Science.gov

Sample records for ionov i anion-radikalami

  1. I I I I I I I I 'I

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2015-09-10

    ... I I IW , c3 I ?& I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I re,@; ' . a%! I W 7 b! - 0 a 3 0 0 W c 0' - E a W -c ?! ... 27 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Pi4 7 f* I II I I I t - - -- - I b/4 - 1 ----- I I ...

  2. Juno I -- Explorer I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    Juno I, a slightly modified Jupiter-C launch vehicle, shortly before the January 31, 1958 launch of America's first satellite, Explorer I. The Jupiter-C, developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, consisted of a modified version of the Redstone rocket's first stage and two upper stages of clustered Baby Sergeant rockets developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  3. Juno I -- Explorer I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    Juno I, a slightly modified Jupiter-C launch vehicle, shortly before the January 31, 1958 launch of America's first satellite, Explorer I. The Jupiter-C, developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, consisted of a modified version of the Redstone rocket's first stage and two upper stages of clustered Baby Sergeant rockets developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  4. SAGE I

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-12

    SAGE I Data and Information Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment ( SAGE ) I gathered data concerning the spatial distribution of stratospheric aerosols, ozone and nitrogen dioxide on a global scale. SAGE I used a Sun Photometer. Guide Documents:  Project ...

  5. Application of electron-stimulated desorption for studying adsorbed layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, V. N.; Kuznetsov, Yu. A.; Potekhina, N. D.

    2013-06-01

    After a brief discussion of the main result of the research initiated by N.I. Ionov in his laboratory using electron-stimulated desorption for studying the surface layers of tungsten, we consider in greater detail recent results on layered coatings formed on the tungsten surface upon simultaneous adsorption of sodium (or cesium) and gold atoms on this surface, as well as the effect of sputtering of samarium atoms on the (Cs + Au)/W(100) surface that has already been formed at 300 K.

  6. I3P Overview

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Deborah Diaz, the NASA's Deputy Chief Information Officer, talks about the Information Technology Infrastructure Integration Program (I3P). I3P is NASA's initiative to provide Agency-wide managemen...

  7. Ares I Operability Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaughnessy, Raymond W.

    2009-01-01

    A general overview of Ares I Operability is presented. The contents include: 1) Vehicle and Ops Concept Overviews; 2) What does operability mean to the Ares I Project?; 3) What is the Ares Project doing to influence operability into the flight hardware designs?; and 4) How do we measure Ares I Project success in infusing operability?

  8. Quantized Algebra I Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBuvitz, William

    2014-01-01

    I am a volunteer reader at the Princeton unit of "Learning Ally" (formerly "Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic") and I recently discovered that high school students are introduced to the concept of quantization well before they take chemistry and physics. For the past few months I have been reading onto computer files a…

  9. Quantized Algebra I Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBuvitz, William

    2014-01-01

    I am a volunteer reader at the Princeton unit of "Learning Ally" (formerly "Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic") and I recently discovered that high school students are introduced to the concept of quantization well before they take chemistry and physics. For the past few months I have been reading onto computer files a…

  10. Hawk-I Calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibon, Pascale

    2017-09-01

    "The High Acuity Wide field K-band Imager (HAWK-I) instrument is a cryogenic wide field imager operating in the wavelength range 0.9 to 2.5 microns. It has been in operations since 2007 on the UT4 at the Very Large Telescope Observatory in seeing-limited mode. In 2017-2018, GRound Layer Adaptive optics Assisted by Lasers module (GRAAL) will be in operation and the system GRAAL+HAWK-I will be commissioned. With GRAAL, already installed, HAWK-I will operate more than 80% of the time with an equivalent K-band seeing of 0.55" (instead of 0.7" without GRAAL). I will present here an overview of the calibration plan for HAWK-I and GRAAL+HAWK-I and particularly the challenging aspects for optimal science products and instrument health monitoring."

  11. Crystallization of lysozyme with (<i>R>)-, (<i>S>)- and (<i>RS>)-2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Stauber, Mark; Jakoncic, Jean; Berger, Jacob; Karp, Jerome M.; Axelbaum, Ariel; Sastow, Dahniel; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Hrnjez, Bruce J.; Asherie, Neer

    2015-03-01

    Chiral control of crystallization has ample precedent in the small-molecule world, but relatively little is known about the role of chirality in protein crystallization. In this study, lysozyme was crystallized in the presence of the chiral additive 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) separately using the <i>R> and <i>S> enantiomers as well as with a racemic <i>RS> mixture. Crystals grown with (<i>R>)-MPD had the most order and produced the highest resolution protein structures. This result is consistent with the observation that in the crystals grown with (<i>R>)-MPD and (<i>RS>)-MPD the crystal contacts are made by (<i>R>)-MPD, demonstrating that there is preferential interaction between lysozyme and this enantiomer. These findings suggest that chiral interactions are important in protein crystallization.

  12. I'm back

    Treesearch

    Bill Block

    2012-01-01

    As some of you might know, I am the new Editor-In-Chief for the Journal of Wildlife Management. Just to get acquainted, here are a few tidbits about me. I am the Program Manager for the Wildlife and Terrestrial Ecosystems Science Program with Rocky Mountain Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. I consider myself a generalist having worked on reptiles, amphibians...

  13. Subpart I: Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The documents below pertain to Subpart I: National Emission Standards for Radionuclide Emissions From Federal Facilities Other Than Nuclear Regulatory Commission Licensees and Not Covered by Subpart H.

  14. Operation DOMINIC I-1962.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    used Included the Javelin. Nike-Cajun. XM-33. Nike- Apache , Honest John-Nike, and Speedball. The rocket launchers were located along the south slue of...Hewstone Diagnostic aircraft I KC-135 Cognac Comm~unications relay 4 I KC-135 Kibosh Diagnostic aircraft I KC-135 Cordova Propagation test aircraft 3 KC-135...K80SI4 CORDOVA KC-13S CAROO)OLF C lie~ ______ I4FWSTONF -C-130O ABUSIVE LAMMKIN - RC-121 SAX’FR a YON 8 4? a IIAU’ICAI. k41L7S (-APP-QO0X) AIRCRAFT

  15. I Have Braces: How Can I Eat Fruits and Veggies?

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Shyness I Have Braces. How Can I Eat Fruits and Veggies? KidsHealth > For Teens > I Have Braces. How Can I Eat Fruits and Veggies? Print A A A I ... and veggies a day. But I can't eat apples and things like that. What do I ...

  16. I'm Pregnant. Should I Get a Flu Shot?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness I'm Pregnant. Should I Get a Flu Shot? KidsHealth > For Teens > I'm Pregnant. Should I Get a Flu Shot? A A A I just found out that I'm 6 weeks pregnant. Do I need to get ...

