluations, highlighting the effect of neighboring particles. We propose new models which capture this effect of neighboring particles. These models are called Pair-wise Interaction Extended Point Particle models (PIEP). Effect of multiple neighboring particles is broken down into pair-wise interactions, and these pair-wise interactions are superimposed to get the final model U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  14. Numerical studies of wall-plasma interactions and ionization phenomena in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Zeng, Guangshang; Tang, Haibin; Huang, Yuping; Liu, Xiangyang

    2016-07-01

    Wall-plasma interactions excited by ablation controlled arcs are very critical physical processes in pulsed plasma thrusters (PPTs). Their effects on the ionization processes of ablated vapor into discharge plasma directly determine PPT performances. To reveal the physics governing the ionization phenomena in PPT discharge, a modified model taking into account the pyrolysis effect of heated polytetrafluoroethylene propellant on the wall-plasma interactions was developed. The feasibility of the modified model was analyzed by creating a one-dimensional simulation of a rectangular ablative PPT. The wall-plasma interaction results based on this modified model were found to be more realistic than for the unmodified model; this reflects the dynamic changes of the inflow parameters during discharge in our model. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial variations of the different plasma species in the discharge chamber were numerically studied. The numerical studies showed that polytetrafluoroethylene plasma was mainly composed of monovalent ions; carbon and fluorine ions were concentrated in the upstream and downstream discharge chamber, respectively. The results based on this modified model were in good agreement with the experimental formation times of the various plasma species. A large number of short-lived and highly ionized carbon and fluorine species (divalent and trivalent ions) were created during initial discharge. These highly ionized species reached their peak density earlier than the singly ionized species.

  15. Computation of axisymmetric and ionized hypersonic flows using particle and continuum methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain D.; Gokcen, Tahir

    1994-01-01

    Comparisons between particle and continuum simulations of hypersonic near-continuum flows are presented. The particle approach employs the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, and the continuum approach solves the appropriate equations of fluid flow. Both simulations have thermochemistry models for air implemented including ionization. A new axisymmetric DSMC code that is efficiently vectorized is developed for this study. In this DSMC code, particular attention is paid to matching the relaxation rates employed in the continuum approach. This investigation represents a continuum of a previous study that considered thermochemical relaxation in one-dimensional shock waves of nitrogen. Comparison of the particle and continuum methods is first made for an axisymmetric blunt-body flow of air at 7 km/s. Very good agreement is obtained for the two solutions. The two techniques also compare well for a one-dimensional shock wave in air at 10 km/s. In both applications, the results are found to be sensitive to various aspects of the chemistry model employed.

  16. Computation of axisymmetric and ionized flows using particle and continuum methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Iain D.; Gokcen, Tahir

    1993-01-01

    Comparisons between particle and continuum simulations of hypersonic near-continuum flows are presented. The particle approach employs the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC), and the continuum approach solves the Euler equations. Both simulations have thermochemistry models for air implemented including ionization. A new axisymmetric DSMC code which is efficiently vectorized is developed for this study. In this DSMC code, particular attention is paid to matching the relaxation rates employed in the continuum approach. This investigation represents a continuation of a previous study which considered thermochemical relaxation in one-dimensional shock waves of nitrogen. Comparison of the particle and continuum methods is first made for an axisymmetric blunt-body flow of air at 7 km/s. Very good agreement is obtained for the two solutions. The two techniques also compare well for a one-dimensional shock wave in air at 10 km/s. In both applications, the results are found to be sensitive to various aspects of the chemistry models employed.

  17. Laser Desorption Ionization of small molecules assisted by Tungsten oxide and Rhenium oxide particles

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Matthew; Wysocki, Vicki; Dagan, Shai

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic metal oxides have shown potential as matrices for assisting in laser desorption ionization (LDI) with advantages over the aromatic acids typically used. Rhenium and tungsten oxides are an attractive option due to their high work functions and relative chemical inertness. In this work, it is shown that ReO3 and WO3, in microparticle (μP) powder forms, can efficiently ionize various types of small molecules and provide minimized background contamination at analyte concentrations below 1 ng/μL. This study shows that untreated inorganic WO3 and ReO3 particles are valid matrix options for detection of protonatable, radical, and precharged species under LDI. Qualitatively, the WO3 μP showed an improved detection of apigenin, sodiated glucose, and the precharged analyte choline, while the ReO3 μP allowed detection of protonated cocaine, quinuclidine, ametryn, and radical ions of polyaromatic hydrocarbons at detection levels as low as 50 pg/μL. For thermometer ion survival yield experiments, it was also shown that the ReO3 powder was significantly softer than CCA. Furthermore, it provided higher intensities of cocaine and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, at laser flux values equal to that used with CCA. PMID:26349643

  18. Energy-Dependent Ionization States of Shock-Accelerated Particles in the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.; Ng, C. K.; Tylka, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    We examine the range of possible energy dependence of the ionization states of ions that are shock-accelerated from the ambient plasma of the solar corona. If acceleration begins in a region of moderate density, sufficiently low in the corona, ions above about 0.1 MeV/amu approach an equilibrium charge state that depends primarily upon their speed and only weakly on the plasma temperature. We suggest that the large variations of the charge states with energy for ions such as Si and Fe observed in the 1997 November 6 event are consistent with stripping in moderately dense coronal. plasma during shock acceleration. In the large solar-particle events studied previously, acceleration occurs sufficiently high in the corona that even Fe ions up to 600 MeV/amu are not stripped of electrons.

  19. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionization energy loss in p p collisions at √{s }=13 TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, Bh; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a search for massive charged long-lived particles produced in p p collisions at √{s }=13 TeV at the LHC using the ATLAS experiment. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1. Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of massive charged long-lived particles, such as R -hadrons. These massive particles are expected to be produced with a velocity significantly below the speed of light, and therefore to have a specific ionization higher than any Standard Model particle of unit charge at high momenta. The Pixel subsystem of the ATLAS detector is used to measure the ionization energy loss of reconstructed charged particles and to search for such highly ionizing particles. The search presented here has much greater sensitivity than a similar search performed using the ATLAS detector in the √{s }=8 TeV data set, thanks to the increase in expected signal cross section due to the higher center-of-mass energy of collisions, to an upgraded detector with a new silicon layer close to the interaction point, and to analysis improvements. No significant deviation from Standard Model background expectations is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R -hadron production cross sections and masses are set. Gluino R -hadrons with lifetimes above 0.4 ns and decaying to q q ¯ plus a 100 GeV neutralino are excluded at the 95% confidence level, with lower mass limit ranging between 740 and 1590 GeV. In the case of stable R -hadrons the lower mass limit at the 95% confidence level is 1570 GeV.

  20. Novel lutetium spectroscopic interactions via cw RIMS (Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry)

    SciTech Connect

    Fearey, B.L.; Miller, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    Novel spectroscopic interactions of argon-ion laser enhanced resonance ionization of lutetium are observed and discussed; these include line-narrowing, non-linear power dependences and anomalous optical pumping effects of the hyperfine transitions. In addition, isotopically saturation dip spectra are observed and presented, allowing for precise determination of hyperfine constants of rare isotopes. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Ring particles - Collisional interactions and physical nature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Davis, D. R.; Greenberg, R.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the properties of, and dynamical processes affecting individual particles of Saturn's rings. Because particles tend to be gravitationally bound when located on the surfaces of larger particles, and since net tidal stresses within the particles are small, particle collisions should produce accretion in Saturn's rings. Rapid accretionary processes within the rings are counterbalanced by tidal disruption of the larger accreted aggregates, which are presently designated 'dynamic ephemeral bodies'. The coefficient of restitution is probably very low, implying that the large particles containing most of the rings' mass are in a monolayer, although the small particles responsible for most of the rings' visible cross section form a layer many particles thick. Kinematic viscosity and interparticle erosive process models should incorporate these properties.

  2. On the Relation of Wave-Particle Interactions, Particle Dynamics, and Suprathermal Particle Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharek, Harald; Galvin, Antoinette; Farrugia, Charles; Klecker, Berndt; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    Wave-particle interactions, ion acceleration, and magnetic turbulence are closely interlinked and the physical processes may occur on different scales. These scales range from the kinetic scale to the macro-scale (MHD-scale). These processes are likely universal and the same basic processes occur at the Earth's environment, at the Earth's bow shock, the solar wind, and around the heliosphere. Undoubtedly, the Earth's environment as well as the close interplanetary space are the best plasma environments to study these processes using satellite measurements. Recently, ACE, STEREO, IBEX and Voyager observations clearly showed that turbulence and wave-particle interactions and turbulence are extremely important in interplanetary space and in the heliosphere. Using data from STEREO, Wind, we have investigated the spectral properties of suprathermal ion distributions. The results show that spectral slopes are very variable and depend on the plasma properties. We have also performed 3D hybrid simulations and studied particle dynamics. These simulations show that the particle dynamics in the turbulent magnetic wave field is Levy-Flight like which leads to a kappa distribution, which is often found in various space environments. This result is very significant of future mission such as THOR and IMAP and current operating missions such as STEREO, IBEX, and MMS.

  3. Algorithm for Computing Particle/Surface Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David W.

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm has been devised for predicting the behaviors of sparsely spatially distributed particles impinging on a solid surface in a rarefied atmosphere. Under the stated conditions, prior particle-transport models in which (1) dense distributions of particles are treated as continuum fluids; or (2) sparse distributions of particles are considered to be suspended in and to diffuse through fluid streams are not valid.

  4. Internal bremsstrahlung of strongly interacting charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurgalin, S. D.; Tchuvil'sky, Yu. M.; Churakova, T. A.

    2016-11-01

    A universal theoretical model intended for calculating internal-bremsstrahlung spectra is proposed. In this model, which can be applied to describing nuclear decays of various type (such as alpha decay, cluster decay, and proton emission), use is made of realistic nucleus-nucleus potentials. Theoretical internal-bremsstrahlung spectra were obtained for the alpha decay of the 214Po nucleus, as well as for the decay of the 222Ra nucleus via the emission of a 14C cluster and for the decay of the 113Cs nucleus via proton emission, and the properties of these spectra were studied. The contributions of various regions (internal, subbarrier, and external) to the internal-bremsstrahlung amplitude were analyzed in detail. It is shown that the contribution of the internal region to the amplitude for internal bremsstrahlung generated in nuclear decay via proton emission is quite large, but that this is not so for alpha decay and decay via cluster emission. Thus, a process in which strong interaction of nuclear particles affects the internal-bremsstrahlung spectrum if found.

  5. Dust particle charge screening in the dry-air plasma produced by an external ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, I. N.; Filippov, A. V.

    2015-08-15

    The ionic composition of the plasma produced by an external ionization source in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature and the screening of the electric field of a dust particle in such a plasma have been investigated. The point sink model based on the diffusion-drift approximation has been used to solve the screening problem. We have established that the main species of ions in the plasma under consideration are O{sub 4}{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup -}, and O{sub 4}{sup -} and that the dust particle potential distribution is described by a superposition of four exponentials with four different constants. We show that the first constant coincides with the inverse Debye length, the second is described by the inverse ambipolar diffusion length of the positive and negative plasma components in the characteristic time of their recombination, the third is determined by the conversion of negative ions, and the fourth is determined by the attachment and recombination of electrons and diatomic ions.

  6. DNA Damage by Ionizing Radiation: Tandem Double Lesions by Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Wang, Dunyou; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation are the source of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, damage to the central nervous system, lowering of the immune response, as well as other radiation-induced damages to human health. Monte Carlo track simulations and kinetic modeling of radiation damages to the DNA employ available molecular and cellular data to simulate the biological effect of high and low LET radiation io the DNA. While the simulations predict single and double strand breaks and base damages, so far all complex lesions are the result of stochastic coincidence from independent processes. Tandem double lesions have not yet been taken into account. Unlike the standard double lesions that are produced by two separate attacks by charged particles or radicals, tandem double lesions are produced by one single attack. The standard double lesions dominate at the high dosage regime. On the other hand, tandem double lesions do not depend on stochastic coincidences and become important at the low dosage regime of particular interest to NASA. Tandem double lesions by hydroxyl radical attack of guanine in isolated DNA have been reported at a dosage of radiation as low as 10 Gy. The formation of two tandem base lesions was found to be linear with the applied doses, a characteristic of tandem lesions. However, tandem double lesions from attack by a charged particle have not been reported.

  7. Protective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide on labile protein interactions during electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Landreh, Michael; Alvelius, Gunvor; Johansson, Jan; Jörnvall, Hans

    2014-05-06

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is a valuable tool to probe noncovalent interactions. However, the integrity of the interactions in the gas-phase is heavily influenced by the ionization process. Investigating oligomerization and ligand binding of transthyretin (TTR) and the chaperone domain from prosurfactant protein C, we found that dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) can improve the stability of the noncovalent interactions during the electrospray process, both regarding ligand binding and the protein quaternary structure. Low amounts of DMSO can reduce in-source dissociation of native protein oligomers and their interactions with hydrophobic ligands, even under destabilizing conditions. We interpret the effects of DMSO as being derived from its enrichment in the electrospray droplets during evaporation. Protection of labile interactions can arise from the decrease in ion charges to reduce the contributions from Coulomb repulsions, as well as from the cooling effect of adduct dissociation. The protective effects of DMSO on labile protein interactions are an important property given its widespread use in protein analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

  8. Probing spin-orbit-interaction-induced electron dynamics in the carbon atom by multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, H. F.; van der Hart, H. W.

    2014-09-01

    We use R-matrix theory with time dependence (RMT) to investigate multiphoton ionization of ground-state atomic carbon with initial orbital magnetic quantum number ML=0 and ML=1 at a laser wavelength of 390 nm and peak intensity of 1014W/cm2. Significant differences in ionization yield and ejected-electron momentum distribution are observed between the two values for ML. We use our theoretical results to model how the spin-orbit interaction affects electron emission along the laser polarization axis. Under the assumption that an initial C atom is prepared at zero time delay with ML=0, the dynamics with respect to time delay of an ionizing probe pulse modeled by using RMT theory is found to be in good agreement with available experimental data.

  9. Particle-in-cell simulations of the critical ionization velocity effect in finite size clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Lu, G.; Goertz, C. K.; Nishikawa, K. - I.

    1994-01-01

    The critical ionization velocity (CIV) mechanism in a finite size cloud is studied with a series of electrostatic particle-in-cell simulations. It is observed that an initial seed ionization, produced by non-CIV mechanisms, generates a cross-field ion beam which excites a modified beam-plasma instability (MBPI) with frequency in the range of the lower hybrid frequency. The excited waves accelerate electrons along the magnetic field up to the ion drift energy that exceeds the ionization energy of the neutral atoms. The heated electrons in turn enhance the ion beam by electron-neutral impact ionization, which establishes a positive feedback loop in maintaining the CIV process. It is also found that the efficiency of the CIV mechanism depends on the finite size of the gas cloud in the following ways: (1) Along the ambient magnetic field the finite size of the cloud, L (sub parallel), restricts the growth of the fastest growing mode, with a wavelength lambda (sub m parallel), of the MBPI. The parallel electron heating at wave saturation scales approximately as (L (sub parallel)/lambda (sub m parallel)) (exp 1/2); (2) Momentum coupling between the cloud and the ambient plasma via the Alfven waves occurs as a result of the finite size of the cloud in the direction perpendicular to both the ambient magnetic field and the neutral drift. This reduces exponentially with time the relative drift between the ambient plasma and the neutrals. The timescale is inversely proportional to the Alfven velocity. (3) The transvers e charge separation field across the cloud was found to result in the modulation of the beam velocity which reduces the parallel heating of electrons and increases the transverse acceleration of electrons. (4) Some energetic electrons are lost from the cloud along the magnetic field at a rate characterized by the acoustic velocity, instead of the electron thermal velocity. The loss of energetic electrons from the cloud seems to be larger in the direction of

  10. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of repulsive particle-particle and particle-wall interactions: Coughing and choking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başaǧaoǧlu, Hakan; Succi, Sauro

    2010-04-01

    We propose and numerically investigate a new particle retention mechanism for particle entrapment in creeping flows in a constricted section of a saturated rough-walled narrow flow channel. We hypothesize that particles, whose size is smaller than channel width, can be temporarily or permanently immobilized in a flow channel away from channel walls due to particle-particle and particle-wall repulsive potentials, and, consequently, the flow field is clogged temporarily (coughing) or permanently (choking). Two mathematically simplified repulsive particle-particle and particle-wall interaction potentials are incorporated into a two-dimensional colloidal lattice-Boltzmann model. These potentials are two-body Lennard-Jones 12 and screened electrostatic repulsive potentials. Numerical simulations reveal that unlike in smooth-walled flow channels, particles are entrapped away from rough-walled channel walls and subsequently clog the flow field if fluid-drag and repulsive forces on particles are in balance. Off-balance forces, however, could result in temporary clogging if repulsive forces are stronger on the advancing edge of a particle than on its trailing edge. The new conceptualization and two-particle numerical simulations successfully captured (i) temporary entrapment of two particles (coughing), (ii) temporary entrapment of one of the particles with permanent entrapment of the other particle (coughing-choking), and (iii) permanent entrapment of both particles (choking) as a function of repulsive interaction strength.

  11. Surface electrical properties of coal particles on interaction with polyelectrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Evmenova, G.L.

    2006-07-15

    The paper presents experimental data obtained in determining an electrokinetic potential of coal particles during their interaction with coagulation and flocculation agents. It is established that flocculation agents allow decreasing electrokinetic potential of mineral particles up to the values that promote aggregation of the particles thereby enabling the control over the stability of coal dispersions.

  12. Electrostatic interaction between colloidal particles trapped at an electrolyte interface.

    PubMed

    Majee, Arghya; Bier, Markus; Dietrich, S

    2014-04-28

    The electrostatic interaction between colloidal particles trapped at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions is studied in the limit of small inter-particle distances. Within an appropriate model analytic expressions for the electrostatic potential as well as for the surface and line interaction energies are obtained. They demonstrate that the widely used superposition approximation, which is commonly applied to large distances between the colloidal particles, fails qualitatively at small distances, and is quantitatively unreliable even at large distances. Our results contribute to an improved description of the interaction between colloidal particles trapped at fluid interfaces.

  13. The interaction of an ionizing ligand with enzymes having a single ionizing group. Implications for the reaction of folate analogues with dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Stone, S R; Morrison, J F

    1983-06-29

    Binding theory has been developed for the reaction of an ionizing enzyme with an ionizing ligand. Consideration has been given to the most general scheme in which all possible reactions and interconversions occur as well as to schemes in which certain interactions do not take place. Equations have been derived in terms of the variation of the apparent dissociation constant (Kiapp) as a function of pH. These equations indicate that plots of pKiapp against pH can be wave-, half-bell- or bell-shaped according to the reactions involved. A wave is obtained whenever there is formation of the enzyme-ligand complexes, ionized enzyme . ionized ligand and protonated enzyme . protonated ligand. The additional formation of singly protonated enzyme-ligand complexes does not affect the wave form of the plot, but can influence the shape of the overall curve. The formation of either ionized enzyme . ionized ligand or protonated enzyme . protonated ligand, with or without singly protonated enzyme-ligand species, gives rise to a half-bell-shaped plot. If only singly protonated enzyme-ligand complexes are formed the plots are bell-shaped, but it is not possible to deduce the ionic forms of the reactants that participate in complex formation. Depending on the reaction pathways, true values for the ionization and dissociation constants may or may not be determined.

  14. Elementary Particle Interactions with CMS at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Spanier, Stefan

    2016-07-31

    The High Energy Particle Physics group of the University of Tennessee participates in the search for new particles and forces in proton-proton collisions at the LHC with the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment. Since the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012, the search has intensified to find new generations of particles beyond the standard model using the higher collision energies and ever increasing luminosity, either directly or via deviations from standard model predictions such as the Higgs boson decays. As part of this effort, the UTK group has expanded the search for new particles in four-muon final states, and in final states with jets, has successfully helped and continues to help to implement and operate an instrument for improved measurements of the luminosity needed for all data analyses, and has continued to conduct research of new technologies for charged particle tracking at a high-luminosity LHC.

  15. Forest canopy interactions with nucleation mode particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Hornsby, K. E.; Novick, K. A.

    2014-07-01

    Forests play a key role in removal of particles from the atmosphere but may also significantly contribute to formation and growth of ultrafine particles. Ultrafine particle size distributions through a deciduous forest canopy indicate substantial capture of nucleation mode particles by the foliage. Concentrations decline with depth into the canopy, such that nucleation mode number concentrations at the bottom of the canopy are an average of 16% lower than those at the top. However, growth rates of nucleation mode particles (diameters 6-30 nm) are invariant with height within the canopy, which implies that the semi-volatile gases contributing to their growth are comparatively well-mixed through the canopy. Growth rates of nucleation mode particles during a meteorological drought year (2012) were substantially lower than during a meteorologically normal year with high soil water potential (2013). This may reflect suppression of actual BVOC emissions by drought and thus reduced production of condensable products (and thus particle growth) during the drought-affected vegetation season. This hypothesis is supported by evidence that growth rates during the normal year exhibit a positive correlation with emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) modeled based on observed forest composition, leaf area index, temperature and PAR, but particle growth rates during the drought-affected vegetation season are not correlated with modeled BVOC emissions. These data thus provide direct evidence for the importance of canopy capture in atmospheric particle budgets and indirect evidence that drought-stress in forests may reduce BVOC emissions and limit growth of nucleation mode particles to climate-relevant sizes.

  16. Kinetic equation for nonlinear resonant wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Mourenas, D.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the nonlinear resonant wave-particle interactions including the effects of particle (phase) trapping, detrapping, and scattering by high-amplitude coherent waves. After deriving the relationship between probability of trapping and velocity of particle drift induced by nonlinear scattering (phase bunching), we substitute this relation and other characteristic equations of wave-particle interaction into a kinetic equation for the particle distribution function. The final equation has the form of a Fokker-Planck equation with peculiar advection and collision terms. This equation fully describes the evolution of particle momentum distribution due to particle diffusion, nonlinear drift, and fast transport in phase-space via trapping. Solutions of the obtained kinetic equation are compared with results of test particle simulations.

  17. Stellar and ionized gas kinematics of the interacting Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC 2992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Lorenzo, B.; Arribas, S.; Mediavilla, E.

    2001-11-01

    Integral field spectroscopy in the central 16''x 12'' (2.4 kpc x 1.8 kpc, if H0 = 75 km s-1 Mpc-1) of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC 2992 has been obtained using the fibre system INTEGRAL. The data are mainly used to study the stellar and ionized gas kinematics. In spite of the photometric disruptions in the outer parts (r > 6 kpc) produced by the interaction with its close companion (NGC 2993), the present stellar velocity field shows regular rotation. The ionized gas presents several kinematically distinct components. Apart from the outflowing component already reported by other authors, we found an additional (high ionization) kinematic component which seems to be associated with the boundaries of the figure-of-eight-shaped emission detected in the 6 cm radio map. We locate the hidden nucleus in the apex of the biconical structure defined by the [O iii] emission, coincident with the outflow origin and with the center of the dust lane. We do not find any clear evidence of direct influence of the interaction in the kinematics of the stars or the ionized gas in the circumnuclear region of NGC 2992.

  18. Field ionization model implemented in Particle In Cell code and applied to laser-accelerated carbon ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nuter, R.; Gremillet, L.; Lefebvre, E.; Levy, A.; Ceccotti, T.; Martin, P.

    2011-03-15

    A novel numerical modeling of field ionization in PIC (Particle In Cell) codes is presented. Based on the quasistatic approximation of the ADK (Ammosov Delone Krainov) theory and implemented through a Monte Carlo scheme, this model allows for multiple ionization processes. Two-dimensional PIC simulations are performed to analyze the cut-off energies of the laser-accelerated carbon ions measured on the UHI 10 Saclay facility. The influence of the target and the hydrocarbon pollutant composition on laser-accelerated carbon ion energies is demonstrated.

  19. Theoretical and observational analysis of individual ionizing particle effects in biological tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.C.

    1980-11-01

    The microstructural damage to living tissue caused by heavy ion radiation was studied. Preliminary tests on rat corneal tissue, rat cerebellar tissue grown in culture, and rat retinal tissue indicated that the best assay for heavy ion damage is the rat cornea. The corneal tissue of the living rat was exposed to beams of carbon at 474 MeV/amu, neon at 8.5 MeV/amu, argon at 8.5 MeV/amu, silicon at 530 MeV/amu, iron at 500 MeV/amu, and iron at 600 MeV/amu. X-rays were also used on corneas to compare with the heavy ion irradiated corneas. Scanning electron microscopy revealed lesions with circular symmetry on the external plasma membranes of corneal epithelium which were irradiated with heavy ions, but similar lesions were not observed on the plasma membranes of x-ray irradiated or non-irradiated control samples. These data verify the special way in which heavy ions interact with matter: each ion interacts coulombically with electrons all along its trajectory to generate a track. The dose from heavy ion radiation is not distributed homogeneously on a tissue microstructural scale but is concentrated along the individual particle track. Even along a single particle track the dose is discontinuous except at the Bragg peak when the LET is maximum. Micrographs of heavy-ion-irradiated corneas demonstrated two significant correlations with the heavy ion beam: (1) the number of plasma membrane lesions per unit area was correlated with the particle fluence, and (2) the diameter of the lesions were linearly related to the energy loss or LET of the individual particle. These observations corroborate what has already been suggested theoretically about heavy ion tracks and what has been shown experimentally. But the new data indicate that particle tracks occur in biological tissues as well, and that a single heavy ion is responsible for each membrane lesion. (ERB)

  20. Forest canopy interactions with nucleation mode particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryor, S. C.; Hornsby, K. E.; Novick, K. A.

    2014-11-01

    Ultrafine particle size distributions through a deciduous forest canopy indicate that nucleation mode particle concentrations decline with depth into the canopy, such that number concentrations at the bottom of the canopy are an average of 16% lower than those at the top. However, growth rates of nucleation mode particles (diameters 6-30 nm) are invariant with height within the canopy, which implies that the semi-volatile gases contributing to their growth are comparatively well-mixed through the canopy. Growth rates of nucleation mode particles during a meteorological drought year (2012) were substantially lower than during a meteorologically normal year with high soil water potential (2013). This may reflect suppression of actual biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions by drought and thus a reduction in the production of condensable products during the drought-affected vegetation season. This hypothesis is supported by evidence that growth rates during the normal year exhibit a positive correlation with emissions of BVOC modeled on observed forest composition, leaf area index, temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), but particle growth rates during the drought-affected vegetation season are not correlated with modeled BVOC emissions. These data thus provide indirect evidence that drought stress in forests may reduce BVOC emissions and limit growth of nucleation mode particles to climate-relevant sizes.

  1. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-14

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter was carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons has been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. The final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV) and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP{sub 3} through IP{sub 6}.

  2. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-01

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter was carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons has been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. The final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV) and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP3 through IP6.

  3. Angle-Dependent Ionization of Small Molecules by Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction and an Absorbing Potential.

    PubMed

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2015-06-04

    The angle-dependence of strong field ionization of O2, N2, CO2, and CH2O has been studied theoretically using a time-dependent configuration interaction approach with a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). Calculation of the ionization yields as a function of the direction of polarization of the laser pulse produces three-dimensional surfaces of the angle-dependent ionization probability. These three-dimensional shapes and their variation with laser intensity can be interpreted in terms of ionization from the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lower lying orbitals, and the Dyson orbitals for the ground and excited states of the cations.

  4. Characterization of the CDMS Ionization Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Arran

    2007-10-01

    Current cosmological models predict that a large portion of the total mass of the universe, about eighty percent, consists of putative dark matter. Theory predicts this dark matter may be in the form of particles constantly passing through the Earth. A class of these particles may interact with ordinary matter, earning the name weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) aims to directly detect the existence of WIMPs. CDMS has designed ZIP (Z-dependent Ionization & Phonon) detectors which measure phonon production and ionization of an interaction, making it possible to determine the interacting particle. The low-energy threshold of the ZIP detectors is determined by the signal-to-noise ratio of the ionization readout. A characterization of the signal-to-noise ratio of the ionization readout, along with possible modifications for improved sensitivity will be presented.

  5. Computation of Capillary Interactions among Many Particles at Free Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Masahiro; Koike, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Yukio

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a new computational method to efficiently estimate capillary interactions among many moving particles at a free surface. A novelty of the method is the immersed free surface (IFS) model that transforms the surface tension exerted on a three-phase contact line on a particle surface into the surface tension exerted on an artificially created virtual free surface in the particle. Using the IFS model along with a level set method and an immersed boundary method, we have reasonably simulated a capillary-force-induced self-assembly of particles that is common in coating-drying of particle suspension.

  6. Particle interaction measurements using laser tweezers optical trapping.

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Timothy P.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Grillet, Anne M.; Molecke, Ryan A.

    2008-08-01

    Laser tweezers optical trapping provides a unique noninvasive capability to trap and manipulate particles in solution at the focal point of a laser beam passed through a microscope objective. Additionally, combined with image analysis, interaction forces between colloidal particles can be quantitatively measured. By looking at the displacement of particles within the laser trap due to the presence of a neighboring particle or looking at the relative diffusion of two particles held near each other by optical traps, interparticle interaction forces ranging from pico- to femto-Newtons can be measured. Understanding interaction forces is critical for predicting the behavior of particle dispersions including dispersion stability and flow rheology. Using a new analysis method proposed by Sainis, Germain, and Dufresne, we can simultaneously calculate the interparticle velocity and particle diffusivity which allows direct calculation of the interparticle potential for the particles. By applying this versatile tool, we measure difference in interactions between various phospholipid bilayers that have been coated onto silica spheres as a new type of solid supported liposome. We measure bilayer interactions of several cell membrane lipids under various environmental conditions such as pH and ionic strength and compare the results with those obtained for empty liposomes. These results provide insight into the role of bilayer fluctuations in liposome fusion, which is of fundamental interest to liposome based drug delivery schemes.

  7. Nuclear gamma rays from energetic particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Gamma ray line emission from nuclear deexcitation following energetic particle reactions is evaluated. The compiled nuclear data and the calculated gamma ray spectra and intensities can be used for the study of astrophysical sites which contain large fluxes of energetic protons and nuclei. A detailed evaluation of gamma ray line production in the interstellar medium is made.

  8. Potential Energy Curves and Collisions Integrals of Air Components. 2; Interactions Involving Ionized Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Collision integrals are fundamental quantities required to determine the transport properties of the environment surrounding aerospace vehicles in the upper atmosphere. These collision integrals can be determined as a function of temperature from the potential energy curves describing the atomic and molecular collisions. Ab initio calculations provide a practical method of computing the required interaction potentials. In this work we will discuss recent advances in scattering calculations with an emphasis on the accuracy that is obtainable. Results for interactions of the atoms and ionized atoms of nitrogen and oxygen will be reviewed and their application to the determination of transport properties, such as diffusion and viscosity coefficients, will be examined.

  9. Ionizing Particle Radiation as a Modulator of Endogenous Bone Marrow Cell Reprogramming: Implications for Hematological Cancers.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Sujatha; Sasi, Sharath P; Zuriaga, Maria A; Hirschi, Karen K; Porada, Christopher D; Coleman, Matthew A; Walsh, Kenneth X; Yan, Xinhua; Goukassian, David A

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of individuals to ionizing radiation (IR), as in the case of astronauts exploring space or radiotherapy cancer patients, increases their risk of developing secondary cancers and other health-related problems. Bone marrow (BM), the site in the body where hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation to mature blood cells occurs, is extremely sensitive to low-dose IR, including irradiation by high-charge and high-energy particles. Low-dose IR induces DNA damage and persistent oxidative stress in the BM hematopoietic cells. Inefficient DNA repair processes in HSC and early hematopoietic progenitors can lead to an accumulation of mutations whereas long-lasting oxidative stress can impair hematopoiesis itself, thereby causing long-term damage to hematopoietic cells in the BM niche. We report here that low-dose (1)H- and (56)Fe-IR significantly decreased the hematopoietic early and late multipotent progenitor (E- and L-MPP, respectively) cell numbers in mouse BM over a period of up to 10 months after exposure. Both (1)H- and (56)Fe-IR increased the expression of pluripotent stem cell markers Sox2, Nanog, and Oct4 in L-MPPs and 10 months post-IR exposure. We postulate that low doses of (1)H- and (56)Fe-IR may induce endogenous cellular reprogramming of BM hematopoietic progenitor cells to assume a more primitive pluripotent phenotype and that IR-induced oxidative DNA damage may lead to mutations in these BM progenitors. This could then be propagated to successive cell lineages. Persistent impairment of BM progenitor cell populations can disrupt hematopoietic homeostasis and lead to hematologic disorders, and these findings warrant further mechanistic studies into the effects of low-dose IR on the functional capacity of BM-derived hematopoietic cells including their self-renewal and pluripotency.

  10. Ionizing Particle Radiation as a Modulator of Endogenous Bone Marrow Cell Reprogramming: Implications for Hematological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Sujatha; Sasi, Sharath P.; Zuriaga, Maria A.; Hirschi, Karen K.; Porada, Christopher D.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Walsh, Kenneth X.; Yan, Xinhua; Goukassian, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of individuals to ionizing radiation (IR), as in the case of astronauts exploring space or radiotherapy cancer patients, increases their risk of developing secondary cancers and other health-related problems. Bone marrow (BM), the site in the body where hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and differentiation to mature blood cells occurs, is extremely sensitive to low-dose IR, including irradiation by high-charge and high-energy particles. Low-dose IR induces DNA damage and persistent oxidative stress in the BM hematopoietic cells. Inefficient DNA repair processes in HSC and early hematopoietic progenitors can lead to an accumulation of mutations whereas long-lasting oxidative stress can impair hematopoiesis itself, thereby causing long-term damage to hematopoietic cells in the BM niche. We report here that low-dose 1H- and 56Fe-IR significantly decreased the hematopoietic early and late multipotent progenitor (E- and L-MPP, respectively) cell numbers in mouse BM over a period of up to 10 months after exposure. Both 1H- and 56Fe-IR increased the expression of pluripotent stem cell markers Sox2, Nanog, and Oct4 in L-MPPs and 10 months post-IR exposure. We postulate that low doses of 1H- and 56Fe-IR may induce endogenous cellular reprogramming of BM hematopoietic progenitor cells to assume a more primitive pluripotent phenotype and that IR-induced oxidative DNA damage may lead to mutations in these BM progenitors. This could then be propagated to successive cell lineages. Persistent impairment of BM progenitor cell populations can disrupt hematopoietic homeostasis and lead to hematologic disorders, and these findings warrant further mechanistic studies into the effects of low-dose IR on the functional capacity of BM-derived hematopoietic cells including their self-renewal and pluripotency. PMID:26528440

  11. Dust particles interaction with plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, C. M.; Jepu, I.; Lungu, C. P.; Chiru, P.; Zaroschi, V.

    2009-11-10

    The flow of plasma and particularly the flow of ions play an important role in dusty plasmas. Here we present some instances in laboratory experiments where the ion flow is essential in establishing dust dynamics in strongly or weakly coupled dust particles. The formation of ion wake potential and its effect on the dynamics of dust crystals, or the ion drag force exerted on micron size dust grains are some of the phenomena observed in the presented experiments.

  12. Coulomb interaction on spin-1 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, D. A.; Barrett, R. C.

    2003-11-01

    Using the electro-weak theory, we find the lowest order perturbative correction to a spin-1 particle in an external Coulomb field. We show this leads to a correction of order (Zα)4 and is independent of the mass of the external field. Previous work with Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau (see Nedjadi and Barrett [J. Math. Phys. 35 (1994) 4517]) and the Proca equation has failed to produce this correction.

  13. Particle identification in a LKr ionization chamber by multiple induced current measurements using the shape analysis of the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaferia, R.; Lanni, F.; Maggi, B.; Palombo, F.; Sala, A.; Cantoni, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Stagni, L.

    1996-01-01

    Charged particle (π/K) separation in the momentum range 0.5-0.7 GeV/c using a new method of shape analysis of the signal from a liquid krypton ionization chamber has been studied experimentally. The detector has been exposed to pions and protons at the T11 test beam at CERN PS. The shape of preamplifier output signal has been recorded by a waveform digitizer and differentiated to obtain multiple measurements of induced current inside a 2 cm gap. Results on particle separation are presented and compared with a Monte Carlo simulation.

  14. Particle identification in a LKr ionization chamber by multiple induced current measurements using the shape analysis of the signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantoni, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Stagni, L.; Diaferia, R.; Lanni, F.; Maggi, B.; Palombo, F.; Sala, A.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.

    1995-02-01

    Charged particle ( {π}/{K}) separation in the momentum range 0.5-0.7 GeV/ c using a new method of shape analysis of the signal from a liquid krypton ionization chamber has been studied experimentally. The detector has been exposed to the T11 test beam at CERN PS. The shape of the preamplifier output signal has been recorded by a waveform digitizer and differentiated to obtain multiple measurements of induced current inside a 2 cm gap. Results on particle separation are presented.

  15. Exactly solvable interacting two-particle quantum graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolte, Jens; Garforth, George

    2017-03-01

    We construct models of exactly solvable two-particle quantum graphs with certain non-local two-particle interactions, establishing appropriate boundary conditions via suitable self-adjoint realisations of the two-particle Laplacian. Showing compatibility with the Bethe ansatz method, we calculate quantisation conditions in the form of secular equations from which the spectra can be deduced. We compare spectral statistics of some examples to well known results in random matrix theory, analysing the chaotic properties of their classical counterparts.

  16. Magnetospheric plasma - Sources, wave-particle interactions and acceleration mechanisms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speiser, T. W.

    1971-01-01

    Some of the basic problems associated with magnetospheric physics are reviewed. The sources of magnetospheric plasma, with auroral particles included as a subset, are discussed. The possible ways in which the solar wind plasma can gain access to the magnetosphere are outlined. Some important consequences of wave-particle interactions are examined. Finally, the basic mechanisms which energize or accelerate particles by reconnection and convection are explained.

  17. Cosmological constraints on the properties of weakly interacting massive particles

    SciTech Connect

    Steigman, G.; Turner, M.S.

    1984-10-01

    Considerations of the age and density of, as well as the evolution of structure in, the Universe lead to constraints on the masses and lifetimes of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). 26 references.

  18. Interaction of Strain and Nuclear Spins in Silicon: Quadrupolar Effects on Ionized Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Hrubesch, Florian M.; Künzl, Markus; Becker, Hans-Werner; Itoh, Kohei M.; Stutzmann, Martin; Hoehne, Felix; Dreher, Lukas; Brandt, Martin S.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear spins of ionized donors in silicon have become an interesting quantum resource due to their very long coherence times. Their perfect isolation, however, comes at a price, since the absence of the donor electron makes the nuclear spin difficult to control. We demonstrate that the quadrupolar interaction allows us to effectively tune the nuclear magnetic resonance of ionized arsenic donors in silicon via strain and determine the two nonzero elements of the S tensor linking strain and electric field gradients in this material to S11=1.5 ×1022 V /m2 and S44=6 ×1022 V /m2 . We find a stronger benefit of dynamical decoupling on the coherence properties of transitions subject to first-order quadrupole shifts than on those subject to only second-order shifts and discuss applications of quadrupole physics including mechanical driving of magnetic resonance, cooling of mechanical resonators, and strain-mediated spin coupling.

  19. Evidence of strong projectile-target-core interaction in single ionization of neon by electron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, S.; Zhang, P.; Xu, S.; Ma, X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Liu, H. P.

    2010-11-15

    The momentum distributions of recoil ions were measured in the single ionization of neon by electron impact at incident energies between 80 and 2300 eV. It was found that there are a noticeable number of recoil ions carrying large momenta, and the relative contributions of these ions becomes more pronounced with the further decrease of incident electron energy. These observed behaviors indicate that there is a strong projectile-target-core interaction in the single-ionization reaction. By comparing our results with those of electron-neon elastic scattering, we concluded that the elastic scattering of the projectile electron on the target core plays an important role at low and intermediate collision energies.

  20. Spatiotemporal binary interaction and designer quasi-particle condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Radha; Pattu Sakthi, Vinayagam; Hyun Jong, Shin; Kuppuswamy, Porsezian

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a new integrable model to investigate the dynamics of two component quasi-particle condensates with spatiotemporal interaction strengths. We derive the associated Lax pair of the coupled Gross—Pitaevskii (GP) equation and construct matter wave solitons. We show that the spatiotemporal binary interaction strengths not only facilitate the stabilization of the condensates, but also enables one to fabricate condensates with desirable densities, geometries, and properties, leading to the so-called “designer quasi-particle condensates”.

  1. Cross sections and rate coefficients for inelastic interactions of heavy particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.; Soon, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    The existing analytical inelastic cross-sections for direct atom-atom ionizing collisions of Firsov (1959), Fleischmann et al. (1972), and Drawin (1968) are discussed. General analytical expressions for direct ionization cross-sections in atom-atom collisions are derived. The main advantage of the present cross-sections is their generality, simplicity, and overall accuracy, which is acceptable in most applications and is better than the overall accuracy of the cross-sections of Firsov, Fleischmann et al., and Drawin. The atom-atom interaction is considered as a superposition of all the pairwise interactions between the test particle and all the electrons of the outer nl shell of the target atom. Such a picture of atom-atom collision is acceptable at low- and medium-impact energies because then the electrons of the outer shell of the target atom are most likely the ones that get ionized. At high-impact energy, the picture becomes inaccurate because of strong overlapping of the atomic shells.

  2. Stochastic transport of interacting particles in periodically driven ratchets.

    PubMed

    Savel'ev, Sergey; Marchesoni, Fabio; Nori, Franco

    2004-12-01

    An open system of overdamped, interacting Brownian particles diffusing on a periodic substrate potential U(x+l)=U(x) is studied in terms of an infinite set of coupled partial differential equations describing the time evolution of the relevant many-particle distribution functions. In the mean-field approximation, this hierarchy of equations can be replaced by a nonlinear integro-differential Fokker-Planck equation. This is applicable when the distance a between particles is much less than the interaction length lambda , i.e., a particle interacts with many others, resulting in averaging out fluctuations. The equation obtained in the mean-field approximation is applied to an ensemble of locally (ainteracting (either repelling or attracting) particles placed in an asymmetric one-dimensional substrate potential, either with an oscillating temperature (temperature rachet) or driven by an ac force (rocked ratchet). In both cases we focus on the high-frequency limit. For the temperature ratchet, we find that the net current is typically suppressed (or can even be inverted) with increasing density of the repelling particles. In contrast, the net current through a rocked ratchet can be enhanced by increasing the density of the repelling particles. In the case of attracting particles, our perturbation technique is valid up to a critical value of the particle density, above which a finite fraction of the particles starts condensing in a liquidlike state near the substrate minima. The dependence of the net transport current on the particle density and the interparticle potential is analyzed in detail for different values of the ratchet parameters.

  3. Interaction between two spherical particles in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Jun-Ichi; Stark, Holger; Yoneya, Makoto; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    We numerically investigate the interaction between two spherical particles in a nematic liquid crystal mediated by elastic distortions in the orientational order. We pay attention to the cases where two particles with equal radii R0 impose rigid normal anchoring on their surfaces and carry a pointlike topological defect referred to as a hyperbolic hedgehog. To describe the geometry of our system, we use bispherical coordinates, which prove useful in the implementation of boundary conditions at the particle surfaces and at infinity. We adopt the Landau de Gennes continuum theory in terms of a second-rank tensor order parameter Qij for the description of the orientational order of a nematic liquid crystal. We also utilize an adaptive mesh refinement scheme that has proven to be an efficient way of dealing with topological defects whose core size is much smaller than the particle size. When the two “dipoles,” composed of a particle and a hyperbolic hedgehog, are in parallel directions, the two-particle interaction potential is attractive for large interparticle distances D and proportional to D-3 as expected from the form of the dipole-dipole interaction, until the well-defined potential minimum at D≃2.46 R0 is reached. For the antiparallel configuration with no hedgehogs between the two particles, the interaction potential is repulsive and behaves as D-2 for D≲10 R0 , which is stronger than the dipole-dipole repulsion ( ˜ D-3 ) expected theoretically as an asymptotic behavior for large D .

  4. Physicochemical Properties of 'Particle Brush'-Based Materials: Using Polymer Graft Modification to Tailor Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Michael D.

    The advent of surface-initiated controlled radical polymerization techniques has allowed a new class of hybrid polymer-grafted nanoparticles, known as eparticle brushes,f to be realized. By grafting polymers from the surface, interactions between particles can be tuned using the precise control over graft architecture (i.e. chain length, dispersity, particle size, and grafting density) afforded by controlled radical polymerizations. Previously, a transition from particle-like to polymer-like interactions in small particles with increasing graft length has been observed. In the limit of long graft lengths, the polymer chains impart new interactions between particles, such as entanglements. These results outline a rich, but largely unexplored parameter space. The present thesis further elucidates the extent to which polymer graft modification facilitates new interaction types between particles and the dependence of those interactions on chain conformation. Specifically, the mechanical properties, processability, phase separation, and vibrational modes of particle brushes are examined. A dependence of the mechanical properties of particle brush assemblies on particle size is accurately captured by accounting for differences in chain conformation between particles of different sizes using a simple scaling model. Further tailoring of mechanical characteristics in weak particle brush assemblies can be achieved using appropriate homopolymer additives to form two-component systems. Improved mechanical properties are accompanied by a significant enhancement in particle processability that allows application of previously unusable processing methods. Considering more complex systems, mesoscale phase separation of nanoparticles is demonstrated for the first time by blending of particle brushes with different graft polymers. Polymer graft modification is seen to not only strengthen and introduce new interactions, but also tune particle properties. Vibrational modes of

  5. Electrostatic interactions between charged dielectric particles in an electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbenev, Ivan N.; Filippov, Anatoly V.; Stace, Anthony J.; Besley, Elena

    2016-08-01

    Theory is developed to address a significant problem of how two charged dielectric particles interact in the presence of a polarizable medium that is a dilute solution of a strong electrolyte. The electrostatic force is defined by characteristic parameters for the interacting particles (charge, radius, and dielectric constant) and for the medium (permittivity and Debye length), and is expressed in the form of a converging infinite series. The limiting case of weak screening and large inter-particle separation is considered, which corresponds to small (macro)ions that carry constant charge. The theory yields a solution in the limit of monopole and dipole terms that agrees exactly with existing analytical expressions, which are generally used to describe ion-ion and ion-molecular interactions in a medium. Results from the theory are compared with DLVO theory and with experimental measurements for the electrostatic force between two PMMA particles contained in a nonpolar solvent (hexadecane) with an added charge control agent.

  6. Turbulence-radiation interactions in a particle-laden flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frankel, Ari; Pouransari, Hadi; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Mani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Turbulent fluctuations in a radiatively participating medium can significantly alter the mean heat transfer characteristics in a manner that current RANS models cannot accurately capture. While turbulence-radiation interaction has been studied extensively in traditional combustion systems, such interactions have not yet been studied in the context of particle-laden flows. This work is motivated by applications in particle-based solar receivers in which external radiation is primarily absorbed by a dispersed phase and conductively exchanged with the carrier fluid. Direct numerical simulations of turbulence with Lagrangian particles subject to a collimated radiation source are performed with a flux-limited diffusion approximation to radiative transfer. The dependence of the turbulence-radiation interaction statistics on the particle Stokes number will be demonstrated. Supported by PSAAP II.

  7. Simulation of Au particle interaction on graphene sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcleod, A.; Vernon, K. C.; Rider, A. E.; Ostrikov, K.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of Au particles with few layer graphene is of interest for the formation of the next generation of sensing devices 1. In this paper we investigate the coupling of single gold nanoparticles to a graphene sheet, and multiple gold nanoparticles with a graphene sheet using COMSOL Multiphysics. By using these simulations we are able to determine the electric field strength and associated hot-spots for various gold nanoparticle-graphene systems. The Au nanoparticles were modelled as 8 nm diameter spheres on 1.5 nm thick (5 layers) graphene, with properties of graphene obtained from the refractive index data of Weber 2 and the Au refractive index data from Palik 3. The field was incident along the plane of the sheet with polarisation tested for both s and p. The study showed strong localised interaction between the Au and graphene with limited spread; however the double particle case where the graphene sheet separated two Au nanoparticles showed distinct interaction between the particles and graphene. An offset was introduced (up to 4 nm) resulting in much reduced coupling between the opposed particles as the distance apart increased. Findings currently suggest that the graphene layer has limited interaction with incident fields with a single particle present whilst reducing the coupling region to a very fine area when opposing particles are involved. It is hoped that the results of this research will provide insight into graphene-plasmon interactions and spur the development of the next generation of sensing devices.