  17. I Have Braces: How Can I Eat Fruits and Veggies?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Shyness I Have Braces. How Can I Eat Fruits and Veggies? KidsHealth > For Teens > I Have Braces. How Can I Eat Fruits and Veggies? A A A I have braces, ... weight. I read about eating 5 servings of fruits and veggies a day. But I can't ...

  18. Hexokinase 1 is required for glucose-induced repression of <i>bZIP63i>, <i>At5g22920i>, and <i>BT2i> in <i>Arabidopsis>

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Sabine; Gardestrom, Per; Pesquet, Edouard; Kleczkowski, Leszek A.

    2015-07-14

    Simple sugars, like glucose (Glc) and sucrose (Suc), act as signals to modulate the expression of hundreds of genes in plants. Frequently, however, it remains unclear whether this regulation is induced by the sugars themselves or by their derivatives generated in the course of carbohydrate (CH) metabolism. In the present study, we tested the relevance of different CH metabolism and allocation pathways affecting expression patterns of five selected sugar-responsive genes (<i>bZIP63i>, <i>At5g22920i>, <i>BT2i>, <i>MGD2i>, and <i>TPS9i>) in <i>Arabidopsis thalianai>. In general, the expression followed diurnal changes in the overall sugar availability. However, under steady growth conditions, this response was hardly impaired in the mutants for CH metabolizing/ transporting proteins (<i>adg1i>, <i>sex1i>, <i>sus1-4i>, <i>sus5/6i>, and <i>tpt2i>), including also hexokinase1 (HXK1) loss- and gain-of-function plants—<i>gin2.1i> and <i>oe3.2i>, respectively. In addition, transgenic plants carrying <i>pbZIP63::GUSi> showed no changes in reporter-gene-expression when grown on sugar under steady-state conditions. In contrast, short-term treatments of agar-grown seedlings with 1% Glc or Suc induced <i>pbZIP63::GUSi> repression, which became even more apparent in seedlings grown in liquid media. Subsequent analyses of liquid-grown <i>gin2.1i> and <i>oe3.2i> seedlings revealed that Glc -dependent regulation of the five selected genes was not affected in gin2.1, whereas it was enhanced in <i>oe3.2i> plants for <i>bZIP63i>, <i>At5g22920i>, and <i>BT>. The sugar treatments had no effect on ATP/ADP ratio, suggesting that changes in gene expression were not linked to cellular energy status. Altogether, the data suggest that HXK1 does not act as Glc sensor controlling <i>bZIP63i>, <i>At5g22920i>, and <i>BT2i> expression, but it is nevertheless required for the production of a downstream metabolic signal regulating their expression

  19. Ovarian Cancer Stage I

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage I Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage I Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  20. Can I Prevent Acne?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Can I Prevent Acne? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can I Prevent Acne? A ... en español ¿Puedo prevenir el acné? What Causes Acne? Contrary to what you may have heard, acne ...

  1. Can I Prevent Acne?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Can I Prevent Acne? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can I Prevent Acne? Print ... en español ¿Puedo prevenir el acné? What Causes Acne? Contrary to what you may have heard, acne ...

  2. "i" Am Needed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The mysteries of mathematics are not easily revealed. Much of present day school mathematics is the product of years, sometimes centuries, of inquiring, wrestling and discovering by men of the highest intellect. The number "i" (designation for the square root of -1) is no exception. This article presents a lesson on the need for "i".

  3. Ares I concept illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown is a concept illustration of the Ares I crew launch vehicle, left, and Ares V cargo launch vehicle. Ares I will carry the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to space. Ares V will serve as NASA's primary vehicle for delivery of large-scale hardware to space.

  4. Identification and Characterization of Switchgrass Histone <i>H3i> and <i>CENH3i> Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Jiamin; Frazier, Taylor; Huang, Linkai; Zhang, Xinquan; Zhao, Bingyu

    2016-07-12

    Switchgrass is one of the most promising energy crops and only recently has been employed for biofuel production. The draft genome of switchgrass was recently released; however, relatively few switchgrass genes have been functionally characterized. <i>CENH3i>, the major histone protein found in centromeres, along with canonical <i>H3i> and other histones, plays an important role in maintaining genome stability and integrity. Despite their importance, the histone <i>H3i> genes of switchgrass have remained largely uninvestigated. In this study, we identified 17 putative switchgrass histone <i>H3i> genes in silico. Of these genes, 15 showed strong homology to histone <i>H3i> genes including six <i>H3.1i> genes, three <i>H3.3i> genes, four <i>H3.3i>-like genes and two <i>H3.1i>-like genes. The remaining two genes were found to be homologous to <i>CENH3i>. RNA-seq data derived from lowland cultivar Alamo and upland cultivar Dacotah allowed us to identify SNPs in the histone <i>H3i> genes and compare their differential gene expression. Interestingly, we also found that overexpression of switchgrass histone <i>H3i> and <i>CENH3i> genes in <i>N. benthamianai> could trigger cell death of the transformed plant cells. Localization and deletion analyses of the histone <i>H3i> and <i>CENH3i> genes revealed that nuclear localization of the N-terminal tail is essential and sufficient for triggering the cell death phenotype. Lastly, our results deliver insight into the mechanisms underlying the histone-triggered cell death phenotype and provide a foundation for further studying the variations of the histone <i>H3i> and <i>CENH3i> genes in switchgrass.

  5. Radiological assistance program: Region I. Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Musolino, S.V.; Kuehner, A.V.; Hull, A.P.

    1985-07-15

    The purpose of the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is to make DOE resources available and provide emergency assistance to state and local agencies in order to control radiological hazards, protect the public health and safety, and minimize the loss of property. This plan is an integral part of a nationwide program of radiological assistance established by the US DOE, and is implemented on a regional basis. The Brookhaven Area Office (BHO) Radiological Assistance Program is applicable to DOE Region I, which consists of the New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland and the District of Columbia. The BHO RAP-1 has been developed to: (a) ensure the availability of an effective radiological assistance capability to ensure the protection of persons and property; (b) provide guidelines to RAP-1 Team personnel for the evaluation of radiological incidents and implementation of corrective actions; (c) maintain liaison with other DOE installations, Federal, State and local organizations which may become involved in radiological assistance operations in Region I; and (d) encourage development of a local capability to cope with radiological incidents.

  6. Comparative genomics of <i>Fructobacillus> spp. and <i>Leuconostoc> spp. reveals niche-specific evolution of <i>Fructobacillus> spp.