  8. Coulomb-tail effect of electron-electron interaction on nonsequential double ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yueming; Huang, Cheng; Lu, Peixiang

    2011-08-01

    With the classical ensemble model, we investigate the manifestations of the Coulomb tail of electron-electron interaction in nonsequential double ionization by comparing the results from the short-range electron-electron interaction with those from the Coulombic electron-electron interaction. At the intensity below the recollision threshold, the two-electron momentum distributions in the direction parallel to the laser polarization show an anticorrelated behavior for the Coulombic electron-electron interaction while a correlated behavior for the short-range interaction, which indicates the responsibility of the Coulomb tail of the electron-electron interaction for the experimentally observed anticorrelated emission [Y. Liu, S. Tschuch, A. Rudenko, M. Durr, M. Siegel, U. Morgner, R. Moshammer, and J. Ullrich, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.101.053001 101, 053001 (2008)]. In the transverse direction, for the Coulombic electron-electron interaction, the two electrons exhibit no effect of repulsion at an intensity below the recollision threshold while a strong repulsion effect at an intensity above the threshold, which becomes weaker as the laser intensity further increases. Back analysis shows that the role of the Coulomb tail of electron-electron interaction leads asymmetric energy sharing (AES) to be prevalent at recollision. This AES results in the two electrons leaving the ion at different times or with different initial momenta, which is responsible for the anticorrelated behavior in the parallel direction and the intensity-dependent repulsion effect in the transverse direction.

  9. Coulomb-tail effect of electron-electron interaction on nonsequential double ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yueming; Huang Cheng; Lu Peixiang

    2011-08-15

    With the classical ensemble model, we investigate the manifestations of the Coulomb tail of electron-electron interaction in nonsequential double ionization by comparing the results from the short-range electron-electron interaction with those from the Coulombic electron-electron interaction. At the intensity below the recollision threshold, the two-electron momentum distributions in the direction parallel to the laser polarization show an anticorrelated behavior for the Coulombic electron-electron interaction while a correlated behavior for the short-range interaction, which indicates the responsibility of the Coulomb tail of the electron-electron interaction for the experimentally observed anticorrelated emission [Y. Liu, S. Tschuch, A. Rudenko, M. Durr, M. Siegel, U. Morgner, R. Moshammer, and J. Ullrich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 053001 (2008)]. In the transverse direction, for the Coulombic electron-electron interaction, the two electrons exhibit no effect of repulsion at an intensity below the recollision threshold while a strong repulsion effect at an intensity above the threshold, which becomes weaker as the laser intensity further increases. Back analysis shows that the role of the Coulomb tail of electron-electron interaction leads asymmetric energy sharing (AES) to be prevalent at recollision. This AES results in the two electrons leaving the ion at different times or with different initial momenta, which is responsible for the anticorrelated behavior in the parallel direction and the intensity-dependent repulsion effect in the transverse direction.

  10. Single particle density of trapped interacting quantum gases

    SciTech Connect

    Bala, Renu; Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.

    2015-05-15

    An expression for single particle density for trapped interacting gases has been obtained in first order of interaction using Green’s function method. Results are easily simplified for homogeneous quantum gases and are found to agree with famous results obtained by Huang-Yang-Luttinger and Lee-Yang.

  11. Plasma lipid analysis by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sonomura, Kazuhiro; Kudoh, Shinobu; Sato, Taka-Aki; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2015-06-01

    A novel method for the analysis of endogenous lipids and related compounds was developed employing hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. A hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with carbamoyl stationary phase achieved clear separation of phosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, ceramide, and mono-hexsosyl ceramide groups with good peak area repeatability (RSD% < 10) and linearity (R(2) > 0.99). The established method was applied to human plasma assays and a total of 117 endogenous lipids were successfully detected and reproducibly identified. In addition, we investigated the simultaneous detection of small polar metabolites such as amino and organic acids co-existing in the same biological samples processed in a single analytical run with lipids. Our results show that hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography is a useful tool for human plasma lipidome analysis and offers more comprehensive metabolome coverage.

  12. Phase-space analysis for ionization processes in the laser-atom interaction using Gabor transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, X. F.; Liu, S. B.; Song, H. Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the ionization processes during laser-atom interaction are investigated in phase-space using Gabor transformation. Based on the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), the depletion of the whole system caused by the mask function is taken into consideration in calculating the plasma density. We obtain the momentum distribution via the Gabor transformation of the escaping portions of the time-dependent wave packet at the detector-like points on the interior boundaries from which the kinetic energies carried by the escaping portions are calculated.

  13. Effect of particle-particle interactions on the acoustic radiation force in an ultrasonic standing wave

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkens, Bart; Ilinskii, Yurii A. Zabolotskaya, Evgenia A.

    2015-10-28

    Ultrasonic standing waves are widely used for separation applications. In MEMS applications, a half wavelength standing wave field is generated perpendicular to a laminar flow. The acoustic radiation force exerted on the particle drives the particle to the center of the MEMS channel, where concentrated particles are harvested. In macro-scale applications, the ultrasonic standing wave spans multiple wavelengths. Examples of such applications are oil/water emulsion splitting [1], and blood/lipid separation [2]. In macro-scale applications, particles are typically trapped in the standing wave, resulting in clumping or coalescence of particles/droplets. Subsequent gravitational settling results in separation of the secondary phase. An often used expression for the radiation force on a particle is that derived by Gorkov [3]. The assumptions are that the particle size is small relative to the wavelength, and therefore, only monopole and dipole scattering contributions are used to calculate the radiation force. This framework seems satisfactory for MEMS scale applications where each particle is treated separately by the standing wave, and concentrations are typically low. In macro-scale applications, particle concentration is high, and particle clumping or droplet coalescence results in particle sizes not necessarily small relative to the wavelength. Ilinskii et al. developed a framework for calculation of the acoustic radiation force valid for any size particle [4]. However, this model does not take into account particle to particle effects, which can become important as particle concentration increases. It is known that an acoustic radiation force on a particle or a droplet is determined by the local field. An acoustic radiation force expression is developed that includes the effect of particle to particle interaction. The case of two neighboring particles is considered. The approach is based on sound scattering by the particles. The acoustic field at the location of

  14. Dissipative Particle Dynamics interaction parameters from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, Fatemeh; Paddison, Stephen J.

    2016-02-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is a commonly employed coarse-grained method to model complex systems. Presented here is a pragmatic approach to connect atomic-scale information to the meso-scale interactions defined between the DPD particles or beads. Specifically, electronic structure calculations were utilized for the calculation of the DPD pair-wise interaction parameters. An implicit treatment of the electrostatic interactions for charged beads is introduced. The method is successfully applied to derive the parameters for a hydrated perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer with absorbed vanadium cations.

  15. Probabilistic approach to nonlinear wave-particle resonant interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Neishtadt, A. I.; Vasiliev, A. A.; Mourenas, D.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we provide a theoretical model describing the evolution of the charged-particle distribution function in a system with nonlinear wave-particle interactions. Considering a system with strong electrostatic waves propagating in an inhomogeneous magnetic field, we demonstrate that individual particle motion can be characterized by the probability of trapping into the resonance with the wave and by the efficiency of scattering at resonance. These characteristics, being derived for a particular plasma system, can be used to construct a kinetic equation (or generalized Fokker-Planck equation) modeling the long-term evolution of the particle distribution. In this equation, effects of charged-particle trapping and transport in phase space are simulated with a nonlocal operator. We demonstrate that solutions of the derived kinetic equations agree with results of test-particle tracing. The applicability of the proposed approach for the description of space and laboratory plasma systems is also discussed.

  16. Electrophoretic interactions and aggregation of colloidal biological particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.; Nichols, Scott C.; Loewenberg, Michael; Todd, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The separation of cells or particles from solution has traditionally been accomplished with centrifuges or by sedimentation; however, many particles have specific densities close to unity, making buoyancy-driven motion slow or negligible, but most cells and particles carry surface charges, making them ideal for electrophoretic separation. Both buoyancy-driven and electrophoretic separation may be influenced by hydrodynamic interactions and aggregation of neighboring particles. Aggregation by electrophoresis was analyzed for two non-Brownian particles with different zeta potentials and thin double layers migrating through a viscous fluid. The results indicate that the initial rate of electrophoretically-driven aggregation may exceed that of buoyancy-driven aggregation, even under conditions in which buoyancy-driven relative motion of noninteracting particles is dominant.

  17. A study on the validity of the point-particle model for particle-turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongzhen; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2002-11-01

    The point-particle model, widely used in simulations of particle-turbulence interaction, is justified when the particle size is smaller than or comparable to the Kolmogorov scale. The precise limits of validity of the approximation and the manner in which errors accrue when the particle size increases are not well known. In the present work, direct simulations are conducted for a single finite-size particle suspended in a decaying homogeneous turbulent flow generated with a spectral code as an intial condition. The simulations are conducted by means of the PHYSALIS method. The trajectories of finite-size and point particles are compared as the particle radius is increased above the Kolmogorov scale for different Stokes numbers.

  18. Reducing Collisional Breakup Of A System Of Charged Particles To Practical Computation: Electron-Impact Ionization Of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    McCurdy, C.W.; Baertschy, M.; Isaacs, W.A.; Rescigno, T.N.

    2001-08-24

    It has been a goal of researchers in the area of atomic collisions for nearly half a century to reduce to practical computation the simplest problem in collisional ionization: the electron-impact ionization of atomic hydrogen. The principal barrier to solving this problem has been the difficult boundary conditions that apply to the complete breakup of a system charged particles. We describe how this goal has been accomplished in the last five years by the application of the mathematical transformation of ''exterior complex scaling'' together with an appropriate formalism for computing the breakup amplitudes from a numerical representation of the complete solution of the Schrodinger equation. Some successes of other recent approaches to this problem are also described.

  19. Effects of magnetic interactions in antiferromagnetic ferrihydrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berquó, Thelma S.; Erbs, Jasmine J.; Lindquist, Anna; Penn, R. Lee; Banerjee, Subir K.

    2009-04-01

    The effects of magnetic interactions in the magnetic properties of six-line ferrihydrite particles were investigated by studying the behavior of aggregated versus coated particles. Four different coating agents (sugar, alginate, lactate and ascorbate) were employed in order to obtain dispersed particles and prevent particle agglomeration; one sub-sample was allowed to dry with no coating agent. The five sets of ferrihydrite particles were from the same batch and the size was estimated as 3.6 ± 0.4 nm in length. Low temperature magnetization, ac susceptibility and Mössbauer spectroscopy data showed contrasting blocking temperatures for uncoated and coated samples with a decrease of TP from about 50 K to 12 K, respectively. The contributions from magnetic interactions were recognized in magnetic measurements and the effective anisotropy constant for non-interacting ferrihydrite was estimated as (100 ± 10) × 103 J m-3. Overall, employing sugar and alginate as coating agents was more successful in preventing particle aggregation and magnetic interactions. In contrast, ascorbate and lactate were unsuitable due to the chemical reaction between the coating agent and ferrihydrite surface.

  20. Studying bubble-particle interactions by zeta potential distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chendi; Wang, Louxiang; Harbottle, David; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-07-01

    Over a decade ago, Xu and Masliyah pioneered an approach to characterize the interactions between particles in dynamic environments of multicomponent systems by measuring zeta potential distributions of individual components and their mixtures. Using a Zetaphoremeter, the measured zeta potential distributions of individual components and their mixtures were used to determine the conditions of preferential attachment in multicomponent particle suspensions. The technique has been applied to study the attachment of nano-sized silica and alumina particles to sub-micron size bubbles in solutions with and without the addition of surface active agents (SDS, DAH and DF250). The degree of attachment between gas bubbles and particles is shown to be a function of the interaction energy governed by the dispersion, electrostatic double layer and hydrophobic forces. Under certain chemical conditions, the attachment of nano-particles to sub-micron size bubbles is shown to be enhanced by in-situ gas nucleation induced by hydrodynamic cavitation for the weakly interacting systems, where mixing of the two individual components results in negligible attachment. Preferential interaction in complex tertiary particle systems demonstrated strong attachment between micron-sized alumina and gas bubbles, with little attachment between micron-sized alumina and silica, possibly due to instability of the aggregates in the shear flow environment.

  1. Simulations of Shock Wave Interaction with a Particle Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneru, Rahul; Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S.'Bala'

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of a shock wave interacting with a cloud of particles are performed in an attempt to understand similar phenomena observed in dispersal of solid particles under such extreme environment as an explosion. We conduct numerical experiments in which a particle curtain fills only 87% of the shock tube from bottom to top. As such, the particle curtain upon interaction with the shock wave is expected to experience Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities. In this study, the initial volume fraction profile matches with that of Sandia Multiphase Shock Tube experiments, and the shock Mach number is limited to M =1.66. In these simulations we use a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach along with state-of-the-art point-particle force and heat transfer models. Measurements of particle dispersion are made at different initial volume fractions of the particle cloud. A detailed analysis of the evolution of the particle curtain with respect to the initial conditions is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  2. Effects of Hydrodynamic Interaction in Aerosol Particle Settling: Mesoscopic Particle-level Full Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuiqing; Yang, Mengmeng; Marshall, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    A new mesoscopic particle-level approach is developed for the full dynamics simulation (FDS) of the settling of systems of aerosol micro-particles. The approach efficiently combines an adhesive discrete-element method for particle motions and an Oseen dynamics method for hydrodynamic interactions. Compared to conventional Stokeslet and Oseenlet simulations, the FDS not only accounts for the cloud-scale fluid inertia effect and the particle inertia effect, but also overcomes the singularity problem using a soft-sphere model of adhesive contact. The effect of hydrodynamic interactions is investigated based on FDS results. The particle inertia is found to reduce the mobility of particle clouds and to elongate the cloud on vertical direction. Meanwhile, the fluid inertia decreases the settling velocity by weakening the hydrodynamic interaction and tends to flatten the cloud, leading to breakup. Expressions for the settling velocity of particle cloud are proposed with consideration of fluid inertia effect and the cloud shape. Finally, the transformation in settling behavior from a finite particle cloud to an unbounded uniform suspension is explained. This work has been funded by the National Natural Science Funds of China (No. 50976058), and by the National Key Basic Research and Development Program (2013CB228506).

  3. Local wave particle resonant interaction causing energetic particle prompt loss in DIII-D plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R. B.; Fu, G. Y.; White, R. B.; Wang, X. G.

    2015-11-01

    A new wave particle resonance mechanism is found explaining the first-orbit prompt neutral beam-ion losses induced by shear Alfvén Eigenmodes (AEs) in the DIII-D tokamak. Because of the large banana width, a typical trapped beam ion can only interact locally with a core localised Alfvén Eigenmode for a fraction of its orbit, i.e. part of its inner leg of the banana orbit. These trapped beam ions can experience substantial radial kick within one bounce as long as the phases of the wave seen by the particles are nearly constant during this local interaction. A wave particle resonant condition is found based on the locally averaged particle orbit frequencies over the interaction part of the particle orbit. It is further found that the frequency width of the local resonance is quite large because the interaction time is short. This implies that particles over a considerable region of phase space can interact effectively with the localised AEs and experience large radial kicks within one bounce orbit. The radial kick size is found numerically and analytically to scale linearly in AE amplitude and is about 5 cm for typical experimental parameters. These results are consistent with experimental measurement.

  4. A transition-state interaction shifts nucleobase ionization toward neutrality to facilitate small ribozyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joseph A; Guo, Man; Jenkins, Jermaine L; Krucinska, Jolanta; Chen, Yuanyuan; Carey, Paul R; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2012-10-17

    One mechanism by which ribozymes can accelerate biological reactions is by adopting folds that favorably perturb nucleobase ionization. Herein we used Raman crystallography to directly measure pK(a) values for the Ade38 N1 imino group of a hairpin ribozyme in distinct conformational states. A transition-state analogue gave a pK(a) value of 6.27 ± 0.05, which agrees strikingly well with values measured by pH-rate analyses. To identify the chemical attributes that contribute to the shifted pK(a), we determined crystal structures of hairpin ribozyme variants containing single-atom substitutions at the active site and measured their respective Ade38 N1 pK(a) values. This approach led to the identification of a single interaction in the transition-state conformation that elevates the base pK(a) > 0.8 log unit relative to the precatalytic state. The agreement of the microscopic and macroscopic pK(a) values and the accompanying structural analysis supports a mechanism in which Ade38 N1(H)+ functions as a general acid in phosphodiester bond cleavage. Overall the results quantify the contribution of a single electrostatic interaction to base ionization, which has broad relevance for understanding how RNA structure can control chemical reactivity.

  5. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    DOE PAGES

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-12

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set (CBS) limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter were carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons have been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. As amore » result, the final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV), and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP3 through IP6.« less

  6. A Transition-State Interaction Shifts Nucleobase Ionization Toward Neutrality to Facilitate Small Ribozyme Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, Joseph A.; Guo, Man; Jenkins, Jermaine L.; Krucinska, Jolanta; Chen, Yuanyuan; Carey, Paul R.; Wedekind, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    One mechanism by which ribozymes can accelerate biological reactions is by adopting folds that favorably perturb nucleobase ionization. Herein we used Raman crystallography to directly measure pKa values for the Ade38 N1-imino group of a hairpin ribozyme in distinct conformational states. A transition-state analogue gave a pKa value of 6.27 ± 0.05, which agrees strikingly well with values measured by pH-rate analyses. To identify the chemical attributes that contribute to the shifted pKa we determined crystal structures of hairpin ribozyme variants containing single-atom substitutions at the active site and measured their respective Ade38 N1 pKa values. This approach led to the identification of a single interaction in the transition-state conformation that elevates the base pKa >0.8 log units relative to the precatalytic state. The agreement of the microscopic and macroscopic pKa values and the accompanying structural analysis support a mechanism in which Ade38 N1(H)+ functions as a general acid in phosphodiester bond cleavage. Overall the results quantify the contribution of a single electrostatic interaction to base ionization, which has broad relevance for understanding how RNA structure can control chemical reactivity. PMID:22989273

  7. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-12

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set (CBS) limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter were carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons have been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. As a result, the final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV), and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP3 through IP6.

  8. Gas-Particle Interactions in a Microgravity Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louge, Michel; Jenkins, James

    1999-01-01

    We are developing a microgravity flow cell in which to study the interaction of a flowing gas with relatively massive particles that collide with each other and with the moving boundaries of the cell. The absence of gravity makes possible the independent control of the relative motion of the boundaries and the flow of the gas. The cell will permit gas-particle interactions to be studied over the entire range of flow conditions over which the mixture is not turbulent. Within this range, we shall characterize the viscous dissipation of the energy of the particle fluctuations, measure the influence of particle-phase viscosity on the pressure drop along the cell, and observe the development of localized inhomogeneities that are likely to be associated with the onset of clusters. These measurements and observations should contribute to an understanding of the essential physics of pneumatic transport.

  9. Interaction measurement of particles bound to a lipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfati, Raphael; Dufresne, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The local shape and dynamics of the plasma membrane play important roles in many cellular processes. Local membrane deformations are often mediated by the adsorption of proteins (notably from the BAR family), and their subsequent self-assembly. The emerging hypothesis is that self-assembly arises from long-range interactions of individual proteins through the membrane's deformation field. We study these interactions in a model system of micron-sized colloidal particles adsorbed onto a lipid bilayer. We use fluorescent microscopy, optical tweezers and particle tracking to measure dissipative and conservative forces as a function of the separation between the particles. We find that particles are driven together with forces of order 100 fN and remain bound in a potential well with a stiffness of order 100 fN/micron.

  10. Particle and energy dependence of the statistical fluctuations of an ionization chamber current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purghel, Lidia; Vaˆlcov, Nicolae

    For the purpose of getting more detailed information concerning the processes leading to statistical fluctuations of an ionization chamber current, measurements with various radioactive sources have been done. By using the experimental arrangement described elsewhere [A. Necula et al. Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 332 (1993) 501] the mean value and the standard deviation of the ionization current for 3H (water vapours), 60Co (sealed source), 85Kr (gas), 204Tl (8 mm diameter disk) and 239Pu (10 mm diameter disk), beta, gamma and alpha sources have been measured. A statistical model explaining the experimental data is proposed.

  11. Evaluation of DNA/Ligand Interactions by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2010-07-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has enabled the detection and characterization of DNA/ligand complexes, including evaluation of both relative binding affinities and selectivities of DNA-interactive ligands. The noncovalent complexes that are transferred from the solution to the gas phase retain the signature of the native species, thus allowing the use of MS to screen DNA/ligand complexes, reveal the stoichiometries of the complexes, and provide insight into the nature of the interactions. Ligands that bind to DNA via metal-mediated modes and those that bind to unusual DNA structures, such as quadruplexes, are amenable to ESI. Chemical probe methods applied to DNA/ligand complexes with ESI-MS detection afford information about ligand-binding sites and conformational changes of DNA that occur upon ligand binding.

  12. The impact of surface properties on particle-interface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anna; Kaz, David; McGorty, Ryan; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    2013-03-01

    The propensity for particles to bind to oil-water interfaces was first noted by Ramsden and Pickering over a century ago, and has been attributed to the huge reduction in surface energy when a particle breaches an oil-water interface and straddles it at its equilibrium height. Since then materials on a variety of length scales have been fabricated using particles at interfaces, from Pickering emulsions to Janus particles. In these applications, it is simply assumed that the particle sits at its hugely energetically favourable equilibrium position. However, it was recently shown that the relaxation of particles towards their equilibrium position is logarithmic in time and could take months, much longer than typical experiments. Here we investigate how surface charge and particle 'hairiness' impact the interaction between micron-sized particles and oil-water interfaces, and explore a molecular kinetic theory model to help understand these results. We use digital holographic microscopy to track micron-sized particles as they approach an oil-water interface with a resolution of 2 nm in all three dimensions at up to thousands of frames per second.

  13. Interactions of casein micelles with calcium phosphate particles.

    PubMed

    Tercinier, Lucile; Ye, Aiqian; Anema, Skelte G; Singh, Anne; Singh, Harjinder

    2014-06-25

    Insoluble calcium phosphate particles, such as hydroxyapatite (HA), are often used in calcium-fortified milks as they are considered to be chemically unreactive. However, this study showed that there was an interaction between the casein micelles in milk and HA particles. The caseins in milk were shown to bind to the HA particles, with the relative proportions of bound β-casein, αS-casein, and κ-casein different from the proportions of the individual caseins present in milk. Transmission electron microscopy showed no evidence of intact casein micelles on the surface of the HA particles, which suggested that the casein micelles dissociated either before or during binding. The HA particles behaved as ion chelators, with the ability to bind the ions contained in the milk serum phase. Consequently, the depletion of the serum minerals disrupted the milk mineral equilibrium, resulting in dissociation of the casein micelles in milk.

  14. Analytical solutions of minimum ionization particle induced current shapes of silicon detectors and simulation of charge collection properties

    SciTech Connect

    Eremin, V.; Chen, W.; Li, Z.

    1993-11-01

    A new analytical, one dimensional method to obtain the induced current shapes and simulation of chasrge shapes for p{sup +} {minus}n{minus}n{sup +} silicon detectors in the case of minimum ionization particle has been developed here. jExact solutions have been found for both electron and hole current shapes. Simulations of induced charge shapes of detectors have also been given. The results of this work are consistent with the earlier work where a semi-analytical method had been used.

  15. Experimental verification of interactions between randomly distributed fine magnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketomi, Susamu; Shull, Robert D.

    2003-10-01

    We experimentally examined whether or not a magnetic fluid (MF) is really superparamagnetic by comparing the initial magnetic susceptibilities of the mother MFs with those of their highly diluted solutions (more than 1000 times diluted) in which the dipole-dipole interaction between the particles was negligible. We used three mother MFs, SA 1, SB 1, and SC 1, and their highly diluted solutions, SA 2, SB 2, and SC 2, respectively. The particles' dispersability was best in SA 1 and poorest in SC 1. From the static field experiment, it was found that the mutual interaction between the particles in SB 1, and SC 1 made clusters of particles with magnetically closed flux circuits even at zero field while no interaction was detected in SA 1. The initial complex magnetic susceptibility, χ˜, as a function of temperature, T, under an AC field experiment revealed that the complex susceptibility of both the samples SA 1 and SA 2 showed peaks as a function of T. However, their χ˜ vs. T curves were not similar, leading to the conclusion that the sample SA 1 was not superparamagnetic. Instead, SA 1 was a magnetic spin-glass induced by the weak interaction between the particle spins. The existence of the spin-glass state was also confirmed by the Volgel-Fulcher law dependence of the AC-susceptibility peak temperature, Tp, or the frequency of the AC field.

  16. Asymmetric exclusion process in a system of interacting Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    Eduardo de Oliveira Rodrigues, José; Dickman, Ronald

    2010-06-01

    We study a continuous-space version of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), consisting of interacting Brownian particles subject to a driving force in a periodic array of potential wells. Particles are inserted into the leftmost well at rate α, hop to the right at unit rate, and are removed at the rightmost well at rate β. Our study is motivated by recent experiments on colloidal particles in a periodic potential generated by an optical tweezers array. Particles spend most of the time near potential minima, approximating the situation on the lattice; a short-range repulsive interaction prevents two particles from occupying the same potential well. A constant driving force, representing Stokes drag on particles suspended in a moving fluid, leads to biased motion. Our results for the density profile and current, obtained via numerical integration of the Langevin equation and dynamic Monte Carlo simulations, indicate that the continuous-space model exhibits phase transitions analogous to those observed in the lattice TASEP. The correspondence is not exact, however, due to the lack of particle-hole symmetry in our model.

  17. Anomalous temperature relaxation and particle transport in a strongly non-unifrom, fully in ionized Plasma in a stromg mangnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Øien, Alf H.

    1995-02-01

    In classical kinetic and transport theory for a fully ionized plasma in a magnetic field, collision integrals from a uniform theory without fields are used. When the magnetic field is so strong that electrons may gyrate during electron—electron and electron—ion interactions, the form of the collision integrals will be modified. Another modification will stem from strong non-uniformities transverse to the magnetic field B. Using collision terms that explicitly incorporate these effects, we derive in particular the temperature relaxation between electrons and ions and the particle transport transverse to the magnetic field. In both cases collisions between gyrating electrons, which move along the magnetic field, and non-gyrating ions, which move in arbitrary directions at a distance transverse to B from the electrons larger than the electron Larmor radius but smaller than the Debye length, give rise to enhancement factors in the corresponding classical expressions of order In (mion/mel).

  18. Effect of ion streaming on particle-particle interactions in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Vivek; Kushner, Mark J.

    2005-02-15

    Dust particles in low-temperature, low-pressure plasmas form Coulomb crystals and display collective behavior under select conditions. The trajectories of ions can be perturbed as they pass by negatively charged dust particles and, in some cases, will converge beyond the particle. This process, called ion streaming, produces a positive potential in the wakefield of the particle that can be large enough to perturb interparticle dynamics. In this paper, we discuss results from a three-dimensional model for dust particle transport in plasma processing reactors with which we investigated the effects of ion streaming on particle-particle interactions. When including the wakefield potential produced by ion streaming, dust particles can form vertically correlated pairs when trapped in electrical potential wells. The ion-streaming force was found to be significant only over a select range of pressures and for given combinations of particle sizes and mass densities. The formation of vertically correlated pairs critically depends on the shape of the potential well. Wakefield forces can also affect the order of multilayer lattices by producing vertical correlations between particles in adjacent layers.

  19. Multi-particle interaction in a model of the hydrophobic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedeaux, D.; Koper, G. J. M.; Ispolatov, S.; Widom, B.

    2001-03-01

    The multi-particle potential of mean force between interstitial solute molecules in Ben-Naim's one-dimensional, many-state lattice model is calculated. The solution is a direct extension of an earlier calculation of the two-particle interaction by Kolomeisky and Widom (Faraday Dis. 112 (1999) 81). It is found that the many-particle interaction potential is a sum of pair potentials between neighboring particles only. An exact equation of state, expressing the activity in the temperature and the pressure, is derived. The resulting solubility of a gaseous hydrophobe, which is defined osmotically, is calculated and found to increase considerably with the gas density.

  20. Irreversible aggregation of interacting particles in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Sidi Ammi, Hachem; Chame, Anna; Touzani, M'hammed; Benyoussef, Abdelilah; Pierre-Louis, Olivier; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2005-04-01

    We present a study of the aggregation of interacting particles in one dimension. This situation, for example, applies to atoms trapped along linear defects at the surface of a crystal. Simulations are performed with two lattice models. In the first model, the borders of atoms and islands interact in a vectorial manner via force monopoles. In the second model, each atom carries a dipole. These two models lead to qualitatively similar but quantitatively different behaviors. In both cases, the final average island size S(f) does not depend on the interactions in the limits of very low and very high coverages. For intermediate coverages, S(f) exhibits an asymmetric behavior as a function of the interaction strength: while it saturates for attractive interactions, it decreases for repulsive interactions. A class of mean-field models is designed, which allows one to retrieve the interaction dependence on the coverage dependence of the average island size with a good accuracy.

  1. Statistical mechanics of point particles with a gravitational interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabanol, M.-L.; Corson, F.; Pomeau, Y.

    2000-04-01

    We study the dynamics of N point particles with a gravitational interaction. The divergence of the microcanonical partition function prevents this system from reaching equilibrium. Assuming a random diffusion in phase space we deduce a scaling law involving time, which is numerically checked for 3 interacting masses in a quadratic nonsymmetrical potential. This random walk on the potential energy scale is studied in some detail and the results agree with the numerics.

  2. Interaction mechanisms between ceramic particles and atomized metallic droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    1992-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to provide insight into the dynamic interactions that occur when ceramic particles are placed in intimate contact with a metallic matrix undergoing a phase change. To that effect, Al-4 wt pct Si/SiCp composite droplets were synthesized using a spray atomization and coinjection approach, and their solidification microstructures were studied both qualitatively and quantitatively. The present results show that SiC particles (SiCp) were incor- porated into the matrix and that the extent of incorporation depends on the solidification con- dition of the droplets at the moment of SiC particle injection. Two factors were found to affect the distribution and volume fraction of SiC particles in droplets: the penetration of particles into droplets and the entrapment and/or rejection of particles by the solidification front. First, during coinjection, particles collide with the atomized droplets with three possible results: they may penetrate the droplets, adhere to the droplet surface, or bounce back after impact. The extent of penetration of SiC particles into droplets was noted to depend on the kinetic energy of the particles and the magnitude of the surface energy change in the droplets that occurs upon impact. In liquid droplets, the extent of penetration of SiC particles was shown to depend on the changes in surface energy, ΔEs, experienced by the droplets. Accordingly, large SiC particles encoun- tered more resistance to penetration relative to small ones. In solid droplets, the penetration of SiC particles was correlated with the dynamic pressure exerted by the SiC particles on the droplets during impact and the depth of the ensuing crater. The results showed that no pene- tration was possible in such droplets. Second, once SiC particles have penetrated droplets, their final location in the microstructure is governed by their interactions with the solidification front. As a result of these interactions, both entrapment and rejection of

  3. Ionizer assisted air filtration for collection of submicron and ultrafine particles-evaluation of long-term performance and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingbing; Ekberg, Lars

    2015-06-02

    Previous research has demonstrated that unipolar ionization can enhance the filter performance to collect airborne particles, aeroallergens, and airborne microorganisms, without affecting the filter pressure drop. However, there is a lack of research on the long-term system performance as well as the influence of environmental and operational parameters. In this paper, both field and laboratory tests were carried out to evaluate the long-term particle collection efficiency of a synthetic filter of class M6 with and without ionization. The effect of air velocity, temperature, relative humidity, and particle concentration were further investigated in laboratory tests. Results showed that ionization enhanced the filtration efficiency by 40%-units during most of the operation time. When the ionization system was managed by periodically switching the ionizer polarity, the filtration efficiency against PM0.3-0.5 was maintained above 50% during half a year. Furthermore, the pressure drop of the ionizer-assisted M6 filter was 25-30% lower than that of a filter of class F7. The evaluation of various influencing factors demonstrated that (1) air moisture reduced the increase of filtration efficiency; (2) higher upstream particle concentration and air velocity decreased the filtration efficiency; and (3) the air temperature had very limited effect on the filtration efficiency.

  4. Acoustofluidics 15: streaming with sound waves interacting with solid particles.

    PubMed

    Sadhal, S S

    2012-08-07

    In Part 15 of the tutorial series "Acoustofluidics-exploiting ultrasonic standing waves forces and acoustic streaming in microfluidic systems for cell and particle manipulation," we examine the interaction of acoustic fields with solid particles. The main focus here is the interaction of standing waves with spherical particles leading to streaming, together with some discussion on one non-spherical case. We begin with the classical problem of a particle at the velocity antinode of a standing wave, and then treat the problem of a sphere at the velocity node, followed by the intermediate situation of a particle between nodes. Finally, we discuss the effect of deviation from sphericity which brings about interesting fluid mechanics. The entire Focus article is devoted to the analysis of the nonlinear fluid mechanics by singular perturbation methods, and the study of the streaming phenomenon that ensues from the nonlinear interaction. With the intention of being instructive material, this tutorial cannot by any means be considered 'complete and comprehensive' owing to the complexity of the class of problems being covered herein.

  5. Theory and modeling of particles with DNA-mediated interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.

    2008-05-01

    In recent years significant attention has been attracted to proposals which utilize DNA for nanotechnological applications. Potential applications of these ideas range from the programmable self-assembly of colloidal crystals, to biosensors and nanoparticle based drug delivery platforms. In Chapter I we introduce the system, which generically consists of colloidal particles functionalized with specially designed DNA markers. The sequence of bases on the DNA markers determines the particle type. Due to the hybridization between complementary single-stranded DNA, specific, type-dependent interactions can be introduced between particles by choosing the appropriate DNA marker sequences. In Chapter II we develop a statistical mechanical description of the aggregation and melting behavior of particles with DNA-mediated interactions. In Chapter III a model is proposed to describe the dynamical departure and diffusion of particles which form reversible key-lock connections. In Chapter IV we propose a method to self-assemble nanoparticle clusters using DNA scaffolds. A natural extension is discussed in Chapter V, the programmable self-assembly of nanoparticle clusters where the desired cluster geometry is encoded using DNA-mediated interactions. In Chapter VI we consider a nanoparticle based drug delivery platform for targeted, cell specific chemotherapy. In Chapter VII we present prospects for future research: the connection between DNA-mediated colloidal crystallization and jamming, and the inverse problem in self-assembly.

  6. Particle Swarm Optimization With Interswarm Interactive Learning Strategy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Quande; Cheng, Shi; Zhang, Qingyu; Li, Li; Shi, Yuhui

    2016-10-01

    The learning strategy in the canonical particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is often blamed for being the primary reason for loss of diversity. Population diversity maintenance is crucial for preventing particles from being stuck into local optima. In this paper, we present an improved PSO algorithm with an interswarm interactive learning strategy (IILPSO) by overcoming the drawbacks of the canonical PSO algorithm's learning strategy. IILPSO is inspired by the phenomenon in human society that the interactive learning behavior takes place among different groups. Particles in IILPSO are divided into two swarms. The interswarm interactive learning (IIL) behavior is triggered when the best particle's fitness value of both the swarms does not improve for a certain number of iterations. According to the best particle's fitness value of each swarm, the softmax method and roulette method are used to determine the roles of the two swarms as the learning swarm and the learned swarm. In addition, the velocity mutation operator and global best vibration strategy are used to improve the algorithm's global search capability. The IIL strategy is applied to PSO with global star and local ring structures, which are termed as IILPSO-G and IILPSO-L algorithm, respectively. Numerical experiments are conducted to compare the proposed algorithms with eight popular PSO variants. From the experimental results, IILPSO demonstrates the good performance in terms of solution accuracy, convergence speed, and reliability. Finally, the variations of the population diversity in the entire search process provide an explanation why IILPSO performs effectively.

  7. Experimental Studies Of Wave-particle Interactions In Space Using Particle Correlators: Results And Future Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, M.; Buckley, A.; Carozzi, T.; Beloff, N.

    The technique of particle correlation measures directly electron modulations that result from naturally occurring and actively stimulated wave-particle interactions in space plasmas. In the past this technique has been used for studies of beam-plasma interactions, caused by both natural auroral electron beams via sounding rockets and by artificially generated electron beams on Shuttle missions: TSS-1/-TSS-1R. It has also been applied to studies of how electrons become energised by waves injected from in-situ transmitters (OEDIPUS-C). All four ESA Cluster-II spacecraft launched in 2000 to study the outer magnetosphere, cusp, and bow shock were implemented with electron correlators. Here the prevalent broader band wave-particle interactions have been more difficult to extract. However, the application of new statistical algorithms has permitted these correlators to provide a novel insight into turbulence occurring and also provided an independent means whereby electron count rates can be corrected for detector saturation effects.

  8. Particle transport in 3 He-rich events: wave-particle interactions and particle anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Zhang, L. D.; Mason, G. L.; Lakhina, G. S.; Hada, T.; Arballo, J. K.; Zwickl, R. D.

    2002-04-01

    Energetic particles and MHD waves are studied using simultaneous ISEE-3 data to investigate particle propagation and scattering between the source near the Sun and 1 AU. 3 He-rich events are of particular interest because they are typically low intensity "scatter-free" events. The largest solar proton events are of interest because they have been postulated to generate their own waves through beam instabilities. For 3 He-rich events, simultaneous interplanetary magnetic spectra are measured. The intensity of the interplanetary "fossil" turbulence through which the particles have traversed is found to be at the "quiet" to "intermediate" level of IMF activity. Pitch angle scattering rates and the corresponding particle mean free paths l

  9. Noisy quantum walks of two indistinguishable interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siloi, Ilaria; Benedetti, Claudia; Piccinini, Enrico; Piilo, Jyrki; Maniscalco, Sabrina; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Bordone, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the dynamics of continuous-time two-particle quantum walks on a one-dimensional noisy lattice. Depending on the initial condition, we show how the interplay between particle indistinguishability and interaction determines distinct propagation regimes. A realistic model for the environment is considered by introducing non-Gaussian noise as time-dependent fluctuations of the tunneling amplitudes between adjacent sites. We observe that the combined effect of particle interaction and fast noise (weak coupling with the environment) provides a faster propagation compared to the noiseless case. This effect can be understood in terms of the band structure of the Hubbard model, and a detailed analysis as a function of both noise and system parameters is presented.

  10. Bounds on halo-particle interactions from interstellar calorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chivukula, Sekhar R.; Cohen, Andrew G.; Dimopoulos, Savas; Walker, Terry P.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that the existence of neutral interstellar clouds constrains the interaction of any particulate dark-matter candidate with atomic hydrogen to be quite small. Even for a halo particle of mass 1 PeV (10 to the 6 GeV), it is shown that the cross section with hydrogen must be smaller than the typical atomic cross section that is expected for a positively charged particle bound to an electron. The argument presented is that if the clouds are in equilibrium, then the rate at which energy is deposited by collisions with dark-matter particles must be smaller than the rate at which the cloud can cool. This argument is used to constrain the interaction cross section of dark matter with hydrogen. Remarks are made on the general viability of charged dark matter. Comments are also made on a bound which derives from the dynamical stability of the halo.

  11. Valence ionized states of iron pentacarbonyl and eta5-cyclopentadienyl cobalt dicarbonyl studied by symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculation and collision-energy resolved Penning ionization electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Ohno, Koichi

    2010-02-28

    Valence ionized states of iron pentacarbonyl Fe(CO)(5) and eta(5)-cyclopentadienyl cobalt dicarbonyl Co(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2) have been studied by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, two-dimensional Penning ionization electron spectroscopy (2D-PIES), and symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculations. Theory provided reliable assignments for the complex ionization spectra of these molecules, which have metal-carbonyl bonds. Theoretical ionization energies agreed well with experimental observations and the calculated wave functions could explain the relative intensities of PIES spectra. The collision-energy dependence of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS) was obtained by 2D-PIES. To interpret these CEDPICS, the interaction potentials between the molecules and a Li atom were examined in several coordinates by calculations. The relation between the slope of the CEDPICS and the electronic structure of the ionized states, such as molecular symmetry and the spatial distribution of ionizing orbitals, was analyzed. In Fe(CO)(5), an attractive interaction was obtained for the equatorial CO, while the interaction for the axial CO direction was repulsive. For Co(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2), the interaction potential in the direction of both Co-C-O and Co-Cp ring was attractive. These anisotropic interactions and ionizing orbital distributions consistently explain the relative slopes of the CEDPICS.

  12. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential.

    PubMed

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2014-11-07

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10(14) W/cm(2) to 3.5 × 10(14) W/cm(2). Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  13. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 1014 W/cm2 to 3.5 × 1014 W/cm2. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  14. Interaction of nanosilver particles with human lymphocyte cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhornik, Alena; Baranova, Ludmila; Volotovski, Igor; Chizhik, Sergey; Drozd, Elizaveta; Sudas, Margarita; Buu Ngo, Quoc; Chau Nguyen, Hoai; Huynh, Thi Ha; Hien Dao, Trong

    2015-01-01

    The damaging effects of nanoparticles were hypothesized to be the oxidative stress caused by the formation of reactive oxygen species and initiation of inflammatory reactions. In this context a study on the effects of nanosilver particles on the formation of reactive oxygen species in human lymphocyte culture was carried out. The obtained results showed that fluorescence intensity considerably increased after cells had interacted with nanosilver particles of varying concentrations, indicating the formation of reactive oxygen species and their accumulation in lymphocyte cells. Morphological study of the lymphocyte cells under the effects of nanosilver particles showed that the change in morphology depends on the concentration and size of nanosilver particles: for a size ≤20 nm the lymphocyte cell significantly shrank with pronounced differences in the morphological structure of the cell membrane, but for a size ≥200 nm no change was observed.

  15. Desorption electrospray ionization-based imaging of interaction between vascular graft and human body.

    PubMed

    Bodzon-Kulakowska, Anna; Drabik, Anna; Mystkowska, Joanna; Chlabicz, Michal; Gacko, Marek; Dabrowski, Jan R; Mielczarek, Przemyslaw; Silberring, Jerzy; Suder, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) is known as a fast and convenient MS-based method for lipid imaging in various biological materials. Here, we applied this technique to visualize lipid distribution in a vascular graft removed from a patient's body. This is a good example of the DESI system capabilities toward imaging of interaction between artificial material and living tissues. Detailed analysis allowed for visualization of the spatial distribution of selected lipids in this implanted, artificial material. Not only DESI-MSI allowed visualization of lipid distribution in the investigated material but also enabled identification of the detected molecular species using MS/MS. Here, this technique was successfully used to evaluate the saturation and spatial distribution of endogenous lipids in the artificial vascular graft. Unambiguous identification of the lipids was done with the aid of fragmentation procedure. We also showed that various lipids localize preferably in graft material or internal plaque existing inside the graft.

  16. Time dilation in relativistic two-particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, B. T.; Morris, M. C.; Ware, M. R.; Su, Q.; Grobe, R.; Stefanovich, E. V.

    2010-11-15

    We study the orbits of two interacting particles described by a fully relativistic classical mechanical Hamiltonian. We use two sets of initial conditions. In the first set (dynamics 1) the system's center of mass is at rest. In the second set (dynamics 2) the center of mass evolves with velocity V. If dynamics 1 is observed from a reference frame moving with velocity -V, the principle of relativity requires that all observables must be identical to those of dynamics 2 seen from the laboratory frame. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that kinematic Lorentz space-time transformations fail to transform particle observables between the two frames. This is explained as a result of the inevitable interaction dependence of the boost generator in the instant form of relativistic dynamics. Despite general inaccuracies of the Lorentz formulas, the orbital periods are correctly predicted by the Einstein's time dilation factor for all interaction strengths.

  17. Particle Interactions in Mixed Solvents and Rough Surfaces Formed by Sedimenting Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnaz, Mehmet Levent

    The quasi-two-dimensional sedimentation of silica particles in a viscous fluid results in quasi-one-dimensional rough surfaces. These surfaces are rough on all length -scales between the particle size and the cell size, but different roughness exponents are observed in two well defined length-scale regimes. The range of hydrodynamic forces should play an important role in determining which, if either, length-scale regime shows universal properties. The strong similarity between the height-height correlations of the surface and the density-density correlations inside the flow at longer lengthscales suggests that the roughness at longer lengthscales is very closely tied to the hydrodynamic interactions in the fluid. Measurements have been performed at three different cell-aspect-ratios and at three different fluid viscosities and in no case is there an observable change in the cross-over length-scales of the system. In another work we have measured the interactions of charged colloidal particles in near critical mixtures of 2.6 lutidine and water (LW). An earlier survey has found a temperature dependent flocculation of particles in the one phase region of the liquid mixture. We have now measured static light scattering as a function of number density of colloidal particles and system temperature at two solvent-mixture compositions on the aggregation side of the coexistence curve of one choice of particles. Using a Zimm analysis in the non-aggregating region where the structure factor does not change rapidly with scattering angle, we have extracted values of the 2nd viral coefficient of the colloidal particles. It is possible to extend this measurement to temperatures close enough to the aggregation temperature to establish the temperature at which the virial coefficient falls through zero as the net particle interaction becomes attractive.

  18. How to model the interaction of charged Janus particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieronimus, Reint; Raschke, Simon; Heuer, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the interaction of charged Janus particles including screening effects. The explicit interaction is mapped via a least square method on a variable number n of systematically generated tensors that reflect the angular dependence of the potential. For n = 2 we show that the interaction is equivalent to a model previously described by Erdmann, Kröger, and Hess (EKH). Interestingly, this mapping is for n = 2 not able to capture the subtleties of the interaction for small screening lengths. Rather, a larger number of tensors has to be used. We find that the characteristics of the Janus type interaction plays an important role for the aggregation behavior. We obtained cluster structures up to the size of 13 particles for n = 2 and 36 and screening lengths κ-1 = 0.1 and 1.0 via Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of the screening length is analyzed and the structures are compared to results for an electrostatic-type potential and for the multipole-expanded Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. We find that a dipole-like potential (EKH or dipole DLVO approximation) is not able to sufficiently reproduce the anisotropy effects of the potential. Instead, a higher order expansion has to be used to obtain cluster structures that are compatible with experimental observations. The resulting minimum-energy clusters are compared to those of sticky hard sphere systems. Janus particles with a short-range screened interaction resemble sticky hard sphere clusters for all considered particle numbers, whereas for long-range screening even very small clusters are structurally different.

  19. Does the ionization potential condition employed in QTP functionals mitigate the self-interaction error?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranasinghe, Duminda S.; Margraf, Johannes T.; Jin, Yifan; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2017-01-01

    Though contrary to conventional wisdom, the interpretation of all occupied Kohn-Sham eigenvalues as vertical ionization potentials is justified by several formal and numerical arguments. Similarly, the performance of density functional approximations (DFAs) for fractionally charged systems has been extensively studied as a measure of one- and many-electron self-interaction errors (MSIEs). These complementary perspectives (initially recognized in ab initio dft) are shown to lead to the unifying concept that satisfying Bartlett's IP theorem in DFA's mitigates self-interaction errors. In this contribution, we show that the IP-optimized QTP functionals (reparameterization of CAM-B3LYP where all eigenvalues are approximately equal to vertical IPs) display reduced self-interaction errors in a variety of tests including the He2+ potential curve. Conversely, the MSIE-optimized rCAM-B3LYP functional also displays accurate orbital eigenvalues. It is shown that the CAM-QTP and rCAM-B3LYP functionals show improved dissociation limits, fundamental gaps and thermochemical accuracy compared to their parent functional CAM-B3LYP.

  20. Numerical investigation of fluid-particle interactions for embolic stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Padilla, Jose; Shadden, Shawn C.

    2016-04-01

    Roughly one-third of all strokes are caused by an embolus traveling to a cerebral artery and blocking blood flow in the brain. The objective of this study is to gain a detailed understanding of the dynamics of embolic particles within arteries. Patient computed tomography image is used to construct a three-dimensional model of the carotid bifurcation. An idealized carotid bifurcation model of same vessel diameters was also constructed for comparison. Blood flow velocities and embolic particle trajectories are resolved using a coupled Euler-Lagrange approach. Blood is modeled as a Newtonian fluid, discretized using the finite volume method, with physiologically appropriate inflow and outflow boundary conditions. The embolus trajectory is modeled using Lagrangian particle equations accounting for embolus interaction with blood as well as vessel wall. Both one- and two-way fluid-particle coupling are considered, the latter being implemented using momentum sources augmented to the discretized flow equations. It was observed that for small-to-moderate particle sizes (relative to vessel diameters), the estimated particle distribution ratio—with and without the inclusion of two-way fluid-particle momentum exchange—were found to be similar. The maximum observed differences in distribution ratio with and without the coupling were found to be higher for the idealized bifurcation model. Additionally, the distribution was found to be reasonably matching the volumetric flow distribution for the idealized model, while a notable deviation from volumetric flow was observed in the anatomical model. It was also observed from an analysis of particle path lines that particle interaction with helical flow, characteristic of anatomical vasculature models, could play a prominent role in transport of embolic particle. The results indicate therefore that flow helicity could be an important hemodynamic indicator for analysis of embolus particle transport. Additionally, in the presence

  1. Magnetic microswimmers: Controlling particle approach through magnetic and hydrodynamic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkati, Farshad; Cheang, U. Kei; Kim, Minjun; Fu, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We investigate magnetic microswimmers actuated by a rotating magnetic field that may be useful for drug delivery, micro-surgery, or diagnostics in human body. For modular swimmers, assembly and disassembly requires understanding the interactions between the swimmer and other modules in the fluid. Here, we discuss possible mechanisms for a frequency-dependent attraction/repulsion between a three-bead, achiral swimmer and other magnetic particles, which represent modular assembly elements. We first investigate the hydrodynamic interaction between a swimmer and nearby particle by studying the Lagrangian trajectories in the vicinity of the swimmer. Then we show that the magnetic forces can be attractive or repulsive depending on the spatial arrangement of the swimmer and particle, with a magnitude that decreases with increasing frequency. Combining magnetic and hydrodynamic effects allows us to understand the overall behavior of magnetic particles near the swimmer. Interestingly, we find that the frequency of rotation can be used to control when the particle can closely approach the swimmer, with potential application to assembly.

  2. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Klumov, Boris A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.

    2015-07-01

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of "color," i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such "chromatic" interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the "colored" and "colorless" systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral and cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the "colorless" patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding "colored" one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.

  3. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral and cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.

  4. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    DOE PAGES

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral andmore » cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.« less

  5. The PHOCUS Project: Particle Interactions in the Polar Summer Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumbel, J.; Hedin, J.; Khaplanov, M.

    2012-12-01

    On the morning of July 21, 2011, the PHOCUS sounding rocket was launched from Esrange, Sweden, into strong noctilucent clouds (NLC) and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) observed by the Esrange lidar and the ESRAD MST radar. The aim of the PHOCUS project (Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer mesosphere) is to study mesospheric particles (ice and meteoric smoke) and their interaction with their neutral and charged environment. Starting out from first ideas in 2005, PHOCUS has developed into a comprehensive venture that connects to a number of new and renewed scientific questions. Interactions of interest comprise the charging and nucleation of particles, the relationship between meteoric smoke and ice, and the influence of these particles on gas-phase chemistry. This presentation gives an overview of the campaign and scientific results. The backbone of the campaign was a sounding rocket with 18 instruments from 8 scientific groups in Sweden, Norway, Germany, Austria and the USA. Atmospheric composition and ice particle properties were probed by a set of optical instruments from Stockholm University, in collaboration with the University in Trondheim. Exciting new instrument developments concerned microwave radiometers for in situ measurements of water vapour at 183 and 558 GHz by Chalmers University of Technology. Charged particles were probed by impact detectors from the University of Colorado, the University of Tromsø and the Leibniz Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP), complemented by direct particle sampling from Stockholm University. The neutral and charged background state of the atmosphere was quantified by the Technical University Graz, IAP, and the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment. Important ground-based instrumentation included the Esrange lidar, the ESRAD MST radar, the SkiYMET meteor radar and EISCAT.

  6. Electrokinetic particle-electrode interactions at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud; Schnitzer, Ory

    2013-01-01

    We provide a macroscale description of electrokinetic particle-electrode interactions at high frequencies, where chemical reactions at the electrodes are negligible. Using a thin-double-layer approximation, our starting point is the set of macroscale equations governing the “bounded” configuration comprising of a particle suspended between two electrodes, wherein the electrodes are governed by a capacitive charging condition and the imposed voltage is expressed as an integral constraint. In the large-cell limit the bounded model is transformed into an effectively equivalent “unbounded” model describing the interaction between the particle and a single electrode, where the imposed-voltage condition is manifested in a uniform field at infinity together with a Robin-type condition applying at the electrode. This condition, together with the standard no-flux condition applying at the particle surface, leads to a linear problem governing the electric potential in the fluid domain in which the dimensionless frequency ω of the applied voltage appears as a governing parameter. In the high-frequency limit ω≫1 the flow is dominated by electro-osmotic slip at the particle surface, the contribution of electrode electro-osmosis being O(ω-2) small. That simplification allows for a convenient analytical investigation of the prevailing case where the clearance between the particle and the adjacent electrode is small. Use of tangent-sphere coordinates allows to calculate the electric and flows fields as integral Hankel transforms. At large distances from the particle, along the electrode, both fields decay with the fourth power of distance.

  7. Light-particle single ionization of argon: Influence of the projectile charge sign

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S.; Olson, R. E.

    2009-07-15

    The ionization of the 3p orbital of argon by incident electrons and positrons is studied by means of the post version of the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial-state model. Results are presented at both 200 and 500 eV impact energies for conditions amenable to present experiments. Differences in the fully differential cross sections (FDCSs) are analyzed and the influence of the projectile charge sign on the emission dynamics is discussed. The FDCSs are found to display the classic binary plus recoil peak structure at 500 eV, but transition to a more complicated four-lobed structure at the lower impact energy.

  8. Differential potential of anisotropic ionization of cosmic particles in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, P. I.

    A determination of the profiles of electron production rates during vertical and quasi-vertical penetrations of solar cosmic rays is presented. A possible quantitative interpretation of particle penetrations with complicated spatial distributions is also presented in the light of recent data acquisitions from the High Altitude Plasma Instrument of the Dynamics Explorer-1 satellite. Two types of particles are found to participate in the precipitation. The first is characterized by double-maximum Maxwell distributions: a high-energy isotropic component and a low-energy anisotropic component. The particles of the second type are parallel and antiparallel with respect to geomagnetic field lines.

  9. Experimental studies of wave-particle interactions in space using particle correlators: Results and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, M. P.; Buckley, A. M.; Carozzi, T.; Beloff, N.

    The technique of particle correlation measures directly electron modulations that result from naturally occurring and actively stimulated wave-particle interactions in space plasmas. In the past this technique has been used for studies of beam-plasma interactions, caused by both natural auroral electron beams via sounding rockets and by artificially generated electron beams on Space Shuttle missions (STS-46, STS-75). It has also been applied to studies of how electrons become energised by waves injected from in-situ transmitters (e.g OEDIPUS-C sounding rocket). All four ESA Cluster-II spacecraft launched in 2000 to study the outer magnetosphere, cusp, and bow shock were implemented with electron correlators. Here the prevalent weaker wave-particle interactions have been more difficult to extract, however, the application of new statistical algorithms has permitted these correlators to provide a novel insight into the plasma turbulence that occurs. Present work involves technical improvements to both sensor design and correlator implementation that enable many electron energy-angle combinations to be simultaneously monitored for wave-particle interactions. A broad energy-angle range spectrograph connected to a multi-channel, multi-frequency range FPGA implemented array of correlators is scheduled to fly early 2004. Neural network techniques previously flown on STS-46 and STS-75, and statistical tests developed for Cluster-II will be used on-board to select data to be transmitted.

  10. Experimental studies of wave-particle interactions in space using particle correlators: results and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, M.; Buckley, A.; Carozzi, T.; Beloff, N.

    The technique of particle correlation measures directly electron modulations that result from naturally occurring and actively stimulated wave-particle interactions in space plasmas. In the past this technique has been used for studies of beam-plasma interactions, caused by both natural auroral electron beams via sounding rockets and by artificially generated electron beams on Shuttle missions: TSS-1/-TSS -1R. It has also been applied to studies of how electrons become energised by waves injected from in-situ transmitters (OEDIPUS-C). All four ESA Cluster-II spacecraft launched in 2000 to study the outer magnetosphere, cusp, and bow shock were implemented with electron correlators. Here the prevalent broader band wave-particle interactions have been more difficult to extract. However, the application of new statistical algorithms has permitted these correlators to provide a novel insight into turbulence occurring and also provided an independent means whereby electron count rates can be corrected for detector saturation effects. Present work involves technical improvements to both sensor design and correlator implementation that enable many electron energy-angle combinations to be simultaneously monitored for wave-particle interactions. A b oad energy -angler range spectrograph connected to a multi-channel, multi-frequency range FPGA implemented array of correlators is scheduled to fly early 2004. Neural network techniques previously flown on TSS -1 , TSS-1R, and statistical tests developed for Cluster-II will be used on-board to select data to be transmitted.

  11. Gas interaction effects on lunar bonded particles and their implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukherjee, N. R.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for an experimental investigation of gas-interaction effects on different Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 lunar-soil samples containing bonded particles. In the experiments, lunar fines were exposed to pure O2, pure water vapor, HCl, NH3, N2, HCOOH, and CH3NH2, in order to observe whether bonded particles would separate. In addition, repeated gas adsorption/desorption measurements were performed to determine the nature and reactive properties of the particle surfaces, and surface areas were measured for comparison with analogous terrestrial samples to determine whether the surface areas of highly radiation-damaged particles were larger or smaller. It is found that N2 is apparently ineffective in separating bonded particles and that the ratio of Apollo 11 to Apollo 12 bonded particles separated by a particular gas exposure ranges from 2.5 to 3.0. Possible reasons for differences in material surface properties at the two Apollo sites are considered, and it is concluded that material from a certain depth at some other site was transported to the Apollo 12 site and mixed with the original material in recent years (considerably less than 2000 years ago).

  12. Characterization of the interactions within fine particle mixtures in highly concentrated suspensions for advanced particle processing.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Akira; Bryant, Gary

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to summarize recent investigations into the dispersion of fine particles, and the characterization of their interactions, in concentrated suspensions. This summary will provide a better understanding of the current status of this research, and will provide useful feedback for advanced particle processing. Such processes include the fabrication of functional nanostructures and the sustainable beneficiation of complex ores. For example, there has been increasing demand for complex ore utilization due to the noticeable decrease in the accessibility of high grade and easily extractable ores. In order to maintain the sustainable use of mineral resources, the effective beneficiation of complex ores is urgently required. It can be successfully achieved only with selective particle/mineral dispersion/liberation and the assistance of mineralogical and particle characterization.

  13. Angular Dependence of Ionization by Circularly Polarized Light Calculated with Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction with an Absorbing Potential.

    PubMed

    Hoerner, Paul; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2017-02-16

    The angular dependence of ionization by linear and circularly polarized light has been examined for N2, NH3, H2O, CO2, CH2O, pyrazine, methyloxirane, and vinyloxirane. Time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential was used to simulate ionization by a seven cycle 800 nm cosine squared pulse with intensities ranging from 0.56 × 10(14) to 5.05 × 10(14) W cm(-2). The shapes of the ionization yield for linearly polarized light can be understood primarily in terms of the nodal structure of the highest occupied orbitals. Depending on the orbital energies, ionization from lower-lying orbitals may also make significant contributions to the shapes. The shapes of the ionization yield for circularly polarized light can be readily explained in terms of the shapes for linearly polarized light. Averaging the results for linear polarization over orientations perpendicular to the direction of propagation yields shapes that are in very good agreement with direct calculations of the ionization yield by circularly polarized light.

  14. pH-responsive aqueous foams stabilized by ionizable latex particles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Murakami, Ryo; Armes, Steven P; Fujii, Syuji; Schmid, Andreas

    2007-08-14

    We have designed a type of colloidal particle whose surface characteristics are sensitive to the pH of the aqueous phase in which they are dispersed. Particles of polystyrene latex stabilized by poly(acrylic acid) can act as stabilizers of aqueous foams by adsorbing at the air-water surface. Foams can be prepared and stabilized only at pH values below the isoelectric point where particles are either uncharged and flocculated or acquire a positive charge. At high pH where particles are anionic, no foam forms. This influence of pH on foamability and stability applies to both pH-dependent and pH-responsive systems.

  15. Single and double ionization of helium by the impact of fast charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Madison, D. H.; Macek, Joseph H.

    2005-12-01

    A survey of the recent literature shows that paradoxes abound in electron- and ion-impact ionization of helium. For example, Schulz et al. [M. Schulz, R. Moshammer, D. Fischer, H. Kollmus, D.H. Madison, S. Jones, J. Ullrich, Nature 422 (2003) 48] found that first-Born and three-body distorted-wave (3DW) theories reproduced their data for single ionization of helium by very fast fully stripped carbon ions in the scattering plane, but not outside the scattering plane. For much slower impacting carbon ions, however, Madison et al. [D.H. Madison, D. Fischer, M. Foster, M. Schulz, R. Moshammer, S. Jones, J. Ullrich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 253201] found good agreement between 3DW theory and experiment, even outside the scattering plane. This creates a dilemma, since distorted-wave perturbation theories are generally thought to improve with increasing, not decreasing, projectile speed! In this contribution, we will address these and other issues, and suggest possible ways of proceeding.

  16. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of Radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouza, Romualdo; Vadas, Justin; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M.

    2017-01-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. The detector is optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (<) 5 MeV/A. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a rise-time of 60 to 70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate while providing a time resolution of 6 to 8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as 8 % for an energy deposit of 3.5 MeV. Beam tests indicate that the detector is an effective tool for the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams at beam intensities up to 3 x 105 ions/s. Supported by the U.S. DOE under Award # DE-FG02-88ER-40404 and the NSF under Grant No. 1342962.

  17. High-rate axial-field ionization chamber for particle identification of radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, J.; Singh, Varinderjit; Visser, G.; Alexander, A.; Hudan, S.; Huston, J.; Wiggins, B. B.; Chbihi, A.; Famiano, M.; Bischak, M. M.; deSouza, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    The design, construction and performance characteristics of a simple axial-field ionization chamber suitable for identifying ions in a radioactive beam are presented. Optimized for use with low-energy radioactive beams (< 5 MeV / A) the detector presents only three 0.5 μm/cm2 foils to the beam in addition to the detector gas. A fast charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) integrated into the detector design is also described. Coupling this fast CSA to the axial field ionization chamber produces an output pulse with a risetime of 60-70 ns and a fall time of 100 ns, making the detector capable of sustaining a relatively high rate and providing a time resolution of 6-8 ns. Tests with an α source establish the detector energy resolution as ∼ 8 % for an energy deposit of ∼3.5 MeV. The energy resolution with beams of 2.5 and 4.0 MeV/A 39K ions and the dependence of the energy resolution on beam intensity is measured. At an instantaneous rate of 3×105 ions/s the energy resolution has degraded to 14% with a pileup of 12%. The good energy resolution of this detector at rates up to 3×105 ions/s makes it an effective tool in the characterization of low-energy radioactive beams.

  18. Quantum particle interacting with a metallic particle: Spectra from quantum Langevin theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, W. M. Edmund; Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2017-01-01

    The effect of a nearby metallic particle on the quantum optical properties of a quantum particle in the four-level double Raman configuration is studied using the quantum Langevin approach. We obtain analytical expressions for the correlated quantum fields of Stokes and anti-Stokes photons emitted from the system and perform analysis on how the interparticle distance, the direction of observation or detection, the strengths of controllable laser fields, the presence of surface plasmon resonance, and the number density of the quantum particle affect the quantum spectra of the Stokes and anti-Stokes fields. We explore the physics behind the quantum-particle-metallic-nanoparticle interaction within the dipole approximation, that is, when the interparticle distance is much larger than the sizes of the particles. Our results show the dependence of the spectra on the interparticle distance in the form of oscillatory behavior with damping as the interparticle distance increases. At weaker laser fields the enhancement of quantum fields which manifests itself in the form of a Fano dip in the central peak of the spectra becomes significant. Also, the quantum-particle-metallic-nanoparticle coupling, which is affected by the size of the metallic nanoparticle and the number density of the quantum particle, changes the angular dependence of the spectra by breaking the angular rotational symmetry. In the presence of surface plasmon resonance the oscillatory dependence of the spectra on the interparticle distance and angles of observation becomes even stronger due to the plasmonic enhancement effect.

  19. [Research in elementary particles and interactions]. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Adair, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Schmidt, M.

    1992-05-01

    Research of the Yale University groups in the areas of elementary particles and their interactions are outlined. Work on the following topics is reported: development of CDF trigger system; SSC detector development; study of heavy flavors at TPL; search for composite objects produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions; high-energy polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; rare K{sup +} decays; unpolarized high-energy muon scattering; muon anomalous magnetic moment; theoretical high-energy physics including gauge theories, symmetry breaking, string theory, and gravitation theory; study of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} interactions with the SLD detector at SLAC; and the production and decay of particles containing charm and beauty quarks.

  20. Quantum breathing mode of interacting particles in harmonic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Sebastian; Hochstuhl, David; Balzer, Karsten; Bonitz, Michael

    2010-04-01

    The breathing mode - the uniform radial expansion and contraction of a system of interacting particles - is analyzed. Extending our previous work [Bauch et al 2009 Phys. Rev. B. 80 054515] we present a systematic analysis of the breathing mode for fermions with an inverse power law interaction potential w(r) ~ r-dwith d = 1,2,3 in the whole range of coupling parameters. The results thus cover the range from the ideal "gas" to the Wigner crystal-like state. In addition to exact results for two particles obtained from a solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation we present results for N = 4,6 from multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock simulations.

  1. A mechanistic interpretation of the resonant wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung; O'Neil, Thomas M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides a simple mechanistic interpretation of the resonant wave-particle interaction of Landau. For the simple case of a Langmuir wave in a Vlasov plasma, the non-resonant electrons satisfy an oscillator equation that is driven resonantly by the bare electric field from the resonant electrons, and in the case of wave damping, this complex driver field is of a phase to reduce the oscillation amplitude. The wave-particle resonant interaction also occurs in waves governed by 2D E × B drift dynamics, such as a diocotron wave. In this case, the bare electric field from the resonant electrons causes E × B drift motion back in the core plasma, reducing the amplitude of the wave.

  2. Losses and nonlinear steady-state particle distribution functions for fully ionized tokamak-plasmas in the collisional transport regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnino, G.

    2011-03-01

    Fully ionized L-mode tokamak plasmas in the fully collisional (Pfirsch-Schlüter) and in the low-collisional (banana) nonlinear transport regimes are analyzed. We derive the expressions for particles and heat losses together with the steady-state particle distribution functions in the several collisional transport regimes. The validity of the nonlinear closure equations, previously derived, has been indirectly tested by checking that the obtained particle distribution functions are indeed solutions of the nonlinear, steady-state, Vlasov-Landau gyro-kinetic equations. A quite encouraging result is the fact that, for L-mode tokamak plasmas a dissymmetry appears between the ion and electron transport coefficients: the latter submits to a nonlinear correction, which makes the radial electron coefficients much larger than the former. In particular we show that when the L-mode JET plasma is out of the linear region, the Pfirsch-Schlüter electron transport coefficients are corrected by an amplification factor, which may reach values of order 102. Such a correction is absent for ions. On the contrary, in the banana regime, the ion transport coefficients are increased by a factor 2 and the nonlinear corrections for electrons are negligible. These results are in line with experiments.

  3. Dynamics of a suspension of interacting yolk-shell particles

    DOE PAGES

    Sánchez Díaz, L. E.; Cortes-Morales, E. C.; Li, X.; ...

    2014-12-01

    In this work we study the self-diusion properties of a liquid of hollow spherical particles (shells) bearing a smaller solid sphere in their interior (yolks). We model this system using purely repulsive hard-body interactions between all (shell and yolk) particles, but assume the presence of a background ideal solvent such that all the particles execute free Brownian motion between collisions, characterized by short-time self-diusion coecients D0 s for the shells and D0 y for the yolks. Using a softened version of these interparticle potentials we perform Brownian dynamics simulations to determine the mean squared displacement and intermediate scattering function ofmore » the yolk-shell complex. These results can be understood in terms of a set of eective Langevin equations for the N interacting shell particles, pre-averaged over the yolks' degrees of freedom, from which an approximate self-consistent description of the simulated self-diusion properties can be derived. Here we compare the theoretical and simulated results between them, and with the results for the same system in the absence of yolks. We nd that the yolks, which have no eect on the shell-shell static structure, in uence the dynamic properties in a predictable manner, fully captured by the theory.« less

  4. Dynamics of a suspension of interacting yolk-shell particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez Díaz, L. E.; Cortes-Morales, E. C.; Li, X.; Chen, Wei-Ren; Medina-Noyola, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work we study the self-diusion properties of a liquid of hollow spherical particles (shells) bearing a smaller solid sphere in their interior (yolks). We model this system using purely repulsive hard-body interactions between all (shell and yolk) particles, but assume the presence of a background ideal solvent such that all the particles execute free Brownian motion between collisions, characterized by short-time self-diusion coecients D0 s for the shells and D0 y for the yolks. Using a softened version of these interparticle potentials we perform Brownian dynamics simulations to determine the mean squared displacement and intermediate scattering function of the yolk-shell complex. These results can be understood in terms of a set of eective Langevin equations for the N interacting shell particles, pre-averaged over the yolks' degrees of freedom, from which an approximate self-consistent description of the simulated self-diusion properties can be derived. Here we compare the theoretical and simulated results between them, and with the results for the same system in the absence of yolks. We nd that the yolks, which have no eect on the shell-shell static structure, in uence the dynamic properties in a predictable manner, fully captured by the theory.

  5. Alpha particle heating at comet-solar wind interaction regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, A. S.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1995-01-01

    The satellite observations at comet Halley have shown strong heating of solar wind alpha particles over an extended region dominated by high-intensity, low-frequency turbulence. These waves are excited by the water group pickup ions and can energize the solar wind plasma by different heating processes. The alpha particle heating by the Landau damping of kinetic Alfven waves and the transit time damping of low-frequency hydromagnetic waves in this region of high plasma beta are studied in this paper. The Alfven wave heating was shown to be the dominant mechanism for the observed proton heating, but it is found to be insufficient to account for the observed alpha particle heating. The transit time damping due to the interaction of the ions with the electric fields associated with the magnetic field compressions of magnetohydrodynamic waves is found to heat the alpha particles preferentially over the protons. Comparison of the calculated heating times for the transit time damping with the observations from comet Halley shows good agreement. These processes contribute to the thermalization of the solar wind by the conversion of its directed energy into the thermal energy in the transition region at comet-solar wind interaction.

  6. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation.

  7. Sideband growth in nonlinear Landau wave-particle interaction.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinca, A. L.

    1972-01-01

    The distortion of the electron velocity distribution caused by a large amplitude Landau wave is determined analytically for the initial-value problem. The resulting stability of electrostatic perturbations impressed on the evolving plasma is studied. Narrow sidebands of the applied frequency experience consecutive growths of large magnitude during the early stages of the nonlinear wave-particle interaction. The significance of the derived results to both wave propagation experiments and triggered VLF emissions in the magnetosphere is discussed.

  8. A study for the detection of ionizing particles with phototransistors on thick high-resistivity silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batignani, G.; Angelini, C.; Bisogni, M. G.; Boscardin, M.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bosisio, L.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciacchi, M.; Dalla Betta, G. F.; Dittongo, S.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregori, P.; Han, D. J.; Manfredi, P. F.; Manghisoni, M.; Marchiori, G.; Neri, N.; Novelli, M.; Paoloni, E.; Piemonte, C.; Rachevskaia, I.; Rama, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Rizzo, G.; Ronchin, S.; Rosso, V.; Simi, G.; Speziali, V.; Stefanini, A.; Zorzi, N.

    2004-09-01

    We report on bipolar NPN phototransistors fabricated at ITC-IRST on thick high-resistivity silicon substrates. The phototransistor emitter is composed of a phosphorus n+ implant, the base is a diffused high-energy boron implant, and the collector is the 600-800 μm thick silicon bulk, contacted on the backplane. We have studied the current amplification for two different doping profiles of the emitter, obtaining values of β ranging from 60 to 3000. For various emitter and base configurations, we measured the static device characteristics and extracted the leakage currents and the base resistance, verifying the fundamental relationship between them and the total base capacitances. The use of such phototransistors to detect ionizing particles is exploited and discussed.

  9. Fitted empirical reference cross sections for K-shell ionization by alpha particles

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, H.; Bolik, O. )

    1993-05-01

    On the basis of the authors' collection of experimental x-ray and Auger production cross-section data for H and He ions, a table is presented of best-fitted cross sections for K-shell vacancy production (direct ionization plus electron capture) by [sup 4]He ions on all elements from [sub 6]C to [sub 92]U. Experimental values are first converted (if necessary) to vacancy production cross sections using fluorescence yields with an approximate correction for the effect of multiple ionization. These values are then normalized, i.e., divided, by an improved version (due to Benka et al.) of the ECPSSR theory by Brandt and Lapicki, to which a correction for electron capture by the projectile (following Lapicki and McDaniel) has been added. Since is has been found empirically that the normalized cross sections (which describe the deviation of theory from experiment), at a certain scaled projectile speed, depend only on the ratio of projectile and target atomic numbers, the data for both He and H ions can be used as input. The normalized values are averaged, fitted by a polynomial, and multiplied by theory to produce best reference cross sections. Discrepant data sets are rejected using a statistical criterion which compares the deviations found to the errors stated in the original publications. The error assigned to the cross section consists of a calculated random contribution and an estimated systematic contribution that describes the limitations of the method. A list of the experimental input data (for [sup 1]H, [sup 2]H, [sup 3]He, and [sup 4]He projectiles) and a table showing the consistency or inconsistency of these data are also given. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Enhanced fluctuations of interacting particles confined in a box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfau, Jean-Baptiste; Coste, Christophe; Saint Jean, Michel

    2012-04-01

    We study the position fluctuations of interacting particles aligned in a finite cell that avoid any crossing in equilibrium with a thermal bath. The focus is put on the influence of the confining force directed along the cell length. We show that the system may be modeled as a 1D chain of particles with identical masses, linked with linear springs of varying spring constants. The confining force may be accounted for by linear springs linked to the walls. When the confining force range is increased toward the inside of the chain, a paradoxical behavior is exhibited. The outermost particles fluctuations are enhanced, whereas those of the inner particles are reduced. A minimum of fluctuations is observed at a distance of the cell extremities that scales linearly with the confining force range. Those features are in very good agreement with the model. Moreover, the simulations exhibit an asymmetry in their fluctuations which is an anharmonic effect. It is characterized by the measurement of the skewness, which is found to be strictly positive for the outer particles when the confining force is short ranged.

  11. Turbulence-particle interactions under surface gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paskyabi, Mostafa Bakhoday

    2016-11-01

    The dispersion and transport of single inertial particles through an oscillatory turbulent aquatic environment are examined numerically by a Lagrangian particle tracking model using a series of idealised test cases. The turbulent mixing is incorporated into the Lagrangian model by the means of a stochastic scheme in which the inhomogeneous turbulent quantities are governed by a one-dimensional k- ɛ turbulence closure scheme. This vertical mixing model is further modified to include the effects of surface gravity waves including Coriolis-Stokes forcing, wave breaking, and Langmuir circulations. To simplify the complex interactions between the deterministic and the stochastic phases of flow, we assume a time-invariant turbulent flow field and exclude the hydrodynamic biases due to the effects of ambient mean current. The numerical results show that the inertial particles acquire perturbed oscillations traced out as time-varying sinking/rising orbits in the vicinity of the sea surface under linear and cnoidal waves and acquire a non-looping single arc superimposed with the high-frequency fluctuations beneath the nonlinear solitary waves. Furthermore, we briefly summarise some recipes through the course of this paper on the implementation of the stochastic particle tracking models to realistically describe the drift and suspension of inertial particles throughout the water column.

  12. Triviality of a model of particles with point interactions in the thermodynamic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Thomas; Seiringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    We consider a model of fermions interacting via point interactions, defined via a certain weighted Dirichlet form. While for two particles the interaction corresponds to infinite scattering length, the presence of further particles effectively decreases the interaction strength. We show that the model becomes trivial in the thermodynamic limit, in the sense that the free energy density at any given particle density and temperature agrees with the corresponding expression for non-interacting particles.

  13. Particle interactions in kaolinite suspensions and corresponding aggregate structures.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Hampton, Marc A; Stokes, Jason R; Nguyen, Anh V; Miller, Jan D

    2011-07-01

    The surface charge densities of the silica face surface and the alumina face surface of kaolinite particles, recently determined from surface force measurements using atomic force microscopy, show a distinct dependence on the pH of the system. The silica face was found to be negatively charged at pH>4, whereas the alumina face surface was found to be positively charged at pH<6, and negatively charged at pH>8. The surface charge densities of the silica face and the alumina face were utilized in this study to determine the interaction energies between different surfaces of kaolinite particles. Results indicate that the silica face-alumina face interaction is dominant for kaolinite particle aggregation at low pH. This face-face association increases the stacking of kaolinite layers, and thereby promotes the edge-face (edge-silica face and edge-alumina face) and face-face (silica face-alumina face) associations with increasing pH, and hence the maximum shear-yield stress at pH 5-5.5. With further increase in pH, the face-face and edge-face association decreases due to increasing surface charge density on the silica face and the edge surfaces, and decreasing surface charge density on the alumina face. At high pH, all kaolinite surfaces become negatively charged, kaolinite particles are dispersed, and the suspension is stabilized. The face-face association at low pH has been confirmed from cryo-SEM images of kaolinite aggregates taken from suspension which show that the particles are mostly organized in a face-face and edge-face manner. At higher pH conditions, the cryo-SEM images of the kaolinite aggregates reveal a lower degree of consolidation and the edge-edge association is evident.

  14. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion.

  15. Interactive computational models of particle dynamics using virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, T.; Diachin, D.; Freitag, L.; Heath, D.; Herzog, J.; Michels, W.

    1996-12-31

    An increasing number of industrial applications rely on computational models to reduce costs in product design, development, and testing cycles. Here, the authors discuss an interactive environment for the visualization, analysis, and modification of computational models used in industrial settings. In particular, they focus on interactively placing massless, massed, and evaporating particulate matter in computational fluid dynamics applications.they discuss the numerical model used to compute the particle pathlines in the fluid flow for display and analysis. They briefly describe the toolkits developed for vector and scalar field visualization, interactive particulate source placement, and a three-dimensional GUI interface. This system is currently used in two industrial applications, and they present the tools in the context of these applications. They summarize the current state of the project and offer directions for future research.

  16. Model-independent analyses of dark-matter particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2015-03-24

    A model-independent treatment of dark-matter particle elastic scattering has been developed, yielding the most general interaction for WIMP-nucleon low-energy scattering, and the resulting amplitude has been embedded into the nucleus, taking into account the selection rules imposed by parity and time-reversal. One finds that, in contrast to the usual spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation, the resulting cross section contains six independent nuclear response functions, three of which are associated with possible velocity-dependent interactions. We find that current experiments are four orders of magnitude more sensitive to derivative couplings than is apparent in the standard SI/SD treatment, which necessarily associated such interactions with cross sections proportional to v2T ~ 10⁻⁶, where vT is the WIMP velocity relative to the center of mass of the nuclear target.

  17. Model-independent analyses of dark-matter particle interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2015-03-24

    A model-independent treatment of dark-matter particle elastic scattering has been developed, yielding the most general interaction for WIMP-nucleon low-energy scattering, and the resulting amplitude has been embedded into the nucleus, taking into account the selection rules imposed by parity and time-reversal. One finds that, in contrast to the usual spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation, the resulting cross section contains six independent nuclear response functions, three of which are associated with possible velocity-dependent interactions. We find that current experiments are four orders of magnitude more sensitive to derivative couplings than is apparent in the standard SI/SD treatment, which necessarily associated such interactions withmore » cross sections proportional to v2T ~ 10⁻⁶, where vT is the WIMP velocity relative to the center of mass of the nuclear target.« less

  18. Understanding particle size and distance driven competition of interparticle interactions and effective single-particle anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacakova, B.; Mantlikova, A.; Niznansky, D.; Kubickova, S.; Vejpravova, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic response of single-domain nanoparticles (NPs) in concentrated systems is strongly affected by mutual interparticle interactions. However, particle proximity significantly influences single-particle effective anisotropy. To solve which of these two phenomena plays a dominant role in the magnetic response of real NP systems, systematic study on samples with well-defined parameters is required. In our work, we prepared a series of nanocomposites constituted of highly-crystalline and well-isolated CoFe2O4 NPs embedded in an amorphous SiO2 matrix using a single-molecule precursor method. This preparation method enabled us to reach a wide interval of particle size and concentration. We observed that the characteristic parameters of the single-domain state (coercivity, blocking temperature) and dipole-dipole interaction energy ({{E}\\text{d-\\text{d}}} ) scaled with each other and increased with increasing {{≤ft({{d}\\text{XRD}}/r\\right)}3} , where d XRD was the NP diameter and r was the interparticle distance. Our results are in excellent agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations of the particle growth. Moreover, we demonstrated that the contribution of {{E}\\text{d-\\text{d}}} acting as an additional energetic barrier to the superspin reversal or as an average static field did not sufficiently explain how the concentrated NP systems responded to an external magnetic field. Alternations in the blocking temperature and coercivity of our NP systems accounted for reformed relaxations of the NP superspins and modified effective anisotropy energy of the interacting NPs. Therefore, the concept of modified NP effective anisotropy explains the magnetic response of our concentrated NP systems better than the concept of the energy barrier influenced by interparticle interactions.

  19. Design and calibration of a rocket-borne electron spectrometer for investigation of particle ionization in the nighttime midlatitude E region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, H. D.; Smith, L. G.

    1974-01-01

    An explanation was developed for the formation, near midnight at midlatitudes, of a broad electron density layer extending approximately from 120 to 180 km and usually referred to as the intermediate E layer. The responsible mechanism is believed to be the converging vertical ion drifts resulting from winds of the solar semidiurnal tide. Numerical solutions of the continuity equation appropriate to the intermediate layer is described for particular models of ion drift, diffusion coefficents, and ionization production. Analysis of rocket observations of the layer show that the ionization rate is highly correlated with the planetary geomagnetic index, K sub p. Particle flux measurements support the idea that energetic electrons are the principal source of this ionization. A semiconductor spectrometer experiment for investigation of the particle flux, spectrum, and angular properties was designed and successfully flown on a Nike Apache rocket. A detailed description of the theory, design, and calibration of the experiment and some preliminary results presented.

  20. Water interaction with laboratory-simulated fossil fuel combustion particles.

    PubMed

    Popovicheva, O B; Kireeva, E D; Shonija, N K; Khokhlova, T D

    2009-10-01

    To clarify the impact of fossil fuel combustion particles' composition on their capacity to take up water, we apply a laboratory approach in which the method of deposition of compounds, identified in the particulate coverage of diesel and aircraft engine soot particles, is developed. It is found that near-monolayer organic/inorganic coverage of the soot particles may be represented by three groups of fossil fuel combustion-derived particulate matter with respect to their Hansh's coefficients related to hydrophilic properties. Water adsorption measurements show that nonpolar organics (aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons) lead to hydrophobization of the soot surface. Acidic properties of organic compounds such as those of oxidized PAHs, ethers, ketones, aromatic, and aliphatic acids are related to higher water uptake, whereas inorganic acids and ionic compounds such as salts of organic acids are shown to be responsible for soot hydrophilization. This finding allows us to quantify the role of the chemical identity of soot surface compounds in water uptake and the water interaction with fossil fuel combustion particles in the humid atmosphere.

  1. Observations of the UARS Particle Environment Monitor and computation of ionization rates in the middle and upper atmosphere during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharber, J. R.; Frahm, R. A.; Winningham, J. D.; Biard, J. C.; Lummerzheim, D.; Rees, M. H.; Chenette, D. L.; Gaines, E. E.; Nightingale, R. W.; Imhof, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper we present observations made by the Particle Environment Monitor (PEM) instruments during the geomagnetic storm of 8-9 November, 1991. Ionization and energy deposition rates as functions of altitude in the middle and upper atmosphere by incident electrons and positive ions in the storm interval are computed. The suite of PEM instruments provides a systematic measurement of energetic particles and their associated X-rays over an energy range not fully covered by previous satellite missions.

  2. Event-chain Monte Carlo algorithms for three- and many-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harland, J.; Michel, M.; Kampmann, T. A.; Kierfeld, J.

    2017-02-01

    We generalize the rejection-free event-chain Monte Carlo algorithm from many-particle systems with pairwise interactions to systems with arbitrary three- or many-particle interactions. We introduce generalized lifting probabilities between particles and obtain a general set of equations for lifting probabilities, the solution of which guarantees maximal global balance. We validate the resulting three-particle event-chain Monte Carlo algorithms on three different systems by comparison with conventional local Monte Carlo simulations: i) a test system of three particles with a three-particle interaction that depends on the enclosed triangle area; ii) a hard-needle system in two dimensions, where needle interactions constitute three-particle interactions of the needle end points; iii) a semiflexible polymer chain with a bending energy, which constitutes a three-particle interaction of neighboring chain beads. The examples demonstrate that the generalization to many-particle interactions broadens the applicability of event-chain algorithms considerably.

  3. Apoptotic activity of 5-fluorouracil in breast cancer cells transformed by low doses of ionizing α-particle radiation.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Cusi, Richard; Calaf, Gloria M

    2016-02-01

    Globally, breast cancer in women is the leading cause of cancer death. This fact has generated an interest to obtain insight into breast tumorigenesis and also to develop drugs to control the disease. Ras is a proto-oncogene that is activated as a response to extracellular signals. As a member of the Ras GTPase superfamily, Rho-A is an oncogenic and a critical component of signaling pathways leading to downstream gene regulation. In chemotherapy, apoptosis is the predominant mechanism by which cancer cells die. However, even when the apoptotic machinery remains intact, survival signaling may antagonize the cell death by signals. The aim of this study was to evaluate 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in cells transformed by low doses of ionizing α-particle radiation, in breast cancer cell lines on these genes, as well as apoptotic activity. We used two cell lines from an in vitro experimental breast cancer model. The MCF-10F and Tumor2 cell lines. MCF-10F was exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) α-particles radiation (150 keV/µm). Tumor2, is a malignant and tumorigenic cell line obtained from Alpha5 (60cGy+E/60cGy+E) injected into the nude mice. Results indicated that 5-FU decreased H-ras, Rho-A, p53, Stat1 and increased Bax gene expression in Tumor2 and decreased Rac1, Rho-A, NF-κB and increased Bax and caspase-3 protein expression in Tumor2. 5-FU decreased H-ras, Bcl-xL and NF-κB and increased Bax gene expression. 5-FU decreased Rac1, Rho-A protein expression and increased Bax and caspase-3 protein expression in MDA-MB-231. Flow cytometry indicated 21.5% of cell death in the control MCF-10F and 80% in Tumor2 cell lines. It can be concluded that 5-FU may exert apoptotic activity in breast cancer cells transformed by low doses of ionizing α-particles in vitro regulating genes of Ras family and related to apoptosis such as Bax, Bcl-xL and NF-κB expression.

  4. Water interaction with hydrophobic and hydrophilic soot particles.

    PubMed

    Popovicheva, Olga; Persiantseva, Natalia M; Shonija, Natalia K; DeMott, Paul; Koehler, Kirsten; Petters, Markus; Kreidenweis, Sonia; Tishkova, Victoria; Demirdjian, Benjamin; Suzanne, Jean

    2008-05-07

    The interaction of water with laboratory soots possessing a range of properties relevant for atmospheric studies is examined by two complementary methods: gravimetrical measurement of water uptake coupled with chemical composition and porosity analysis and HTDMA (humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer) inference of water uptake accompanied by separate TEM (transmission electron microscopy) analysis of single particles. The first method clarifies the mechanism of water uptake for bulk soot and allows the classification of soot with respect to its hygroscopicity. The second method highlights the dependence of the soot aerosol growth factor on relative humidity (RH) for quasi-monodisperse particles. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic soot are qualitatively defined by their water uptake and surface polarity: laboratory soot particles are thus classified from very hydrophobic to very hydrophilic. Thermal soot particles produced from natural gas combustion are classified as hydrophobic with a surface of low polarity since water is found to cover only half of the surface. Graphitized thermal soot particles are proposed for comparison as extremely hydrophobic and of very low surface polarity. Soot particles produced from laboratory flame of TC1 aviation kerosene are less hydrophobic, with their entire surface being available for statistical monolayer water coverage at RH approximately 10%. Porosity measurements suggest that, initially, much of this surface water resides within micropores. Consequently, the growth factor increase of these particles to 1.07 at RH > 80% is attributed to irreversible swelling that accompanies water uptake. Hysteresis of adsorption/desorption cycles strongly supports this conclusion. In contrast, aircraft engine soot, produced from burning TC1 kerosene in a gas turbine engine combustor, has an extremely hydrophilic surface of high polarity. Due to the presence of water soluble organic and inorganic material it can be covered by many water

  5. Resonant wave-particle interactions modified by intrinsic Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C. S.; Lee, K. H.; Wang, C. B.; Wu, D. J.

    2012-08-15

    The concept of wave-particle interactions via resonance is well discussed in plasma physics. This paper shows that intrinsic Alfven waves can qualitatively modify the physics discussed in conventional linear plasma kinetic theories. It turns out that preexisting Alfven waves can affect particle motion along the ambient magnetic field and, moreover, the ensuing force field is periodic in time. As a result, the meaning of the usual Landau and cyclotron resonance conditions becomes questionable. It turns out that this effect leads us to find a new electromagnetic instability. In such a process intrinsic Alfven waves not only modify the unperturbed distribution function but also result in a different type of cyclotron resonance which is affected by the level of turbulence. This instability might enable us to better our understanding of the observed radio emission processes in the solar atmosphere.

  6. Erosion processes due to energetic particle-surface interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, K.; Roth, J.

    2010-05-20

    The interaction of the fast particles from the hot plasma of a magnetic confinement fusion experiment with the first wall is one of the most challenging problems toward the realization of a fusion power plant. The erosion of the first wall by the fast particles leads to life time limitations and the radiative cooling of the plasma by the eroded impurity species lowers the energy confinement. Apart from these obvious consequences also the trapping of large quantities of the fuelling species (deuterium and tritium) in re-deposited layers of the eroded species poses a problem due to accumulation of large radiative inventories and plasma fuelling inefficiency. The source of all these challenges is the erosion of first wall components due to physical sputtering, chemical erosion and radiation enhanced sublimation. This paper will give an overview about the physical principles behind these erosion channels.

  7. Wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere of Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S.; Gurnett, D.A.; Scarf, F.L.; Coroniti, F.V.

    1988-07-01

    The Voyager 2 encounter of Uranus has provided observations of plasma waves in and near the magnetosphere. These data, while the first from Uranus, will also be the only direct information on wave-particle interactions at this planet for many years to come. The observations include electrostatic waves upstream of the bow shock, turbulence in the shock, Bernstein emissions and whistler mode waves in the magnetosphere, broadband electrostatic noise in the magnetotail, and a number of the other types of plasma waves which have yet to be clearly identified. Each of these types of waves exist in a plasma environment which both supports the growth of the waves and is modified by interactions with the waves. Wave-particle interactions provide the channels through which the waves can accelerate, scatter, or thermalize the plasmas. The most spectacular example in the case of Uranus is the extremely intense whistler mode activity in the inner magnetosphere which is the source of strong pitch angle diffusion. The resulting electron precipitation is sufficient to produce the auroral emissions observed by Voyager. The strong diffusion, however, presents the problem of supplying electrons in the range of 5 to 40 keV in order to support the losses to the atmosphere.

  8. Wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere of Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scarf, F. L.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1988-01-01

    The Voyager 2 encounter of Uranus has provided observations of plasma waves in and near the magnetosphere. These data, while the first from Uranus, will also be the only direct information on wave-particle interactions at this planet for many years to come. The observations include electrostatic waves upstream of the bow shock, turbulence in the shock, Bernstein emissions and whistler mode waves in the magnetosphere, broadband electrostatic noise in the magnetotail, and a number of the other types of plasma waves which have yet to be clearly identified. Each of these types of waves exist in a plasma environment which both supports the growth of the waves and is modified by interactions with the waves. Wave-particle interactions provide the channels through which the waves can accelerate, scatter, or thermalize the plasmas. The most spectacular example in the case of Uranus is the extremely intense whistler mode activity in the inner magnetosphere which is the source of strong pitch angle diffusion. The resulting electron precipitation is sufficient to produce the auroral emissions observed by Voyager. The strong diffusion, however, presents the problem of supplying electrons in the range of 5 to 40 keV in order to support the losses to the atmosphere.

  9. Interaction of tallow and hay particle size on ruminal parameters.

    PubMed

    Lewis, W D; Bertrand, J A; Jenkins, T C

    1999-07-01

    Four nonlactating ruminally cannulated Holstein cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square experiment with 4 21-d periods to determine if the effects of dietary fat would be affected by hay particle length. Treatments consisted of two levels of tallow (0 and 5%) and two hay particle lengths (short-cut and long-cut) in a 2 x 2 factorial. Diets contained alfalfa hay, corn silage, and concentrate [1:1:2, dry matter (DM) basis] fed as a total mixed ration (TMR) once per day. Samples of the 0 and 5% tallow TMR were ground and incubated in situ in polyester bags for 24 and 48 h. Ruminal samples were taken on day 21 at 0800 h and at 2-h intervals until 1600 h. The total tract digestibilities of acid detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) were not affected by tallow or by hay by tallow interactions. There was a trend for tallow to improve total tract digestibility of crude protein (CP) (70.2 vs. 74.7%). After 48 h of ruminal incubation, tallow significantly decreased the digestibilities of DM, ADF, and NDF. No hay length by tallow interactions for DM, NDF, ADF or CP digestibilities occurred after 24 or 48 h. Tallow increased concentrations of propionate and decreased concentrations of acetate and valerate and the acetate-to-propionate ratio. Total volatile fatty acids increased when tallow was added to diets with short-cut hay, which suggests that when unprotected fat is added to diets with a high level of hay, a short-cut hay length may be advantageous. This result may be due to shorter rumen retention time of feed particles, which reduces the time for fatty acids to exert antimicrobial effects. Or, it may because the increased surface area of the hay particle provides more area for microbial attachment and increased fermentation.

  10. Nano to micro particle size distribution measurement in the fluid by interactive force apparatus for fine particle processing.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Toyohisa; Dodbiba, Gjergj; Okaya, Katsunori; Matsuo, Seiji; Wang, Li Pang; Onda, Kana; Otsuki, Akira

    2013-12-01

    The direct measurement of fine particles size distribution of dispersions or coagulations in liquid is important for water purification, fine particles separation for recycling and mineral processing, as well as the new material production. The nano to micro particle size is usually measured by light scattering method; however, it is difficult to measure at high concentration of suspension. Here, a novel dynamical method by using the interactive force measurement between particles in liquid under electric field is used for measuring distribution of fine particle. Three types of nano to submicron particles, that is well-dispersed nano particles, coagulated nano particles and settled submicron particles, have been measured by interactive force measurement method. The particle size distributions are compered with the size distributions of dried particles measured by TEM or SEM. The well-dispersed nano particle size distribution by interactive force measurement is influenced by the nano size surfactant micelles. The size distribution of coagulated nano particles in water is larger than the result by TEM. On the other hand, the submicron nickel particle size distribution is similar with the one analyzed by SEM.

  11. Measurement of Charged Particle Interactions in Spacecraft and Planetary Habitat Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Cary J.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Miller, Jack; Wilson, John W.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate models of health risks to astronauts on long-duration missions outside the geomagnetosphere will require a full understanding of the radiation environment inside a spacecraft or planetary habitat. This in turn requires detailed knowledge of the flux of incident particles and their propagation through matter, including the nuclear interactions of heavy ions that are a part of the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR). The most important ions are likely to be iron, silicon, oxygen, and carbon. Transport of heavy ions through complex shielding materials including self-shielding of tissue modifies the radiation field at points of interest (e.g., at the blood-forming organs). The incident flux is changed by two types of interactions: (1) ionization energy loss, which results in reduced particle velocity and higher LET (Linear Energy Transfer); and (2) nuclear interactions that fragment the incident nuclei into less massive ions. Ionization energy loss is well understood, nuclear interactions less so. Thus studies of nuclear fragmentation at GCR-like energies are needed to fill the large gaps that currently exist in the database. These can be done at only a few accelerator facilities where appropriate beams are available. Here we report results from experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory s Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan (HIMAC). Recent efforts have focused on extracting charge-changing and fragment production cross sections from silicon beams at 400, 600, and 1200 MeV/nucleon. Some energy dependence is observed in the fragment production cross sections, and as in other data sets the production of fragments with even charge numbers is enhanced relative to those with odd charge numbers. These data are compared to the NASA-LaRC model NUCFRG2. The charge-changing cross section data are compared to recent calculations using an improved model due to Tripathi, which accurately predicts the

  12. Photofragmentation, state interaction, and energetics of Rydberg and ion-pair states: Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of HI

    SciTech Connect

    Hróðmarsson, Helgi Rafn; Wang, Huasheng; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2014-06-28

    Mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization data for hydrogen iodide (HI), for two-photon resonance excitation to Rydberg and ion-pair states in the 69 600–72 400 cm{sup −1} region were recorded and analyzed. Spectral perturbations due to homogeneous and heterogeneous interactions between Rydberg and ion-pair states, showing as deformations in line-positions, line-intensities, and line-widths, were focused on. Parameters relevant to photodissociation processes, state interaction strengths and spectroscopic parameters for deperturbed states were derived. Overall interaction and dynamical schemes to describe the observations are proposed.