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Akihito; Tanizawa, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Naoto; Maeno, Shintaro; Kumar, Himanshu; Shiwa, Yuh; Okada, Sanae; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Dicks, Leon; Nakagawa, Junichi; Arita, Masanori

    2015-12-29

    In this study, <i>Fructobacillus> spp. in fructose-rich niches belong to the family <i>Leuconostocaceae>. They were originally classified as <i>Leuconostoc> spp., but were later grouped into a novel genus, <i>Fructobacillus> , based on their phylogenetic position, morphology and specific biochemical characteristics. The unique characters, so called fructophilic characteristics, had not been reported in the group of lactic acid bacteria, suggesting unique evolution at the genome level. Here we studied four draft genome sequences of <i>Fructobacillus> spp. and compared their metabolic properties against those of <i>Leuconostoc> spp. As a result, <i>Fructobacillus> species possess significantly less protein coding sequences in their small genomes. The number of genes was significantly smaller in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. Several other metabolic pathways, including TCA cycle, ubiquinone and other terpenoid-quinone biosynthesis and phosphotransferase systems, were characterized as discriminative pathways between the two genera. The adhE gene for bifunctional acetaldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase, and genes for subunits of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex were absent in <i>Fructobacillus> spp. The two genera also show different levels of GC contents, which are mainly due to the different GC contents at the third codon position. In conclusion, the present genome characteristics in <i>Fructobacillus> spp. suggest reductive evolution that took place to adapt to specific niches.

  7. I-131-MIBG therapies.

    PubMed

    Vöö, Stefan; Bucerius, Jan; Mottaghy, Felix M

    2011-11-01

    Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is a tracer that selectively targets neuroendocrine cells. On this basis, radiolabeled iodinated-MIBG (I-131-MIBG) has been introduced as a molecular nuclear therapy in the management of neuroendocrine tumors, including neuroblastoma, pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma, neuroendocrine carcinomas, and other rare neuroendocrine tumors. Extensive work has been addressed to develop I-131-MIBG therapy: doses, therapeutic schemes, and efficiency. In this paper, we present an overview on I-131-MIBG therapy, with main focus on different aspects how to perform this treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mother, may I ...?

    PubMed

    Bourn, S

    1994-01-01

    If you've been working in EMS for much more than a week, the title of this column probably evoked some sort of visceral response from you--and not a positive one. The phrase "Mother, may I...?" has long been attached to EMS systems that require EMTs and paramedics to call their base hospitals prior to performing most interventions or delivering medications. Where the rub comes in is that most field people I know would prefer a little more leeway, something like a "Mother, I'm going out now" type of system.

  9. I'm Pregnant. Should I Get a Flu Shot?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Shyness I'm Pregnant. Should I Get a Flu Shot? KidsHealth > For Teens > I'm Pregnant. Should I Get a Flu Shot? Print A A A I just found ... weeks pregnant. Do I need to get the flu vaccine or will it affect my pregnancy? – Eliza* ...

  10. I Remember Highlander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams-Hawkins, Maria

    2016-01-01

    "I Remember Highlander" reflects on the life choices of Marion Barry and Herman Henning Jr., fraternity brothers who sought the same goal but took different paths. The essay examines cultural and family situations that shaped lives and decisions.

  11. Collider Signal I :. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.

    2010-08-01

    These TASI lectures were part of the summer school in 2008 and cover the collider signal associated with resonances in models of physics beyond the Standard Model. I begin with a review of the Z boson, one of the best-studied resonances in particle physics, and review how the Breit-Wigner form of the propagator emerges in perturbation theory and discuss the narrow width approximation. I review how the LEP and SLAC experiments could use the kinematics of Z events to learn about fermion couplings to the Z. I then make a brief survey of models of physics beyond the Standard Model which predict resonances, and discuss some of the LHC observables which we can use to discover and identify the nature of the BSM physics. I finish up with a discussion of the linear moose that one can use for an effective theory description of a massive color octet vector particle.

  12. Type I diabetes (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... high levels of glucose in the blood, the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas secrete the hormone insulin. Type I diabetes occurs when these cells are destroyed by the body's own immune system.

  13. Should I Floss?

    MedlinePlus

    ... email this article Yes. Floss removes plaque and debris that sticks to teeth and gums in between ... Why should I floss? Floss removes plaque and debris that adhere to teeth and gums in between ...

  14. iCARE

    Cancer.gov

    The iCARE R Package allows researchers to quickly build models for absolute risk, and apply them to estimate an individual's risk of developing disease during a specifed time interval, based on a set of user defined input parameters.

  15. Ares I Integration Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, Jim

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the planned Integration approach for the Ares I Launch vehicle. It includes organization charts, and diagrams showing responsibilities for the various activities of the launch. Included is also a timeline with milestones for the project.

  16. Why Am I Dizzy?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... I Dizzy?" A few of the more common balance orders that affect older adults are labyrinthitis, Ménière's ... courtesy of Johns Hopkins Center for Hearing and Balance and the Vestibular Disorders Association (VEDA).

  17. If I Were Judge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringsjord, Selmer

    I have spent a lot of time through the years attacking the Turing Test and its variants (e.g., Harnad's Total Turing Test). As far as I am concerned, my attacks have been lethal, but of course not everyone agrees. At any rate, in the present paper I shift gears: I pretend that the Turing Test is valid, put on the table a proposition designed to capture this validity, and then slip into the shoes of the judge, determined to deliver a correct verdict as to which contestant is the machine, and which the woman. My strategies for separating mind from machine may well reveal some dizzying new-millennium challenges for Artificial Intelligence.

  18. I Remember Highlander

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams-Hawkins, Maria

    2016-01-01

    "I Remember Highlander" reflects on the life choices of Marion Barry and Herman Henning Jr., fraternity brothers who sought the same goal but took different paths. The essay examines cultural and family situations that shaped lives and decisions.

  19. Comparative structural analysis of <i>Bru1i> region homeologs in <i>Saccharum spontaneumi> and <i>S. officinarumi>

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jisen; Sharma, Anupma; Yu, Qingyi; Wang, Jianping; Li, Leiting; Zhu, Lin; Zhang, Xingtan; Chen, Youqiang; Ming, Ray