  13. The eye (and brain) as ionizing particle detector? First results from the ALTEA - space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narici, Livio

    The first part of ALTEA-Space experiments have been performed on the ISS (USLab) between August 2006 and July 2007. The ALTEA hardware features 6 particle telescopes each with 6 striped 8 x 16 cm2 silicon planes arranged alternately in the x and y direction. These detectors are hold by helmet shaped holder. ALTEA features also a light tight visual stimulation unit, a 32 channel EEG cap and electronics, a 3-buttons pushbutton. Two different experiment modalities were run: DOSI and CNSM. The former is the study of the radiation environment of the USLab, and results from these measurements are mostly covered by other papers in this conference; the latter is the study of the electrophysiological activity in coincidence with particle traveling through the eye/brain of the astronaut, with specific reference to the observed light flashes. In this paper we will present first results from these measurements and discuss, within this panorama, the amount of the measured radiation in the brain/eye. Seven CNSM sessions have been performed (on three astronauts), with a total of 20 light flashes perceived. Comparisons with previous measurements in Low Earth Orbit and during the flights to the Moon will be also shown

  14. Interactive data exploration and particle tracking for general circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, R. I.; Peskin, R. L.; Walther, S. S.; Zinn, H. P.

    1995-01-01

    The SCENE environment for interactive visualization of complex data sets is discussed. This environment is used to create tools for graphical exploration of atmospheric flow models. These tools may be extended by the user in a seamless manner, so that no programming is required. A module for accurately tracing field lines and particle trajectories in SCENE is presented. This is used to examine the flowfield qualitatively with streamlines and pathlines and to identify critical points in the velocity field. The paper also describes a visualization tool for general circulation models on which the primary features of the environment are demonstrated.

  15. Field theories and exact stochastic equations for interacting particle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andreanov, Alexei; Lefevre, Alexandre; Biroli, Giulio; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe

    2006-09-15

    We consider the dynamics of interacting particles with reaction and diffusion. Starting from the underlying discrete stochastic jump process we derive a general field theory describing the dynamics of the density field, which we relate to an exact stochastic equation on the density field. We show how our field theory maps onto the original Doi-Peliti formalism, allowing us to clarify further the issue of the 'imaginary' Langevin noise that appears in the context of reaction-diffusion processes. Our procedure applies to a wide class of problems and is related to large deviation functional techniques developed recently to describe fluctuations of nonequilibrium systems in the hydrodynamic limit.

  16. Reduced quasilinear models for energetic particles interaction with Alfvenic eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghantous, Katy

    The Line Broadened Quasilinear (LBQ) and the 1.5D reduced models are able to predict the effect of Alfvenic eigenmodes' interaction with energetic particles in burning plasmas. This interaction can result in energetic-particle losses that can damage the first wall, deteriorate the plasma performance, and even prevent ignition. The 1.5D model assumes a broad spectrum of overlapping modes and, based on analytic expressions for the growth and damping rates, calculates the pressure profiles that the energetic particles relax to upon interacting with the modes. 1.5D is validated with DIII-D experiments and predicted neutron losses consistent with observation. The model is employed to predict alpha-particle fusion-product losses in a large-scale operational parameter-space for burning plasmas. The LBQ model captures the interaction both in the regime of isolated modes as well as in the conventional regime of overlapping modes. Rules were established that allow quasilinear equations to replicate the expected steady-state saturation levels of isolated modes. The fitting formula is improved and the model is benchmarked with a Vlasov code, BOT. The saturation levels are accurately predicted and the mode evolution is well-replicated in the case of steady-state evolution where the collisions are high enough that coherent structures do not form. When the collisionality is low, oscillatory behavior can occur. LBQ can also exhibit non-steady behavior, but the onset of oscillations occurs for much higher collisional rates in BOT than in LBQ. For certain parameters of low collisionality, hole-clump creation and frequency chirping can occur which are not captured by the LBQ model. Also, there are cases of non-steady evolution without chirping which is possible for LBQ to study. However the results are inconclusive since the periods and amplitudes of the oscillations in the mode evolution are not well-replicated. If multiple modes exist, they can grow to the point of overlap which

  17. Time fluctuations in isolated quantum systems of interacting particles.

    PubMed

    Zangara, Pablo R; Dente, Axel D; Torres-Herrera, E J; Pastawski, Horacio M; Iucci, Aníbal; Santos, Lea F

    2013-09-01

    Numerically, we study the time fluctuations of few-body observables after relaxation in isolated dynamical quantum systems of interacting particles. Our results suggest that they decay exponentially with system size in both regimes, integrable and chaotic. The integrable systems considered are solvable with the Bethe ansatz and have a highly nondegenerate spectrum. This is in contrast with integrable Hamiltonians mappable to noninteracting ones. We show that the coefficient of the exponential decay depends on the level of delocalization of the initial state with respect to the energy shell.

  18. Particle size and particle-particle interactions on tensile properties and reinforcement of corn flour particles in natural rubber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Renewable corn flour has a significant reinforcement effect in natural rubber. The corn flour was hydrolyzed and microfluidized to reduce its particle size. Greater than 90% of the hydrolyzed corn flour had an average size of ~300 nm, a reduction of 33 times compared to unhydrolyzed corn flour. Comp...

  19. Quantifying Protein-Fatty Acid Interactions Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lan; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2011-02-01

    The application of the direct electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) assay to quantify interactions between bovine β-lactoglobulin (Lg) and a series of fatty acids (FA), CH3(CH2)xCOOH, where x = 6 (caprylic acid, CpA), 8 (capric acid, CA), 10 (lauric acid, LA), 12 (myristic acid, MA), 14 (palmitic acid, PA) and 16 (stearic acid, SA), is described. Control ESI-MS binding measurements performed on the Lg-PA interaction revealed that both the protonated and deprotonated gas phase ions of the (Lg + PA) complex are prone to dissociate in the ion source, which leads to artificially small association constants ( K a ). The addition of imidazole, a stabilizing solution additive, at high concentration (10 mM) increased the relative abundance of (Lg + PA) complex measured by ESI-MS in both positive and negative ion modes. The K a value measured in negative ion mode and using sampling conditions that minimize in-source dissociation is in good agreement with a value determined using a competitive fluorescence assay. The K a values measured by ESI-MS for the Lg interactions with MA and SA are also consistent with values expected based on the fluorescence measurements. However, the K a values measured using optimal sampling conditions in positive ion mode are significantly lower than those measured in negative ion mode for all of the FAs investigated. It is concluded that the protonated gaseous ions of the (Lg + FA) complexes are kinetically less stable than the deprotonated ions. In-source dissociation was significant for the complexes of Lg with the shorter FAs (CpA, CA, and LA) in both modes and, in the case of CpA, no binding could be detected by ESI-MS. The affinities of Lg for CpA, CA, and LA determined using the reference ligand ESI-MS assay, a method for quantifying labile protein-ligand complexes that are prone to in-source dissociation, were found to be in good agreement with reported values.

  20. Fast scalable visualization techniques for interactive billion-particle walkthrough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinlian

    This research develops a comprehensive framework for interactive walkthrough involving one billion particles in an immersive virtual environment to enable interrogative visualization of large atomistic simulation data. As a mixture of scientific and engineering approaches, the framework is based on four key techniques: adaptive data compression based on space-filling curves, octree-based visibility and occlusion culling, predictive caching based on machine learning, and scalable data reduction based on parallel and distributed processing. In terms of parallel rendering, this system combines functional parallelism, data parallelism, and temporal parallelism to improve interactivity. The visualization framework will be applicable not only to material simulation, but also to computational biology, applied mathematics, mechanical engineering, and nanotechnology, etc.

  1. Probing Competitive Noncovalent Interactions: Resonance Enhanced Two-Photon Ionization (R2PI) Spectroscopy of Haloaromatic Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyambo, Silver; Muzangwa, Lloyd; Uhler, Brandon; Reid, Scott A.

    2013-06-01

    Non-covalent interactions in bromobenzene have been studied here using resonance two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy combined with a linear TOF-mass spectrometer. Bromobenzene clusters were created in a supersonic expansion with helium as a carrier gas. The molecules were excited and ionized from the ground state in a two stage process. The general trend observed in the R2PI spectra of all the clusters is the broadness and a red-shift relative to the monomer absorption. Optimized dimer and trimer structures were calculated at the M06-2x/aug-cc-pVDZ level, which show that π-stacked and C-H/π interactions are most important in these clusters. TD-DFT calculations of the different cluster conformers have been carried out to assess the geometry changes active upon electronic excitation. The theoretical studies are helpful in explaining trends observed in the R2PI spectra.

  2. On the interaction between radon progeny and particles generated by electronic and traditional cigarettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Trassierra, C.; Cardellini, F.; Buonanno, G.; De Felice, P.

    2015-04-01

    During their entire lives, people are exposed to the pollutants present in indoor air. Recently, Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems, mainly known as electronic cigarettes, have been widely commercialized: they deliver particles into the lungs of the users but a "second-hand smoke" has yet to be associated to this indoor source. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring radioactive gas, i.e. radon, represents a significant risk for lung cancer, and the cumulative action of these two agents could be worse than the agents separately would. In order to deepen the interaction between radon progeny and second-hand aerosol from different types of cigarettes, a designed experimental study was carried out by generating aerosol from e-cigarette vaping as well as from second-hand traditional smoke inside a walk-in radon chamber at the National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (INMRI) of Italy. In this chamber, the radon present in air comes naturally from the floor and ambient conditions are controlled. To characterize the sidestream smoke emitted by cigarettes, condensation particle counters and scanning mobility particle sizer were used. Radon concentration in the air was measured through an Alphaguard ionization chamber, whereas the measurement of radon decay product in the air was performed with the Tracelab BWLM Plus-2S Radon daughter Monitor. It was found an increase of the Potential Alpha-Energy Concentration (PAEC) due to the radon decay products attached to aerosol for higher particle number concentrations. This varied from 7.47 ± 0.34 MeV L-1 to 12.6 ± 0.26 MeV L-1 (69%) for the e-cigarette. In the case of traditional cigarette and at the same radon concentration, the increase was from 14.1 ± 0.43 MeV L-1 to 18.6 ± 0.19 MeV L-1 (31%). The equilibrium factor increases, varying from 23.4% ± 1.11% to 29.5% ± 0.26% and from 30.9% ± 1.0% to 38.1 ± 0.88 for the e-cigarette and traditional cigarette, respectively. These growths still continue for long

  3. Double-resonant fast particle-wave interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneller, M.; Lauber, Ph.; Brüdgam, M.; Pinches, S. D.; Günter, S.

    2012-10-01

    In future fusion devices fast particles must be well confined in order to transfer their energy to the background plasma. Magnetohydrodynamic instabilities like toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes or core-localized modes such as beta-induced Alfvén eigenmodes and reversed shear Alfvén eigenmodes, both driven by fast particles, can lead to significant losses. This is observed in many ASDEX Upgrade discharges. This study applies the drift-kinetic HAGIS code with the aim of understanding the underlying resonance mechanisms, especially in the presence of multiple modes with different frequencies. Of particular interest is the resonant interaction of particles simultaneously with two different modes, referred to as ‘double-resonance’. Various mode overlapping scenarios with different q profiles are considered. It is found that, depending on the radial mode distance, double-resonance is able to enhance growth rates as well as mode amplitudes significantly. Surprisingly, no radial mode overlap is necessary for this effect. Quite the contrary is found: small radial mode distances can lead to strong nonlinear mode stabilization of a linearly dominant mode.

  4. Study of dust particle charging in weakly ionized inert gases taking into account the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Dyatko, N. A.; Kostenko, A. S.

    2014-11-15

    The charging of dust particles in weakly ionized inert gases at atmospheric pressure has been investigated. The conditions under which the gas is ionized by an external source, a beam of fast electrons, are considered. The electron energy distribution function in argon, krypton, and xenon has been calculated for three rates of gas ionization by fast electrons: 10{sup 13}, 10{sup 14}, and 10{sup 15} cm{sup −1}. A model of dust particle charging with allowance for the nonlocal formation of the electron energy distribution function in the region of strong plasma quasi-neutrality violation around the dust particle is described. The nonlocality is taken into account in an approximation where the distribution function is a function of only the total electron energy. Comparative calculations of the dust particle charge with and without allowance for the nonlocality of the electron energy distribution function have been performed. Allowance for the nonlocality is shown to lead to a noticeable increase in the dust particle charge due to the influence of the group of hot electrons from the tail of the distribution function. It has been established that the screening constant virtually coincides with the smallest screening constant determined according to the asymptotic theory of screening with the electron transport and recombination coefficients in an unperturbed plasma.

  5. Attosecond pulse formation via switching of resonant interaction by tunnel ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, V. A.; Akhmedzhanov, T. R.; Radeonychev, Y. V.; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2015-02-01

    We derive an analytical solution uncovering the origin of few-cycle attosecond pulse formation from vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in an atomic gas simultaneously irradiated by a moderately strong infrared (IR) laser field, which does not perturb atoms in the ground state, but induces rapid quasistatic ionization from the excited states [Polovinkin et al., Opt. Lett. 36, 2296 (2011), 10.1364/OL.36.002296]. The derived solution shows that the pulses are produced due to periodic switching of the resonant interaction between the incident VUV radiation and the atoms: turning it off near the crests of the IR-field strength and switching it back on near the IR-field zero crossings. We extend the method originally proposed by Polovinkin et al. [Opt. Lett. 36, 2296 (2011), 10.1364/OL.36.002296] to non-hydrogen-like media and show that the pulses can be produced from resonant VUV radiation in a variety of atomic gases. The pulses are nearly bandwidth limited without external adjustment of phases of the generated sidebands. Proximity of the carrier frequency of the produced pulses to intra-atomic resonances may allow their efficient utilization for nondestructive steering of ultrafast dynamics of the bound electrons. The experimental possibilities for attosecond pulse formation from 58.4 nm VUV radiation in helium and from 73.6 nm VUV radiation in neon dressed by the 3.9 μm laser field, as well as from 122 nm VUV radiation in atomic hydrogen dressed by C O2 -laser field are discussed.

  6. Copper-silver ionization at a US hospital: interaction of treated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Tap water sampling and surface analysis of copper pipe/bathroom porcelain were performed to explore the fate of copper and silver during the first nine months of copper-silver ionization (CSI) applied to cold and hot water at a hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. Ions dosed by CSI into the water at its point of entry to the hospital were inadvertently removed from hot water by a cation-exchange softener in one building (average removal of 72% copper and 51% silver). Copper at the tap was replenished from corrosion of the building’s copper pipes but was typically unable to reach 200 µg/L in first-draw and flushed hot and cold water samples. Unlike copper, silver solubility was not restricted by the incoming water’s high pH of 8.5. Cold water lines had >20 µg/L silver at most of the taps that were sampled, which further increased after flushing. However, silver plating onto copper pipe surfaces (particularly in the hot water line) prevented reaching 20 µg/L silver in hot water of many taps. Aesthetically displeasing purple/grey stains in bathroom porcelain were attributed to chlorargyrite [AgCl(s)], an insoluble precipitate that formed when CSI-dosed Ag+ ions combined with Cl- ions that were present in the incoming water. Overall, CSI aims to control Legionella bacteria in drinking water, but plumbing material interactions, aesthetics and other implications also deserve consideration to holistically evaluate in-building drinking water disinfection. To inform the

  7. Interaction of dilute colloidal particles in a mixed solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Kurnaz, M.L.; Maher, J.V.

    1995-06-01

    We have measured the second virial coefficient {ital B}{sub 2} of very dilute colloidal dispersions of charge-stabilized polystyrene latex spheres in the one-phase region of the mixed solvent 2,6-lutidine plus water. These measurements were made as a function of temperature for two solvent compositions, both of which are richer in 2,6-lutidine than the binary liquid mixture`s critical composition. The temperature ranges started deep in the one-phase region and approached the coexistence curve but did not penetrate the region of reversible aggregation near the coexistence curve. Very large, positive (repulsive-interaction) virial coefficients are observed at temperatures far from the aggregation zone and for calibration samples whose solvent is pure water. These large values of {ital B}{sub 2} are impossible to model without invoking long-range repulsive interactions whose origin is difficult to explain. As the temperature is brought nearer to the aggregation zone, the virial coefficient plunges through zero to large negative (attractive-interaction) values. Crude modeling suggests that the observed changes in the interactions are not inconsistent with a temperature-dependent attraction arising from adsorption layer energetics operating at distances of a few solvent-fluctuation correlation lengths from the particle surfaces.

  8. Quantum chaos and thermalization in isolated systems of interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgonovi, F.; Izrailev, F. M.; Santos, L. F.; Zelevinsky, V. G.

    2016-04-01

    This review is devoted to the problem of thermalization in a small isolated conglomerate of interacting constituents. A variety of physically important systems of intensive current interest belong to this category: complex atoms, molecules (including biological molecules), nuclei, small devices of condensed matter and quantum optics on nano- and micro-scale, cold atoms in optical lattices, ion traps. Physical implementations of quantum computers, where there are many interacting qubits, also fall into this group. Statistical regularities come into play through inter-particle interactions, which have two fundamental components: mean field, that along with external conditions, forms the regular component of the dynamics, and residual interactions responsible for the complex structure of the actual stationary states. At sufficiently high level density, the stationary states become exceedingly complicated superpositions of simple quasiparticle excitations. At this stage, regularities typical of quantum chaos emerge and bring in signatures of thermalization. We describe all the stages and the results of the processes leading to thermalization, using analytical and massive numerical examples for realistic atomic, nuclear, and spin systems, as well as for models with random parameters. The structure of stationary states, strength functions of simple configurations, and concepts of entropy and temperature in application to isolated mesoscopic systems are discussed in detail. We conclude with a schematic discussion of the time evolution of such systems to equilibrium.

  9. Strong interactive massive particles from a strong coupled theory

    SciTech Connect

    Khlopov, Maxim Yu.; Kouvaris, Chris

    2008-03-15

    Minimal walking technicolor models can provide a nontrivial solution for cosmological dark matter, if the lightest technibaryon is doubly charged. Technibaryon asymmetry generated in the early Universe is related to baryon asymmetry, and it is possible to create an excess of techniparticles with charge (-2). These excessive techniparticles are all captured by {sup 4}He, creating techni-O-helium tOHe atoms, as soon as {sup 4}He is formed in big bang nucleosynthesis. The interaction of techni-O-helium with nuclei opens new paths to the creation of heavy nuclei in big bang nucleosynthesis. Because of the large mass of technibaryons, the tOHe ''atomic'' gas decouples from the baryonic matter and plays the role of dark matter in large scale structure formation, while structures in small scales are suppressed. Nuclear interactions with matter slow down cosmic techni-O-helium in the Earth below the threshold of underground dark matter detectors, thus escaping severe cryogenic dark matter search constraints. On the other hand, these nuclear interactions are not sufficiently strong to exclude this form of strongly interactive massive particles by constraints from the XQC experiment. Experimental tests of this hypothesis are possible in the search for tOHe in balloon-borne experiments (or on the ground) and for its charged techniparticle constituents in cosmic rays and accelerators. The tOHe atoms can cause cold nuclear transformations in matter and might form anomalous isotopes, offering possible ways to exclude (or prove?) their existence.

  10. Specific influence of univalent cations on the ionization of alumina-coated TiO2 particles and on the adsorption of poly(acrylic)acid.

    PubMed

    Malgat, Alexandre; Boisvert, Jean-Philippe; Daneault, Claude

    2004-01-15

    A surface counterion titration method was used to monitor the interaction of monovalents cations (Li(+), Na(+), TMA(+)) with the surface of alumina-coated TiO(2) particles in concentrated media at different pH and electrolyte concentrations. This method allows measuring separately the negative and positive contribution to the surface charge. It showed that Cl(-) and TMA(+) are indifferent ions, but Li(+) and Na(+) specifically adsorb on the non-ionized alumina surface sites. The binding sequence of cations is Li(+)>Na(+)>TMA(+) at all ionic strengths investigated and is consistent with the structure-making and structure-breaking model developed a few decades ago. Polyacrylic acid (PAA) previously neutralized with the corresponding hydroxide (LiOH, NaOH, TMAOH) has been adsorbed on the alumina surface at different pH. The polymer counterion has a significant influence on the polymer adsorption. The sequence of the surface coverage as a function of the polymer counterion follows the order Li-PAA > Na-PAA > TMA-PAA. The much higher surface coverage with Li-PAA and Na-PAA compared to TMA-PAA is explained by the specific adsorption of Li-PAA and Na-PAA on the nonionized alumina surface sites, the same way LiCl and NaCl do.

  11. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-11-07

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} to 3.5 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  12. Weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus elastic scattering response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2014-06-01

    Background: A model-independent formulation of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-nucleon scattering was recently developed in Galilean-invariant effective field theory. Purpose: Here we complete the embedding of this effective interaction in the nucleus, constructing the most general elastic nuclear cross section as a factorized product of WIMP and nuclear response functions. This form explicitly defines what can and cannot be learned about the low-energy constants of the effective theory—and consequently about candidate ultraviolet theories of dark matter—from elastic scattering experiments. Results: We identify those interactions that cannot be reliably treated in a spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation: For derivative- or velocity-dependent couplings, the SI/SD formulation generally mischaracterizes the relevant nuclear operator and its multipolarity (e.g., scalar or vector) and greatly underestimates experimental sensitivities. This can lead to apparent conflicts between experiments when, in fact, none may exist. The new nuclear responses appearing in the factorized cross section are related to familiar electroweak nuclear operators such as angular momentum l⃗(i) and the spin-orbit coupling σ⃗(i).l⃗(i). Conclusions: To unambiguously interpret experiments and to extract all of the available information on the particle physics of dark matter, experimentalists will need to (1) do a sufficient number of experiments with nuclear targets having the requisite sensitivities to the various operators and (2) analyze the results in a formalism that does not arbitrarily limit the candidate operators. In an appendix we describe a code that is available to help interested readers implement such an analysis.

  13. Raman scattering investigation of VOCs in interaction with ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facq, Sébastien; Oancea, Adriana; Focsa, Cristian; Chazallon, Bertrand

    2010-05-01

    Cirrus clouds that form in the Earth's upper troposphere (UT) are known to play a significant role in the radiation budget and climate [1]. These clouds that cover about 35% of the Earth's surface [2] are mainly composed of small ice particles that can provide surfaces for trace gas interactions [3]. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are present in relative high abundance in the UT [4][5]. They promote substantial sources of free OH radicals that are responsible for driving photochemical cycles in the atmosphere. Their presence can both influence the oxidizing capacity and the ozone budget of the atmosphere. VOCs can interact with ice particles via different trapping processes (adsorption, diffusion, freezing, and co-deposition, i.e., incorporation of trace gases during growing ice conditions) which can result in the perturbation of the chemistry and photochemistry of the UT. Knowledge of the incorporation processes of VOCs in ice particles is important in order to understand and predict their impact on the ice particles structure and reactivity and more generally on the cirrus cloud formation. This proceeds via the in-situ characterization of the ice condensed phase in a pressure and temperature range of the UT. An important mechanism of UT cirrus cloud formation is the heterogeneous ice freezing process. In this study, we examine and characterize the interaction of a VOC, i.e., ethanol (EtOH) with ice particles during freezing. Vibrational spectra of water O-H and EtOH C-H spectral regions are analysed using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy. Information at the molecular level on the surface structure can be derived from accompanying changes observed in band shapes and vibrational mode frequencies. Depending of the EtOH content, different crystalline phases have been identified and compared to hydrates previously reported for the EtOH-water system. Particular attention is paid on the effect of EtOH aqueous solutions cooling rate and droplet sizes on the phases

  14. Determination of Isoflavone Content in SRM 3238 Using Liquid Chromatography-Particle Beam/Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lynn X.; Burdette, Carolyn Q.; Phillips, Melissa M.; Rimmer, Catherine A.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of marker components in botanical materials is a challenging task and the increased consumption of botanicals and dietary supplements demands a greater understanding of the associated health benefits and risks. In order to successfully acquire and compare clinical results and correlate health trends, accurate, precise, and validated methods of analysis must be developed. Presented here is the development of a quantitative method for the determination of soy isoflavones (daidzin, glycitin, genistin, daidzein, and genistein) using liquid chromatography-particle beam/electron ionization mass spectrometry (LC-PB/EIMS). An internal standard (IS) approach for quantitation using 7-hydroxy-4-chromone as the IS compound was employed, with response factors for each individual isoflavone obtained from calibrant solutions. The results from this method were compared with the certified and reference values for NIST SRM 3238 Soy-Containing Solid Oral Dosage Form to demonstrate that the method was in control. Results obtained using LC-PB/EIMS were consistent with the NIST certified or reference values and their uncertainties for all five isoflavones, demonstrating that the LC-PB/EIMS approach is both accurate and precise when used for the determination of the target isoflavones in soy-containing dietary supplement finished products, while simultaneously providing structural information. PMID:26651559

  15. The calculation of ionization energies by perturbation, configuration interaction and approximate coupled pair techniques and comparisons with green's function methods for Ne, H 2O and N 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacskay, George B.

    1980-05-01

    The vertical valence ionization potentials of Ne, H 2O and N 2 have been calculated by Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation and configuration interaction methods. The calculations were carried out in the space of a single determinant reference state and its single and double excitations, using both the N and N - 1 electron Hartree-Fock orbitals as hole/particle bases. The perturbation series for the ion state were generally found to converge fairly slowly in the N electron Hartree-Fock (frozen) orbital basis, but considerably faster in the appropriate N - 1 electron RHF (relaxed) orbital basis. In certain cases, however, due to near-degeneracy effects, partial, and even complete, breakdown of the (non-degenerate) perturbation treatment was observed. The effects of higher excitations on the ionization potentials were estimated by the approximate coupled pair techniques CPA' and CPA″ as well as by a Davidson type correction formula. The final, fully converged CPA″ results are generally in good agreement with those from PNO-CEPA and Green's function calculations as well as experiment.

  16. Threshold separation distance for attractive interaction between dust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Jabdaraghi, R. Najafi; Sobhanian, S.

    2008-09-07

    Interaction between dust grains in a dusty plasma could be both repulsive and attractive. The Coulomb interaction between two negatively charged dust particulates and the electrostatic force between them are repulsive, while the shadowing force affecting them is attractive. We show in this paper that in some experimental conditions, there is some grain separation zone for which the attractive shadowing force is larger than the repulsive forces between them. In experimental conditions, for the grains separation distance r = 0.4 cm the shadowing force is almost equal to the electrostatic force between them and for r>0.4 cm the shadowing force exceeds the electrostatic force. So the resultant interaction force will be attractive. The possibility of dust crystal formation in this zone and also the motion of dust particles in the resultant potential of the form V = -(a/r)+(b/r{sup 2}) will be discussed. This form of potential comes from the combination electrostatic (F{sub es} (c/r{sup 3})) and shadowing (F{sub shadow} = -(d/r{sup 2})) forces.

  17. Foamy Virus Protein—Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Martin V.; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  18. The effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, David; Fairweather, Michael; Biggs, Simon; Rhodes, Dominic

    2007-07-01

    Preliminary work has been completed to investigate the effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries. Classically hydro-transport studies have focused on the flow of coarse granular material in Newtonian fluids. However, with current economical and environmental pressures, the need to increase solid loadings in pipe flow has lead to studies that examine non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. The flow characteristics of non-Newtonian slurries can be greatly influenced through controlling the solution chemistry. Here we present data on an 'ideal' slurry where the particle size and shape is controlled together with the solution chemistry. We have investigated the effect of adsorbed cations on the stability of a suspension, the packing nature of a sediment and the frictional forces to be overcome during re-slurrying. A significant change in the criteria assessed was observed as the electrolyte concentration was increased from 0.1 mM to 1 M. In relation to industrial processes, such delicate control of the slurry chemistry can greatly influence the optimum operating conditions of non-Newtonian pipe flows. (authors)

  19. A new mechanism for relativistic particle acceleration via wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Markidis, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto

    2006-10-01

    Often in laboratory, space and astrophysical plasma, high energy populations are observed. Two puzzling factors still defy our understanding. First, such populations of high energy particles produce power law distributions that are not only ubiquitous but also persistent in time. Such persistence is in direct contradiction to the H theorem that states the ineluctable transition of physical systems towards thermodynamic equilibrium, and ergo Maxwellian distributions. Second, such high energy populations are efficiently produced, much more efficiently than processes that we know can produce. A classic example of such a situation is cosmic rays where power alws extend up to tremendolus energy ranges. In the present work, we identify a new mechanism for particle acceleration via wave-particle interaction. The mechanism is peculiar to special relativity and has no classical equivalent. That explains why it is not observed in most simulation studies of plasma processes, based on classical physics. The mechanism is likely to be active in systems undergoing streaming instabilities and in particular shocked systems. The new mechanism can produce energy increases vastly superior to previously known mechanisms (such as Fermi acceleration) and can hold the promise of explaining at least some of the observed power laws.

  20. Particle acceleration at corotating interaction regions in the heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubouchi, K.

    2014-11-01

    Hybrid simulations are performed to investigate the dynamics of both solar wind protons and interplanetary pickup ions (PUIs) around the corotating interaction region (CIR). The one-dimensional system is applied in order to focus on processes in the direction of CIR propagation. The CIR is bounded by forward and reverse shocks, which are responsible for particle acceleration. The effective acceleration of solar wind protons takes place when the reverse shock (fast wind side) favors a quasi-parallel regime. The diffusive process accounts for this acceleration, and particles can gain energy in a suprathermal range (on the order of 10 keV). In contrast, the PUI acceleration around the shock differs from the conventional model in which the motional electric field along the shock surface accelerates particles. Owing to their large gyroradius, PUIs can gyrate between the upstream and downstream, several proton inertial lengths away from the shock. This 'cross-shock' gyration results in a net velocity increase in the field-aligned component, indicating that the magnetic mirror force is responsible for acceleration. The PUIs that remain in the vicinity of the shock for a long duration (tens of gyroperiods) gain much energy and are reflected back toward the upstream. These reflected energetic PUIs move back and forth along the magnetic field between a pair of CIRs that are magnetically connected. The PUIs are repeatedly accelerated in each reflection, leading to a maximum energy gain close to 100 keV. This mechanism can be evaluated in terms of 'preacceleration' for the generation of anomalous cosmic rays.

  1. Soft particle production in very high energy hadron interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebr, Jan; Nečesal, Petr; Ridky, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Indications of a discrepancy between simulations and data on the number of muons in cosmic ray (CR) showers exist over a large span of energies. We focus in particular on the excess of multi-muon bundles observed by the DELPHI detector at LEP and on the excess in the muon number in general reported by the Pierre Auger Observatory. Even though the primary CR energies relevant for these experiments differ by orders of magnitude, we can find a single mechanism which can simultaneously increase predicted muon counts for both, while not violating constraints from accelerators or from the longitudinal shower development as observed by the Pierre Auger Observatory. We present a brief motivation and describe a practical implementation of such a model, based on the addition of soft particles to interactions above a chosen energy threshold. Results of an extensive set of simulations show the behavior of this model in various parts of a simplified parameter space.

  2. Atoms and Ions Interacting with Particles and Fields: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robicheaux, Francis

    2014-09-18

    This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms with particles and fields. The duration of the grant was the 10 year period from 8/2003 to 8/2013. All of the support from the grant was used to pay salaries of the PI, postdocs, graduate students, and undergraduates and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals. There were 65 peer reviewed publications over these 10 years with 8 of the publications in Physical Review Letters; all of the other articles were in respected peer reviewed journals (Physical Review A, New Journal of Physics, Journal of Physics B, ...). I will disuss the results for the periods of time relevant for each grant period.

  3. Interaction of Escherichia coli and Soil Particles in Runoff

    PubMed Central

    Muirhead, Richard William; Collins, Robert Peter; Bremer, Philip James

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory-scale model system was developed to investigate the transport mechanisms involved in the horizontal movement of bacteria in overland flow across saturated soils. A suspension of Escherichia coli and bromide tracer was added to the model system, and the bromide concentration and number of attached and unattached E. coli cells in the overland flow were measured over time. Analysis of the breakthrough curves indicated that the E. coli and bromide were transported together, presumably by the same mechanism. This implied that the E. coli was transported by advection with the flowing water. Overland-flow transport of E. coli could be significantly reduced if the cells were preattached to large soil particles (>45 μm). However, when unattached cells were inoculated into the system, the E. coli appeared to attach predominantly to small particles (<2 μm) and hence remained unattenuated during transport. These results imply that in runoff generated by saturation-excess conditions, bacteria are rapidly transported across the surface and have little opportunity to interact with the soil matrix. PMID:16672484

  4. Microscopic theory of polymer-mediated interactions between spherical particles

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.P.; Schweizer, K.S.

    1998-12-01

    We develop an analytic integral equation theory for treating polymer-induced effects on the structure and thermodynamics of dilute suspensions of hard spheres. Results are presented for the potential of mean force, free energy of insertion per particle into a polymer solution, and the second virial coefficient between spheres. The theory makes predictions for all size ratios between the spheres and the polymer coil dimension. Based on the Percus{endash}Yevick (PY) closure, the attractive polymer-induced depletion interaction is predicted to be too weak under athermal conditions to induce a negative value for the second virial coefficient, B{sub 2}{sup cc}, between spheres in the colloidal limit when the spheres are much larger than the coil size. A nonmonotonic dependence of the second virial coefficient on polymer concentration occurs for small enough particles, with the largest polymer-mediated attractions and most negative B{sub 2}{sup cc} occurring near the dilute{endash}semidilute crossover concentration. Predictions for the polymer-mediated force between spheres are compared to the results of computer simulations and scaling theory. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Dynamics of particle--turbulence interaction at the dissipative scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Dam, Nico; van de Water, Willem; JM Burgerscentrum Collaboration; COST Action, Particles in Turbulence Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present results of a novel phosphorescent tagging technique that is particularly suited to study particle-laden flows. Using phosphorescent droplets we probe the dynamics of particle-turbulence interaction at the dissipative length scales. We create a cloud of droplets within a chamber capable of generating homogeneous, isotropic turbulence with zero-mean flow. The droplets have Stokes number St ~ 1 , and the flow is intensely turbulent, with Reynolds number Reλ ~ 500 . Using a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser, we can tag a variety of volumes, such as thin slabs or thin, pencil-like cylinders. The droplets in these volumes glow during a few Kolmogorov times. By tracking the fate of pencil-shaped clouds using a fast (5 kHz) camera, we come to the surprising conclusion that they disperse faster than fluid elements, with a spreading rate reaching a maximum at St ~ 2 . Sheets of tagged droplets display preferential concentration at work; we discuss statistical quantities that can capture these events. This project is funded by Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM).

  6. Aerosol mass spectrometry: particle-vaporizer interactions and their consequences for the measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.-M.; Faber, P.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-09-01

    The Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) is a frequently used instrument for on-line measurement of the ambient sub-micron aerosol composition. With the help of calibrations and a number of assumptions on the flash vaporization and electron impact ionization processes, this instrument provides robust quantitative information on various non-refractory ambient aerosol components. However, when measuring close to certain anthropogenic or marine sources of semi-refractory aerosols, several of these assumptions may not be met and measurement results might easily be incorrectly interpreted if not carefully analyzed for unique ions, isotope patterns, and potential slow vaporization associated with semi-refractory species. Here we discuss various aspects of the interaction of aerosol particles with the AMS tungsten vaporizer and the consequences for the measurement results: semi-refractory components - i.e., components that vaporize but do not flash-vaporize at the vaporizer and ionizer temperatures, like metal halides (e.g., chlorides, bromides or iodides of Al, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Na, Pb, Sr, Zn) - can be measured semi-quantitatively despite their relatively slow vaporization from the vaporizer. Even though non-refractory components (e.g., NH4NO3 or (NH4)2SO4) vaporize quickly, under certain conditions their differences in vaporization kinetics can result in undesired biases in ion collection efficiency in thresholded measurements. Chemical reactions with oxygen from the aerosol flow can have an influence on the mass spectra for certain components (e.g., organic species). Finally, chemical reactions of the aerosol with the vaporizer surface can result in additional signals in the mass spectra (e.g., WO2Cl2-related signals from particulate Cl) and in conditioning or contamination of the vaporizer, with potential memory effects influencing the mass spectra of subsequent measurements. Laboratory experiments that investigate these particle-vaporizer interactions are

  7. Aerosol mass spectrometry: particle-vaporizer interactions and their consequences for the measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.-M.; Faber, P.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-04-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) is a frequently used instrument for on-line measurement of the ambient sub-micron aerosol composition. With the help of calibrations and a number of assumptions on the flash vaporization and electron impact ionization processes this instrument provides robust quantitative information on various ambient aerosol components. However, when measuring close to certain anthropogenic sources or in marine environments, several of these assumptions may not be met and measurement results might easily be misinterpreted. Here we discuss various aspects of the interaction of aerosol particles with the AMS tungsten vaporizer and the consequences for the measurement results: semi-refractory components, i.e. components that vaporize but do not flash vaporize at the vaporizer and ionizer temperatures, like metal halides (e.g. chlorides, bromides or iodides of Al, Ba, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Na, Pb, Sr, Zn) can be measured semi-quantitatively despite their relatively slow vaporization from the vaporizer. Even though non-refractory components (e.g. NH4NO3 or (NH4)2SO4) vaporize quickly, their differences in vaporization kinetics can result in undesired biases in ion collection efficiency in the measurements. Chemical reactions with water vapor and oxygen from the aerosol flow can have an influence on the mass spectra for certain components (e.g. NH4NO3, (NH4)2SO4, organic species). Finally, chemical reactions of the aerosol with the vaporizer surface can result in additional signals in the mass spectra (e.g. WO2C2-related signals from particulate Cl) and in conditioning or contamination of the vaporizer with potential memory effects influencing the mass spectra of subsequent measurements. Laboratory experiments that investigate these particle-vaporizer interactions are presented and are discussed together with field results showing that measurements of typical continental or urban aerosols are not significantly affected while laboratory

  8. A Massively Parallel Particle Code for Rarefied Ionized and Neutral Gas Flows in Earth and Planetary Atmospheres, Ionospheres and Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the global structure, dynamics, and physical and chemical processes occurring in the upper atmospheres, exospheres, and ionospheres of the Earth, the other planets, comets and planetary satellites and their interactions with their outer particles and fields environs, it is often necessary to address the fundamentally non-equilibrium aspects of the physical environment. These are regions where complex chemistry, energetics, and electromagnetic field influences are important. Traditional approaches are based largely on hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic MHD) formulations and are very important and highly useful. However, these methods often have limitations in rarefied physical regimes where the molecular collision rates and ion gyrofrequencies are small and where interactions with ionospheres and upper neutral atmospheres are important.

  9. Calculating the Annihilation Rate of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Matthew; Rothstein, Ira Z.; Vaidya, Varun

    2015-05-01

    We develop a formalism that allows one to systematically calculate the weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) annihilation rate into gamma rays whose energy far exceeds the weak scale. A factorization theorem is presented which separates the radiative corrections stemming from initial-state potential interactions from loops involving the final state. This separation allows us to go beyond the fixed order calculation, which is polluted by large infrared logarithms. For the case of Majorana WIMPs transforming in the adjoint representation of SU(2), we present the result for the resummed rate at leading double-log accuracy in terms of two initial-state partial-wave matrix elements and one hard matching coefficient. For a given model, one may calculate the cross section by finding the tree level matching coefficient and determining the value of a local four-fermion operator. The effects of resummation can be as large as 100% for a 20 TeV WIMP. However, for lighter WIMP masses relevant for the thermal relic scenario, leading-log resummation modifies the Sudakov factors only at the 10% level. Furthermore, given comparably sized Sommerfeld factors, the total effect of radiative corrections on the semi-inclusive photon annihilation rate is found to be percent level. The generalization of the formalism to other types of WIMPs is discussed.

  10. Acoustically mediated long-range interaction among multiple spherical particles exposed to a plane standing wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shenwei; Qiu, Chunyin; Wang, Mudi; Ke, Manzhu; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study the acoustically mediated interaction forces among multiple well-separated spherical particles trapped in the same node or antinode plane of a standing wave. An analytical expression of the acoustic interaction force is derived, which is accurate even for the particles beyond the Rayleigh limit. Interestingly, the multi-particle system can be decomposed into a series of independent two-particle systems described by pairwise interactions. Each pairwise interaction is a long-range interaction, as characterized by a soft oscillatory attenuation (at the power exponent of n = -1 or -2). The vector additivity of the acoustic interaction force, which is not well expected considering the nonlinear nature of the acoustic radiation force, is greatly useful for exploring a system consisting of a large number of particles. The capability of self-organizing a big particle cluster can be anticipated through such acoustically controllable long-range interaction.

  11. Theoretical and experimental examination of particle-particle interaction effects on induced dipole moments and dielectrophoretic responses of multiple particle chains.

    PubMed

    Moncada-Hernandez, Hector; Nagler, Eliot; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-07-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), an electrokinetic phenomenon based on particle polarizations in nonuniform electric fields, is increasingly employed for particle and cell characterizations and manipulations in microdevices. However, particle number densities are rarely varied and particle-particle interactions are largely overlooked, but both affect particle's effective polarizations by changing the local electric field, which directly impacts particle assembly into chains. This work examines theoretical and experimental particle-particle interactions and dielectrophoretic responses in nonuniform electric fields, then presents individual and chain velocities of spherical polystyrene microparticles and red blood cells (RBCs) under DEP forces in a modified quadruple electrode microdevice. Velocities are independently compared between 1, 2, 3, and 4 polystyrene beads and RBCs assembled into chains aligned with the electric field. Simulations compared induced dipole moments for particles experiencing the same (single point) and changing (multiple points) electric fields. Experiments and simulations are compared by plotting DEP velocities versus applied signal frequency from 1 kHz to 80 MHz. Simulations indicate differences in the DEP force exerted on each particle according to chain position. Simulations and experiments show excellent qualitative agreement; chains with more particles experienced a decrease in the DEP response for both polystyrene beads and RBCs. These results advance understanding of the extent that induced dipole polarizations with multiple particle chains affect observed behaviors in electrokinetic cellular diagnostic systems.

  12. High-Resolution Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Water- Soluble Organic Aerosols Collected with a Particle into Liquid Sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    This work demonstrates the utility of a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) a technique traditionally used for identification of inorganic ions present in ambient or laboratory aerosols for the analysis of water soluble organic aerosol (OA) using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR ESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was produced from 0.5 ppm mixing ratios of limonene and ozone in a 5 m3 Teflon chamber. SOA was collected simultaneously using a traditional filter sampler and a PILS. The filter samples were later extracted with either water or acetonitrile, while the aqueous PILS samples were analyzed directly. In terms of peak intensities, types of detectable compounds, average O:C ratios, and organic mass to organic carbon ratios, the resulting high resolution mass spectra were essentially identical for the PILS and filter based samples. SOA compounds extracted from both filter/acetonitrile extraction and PILS/water extraction accounted for >95% of the total ion current in ESI mass spectra. This similarity was attributed to high solubility of limonene SOA in water. In contrast, significant differences in detected ions and peak abundances were observed for pine needle biomass burning organic aerosol (BBOA) collected with PILS and filter sampling. The water soluble fraction of BBOA is considerably smaller than for SOA, and a number of unique peaks were detectable only by the filter/acetonitrile method. The combination of PILS collection with HR-ESI-MS analysis offers a new approach for molecular analysis of the water-soluble organic fraction in biogenic SOA, aged photochemical smog, and BBOA.

  13. Dynamically Tuning Particle Interactions and Assemblies at Soft Interfaces: Reversible Order-Disorder Transitions in 2D Particle Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Park, Bum Jun; Lee, Daeyeon

    2015-09-16

    Particles trapped at fluid interfaces experience long-range interactions that determine their assembly behavior. Because particle interactions at fluid interfaces tend to be unusually strong, once particles organize themselves into a 2D assembly, it is challenging to induce changes in their microstructure. In this report, a new approach is presented to induce reversible order-disorder transitions (ODTs) in the 2D monolayer of colloidal particles trapped at a soft gel-fluid interface. Particles at the soft interface, consisting of a nonpolar superphase and a weakly gelled subphase, initially form a monolayer with a highly ordered structure. The structure of this monolayer can be dynamically varied by the addition or removal of the oil phase. Upon removing the oil via evaporation, the initially ordered particle monolayer undergoes ODT, driven by capillary attractions. The ordered monolayer can be recovered through disorder-to-order transition by simply adding oil atop the particle-laden soft interface. The possibility to dynamically tune the interparticle interactions using soft interfaces can potentially enable control of the transport and mechanical properties of particle-laden interfaces and provide model systems to study particle-laden soft interfaces that are relevant to biological tissues or organs.

  14. Direct isotope ratio analysis of individual uranium-plutonium mixed particles with various U/Pu ratios by thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Miyamoto, Yutaka; Magara, Masaaki

    2015-02-01

    Uranium and plutonium isotope ratios in individual uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) mixed particles with various U/Pu atomic ratios were analyzed without prior chemical separation by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Prior to measurement, micron-sized particles with U/Pu ratios of 1, 5, 10, 18, and 70 were produced from uranium and plutonium certified reference materials. In the TIMS analysis, the peaks of americium, plutonium, and uranium ion signals were successfully separated by continuously increasing the evaporation filament current. Consequently, the uranium and plutonium isotope ratios, except the (238)Pu/(239)Pu ratio, were successfully determined for the particles at all U/Pu ratios. This indicates that TIMS direct analysis allows for the measurement of individual U-Pu mixed particles without prior chemical separation.

  15. Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2013-07-31

    This is the final report of a program of research on ``Experimental Studies of Elementary Particle Interactions at High Energies'' of the High Energy Physics (HEP) group of The Rockefeller University. The research was carried out using the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Three faculty members, two research associates, and two postdoctoral associates participated in this project. At CDF, we studied proton-antiproton collisions at an energy of 1.96 TeV. We focused on diffractive interactions, in which the colliding antiproton loses a small fraction of its momentum, typically less than 1%, while the proton is excited into a high mass state retaining its quantum numbers. The study of such collisions provides insight into the nature of the diffractive exchange, conventionally referred to as Pomeron exchange. In studies of W and Z production, we found results that point to a QCD-based interpretation of the diffractive exchange, as predicted in a data-driven phenomenology developed within the Rockefeller HEP group. At CMS, we worked on diffraction, supersymmetry (SUSY), dark matter, large extra dimensions, and statistical applications to data analysis projects. In diffraction, we extended our CDF studies to higher energies working on two fronts: measurement of the single/double diffraction and of the rapidity gap cross sections at 7 TeV, and development of a simulation of diffractive processes along the lines of our successful model used at CDF. Working with the PYTHIA8 Monte Carlo simulation authors, we implemented our model as a PYTHIA8-MBR option in PYTHIA8 and used it in our data analysis. Preliminary results indicate good agreement. We searched for SUSY by measuring parameters in the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) and found results which, combined with other experimental constraints and theoretical considerations, indicate that the

  16. Real-time gas and particle-phase organic acids measurement at a forest site using chemical ionization high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry during BEACHON-RoMBAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatavelli, L. R.; Stark, H.; Kimmel, J.; Cubison, M.; Day, D. A.; Jayne, J.; Thornton, J. A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    We present measurement of organic acids in gas and aerosol particles conducted in a ponderosa pine forest during July and August 2011 as part of the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study (BEACHON-RoMBAS; http://tinyurl.com/BEACHON-RoMBAS). The measurement technique is based on chemical ionization, high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry and utilizes a Micro-Orifice Volatilization Impactor [MOVI-CI-HR-ToFMS; Yatavelli et al., AS&T, 2010] to collect sub-micron aerosol particles while simultaneously measuring the gas-phase composition. The collected particles are subsequently analyzed by temperature-programmed thermal desorption. The reagent ion chosen for this campaign is the acetate anion (CH3C(O)O-, m/z 59), which reacts selectively via proton transfer with compounds that are stronger gas-phase acids than acetic acid [Veres et al., IJMS, 2008]. Preliminary results show substantial particle-phase concentrations of biogenic oxidation products such as hydroxy-glutaric acid, pinic acid, pinonic acid, and hydroxy-pinonic acid along with numerous lower and higher molecular weight organic acids. Correlations of the organic acid concentrations with meteorological, gas and aerosol parameters measured by other instrumentation are investigated in order to understand the formation, transformation, and partitioning of gas and particle-phase organic acids in a forested environment dominated by terpenes.

  17. Lubrication analysis of interacting rigid cylindrical particles in confined shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinaels, R.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-07-15

    Lubrication analysis is used to determine analytical expressions for the elements of the resistance matrix describing the interaction of two rigid cylindrical particles in two-dimensional shear flow in a symmetrically confined channel geometry. The developed model is valid for non-Brownian particles in a low-Reynolds-number flow between two sliding plates with thin gaps between the two particles and also between the particles and the walls. Using this analytical model, a comprehensive overview of the dynamics of interacting cylindrical particles in shear flow is presented. With only hydrodynamic interactions, rigid particles undergo a reversible interaction with no cross-streamline migration, irrespective of the confinement value. However, the interaction time of the particle pair substantially increases with confinement, and at the same time, the minimum distance between the particle surfaces during the interaction substantially decreases with confinement. By combining our purely hydrodynamic model with a simple on/off non-hydrodynamic attractive particle interaction force, the effects of confinement on particle aggregation are qualitatively mapped out in an aggregation diagram. The latter shows that the range of initial relative particle positions for which aggregation occurs is increased substantially due to geometrical confinement. The interacting particle pair exhibits tangential and normal lubrication forces on the sliding plates, which will contribute to the rheology of confined suspensions in shear flow. Due to the combined effects of the confining walls and the particle interaction, the particle velocities and resulting forces both tangential and perpendicular to the walls exhibit a non-monotonic evolution as a function of the orientation angle of the particle pair. However, by incorporating appropriate scalings of the forces, velocities, and doublet orientation angle with the minimum free fraction of the gap height and the plate speed, master curves for

  18. The interaction of solid particles with laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misconi, Nebil Y.; Rusk, Edwin T.; Oliver, John P.

    1989-04-01

    Light scattering curves of intensity vs. scattering angle were made of layers of transparent silica particles, single silica particles isolated by optical levitation; using an Argon ion laser light source and a goniometer mounted silicon photodiode detector. Scattering measurements of spherical particles demonstrated an excellent agreement with Mie theory. Spheroids and irregular particles were also measured. Dynamics of particles in a space environment were studied both theoretically, and experimentally inside a 10 to the -7th power Torr vacuum chamber. Research in this area will be continued to determine the effective moment arm of optically induced particle rotation.

  19. Effect of the Mo/ller interaction on electron-impact ionization of high-Z hydrogenlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, D. L.; Reed, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the Mo/ller interaction in relativistic distorted-wave calculations of cross sections for electron-impact ionization of high-Z hydrogenlike ions. We found that the Mo/ller interaction significantly increases the cross section for hydrogenlike uranium, and brings our calculated results into very good agreement with experimental results reported by Marrs, Elliott, and Knapp [Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 4082 (1994)]. We found similar increases in the cross sections for other hydrogenlike ions. Our results also show that these effects become important at much lower collision energy than previously reported [D. L. Moores and M. S. Pindzola, Phys. Rev. A 41, 3603 (1990)]. With the Mo/ller interaction included, our cross sections for these ions are in good agreement with preliminary results obtained in recent experiments on the electron-beam ion trap (EBIT).

  20. Effect of the deformability of guest particles on the tensile strength of tablets from interactive mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Sharad; Lakio, Satu; Gengenbach, Thomas; Larson, Ian; Morton, David A V

    2016-12-05

    In this study, we investigated the influence of deformability of specifically-engineered guest particles on the tensile strength of tablets of interactive mixtures. The binder polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) of different molecular weights were spray dried with l-leucine to create guest particle formulations. The guest particle formulations were characterized by their particle size, surface l-leucine concentration and glass transition temperature (Tg). These spray-dried particles were then blended with paracetamol to form interactive mixtures, which were compacted into tablets and tablet tensile strength and elastic recovery were determined. The guest particles had particle diameters in the range of 1-10μm, and surfaces that were l-leucine enriched. The Tg of guest particle formulations increased with increasing molecular weight of the PVP. All the guest particle formulations formed an observed homogeneous interactive mixture with paracetamol. The tensile strength of the tablets of interactive mixtures increased with decreasing Tg of the guest particles. In these interactive mixtures, higher tensile strength was also associated with lower tablet elastic recovery. The elastic recovery of the tablets showed a correlation with the elastic recovery of the tablets of guest particles. Thus, our results indicated that the deformability of guest particles dictates the tensile strength of the tablets of these interactive mixtures.

  1. Effects of hydrodynamic interactions on rectified transport of self-propelled particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Bao-quan; He, Ya-feng; Zhong, Wei-rong

    2017-01-01

    Directed transport of self-propelled particles is numerically investigated in a three-dimensional asymmetric potential. Beside the steric repulsive forces, hydrodynamic interactions between particles have been taken into account in an approximate way. From numerical simulations, we find that hydrodynamic interactions can strongly affect the rectified transport of self-propelled particles. Hydrodynamic interactions enhance the performance of the rectified transport when particles can easily pass across the barrier of the potential, and reduce the rectified transport when particles are mainly trapped in the potential well.

  2. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  3. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of −0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process. PMID:27104527

  4. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-04-20

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  5. Interactions of energetic particles and clusters with solids

    SciTech Connect

    Averback, R.S.; Hsieh, Horngming . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Diaz de la Rubia, T. ); Benedek, R. )

    1990-12-01

    Ion beams are being applied for surface modifications of materials in a variety of different ways: ion implantation, ion beam mixing, sputtering, and particle or cluster beam-assisted deposition. Fundamental to all of these processes is the deposition of a large amount of energy, generally some keV's, in a localized area. This can lead to the production of defects, atomic mixing, disordering and in some cases, amorphization. Recent results of molecular dynamics computer simulations of energetic displacement cascades in Cu and Ni with energies up to 5 keV suggest that thermal spikes play an important role in these processes. Specifically, it will be shown that many aspects of defect production, atomic mixing and cascade collapse'' can be understood as a consequence of local melting of the cascade core. Included in this discussion will be the possible role of electron-phonon coupling in thermal spike dynamics. The interaction of energetic clusters of atoms with solid surfaces has also been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. this process is of interest because a large amount of energy can be deposited in a small region and possibly without creating point defects in the substrate or implanting cluster atoms. The simulations reveal that the dynamics of the collision process are strongly dependent on cluster size and energy. Different regimes where defect production, local melting and plastic flow dominate will be discussed. 43 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-07

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 {mu}A) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 {+-} 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  7. Microscale simulations of shock interaction with large assembly of particles for developing point-particle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Siddharth; Neal, Chris; Mehta, Yash; Sridharan, Prasanth; Jackson, Thomas; Balachandar, S.

    2017-01-01

    Micrsoscale simulations are being conducted for developing point-particle and other related models that are needed for the mesoscale and macroscale simulations of explosive dispersal of particles. These particle models are required to compute (a) instantaneous aerodynamic force on the particle and (b) instantaneous net heat transfer between the particle and the surrounding. A strategy for a sequence of microscale simulations has been devised that allows systematic development of the hybrid surrogate models that are applicable at conditions representative of the explosive dispersal application. The ongoing microscale simulations seek to examine particle force dependence on: (a) Mach number, (b) Reynolds number, and (c) volume fraction (different particle arrangements such as cubic, face-centered cubic (FCC), body-centered cubic (BCC) and random). Future plans include investigation of sequences of fully-resolved microscale simulations consisting of an array of particles subjected to more realistic time-dependent flows that progressively better approximate the actual problem of explosive dispersal. Additionally, effects of particle shape, size, and number in simulation as well as the transient particle deformation dependence on various parameters including: (a) particle material, (b) medium material, (c) multiple particles, (d) incoming shock pressure and speed, (e) medium to particle impedance ratio, (f) particle shape and orientation to shock, etc. are being investigated.

  8. A validation of a simple model for the calculation of the ionization energies in X-ray laser-cluster interactions

    SciTech Connect

    White, Jeff; Ackad, Edward

    2015-02-15

    The outer-ionization of an electron from a cluster is an unambiguous quantity, while the inner-ionization threshold is not, resulting in different microscopic quantum-classical hybrid models used in laser-cluster interactions. A simple local ionization threshold model for the change in the ionization energy is proposed and examined, for atoms and ions, at distances in between the initial configuration of the cluster to well into the cluster's disintegration. This model is compared with a full Hartree-Fock energy calculation which accounts for the electron correlation effects using the coupled cluster method with single and double excitations with perturbative triples (CCSD(T)). Good agreement is found between the two lending a strong theoretical support to works which rely on such models for the final and transient properties of the laser-cluster interaction.

  9. The interaction of melanin with ionizing and UVC radiations: Characterization of thymine damage

    SciTech Connect

    Huselton, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    These studies were undertaken to determine whether melanin could protect DNA against the harmful effects of ionizing or UVC radiations. A simple, in vitro, model system was developed to evaluate eumelanin (Sigma melanin) as a radioprotector of solutions of 0.1 mM thymine or thymidine exposed to 570Gy of ionizing radiation. Sigma melanin was compared to several amino acids, other biomolecules or to other forms of melanin. To investigate the role of melanin as a passive screen of UVC radiation, melanotic (I{sub 3}), amelanotic (AMEL) cells (both derived from a Cloudman S91 melanoma) and non-melanotic (EMT6) cells were labelled with radioactive dTHd and exposed to 0, 1, 5 or 10KJ/m{sup 2} of UVC. The DNA was extracted; the bases hydrolyzed with concentrated HCl. Thymine bases were separated by reverse phase HPLC. No difference in dimer content was observed between I{sub 3} and AMEL cells, but EMT6 cells had nearly twice the amount of dimer. Overall thymine degradation was more pronounced in I{sub 3} cells than in the other two cell lines, due to the production of non-dimer thymine damage. This damage was identified as thymine glycol by HPLC and mass spectrometry. Melanin, upon exposure to UVC, appears to enhance thymine damage by producing oxidative damage.

  10. Experimental investigation of particle surface interactions for turbomachinery application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, A.; Tabakoff, W.

    This paper describes an experimental investigation to determine the particle restitution characteristics after impacting solid targets in a particulate flow wind tunnel. The tests simulate the two phase flow conditions encountered in turbomachinery operating in particle laden flow environments. Both incoming and rebounding velocities are measured using a three color Argon Ion laser in backward scattered mode through a window in the tunnel section containing the impact target. The experimental results are presented for ash particles impinging on RENE 41 targets at different impact conditions. The presented results are applicable to particle dynamics simulations in gas turbine engines and to the prediction of the associated blade surface erosion.

  11. Dynamic cross correlation studies of wave particle interactions in ULF phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpherron, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic field observations made by satellites in the earth's magnetic field reveal a wide variety of ULF waves. These waves interact with the ambient particle populations in complex ways, causing modulation of the observed particle fluxes. This modulation is found to be a function of species, pitch angle, energy and time. The characteristics of this modulation provide information concerning the wave mode and interaction process. One important characteristic of wave-particle interactions is the phase of the particle flux modulation relative to the magnetic field variations. To display this phase as a function of time a dynamic cross spectrum program has been developed. The program produces contour maps in the frequency time plane of the cross correlation coefficient between any particle flux time series and the magnetic field vector. This program has been utilized in several studies of ULF wave-particle interactions at synchronous orbit.

  12. Chaotic delocalization of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-06-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in the classical Harper model in the regime when one-particle motion is absolutely bounded inside one cell of periodic potential. The interaction between particles breaks integrability of classical motion leading to emergence of Hamiltonian dynamical chaos. At moderate interactions and certain energies above the mobility edge this chaos leads to a chaotic propulsion of two particles with their diffusive spreading over the whole space both in one and two dimensions. At the same time the distance between particles remains bounded by one or two periodic cells demonstrating appearance of new composite quasi-particles called chaons. The effect of chaotic delocalization of chaons is shown to be rather general being present for Coulomb and short range interactions. It is argued that such delocalized chaons can be observed in experiments with cold atoms and ions in optical lattices.

  13. Atomic data for controlled fusion research. Volume III. Particle interactions with surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.W.

    1985-02-01

    This report provides a handbook of data concerning particle solid interactions that are relevant to plasma-wall interactions in fusion devices. Published data have been collected, assessed, and represented by a single functional relationship which is presented in both tabular and graphical form. Mechanisms reviewed here include sputtering, secondary electron emission, particle reflection, and trapping.

  14. Lieb-Thirring inequality for a model of particles with point interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Rupert L.; Seiringer, Robert

    2012-09-15

    We consider a model of quantum-mechanical particles interacting via point interactions of infinite scattering length. In the case of fermions we prove a Lieb-Thirring inequality for the energy, i.e., we show that the energy is bounded from below by a constant times the integral of the particle density to the power (5/3).

  15. Cellular interactions of surface modified nanoporous silicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimbo, Luis M.; Sarparanta, Mirkka; Mäkilä, Ermei; Laaksonen, Timo; Laaksonen, Päivi; Salonen, Jarno; Linder, Markus B.; Hirvonen, Jouni; Airaksinen, Anu J.; Santos, Hélder A.

    2012-05-01

    In this study, the self-assembly of hydrophobin class II (HFBII) on the surface of thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) nanoparticles was investigated. The HFBII-coating converted the hydrophobic particles into more hydrophilic ones, improved the particles' cell viability in both HT-29 and Caco-2 cell lines compared to uncoated particles, and enhanced the particles' cellular association. The amount of HFBII adsorbed onto the particles was also successfully quantified by both the BCA assay and a HPLC method. Importantly, the permeation of a poorly water-soluble drug, indomethacin, loaded into THCPSi particles across Caco-2 monolayers was not affected by the protein coating. In addition, 125I-radiolabelled HFBII did not extensively permeate the Caco-2 monolayer and was found to be stably adsorbed onto the THCPSi nanoparticles incubated in pH 7.4, which renders the particles the possibility for further track-imaging applications. The results highlight the potential of HFBII coating for improving wettability, increasing biocompatibility and possible intestinal association of PSi nanoparticulates for drug delivery applications.In this study, the self-assembly of hydrophobin class II (HFBII) on the surface of thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon (THCPSi) nanoparticles was investigated. The HFBII-coating converted the hydrophobic particles into more hydrophilic ones, improved the particles' cell viability in both HT-29 and Caco-2 cell lines compared to uncoated particles, and enhanced the particles' cellular association. The amount of HFBII adsorbed onto the particles was also successfully quantified by both the BCA assay and a HPLC method. Importantly, the permeation of a poorly water-soluble drug, indomethacin, loaded into THCPSi particles across Caco-2 monolayers was not affected by the protein coating. In addition, 125I-radiolabelled HFBII did not extensively permeate the Caco-2 monolayer and was found to be stably adsorbed onto the THCPSi

  16. Cell and Particle Interactions and Aggregation During Electrophoretic Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this research were (i) to perform experiments for observing and quantifying electrophoretic aggregation, (ii) to develop a theoretical description to appropriately analyze and compare with the experimental results, (iii) to study the combined effects of electrophoretic and gravitational aggregation of large particles, and the combined effects of electrophoretic and Brownian aggregation of small particles, and (iv) to perform a preliminary design of a potential future flight experiment involving electrophoretic aggregation. Electrophoresis refers to the motion of charged particles, droplets or molecules in response to an applied electric field. Electrophoresis is commonly used for analysis and separation of biological particles or molecules. When particles have different surface charge densities or potentials, they will migrate at different velocities in an electric field. This differential migration leads to the possibility that they will collide and aggregate, thereby preventing separation.

  17. Simulation of Alfven wave-resonant particle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Pekker, M.

    1995-07-01

    New numerical simulations are presented on the self-consistent dynamics of energetic particles and a set of unstable discrete shear Alfven modes in a tokamak. Our code developed for these simulations has been previously tested in the simulations of the bump-on-tail instability model. The code has a Hamiltonian structure for the mode-particle coupling, with the superimposed wave damping, particle source and classical relaxation processes. In the alpha particle-Alfven wave problem, we observe a transition from a single mode saturation to the mode overlap and global quasilinear diffusion, which is qualitatively similar to that observed in the bump-on-tail model. We demonstrate a considerable enhancement in the wave energy due to the resonance overlap. We also demonstrate the effect of global diffusion on the energetic particle losses.

  18. Relationship between the cohesion of guest particles on the flow behaviour of interactive mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Sharad; Gengenbach, Thomas; Millington-Smith, Doug; Armstrong, Brian; Morton, David A V; Larson, Ian

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects cohesion of small surface-engineered guest binder particles on the flow behaviour of interactive mixtures. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) - a model pharmaceutical binder - was spray-dried with varying l-leucine feed concentrations to create small surface-engineered binder particles with varying cohesion. These spray-dried formulations were characterised by their particle size distribution, morphology and cohesion. Interactive mixtures were produced by blending these spray-dried formulations with paracetamol. The resultant blends were visualised under scanning electron microscope to confirm formation of interactive mixtures. Surface coverage of paracetamol by guest particles as well as the flow behaviour of these mixtures were examined. The flow performance of interactive mixtures was evaluated using measurements of conditioned bulk density, basic flowability energy, aeration energy and compressibility. With higher feed l-leucine concentrations, the surface roughness of small binder particles increased, while their cohesion decreased. Visual inspection of the SEM images of the blends indicated that the guest particles adhered to the surface of paracetamol resulting in effective formation of interactive mixtures. These images also showed that the low-cohesion guest particles were better de-agglomerated that consequently formed a more homogeneous interactive mixture with paracetamol compared with high-cohesion formulations. The flow performance of interactive mixtures changed as a function of the cohesion of the guest particles. Interactive mixtures with low-cohesion guest binder particles showed notably improved bulk flow performance compared with those containing high-cohesion guest binder particles. Thus, our study suggests that the cohesion of guest particles dictates the flow performance of interactive mixtures.

  19. Two-phase flow predictions of the turbulent flow in a combustion chamber including particle-particle interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Michael; Alletto, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Relying on large-eddy simulation (LES) and an efficient algorithm to track a huge number of Lagrangian particles through turbulent flow fields in general complex 3D domains, the flow in a pipe and a model combustion chamber is tackled. The influence of particle-fluid (two-way coupling) as well as particle-particle interactions (four-way coupling) is investigated. The latter is modeled based on deterministic collision detection. First, the LES results of a particle-laden vertical pipe flow with a specular wall and a mass loading of 110% are evaluated based on DNS data from the literature. Second, the predicted LES data of a ring combustion chamber at two different mass loadings (22% and 110%) are analyzed and compared with experimental measurements.

  20. Separable wave equation for three Coulomb interacting particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colavecchia, F. D.; Gasaneo, G.; Garibotti, C. R.

    1998-02-01

    We consider a separable approximation to the Schrödinger equation for the three-body Coulomb problem and found its exact solution above the ionization threshold. This wave function accounts for different possible asymptotic behaviors and reduces to the well-known product of three two-body Coulomb waves (C3) for scattering conditions. The momenta and position-dependent modifications recently proposed for the Sommerfeld parameters, as an improvement to the C3 model, are analyzed. We show how these changes can be included in our model as a suitable physically based variations in the separable approximation for the wave equation.

  1. Interaction of Particles and Turbulence in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dacles-Mariani, Jennifer S.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Cuzzi, J. N.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The most widely accepted theories for the formation of the Solar system claim that small solid particles continue to settle into a thin layer at the midplane of the Solar nebula until it becomes gravitationally unstable and collapses directly into km-sized planetesimals. This scenario has been challenged on at least two grounds: (1) due to turbulence, the particles may not settle into a thin layer, and (2) a thin layer may not be unstable. The Solar nebula contains at least three sources of turbulence: radial shear, vertical shear, and thermal convection. The first of these is small and probably negligible, while the last is poorly understood. However, the second contribution is likely to be substantial. The particle-rich layer rotates at nearly the Keplerian speed, but the surrounding gaseous nebula rotates slower because it is partly supported by pressure. The resulting shear generates a turbulent boundary layer which stirs the particles away from the midplane, and forestalls gravitational instability. Our previous work used a 'zero-equation' (Prandtl) model to predict the intensity of shear-generated turbulence, and enabled us to demonstrate numerically that settling of particles to the midplane is self-limiting. However, we neglected the possibility that mass loading by particles might damp the turbulence. To explore this, we have developed a more sophisticated 'one-equation' model which incorporates local generation, transport, and dissipation of turbulence, as well as explicit damping of turbulence by particles. We also include a background level of global turbulence to represent other sources. Our results indicate that damping flattens the distribution of particles somewhat, but that background turbulence thickens the particle layer.

  2. A quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical approach to the investigation of particle-molecule interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloth, Marianne; Bilde, Merete; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.

    2003-06-01

    A quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical aerosol model is developed to describe the interaction between gas phase molecules and atmospheric particles. The model enables the calculation of interaction energies and time-dependent properties. We use the model to investigate how a succinic acid molecule interacts with an aqueous particle. We show how the interaction energies and linear response properties (excitation energies, transition moments, and polarizabilities) depend on the distance between aerosol particle and molecule and on their relative orientation. The results are compared with those obtained previously using a dielectric continuum model [Sloth et al., J. Phys. Chem. (submitted)].

  3. Effects of ionizing radiation on the immune system with special emphasis on the interaction of dendritic and T cells.

    PubMed

    Manda, Katrin; Glasow, Annegret; Paape, Daniel; Hildebrandt, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), as professional antigen-presenting cells, are members of the innate immune system and function as key players during the induction phase of adaptive immune responses. Uptake, processing, and presentation of antigens direct the outcome toward either tolerance or immunity. The cells of the immune system are among the most highly radiosensitive cells in the body. For high doses of ionizing radiation (HD-IR) both immune-suppressive effects after whole body irradiation and possible immune activation during tumor therapy were observed. On the other hand, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (LD-IR) on the immune system are controversial and seem to show high variability among different individuals and species. There are reports revealing that protracted LD-IR can result in radioresistance. But immune-suppressive effects of chronic LD-IR are also reported, including the killing or sensitizing of certain cell types. This article shall review the current knowledge of radiation-induced effects on the immune system, paying special attention to the interaction of DCs and T cells.

  4. Altered Telomere Nuclear Matrix Interactions and Nucleosomal Periodicity in Ataxia Telangiectasia Cells before and after Ionizing Radiation Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Dhar, Sonu; Pandita, Tej K.

    1999-01-01

    Cells derived from ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) patients show a prominent defect at chromosome ends in the form of chromosome end-to-end associations, also known as telomeric associations, seen at G1, G2, and metaphase. Recently, we have shown that the ATM gene product, which is defective in the cancer-prone disorder A-T, influences chromosome end associations and telomere length. A possible hypothesis explaining these results is that the defective telomere metabolism in A-T cells are due to altered interactions between the telomeres and the nuclear matrix. We examined these interactions in nuclear matrix halos before and after radiation treatment. A difference was observed in the ratio of soluble versus matrix-associated telomeric DNA between cells derived from A-T and normal individuals. Ionizing radiation treatment affected the ratio of soluble versus matrix-associated telomeric DNA only in the A-T cells. To test the hypothesis that the ATM gene product is involved in interactions between telomeres and the nuclear matrix, we examined such interactions in human cells expressing either a dominant-negative effect or complementation of the ATM gene. The phenotype of RKO colorectal tumor cells expressing ATM fragments containing a leucine zipper motif mimics the altered interactions of telomere and nuclear matrix similar to that of A-T cells. A-T fibroblasts transfected with wild-type ATM gene had corrected telomere-nuclear matrix interactions. Further, we found that A-T cells had different micrococcal nuclease digestion patterns compared to normal cells before and after irradiation, indicating differences in nucleosomal periodicity in telomeres. These results suggest that the ATM gene influences the interactions between telomeres and the nuclear matrix, and alterations in telomere chromatin could be at least partly responsible for the pleiotropic phenotypes of the ATM gene. PMID:10490633

  5. Effective Semi-empirical Interaction Potential for Dusty Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Omarbakiyeva, Y. A.; Dosbolayev, M. K.; Jumabekov, A. N.

    2008-09-07

    The Poisson equation was numerically solved on the basis of the experimental correlation functions of dusty particles. Calculations were performed with real parameters of dusty plasma. Reconstructed potential has oscillated character; the minimums coincide to maximums of correlation functions.

  6. Interactive design environment transportation channel of relativistic charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osadchuk, I. O.; Averyanov, G. P.; Budkin, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    Considered a modern implementation of a computer environment for the design of channels of transportation of high-energy charged particle beams. The environment includes a software package for the simulation of the dynamics of charged particles in the channel, operating means for changing parameters of the channel, the elements channel optimization and processing of the output characteristics of the beam with the graphical output the main output parameters.

  7. Approach to the unification of elementary particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1981-09-01

    The assumption that the grand unified theory (GUT) emerges as an effective theory describing bound states of N = 8 supergravity preons should determine the GUT particle spectrum and constrain their couplings. Analysis of the spectrum has led to some possibly encouraging indications. At the least, the particle content in scalars, vectors and fermions needed to reproduce SU(5) phenomenology can be found among the states of the EGMZ multiplet.

  8. Microbial interactions lead to rapid micro-scale successions on model marine particles

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Manoshi S.; Sliwerska, Elzbieta; Gore, Jeff; Polz, Martin F.; Cordero, Otto X.

    2016-01-01

    In the ocean, organic particles harbour diverse bacterial communities, which collectively digest and recycle essential nutrients. Traits like motility and exo-enzyme production allow individual taxa to colonize and exploit particle resources, but it remains unclear how community dynamics emerge from these individual traits. Here we track the taxon and trait dynamics of bacteria attached to model marine particles and demonstrate that particle-attached communities undergo rapid, reproducible successions driven by ecological interactions. Motile, particle-degrading taxa are selected for during early successional stages. However, this selective pressure is later relaxed when secondary consumers invade, which are unable to use the particle resource but, instead, rely on carbon from primary degraders. This creates a trophic chain that shifts community metabolism away from the particle substrate. These results suggest that primary successions may shape particle-attached bacterial communities in the ocean and that rapid community-wide metabolic shifts could limit rates of marine particle degradation. PMID:27311813

  9. Microbial interactions lead to rapid micro-scale successions on model marine particles.

    PubMed

    Datta, Manoshi S; Sliwerska, Elzbieta; Gore, Jeff; Polz, Martin F; Cordero, Otto X

    2016-06-17

    In the ocean, organic particles harbour diverse bacterial communities, which collectively digest and recycle essential nutrients. Traits like motility and exo-enzyme production allow individual taxa to colonize and exploit particle resources, but it remains unclear how community dynamics emerge from these individual traits. Here we track the taxon and trait dynamics of bacteria attached to model marine particles and demonstrate that particle-attached communities undergo rapid, reproducible successions driven by ecological interactions. Motile, particle-degrading taxa are selected for during early successional stages. However, this selective pressure is later relaxed when secondary consumers invade, which are unable to use the particle resource but, instead, rely on carbon from primary degraders. This creates a trophic chain that shifts community metabolism away from the particle substrate. These results suggest that primary successions may shape particle-attached bacterial communities in the ocean and that rapid community-wide metabolic shifts could limit rates of marine particle degradation.

  10. Wave-particle interaction in the Faraday waves.

    PubMed

    Francois, N; Xia, H; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2015-10-01

    Wave motion in disordered Faraday waves is analysed in terms of oscillons or quasi-particles. The motion of these oscillons is measured using particle tracking tools and it is compared with the motion of fluid particles on the water surface. Both the real floating particles and the oscillons, representing the collective fluid motion, show Brownian-type dispersion exhibiting ballistic and diffusive mean squared displacement at short and long times, respectively. While the floating particles motion has been previously explained in the context of two-dimensional turbulence driven by Faraday waves, no theoretical description exists for the random walk type motion of oscillons. It is found that the r.m.s velocity ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) of oscillons is directly related to the turbulent r.m.s. velocity ⟨μ̃⟩(rms) of the fluid particles in a broad range of vertical accelerations. The measured ⟨μ̃(osc)⟩(rms) accurately explains the broadening of the frequency spectra of the surface elevation observed in disordered Faraday waves. These results suggest that 2D turbulence is the driving force behind both the randomization of the oscillons motion and the resulting broadening of the wave frequency spectra. The coupling between wave motion and hydrodynamic turbulence demonstrated here offers new perspectives for predicting complex fluid transport from the knowledge of wave field spectra and vice versa.

  11. Particle Pusher for the Investigation of Wave-Particle Interactions in the Magnetic Centrifugal Mass Filter (MCMF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp-McDowall, Taylor; Ochs, Ian; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2016-10-01

    A particle pusher was constructed in MATLAB using a fourth order Runge-Kutta algorithm to investigate the wave-particle interactions within theoretical models of the MCMF. The model simplified to a radial electric field and a magnetic field focused in the z direction. Studies on an average velocity calculation were conducted in order to test the program's behavior in the large radius limit. The results verified that the particle pusher was behaving correctly. Waves were then simulated on the rotating particles with a periodic divergenceless perturbation in the Bz component of the magnetic field. Preliminary runs indicate an agreement of the particle's motion with analytical predictions-ie. cyclic contractions of the doubly rotating particle's gyroradius.The next stage of the project involves the implementation of particle collisions and turbulence within the particle pusher in order to increase its accuracy and applicability. This will allow for a further investigation of the alpha channeling electrode replacement thesis first proposed by Abraham Fetterman in 2011. Made possible by Grants from the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Program for Plasma Science and Technology (PPST).

  12. Interaction Between Cytochrome c and the Hapten 2,4-Dinitro-fluorobenzene by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo; Chu, Yan-qiu; Dai, Zhao-yun; Ding, Chuan-fan

    2008-06-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, which results from skin exposure to low molecular weight chemicals such as haptens. To clarify the pathogenic mechanism, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange, as well as UV spectroscopy, were applied to determine the interaction between the model protein cytochrome c (cyt c) and the hapten 2,4-dinitro-fluorobenzene (DNFB). The ESI-MS results demonstrate that the conformation of cyt c can change from native folded state into partially unfolded state with the increase of DNFB. The equilibrium state H/D exchange followed by ESI-MS further confirms the above results. UV spectroscopy indicates that the strong-field coordination between iron of heme (prosthetic group) and His18 or Met80 of cyt c is not obviously affected by the hapten.

  13. Investigation of protein-protein noncovalent interactions in soybean agglutinin by electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, X J; Brewer, C F; Saha, S; Chernushevich, I; Ens, W; Standing, K G

    1994-09-01

    Noncovalent interactions in soybean agglutinin (SBA) were studied on an electrospray ionization (ESI) time-of-flight mass spectrometer constructed recently at the University of Manitoba. The high m/z range and high sensitivity of the instrument together with mild ESI interface conditions turned out to be ideal for detecting this noncovalently bonded tetrameric protein (MW approximately 116,000 Da) in low charge states (z = 23 to 27). By altering the acetonitrile content of the SBA solutions it was shown that the observed SBA tetramers are due to structurally specific noncovalent associations in solution. Octamers and dodecamers (MW approximately 350,000 Da) were also detected. Information on the quaternary structure of the tetramers was obtained by analyzing the fragment-ion spectrum resulting from the collision-induced dissociation of the tetramer ions.

  14. Ionization behavior of amino lipids for siRNA delivery: determination of ionization constants, SAR, and the impact of lipid pKa on cationic lipid-biomembrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingtao; Fan, Haihong; Levorse, Dorothy A; Crocker, Louis S

    2011-03-01

    Ionizable amino lipids are being pursued as an important class of materials for delivering small interfering RNA (siRNA) therapeutics, and research is being conducted to elucidate the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of these lipids. The pK(a) of cationic lipid headgroups is one of the critical physiochemical properties of interest due to the strong impact of lipid ionization on the assembly and performance of these lipids. This research focused on developing approaches that permit the rapid determination of the relevant pK(a) of the ionizable amino lipids. Two distinct approaches were investigated: (1) potentiometric titration of amino lipids dissolved in neutral surfactant micelles; and (2) pH-dependent partitioning of a fluorescent dye to cationic liposomes formulated from amino lipids. Using the approaches developed here, the pK(a) values of cationic lipids with distinct headgroups were measured and found to be significantly lower than calculated values. It was also found that lipid-lipid interaction has a strong impact on the pK(a) values of lipids. Lysis of model biomembranes by cationic lipids was used to evaluate the impact of lipid pK(a) on the interaction between cationic lipids and cell membranes. It was found that cationic lipid-biomembrane interaction depends strongly on lipid pK(a) and solution pH, and this interaction is much stronger when amino lipids are highly charged. The presence of an optimal pK(a) range of ionizable amino lipids for siRNA delivery was suggested based on these results. The pK(a) methods reported here can be used to support the SAR screen of cationic lipids for siRNA delivery, and the information revealed through studying the impact of pK(a) on the interaction between cationic lipids and cell membranes will contribute significantly to the design of more efficient siRNA delivery vehicles.

  15. Can a particle interacting with a scalar field reach the speed of light\\?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollick, Dan N.

    1995-09-01

    The motion of a particle interacting with a scalar field is examined. It is shown that the effective mass of the particle is a linear function of the scalar field and that the particle reaches the speed of light when its effective mass goes to zero if scalar field radiation is neglected. The equation of motion for the particle including radiation reaction has the same form as the Lorentz-Dirac equation. The radiation emitted diverges as the particle approaches the speed of light and prevents the particle from becoming luminal. The energy-momentum tensor for the particle and field is calculated and it is shown that there exists an interaction energy-momentum tensor which allows for violations of the weak energy condition.

  16. Inner-shell ionization of rotating linear molecules in the presence of spin-dependent interactions: Entanglement between a photoelectron and an auger electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, R.; Chandra, N.; Parida, S.

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports results of a theoretical study of angle- and spin-resolved photo-Auger electron coincident spectroscopy in the form of entanglement between these two particles emitted from a linear molecule. First, we develop an expression for a density matrix needed for studying spin-entanglement between a photoelectron and an Auger electron. In order to properly represent the molecular symmetries, nuclear rotation, and the spin-dependent interactions (SDIs), we have used symmetry adapted wavefunctions in Hund’s coupling scheme (a) for all the species participating in this two-step process. This expression shows that spin-entanglement in a photo-Auger electron pair in the presence of SDIs very strongly depends upon, among other things, polarization of the ionizing radia- tion, directions of motion and of spin polarization of two ejected electrons, and the dynamics of photoionization and of Auger decay. We have applied this expression, as an example, to a generic linear molecule in its J0, M0 = 0 state. This model calculation clearly brings out the salient features of the spin-entanglement of a photo-Auger electron pair in the presence of the SDIs.

  17. Resonant wave-particle interaction in the radiation belts: quasi-linear scattering vs. nonlinear acceleration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, Anton; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Mourenas, Didier; Vasiliev, Alexei

    Wave-particle resonant interaction is the main mechanism responsible for electron acceleration and scattering in the radiation belts. There are two approaches describing this interaction - quasi-linear theory describes particle diffusion in momentum space, while nonlinear trapping of particles by high-amplitude waves can describe fast particle acceleration. The diffusion approach is more developed and widely used now. However, many modern observations in the radiation belts suggest the presence of significant population of large amplitude waves which can be responsible for nonlinear wave-particle interaction. We show that such nonlinear wave-particle resonant interaction corresponds to the fast transport of particles in phase space. We show that the general approach for the description of the evolution of the particle velocity distribution based on the Fokker-Plank equation can be modified to consider the process of nonlinear wave-particle interaction, including particle trapping. Such a modification consists in one additional operator describing fast particle jumps in phase space. The proposed approach is illustrated by considering the acceleration of relativistic electrons by strongly oblique whistler waves. We determine the typical variation of electron phase-density due to nonlinear wave-particle interaction and compare this variation with pitch-angle/energy diffusion due to quasi-linear electron scattering. We show that relation between nonlinear and quasi-linear effects is controlled by the distribution of wave-amplitudes. When this distribution has a heavy tail, nonlinear effects can become dominant in the formation of the electron energy distribution. We compare effectiveness of quasi-linear diffusion and nonlinear trapping for conditions typical for Earth radiation belts.

  18. Plasma/particle interaction in subsonic argon/helium thermal plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Haggard, D.C.

    1993-04-01

    Understanding the behavior of a particle and the interactions between a particle and the plasma surrounding it is important to the development and optimization of the plasma spray coating process. This is an experimental study of the interaction between a subsonic thermal plasma jet and injected nickel-aluminum particles. The velocity, temperature and composition of the gas flow field is mapped using an enthalpy probe/mass spectrometer system. The particle flow field is examined by simultaneously measuring the in-flight size, velocity, and temperature of individual particles. The complex interaction between the gas and particle flow fields is examined by combining the two sets of data. Particle and gas temperatures and velocities are compared in the vicinity of a nominal substrate standoff distance and axially along the median particle trajectory. The temperature and velocity difference is shown to vary substantially depending on the particle`s trajectory. By the time a particle on the median trajectory reaches the nominal substrate stand off of 63.5 mm it is transferring it`s heat and momentum to the plasma gas.

  19. Wave - fluid particle interaction in the Faraday waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, Nicolas; Xia, Hua; Punzmann, Horst; Shats, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Faraday waves are parametrically excited perturbations that appear on a liquid surface when the latter is vertically vibrated. Recently it has been discovered that: 1) such wave field can be described as a disordered lattice made of localised oscillating excitations, termed oscillons, 2) the horizontal motion of fluid particles on the water surface reproduces in detail the motion of fluid in two-dimensional turbulence. Here we report experimental measurements of the motion of both entities using Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking Velocimetry techniques. Those techniques allow to measure Lagrangian and Eulerian features of the oscillon motion and compare them with those of the fluid motion. A strong coupling is uncovered between the erratic motion of the waves and the turbulent agitation of the fluid particles. Both motions show Brownian-type dispersion and the r.m.s velocity of oscillons is directly related to the r.m.s. velocity of the fluid particles in a broad range of vertical accelerations. These results offer new perspectives for predicting surface fluid transport from the knowledge of the wave fields and vice versa. In particular, the broadening of the wave spectra at high wave amplitude can be predicted if the 2D turbulence energy is known. This work was supported by the Australian Research Council's Discovery Projects funding scheme (DP150103468 and DP160100863). NF acknowledges support by the Australian Research Council's DECRA Award (DE160100742).

  20. Submicrometer particle removal indoors by a novel electrostatic precipitator with high clean air delivery rate, low ozone emissions, and carbon fiber ionizer.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-J; Han, B; Kim, Y-J; Oda, T; Won, H

    2013-10-01

    A novel positive-polarity electrostatic precipitator (ESP) was developed using an ionization stage (0.4 × 0.4 × 0.14 m(3) ) with 16 carbon fiber ionizers in each channel and a collection stage (0.4 × 0.4 × 0.21 m(3) ) with parallel metallic plates. The single-pass collection efficiency and clean air delivery rate (CADR) were measured by standard tests using KCl particles in 0.25-0.35 μm. Performance was determined using the Deutsch equation and established diffusion and field charging theories and also compared with the commercialized HEPA filter-type air cleaner. Experimental results showed that the single-pass collection efficiency of the ESP ranged from 50 to 95% and decreased with the flow rate (10-20 m(3) /min), but increased with the voltage applied to the ionizers (6 to 8 kV) and collection plates (-5 to -7 kV). The ESP with 18 m(3) /min achieved a CADR of 12.1 m(3) /min with a voltage of 8 kV applied to the ionization stage and with a voltage of -6 kV applied to the collection stage. The concentration of ozone in the test chamber (30.4 m(3) ), a maximum value of 5.4 ppb over 12 h of continuous operation, was much lower than the current indoor regulation (50 ppb).

  1. An approach to mineral particle-air bubble interaction in turbulent flow of flotation cell

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S.; Song, S.; Gou, J.; Pan, Y.

    1995-12-31

    The calculated potential energies of interaction between hydrophobic particle of three minerals (rhodochrosite, quartz and talc) and air bubble show that the energy of hydrophobic interaction is the dominant factor for their attachment. An attachment rate equation, integrating particle-bubble collision and adhesion by introducing a capture efficiency, has been put forward. It was found that the hydrophobic particle-bubble aggregates can not be disconnected in the bulk zone of flotation cell, whereas in the impeller zone the breakup may occur, particularly for the coarser particles captured by bubble. Finally, the flotation rate constant was estimated theoretically and verified by experiments.

  2. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Dynamical Magnetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B0 = 0.5.

  3. SIMULATIONS OF ENERGETIC PARTICLES INTERACTING WITH DYNAMICAL MAGNETIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A. E-mail: husseinm@myumanitoba.ca

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B{sub 0} = 0.5.

  4. Dispersive approaches for three-particle final state interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, I. V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we present different representations of the Khuri-Treiman equation and discuss advantages and disadvantages of each representation. In particular we focus on the inversion technique proposed by Pasquier, which, even though developed a long time ago, has not been used in modern analyses of data on three particle decays. We apply the method to a toy model and compare the sensitivity of this and alternative solution methods to the left-hand cut contribution. We also discuss the meaning and applicability of Watson's theorem when three particles in final states are involved.

  5. Determination of isoflavone content in soy, red clover, and kudzu dietary supplement materials by liquid chromatography-particle beam/electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Burdette, Carolyn Q; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Increased consumption of dietary supplements brings about important requirements of analytical methods to allow accurate and precise measurements of the chemical composition of these botanical materials. Presented here is the isoflavone content in proposed National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference materials (SRMs) determined by LC-particle beam/electron ionization MS. Botanical materials (soy, red clover, and kudzu) are characterized for the content of a suite of five isoflavones (puerarin, daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and biochanin A). These compounds are of interest due to correlations with certain health benefits. An RP chromatographic separation was first optimized using UV-Vis spectrophotometric detection. The LC output was then introduced to an electron ionization source using a particle beam interface on an Extrel Benchmark MS system. The separation was carried out using a commercial C18 column and a linear gradient using water and methanol (both containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid as mobile phases A and B, at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min over 40 min. LOD values for the isoflavones were determined to be at the ng level. Quantitation was performed using an internal standard (IS) approach with 7-hydroxy-4-chromone as the IS compound. The levels of isoflavones in the botanical products were determined for the proposed SRMs.

  6. Probing the nature of interactions in SH2 binding interfaces--evidence from electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, E. W.; Henriques, D. A.; Renzoni, D.; Morton, C. J.; Mulhern, T. D.; Pitkeathly, M. C.; Ladbury, J. E.; Robinson, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    We have adopted nanoflow electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to probe the mechanism of peptide recognition by the SH2 domain from the Src family tyrosine kinase protein, Fyn. This domain is involved in the mediation of intracellular signal transduction pathways by interaction with proteins containing phosphorylated tyrosine (Y*) residues. The binding of tyrosyl phosphopeptides can mimic these interactions. Specificity in these interactions has been attributed to the interaction of the Y* and residues proximal and C-terminal to it. Previous studies have established that for specific binding with Fyn, the recognition sequence consists of pTyr-Glu-Glu-Ile. The specific interactions involve the binding of Y* with the ionic, and the Y* + 3 Ile residue with the hydrophobic binding pockets on the surface of the Fyn SH2 domain. In this work, a variation in the Y* + 3 residue of this high-affinity sequence was observed to result in changes in the relative binding affinities as determined in solution (ITC) and in the gas phase (nanoflow ESI-MS). X-ray analysis shows that a feature of the Src family SH2 domains is the involvement of water molecules in the peptide binding site. Under the nanoflow ESI conditions, water molecules appear to be maintained in the Fyn SH2-ligand complex. Compelling evidence for these molecules being incorporated in the SH2-peptide interface is provided by the prevalence of the peaks assigned to water-bound over the water-free complex at high-energy conditions. Thus, the stability of water protein-ligand complex appears to be intimately linked to the presence of water. PMID:10548041

  7. ON THE INTERACTION OF ADENINE WITH IONIZING RADIATION: MECHANISTICAL STUDIES AND ASTROBIOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Nicholas L.; Ullrich, Susanne; Bennett, Chris J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2011-04-01

    The molecular inventory available on the prebiotic Earth was likely derived from both terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources. A complete description of which extraterrestrial molecules may have seeded early Earth is therefore necessary to fully understand the prebiotic evolution which led to life. Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are expected to cause both the formation and destruction of important biomolecules-including nucleic acid bases such as adenine-in the interstellar medium within the ices condensed on interstellar grains. The interstellar ultraviolet (UV) component is expected to photochemically degrade gas-phase adenine on a short timescale of only several years. However, the destruction rate is expected to be significantly reduced when adenine is shielded in dense molecular clouds or even within the ices of interstellar grains. Here, biomolecule destruction by the energetic charged particle component of the GCR becomes important as it is not fully attenuated. Presented here are results on the destruction rate of the nucleobase adenine in the solid state at 10 K by energetic electrons, as generated in the track of cosmic ray particles as they penetrate ices. When both UV and energetic charged particle destructive processes are taken into account, the half-life of adenine within dense interstellar clouds is found to be {approx}6 Myr, which is on the order of a star-forming molecular cloud. We also discuss chemical reaction pathways within the ices to explain the production of observed species, including the formation of nitriles (R-C{identical_to}N), epoxides (C-O-C), and carbonyl functions (R-C=O).

  8. Thermocapillary Interaction between a Solid Particle and a Liquid-Gas Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, A. A.; Leshansky, A. M.; Nir, A.

    1996-11-01

    Interaction between solid particles and a free liquid-gas interface is very important for flotation processes and for various processes involving multiphase flows. In the present contribution, interaction between a hot solid particle submerged into an ambient fluid, and a free liquid-gas interface is considered. A non-uniform temperature field around the solid particle produces surface tension gradients at the liquid-gas interface which generate a thermocapillary flow in the surrounding fluid. This flow yields the motion of the solid particle itself. Three cases are considered: (i) interaction between a solid particle and a spherical gas bubble at a finite separation distance; (ii) thermocapillary motion of a solid particle and an attached gas bubble; (iii) interaction between a solid particle and a plane undeformable liquid-gas interface. In all cases the velocity of the thermocapillarity induced motion of the solid particle is calculated in the approximation of the Stokes flow and a low Peclet number as a function of the separation distance and the bubble-to-particle radii ratio. Some preliminary results of the present work have been published in (A.A.Golovin, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 21), 715 (1995)..

  9. Aromatic pi-pi interaction mediated by a metal atom: structure and ionization of the bis(eta(6)-benzene)chromium-benzene cluster.

    PubMed

    Han, Songhee; Singh, N Jiten; Kang, Tae Yeon; Choi, Kyo-Won; Choi, Sunyoung; Baek, Sun Jong; Kim, Kwang S; Kim, Sang Kyu

    2010-07-21

    Aromatic pi-pi interaction in the presence of a metal atom has been investigated experimentally and theoretically with the model system of bis(eta(6)-benzene)chromium-benzene cluster (Cr(Bz)(2)-Bz) in which a free solvating benzene is non-covalently attached to the benzene moiety of Cr(Bz)(2). One-photon mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy and first principles calculations are employed to identify the structure of Cr(Bz)(2)-Bz which adopts the parallel-displaced configuration. The decrease in ionization potential for Cr(Bz)(2)-Bz compared with Cr(Bz)(2), resulting from the increase of the cation-pi stabilization energy upon ionization, is consistent with the parallel-displaced structure of the cluster. Theoretical calculations give the detailed cluster structures with associated energetics, thus revealing the nature of pi-pi-metal or pi-pi-cation interactions at the molecular level.

  10. Numerical simulation of particle-wave interaction in boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Danabasoglu, G.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of wall injection and particle motion on the spatial stability of two-dimensional plane channel flow are investigated. For this purpose, an accurate Navier-Stokes solver to simulate the space-time evolution of disturbances in three-dimensional flows has been developed. The code is operational on the NASA Langley CRAY2 and can be ported to any other supercomputer. The code has been tested extensively in tracking the spatial evolution of two-dimensional disturbances in plane channel flow and provided excellent agreement with the linear theory including at the inflow/outflow boundaries. Preliminary calculations have been performed to investigate the effects of stationary and moving sources of vortical disturbances simulating a particle traveling in the flow field. Results suggest that even at very low amplitudes, vortical disturbances act as amplifiers on the Tollmien-Schlichting waves promoting rapid instability. It is also found that slow moving particles are more dangerous than both stationary and fast moving particles for the same disturbance levels.

  11. Influence of dipolar interactions on hyperthermia properties of ferromagnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serantes, D.; Baldomir, D.; Martinez-Boubeta, C.; Simeonidis, K.; Angelakeris, M.; Natividad, E.; Castro, M.; Mediano, A.; Chen, D.-X.; Sanchez, A.; Balcells, LI.; Martínez, B.

    2010-10-01

    We show both experimental evidences and Monte Carlo modeling of the effects of interparticle dipolar interactions on the hysteresis losses. Results indicate that an increase in the intensity of dipolar interactions produce a decrease in the magnetic susceptibility and hysteresis losses, thus diminishing the hyperthermia output. These findings may have important clinical implications for cancer treatment.