    2016-06-10

    Here, sugarcane is a major sugar and biofuel crop, but genomic research and molecular breeding have lagged behind other major crops due to the complexity of auto-allopolyploid genomes. Sugarcane cultivars are frequently aneuploid with chromosome number ranging from 100 to 130, consisting of 70-80 % <i>S. officinarumi>, 10-20 % <i>S. spontaneumi>, and 10 % recombinants between these two species. Analysis of a genomic region in the progenitor autoploid genomes of sugarcane hybrid cultivars will reveal the nature and divergence of homologous chromosomes. As a result, to investigate the origin and evolution of haplotypes in the <i>Bru1i> genomic regions in sugarcane cultivars, we identified two BAC clones from <i>S. spontaneumi> and four from <i>S. officinarumi> and compared to seven haplotype sequences from sugarcane hybrid R570. The results clarified the origin of seven homologous haplotypes in R570, four haplotypes originated from <i>S. officinarumi>, two from <i>S. spontaneumi> and one recombinant.. Retrotransposon insertions and sequences variations among the homologous haplotypes sequence divergence ranged from 18.2 % to 60.5 % with an average of 33. 7 %. Gene content and gene structure were relatively well conserved among the homologous haplotypes. Exon splitting occurred in haplotypes of the hybrid genome but not in its progenitor genomes. Tajima's D analysis revealed that <i>S. spontaneumi> hapotypes in the Bru1 genomic regions were under strong directional selection. Numerous inversions, deletions, insertions and translocations were found between haplotypes within each genome. In conclusion, this is the first comparison among haplotypes of a modern sugarcane hybrid and its two progenitors. Tajima's D results emphasized the crucial role of this fungal disease resistance gene for enhancing the fitness of this species and indicating that the brown rust resistance gene in R570 is from <i>S. spontaneumi>. Species-specific InDel, sequences

  20. Myosin-I nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, P G; Albanesi, J P; Bahler, M; Bement, W M; Berg, J S; Burgess, D R; Burnside, B; Cheney, R E; Corey, D P; Coudrier, E; de Lanerolle, P; Hammer, J A; Hasson, T; Holt, J R; Hudspeth, A J; Ikebe, M; Kendrick-Jones, J; Korn, E D; Li, R; Mercer, J A; Milligan, R A; Mooseker, M S; Ostap, E M; Petit, C; Pollard, T D; Sellers, J R; Soldati, T; Titus, M A

    2001-11-26

    We suggest that the vertebrate myosin-I field adopt a common nomenclature system based on the names adopted by the Human Genome Organization (HUGO). At present, the myosin-I nomenclature is very confusing; not only are several systems in use, but several different genes have been given the same name. Despite their faults, we believe that the names adopted by the HUGO nomenclature group for genome annotation are the best compromise, and we recommend universal adoption.

  1. Apps I Have Loved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    According to a March estimate from Distimo, there were 653,614 apps in the iPhone, Android, iPad, BlackBerry, and Windows Mobile stores alone. So, is it any wonder that these busy people have found a few that come in handy on the job? Mobile apps are as indispensable to district IT executives as they are becoming in the classroom--for professional…

  2. Apps I Have Loved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    According to a March estimate from Distimo, there were 653,614 apps in the iPhone, Android, iPad, BlackBerry, and Windows Mobile stores alone. So, is it any wonder that these busy people have found a few that come in handy on the job? Mobile apps are as indispensable to district IT executives as they are becoming in the classroom--for professional…

  3. Why I Love Vendors

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2010-02-01

    In December, I attended the annual meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology, as I have done regularly for the last several decades. It is always a good way to catch up with old friends and look for the latest trends in cell biology. I rarely attend the talks, having found that they more reflect the fashion of the moment (or the past) than the direction of the field. Poster sessions are more to my liking, since they provide a chance to talk to enthusiastic young scientists in the trenches. But my favorite stop has always been the vendor booths. When I tell my friends that I love visiting vendor booths, most of them seem to think I am kidding. At meetings, many scientists seem to feel that vendors are necessary evils. They provide free candy and cheap pens in exchange for bombarding us with ads and scanning our badges. Like popup ads in web browsers, we have learned to both ignore and accept them as part of the landscape. It is unfortunate that we have become so inured to their presence. Talks and posters capture exciting research from the last few years or months, but vendor booths capture the future, offering one of the clearest visions of where a field is going.

  4. iLocater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepp, Justin R.

    2013-01-01

    We present the science case and optical design for iLocater: a precision NIR Doppler spectrometer for the Large Binocular Telescope. iLocater is the world's first AO-fed ultra-stable RV instrument. By working at the diffraction limit, the instrument has spatial dimensions less than 0.5 cubic-meters (the size of a travel carry-on bag), and is thus physically smaller than comparable seeing-limited spectrographs. The benefits of a small point-spread function are three-fold: (1) high spectral resolution; (2) a smaller and thus more stable instrument; (3) smaller and thus less expensive optics. iLocater will operate in the Y-band, achieve R=110,000 spectral resolution, and identify terrestrial planets orbiting in the habitable zone of nearby M-dwarf stars.

  5. Ares I Avionics Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchant, Christopher C.

    2009-01-01

    The Ares I is the next generation human-rated launcher for the United States Constellation program. This system is required to provide single fault tolerance within defined crew safety and mission reliability limits. As part of the effort to achieve those safety goals, Ares I includes an avionics subsystem built as a multistring, voting architecture. The avionics design draws upon experience gained from building fly-by-wire systems for Shuttle, X- 38, and Seawolf. Architectural drivers for the avionics design include using proven technologies with existing suppliers of space rated parts for critical functions (to reduce overall development risk), easing the software development effort by using an off-theshelf, DO-178B certifiable, ARINC-653 operating system in the main flight computers, minimizing mutual data and power connections that might lead to a common-mode hardware failure of the redundant avionics strings, and centralizing overall Ares I command & control within the Upper Stage.

  6. The first full orbit of <i>η> Carinae seen by <i>Fermi>

    SciTech Connect

    Reitberger, Klaus; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Takahashi, H.

    2015-05-08

    The binary system η Carinae has completed its first 5.54 y orbit since the beginning of science operation of the <i>Fermi> Large Area Telescope (LAT). We are now able to investigate the high-energy γ-ray source at the position of <i>η> Carinae over its full orbital period. By this, we can address and confirm earlier predictions for temporal and spectral variability. Here, newer versions of the LAT datasets, instrument response functions and background models allow for a more accurate analysis. Therefore it is important to re-evaluate the previously analyzed time period along with the new data to further constrain location, spectral shape, and flux time history of the γ-ray source. As a result, we confirm earlier predictions of increasing flux values above 10 GeV toward the next periastron passage. For the most recent part of the data sample, flux values as high as those before the first periastron passage in 2008 are recorded. A comparison of spectral energy distributions around periastron and apastron passages reveals strong variation in the high-energy band. This is due to a second spectral component that is present only around periastron. In conclusion, improved spatial consistency with the γ-ray source at the position of <i>η> Carinae along with the confirmation of temporal variability above 10 GeV in conjunction with the orbital period strengthens the argument for unambiguous source identification. Spectral variability provides additional constraints for future modeling of the particle acceleration and γ-ray emission in colliding-wind binary systems.