  12. Plasma/particle interaction in subsonic argon/helium thermal plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, W.D.; Fincke, J.R.; Haggard, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of a particle and the interactions between a particle and the plasma surrounding it is important to the development and optimization of the plasma spray coating process. This is an experimental study of the interaction between a subsonic thermal plasma jet and injected nickel-aluminum particles. The velocity, temperature and composition of the gas flow field is mapped using an enthalpy probe/mass spectrometer system. The particle flow field is examined by simultaneously measuring the in-flight size, velocity, and temperature of individual particles. The complex interaction between the gas and particle flow fields is examined by combining the two sets of data. Particle and gas temperatures and velocities are compared in the vicinity of a nominal substrate standoff distance and axially along the median particle trajectory. The temperature and velocity difference is shown to vary substantially depending on the particle's trajectory. By the time a particle on the median trajectory reaches the nominal substrate stand off of 63.5 mm it is transferring it's heat and momentum to the plasma gas.

  13. A numerical study of initial-stage interaction between shock and particle curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaolong; Jiang, Lingjie

    2016-11-01

    High speed particulate flow appears in many scientific and engineering problems. Wagner et al., 2012 studied the planar shock - particle curtain interaction experimentally, found the movement and expansion of the particle curtain, together with the movement of shock waves. Theofanous et al., 2016 did similar experiments, discovered a time scaling that reveals a universal regime for cloud expansion. In these experiments, both the particle-fluid interaction and the particle-particle collision are not negligible, which make it challenging to be dealt with. This work aims to numerically study and understand this problem. Applying the stratified multiphase model presented by Chang & Liou 2007 and regarding one phase as solid, following Regele et al., 2014, we study the initial stage of a planar shock impacting on a particle curtain in 2D, in which the particles can be regarded as static so that the collision between particles are not considered. The locations of reflected shock, transmitted shock, and contact discontinuity are examined. The turbulent energy generated in the interacting area is investigated. Keeping the total volume fraction of particles, and changing the particle number, good convergence results are obtained. Effective drag coefficient in 1D model is also calibrated. The authors acknowledge the support from National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91230203).

  14. 3D Plasma Clusters: Analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, T.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Annaratone, B. M.

    2008-09-07

    3D plasma clusters (up to 100 particles) have been built inside small (32 mm{sup 3}) plasma volume in gravity. It has been estimated that the external confinement has a negligible influence on the processes inside the clusters. At such conditions the analysis of dynamical evolution and individual particle interactions have shown that the binary interaction among particles in addition to the repelling Coulomb force exhibits also an attractive part. The tendency of the systems to approach the state with minimum energy by rearranging particles inside has been detected. The measured 63 particles' cluster vibrations are in close agreement with vibrations of a drop with surface tension. This indicates that even a 63 particle cluster already exhibits properties normally associated with the cooperative regime.

  15. [Determination of melamine residue in raw milk and dairy products using hydrophilic interaction chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yan, Lijuan; Wu, Min; Zhang, Zhigang; Zhou, Yu; Lin, Liyi; Fang, Enhua; Xu, Dunming; Chen, Luping

    2008-11-01

    A method for the determination of melamine residue in raw milk and dairy products was developed using hydrophilic interaction chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-ESI-MS/MS). The melamine residue in the test sample was extracted with 1% trichloroacetic acid-acetonitrile (1 : 1, v/v) solution. The homogenate was centrifuged and the supernatant was collected. The extract was cleaned up using a mixed-mode cation exchange (MCX) solid-phase extraction cartridge and then concentrated, and analyzed by HILIC-ESI-MS/MS. The gradient chromatographic separation was performed using a hydrophilic silica column (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) with 10 mmol/L ammonium acetate buffer (pH 3.0) and acetonitrile as the mobile phases. Due to its hydrophilic property, melamine was well retained on the column and seperated from other compounds. It effectively reduced matrix effect. A triple quadruple mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source was employed for the qualitative and quantitative measurement of melamine. The melamine was quantified using the fragments produced from the protonated melamine ion through multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in positive ion mode. Two MRM transitions from the protonated melamine ion (m/z 127 --> 85 and m/z 127 --> 68) were monitored. The average recoveries were between 76.3% and 98.7% in the spiked range of 0.5 to 10 mg/kg in raw milk and dairy products, and the relative standard deviations were less than 6.8%. The linear range was from 0.05 to 10.0 mg/L. The limit of quantification (S/N > 10) was 0.05 mg/kg. The method is highly selective and sensitive for the measurements of melamine and adequate for the analysis of melamine in raw milk and dairy products.

  16. Calculation of effective atomic number and electron density of essential biomolecules for electron, proton, alpha particle and multi-energetic photon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Onaran, Tayfur

    2015-07-01

    Effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) of some essential biomolecules have been calculated for total electron interaction, total proton interaction and total alpha particle interaction using an interpolation method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. Also, the spectrum weighted Zeff for multi-energetic photons has been calculated using Auto-Zeff program. Biomolecules consist of fatty acids, amino acids, carbohydrates and basic nucleotides of DNA and RNA. Variations of Zeff and Ne with kinetic energy of ionizing charged particles and effective photon energies of heterogeneous sources have been studied for the given materials. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne have been observed through the entire energy region for electron, proton and alpha particle interactions. Non-uniform variation has been observed for protons and alpha particles in low and intermediate energy regions, respectively. The maximum values of Zeff have found to be in higher energies for total electron interaction whereas maximum values have found to be in relatively low energies for total proton and total alpha particle interactions. When it comes to the multi-energetic photon sources, it has to be noted that the highest Zeff values were found at low energy region where photoelectric absorption is the pre-dominant interaction process. The lowest values of Zeff have been shown in biomolecules such as stearic acid, leucine, mannitol and thymine, which have highest H content in their groups. Variation in Ne seems to be more or less the same with the variation in Zeff for the given materials as expected.

  17. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography/positive ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method for the quantification of alprazolam and α-hydroxy-alprazolam in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Kalogria, Eleni; Pistos, Constantinos; Panderi, Irene

    2013-12-30

    A hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography/positive ion electrospray-mass spectrometry (HILIC-ESI/MS) has been developed and fully validated for the quantification of alprazolam and its main metabolite, α-hydroxy-alprazolam, in human plasma. The assay is based on 50μL plasma samples, following liquid-liquid extraction. All analytes and the internal standard (tiamulin) were separated by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography using an X-Bridge-HILIC analytical column (150.0mm×2.1mm i.d., particle size 3.5μm) under isoscratic elution. The mobile phase was composed of a 7% 10mM ammonium formate water solution in acetonitrile and pumped at a flow rate of 0.20mLmin(-1). Running in positive electrospray ionization and selected ion monitoring (SIM) the mass spectrometer was set to analyze the protonated molecules [M+H](+) at m/z 309, 325 and 494 for alprazolam, α-hydroxy-alprazolam and tiamulin (ISTD) respectively. The assay was linear over the concentration range of 2.5-250ngmL(-1) for alprazolam and 2.5-50ngmL(-1) for α-hydroxy alprazolam. Intermediate precision was less than 4.1% over the tested concentration ranges. The method is the first reported application of HILIC in the analysis benzodiazepines in human plasma. With a small sample size (50μL human plasma) and a run time less than 10.0min for each sample the method can be used to support a wide range of clinical studies concerning alprazolam quantification.

  18. L. V. Keldysh's "Ionization in the Field of a Strong Electromagnetic Wave" and modern physics of atomic interaction with a strong laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, M. V.

    2016-03-01

    Basic premises, approximations, and results of L.V. Keldysh's 1964 work on multiphoton ionization of atoms are discussed, as well as its influence on the modern science of the interaction of atomic-molecular systems with a strong laser field.

  19. Dispersive approaches for three-particle final state interaction

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Peng; Danilkin, Igor V.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-10-30

    In this work, we presented different representations of Khuri-Treiman equation, the advantage and disadvantage of each representations are discussed. With a scattering amplitude toy model, we also studied the sensitivity of solution of KT equation to left-hand cut of toy model and to the different approximate methods. At last, we give a brief discussion of Watson's theorem when three particles in final states are involved.

  20. Direct effects of ionizing radiation on integral membrane proteins. Noncovalent energy transfer requires specific interpeptide interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jhun, E.; Jhun, B.H.; Jones, L.R.; Jung, C.Y. )

    1991-05-25

    The 12 transmembrane alpha helices (TMHs) of human erythrocyte glucose transporter were individually cut by pepsin digestion as membrane-bound 2.5-3.5-kDa peptide fragments. Radiation-induced chemical degradation of these fragments showed an average target size of 34 kDa. This is 10-12 x larger than the average size of an individual TMH, demonstrating that a significant energy transfer occurs among these TMHs in the absence of covalent linkage. Heating this TMH preparation at 100{degree}C for 15 min reduced the target size to 5 kDa or less, suggesting that the noncovalent energy transfer requires specific helix-helix interactions. Purified phospholamban, a small (6-kDa) integral membrane protein containing a single TMH, formed a pentameric assembly in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical degradation target size of this phospholamban pentamer was 5-6 kDa, illustrating that not all integral membrane protein assemblies permit intersubunit energy transfer. These findings together with other published observations suggest strongly that significant noncovalent energy transfer can occur within the tertiary and quaternary structure of membrane proteins and that as yet undefined proper molecular interactions are required for such covalent energy transfer. Our results with pepsin-digested glucose transporter also illustrate the importance of the interhelical interaction as a predominating force in maintaining the tertiary structure of a transmembrane protein.

  1. Interactions of Ultracold Impurity Particles with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-23

    STATEMENT 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Research on interactions between quantum gases and impurities has become an active area of AMO . Here...2015 Abstract. Research on interactions between quantum gases and impurities (ions, other atoms etc.) has become an active area of AMO research...respectively. Green and red electrodes are grounded. PRL 107, 103001 (2011) P HY S I CA L R EV I EW LE T T E R S week ending 2 SEPTEMBER 2011 0031-9007=11

  2. Current sheet interaction and particle acceleration in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Andrew F.

    1990-01-01

    The thin, rapidly rotating current sheet in Jupiter's magnetodisk can energize heavy ions by hundreds of keV. If the magnetic field lines are azimuthally swept back, energetic ions undergoing nonadiabatic current sheet interactions will step radially outward and be centrifugally energized. Estimated energization times can be comparable to the Jovian rotation period. Nonadiabatic interactions with the rotating Jovian current sheet may be an important energization mechanism for heavy ions, but are not effective for energizing electrons or light ions like protons.

  3. Elementary particle interactions. Progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Read, K.; Ward, B.F.L.

    1992-10-01

    Work continues on strange particle production in weak interactions using data from a high-energy neutrino exposure in a freon bubble chamber. Meson photoproduction has also consumed considerable effort. Detector research and development activities have been carried out.

  4. Elementary particle interactions. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Read, K.; Ward, B.F.L.

    1992-10-01

    Work continues on strange particle production in weak interactions using data from a high-energy neutrino exposure in a freon bubble chamber. Meson photoproduction has also consumed considerable effort. Detector research and development activities have been carried out.

  5. Delocalization of two interacting particles in the 2D Harper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, Klaus M.; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2016-01-01

    We study the problem of two interacting particles in a two-dimensional quasiperiodic potential of the Harper model. We consider an amplitude of the quasiperiodic potential such that in absence of interactions all eigenstates are exponentially localized while the two interacting particles are delocalized showing anomalous subdiffusive spreading over the lattice with the spreading exponent b ≈ 0.5 instead of a usual diffusion with b = 1. This spreading is stronger than in the case of a correlated disorder potential with a one particle localization length as for the quasiperiodic potential. At the same time we do not find signatures of ballistic pairs existing for two interacting particles in the localized phase of the one-dimensional Harper model.

  6. Effects of field interactions upon particle creation in Robertson-Walker universes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birrell, N. D.; Davies, P. C. W.; Ford, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    Particle creation due to field interactions in an expanding Robertson-Walker universe is investigated. A model in which pseudoscalar mesons and photons are created as a result of their mutual interaction is considered, and the energy density of created particles is calculated in model universes which undergo a bounce at some maximum curvature. The free-field creation of non-conformally coupled scalar particles and of gravitons is calculated in the same space-times. It is found that if the bounce occurs at a sufficiently early time the interacting particle creation will dominate. This result may be traced to the fact that the model interaction chosen introduces a length scale which is much larger than the Planck length.

  7. A study of the non-covalent interaction between flavonoids and DNA triplexes by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Cuihong; Cui, Meng; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2009-06-01

    The binding interactions of 22 flavonoids (9 aglycones and 13 glycosides) with DNA triplexes were investigated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The results revealed that the hydroxyl positions of aglycones, the locations and numbers of saccharide, as well as the aglycone skeletons play roles in the triplex-binding properties of flavonoids. The presence of 3-OH, or 3'-OH, or replacement of 4'-OH with methoxy group in aglycones decreased the fraction of bound DNA sharply. Flavonoid glycosides exhibit higher binding affinities towards the DNA triplexes than their aglycone counterparts. Glycosylations of flavones at the 8-C position and isoflavones at the 7-O position show higher binding affinities than those on the other positions of ring A of aglycones. Glycosylation with a disaccharide on C3 position of flavonol results in higher binding affinity than that with monosaccharide. Flexibility of the ring B is favorable for its interaction with DNA triplex. According to sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) experiments, glycosylation and non-planarity of flavonoid aglycones lead to different dissociation pathways of the flavonoid/triplex complexes. The differences between dissociation patterns suggest different DNA-binding modes or DNA-binding affinities. Although the exact binding geometry of the flavonoid-triplex complexes cannot be specified, the results may be helpful for understanding the triplex-binding properties of flavonoids and give a clue to design of triplex-binding ligands.

  8. BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry: Reagentless Detection of Individual Airborne Spores and Other Bioagent Particles Based on Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, Paul Thomas

    2004-09-01

    Better devices are needed for the detection of aerosolized biological warfare agents. Advances in the ongoing development of one such device, the BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system, are described here in detail. The system samples individual, micrometer-sized particles directly from the air and analyzes them in real-time without sample preparation or use of reagents. At the core of the BAMS system is a dual-polarity, single-particle mass spectrometer with a laser based desorption and ionization (DI) system. The mass spectra produced by early proof-of-concept instruments were highly variable and contained limited information to differentiate certain types of similar biological particles. The investigation of this variability and subsequent changes to the DI laser system are described. The modifications have reduced the observed variability and thereby increased the usable information content in the spectra. These improvements would have little value without software to analyze and identify the mass spectra. Important improvements have been made to the algorithms that initially processed and analyzed the data. Single particles can be identified with an impressive level of accuracy, but to obtain significant reductions in the overall false alarm rate of the BAMS instrument, alarm decisions must be made dynamically on the basis of multiple analyzed particles. A statistical model has been developed to make these decisions and the resulting performance of a hypothetical BAMS system is quantitatively predicted. The predictions indicate that a BAMS system, with reasonably attainable characteristics, can operate with a very low false alarm rate (orders of magnitude lower than some currently fielded biodetectors) while still being sensitive to small concentrations of biological particles in a large range of environments. Proof-of-concept instruments, incorporating some of the modifications described here, have already performed well in independent testing.

  9. Inverse Bremsstrahlung Heating in Laser-Matter Interactions: the effects of other particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Rishi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Ackad, Edward

    2016-10-01

    The laser-matter interaction of inverse bremsstrahlung heating is studied via a particle in cell code, PICLS and via molecular dynamics code, MD. Inverse bremsstrahlung heating, an important process in the laser-matter interaction, involves three different kinds of interactions, i)the interaction of the electrons with the external laser field, ii) the electron-ion interaction and iii) the electron-electron interaction. In the interaction of atomic clusters with femtosecond laser pulses, nanoplasmas with high density are created. A new scaling for the rate of energy absorption in inverse bremsstrahlung heating has been derived which depends on the external laser field as well as electric field due to the other particles. Electric fields due to the particles depend on a parameter, the potential depth. Thus, inverse bremsstrahlung heating also depends on potential depth. We will discuss the particle in cell code results and molecular dynamics code results by varying laser intensities and potential depths to understand the effect of potential depth as well as the particle's field's dependence of inverse bremsstrahlung heating in laser-matter interaction. This work was supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-14-1-0247.

  10. Validity of Saha's equation of thermal ionization for negatively charged spherical particles in complex plasmas in thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2011-04-15

    The authors have discussed the validity of Saha's equation for the charging of negatively charged spherical particles in a complex plasma in thermal equilibrium, even when the tunneling of the electrons, through the potential energy barrier surrounding the particle is considered. It is seen that the validity requires the probability of tunneling of an electron through the potential energy barrier surrounding the particle to be independent of the direction (inside to outside and vice versa) or in other words the Born's approximation should be valid.

  11. Interaction of Ionizing Radiation, Genetically Active Chemicals, and Radiofrequency Radiation in Human and Rodent Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    proflavin , a drug known to intercalate with DNA. Again, when cells were exposed simultaneously to RFR SAR = 40.8- + 13.4 (SD) W/kg or 40 W/kg at power...densities of 87 or 65 mW/cm ), no effect of the RFR on the proflavin induced mutagenicity was observed (Meltz et al., 1990). SCE Induction Previously...Meltz ML, Eagan P, and Erwin DN (1990). Proflavin and Microwave Radiation: Absence of a Mutagenic Interaction. Bioelectromagnetics 11:149-157. Ciaravino

  12. INTERACTION OF IONIZING RADIATION AND E. COLI ENDOTOXIN. I. EFFECT OF RADIATION ON ENDOTOXIN SHOCK.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    E . coli endotoxin and total body irradiation has been studied in 38 adult mongrel dogs. Results indicate that prior irradiation (1000 r) abolishes the endotoxin shock syndrome, and the dogs die of radiation sickness on an average of 62 hr after exposure. Unirradiated dogs given E . coli endotoxin die on an average of 5 hr after injection of the toxin. It is postulated that irradiation interferes with, or actually prevents, the ’trigger mechanism’ of endotoxin shock. This interaction may involve the immune mechanism, complement, liberation

  13. Two-body relativistic scattering of directly interacting particles

    SciTech Connect

    Droz-Vincent, P.

    1984-02-15

    Two-body relativistic scattering via direct interaction is discussed. For a certain class of interactions the problem is equivalent to a family of nonrelativistic scattering problems. The relativistic mass shell is shown to correspond with the kinetic-energy shell of the reduced problem. Under certain sufficient assumptions it is shown that known proofs apply, which ensure that the wave operators exist off-shell. Under more precise conditions, the scattering operator S can be defined also on the mass shell, which is stable by its action. Moreover, S preserves the positivity of energy and is unitary with respect to the inner product of on-shell states. In a more particular case, we obtain a natural normalization in the interacting mass shell.

  14. Transport equations for subdiffusion with nonlinear particle interaction.

    PubMed

    Straka, P; Fedotov, S

    2015-02-07

    We show how the nonlinear interaction effects 'volume filling' and 'adhesion' can be incorporated into the fractional subdiffusive transport of cells and individual organisms. To this end, we use microscopic random walk models with anomalous trapping and systematically derive generic non-Markovian and nonlinear governing equations for the mean concentrations of the subdiffusive cells or organisms. We uncover an interesting interaction between the nonlinearities and the non-Markovian nature of the transport. In the subdiffusive case, this interaction manifests itself in a nontrivial combination of nonlinear terms with fractional derivatives. In the long time limit, however, these equations simplify to a form without fractional operators. This provides an easy method for the study of aggregation phenomena. In particular, this enables us to show that volume filling can prevent "anomalous aggregation," which occurs in subdiffusive systems with a spatially varying anomalous exponent.

  15. Kinematics of the ionized and molecular gas in nearby luminous infrared interacting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Beckman, John; Font, Joan; Rosado, Margarita; Camps-Fariña, Artemi; Borlaff, Alejandro

    2017-03-01

    We have observed three luminous infrared galaxy systems which are pairs of interacting galaxies, with the Galaxy Hα Fabry-Perot system mounted on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, and combined the observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations of these systems in CO emission to compare the physical properties of the star formation regions and the molecular gas clouds, and specifically the internal kinematics of the star-forming regions. We identified 88 star-forming regions in the Hα emission data cubes, and 27 molecular cloud complexes in the CO emission data cubes. The surface densities of the star formation rate and the molecular gas are significantly higher in these systems than in non-interacting galaxies and the Galaxy, and are closer to the surface densities of the star formation rate and the molecular gas of extreme star-forming galaxies at higher redshifts. The large values of the velocity dispersion also show the enhanced gas surface density. The H II regions are situated on the SFR - σv envelope, and so are also in virial equilibrium. Since the virial parameter decreases with the surface densities of both the star formation rate and the molecular gas, we claim that the clouds presented here are gravitationally dominated rather than being in equilibrium with the external pressure.

  16. Nonresonant Interaction of Charged Energetic Particles with Low-frequency Noncompressive Turbulence: Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragot, B. R.

    2012-10-01

    A new method for simulating the three-dimensional dynamics of charged energetic particles in very broadband noncompressive magnetic turbulence is introduced. All scales within the primary inertial range of the turbulence observed in the solar wind near 1 AU are now included for the independent computations of both the particle dynamics and the turbulent magnetic field lines (MFLs). While previous theories of resonant particle pitch-angle (PA) scattering and transport in interplanetary magnetic fields had favored interpreting the observed depletions in the electron PA distributions (PADs) around 90° PA as evidence of poor scattering at low PA cosines, the computed particle dynamics reveal a very different reality. The MFL directions now vary on many scales, and the PADs are depleted around 90° PA due to nonresonant filtering of the particles that propagate at too large an angle to the local magnetic field. Rather than being too weak, the scattering through 90° PA is actually so strong that the particles (electrons and protons/ions) are reflected and trapped in the turbulent magnetic fields. While the low-frequency nonresonant turbulence produces ubiquitous magnetic traps that only let through particles with the most field-aligned velocities, higher-frequency near-gyroscale turbulence, when present, enhances particle transport by allowing the particles to navigate between magnetic traps. Finally, visualizing both particle trajectories and MFLs in the very same turbulence reveals a powerful tool for understanding the effects of the turbulent fields on the particle dynamics and cross-field transport. Some cross-field-line scattering, strongly amplified by MFL dispersal, results in a strong cross-field scattering of the particles. From this visualization, it also appears that near-gyroscale turbulence, previously known as gyroresonant turbulence, does not resonantly interact with the particles. The interaction between particles and fields at or near the gyroscale

  17. Time-dependent configuration-interaction-singles calculation of the 5 p -subshell two-photon ionization cross section in xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin

    2017-01-01

    The 5 p two-photon ionization cross section of xenon in the photon-energy range below the one-photon ionization threshold is calculated within the time-dependent configuration-interaction-singles (TDCIS) method. The TDCIS calculations are compared to random-phase-approximation calculations [Wendin et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 4, 833 (1987), 10.1364/JOSAB.4.000833] and are found to reproduce the energy positions of the intermediate Rydberg states reasonably well. The effect of interchannel coupling is also investigated and found to change the cross section of the 5 p shell only slightly compared to the intrachannel case.

  18. Laser stripping of hydrogen atoms by direct ionization

    DOE PAGES

    Brunetti, E.; Becker, W.; Bryant, H. C.; ...

    2015-05-08

    Direct ionization of hydrogen atoms by laser irradiation is investigated as a potential new scheme to generate proton beams without stripping foils. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation describing the atom-radiation interaction is numerically solved obtaining accurate ionization cross-sections for a broad range of laser wavelengths, durations and energies. Parameters are identified where the Doppler frequency up-shift of radiation colliding with relativistic particles can lead to efficient ionization over large volumes and broad bandwidths using currently available lasers.

  19. Production of neutrons from interactions of GCR-like particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilbronn, L.; Frankel, K.; Holabird, K.; Zeitlin, C.; McMahan, M. A.; Rathbun, W.; Cronqvist, M.; Gong, W.; Madey, R.; Htun, M.; Elaasar, M.; Anderson, B. D.; Baldwin, A. R.; Jiang, J.; Keane, D.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Watson, J. W.; Zhang, W. M.; Galonsky, A.; Ronningen, R.; Zecher, P.; Kruse, J.; Wang, J.; Miller, J. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    In order to help assess the risk to astronauts due to the long-term exposure to the natural radiation environment in space, an understanding of how the primary radiation field is changed when passing through shielding and tissue materials must be obtained. One important aspect of the change in the primary radiation field after passing through shielding materials is the production of secondary particles from the breakup of the primary. Neutrons are an important component of the secondary particle field due to their relatively high biological weighting factors, and due to their relative abundance, especially behind thick shielding scenarios. Because of the complexity of the problem, the estimation of the risk from exposure to the secondary neutron field must be handled using calculational techniques. However, those calculations will need an extensive set of neutron cross section and thicktarget neutron yield data in order to make an accurate assessment of the risk. In this paper we briefly survey the existing neutron-production data sets that are applicable to the space radiation transport problem, and we point out how neutron production from protons is different than neutron production from heavy ions. We also make comparisons of one the heavy-ion data sets with Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) calculations.

  20. Toward a Unified Picture of Elementary Particle Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaillard, Mary K.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses progress made over the last two decades concerning the synthesis and possible unification of the three interactions (strong, electromagnetic, gravitational) relevant to high energy experiments. Areas addressed include quantum field theories, a unified quantum field theory, connection with cosmology, and possibilities for further…

  1. Reaction Mechanisms and Particle Interaction in Burning Two-Phase Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Shoshin, Yuriy L.; Murdyy, Ruslan S.; Hoffmann, Vern K.

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to understand the mechanisms by which particle interactions affect ignition and combustion in the two-phase systems. Combustion of metal aerosols representing the two-phase systems is carried out in the microgravity environment enabling one to avoid the buoyant flows that mask the particle motion due to the particle-particle interaction effects. In addition, relatively large, e.g., 100 micron diameter particles can be used, that remain aerosolized (i.e., do not fall down as they would at normal gravity) so that their behavior ahead, behind, and within the propagating flame can be resolved optically. An experimental apparatus exploiting this approach has been designed for the 2.2-s drop tower microgravity experiments. A typical experiment includes fluidizing metal particles under microgravity in an acoustic field, turning off the acoustic exciter, and igniting the created aerosol at a constant pressure using a hot wire igniter. The flame propagation and details of the individual particle combustion and particle interactions are studied using high-speed movie and video cameras coupled with microscope lenses to resolve individual particles. Recorded flame images are digitized and various image processing techniques including flame position tracking, color separation, and pixel by pixel image comparisons are employed to understand the processes occurring in the burning aerosols. Condensed combustion products are collected after each experiment for the phase, composition, and morphology analyses. New experiments described in this paper address combustion of Ti and Al particle clouds in air and combustion of Mg particle clouds in CO2. In addition, microgravity combustion experiments have been conducted with the particles of the newly produced Al-Mg mechanical alloys aerosolized in air.

  2. Emergent ultra-long-range interactions between active particles in hybrid active-inactive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua P.; Aragones, Juan L.; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser

    2016-04-01

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range of such interactions as well as their magnitude has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Very recently, effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our systems are 2D colloidal monolayers composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids, and a very small fraction of active (spinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation timescale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that, in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials.

  3. Direct and indirect effects of ionizing radiation on grazer-phytoplankton interactions.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Francisco J A; Bradshaw, Clare

    2016-05-01

    Risk assessment of exposure to radionuclides and radiation does not usually take into account the role of species interactions. We investigated how the transfer of carbon between a primary producer, Raphidocelis subcapitata, and a consumer, Daphnia magna, was affected by acute exposure to gamma radiation. In addition to unexposed controls, different treatments were used where: a) only D. magna (Z treatment); b) only R. subcapitata (P treatment) and c) both D. magna and R. subcapitata (ZP treatment) were exposed to one of three acute doses of gamma radiation (5, 50 and 100 Gy). We then compared differences among treatments for three endpoints: incorporation of carbon by D. magna, D. magna growth and R. subcapitata densities. Carbon incorporation was affected by which combination of species was irradiated and by the radiation dose. Densities of R. subcapitata at the end of the experiment were also affected by which species had been exposed to radiation. Carbon incorporation by D. magna was significantly lower in the Z treatment, indicating reduced grazing, an effect stronger with higher radiation doses, possibly due to direct effects of gamma radiation. Top-down indirect effects of this reduced grazing were also seen as R. subcapitata densities increased in the Z treatment due to decreased herbivory. The opposite pattern was observed in the P treatment where only R. subcapitata was exposed to gamma radiation, while the ZP treatment showed intermediate results for both endpoints. In the P treatments, carbon incorporation by D. magna was significantly higher than in the other treatments, suggesting a higher grazing pressure. This, together with direct effects of gamma radiation on R. subcapitata, probably significantly decreased phytoplankton densities in the P treatment. Our results highlight the importance of taking into account the role of species interactions when assessing the effects of exposure to gamma radiation in aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Molecular characterization of cancer reveals interactions between ionizing radiation and chemicals on rat mammary carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Doi, Kazutaka; Tani, Shusuke; Ishikawa, Ken-ichi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Imai, Takashi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2014-04-01

    Although various mechanisms have been inferred for combinatorial actions of multiple carcinogens, these mechanisms have not been well demonstrated in experimental carcinogenesis models. We evaluated mammary carcinogenesis initiated by combined exposure to various doses of radiation and chemical carcinogens. Female rats at 7 weeks of age were γ-irradiated (0.2-2 Gy) and/or exposed to 1-methyl-1-nitrosourea (MNU) (20 or 40 mg/kg, single intraperitoneal injection) or 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) (40 mg/kg/day by gavage for 10 days) and were observed until 50 weeks of age. The incidence of mammary carcinoma increased steadily as a function of radiation dose in the absence of chemicals; mathematical analysis supported an additive increase when radiation was combined with a chemical carcinogen, irrespective of the chemical species and its dose. Hras mutations were characteristic of carcinomas that developed after chemical carcinogen treatments and were overrepresented in carcinomas induced by the combination of radiation and MNU (but not PhIP), indicating an interaction of radiation and MNU at the level of initiation. The expression profiles of seven classifier genes, previously shown to distinguish two classes of rat mammary carcinomas, categorized almost all examined carcinomas that developed after individual or combined treatments with radiation (1 Gy) and chemicals as belonging to a single class; more comprehensive screening using microarrays and a separate test sample set failed to identify differences in gene expression profiles among these carcinomas. These results suggest that a complex, multilevel interaction underlies the combinatorial action of radiation and chemical carcinogens in the experimental model.

  5. Nonequilibrium charge transport in an interacting open system: Two-particle resonance and current asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Dibyendu; Soori, Abhiram; Sen, Diptiman; Dhar, Abhishek

    2009-08-01

    We use the Lippman-Schwinger scattering theory to study nonequilibrium electron transport through an interacting open quantum dot. The two-particle current is evaluated exactly while we use perturbation theory to calculate the current when the leads are Fermi liquids at different chemical potentials. We find an interesting two-particle resonance induced by the interaction and obtain criteria to observe it when a small bias is applied across the dot. Finally, for a system without spatial inversion symmetry, we find that the two-particle current is quite different depending on whether the electrons are incident from the left or the right lead.

  6. The interaction between multi-charged organic salts and poly(vinylpyridine) microgel particles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Kaizhong; Bradley, Melanie; Vincent, Brian

    2010-04-01

    The interaction between negatively charged organic salts, with one two and three sulfonate groups respectively, and positively charged poly(2-vinylpyridine) microgel particles has been investigated. Absorption isotherms are used to describe the uptake of organic salt into the microgel network and the particle size and electrophoretic mobility of the dispersions have been discussed in terms of the electrostatic attraction between the organic salts and microgel network. The results suggest that all organic salts interact weakly with the microgel particles, and there is a tendency towards more noticeable changes in the microgel dispersion properties at lower concentration as the number of sulfonate groups within the organic salts increases.

  7. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Searches for New Particles and Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Toback, David; ŽIvković, Lidija

    2015-02-17

    We present a summary of results for searches for new particles and interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the CDF and the D0 experiments. These include results from Run I as well as Run II for the time period up to July 2014. We focus on searches for supersymmetry, as well as other models of new physics such as new fermions and bosons, various models of excited fermions, leptoquarks, technicolor, hidden-valley model particles, long-lived particles, extra dimensions, dark matter particles, and signature-based searches.

  8. Electrostatic analysis of the interactions between charged particles of dielectric materials.

    PubMed

    Bichoutskaia, Elena; Boatwright, Adrian L; Khachatourian, Armik; Stace, Anthony J

    2010-07-14

    An understanding of the electrostatic interactions that exist between charged particles of dielectric materials has applications that span much of chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering. Areas of interest include cloud formation, ink-jet printing, and the stability of emulsions. A general solution to the problem of calculating electrostatic interactions between charged dielectric particles is presented. The solution converges very rapidly for low values of the dielectric constant and is stable up to the point where particles touch. Through applications to unspecified particles with a range of size and charge ratios, the model shows that there exist distinct regions of dielectric space where particles with the same sign of charge are strongly attracted to one another.

  9. High-energy tail distributions and resonant wave particle interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leubner, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    High-energy tail distributions (k distributions) are used as an alternative to a bi-Lorentzian distribution to study the influence of energetic protons on the right- and left-hand cyclotron modes in a hot two-temperature plasma. Although the parameters are chosen to be in a range appropriate to solar wind or magnetospheric configurations, the results apply not only to specific space plasmas. The presence of energetic particles significantly alters the behavior of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes, leading to a wide range of unstable frequencies and increased growth rates. From the strongly enhanced growth rates it can be concluded that high-energy tail distributions should not show major temperature anisotropies, which is consistent with observations.

  10. (Experimental studies of elementary particle interactions at high energies)

    SciTech Connect

    Khuri, N.N.

    1990-01-01

    This report includes descriptions of the combined work of both Tasks B and B{sub 1} at Rockefeller University. Some highlights are worth stressing in this brief introduction. First, one should note the active involvement of two members of our group, Ren and Callaway, in understanding the problem of superconductivity, both high and low {Tc}. This reflects the broad reach of many, but perhaps not all, particle physicists. Second, spurred by the Rockefeller environment, some in our group are also looking at problems in biology. As for our main purpose, I would like to single out the results of Sanda and Morozumi on the {Delta}I = {1/2} rule, the work of Bitar, Ren and myself on a new approach to the path integral, S.Y. Pi's results on Chern-Simons non-relativistic quantum mechanics, and finally the work by Lee and collaborators on the origin of Fermion masses and mixing.

  11. Turbulence and wave particle interactions in solar-terrestrial plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulk, G. A.; Goldman, M. V.; Toomre, J.

    1985-01-01

    Activities in the following study areas are reported: (1) particle and wave processes in solar flares; (2) solar convection zone turbulence; and (3) solar radiation emission. To investigate the amplification of cyclotron maser radiation in solar flares, a radio frequency. (RF) heating model was developed for the corona surrounding the energy release site. Then nonlinear simulations of compressible convection display prominent penetration by plumes into regions of stable stratification at the base of the solar convection zone, leading to the excitation of internal gravity waves there. Lastly, linear saturation of electron-beam-driven Langmuir waves by ambient density fluctuations, nonlinear saturation by strong turbulence processes, and radiation emission mechanisms are examined. An additional section discusses solar magnetic fields and hydromagnetic waves in inhomogeneous media, and the effect of magnetic fields on stellar oscillation.

  12. Towards a Revised Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Surface Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler

    2005-06-09

    The components of the neutral- and plasma-surface interaction model used in the Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS 2 are reviewed. The idealized surfaces and processes handled by that model are inadequate for accurately simulating neutral transport behavior in present day and future fusion devices. We identify some of the physical processes missing from the model, such as mixed materials and implanted hydrogen, and make some suggestions for improving the model.

  13. Generation of Energetic Particles in Intense Laser Matter Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, Bhuvanesh; Muhammad, Tayyab; Bagchi, Suman; Mandal, Tirtha; Chakera, Juzer; Naik, Prasad; Gupta, Parshotam Dass; Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, India. Collaboration; Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna CentreAdvanced Technology, Indore, India. Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The acceleration of high energy ion beams up to several tens of MeV per nucleon following the interaction of an ultra-short (t <50 fs), intense (Iλ2 >1018 W.cm-2. μm-2) laser pulse with solid targets, is one of the burgeoning fields of research in the last few years. Mechanisms leading to forward-accelerated, high quality ion beams, operating at currently accessible laser intensities (up to 1021 W/cm2) in laser-matter interactions, are mainly associated with large electric fields set up at the target rear interface by the laser-accelerated electrons leaving the target. In this paper, we present our recent experimental results on MeV ion generation by mildly relativistic (1019 W / cm - 2) short-pulse (45 fs) laser interaction with foil targets of varying thicknesses, structured / uniform targets (e.g. nano structures on thin metallic foils, sandwich targets). Spectral modification / bunching, and divergence from structured targets will be discussed. DST Ramanujan Fellowship (SR/S2/RJN-25/2012).

  14. Detection of flunixin in equine urine using high-performance liquid chromatography with particle beam and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Stanley, S M; Owens, N A; Rodgers, J P

    1995-05-05

    A normal-phase HPLC method combined with particle-beam mass spectrometry (PB-MS) was developed for the analysis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The forty one NSAIDs analysed responded in one or more (electron impact, positive and negative chemical ionisation) modes and highly characteristic spectra were produced. A mixed-mode solid-phase extraction (SPE) method for isolating acidic NSAIDs was developed using the Bond Elut Certify II cartridge. The average recovery was 88.5%. Flunixin, extracted by SPE from urine of a mare to which the meglumine salt had been administered was positively identified by HPLC-PB-MS and HPLC-atmospheric pressure ionization (API) MS methods.

  15. Asymmetries between strange and antistrange particle production inpion-proton interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, T.D.; Vogt, R.

    2002-01-29

    Recent measurements of the asymmetries between Feynman x-distributions of strange and antistrange hadrons in {pi}{sup -}A interactions show a strong effect as a function of x{sub F}. We calculate strange hadron production in the context of the intrinsic model and make predictions for particle/antiparticle asymmetries in these interactions.

  16. Computation of Cosmic Ray Ionization and Dose at Mars: a Comparison of HZETRN and Planetocosmics for Proton and Alpha Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gronoff, Guillaume; Norman, Ryan B.; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to evaluate the cosmic ray environment at Mars is of interest for future manned exploration. To support exploration, tools must be developed to accurately access the radiation environment in both free space and on planetary surfaces. The primary tool NASA uses to quantify radiation exposure behind shielding materials is the space radiation transport code, HZETRN. In order to build confidence in HZETRN, code benchmarking against Monte Carlo radiation transport codes is often used. This work compares the dose calculations at Mars by HZETRN and the Geant4 application Planetocosmics. The dose at ground and the energy deposited in the atmosphere by galactic cosmic ray protons and alpha particles has been calculated for the Curiosity landing conditions. In addition, this work has considered Solar Energetic Particle events, allowing for the comparison of varying input radiation environments. The results for protons and alpha particles show very good agreement between HZETRN and Planetocosmics.

  17. Collision-energy-resolved Penning ionization electron spectroscopy of p-benzoquinone: Study of electronic structure and anisotropic interaction with He*(2 3S) metastable atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Naoki; Okamura, Kohji; Ohno, Koichi

    2004-06-01

    Collision energy dependence of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS) of p-benzoquinone with He*(2 3S) metastable atoms indicates that interaction potentials between p-benzoquinone and He*(2 3S) are highly anisotropic in the studied collision energy range (100-250 meV). Attractive interactions were found around the C=O groups for in-plane and out-of-plane directions, while repulsive interactions were found around CH bonds and the benzenoid ring. Assignment of the first four ionic states of p-benzoquinone and an analogous methyl-substituted compound was examined with CEDPICS and anisotropic distributions of the corresponding two nonbonding oxygen orbitals (nO+,nO-) and two πCC orbitals (πCC+,πCC-). An extra band that shows negative CEDPICS was observed at ca. 7.2 eV in Penning ionization electron spectrum.

  18. Search for metastable heavy charged particles with large ionization energy loss in pp collisions at s=13TeV using the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.

    2016-06-28

    This study presents a search for massive charged long-lived particles produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 13TeV at the LHC using the ATLAS experiment. The data set used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb–1. Many extensions of the Standard Model predict the existence of massive charged long-lived particles, such as R-hadrons. These massive particles are expected to be produced with a velocity significantly below the speed of light, and therefore to have a specific ionization higher than any Standard Model particle of unit charge at high momenta. The Pixel subsystem of the ATLAS detector is used to measure the ionization energy loss of reconstructed charged particles and to search for such highly ionizing particles. The search presented here has much greater sensitivity than a similar search performed using the ATLAS detector in the $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8TeV data set, thanks to the increase in expected signal cross section due to the higher center-of-mass energy of collisions, to an upgraded detector with a new silicon layer close to the interaction point, and to analysis improvements. No significant deviation from Standard Model background expectations is observed, and lifetime-dependent upper limits on R-hadron production cross sections and masses are set. Gluino R-hadrons with lifetimes above 0.4 ns and decaying to $q\\overline{q}$ plus a 100 GeV neutralino are excluded at the 95% confidence level, with lower mass limit ranging between 740 and 1590 GeV. In the case of stable R-hadrons the lower mass limit at the 95% confidence level is 1570 GeV.

  19. Measurements of particle-wall interaction forces using simultaneous position and force detection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashchuk, Anatolii V.; Bui, Ann A. M.; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Carberry, David M.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2016-09-01

    Particle-wall interactions are important in biology, micromachining, coagulation studies, and many other areas of science. As a contactless tool, optical tweezers are ideal for measuring these kind of interactions. Here we will present a new method for calculating the non-optical forces acting on a trapped particle using simultaneous position and force detection. Analysis of the particle's Brownian motion when trapped gives a measure of all the forces experienced by the particle. In contrast, measuring only the light's momentum change directly gives the solely optical force. This is achieved measuring the changes in the scattered light. The difference between the forces recorded by the two techniques reveals the external forces acting on the trapped particle. Therefore, by trapping the particle close to a wall, one can study the particle-wall interaction force in details. The simulation were done using the optical tweezer toolbox [1] to find the optical force acting on a particle. The net force was calculated from a Brownian motion's statistics of a trapped particle in the presence of the exponential external force. By using the proposed method, we were able to successfully reconstruct the external force. The experiment was done on a trapped spherical PMMA particle (d=2.2um) close to the 3D-printed wall. For the particle-wall distance 0.7um the non-optical force is 100fN . The experiment and simulation results confirm the efficiency of the proposed method for an external force measurements. [1] Nieminen et al., J. Opt. A 9, S196-S203 (2007).

  20. Copper-silver ionization at a US hospital: Interaction of treated drinking water with plumbing materials, aesthetics and other considerations.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllidou, Simoni; Lytle, Darren; Muhlen, Christy; Swertfeger, Jeff

    2016-10-01

    Tap water sampling and surface analysis of copper pipe/bathroom porcelain were performed to explore the fate of copper and silver during the first nine months of copper-silver ionization (CSI) applied to cold and hot water at a hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. Ions dosed by CSI into the water at its point of entry to the hospital were inadvertently removed from hot water by a cation-exchange softener in one building (average removal of 72% copper and 51% silver). Copper at the tap was replenished from corrosion of the building's copper pipes but was typically unable to reach 200 μg/L in first-draw and flushed hot and cold water samples. Cold water lines had >20 μg/L silver at most of the taps that were sampled, which further increased after flushing. However, silver plating onto copper pipe surfaces (in the cold water line but particularly in the hot water line) prevented reaching 20 μg/L silver in cold and/or hot water of some taps. Aesthetically displeasing purple/grey stains in bathroom porcelain were attributed to chlorargyrite [AgCl(s)], an insoluble precipitate that formed when CSI-dosed Ag(+) ions combined with Cl(-) ions that were present in the incoming water. Overall, CSI aims to control Legionella bacteria in drinking water, but plumbing material interactions, aesthetics and other implications also deserve consideration to holistically evaluate in-building drinking water disinfection.

  1. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry of a complex mixture of native and oxidized phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Losito, I; Facchini, L; Diomede, S; Conte, E; Megli, F M; Cataldi, T R I; Palmisano, F

    2015-11-27

    A mixture of native and oxidized phospholipids (PLs), generated by the soybean lipoxygenase type V-catalyzed partial oxidation of a lipid extract obtained from human platelets, was analyzed by Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography-ElectroSpray Ionization-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (HILIC-ESI-MS/MS). The complexity of the resulting mixture was remarkable, considering that the starting lipid extract, containing (as demonstrated in a previous study) about 130 native PLs, was enriched with enzymatically generated hydroperoxylated derivatives and chemically generated hydroxylated forms of PLs bearing polyunsaturated side chains. Nonetheless, the described analytical approach proved to be very powerful; indeed, focusing on phosphatidylcolines (PCs), the most abundant PL class in human platelets, about fifty different native/oxidized species could be identified in a single HILIC-ESI-MS/MS run. Low-energy collision induced dissociation tandem MS (CID-MS/MS) experiments on chromatographically separated species showed single neutral losses of H2O2 and H2O to be typical fragmentation pathways of hydroperoxylated PCs, whereas a single H2O loss was observed for hydroxylated ones. Moreover, diagnostic losses of n-hexanal or n-pentanol were exploited to recognize PCs hydroperoxylated on the last but five carbon atom of a ɷ-6 polyunsaturated side chain. Despite the low resolution of the 3D ion trap mass analyzer used, the described HILIC-ESI-MS/MS approach appears very promising for the identification of oxidized lipids in oxidatively stressed complex biological systems.

  2. Ionization States of Residues in OmpF and Mutants: Effects of Dielectric Constant and Interactions between Residues

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sameer; Jakobsson, Eric

    2004-01-01

    To understand ion permeation, one must assign correct ionization states to titratable amino acid residues in protein channels. We report on the effects of physical and methodological assumptions in calculating the protonation states at neutral bulk pH of titratable residues lining the lumen of the native Escherichia coli OmpF channel, and five mutants. We systematically considered a wide range of assumed protein dielectric constants and all plausible combinations of protonation states for electrostatically interacting side chains, and three different levels of accounting for solute shielding: 1), full nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann; 2), linearized Poisson-Boltzmann; and 3), neglect of solute shielding. For this system we found it acceptable to neglect solute shielding, a result we postulate to be generalizable to narrow lumens of other protein channels. For the large majority of residues, the protonation state at neutral bulk pH was found to be independent of the assumed dielectric constant of the protein, and unambiguously determined by the calculation; for native OmpF only Asp-127 has a protonation state that is sensitive to the assumed protein dielectric constant. Our results are significant for understanding two published experimental observations: the structure of the narrow part of the channel, and the ionic selectivity of OmpF mutants. PMID:14747308

  3. The Interparticle Interaction Between a Vertically Aligned Dust Particle Pair in a Complex Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ke; Ding, Zhiyue; Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2016-10-01

    The interaction between dust particles is a fundamental topic in complex plasma. In experiments on earth, the interparticle interaction in the horizontal direction (i.e., perpendicular to the gravitational force) is generally recognized to be a Yukawa potential. However, the interaction in the vertical direction is much more complicated, primarily due to the ion flow in the plasma sheath. In this research, we introduce a non-intrusive method to study the interaction between a vertically aligned dust particle pair confined in a glass box placed on the lower powered electrode within a GEC reference cell. This system is investigated for varying rf powers to obtain the trend of the interparticle interaction strength, which is contrasted with theoretical results. Using spontaneous thermal fluctuations of the neutral gas as the only driving force, we obtain the normal mode spectra of the dust pair, revealing not only the oscillation frequencies, but also the vibration amplitudes of the normal modes. The interaction strength between the upper and lower particle is obtained quantitatively from these mode spectra, showing strong nonreciprocity in both the vertical and horizontal directions. It will also be shown that the resulting horizontal attractive force of the upper particle on the lower particle can be larger than the horizontal confinement produced by the glass box alone. NSF / DOE funding is gratefully acknowledged - PHY1414523 & PHY1262031.

  4. Analytical theory of effective interactions in binary colloidal systems of soft particles.

    PubMed

    Majka, M; Góra, P F

    2014-09-01

    While density functional theory with integral equations techniques are very efficient tools in the numerical analysis of complex fluids, analytical insight into the phenomenon of effective interactions is still limited. In this paper, we propose a theory of binary systems that results in a relatively simple analytical expression combining arbitrary microscopic potentials into effective interaction. The derivation is based on translating a many-particle Hamiltonian including particle-depletant and depletant-depletant interactions into the occupation field language, which turns the partition function into multiple Gaussian integrals, regardless of what microscopic potentials are chosen. As a result, we calculate the effective Hamiltonian and discuss when our formula is a dominant contribution to the effective interactions. Our theory allows us to analytically reproduce several important characteristics of systems under scrutiny. In particular, we analyze the following: the effective attraction as a demixing factor in the binary systems of Gaussian particles, the screening of charged spheres by ions, which proves equivalent to Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, effective interactions in the binary mixtures of Yukawa particles, and the system of particles consisting of both a repulsive core and an attractive/repulsive Yukawa interaction tail. For this last case, we reproduce the "attraction-through-repulsion" and "repulsion-through-attraction" effects previously observed in simulations.