  7. Mucopolysaccharidosis type I.

    PubMed

    Wraith, J E; Jones, Simon

    2014-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is caused by a deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase a-L-Iduronidase leading to accumulation of the GAGs, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulphate, The disease spectrum includes a disorder with severe involvement and CNS disease Hurler disease (HPS I H) a chronic disease without CNS disease Scheie disease (HPS I S5) and the intermediate Hurler/Scheie disease(HPS I HIS).The urine GAGs pattern. confirmed by Iduronidase enzyme assay is diagnostic. Over 200 mutations exist. Genotype / phenotype correlation is poor but two nonsense mutations results in Hurler disease.The skeletal disease dysostosis multiplex (DM) is seen in severe variants of MPS I. The hypoplastic odontoid putting these patients at high risk of cervical cord damage. MPS IH (Hurler Disease) affected infants develop a spinal 'gibbus' deformity, persistent nasal discharge, middle ear effusions and frequent upper respiratory infection. They have "coarse", facial features, and an enlarged tongue. . Progressive upper airway disease leads to obstructive sleep apnoea. Corneal clouding and cognitive impairment appears, growth ceases. Joint stiffness and contractures limit mobility. Cardiac disease is universal. Death occurs before 10 years. SCHEIE patients are diagnosed as teenagers with hepatomegaly, joint contractures, cardiac valve abnormalities and corneal clouding . Prolonged survival with considerable disability without cognitive impairment is usual. MPS IH/S Hurler/Scheie. is diagnosed by 6.5 years, with variable skeletal and visceral manifestations without cognitive involvement. Joint stiffness, corneal clouding, , umbilical hernia, abnormal facies, hepatomegaly, joint contractures, and cervical myelopathy occur. Patients die in their 20s .Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) the standard treatment of MPS IH for 30 years is unpredictable .When performed before 2 years it can stabilize cognitive impairment. Hepatosplenomegaly, urine GAGs excretion, upper

  8. TCAS I Design Guidelines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-24

    DERIVATION OF TAU BASED ON POWER TRACKING B-I APPENDIX C INTERFERENCE ANALYSIS FOR LOW POWER INTERROGATORS C-I APPENDIX D LINK ANALYSIS FOR A LOW-POWER...Transfer of Bearing Information 6 3-1 Airborne Measurement Facility 8 3-2 TCAS Experimental Unit 9 4-1 Free Space Loss at 1090 MHz 15 4-2 Power Tracking Performance...Technique 4-2 Encounter Speed Performance (Calculated) for 14 Received Power Level Thresholding Technique 4-3 Tau (T) Derived From Power Tracking 16

  9. 129I and 127I transport in the Mississippi River.

    PubMed

    Oktay, S D; Santschi, P H; Moran, J E; Sharma, P

    2001-11-15

    The watershed processes which control 129I/127I ratios, 129I and 127I concentrations, and speciation of iodine isotopes were studied through an investigation into the variability of these parameters in the Mississippi River near New Orleans, undertaken in 1996-1998. Analyses of suspended particulate matter (SPM) revealed a greater percent association of 127I than of 129I, resulting in lower 129I/127I ratios in SPM than in surrounding water. Furthermore, crossflow ultrafiltration showed that organo-iodine was the dominant form for both isotopes, with 70-85% of these isotopes found in the 0.45 microm filter-passing fraction associated with colloidal macromolecular organic matter. 129I showed a weak correlation, 127I no correlation, and 129I/127I ratios a strong inverse correlation with river flow rate. Inverse correlations between 129I/127I ratios and river flow rates can be best explained by rainwater and evapotranspiration dominated ratios at base flow and a lowering of the isotope ratios during higher flow due to extra inputs of 127I from soil weathering. We postulate that different equilibration times for 127I and 129I as well as for bomb-produced 129I and reprocessing-produced 129I are responsible for these fractionation effects and the differential mobilities of these isotopes in the Mississippi River watershed.

  10. "I Spy" Engaged Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassano, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    Encourages student awareness of the connections between their classroom experiences and real life. Develops an idea to motivate and keep track of students' findings, the "I Spy Vocab Words" contest. Describes how the author implemented the contest. Notes how the program has students keep a log of vocabulary words they find in their everyday lives.…

  11. When I Was 41

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santaniello, Shelly W.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author, a third grade teacher at Hillside School in Needham, Washington, describes how, after a death in her family, she found comfort and made valuable connections with her students by completing a "When I Was" writing assignment that she had assigned them. While sharing the story of her uncle's death with her students, she…

  12. SSIP Phase I Roadmap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinh, Megan; Lucas, Anne; Taylor, Cornelia; Kelley, Grace; Kasprzak, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This roadmap provides a description of the activities involved in the development of the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP) (SPP/APR Indicators C11 and B17) due to the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) on April 1, 2015. The roadmap is intended to support states with completing Phase I of the SSIP process. This document provides…

  13. Title I and Homelessness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Title I, Part A, of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) provides financial assistance through State Educational Agencies (SEAs) to Local Educational Agencies (LEAs or school districts) and public schools with high numbers or percentages of disadvantaged children to help ensure that all children meet challenging state academic content and student…

  14. I Hate Reviews!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, Terry

    2003-01-01

    In our business we have all kinds of reviews: financial reviews, strategy reviews, technical reviews, test reviews, design reviews, baseline reviews, etc., etc. Some ways to avoid the most common pitfalls that I find specifically in these kinds of reviews are given.

  15. iPhone paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-12-01

    Could you write a scientific manuscript using just your iPhone? Well, when Christoph Bartneck at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand was invited to submit a paper to the International Conference on Atomic and Nuclear Physics, in Atlanta, Georgia, in November, he decided to do just that.

  16. Meatcutting Testbook, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strazicich, Mirko, Ed.

    This document contains objective tests for each lesson in the Meatcutting Workbook, Part I (see note), which is designed for apprenticeship programs in meatcutting in California. Each of the 36 tests contains from 10 to 45 multiple-choice items. The tests are grouped according to the eight units of the workbook: the apprentice meatcutter; applied…

  17. SSIP Phase I Roadmap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinh, Megan; Lucas, Anne; Taylor, Cornelia; Kelley, Grace; Kasprzak, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This roadmap provides a description of the activities involved in the development of the State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP) (SPP/APR Indicators C11 and B17) due to the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) on April 1, 2015. The roadmap is intended to support states with completing Phase I of the SSIP process. This document provides…

  18. Methods & Strategies: I Wonder...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Anne

    2013-01-01

    "I Wonder" boards are a teaching strategy that can be used in the classroom, as well as during science learning opportunities in nonformal settings, such as after-school science programs or summer camps.This simple strategy has led to deeper science exploration in 4-H, as young people learn alongside program staff, teachers, or…

  19. When I Was 41

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santaniello, Shelly W.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author, a third grade teacher at Hillside School in Needham, Washington, describes how, after a death in her family, she found comfort and made valuable connections with her students by completing a "When I Was" writing assignment that she had assigned them. While sharing the story of her uncle's death with her students, she…

  20. EPA iComplaints

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The iComplaints system is an enterprise-level COTS (Commercial Off-The-Shelf) product that provides all of the funtionality required to collect, track, manage, process and report on information regarding internal EEO complaints in accordance with several civil rights laws and regulations, to include but not limited to, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.

  1. Library Studies I Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, William J.

    Developed for use in the Library Studies I component of the Library Studies Program at Bloomsburg University (Pennsylvania), this self-paced workbook is intended to acquaint students with the Harvey A. Andruss Library and help them develop information-seeking skills. The workbook is designed to be used in conjunction with an exercise book, and…

  2. Methods & Strategies: I Wonder...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Anne

    2013-01-01

    "I Wonder" boards are a teaching strategy that can be used in the classroom, as well as during science learning opportunities in nonformal settings, such as after-school science programs or summer camps.This simple strategy has led to deeper science exploration in 4-H, as young people learn alongside program staff, teachers, or…

  3. Ares I concept illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown is an illustration of the Ares I concept. The first stage will be a single, five-segment solid rocket booster derived from the space shuttle programs reusable solid rocket motor. The first stage is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama for NASA's Constellation program.

  4. Ares I concept illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Shown is a concept illustration of Ares I which is an in-line, two-stage rocket that will transport the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to low earth orbit. Orion will accommodate as many as six astronauts. The first stage will consist of the five-segment solid rocket booster.

  5. I Need A Friend.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Charlotte Baker

    1980-01-01

    Contains the second part of the "I Need a Friend" Copy Master Series designed for use by educators to teach children about the responsibilities humans have for their fellow creatures. The stories can be reproduced for distribution to students or used as a coloring book. (Author/SA)

  6. iBank

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermundo, Cesar B.; Bermundo, Alex B.; Ballester, Rex C.

    2012-01-01

    iBank is a project that utilizes a software to create an item Bank that store quality questions, generate test and print exam. The items are from analyze teacher-constructed test questions that provides the basis for discussing test results, by determining why a test item is or not discriminating between the better and poorer students, and by…

  7. Alexander I. Ignatowski

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinov, Igor E.; Jankovic, Gradimir M.

    2013-01-01

    In 1908, Alexander I. Ignatowski (1875–1955) published his pioneering work that first revealed a relationship between cholesterol-rich food and experimental atherosclerosis. This early experimental work paved a way to the metabolic study of the mechanism of atherosclerosis. Herein, we present a brief account of Ignatowski's work and life. PMID:23914012

  8. Why I Study Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uchmanowicz, Pauline

    English teachers together with multilingual and multidialect students can create new standards for language use and learning in the classroom. A teacher of writing and ethnic studies finds herself telling her students "I still have time to learn Spanish." Many to whom she speaks these words are native speakers of Spanish, struggling in classroom…

  9. Pearl I. Young

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Pearl I. Young, the NACA's first female professional, at work in the instrument research laboratory circa 1929. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication, by James Schultz, page 47. Also published in Engineer in Charge: A History of the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory, 1917-1958 by James R. Hansen, (page 209).

  10. Amarcord: I Remember

    PubMed Central

    Carafoli, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    I have tried to offer a historical account of a success story, as I saw it develop from the early times when it interested only a few aficionados to the present times when it has pervaded most of cell biochemistry and physiology. It is of course the story of calcium signaling. It became my topic of work when I was a young postdoctoral fellow at The Johns Hopkins University. I entered it through a side door, that of mitochondria, which had been my area of work during my earlier days in Italy. The 1960s and 1970s were glorious times for mitochondrial calcium signaling, but the golden period was not going to last. As I have discussed below, mitochondrial calcium gradually lost appeal, entering a long period of oblivion. Its fading happened as the general area of calcium signaling was instead experiencing a phase of explosive growth, with landmark discoveries at the molecular and cellular levels. These discoveries established that calcium signaling was one of the most important areas of cell biology. However, mitochondria as calcium partners were not dead; they were only dormant. In the 1990s, they were rescued from their state of neglect to the central position of the regulation of cellular calcium signaling, which they had once rightly occupied. Meanwhile, it had also become clear that calcium is an ambivalent messenger. Hardly anything important occurs in cells without the participation of the calcium message, but calcium must be controlled with absolute precision. This is an imperative necessity, which becomes unfortunately impaired in a number of disease conditions that transform calcium into a messenger of death. PMID:23836917

  11. {sup 129}I Interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Caffee, M W; Roberts, M L

    1999-09-30

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for {sup 129}I was organized and conducted. Nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic ''standard type'' materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios of the samples varied from 10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}14}. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the samples. In Phase I, the {sup 129}I AMS measurements for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in {sup 129}I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I {sup 129}I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the {sup 129}I intercomparison, three separate laboratories prepared AgI from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves). Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then re-distributed to the participating {sup 129}I AMS facilities and {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  12. Near-complete genome sequence of the cellulolytic Bacterium <i>Bacteroides> (<i>Pseudobacteroides>) <i>cellulosolvens> ATCC 35603

    SciTech Connect

    Dassa, Bareket; Utturkar, Sagar M.; Hurt, Richard A.; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Keller, Martin; Xu, Jian; Reddy, Harish Kumar; Borovok, Ilya; Grinberg, Inna Rozman; Lamed, Raphael; Zhivin, Olga; Bayer, Edward A.; Brown, Steven D.

    2015-09-24

    We report the single-contig genome sequence of the anaerobic, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacterium, <i>Bacteroides cellulosolvensi>. The bacterium produces a particularly elaborate cellulosome system, whereas the types of cohesin-dockerin interactions are opposite of other known cellulosome systems: cell-surface attachment is thus mediated via type-I interactions whereas enzymes are integrated via type-II interactions.

  13. Combinatorial Algorithms I,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    sophisticated compiler from a high level Algol6O- or Pascal-like language which even allows us some statements in natural English. Thbis will make the...incur some costs using them. And, naturally , we are interested in minimizing these costs. As in economics, we have to clarify two questions first: (1...also have to find a formal definition of a problem. Here, an instance of a problem would be given by some string, i.e., finite sequence of characters

  14. Measurement of (124)I.

    PubMed

    Sahagia, M; Ioan, M-R; Antohe, A; Luca, A; Ivan, C

    2016-03-01

    The paper describes the measurements performed at IFIN-HH regarding the creation of a Romanian (124)I standard, consisting of: absolute standardization of the solution by the application of the 4πβ(PC)-γ coincidence method; Calibration of the CENTRONIC IG12/20A ionization chamber with a standardised solution and comparison with a calculated efficiency; γ-ray spectrometry activity measurement and determination of the impurity levels; Comparison of the results of the three methods.