  5. Interaction of Charged Colloidal Particles at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Girotto, Matheus; Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Levin, Yan

    2016-07-07

    We study, using Monte Carlo simulations, the interaction between charged colloidal particles confined to the air-water interface. The dependence of force on ionic strength and counterion valence is explored. For 1:1 electrolyte, we find that the electrostatic interaction at the interface is very close to the one observed in the bulk. On the other hand, for salts with multivalent counterions, an interface produces an enhanced attraction between like charged colloids. Finally, we explore the effect of induced surface charge at the air-water interface on the interaction between colloidal particles.

  6. 2D double interaction method for modeling small particles contaminating microstructures located on substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albella, P.; Moreno, F.; Saiz, J. M.; González, F.

    2007-07-01

    An interaction model developed in previous research [de la Peña JL, González F, Saiz JM, Moreno F, Valle PJ. Sizing particles on substrates. A general method for oblique incidence. J Appl Phys 1999; 85:432] is extended to the study of two-scaled systems consisting of particles located on larger structures. Far-field scattering patterns produced by these systems can be obtained by coherent addition of different electromagnetic contributions, each one obtained from an independent isolated particle calculation. Results are performed on a 2D scheme, where they can be easily compared with those given by an exact method. This analysis shows some features of the scattering patterns that can be obtained with high reliability. Research on this kind of systems can be applied to 3D situations like particle substrate contamination and particle particle contamination.

  7. Interacting particles in a periodically moving potential: traveling wave and transport.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Rakesh; Chatterjee, Sakuntala; Pradhan, Punyabrata; Manna, S S

    2014-02-01

    We study a system of interacting particles in a periodically moving external potential, within the simplest possible description of paradigmatic symmetric exclusion process on a ring. The model describes diffusion of hardcore particles where the diffusion dynamics is locally modified at a uniformly moving defect site, mimicking the effect of the periodically moving external potential. The model, though simple, exhibits remarkably rich features in particle transport, such as polarity reversal and double peaks in particle current upon variation of defect velocity and particle density. By tuning these variables, the most efficient transport can be achieved in either direction along the ring. These features can be understood in terms of a traveling density wave propagating in the system. Our results could be experimentally tested, e.g., in a system of colloidal particles driven by a moving optical tweezer.

  8. An investigation of electrostatic interactions between organically functionalized silica particles, surfaces, and metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahl, Sarah Margaret

    This research focuses on the electrostatic interactions between silica particles and either coated surfaces or metal ions. This work has two objectives: to begin a preliminary investigation into particle-surface systems that may be ideal for further investigation as a sensor and to investigate metal-ligand interactions for the potential use of metal ions to aid in the self assembly of silica particles. Silica particles with various organic functionalizations were synthesized from trialkoxysilane precursors using variations of the Stöber synthesis method, a well-known colloidal suspensions technique. The functional groups that were used in this work include mercaptopropyl (MPTMS), ethylenediamine (enTMOS), and aminopropyl groups (APTES). The aminopropyl functionalized particles were synthesized by varying the mol% of APTES in a tetraethoxyorthosilicate (TEOS) particle formulation. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyze the particles for size, shape, and composition. Silica particles with all three functionalizations were used for the particle-surface study, whereas only MPTMS particles were used in the metal-ligand study. The coatings used for the particle-surface study were synthesized using standard sol gel chemistry with trialkoxysilane precursors as well. The functional groups used in this study include methyl (MTMOS) and aminopropyl groups (TEOS/APTES). Sol gel coatings incorporating carboxy and ammonium groups were also investigated but were not suitable for further study. FTIR was used to analyze the MTMOS and TEOS/APTES coatings. The adsorption of the MPTMS particles onto TEOS/APTES coatings and enTMOS or TEOS/APTES particles onto MTMOS coatings over time was monitored using fluorescence spectroscopy. Since silica particles are not fluorescent in the visible light range, a fluorescent dye was incorporated into the particles, either rhodamine (MPTMS particles) or pyranine dye (enTMOS, TEOS

  9. On the ``Matrix Approach'' to Interacting Particle Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sanctis, L.; Isopi, M.

    2004-04-01

    Derrida et al. and Schütz and Stinchcombe gave algebraic formulas for the correlation functions of the partially asymmetric simple exclusion process. Here we give a fairly general recipe of how to get these formulas and extend them to the whole time evolution (starting from the generator of the process), for a certain class of interacting systems. We then analyze the algebraic relations obtained to show that the matrix approach does not work with some models such as the voter and the contact processes.

  10. A Simple Model of Bose-Einstein Condensation of Interacting Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poluektov, Yu. M.

    2017-03-01

    A simple model of Bose-Einstein condensation of interacting particles is proposed. It is shown that in the condensate state the dependence of thermodynamic quantities on the interaction constant does not allow an expansion in powers of the coupling constant. Therefore, it is impossible to pass to the Einstein model of condensation in an ideal Bose gas by means of a limiting passage, setting the interaction constant to zero. The account for the interaction between particles eliminates difficulties in the description of condensation available in the model of an ideal gas, which are connected with the fulfillment of thermodynamic relations and an infinite value of the particle number fluctuation in the condensate phase.

  11. Quantum Phase Coherence in Mesoscopic Transport Devices with Two-Particle Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhimei; Guo, Xiaofang; Xue, Haibin; Xue, Naitao; Liang, J.-Q.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a new type of quantum phase coherence (QPC), which is generated by the two-body interaction. This conclusion is based on quantum master equation analysis for the full counting statistics of electron transport through two parallel quantum-dots with antiparallel magnetic fluxes in order to eliminate the Aharonov-Bohm interference of either single-particle or non-interacting two-particle wave functions. The interacting two-particle QPC is realized by the flux-dependent oscillation of the zero-frequency cumulants including the shot noise and skewness with a characteristic period. The accurately quantized peaks of cumulant spectrum may have technical applications to probe the two-body Coulomb interaction. PMID:26255858

  12. Particle-Surface Interaction Databases in ALADDIN Format

    DOE Data Explorer

    These databases are listed as recommended resources by CFADC. They represent older data and are not necessarily DOE-originated or funded. However, they are cited in the DOE Data Explorer because of their availability through a DOE Data Center. The citations for these databases are: 1) Energy Dependence of Ion-Induced Sputtering Yields of Monatomic Solids in the Low Energy Region. N. Matsunami, Y. Yamamura, N. Itoh, H. Tawara, T. Kawamura. Report IPPJ-AM-52, Institute of Plasma Physics (National Institute for Fusion Science), Nagoya, Japan (1987); 2) Energy Dependence of the Yields of Ion-Induced Sputtering of Monatomic Solids. N. Maksunami, Y. Yamaura, Y. Itikawa, N. Itoh, Y. Kazumata, S. Miyagawer, K. Morita, R. Strimizu, H. Tawara. Report IPPJ-AM-32, Institute of Plasma Physics (National Institute for Fusion Science), Nagoya, Japan (1988); 3) Particle Reflection from Surfaces - A Recommended Data Base. E. W. Thomas, R. K. Janev and J. J. Smith. Report IAEA INDC(NDS)-249, July 1991; 4) Sputtering Data. W. Eckstein, C. Garcia-Rosales, J. Roth and W. Ottenberger. Max-Plank-Institute fur Plasmaphysik Report IPP9/82 (1993); 5) An Evaluated Database for Sputtering. E. W. Thomas, R. K. Janev, J. Botero, J. J. Smith and Y. Qiu. Report IAEA INDC(NDS)-287 (1993).

  13. Collective Behavior of Interacting Particles: Radius-Dependent Phase Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarras, I.; Moussa, N.; Mazroui, M.; Boughaleb, Y.; Hajjaji, A.

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to study and discuss the effect of three zones (repulsion zone, orientation zone and attraction zone) on the phase transition in 2D-collective moving particles. Our main motivation is to better understand the complex behavior of non-equilibrium multi-agent system by extending the earlier and original model proposed by Viscek et al. [T. Viscek et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.75 (1995) 1226] for one zone. The analysis is performed over different situations by using a numerical simulation method. It is found that the radius R2 of orientation zone plays an important role in the system. In effect, by varying the parameter R2 a phase transition can be achieved from disordered moving of individuals to a group to highly aligned collective motion. The results also show that, the critical value of R2 at which the transition emerges depends strongly on the size of the repulsion zone but not on the size of attraction one.

  14. Fast transport in phase space due to nonlinear wave-particle interaction in the radiation belts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, Anton; Vasiliev, Alexii; Mourenas, Didier; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Boscher, Daniel; Rolland, Guy

    2014-05-01

    We present an analytical, simplified formulation accounting for the fast transport of particles in phase space, in the presence of nonlinear wave-particle resonant interactions in an inhomogeneous magnetic field representative of the radiation belts. We show that the general approach for the description of the evolution of the particle velocity distribution based on the Fokker-Plank equation can be modified to consider the process of nonlinear wave-particle interaction, including particle trapping. Such a modification consists in one additional operator describing fast particle jumps in phase space. The proposed approach is illustrated by considering the acceleration of relativistic electrons by strongly oblique whistler waves. We determine the typical variation of electron phase-density due to nonlinear wave-particle interaction and compare this variation with pitch-angle/energy diffusion due to quasi-linear electron scattering. We show that relation between nonlinear and quasi-linear effects is controlled by the distribution of wave-amplitudes. When this distribution has a heavy tail, nonlinear effects can become dominant in the formation of the electron energy distribution.

  15. Emergent ultra–long-range interactions between active particles in hybrid active–inactive systems

    PubMed Central

    Steimel, Joshua P.; Aragones, Juan L.; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Particle–particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range of such interactions as well as their magnitude has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Very recently, effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our systems are 2D colloidal monolayers composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids, and a very small fraction of active (spinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra–long-range attractive interaction induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation timescale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that, in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials. PMID:27071096

  16. Direct measurements of the interactions between clathrate hydrate particles and water droplets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenwei; Li, Mingzhong; Zhang, Guodong; Koh, Carolyn A

    2015-08-14

    Clathrate hydrate particle agglomeration is often considered to be one of the key limiting factors in plug formation. The hydrate particle-water interaction can play a critical role in describing hydrate agglomeration, yet is severely underexplored. Therefore, this work investigates the interactions between water droplets and cyclopentane hydrate particles using a micromechanical force (MMF) apparatus. Specifically, the effect of contact time, temperature/subcooling, contact area, and the addition of Sorbitane monooleate (Span 80) surfactant on the water droplet-hydrate particle interaction behavior are studied. The measurements indicate that hydrate formation during the measurement would increase the water-hydrate interaction force significantly. The results also indicate that the contact time, subcooling and concentration of cyclopentane, which determine the hydrate formation rate and hydrate amount, will affect the hydrate-water interaction force. In addition, the interaction forces also increase with the water-hydrate contact area. The addition of Span 80 surfactant induces a change in the hydrate morphology and renders the interfaces stable versus unstable (leading to coalescence), and the contact force can affect the hydrate-water interaction behavior significantly. Compared with the hydrate-hydrate cohesion force (measured in cyclopentane), the hydrate-water adhesion force is an order of magnitude larger. These new measurements can help to provide new and critical insights into the hydrate agglomeration process and potential strategies to control this process.

  17. Concurrent Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Interaction Forces Improves Particle Deposition Predictions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chao; Ren, Carolyn L; Emelko, Monica B

    2016-04-19

    It is widely believed that media surface roughness enhances particle deposition-numerous, but inconsistent, examples of this effect have been reported. Here, a new mathematical framework describing the effects of hydrodynamics and interaction forces on particle deposition on rough spherical collectors in absence of an energy barrier was developed and validated. In addition to quantifying DLVO force, the model includes improved descriptions of flow field profiles and hydrodynamic retardation functions. This work demonstrates that hydrodynamic effects can significantly alter particle deposition relative to expectations when only the DLVO force is considered. Moreover, the combined effects of hydrodynamics and interaction forces on particle deposition on rough, spherical media are not additive, but synergistic. Notably, the developed model's particle deposition predictions are in closer agreement with experimental observations than those from current models, demonstrating the importance of inclusion of roughness impacts in particle deposition description/simulation. Consideration of hydrodynamic contributions to particle deposition may help to explain discrepancies between model-based expectations and experimental outcomes and improve descriptions of particle deposition during physicochemical filtration in systems with nonsmooth collector surfaces.

  18. The interaction of small metal particles with refractory oxide supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.; Heinemann, K.

    1985-01-01

    Islands and continuous layers of Pd were grown in UHV on Mo and MoO subtrates. As-deposited Pd islands and layers exhibited bulk Pd adsorption properties for CO when the Pd had been deposited at RT and at thicknesses exceeding 3 ML. However, CO adsorption was drastically reduced upon annealing. This deactivation was interpreted in terms of substrate/support interaction involving the diffusion of substrate species toward the Pd surface, using AES, TPD, and work function measurement techniques. A study of the growth and annealing behavior of Pd on Mo(110) was made for thicknesses up to 12 monolayers and substrate temperatures up to 1300K, using AES, XPS, LEED, and work function measurements. At low tempertures Pd formed a monolayer without alloying. In thick layers (12 ML) annealed about 700 K, Mo diffusion into the Pd layer and alloying were noted. Such layers remained continuous up to 1100 K. Thinner Pd layers were less stable and started coalescing upon annealing to as little as 550 K. Significant changes in Pd Auger peak shape, as well as shifts of Pd core levels, were observed during layer growth and annealing.

  19. Interaction potential of microparticles in a plasma: role of collisions with plasma particles.

    PubMed

    Khrapak, S A; Ivlev, A V; Morfill, G

    2001-10-01

    The interaction potential of two charged microparticles in a plasma is studied. Violation of the plasma equilibrium around the dust particles due to plasma-particle inelastic collisions results in three effects: long-range (non-Yukawa) electrostatic repulsion, attraction due to ion shadowing, and attraction or repulsion due to neutral shadowing (depending on the sign of the temperature difference between the particle surface and neutral gas). An analytical expression for the total potential is obtained and compared with previous theoretical results. The relative contribution of these effects is studied in two limiting cases-an isotropic bulk plasma and the plasma sheath region. The results obtained are compared with existing experimental results on pair particle interaction. The possibility of the so-called dust molecule formation is discussed.

  20. Role of Polymer Segment-Particle Surface Interactions in Controlling Nanoparticle Dispersions in Concentrated Polymer Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2014-09-24

    The microstructure of particles suspended in concentrated polymer solutions is examined with small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. Of interest are changes to long wavelength particle density fluctuations in ternary mixtures of silica nanoparticles suspended in concentrated solutions of poly(ethylene glycol). The results are understood in terms of application of the pseudo-two-component polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) theory modified to account for solvent addition via effective contact strength of interfacial attraction, εpc, in an implicit manner. The combined experimental-theoretical study emphasizes the complex interactions between solvent, polymer, and particle surface that control particle miscibility but also demonstrate that these factors can all be understood in terms of variations of εpc.

  1. The Classical Theory of Light Colors: a Paradigm for Description of Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazilu, Nicolae; Agop, Maricel; Gatu, Irina; Iacob, Dan Dezideriu; Butuc, Irina; Ghizdovat, Vlad

    2016-06-01

    The color is an interaction property: of the interaction of light with matter. Classically speaking it is therefore akin to the forces. But while forces engendered the mechanical view of the world, the colors generated the optical view. One of the modern concepts of interaction between the fundamental particles of matter - the quantum chromodynamics - aims to fill the gap between mechanics and optics, in a specific description of strong interactions. We show here that this modern description of the particle interactions has ties with both the classical and quantum theories of light, regardless of the connection between forces and colors. In a word, the light is a universal model in the description of matter. The description involves classical Yang-Mills fields related to color.

  2. A semi-grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation model for ion binding to ionizable surfaces: Proton binding of carboxylated latex particles as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurga, Sergio; Rey-Castro, Carlos; Pastor, Isabel; Vilaseca, Eudald; David, Calin; Garcés, Josep Lluís; Puy, Jaume; Mas, Francesc

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we present a computer simulation study of the ion binding process at an ionizable surface using a semi-grand canonical Monte Carlo method that models the surface as a discrete distribution of charged and neutral functional groups in equilibrium with explicit ions modelled in the context of the primitive model. The parameters of the simulation model were tuned and checked by comparison with experimental titrations of carboxylated latex particles in the presence of different ionic strengths of monovalent ions. The titration of these particles was analysed by calculating the degree of dissociation of the latex functional groups vs. pH curves at different background salt concentrations. As the charge of the titrated surface changes during the simulation, a procedure to keep the electroneutrality of the system is required. Here, two approaches are used with the choice depending on the ion selected to maintain electroneutrality: counterion or coion procedures. We compare and discuss the difference between the procedures. The simulations also provided a microscopic description of the electrostatic double layer (EDL) structure as a function of pH and ionic strength. The results allow us to quantify the effect of the size of the background salt ions and of the surface functional groups on the degree of dissociation. The non-homogeneous structure of the EDL was revealed by plotting the counterion density profiles around charged and neutral surface functional groups.

  3. Non-linearity issues and multiple ionization satellites in the PIXE portion of spectra from the Mars alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, John L.; Heirwegh, Christopher M.; Ganly, Brianna

    2016-09-01

    Spectra from the laboratory and flight versions of the Curiosity rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer were fitted with an in-house version of GUPIX, revealing departures from linear behavior of the energy-channel relationships in the low X-ray energy region where alpha particle PIXE is the dominant excitation mechanism. The apparent energy shifts for the lightest elements present were attributed in part to multiple ionization satellites and in part to issues within the detector and/or the pulse processing chain. No specific issue was identified, but the second of these options was considered to be the more probable. Approximate corrections were derived and then applied within the GUAPX code which is designed specifically for quantitative evaluation of APXS spectra. The quality of fit was significantly improved. The peak areas of the light elements Na, Mg, Al and Si were changed by only a few percent in most spectra. The changes for elements with higher atomic number were generally smaller, with a few exceptions. Overall, the percentage peak area changes are much smaller than the overall uncertainties in derived concentrations, which are largely attributable to the effects of rock heterogeneity. The magnitude of the satellite contributions suggests the need to incorporate these routinely in accelerator-based PIXE using helium beams.

  4. Simulation of Alpha Particles in Rotating Plasma Interacting with a Stationary Ripple

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-01-11

    Superthermal ExB rotation can provide magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and enhanced confinement to axisymmetric mirrors. However, the rotation speed has been limited by phenomena at end electrodes. A new prediction is that rotation might instead be produced using a magnetic ripple and alpha particle kinetic energy, in an extension of the alpha channeling concept. The interaction of alpha particles with the ripple results in visually interesting and practically useful orbits.

  5. Double ionization effect in electron accelerations by high-intensity laser pulse interaction with a neutral gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2013-11-01

    We study the effect of laser-induced double-ionization of a helium gas (with inhomogeneous density profile) on vacuum electron acceleration. For enough laser intensity, helium gas can be found doubly ionized and it strengthens the divergence of the pulse. The double ionization of helium gas can defocus the laser pulse significantly, and electrons are accelerated by the front of the laser pulse in vacuum and then decelerated by the defocused trail part of the laser pulse. It is observed that the electrons experience a very low laser-intensity at the trailing part of the laser pulse. Hence, there is not much electron deceleration at the trailing part of the pulse. We found that the inhomogeneity of the neutral gas reduced the rate of tunnel ionization causing less defocusing of the laser pulse and thus the electron energy gain is reduced.

  6. Wave-particle interactions induced by SEPAC on Spacelab 1 Wave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. W. L.; Obayashi, T.; Kawashima, N.; Sasaki, S.; Yanagisawa, M.; Burch, J. L.; Reasoner, D. L.; Roberts, W. T.

    1985-01-01

    Space experiments with particle accelerators (SEPAC) flew on Spacelab 1 in November and December 1983. SEPAC included an accelerator which emitted electrons into the ionospheric plasma with energies up to 5 keV and currents up to 300 mA. The SEPAC equipment also included an energetic plasma generator, a neutral gas generator, and an extensive array of diagnostics. The diagnostics included plasma wave detectors, and energetic electron analyzer, a photometer, a high sensitivity television camera, a Langmuir probe and a pressure gage. Twenty-eight experiments were performed during the mission to investigate beam-plasma interactions, electron beam dynamics, plasma beam propagation, and vehicle charging. The wave-particle interactions were monitored by the plasma wave instrumentation, by the energetic electron detector and by the optical detectors. All show evidence of wave-particle interactions, which are described in this paper.

  7. Secondary Cosmic Ray Particles Due to GCR Interactions in the Earth's Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Battistoni, G.; Cerutti, F.; Fasso, A.; Ferrari, A.; Garzelli, M.V.; Lantz, M.; Muraro, S. Pinsky, L.S.; Ranft, J.; Roesler, S.; Sala, P.R.; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2009-06-16

    Primary GCR interact with the Earth's atmosphere originating atmospheric showers, thus giving rise to fluxes of secondary particles in the atmosphere. Electromagnetic and hadronic interactions interplay in the production of these particles, whose detection is performed by means of complementary techniques in different energy ranges and at different depths in the atmosphere, down to the Earth's surface. Monte Carlo codes are essential calculation tools which can describe the complexity of the physics of these phenomena, thus allowing the analysis of experimental data. However, these codes are affected by important uncertainties, concerning, in particular, hadronic physics at high energy. In this paper we shall report some results concerning inclusive particle fluxes and atmospheric shower properties as obtained using the FLUKA transport and interaction code. Some emphasis will also be given to the validation of the physics models of FLUKA involved in these calculations.

  8. Fluctuation-induced transport of two coupled particles: Effect of the interparticle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhnovskii, Yurii A.; Rozenbaum, Viktor M.; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Trakhtenberg, Leonid I.; Lin, Sheng Hsien

    2014-06-01

    We consider a system of two coupled particles fluctuating between two states, with different interparticle interaction potentials and particle friction coefficients. An external action drives the interstate transitions that induces reciprocating motion along the internal coordinate x (the interparticle distance). The system moves unidirectionally due to rectification of the internal motion by asymmetric friction fluctuations and thus operates as a dimeric motor that converts input energy into net movement. We focus on how the law of interaction between the particles affects the dimer transport and, in particular, the role of thermal noise in the motion inducing mechanism. It is argued that if the interaction potential behaves at large distances as xα, depending on the value of the exponent α, the thermal noise plays a constructive (α > 2), neutral (α = 2), or destructive (α < 2) role. In the case of α = 1, corresponding piecewise linear potential profiles, an exact solution is obtained and discussed in detail.

  9. Pairwise Interaction Extended Point Particle (PIEP) Model for a Random Array of Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiki, Georges; Jackson, Thomas; Balachandar, Sivaramakrishnan; CenterCompressible Multiphase Turbulence Team

    2016-11-01

    This study investigates a flow past random array of spherical particles. The understanding of the governing forces within these arrays is crucial for obtaining accurate models used in particle-laden simulations. These models have to faithfully reflect the sub-grid interactions between the particles and the continuous phase. The models being used today assumes an average force on all particles within the array based on the mean volume fraction and Reynolds number. Here, we develop a model which can compute the drag and lateral forces on each particle by accounting for the precise location of few surrounding neighbors. A pairwise interaction is assumed where the perturbation flow induced by each neighbor is considered separately, then the effect of all neighbors are linearly superposed to obtain the total perturbation. Faxén correction is used to quantify the force perturbation due to the presence of the neighbors. The single neighbor perturbations are mapped in the vicinity of a reference sphere and stored as libraries. We test the Pairwise Interaction Extended Point-Particle (PIEP) model for random arrays at two different volume fractions of ϕ = 0 . 1 and 0.21 and Reynolds number in the range 16 <= Re <= 170 . The PIEP model predictions are compared against drag and lift forces obtained from fully-resolved DNS performed using immersed boundary method. We observe the PIEP model prediction to correlate much better with the DNS results than the classical mean drag model prediction.

  10. Quasi-linear wave-particle interactions in the earth's radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalon, Elena; Silevitch, Michel B.; Rothwell, Paul L.; Burke, William J.

    1989-11-01

    A self-consistent theory on the interaction of magnetospheric particles with ducted electromagnetic cyclotron waves is presented. The main contribution is to calculate the coupling coefficients for the ray equations describing the temporal evolution of the cyclotron instability. These are obtained within the framework of quasi-linear interaction of waves and particles. A set of equations is derived based on the Fokker-Planck theory of pitch angle diffusion, describing the evolution time of the number of particles in the flux tube and the energy density of waves for the interaction of Alfven waves with protons and of whistler waves with electrons. The coupling coefficients are obtained, based on a quasi-linear analysis after averaging over the particle bounce motion. It is found that the equilibrium solutions for particle fluxes and wave amplitudes are stable under small local perturbations. The reflection of the waves in the ionosphere is discussed. A stability analysis around the equilibrium solutions for precipitating particle fluxes and wave intensity indicates that an actively excited ionosphere can cause the development of explosive instabilities.

  11. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography versus reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry: effect of electrospray ionization source geometry on sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Periat, Aurélie; Kohler, Isabelle; Bugey, Aurélie; Bieri, Stefan; Versace, François; Staub, Christian; Guillarme, Davy

    2014-08-22

    In this study, the influence of electrospray ionization (ESI) source design on the overall sensitivity achieved in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), was investigated. State-of-the-art triple quadrupole mass analyzers from AB Sciex, Agilent Technologies and Waters equipped with brand specific source geometries were tested with various mobile phase pH on 53 pharmaceutical compounds. The design of the ESI source showed to strongly influence the gain in sensitivity that can be achieved in HILIC compared to RPLC mode. The 6460 Triple Quadrupole LC/MS system from Agilent Technologies was particularly affected by mobile phase settings. Indeed, compared to RPLC conditions, 92% of the compounds had an increased signal-to-noise ratio at a flow rate of 300 μL/min in HILIC mode at pH 6, while this percentage dropped to only 7% at 1000 μL/min and pH 3. In contrast, the influence of flow rate and mobile phase pH on the gain in sensitivity between RPLC and HILIC was found very limited with the API 5000 LC/MS/MS system from AB Sciex, as only 15 to 36% of the tested compounds showed an enhanced sensitivity in HILIC mode. With the Xevo TQ-S instrument from Waters, superior sensitivity in HILIC was noticed for 85% of the compounds with optimal conditions (i.e., pH 3 and 1000 μL/min), whereas at sub-optimal conditions (i.e. pH 6 and 300 μL/min), it represented less than 50%. The gain in sensitivity observed in HILIC was found less significant with the recent LC-MS platforms used in this study than for old-generation instruments. Indeed, the improved ESI sources equipping the recent mass analyzers allow for enhanced evaporation efficiency, mainly for RPLC mobile phases containing high proportion of water and this even at high flow rates.

  12. Coherent control of interacting particles using dynamical and Aharonov-Bohm phases.

    PubMed

    Creffield, C E; Platero, G

    2010-08-20

    A powerful method of manipulating the dynamics of quantum coherent particles is to control the phase of their tunneling. We consider a system of two electrons hopping on a quasi-one-dimensional lattice in the presence of a uniform magnetic field and study the effect of adding a time-periodic driving potential. We show that the dynamical phases produced by the driving can combine with the Aharonov-Bohm phases to give precise control of the localization and dynamics of the particles, even in the presence of strong particle interactions.

  13. Numerical simulations of the interaction between a settling particle and a rising microbubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Henrik; Sibaki, Ebrahim Karimi; Sasic, Srdjan

    2012-09-01

    In the current work the hydrodynamic interaction between a settling particle and a rising microbubble is investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations are performed in a multiphase direct numerical simulation (DNS) framework, indicating that all relevant spatial and temporal scales are resolved. It is shown that the method predicts that particle-bubble attachment is possible when the initial horizontal distance between their centers is small and that the particle will pass the bubble without attaching when this initial distance is large. Furthermore, it is shown that the probability of a successful attachment is lower if the bubble Eötvös and Morton numbers are significantly larger than unity.

  14. Hamiltonian stochastic processes induced by successive wave-particle interactions in stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Ghizzo, A; Del Sarto, D; Reveille, T

    2009-04-01

    The long-time dynamics of particles interacting resonantly with large-amplitude coherent plasma wave is investigated in the kinetic regime of stimulated Raman scattering in which particle trapping plays a major role (and which corresponds to a high value of the parameter k_{EPW}lambda_{D}, where k_{EPW} is the plasma wave vector and lambda_{D} is the electron Debye length). Using Vlasov simulations, the dynamics of such particles become stochastic when repeated wave-particle interactions take place. For small values of the ratio tau_{auto}/tau_{b} of the autocorrelation time to the bounce time of particle (condition usually met in backward propagation of the scattered wave) the turbulent regime results in the merging of phase-space trapping vortices according to a weak turbulencelike scenario. For high values of tau_{auto}/tau_{b} (or narrow spectrum of longitudinal electric field as met when only one plasma wave is present), the stochasticity is now induced by particle trapping, detrapping, and retrapping in the adiabatically fluctuating field. The stochastic transitions performed by resonant particles above (or below) the separatrix limit in phase space determine now the long-time plasma evolution.

  15. Hamiltonian stochastic processes induced by successive wave-particle interactions in stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghizzo, A.; Del Sarto, D.; Reveille, T.

    2009-04-01

    The long-time dynamics of particles interacting resonantly with large-amplitude coherent plasma wave is investigated in the kinetic regime of stimulated Raman scattering in which particle trapping plays a major role (and which corresponds to a high value of the parameter kEPWλD , where kEPW is the plasma wave vector and λD is the electron Debye length). Using Vlasov simulations, the dynamics of such particles become stochastic when repeated wave-particle interactions take place. For small values of the ratio τauto/τb of the autocorrelation time to the bounce time of particle (condition usually met in backward propagation of the scattered wave) the turbulent regime results in the merging of phase-space trapping vortices according to a weak turbulencelike scenario. For high values of τauto/τb (or narrow spectrum of longitudinal electric field as met when only one plasma wave is present), the stochasticity is now induced by particle trapping, detrapping, and retrapping in the adiabatically fluctuating field. The stochastic transitions performed by resonant particles above (or below) the separatrix limit in phase space determine now the long-time plasma evolution.

  16. Wave-particle interactions in a resonant system of photons and ion-solvated water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Eiji

    2017-02-01

    We investigate a laser model for a resonant system of photons and ion cluster-solvated rotating water molecules in which ions in the cluster are identical and have very low, non-relativistic velocities and direction of motion parallel to a static electric field induced in a single direction. This model combines Dicke superradiation with wave-particle interaction. As the result, we find that the equations of motion of the system are expressed in terms of a conventional free electron laser system. This result leads to a mechanism for dynamical coherence, induced by collective instability in the wave-particle interaction.

  17. Simulations of two-particle interactions with 2D quantum walks in time

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.; Laiho, K.; Silberhorn, C.; Rohde, P. P.; Štefaňak, M.; Potoček, V.; Hamilton, C.; Jex, I.

    2014-12-04

    We present the experimental implementation of a quantum walk on a two-dimensional lattice and show how to employ the optical system to simulate the quantum propagation of two interacting particles. Our quantum walk in time transfers the spatial spread of a quantum walk into the time domain, which guarantees a high stability and scalability of the setup. We present with our device quantum walks over 12 steps on a 2D lattice. By changing the properties of the driving quantum coin, we investigate different kinds of two-particle interactions and reveal their impact on the occurring quantum propagation.

  18. Salt-induced conformation and interaction changes of nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed Central

    Mangenot, Stéphanie; Leforestier, Amélie; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Livolant, Françoise

    2002-01-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering was used to follow changes in the conformation and interactions of nucleosome core particles (NCP) as a function of the monovalent salt concentration C(s). The maximal extension (D(max)) of the NCP (145 +/- 3-bp DNA) increases from 137 +/- 5 A to 165 +/- 5 A when C(s) rises from 10 to 50 mM and remains constant with further increases of C(s) up to 200 mM. In view of the very weak increase of the R(g) value in the same C(s) range, we attribute this D(max) variation to tail extension, a proposal confirmed by simulations of the entire I(q) curves, considering an ideal solution of particles with tails either condensed or extended. This tail extension is observed at higher salt values when particles contain longer DNA fragments (165 +/- 10 bp). The maximal extension of the tails always coincides with the screening of repulsive interactions between particles. The second virial coefficient becomes smaller than the hard sphere virial coefficient and eventually becomes negative (net attractive interactions) for NCP(145). Addition of salt simultaneously screens Coulombic repulsive interactions between NCP and Coulombic attractive interactions between tails and DNA inside the NCP. We discuss how the coupling of these two phenomena may be of biological relevance. PMID:11751321

  19. Euler-Lagrange Modeling of Vortex Interaction with a Particle-Laden Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Fernando

    Rotorcraft operation in austere environments can result in difficult operating conditions, particularly in the vicinity of sandy areas. The uplift of sediment by rotorcraft downwash, a phenomenon known as brownout, hinders pilot visual cues and may result in a potentially dangerous situation. Brownout is a complex multiphase flow problem that is not unique and depends on both the characteristics of the rotorcraft and the sediment. The lack of fundamental understanding constrains models and limits development of technologies that could mitigate the adverse effects of brownout. This provides the over-arching motivation of the current work focusing on models of particle-laden sediment beds. The particular focus of the current investigations is numerical modeling of near-surface fluid-particle interactions in turbulent boundary layers with and without coherent vortices superimposed on the background flow, that model rotorcraft downwash. The simulations are performed with two groups of particles having different densities both of which display strong vortex-particle interaction close to the source location. The simulations include cases with inter-particle collisions and gravitational settling. Particle effects on the fluid are ignored. The numerical simulations are performed using an Euler- Lagrange method in which a fractional-step approach is used for the fluid and with the particulate phase advanced using Discrete Particle Simulation. The objectives are to gain insight into the fluid-particle dynamics that influence transport near the bed by analyzing the competing effects of the vortices, inter-particle collisions, and gravity. Following the introduction of coherent vortices into the domain, the structures convect downstream, dissipate, and then recover to an equilibrium state with the boundary layer. The particle phase displays an analogous return to an equilibrium state as the vortices dissipate and the boundary layer recovers, though this recovery is slower than

  20. Observation and Control of Hamiltonian Chaos in Wave-particle Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Doveil, F.; Ruzzon, A.; Elskens, Y.

    2010-11-23

    Wave-particle interactions are central in plasma physics. The paradigm beam-plasma system can be advantageously replaced by a traveling wave tube (TWT) to allow their study in a much less noisy environment. This led to detailed analysis of the self-consistent interaction between unstable waves and an either cold or warm electron beam. More recently a test cold beam has been used to observe its interaction with externally excited wave(s). This allowed observing the main features of Hamiltonian chaos and testing a new method to efficiently channel chaotic transport in phase space. To simulate accurately and efficiently the particle dynamics in the TWT and other 1D particle-wave systems, a new symplectic, symmetric, second order numerical algorithm is developed, using particle position as the independent variable, with a fixed spatial step.This contribution reviews: presentation of the TWT and its connection to plasma physics, resonant interaction of a charged particle in electrostatic waves, observation of particle trapping and transition to chaos, test of control of chaos, and description of the simulation algorithm.The velocity distribution function of the electron beam is recorded with a trochoidal energy analyzer at the output of the TWT. An arbitrary waveform generator is used to launch a prescribed spectrum of waves along the 4m long helix of the TWT. The nonlinear synchronization of particles by a single wave, responsible for Landau damping, is observed. We explore the resonant velocity domain associated with a single wave as well as the transition to large scale chaos when the resonant domains of two waves and their secondary resonances overlap. This transition exhibits a devil's staircase behavior when increasing the excitation level in agreement with numerical simulation.A new strategy for control of chaos by building barriers of transport in phase space as well as its robustness is successfully tested. The underlying concepts extend far beyond the field of

  1. Electrostatic Interactions in Dissipative Particle Dynamics: Toward a Mesoscale Modeling of the Polyelectrolyte Brushes.

    PubMed

    Ibergay, Cyrille; Malfreyt, Patrice; Tildesley, Dominic J

    2009-12-08

    We report mesoscopic simulations of bulk electrolytes and polyelectrolyte brushes using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method. The calculation of the electrostatic interactions is carried out using both the Ewald summation method and the particle-particle particle-mesh technique with charges distributed over the particles. The local components of the pressure tensor are calculated using the Irving and Kirkwood, and the method of planes and mechanical equilibrium is demonstrated. The profiles of the normal component of the pressure tensor are shown to be similar for both the Ewald and particle-particle particle-mesh methods for a single polyelectrolyte brush. We show that the PPPM method with the MOP technique is the appropriate choice for simulations of this type. The mesoscale modeling of a strongly stretched polylectrolyte brush formed by strong charged polymer chains at a high grafting density shows that the polyelectrolyte follows the nonlinear osmotic regime, as expected from the calculation of the Gouy-Chapman length and the dimensionless Manning ratio.

  2. Euler-Lagrange Simulations of Particle Interactions with Coherent Vortices in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Fernando; Naqvi, Iftekhar; Squires, Kyle; Piomelli, Ugo

    2009-11-01

    The overarching interest of the current investigations is numerical modeling of particle entrainment and deposition near sandy beds as relevant to the problem of rotorcraft brownout. Numerical simulations are being performed using an Euler-Lagrange method. Solution of the incompressible gas-phase flow field is accomplished using a fractional-step numerical method; the particulate phase is advanced using Discrete Particle Simulation. The particular flow field of interest models a rotor wake and is comprised of coherent vortices embedded in a turbulent boundary layer. The particles, once suspended, interact with the coherent wake vortices characterizing the rotor flow, and with the finer scale turbulence generated near the ground. The primary objectives are two-flow. First, to gain insight into the particle-vortex dynamics that influence transport near the bed and, second, to advance understanding of the mesoscopic particle velocity field. The latter objective requires very large particle ensembles in order to recover an Eulerian description of the particle field, important to advancing other simulation strategies for two-phase flows. Predictions of the flows for a range of particle and flow parameters will be presented.

  3. Quasi-particles and effective mean field in strongly interacting matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévai, P.; Ko, C. M.

    2010-03-01

    We introduce a quasi-particle model of strongly interacting quark-gluon matter and explore the possible connection to an effective field theoretical description consisting of a scalar σ field by introducing a dynamically generated mass, M(σ), and a self-consistently determined interaction term, B(σ). We display a possible connection between the two types of effective description, using the Friedberg-Lee model.

  4. Basis-set expansion and truncation approach to interacting Bose particles problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, Michelle Wynne; Sykes, Andrew; Corson, John; Bohn, John

    2014-05-01

    As ultracold gases push into regimes beyond mean-field physics, alternative approaches are required to follow their behavior. To this end, we investigate a basis set expansion and truncation scheme based on perturbation theory to obtain approximate ground state energies as a function of interaction parameter. We explore the ability of this approach to describe interacting Bose particles in 1D and 3D. AFOSR MURI, US DoD through the NDSEG Fellowship Program, and JILA PFC.

  5. On the theory of high-frequency permittivity of a fully ionized plasma I: Electron-ion interaction pseudopotential and rules of sum

    SciTech Connect

    Bobrov, V. B.

    2011-03-15

    In the context of the electron-ion interaction potential, a rigorous description is given of the permittivity {epsilon}({omega}) of a fully ionized plasma in the frequency range {omega} Much-Greater-Than v-tilde{sub ei}, where v{sub ei} is the characteristic electron-ion collision frequency. The interaction and degeneration effects in the electron and ion subsystems are systematically taken into account. The asymptotics of the effective collision frequency {nu}({omega}) and the renormalization function {gamma}({omega}) for the plasma frequency are found, and the rules of sums for the permittivity {epsilon}({omega}) are determined.

  6. Physics and Applications of Interacting Magnetic Particles: Effect of Patterned Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikockis, Michael Vito

    In controlling interacting nano- and micro-particles as well as biomolecules, one gains access to a broad range of applications spanning from self-assembly and nanofabrication to creating useful soft matter constructs. This dissertation investigates interacting superparamagnetic particles residing on two different patterned micro-magnetic thin-film platforms: zigzag CoFe wires that support stationary domain walls, and NiFe shapes that yield mobile domains. Interactions between these particles, the underlying stationary or mobile magnetic domains, and external magnetic fields give rise to tunable, ordered micro-particle arrays (clusters) that can be remotely activated and maneuvered. Seamless schemes to self-assemble, disassemble, transport, and reconstruct ordered planar arrays of fluid-borne microspheres are illustrated with the CoFe wires while their Brownian fluctuations are shown to provide an elegant means to probe the local energy landscape in which the spheres are constrained to move. Finally, a magneto-optical micro grating is developed using mobile domains in NiFe to modulate inter-particle spacing and thus diffract and steer photon beams with high precision. The potential for a magneto-optical lock and other photonic applications with this approach are discussed.

  7. Mechanisms governing the interaction of metallic particles with nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Demos, Stavros G; Negres, Raluca A; Raman, Rajesh N; Shen, Nan; Rubenchik, Alexander M; Matthews, Manyalibo J

    2016-04-04

    The interaction of nanosecond laser pulses at 1064- and 355-nm with micro-scale, nominally spherical metallic particles is investigated in order to elucidate the governing interaction mechanisms as a function of material and laser parameters. The experimental model used involves the irradiation of metal particles located on the surface of transparent plates combined with time-resolved imaging capable of capturing the dynamics of particle ejection, plume formation and expansion along with the kinetics of the dispersed material from the liquefied layer of the particle. The mechanisms investigated in this work are informative and relevant across a multitude of materials and irradiation geometries suitable for the description of a wide range of specific applications. The experimental results were interpreted using physical models incorporating specific processes to assess their contribution to the overall observed behaviors. Analysis of the experimental results suggests that the induced kinetic properties of the particle can be adequately described using the concept of momentum coupling introduced to explain the interaction of plane metal targets to large-aperture laser beams. The results also suggest that laser energy deposition on the formed plasma affects the energy partitioning and the material modifications to the substrate.

  8. Influence of an Additive-Free Particle Spreading Method on Interactions between Charged Colloidal Particles at an Oil/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yi, Zonglin; Xing, Xiaochen; Ngai, To; Jin, Fan

    2016-05-17

    The assembly and manipulation of charged colloidal particles at oil/water interfaces represent active areas of fundamental and applied research. Previously, we have shown that colloidal particles can spontaneously generate unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface when spreading solvent is used to disperse them at an oil/water interface. These residual charges in turn affect the long-ranged electrostatic repulsive forces and packing of particles at the interface. To further uncover the influence arising from the spreading solvents on interfacial particle interactions, in the present study we utilize pure buoyancy to drive the particles onto an oil/water interface and compare the differences between such a spontaneously adsorbed particle monolayer to the spread monolayer based on solvent spreading techniques. Our results show that the solvent-free method could also lead particles to spread well at the interface, but it does not result in violent sliding of particles along the interface. More importantly, this additive-free spreading method can avoid the formation of unstable residual charges at the particle/oil interface. These findings agree well with our previous hypothesis; namely, those unstable residual charges are triboelectric charges that arise from the violently rubbing of particles on oil at the interface. Therefore, if the spreading solvents could be avoided, then we would be able to get rid of the formation of residual charges at interfaces. This finding will provide insight for precisely controlling the interactions among colloidal particles trapped at fluid/fluid interfaces.

  9. Mass spectra of the particle-antiparticle system with a Dirac oscillator interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moshinsky, M.; Loyola, G.

    1993-01-01

    The present view about the structure of mesons is that they are a quark-antiquark system. The mass spectrum corresponding to this system should, in principle, be given by chromodynamics, but this turns out to be a complex affair. Thus it is of some interest to consider relativistic systems of particle-antiparticle, with a simple type of interaction, which could give some insight on the spectra we can expect for mesons. This analysis is carried out when the interaction is of the Dirac oscillator type. It is shown that the Dirac equation of the antiparticle can be obtained from that of the particle by just changing the frequency omega into -omega. Following a procedure suggested by Barut, the equation for the particle-antiparticle system is derived and it is solved by a perturbation procedure. Thus, explicit expressions for the square of the mass spectra are obtained and its implications in the meson case is discussed.

  10. A study of single drug particle adhesion interactions using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Eve, J K; Patel, N; Luk, S Y; Ebbens, S J; Roberts, C J

    2002-05-15

    This paper aims to use Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to characterise the interaction forces between micronized salbutamol particles, an active ingredient frequently used in metered dose inhalers, and also to glass, lactose and a fluoropolymer. The methodology used involves challenging a salbutamol functionalized AFM tip to the surfaces of interest and measuring the force experienced by the cantilever as a function of tip-sample separation. Analysis of this force-distance data allows quantification of the particle-substrate adhesion. This study yields a ranking of adhesion as glass>lactose>salbutamol>polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). An increase in the interaction force between the salbutamol particle and PTFE on repeated contact due to tribocharging is also observed.

  11. Interactive Computer Simulation and Animation for Improving Student Learning of Particle Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, N.; Guo, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Computer simulation and animation (CSA) has been receiving growing attention and wide application in engineering education in recent years. A new interactive CSA module was developed in the present study to improve student learning of particle kinetics in an undergraduate engineering dynamics course. The unique feature of this CSA module is that…

  12. Self-ducting of large-amplitude whistler waves. [wave-particle interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Whistler waves are launched from an electric dipole of length L in a large-volume laboratory plasma. With increasing wave amplitude, the radiation pattern narrows and finally forms a duct of diameter approximately equal to L. The ducted waves propagate nearly undamped. The observed nonlinear effects are explained by wave-particle interactions.

  13. Notes on oscillator-like interactions of various spin relativistic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dvoeglazov, Valeri V.; Delsolmesa, Antonio

    1995-01-01

    The equations for various spin particles with oscillator-like interactions are discussed in this talk. Topics discussed include: (1) comment on 'The Klein-Gordon Oscillator'; (2) the Dirac oscillator in quaternion form; (3) the Dirac-Dowker oscillator; (4) the Weinberg oscillator; and (5) note on the two-body Dirac oscillator.

  14. Ab Initio Study of Ionized Water Radical Cation (H2O)8(+) in Combination with the Particle Swarm Optimization Method.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mei; Hu, Cui-E; Lv, Zhen-Long; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2016-12-01

    The structures of cationic water clusters (H2O)8(+) have been globally explored by the particle swarm optimization method in combination with quantum chemical calculations. Geometry optimization and vibrational analysis for the 15 most interesting clusters were computed at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level and infrared spectrum calculation at MPW1K/6-311++G** level. Special attention was paid to the relationships between their configurations and energies. Both MP2 and B3LYP-D3 calculations revealed that the cage-like structure is the most stable, which is different from a five-membered ring lowest energy structure but agrees well with a cage-like structure in the literature. Furthermore, our obtained cage-like structure is more stable by 0.87 and 1.23 kcal/mol than the previously reported structures at MP2 and B3LYP-D3 levels, respectively. Interestingly, on the basis of their relative Gibbs free energies and the temperature dependence of populations, the cage-like structure predominates only at very low temperatures, and the most dominating species transforms into a newfound four-membered ring structure from 100 to 400 K, which can contribute greatly to the experimental infrared spectrum. By topological analysis and reduced density gradient analysis, we also investigated the structural characteristics and bonding strengths of these water cluster radical cations.

  15. Effect of long-range repulsive Coulomb interactions on packing structure of adhesive particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing; Liu, Wenwei; Makse, Hernán A

    2016-02-14

    The packing of charged micron-sized particles is investigated using discrete element simulations based on adhesive contact dynamic model. The formation process and the final obtained structures of ballistic packings are studied to show the effect of interparticle Coulomb force. It is found that increasing the charge on particles causes a remarkable decrease of the packing volume fraction ϕ and the average coordination number 〈Z〉, indicating a looser and chainlike structure. Force-scaling analysis shows that the long-range Coulomb interaction changes packing structures through its influence on particle inertia before they are bonded into the force networks. Once contact networks are formed, the expansion effect caused by repulsive Coulomb forces are dominated by short-range adhesion. Based on abundant results from simulations, a dimensionless adhesion parameter Ad*, which combines the effects of the particle inertia, the short-range adhesion and the long-range Coulomb interaction, is proposed and successfully scales the packing results for micron-sized particles within the latest derived adhesive loose packing (ALP) regime. The structural properties of our packings follow well the recent theoretical prediction which is described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function, indicating some kind of universality in the low packing density regime of the phase diagram regardless of adhesion or particle charge. Based on the comprehensive consideration of the complicated inter-particle interactions, our findings provide insight into the roles of short-range adhesion and repulsive Coulomb force during packing formation and should be useful for further design of packings.