  15. Average and local crystal structures of (Ga1–<i>xi>Znx>)(N1–<i>xOx>) solid solution nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Neuefeind, Joerg C.; Tyson, Trevor A.; Schieber, Natalie; Han, Wei -Qiang

    2015-11-06

    We report the comprehensive study of the crystal structure of (Ga1–<i>xi>Znx>)(N1–<i>xOx>) solid solution nanoparticles by means of neutron and synchrotron x-ray scattering. In our study we used four different types of (Ga1–<i>xi>Znx>)(N1–<i>xOx>) nanoparticles, with diameters of 10–27 nm and x = 0.075–0.51, which show the narrow energy-band gaps from 2.21 to 2.61 eV. The Rietveld analysis of the neutron diffraction data revealed that the average crystal structure is the hexagonal wurtzite (space group P63mc), in agreement with previous reports on similar bulk materials. The pair-distribution function (PDF) analysis of the same data found that the local structure is more disordered than the average one. It is best described by the model with a lower symmetry space group P1, where atoms are quasirandomly distorted from their nominal positions in the hexagonal wurtzite lattice.

  16. Fermentation of dilute acid pretreated <i>Populus> by <i>Clostridium thermocellumi>, <i>Caldicellulosiruptor besciii>, and <i>Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansisi>

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Kelsey L.; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D.; Thompson, Olivia A.; Elkins, James G.; Davison, Brian H.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.

    2015-07-25

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), which merges enzyme production, biomass hydrolysis, and fermentation into a single step, has the potential to become an efficient and economic strategy for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to transportation fuels or chemicals. In this study, we evaluated <i>Clostridium thermocellumi>, <i>Caldicellulosiruptor besciii>, and <i>Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansisi>, three , thermophilic,cellulolytic, mixed-acid fermenting candidate CBP microorganisms, for their fermentation capabilities using dilute acid pretreated <i>Populus> as a model biomass feedstock. Under pH controlled, anaerobic fermentation conditions, each candidate successfully digested a minimum of 75% of the cellulose from dilute acid pretreated <i>Populus>, as indicated by an increase in planktonic cells and end-product metabolites and a concurrent decrease in glucan content. <i>C. thermocellumi>, which employs a cellulosomal approach to biomass degradation, required 120 hours to achieve 75% cellulose utilization. In contrast, the non-cellulosomal, secreted hydrolytic enzyme system of the <i>Caldicellulosiruptor> sp. required 300 hours to achieve similar results. End-point fermentation conversions for <i>C. thermocellumi>, <i>C. besciii>, and <i>C. obsidiansisi> were determined to be 0.29, 0.34, and 0.38 grams of total metabolites per gram of loaded glucan, respectively. This data provide a starting point for future strain engineering efforts that can serve to improve the biomass fermentation capabilities of these three promising candidate CBP platforms.

  17. Unusual ground states in <i>R>5<i>T>4<i>X>10 (<i>R> = rare earth; <i>T> = Rh, Ir; and <i>X> = Si, Ge, Sn) : a review.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Srinivasan; Van Smaalen, Sander

    2017-07-04

    Rare earth compounds of the type <i>R</i><sub>5</sub><i>T</i><sub>4</sub><i>X</i><sub>10</sub> (<i>R</i> = rare earth; <i>T</i> = Rh, Ir, and <i>X</i> = Si, Ge, Sn) display a variety of phase transitions towards exotic states, including charge density waves (CDW), local moment magnetism, antiferromagnetism in the heavy fermion state, superconductivity and giant positive magnetoresistance. They support strongly correlated electron systems. In particular, <i>R</i><sub>5</sub>Ir<sub>4</sub>Si<sub>10</sub> (<i>R</i> = Dy-Lu) exhibit strong coupling CDWs with high transition temperatures and superconductivity or magnetic ordering at lower temperatures. <i>R</i><sub>5</sub><i>T</i><sub>4</sub>Ge<sub>10</sub> (<i>R</i> = Gd-Tm; <i>T</i> = Co, Rh, Ir) show multiple magnetic transitions with large magnetoresistance below the magnetic transitions. Finally, the light rare earth series <i>R</i><sub>5</sub><i>T</i><sub>4</sub>Sn<sub>10</sub> (<i>R</i> = Ce, Pr, Nd; <i>T</i> = Rh, Ir) display heavy fermion behaviour (for Ce and Pr) or possess giant positive magnetoresistance (for Nd) at low temperatures. This review provides a comprehensive overview of compounds, crystal structures and phase transitions. This is followed by an in-depth discussion of the mechanisms of the phase transitions and the properties of the ordered states. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  18. 129I interlaboratory comparison: phase I and phase II results

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.I.; Caffee, M.W.; Proctor, I.D.

    1997-07-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for 129I was organized and conducted. A total of nine laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In Phase I of the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were measured. The suite of samples contained both synthetic `standard type` materials (i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic 129I/127I ratios of the samples varied from 10`-8 to 10`-14. In this phase, each laboratory was responsible for its own chemical preparation of the environmental samples. The 129I AMS measurements obtained at different laboratories for prepared AgI were in good agreement. However, large discrepancies were seen in 129I AMS measurements of environmental samples. Because of the large discrepancies seen in the Phase I intercomparison, a subsequent study was conducted. In Phase II of the comparison, AgI was prepared from two environmental samples (IAEA 375 soil and maples leaves) by three separate laboratories. Each laboratory used its own chemical preparation method with each of the methods being distinctly different. The resulting six samples (two sets of three) were then redistributed to the participating 129I AMS facilities and 129I/127I ratios measured. Results and discussion of both the Phase I and Phase II interlaboratory comparison are presented.

  19. Emulating I - biomed 2010.

    PubMed

    Frenger, Paul

    2010-01-01

    A resting state of consciousness exists in which neural activity, energy consumption and cerebral blood flow are minimized. The author refers to this as i, or little I. In this basal state, there is no internal visual or verbal mental activity, sensory-motor functions are blocked, the executive function is in standby mode and the EEG exhibits theta-alpha band activity. As background, the author describes his experiences as a US Air Force test subject in the 1970s in unpublished training experiments using biofeedback and meditative techniques to control autonomic nervous system functions. The author used this information to extend his computerized human nervous system function emulator (HNSFE), a multitasking IEEE 1275 / Forth language program which imitates the major neural-cognitive operations of the human brain, artificial intelligence, synthetic emotions and somatic control. This program runs on a PC/104 multiprocessor network which includes 8-core 32-bit microprocessors and analog circuit boards to support artificial neural networks, neural membrane substrate-receptor binding simulation, emotional responses and high-level behaviors. The author now moves the executive function i to a separate ARM-based processor board. A waveform generator integrated circuit was also added to create a synthetic EEG signal, whose frequency was varied by a voltage produced by the ARM processor board. The result is a facsimile of the resting state of the conscious brain, instantiated in its own CPU board, generating a simulated EEG, in which the full range of brain functions may be reactivated by voluntary means or by incoming sensory alert.