  16. Numerical modeling of the early interaction of a planar shock with a dense particle field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regele, Jonathan; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2011-11-01

    Dense compressible multiphase flows are of interest for multiphase turbomachinary and energetic material detonations. Still, there is little understanding of the detailed interaction mechanisms between shock waves and dense (particle volume fraction αd > 0 . 001) particle fields. A recent experimental study [Wagner et al, AIAA Aero. Sci., Orlando, 2011-188] has focused on the impingement of a planar shock wave on a dense particle curtain. In the present work, numerical solutions of the Euler equations in one and two dimensions are performed for a planar shock wave impinging on a fixed particle curtain and are compared to the experimental data for early times. Comparison of the one- and two-dimensional results demonstrate that the one-dimensional description captures the large scale flow behavior, but is inadequate to capture all the details observed in the experiments. The two-dimensional solutions are shown to reproduce the experimentally observed flow structures and provide insight into how these details originate.

  17. Non-linear interactions of plasma waves in the context of solar particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallegos-Cruz, A.; Perez-Peraza, J.

    2001-08-01

    Stochastic particle acceleration in plasmas by means of MHD turbulence in-volves a wide range of alternatives according to, the specific wave mode, the frequency regime of the turbulence, the kind of particles to be accelerated, the assumed plasma model and so on. At present most of the alternatives have been studied with relatively deepness, though some features are not yet com-pletely understood. One of them is the delimitation of the real importance of non-lineal effects of turbulence waves in the process of particle acceleration. In this work we analyse such effects taking into account the temporal evolution of the turbulence. For illustration we exemplify our analysis with the fast MHD mode. Our results show that in some specific stages of the turbulence evolu-tion, non-linear interactions have important effects in the process of particle acceleration.

  18. A Hamiltonian Model of Dissipative Wave-particle Interactions and the Negative-mass Effect

    SciTech Connect

    A. Zhmoginov

    2011-02-07

    The effect of radiation friction is included in the Hamiltonian treatment of wave-particle interactions with autoresonant phase-locking, yielding a generalized canonical approach to the problem of dissipative dynamics near a nonlinear resonance. As an example, the negativemass eff ect exhibited by a charged particle in a pump wave and a static magnetic field is studied in the presence of the friction force due to cyclotron radiation. Particles with negative parallel masses m! are shown to transfer their kinetic energy to the pump wave, thus amplifying it. Counterintuitively, such particles also undergo stable dynamics, decreasing their transverse energy monotonically due to cyclotron cooling, whereas some of those with positive m! undergo cyclotron heating instead, extracting energy from the pump wave.

  19. Imprint Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Monitoring Secondary Metabolites Production during Antagonistic Interaction of Fungi.

    PubMed

    Tata, Alessandra; Perez, Consuelo; Campos, Michel L; Bayfield, Mark A; Eberlin, Marcos N; Ifa, Demian R

    2015-12-15

    Direct analysis of microbial cocultures grown on agar media by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is quite challenging. Due to the high gas pressure upon impact with the surface, the desorption mechanism does not allow direct imaging of soft or irregular surfaces. The divots in the agar, created by the high-pressure gas and spray, dramatically change the geometry of the system decreasing the intensity of the signal. In order to overcome this limitation, an imprinting step, in which the chemicals are initially transferred to flat hard surfaces, was coupled to DESI-MS and applied for the first time to fungal cocultures. Note that fungal cocultures are often disadvantageous in direct imaging mass spectrometry. Agar plates of fungi present a complex topography due to the simultaneous presence of dynamic mycelia and spores. One of the most devastating diseases of cocoa trees is caused by fungal phytopathogen Moniliophthora roreri. Strategies for pest management include the application of endophytic fungi, such as Trichoderma harzianum, that act as biocontrol agents by antagonizing M. roreri. However, the complex chemical communication underlying the basis for this phytopathogen-dependent biocontrol is still unknown. In this study, we investigated the metabolic exchange that takes place during the antagonistic interaction between M. roreri and T. harzianum. Using imprint-DESI-MS imaging we annotated the secondary metabolites released when T. harzianum and M. roreri were cultured in isolation and compared these to those produced after 3 weeks of coculture. We identified and localized four phytopathogen-dependent secondary metabolites, including T39 butenolide, harzianolide, and sorbicillinol. In order to verify the reliability of the imprint-DESI-MS imaging data and evaluate the capability of tape imprints to extract fungal metabolites while maintaining their localization, six representative plugs along the entire M. roreri/T. harzianum

  20. Collisional relaxation of an isotopic, strongly magnetized pure ion plasma and topics in resonant wave-particle interaction of plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chim, Chi Yung

    First in Chapter 2, we discuss the collisional relaxation of a strongly magnetized pure ion plasma that is composed of two species with slightly different masses, but both with singly-ionized atoms. In a limit of high cyclotron frequencies O j, the total cyclotron action Ij for the two species are adiabatic invariants. In a few collisions, maximizing entropy yields a modified Gibbs distribution of the form exp[-H/T ∥-alpha1 I 1-alpha2I2]. Here, H is the total Hamiltonian and alphaj's are related to parallel and perpendicular temperatures through T ⊥j=(1/T∥ +alphaj/Oj) -1. On a longer timescale, the two species share action so that alpha 1 and alpha2 relax to a common value alpha. On an even longer timescale, the total action ceases to be a constant of the motion and alpha relaxes to zero. Next, weak transport produces a low density halo of electrons moving radially outward from the pure electron plasma core, and the m = 1 mode begins to damp algebraically when the halo reaches the wall. The damping rate is proportional to the particle flux through the resonant layer at the wall. Chapter 3 explains analytically the new algebraic damping due to both mobility and diffusion transport. Electrons swept around the resonant "cat's eye" orbits form a dipole (m = 1) density distribution, setting up a field that produces ExB-drift of the core back to the axis, that is, damps the mode. Finally, Chapter 4 provides a simple mechanistic interpretation of the resonant wave-particle interaction of Landau. For the simple case of a Vlasov plasma oscillation, the non-resonant electrons are driven resonantly by the bare electric field from the resonant electrons, and this complex driver field is of a phase to reduce the oscillation amplitude. The wave-particle resonant interaction also occurs in 2D ExB-drift waves, such as a diocotron wave. In this case, the bare electric field from the resonant electrons causes ExB-drift motion back in the core plasma, thus damping the wave.

  1. Large space system - Charged particle environment interaction technology. [effects on high voltage solar array performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.; Roche, J. C.; Grier, N. T.

    1979-01-01

    Large high-voltage space power systems proposed for future applications in both low earth orbit and geosynchronous altitudes must operate in the space charged-particle environment with possible interactions between this environment and the high-voltage surfaces. The paper reviews the ground experimental work to provide indicators for the interactions that could exist in the space power system. A preliminary analytical model of a large space power system is constructed using the existing NASA Charging Analyzer Program, and its performance in geosynchronous orbit is evaluated. The analytical results are used to illustrate the regions where detrimental interactions could exist and to establish areas where future technology is required.

  2. Determination of catechins and caffeine in proposed green tea standard reference materials by liquid chromatography-particle beam/electron ionization mass spectrometry (LC-PB/EIMS).

    PubMed

    Castro, Joaudimir; Pregibon, Tara; Chumanov, Kristina; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2010-10-15

    Presented here is the quantitative analysis of green tea NIST standard reference materials (SRMs) via liquid chromatography-particle beam/electron ionization mass spectrometry (LC-PB/EIMS). Three different NIST green tea standard reference materials (SRM 3254 Camellia sinesis Leaves, SRM 3255 C. sinesis Extract and SRM 3256 Green Tea-containing Oral Dosage Form) are characterized for the content of caffeine and a series of catechin species (gallic acid, catechin, epicatechin, epigallocatechin, epicatechin gallate and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)). The absolute limits of detection for caffeine and the catechin species were determined to be on the nanogram level. A reversed-phase chromatographic separation of the green tea reference materials was carried out on a commercial C(18) column using a gradient of water (containing 0.1% TFA) and 2:1 methanol:acetonitrile (containing 0.1%TFA) at 0.9mLmin(-1) and an analysis time of 50min. Quantification of caffeine and the catechin species was carried out using the standard addition and internal standard methods, with the latter providing appreciable improvements in precision and recovery.

  3. Liquid chromatography-particle beam electron ionization mass spectrometry method for analysis of botanical extracts: evaluation of ephedrine alkaloids in standard reference materials.

    PubMed

    Castro, Joaudimir; Krishna, M V Balarama; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The preliminary validation of a high-performance liquid chromatography particle beam mass spectrometry method (HPLC-PB/MS) with electron impact ionization source for analysis of botanical extracts is presented. The LC-PB/MS system was evaluated for the analysis of ephedrine alkaloids using ephedra-containing National Institute of Standards and Technology dietary supplement standard reference materials (SRMs) 3241 Ephedra Sinica Stapf Native Extract and 3242 Ephedra Sinica Stapf Commercial Extract. The ephedrine alkaloids were separated by reversed-phase chromatography using a phenyl column at room temperature. A linear gradient method with a mobile phase composition varying from 5:95 [MeOH:0.1% trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in water] to 20:80 (MeOH:0.1% TFA in water) at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min, with an analysis time of less than 20 min, was used. The source block temperature was evaluated to determine the optimal operating conditions by monitoring the intensities and fragmentation patterns of the ephedrine alkaloids. Ephedrine and N-methylephedrine were taken as a representative of the test alkaloids. The LODs on the sub-nanogram level were achieved, with ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, and methylephedrine in the SRMs quantified by a standard addition method with recoveries of > or = 86% and RSDs of < or = 14% (n = 3).

  4. Optical extinction, refractive index, and multiple scattering for suspensions of interacting colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parola, Alberto; Piazza, Roberto; Degiorgio, Vittorio

    2014-09-01

    We provide a general microscopic theory of the scattering cross-section and of the refractive index for a system of interacting colloidal particles, exact at second order in the molecular polarizabilities. In particular: (a) we show that the structural features of the suspension are encoded into the forward scattered field by multiple scattering effects, whose contribution is essential for the so-called "optical theorem" to hold in the presence of interactions; (b) we investigate the role of radiation reaction on light extinction; (c) we discuss our results in the framework of effective medium theories, presenting a general result for the effective refractive index valid, whatever the structural properties of the suspension, in the limit of particles much larger than the wavelength; (d) by discussing strongly-interacting suspensions, we unravel subtle anomalous dispersion effects for the suspension refractive index.

  5. Combined application of alpha-track and fission-track techniques for detection of plutonium particles in environmental samples prior to isotopic measurement using thermo-ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Gyu; Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Kimura, Takaumi

    2011-07-15

    The fission track technique is a sensitive detection method for particles which contain radio-nuclides like (235)U or (239)Pu. However, when the sample is a mixture of plutonium and uranium, discrimination between uranium particles and plutonium particles is difficult using this technique. In this study, we developed a method for detecting plutonium particles in a sample mixture of plutonium and uranium particles using alpha track and fission track techniques. The specific radioactivity (Bq/g) for alpha decay of plutonium is several orders of magnitude higher than that of uranium, indicating that the formation of the alpha track due to alpha decay of uranium can be disregarded under suitable conditions. While alpha tracks in addition to fission tracks were detected in a plutonium particle, only fission tracks were detected in a uranium particle, thereby making the alpha tracks an indicator for detecting particles containing plutonium. In addition, it was confirmed that there is a linear relationship between the numbers of alpha tracks produced by plutonium particles made of plutonium certified standard material and the ion intensities of the various plutonium isotopes measured by thermo-ionization mass spectrometry. Using this correlation, the accuracy in isotope ratios, signal intensity and measurement errors is presumable from the number of alpha tracks prior to the isotope ratio measurements by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. It is expected that this method will become an effective tool for plutonium particle analysis. The particles used in this study had sizes between 0.3 and 2.0 μm.

  6. Copper-silver ionization at a US hospital: interaction of treated drinking water with plumbing materials, aesthetics and other considerations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tap water sampling and surface analysis of copper pipe/bathroom porcelain were performed to explore the fate of copper and silver during the first nine months of copper-silver ionization (CSI) applied to cold and hot water at a hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. Ions dosed by CSI into...

  7. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  8. Process maps for plasma spray: Part 1: Plasma-particle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    GILMORE,DELWYN L.; NEISER JR.,RICHARD A.; WAN,YUEPENG; SAMPATH,SANJAY

    2000-01-26

    This is the first paper of a two part series based on an integrated study carried out at Sandia National Laboratories and the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The aim of the study is to develop a more fundamental understanding of plasma-particle interactions, droplet-substrate interactions, deposit formation dynamics and microstructural development as well as final deposit properties. The purpose is to create models that can be used to link processing to performance. Process maps have been developed for air plasma spray of molybdenum. Experimental work was done to investigate the importance of such spray parameters as gun current, auxiliary gas flow, and powder carrier gas flow. In-flight particle diameters, temperatures, and velocities were measured in various areas of the spray plume. Samples were produced for analysis of microstructures and properties. An empirical model was developed, relating the input parameters to the in-flight particle characteristics. Multi-dimensional numerical simulations of the plasma gas flow field and in-flight particles under different operating conditions were also performed. In addition to the parameters which were experimentally investigated, the effect of particle injection velocity was also considered. The simulation results were found to be in good general agreement with the experimental data.

  9. Mercury's solar wind interaction during the evolution of the solar radiation and particle environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammer, H.; Ribas, I.; Biernat, H. K.; Kolb, C.; Penz, T.; Patel, M. R.; Semenov, V. S.; Wurz, P.; Orsini, S.; Massetti, S.

    2003-04-01

    Astrophysical observations suggest that the young main-sequence Sun rotated about 10 times faster than today and had correspondingly stronger magnetic activity, which triggered higher radiation and particle emission. Quantitative estimates of the solar high-energy flux evolution are only indirectly possible by comparison with solar proxies. Multiwavelength observations in the 0.1 nm to 330 nm spectral region have been collected for a sample of solar proxies, containing stars which represent most of the Sun's main sequence lifetime from 130 Myr to 8.5 Gyr. They show an excellent correlation between the emitted flux and the stellar age. We use a power law relation between rotation periods, X-ray fluxes and solar mass loss for the estimation of the solar wind mass flux evolution during the past 4.5 Gyr ago. Mercury's present exosphere indicate a strong radiation-particle-surface interaction related to the solar particle and radiation environment. Since Mercury is the closest planet to the Sun, its surface was most exposed to enhanced particle- and radiation fluxes than those of any of the other Solar System bodies. To evaluate how such effects may have influenced Mercury's surface, we study the solar wind-magnetospheric interaction with emphasis of the influence of the interplanetary magnetic field particle surface sputtering and photon stimulated desorption processes during the planets history by using the observational data from the Sun in Time programme.

  10. Diffusion of Particles in the Extracellular Matrix: The Effect of Repulsive Electrostatic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Poh, Ming-Zher; Insin, Numpon; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Fukumura, Dai; Munn, Lance L.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffusive transport of macromolecules and nanoparticles in charged fibrous media is of interest in many biological applications, including drug delivery and separation processes. Experimental findings have shown that diffusion can be significantly hindered by electrostatic interactions between the diffusing particle and charged components of the extracellular matrix. The implications, however, have not been analyzed rigorously. Here, we present a mathematical framework to study the effect of charge on the diffusive transport of macromolecules and nanoparticles in the extracellular matrix of biological tissues. The model takes into account steric, hydrodynamic, and electrostatic interactions. We show that when the fiber size is comparable to the Debye length, electrostatic forces between the fibers and the particles result in slowed diffusion. However, as the fiber diameter increases the repulsive forces become less important. Our results explain the experimental observations that neutral particles diffuse faster than charged particles. Taken together, we conclude that optimal particles for delivery to tumors should be initially cationic to target the tumor vessels and then change to neutral charge after exiting the blood vessels. PMID:20816045

  11. Final Report - Interaction of radiation and charged particles in miniature plasma structures

    SciTech Connect

    Antonsen, Thomas M.

    2014-07-16

    The extension of our program to the development of theories and models capable of describing the interactions of intense laser pulses and charged particles in miniature plasma channels is reported. These channels, which have recently been created in the laboratory, have unique dispersion properties that make them interesting for a variety of applications including particle acceleration, high harmonic generation, and THz generation. Our program systematically explored the properties of these channels, including dispersion, losses, and coupling. A particular application that was pursued is the generation of intense pulses of THz radiation by short laser pulses propagating these channels. We also explored the nonlinear dynamics of laser pulses propagating in these channels.

  12. Wave-particle interactions in the radiation belts: effect of wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, Dimitris; Tornquist, Mattias; Koepke, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Particle acceleration in Earth's radiation belts is often explain in terms of radial diffusion theory. Some of the most important contributions to diffusive transport are stochastic as well as resonant interactions with low-frequency (Alfven/magnetosonic) waves. While spectra of such waves are traditionally assumed to be broadband and spectrally white, a number of recent studies [Rae et al., 2012; Ozeke et al., 2012] indicate that the spectra of ground geomagnetic pulsations are significantly more complex. We examine power-law spectra in particle simulations in a realistic magnetospheric field configuration and report on their effect on the transport and energization of the pre-storm electron population.

  13. ReaDDyMM: Fast Interacting Particle Reaction-Diffusion Simulations Using Graphical Processing Units

    PubMed Central

    Biedermann, Johann; Ullrich, Alexander; Schöneberg, Johannes; Noé, Frank

    2015-01-01

    ReaDDy is a modular particle simulation package combining off-lattice reaction kinetics with arbitrary particle interaction forces. Here we present a graphical processing unit implementation of ReaDDy that employs the fast multiplatform molecular dynamics package OpenMM. A speedup of up to two orders of magnitude is demonstrated, giving us access to timescales of multiple seconds on single graphical processing units. This opens up the possibility of simulating cellular signal transduction events while resolving all protein copies. PMID:25650912

  14. Time delay can facilitate coherence in self-driven interacting-particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongzheng; Lin, Wei; Erban, Radek

    2014-12-01

    Directional switching in a self-propelled particle model with delayed interactions is investigated. It is shown that the average switching time is an increasing function of time delay. The presented results are applied to studying collective animal behavior. It is argued that self-propelled particle models with time delays can explain the state-dependent diffusion coefficient measured in experiments with locust groups. The theory is further generalized to heterogeneous groups where each individual can respond to its environment with a different time delay.

  15. Hepatotoxicity and Drug/Chemical Interaction Toxicity of Nanoclay Particles in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isoda, Katsuhiro; Nagata, Ryutaro; Hasegawa, Tomoya; Taira, Yuichiro; Taira, Ikuko; Shimizu, Yoshimi; Isama, Kazuo; Nishimura, Tetsuji; Ishida, Isao

    2017-03-01

    Nanomaterials are relatively new and unconventional materials with many useful properties, but their effects on biological systems are poorly understood. Nanoclay is a general term for layered mineral silicate nanoparticles that are ideally suited for use in clay-based nanocomposites. The potential biological hazards of nanoclays have not been addressed, however. Therefore, we investigated the in vivo effects and drug interactions of nanoclays. In mice, administration of nanoclay particles via the tail vein led to acute liver injury. Co-administration of nanoclay and carbon tetrachloride, paraquat, or cisplatin resulted in both liver and kidney injury. Our findings thus indicate that nanoclay particles are potentially hepato- and nephrotoxic.

  16. The spartial distribution of the particles of the beam interacting with an inhomogeneous electromagnetic wave

    SciTech Connect

    Serov, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    The time variation of the spartial distribution of an electron beam reflected by an inhomogeneous wave or traverse the wave was investigated. The injected beam is perpendicular to the direction of propagation of the wave. The interaction between an electron beam and an electromagnetic wave not only produces electron oscillation but also substantially changes the electron phase and energy distribution. It is shown that under specific conditions one part of particles are reflected by an electromagnetic wave and other part of particles traverse the wave.

  17. Biomolecular interactions in HCV nucleocapsid-like particles as revealed by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Casado, Arantxa; Molina, Marina; Carmona, Pedro

    2007-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) occurs in the form of 55-65 nm spherical particles, but the structure of the virion remains to be clarified. Structural studies of HCV have been hampered by the lack of an appropriate cell culture system. However, structural analyses of HCV components can provide an essential framework for understanding of the molecular mechanism of virion assembly. This article reviews the potential of vibrational spectroscopy aimed at the knowledge of HCV structural biology, particularly regarding biomolecular interactions in nucleocapsid-like particles obtained in vitro.

  18. Computational Studies on Interaction between Air Bubbles and Hydrophobic Mineral Particles Covered by Nonpolar Oil.

    PubMed

    Song; Lopez-Valdivieso

    1999-04-01

    Computations based on the extended DLVO theory are carried out on the potential energies of interactions between air bubbles and talc particles covered by nonpolar oil. It is shown that the major role of nonpolar oil in this system is to greatly increase the depth of the primary energy valley, giving rise to a much stronger bubble-particle aggregate that can support greater aggregate-rupture force fields from turbulent flows. Also, due to nonpolar oil involvement, the energy barrier between bubbles and mineral particles sharply collapses down and further separates, indicative of a greater probability of attachment of mineral particles to air bubbles. A linear relationship is found between the primary energy valley and the contact angles of oil or bubbles, and thus a simple and approximate formula is presented to evaluate the depth of the primary energy valley. In addition, it is found that the primary energy valley and the energy barrier are directly proportional to the effective particle radius, but the barrier location is independent of the effective particle radius. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Microfluidic devices for modeling cell-cell and particle-cell interactions in the microvasculature

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakarpandian, Balabhaskar; Shen, Ming-Che; Pant, Kapil; Kiani, Mohammad F.

    2011-01-01

    Cell-fluid and cell-cell interactions are critical components of many physiological and pathological conditions in the microvasculature. Similarly, particle-cell interactions play an important role in targeted delivery of therapeutics to tissue. Development of in vitro fluidic devices to mimic these microcirculatory processes has been a critical step forward in our understanding of the inflammatory process, development of nano-particulate drug carriers, and developing realistic in vitro models of the microvasculature and its surrounding tissue. However, widely used parallel plate flow based devices and assays have a number of important limitations for studying the physiological conditions in vivo. In addition, these devices are resource hungry and time consuming for performing various assays. Recently developed, more realistic, microfluidic based devices have been able to overcome many of these limitations. In this review, an overview of the fluidic devices and their use in studying the effects of shear forces on cell-cell and cell-particle interactions is presented. In addition, use of mathematical models and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based models for interpreting the complex flow patterns in the microvasculature are highlighted. Finally, the potential of 3D microfluidic devices and imaging for better representing in vivo conditions under which cell-cell and cell-particle interactions take place are discussed. PMID:21763328

  20. The Effective Field Theory approach towards membrane-mediated interactions between particles.

    PubMed

    Yolcu, Cem; Haussman, Robert C; Deserno, Markus

    2014-06-01

    Fluid lipid membranes can mediate forces between particles bound to them: A local deformation of the surface geometry created by some object spreads to distant regions, where other objects can respond to it. The physical characteristics of these geometric interactions, and how they are affected by thermal fluctuations, are well described by the simple continuum curvature-elastic Hamiltonian proposed 40 years ago by Wolfgang Helfrich. Unfortunately, while the underlying principles are conceptually straightforward, the corresponding calculations are not-largely because one must enforce boundary conditions for finite-sized objects. This challenge has inspired several heuristic approaches for expressing the problem in a point particle language. While streamlining the calculations of leading order results and enabling predictions for higher order corrections, the ad hoc nature of the reformulation leaves its domain of validity unclear. In contrast, the framework of Effective Field Theory (EFT) provides a systematic way to construct a completely equivalent point particle description. In this review we present a detailed account for how this is accomplished. In particular, we use a familiar example from electrostatics as an analogy to motivate the key steps needed to construct an EFT, most notably capturing finite size information in point-like "polarizabilities," and determining their value through a suitable "matching procedure." The interaction (free) energy then emerges as a systematic cumulant expansion, for which powerful diagrammatic techniques exist, which we also briefly revisit. We then apply this formalism to derive series expansions for interactions between flat and curved particle pairs, multibody interactions, as well as corrections to all these interactions due to thermal fluctuations.

  1. A review of the processes by which ultrasound is generated through the interaction of ionizing radiation and irradiated materials: some possible applications.

    PubMed

    Baily, N A

    1992-01-01

    The production of acoustic waves following the absorption of energy deposited by ionizing radiation, with a consequent production of localized thermal spikes has been confirmed by a number of papers published in the physics literature. This paper reviews the basic theory and presents most of the supporting experimental data. Some of the experimental methods used and the results obtained are summarized. In addition to the rather straightforward and routine use of acoustic phenomena produced by ionizing radiation for the detection and measurements of such radiation, there are some special applications that appear to be especially attractive for medical physics. Some of these are unique to ionizing radiation in that the amplitude of the ultrasound wave is proportional to the energy deposited in small volumes at localized sites of these interactions, while others derive from methodologies already in use with nonionizing radiations. The detection and measurement of this ultrasonic radiation could possibly lead to methods for the study of such fundamental phenomenon as track structure, precision localization of therapeutic treatment beams, and even the possible imaging of internal anatomic structures to provide on-line portal images.

  2. Effects of hydrodynamic retardation and interparticle interactions on the self-assembly in a drying droplet containing suspended solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebovka, N. I.; Khrapatiy, S.; Melnyk, R.; Vygornitskii, M.

    2014-05-01

    Self-assembly of particles, suspended in a drying droplet, were studied by the Monte Carlo method. The Brownian diffusion of particles was simulated accounting for the effect of hydrodynamic retardation and interparticle interactions. The model allowed for explaining formation of the "coffee ring" patterns even without accounting for the radial flows towards the three-phase contact line. Morphologies of the drying patterns and their dependence on interparticle interactions and concentration of particles are discussed.

  3. Roles of the major, small, acid-soluble spore proteins and spore-specific and universal DNA repair mechanisms in resistance of Bacillus subtilis spores to ionizing radiation from X rays and high-energy charged-particle bombardment.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Ralf; Setlow, Peter; Horneck, Gerda; Berger, Thomas; Reitz, Günther; Rettberg, Petra; Doherty, Aidan J; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2008-02-01

    The role of DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination, spore photoproduct lyase, and DNA polymerase I and genome protection via alpha/beta-type small, acid-soluble spore proteins (SASP) in Bacillus subtilis spore resistance to accelerated heavy ions (high-energy charged [HZE] particles) and X rays has been studied. Spores deficient in NHEJ and alpha/beta-type SASP were significantly more sensitive to HZE particle bombardment and X-ray irradiation than were the recA, polA, and splB mutant and wild-type spores, indicating that NHEJ provides an efficient DNA double-strand break repair pathway during spore germination and that the loss of the alpha/beta-type SASP leads to a significant radiosensitivity to ionizing radiation, suggesting the essential function of these spore proteins as protectants of spore DNA against ionizing radiation.

  4. Momentum-exchange method in lattice Boltzmann simulations of particle-fluid interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Cai, Qingdong; Xia, Zhenhua; Wang, Moran; Chen, Shiyi

    2013-07-01

    The momentum exchange method has been widely used in lattice Boltzmann simulations for particle-fluid interactions. Although proved accurate for still walls, it will result in inaccurate particle dynamics without corrections. In this work, we reveal the physical cause of this problem and find that the initial momentum of the net mass transfer through boundaries in the moving-boundary treatment is not counted in the conventional momentum exchange method. A corrected momentum exchange method is then proposed by taking into account the initial momentum of the net mass transfer at each time step. The method is easy to implement with negligible extra computation cost. Direct numerical simulations of a single elliptical particle sedimentation are carried out to evaluate the accuracy for our method as well as other lattice Boltzmann-based methods by comparisons with the results of the finite element method. A shear flow test shows that our method is Galilean invariant.

  5. Charged-particle distributions in pp interactions at [Formula: see text] measured with the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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Pezoa, R; Phillips, P W; Piacquadio, G; Pianori, E; Picazio, A; Piccaro, E; Piccinini, M; Pickering, M A; Piegaia, R; Pilcher, J E; Pilkington, A D; Pin, A W J; Pina, J; Pinamonti, M; Pinfold, J L; Pingel, A; Pires, S; Pirumov, H; Pitt, M; Plazak, L; Pleier, M-A; Pleskot, V; Plotnikova, E; Plucinski, P; Pluth, D; Poettgen, R; Poggioli, L; Pohl, D; Polesello, G; Poley, A; Policicchio, A; Polifka, R; Polini, A; Pollard, C S; Polychronakos, V; Pommès, K; Pontecorvo, L; Pope, B G; Popeneciu, G A; Popovic, D S; Poppleton, A; Pospisil, S; Potamianos, K; Potrap, I N; Potter, C J; Potter, C T; Poulard, G; Poveda, J; Pozdnyakov, V; Pozo Astigarraga, M E; Pralavorio, P; Pranko, A; Prell, S; Price, D; Price, L E; Primavera, M; Prince, S; Proissl, M; Prokofiev, K; Prokoshin, F; Protopopescu, S; Proudfoot, J; Przybycien, M; Puddu, D; Puldon, D; Purohit, M; Puzo, P; Qian, J; Qin, G; Qin, Y; Quadt, A; Quayle, W B; Queitsch-Maitland, M; Quilty, D; Raddum, S; Radeka, V; Radescu, V; Radhakrishnan, S K; Radloff, P; Rados, P; Ragusa, F; Rahal, G; Raine, J A; Rajagopalan, S; Rammensee, M; Rangel-Smith, C; Ratti, M G; Rauscher, F; Rave, S; Ravenscroft, T; Raymond, M; Read, A L; Readioff, N P; Rebuzzi, D M; Redelbach, A; Redlinger, G; Reece, R; Reeves, K; Rehnisch, L; Reichert, J; Reisin, H; Rembser, C; Ren, H; Rescigno, M; Resconi, S; Rezanova, O L; Reznicek, P; Rezvani, R; Richter, R; Richter, S; Richter-Was, E; Ricken, O; Ridel, M; Rieck, P; Riegel, C J; Rieger, J; Rifki, O; Rijssenbeek, M; Rimoldi, A; Rinaldi, L; Ristić, B; Ritsch, E; Riu, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rizvi, E; Rizzi, C; Robertson, S H; Robichaud-Veronneau, A; Robinson, D; Robinson, J E M; Robson, A; Roda, C; Rodina, Y; Rodriguez Perez, A; Rodriguez Rodriguez, D; Roe, S; Rogan, C S; Røhne, O; Romaniouk, A; Romano, M; Romano Saez, S M; Romero Adam, E; Rompotis, N; Ronzani, M; Roos, L; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Rosbach, K; Rose, P; Rosenthal, O; Rossetti, V; Rossi, E; Rossi, L P; Rosten, J H N; Rosten, R; Rotaru, M; Roth, I; Rothberg, J; 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Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, M; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of distributions of charged particles which are produced in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of [Formula: see text] and recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. A special dataset recorded in 2012 with a small number of interactions per beam crossing (below 0.004) and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 160 [Formula: see text] was used. A minimum-bias trigger was utilised to select a data sample of more than 9 million collision events. The multiplicity, pseudorapidity, and transverse momentum distributions of charged particles are shown in different regions of kinematics and charged-particle multiplicity, including measurements of final states at high multiplicity. The results are corrected for detector effects and are compared to the predictions of various Monte Carlo event generator models which simulate the full hadronic final state.

  6. On Nonlinear Self-interaction of Geodesic Acoustic Mode Driven By Energetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    G.Y. Fu

    2010-10-01

    It is shown that nonlinear self-interaction of energetic particle-driven Geodesic Acoustic Mode does not generate a second harmonic in radial electric field using the fluid model. However, kinetic effects of energetic particles can induce a second harmonic in the radial electric field. A formula for the second order plasma density perturbation is derived. It is shown that a second harmonic of plasma density perturbation is generated by the convective nonlinearity of both thermal plasma and energetic particles. Near the midplane of a tokamak, the second order plasma density perturbation (the sum of second harmonic and zero frequency sideband) is negative on the low field side with its size comparable to the main harmonic at low fluctuation level. These analytic predictions are consistent with the recent experimental observation in DIII-D.

  7. On Nonlinear Self-interaction of Geodesic Acoustic Mode Driven by Energetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    G. Y. Fu

    2010-06-04

    It is shown that nonlinear self-interaction of energetic particle-driven Geodesic Acoustic Mode does not generate a second harmonic in radial electric field using the fluid model. However, kinetic effects of energetic particles can induce a second harmonic in the radial electric field. A formula for the second order plasma density perturbation is derived. It is shown that a second harmonic of plasma density perturbation is generated by the convective nonlinearity of both thermal plasma and energetic particles. Near the midplane of a tokamak, the second order plasma density perturbation (the sum of second harmonic and zero frequency sideband) is negative on the low field side with its size comparable to the main harmonic at low uctuation level. These analytic predictions are consistent with the recent experimental observation in DIII-D.

  8. Geometric universality of currents in an open network of interacting particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai A; Chernyak, Vladimir Y; Chertkov, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We discuss a non-equilibrium statistical system on a graph or network. Identical particles are injected, interact with each other, traverse, and leave the graph in a stochastic manner described in terms of Poisson rates, possibly dependent on time and instantaneous occupation numbers at the nodes of the graph. We show that under the assumption of the relative rates constancy, the system demonstrates a profound statistical symmetry, resulting in geometric universality of the particle currents statistics. The phenomenon applies broadly to many man-made and natural open stochastic systems, such as queuing of packages over internet, transport of electrons and quasi-particles in mesoscopic systems, and chains of reactions in bio-chemical networks. We illustrate the utility of the general approach using two enabling examples from the two latter disciplines.

  9. Attractive particle interaction forces and packing density of fine glass powders.

    PubMed

    Parteli, Eric J R; Schmidt, Jochen; Blümel, Christina; Wirth, Karl-Ernst; Peukert, Wolfgang; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2014-09-02

    We study the packing of fine glass powders of mean particle diameter in the range (4-52) μm both experimentally and by numerical DEM simulations. We obtain quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, if both types of attractive forces of particle interaction, adhesion and non-bonded van der Waals forces are taken into account. Our results suggest that considering only viscoelastic and adhesive forces in DEM simulations may lead to incorrect numerical predictions of the behavior of fine powders. Based on the results from simulations and experiments, we propose a mathematical expression to estimate the packing fraction of fine polydisperse powders as a function of the average particle size.

  10. Thyroid nodules, polymorphic variants in DNA repair and RET-related genes, and interaction with ionizing radiation exposure from nuclear tests in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Sigurdson, Alice J; Land, Charles E; Bhatti, Parveen; Pineda, Marbin; Brenner, Alina; Carr, Zhanat; Gusev, Boris I; Zhumadilov, Zhaxibay; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, Andre; Rutter, Joni L; Ron, Elaine; Struewing, Jeffery P

    2009-01-01

    Risk factors for thyroid cancer remain largely unknown except for ionizing radiation exposure during childhood and a history of benign thyroid nodules. Because thyroid nodules are more common than thyroid cancers and are associated with thyroid cancer risk, we evaluated several polymorphisms potentially relevant to thyroid tumors and assessed interaction with ionizing radiation exposure to the thyroid gland. Thyroid nodules were detected in 1998 by ultrasound screening of 2997 persons who lived near the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan when they were children (1949-1962). Cases with thyroid nodules (n = 907) were frequency matched (1:1) to those without nodules by ethnicity (Kazakh or Russian), gender and age at screening. Thyroid gland radiation doses were estimated from fallout deposition patterns, residence history and diet. We analyzed 23 polymorphisms in 13 genes and assessed interaction with ionizing radiation exposure using likelihood ratio tests (LRT). Elevated thyroid nodule risks were associated with the minor alleles of RET S836S (rs1800862, P = 0.03) and GFRA1 -193C>G (rs not assigned, P = 0.05) and decreased risk with XRCC1 R194W (rs1799782, P trend = 0.03) and TGFB1 T263I (rs1800472, P = 0.009). Similar patterns of association were observed for a small number of papillary thyroid cancers (n = 25). Ionizing radiation exposure to the thyroid gland was associated with significantly increased risk of thyroid nodules (age and gender adjusted excess odds ratio/Gy = 0.30, 95% CI 0.05-0.56), with evidence for interaction by genotype found for XRCC1 R194W (LRT P value = 0.02). Polymorphisms in RET signaling, DNA repair and proliferation genes may be related to risk of thyroid nodules, consistent with some previous reports on thyroid cancer. Borderline support for gene-radiation interaction was found for a variant in XRCC1, a key base excision repair protein. Other pathways such as genes in double-strand break repair, apoptosis and genes related to

  11. Orientation and self-assembly of cylindrical particles by anisotropic capillary interactions.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Eric P; Cavallaro, Marcello; Botto, Lorenzo; Bernate, Jorge C; Garbin, Valeria; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2010-10-05

    In this research, we study cylindrical microparticles at fluid interfaces. Cylinders orient and assemble with high reliability to form end-to-end chains in dilute surfaces or dense rectangular lattices in crowded surfaces owing to capillary interactions. In isolation, a cylinder assumes one of two possible equilibrium states, the end-on state, in which the cylinder axis is perpendicular to the interface, or the side-on state, in which the cylinder axis is parallel to the interface. A phase diagram relating aspect ratio and contact angle is constructed to predict the preferred state and verified in experiment. Cylinders in the side-on state create distortions that result in capillary interactions. Overlapping deformations by neighboring particles drive oriented capillary assembly. Interferometry, electron microscopy, and numerical simulations are used to characterize the interface shape around isolated particles. Experiments and numerics show that "side-on" cylinders have concentrated excess area near the end faces, and that the interface distortion resembles an elliptical quadrupole a few radii away from the particle surface. To model the cylinder interactions for separations greater than a few radii, an anisotropic potential is derived based on elliptical quadrupoles. This potential predicts an attractive force and a torque, both of which depend strongly on aspect ratio, in keeping with experiment. Particle trajectories and angular orientations recorded by video microscopy agree with the predicted potential. In particular, the analysis predicts the rate of rotation, a feature lacking in prior analyses. To understand interactions near contact, the concentrated excess area near the cylinder ends is quantified and its role in creating stable end-to-end assemblies is discussed. When a pair of cylinders is near contact, these high excess area regions overlap to form a capillary bridge between the particles. This capillary bridge may stabilize the end-to-end chains

  12. Hydrogeomorphology of the hyporheic zone: Stream solute and fine particle interactions with a dynamic streambed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Drummond, J. D.; Martin, R. L.; McPhillips, L. E.; Packman, A. I.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Stonedahl, S. H.; Aubeneau, A. F.; Sawyer, A. H.; Larsen, L. G.; Tobias, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Hyporheic flow in streams has typically been studied separately from geomorphic processes. We investigated interactions between bed mobility and dynamic hyporheic storage of solutes and fine particles in a sand-bed stream before, during, and after a flood. A conservatively transported solute tracer (bromide) and a fine particles tracer (5 μm latex particles), a surrogate for fine particulate organic matter, were co-injected during base flow. The tracers were differentially stored, with fine particles penetrating more shallowly in hyporheic flow and retained more efficiently due to the high rate of particle filtration in bed sediment compared to solute. Tracer injections lasted 3.5 h after which we released a small flood from an upstream dam one hour later. Due to shallower storage in the bed, fine particles were rapidly entrained during the rising limb of the flood hydrograph. Rather than being flushed by the flood, we observed that solutes were stored longer due to expansion of hyporheic flow paths beneath the temporarily enlarged bedforms. Three important timescales determined the fate of solutes and fine particles: (1) flood duration, (2) relaxation time of flood-enlarged bedforms back to base flow dimensions, and (3) resulting adjustments and lag times of hyporheic flow. Recurrent transitions between these timescales explain why we observed a peak accumulation of natural particulate organic matter between 2 and 4 cm deep in the bed, i.e., below the scour layer of mobile bedforms but above the maximum depth of particle filtration in hyporheic flow paths. Thus, physical interactions between bed mobility and hyporheic transport influence how organic matter is stored in the bed and how long it is retained, which affects decomposition rate and metabolism of this southeastern Coastal Plain stream. In summary we found that dynamic interactions between hyporheic flow, bed mobility, and flow variation had strong but differential influences on base flow retention and

  13. Hydrogeomorphology of the hyporheic zone: stream solute and fine particle interactions with a dynamic streambed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Drummond, J.D.; Martin, R.L.; McPhillips, L.E.; Packman, A.I.; Jerolmack, D.J.; Stonedahl, S.H.; Aubeneau, A.F.; Sawyer, A.H.; Larsen, L.G.; Tobias, C.R.

    2012-01-01

    Hyporheic flow in streams has typically been studied separately from geomorphic processes. We investigated interactions between bed mobility and dynamic hyporheic storage of solutes and fine particles in a sand-bed stream before, during, and after a flood. A conservatively transported solute tracer (bromide) and a fine particles tracer (5 μm latex particles), a surrogate for fine particulate organic matter, were co-injected during base flow. The tracers were differentially stored, with fine particles penetrating more shallowly in hyporheic flow and retained more efficiently due to the high rate of particle filtration in bed sediment compared to solute. Tracer injections lasted 3.5 h after which we released a small flood from an upstream dam one hour later. Due to shallower storage in the bed, fine particles were rapidly entrained during the rising limb of the flood hydrograph. Rather than being flushed by the flood, we observed that solutes were stored longer due to expansion of hyporheic flow paths beneath the temporarily enlarged bedforms. Three important timescales determined the fate of solutes and fine particles: (1) flood duration, (2) relaxation time of flood-enlarged bedforms back to base flow dimensions, and (3) resulting adjustments and lag times of hyporheic flow. Recurrent transitions between these timescales explain why we observed a peak accumulation of natural particulate organic matter between 2 and 4 cm deep in the bed, i.e., below the scour layer of mobile bedforms but above the maximum depth of particle filtration in hyporheic flow paths. Thus, physical interactions between bed mobility and hyporheic transport influence how organic matter is stored in the bed and how long it is retained, which affects decomposition rate and metabolism of this southeastern Coastal Plain stream. In summary we found that dynamic interactions between hyporheic flow, bed mobility, and flow variation had strong but differential influences on base flow retention and

  14. Phase-field simulations of the interaction between a grain boundary and an evolving second-phase particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kunok; Moelans, Nele

    2015-04-01

    We performed phase-field simulations to analyse the interaction of a migrating grain boundary with an evolving second-phase particle. It is found that depending on the difference between the interfacial energies of the particle-matrix interface for the two grain orientations involved and the driving force for grain boundary movement, particles with a particle size well above the critical limit can dissolve due to passage of the boundary.

  15. Rubber particle proteins, HbREF and HbSRPP, show different interactions with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Estevez, Yannick; Zhendre, Vanessa; Henry, Sarah; Thévenot, Julie; Dufourc, Erick J; Alves, Isabel D; Peruch, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The biomembrane surrounding rubber particles from the hevea latex is well known for its content of numerous allergen proteins. HbREF (Hevb1) and HbSRPP (Hevb3) are major components, linked on rubber particles, and they have been shown to be involved in rubber synthesis or quality (mass regulation), but their exact function is still to be determined. In this study we highlighted the different modes of interactions of both recombinant proteins with various membrane models (lipid monolayers, liposomes or supported bilayers, and multilamellar vesicles) to mimic the latex particle membrane. We combined various biophysical methods (polarization-modulation-infrared reflection-adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS)/ellipsometry, attenuated-total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), plasmon waveguide resonance (PWR), fluorescence spectroscopy) to elucidate their interactions. Small rubber particle protein (SRPP) shows less affinity than rubber elongation factor (REF) for the membranes but displays a kind of "covering" effect on the lipid headgroups without disturbing the membrane integrity. Its structure is conserved in the presence of lipids. Contrarily, REF demonstrates higher membrane affinity with changes in its aggregation properties, the amyloid nature of REF, which we previously reported, is not favored in the presence of lipids. REF binds and inserts into membranes. The membrane integrity is highly perturbed, and we suspect that REF is even able to remove lipids from the membrane leading to the formation of mixed micelles. These two homologous proteins show affinity to all membrane models tested but neatly differ in their interacting features. This could imply differential roles on the surface of rubber particles.

  16. Excitation of Poloidal standing Alfven waves through drift resonance wave-particle interaction (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, L.; Takahashi, K.; Wygant, J. R.; Chen, L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Thaller, S. A.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Baker, D. N.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Funsten, H. O.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H.

    2013-12-01

    Charged particles trapped in the magnetosphere undergo a longitudinal drift motion around the Earth induced by the magnetic field curvature and gradient. The resonant wave-particle interaction associated with the drift motion is important for understanding the dynamics of the ring current and radiation belt particles. Using cross-spectral analysis of electric field, magnetic field, and ion flux data from the Van Allen Probe (RBSP) spacecraft, we present direct evidence identifying the generation of a fundamental mode standing poloidal wave through drift-resonance interactions in the inner magnetosphere. Intense azimuthal electric field (E φ ) oscillations as large as 10mV/m are observed associated with radial magnetic field (Br) oscillations in the dawn-noon sector near but south of the magnetic equator at L~5. The observed wave period, Eφ/Br, and the 90 degrees phase lag between Br and Eφ are all consistent with fundamental mode standing poloidal waves. Phase shifts between particle fluxes and wave electric fields clearly demonstrate a drift resonance with ~90 keV ring current ions. The estimated earthward gradient of ion phase space density provides free energy source for wave generation through the drift-resonance instability. To our knowledge, this is the first unambiguous observation of drift-resonance wave-particle interaction driving poloidal wave oscillations in the magnetosphere. Similar drift-resonance process should occur ubiquitously in collisionless plasma systems. One example is the ';fishbone' instability in fusion plasma devices. In addition, our observations have important implications for the long-standing mysterious origin of Giant Pulsations detected on the ground.

  17. Inter-particle interactions and magnetism in manganese-zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddar, P.; Srikanth, H.; Morrison, S. A.; Carpenter, E. E.

    2005-03-01

    Manganese-zinc ferrite (Mn xZn 1-xFe 2O 4) nanoparticles were synthesized by reverse micelle technique using two different surfactant media—(1) bis-(2-ethylhexl) sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) and (2) mix of nonylphenol poly(oxyethylene) 5 and nonylphenol poly(oxyethylene) 9 (NP) followed by annealing of precursors to remove the surfactant coating and to obtain better crystalline phase. A comparison of the magnetic properties showed distinct differences in blocking temperature, coercivity and saturation magnetization. Radio-frequency (RF) transverse susceptibility (TS) measurements were in agreement with the static magnetization data. Our precise TS measurements further revealed features associated with anisotropy fields that were dependent on the grain size, crystallinity and inter-particle interactions. Overall, we have demonstrated that RF TS is an excellent probe of the dynamic magnetization and influence of effects such as crystallinity and inter-particle interactions in soft ferrite nanoparticles.

  18. Influence of the electronic plasma density on the wave particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard-Piet, Angelica; Boscher, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    The wave particle interaction, which is well known to be a major phenomenon in the electron radiation belts dynamics, is based on two main parameters: the characteristics of the wave (type of wave, intensity,…) and the characteristics of the ambient plasma. In this work we studied the second parameter. On one side, the electronic plasma density can be derived from in-situ measurements. On the other side, several empirical models exist: GCPM, IZMIRAN or Carpenter models. Here, we compared electronic plasma densities derived from in-situ measurements each other and with existing models. Then, we investigated on the electronic plasma density distribution to distinguish the inside to the outside plasmasphere. Finally, the effect of the electronic plasma density on the diffusion coefficients due to wave particle interaction has been studied via a numerical code, called WAPI, based on quasi linear theory.

  19. Ground state energy of a non-integer number of particles with δ attractive interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Éric; Derrida, Bernard

    2000-04-01

    We show how to define and calculate the ground state energy of a system of quantum particles with δ attractive interactions when the number of particles n is non-integer. The question is relevant to obtain the probability distribution of the free energy of a directed polymer in a random medium. When one expands the ground state energy in powers of the interaction, all the coefficients of the perturbation series are polynomials in n, allowing to define the perturbation theory for non-integer n. We develop a procedure to calculate all the cumulants of the free energy of the directed polymer and we give explicit, although complicated, expressions of the first three cumulants.

  20. Giant Polymersome Protocells Dock with Virus Particle Mimics via Multivalent Glycan-Lectin Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kubilis, Artur; Abdulkarim, Ali; Eissa, Ahmed M.; Cameron, Neil R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the low complexity of their components, several simple physical systems, including microspheres, coacervate droplets and phospholipid membrane structures (liposomes), have been suggested as protocell models. These, however, lack key cellular characteristics, such as the ability to replicate or to dock with extracellular species. Here, we report a simple method for the de novo creation of synthetic cell mimics in the form of giant polymeric vesicles (polymersomes), which are capable of behavior approaching that of living cells. These polymersomes form by self-assembly, under electroformation conditions, of amphiphilic, glycosylated block copolymers in aqueous solution. The glycosylated exterior of the resulting polymeric giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) allows their selective interaction with carbohydrate-binding receptor-functionalized particles, in a manner reminiscent of the cell-surface docking of virus particles. We believe that this is the first example of a simple protocell model displaying cell-like behavior through a native receptor-ligand interaction. PMID:27576579