  20. Fatty alcohol production in <i>Lipomyces starkeyii> and <i>Yarrowia lipolyticai>

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Wei, Hui; Knoshaug, Eric; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Xu, Qi; Himmel, Michael E.; Zhang, Min

    2016-10-24

    Current biological pathways to produce biofuel intermediates amenable to separations and catalytic upgrading to hydrocarbon fuels are not cost effective. Previously, oleaginous yeasts have been investigated primarily for lipid production. However, yeasts store neutral lipids intracellularly making recovery difficult and expensive. In addition, once recovered from the cells, lipids are difficult to blend directly with the existing fuels without upgrading. We have, therefore, begun to investigate secreted fatty acid-derived products which can be easily recovered and upgraded to fuels. In this study, we successfully demonstrate the production of fatty alcohols by the oleaginous yeasts, <i>Yarrowia lipolyticai> and <i>Lipomyces starkeyii>, through expression of the fatty acyl-CoA reductase gene from <i>Marinobactor aquaeoleii> VT8. This strategy resulted in the production of 167 and 770 mg/L of fatty alcohols in shake flask from <i>Y. lipolyticai> and <i>L starkeyii>, respectively. When using a dodecane overlay during fermentation, 92 and 99% of total fatty alcohols produced by <i>Y. lipolyticai> and <i>L. starkeyii>, respectively, were extracted into the dodecane phase, which compares favorably to the 3 and 50% recovered, respectively, without the dodecane layer. In both oleaginous yeasts, long chain length, saturated fatty alcohols, i.e., hexadecanol (C16:0) and octadecanol (C18:0), were predominant and accounted for more than 85% of the total fatty alcohols produced. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of fatty alcohol production in <i>L. starkeyii>. Furthermore, this work demonstrates that the oleaginous yeasts, <i>Y. lipolyticai> and <i>L. starkeyii>, can serve as platform organisms for the production of fatty acid-derived biofuels and bioproducts.

  1. Filaments in Lupus I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Rodon, J.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Plunkett, A.

    2017-06-01

    The mechanisms behind the formation of sub-stellar mass sources are key to determine the populations at the low-mass end of the stellar distribution. Here, we present mapping observations toward the Lupus I cloud in C18O(2-1) and 13CO(2-1) obtained with APEX. We have identified a few velocity-coherent filaments. Each contains several substellar mass sources that are also identified in the 1.1mm continuum data (see also SOLA catalogue presentation). We will discuss the velocity structure, fragmentation properties of the identified filaments, and the nature of the detected sources.

  2. Infrared Atmospheric Emission. I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    contract. They are (i) "The 5g Levels of Atomic Nitrogen" AO)YA ii Edward S. Chang and Hajime Sakai J. Phys. B 14, L391 (1981) (ii) "Infrared Emission...At. Idol. Phys. 14 (1981) L391 -L395. printed in Great Bjritain LETTER TO THE EDITOR INC 5g levels of atomic nitrogent Edward S Chang and Hajime Sakai...81/120391 +05$01.30 C) 1981 The Institute of Physics L391 The U.S. Qovermnt is authoried to repoduce and sem tns report. Parmb@a- or ur Uther

  3. Terra Incognita I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, M.; Schönert, S.

    2005-08-01

    The topics discussed in the workshop session "Terra Incognita I" included a wide range of science. Central to the discussion however was the study of sub-leading neutrino oscillations driven by Θ 13 and the possibility to observe CP-violation in the leptonic sector. Furthermore, the long-standing problem of sterile neutrinos was addressed, as well as the scenario that UHECR could be produced via so called Z-bursts. To employ neutrinos in the literal meaning of the workshop session title "Terra Incognita", namely to explore the unknown earth with neutrinos from geo-chemical origin, completed the session.

  4. Ionic Conductivities of Molten CuI and AgI-CuI Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahara, Shuta; Shimakura, Hironori; Ohno, Satoru; Fukami, Takanori

    2017-08-01

    Ionic conductivities σ for molten CuI and AgI-CuI mixtures were measured in the temperature ranges of approximately 580-800 and 500-850 °C, respectively. The value of σ for molten CuI in the range is smaller than that for molten CuBr and CuCl. σ for molten AgI-CuI mixtures decreases with increasing CuI-concentration. The activation energies Ea for molten AgI-CuI system were determined from the analysis of temperature dependence of σ by using the by Arrhenius type equation. Ea for molten AgI-CuI gradually increase with increasing CuIconcentration.

  5. Division i: Fundamental Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Dennis D.; Klioner, Sergei A.; Vondrák, Jan; Evans, Dafydd Wyn; Hohenkerk, Catherine Y.; Hosokawa, Mizuhiko; Huang, Cheng-Li; Kaplan, George H.; Knežević, Zoran; Manchester, Richard N.; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Petit, Gérard; Schuh, Harald; Soffel, Michael H.; Zacharias, Norbert

    2012-04-01

    The goal of the division is to address the scientific issues that were developed at the 2009 IAU General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro. These are:•Astronomical constants-Gaussian gravitational constant, Astronomical Unit, GMSun, geodesic precession-nutation•Astronomical software•Solar System Ephemerides-Pulsar research-Comparison of dynamical reference frames•Future Optical Reference Frame•Future Radio Reference Frame•Exoplanets-Detection-Dynamics•Predictions of Earth orientation•Units of measurements for astronomical quantities in relativistic context•Astronomical units in the relativistic framework•Time-dependent ecliptic in the GCRS•Asteroid masses•Review of space missions•Detection of gravitational waves•VLBI on the Moon•Real time electronic access to UT1-UTCIn pursuit of these goals Division I members have made significant scientific and organizational progress, and are organizing a Joint Discussion on Space-Time Reference Systems for Future Research at the 2012 IAU General Assembly. The details of Division activities and references are provided in the individual Commission and Working Group reports in this volume. A comprehensive list of references related to the work of the Division is available at the IAU Division I website at http://maia.usno.navy.mil/iaudiv1/.

  6. Father and I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Father (K. C. Yang (楊克純), 1896-1973) was a high school teacher in Anqing (安慶) in 1922 when I was born in Hefei (合肥). Anqing was then also called Huaining (懷寧). Father gave me the name Chen Ning, of which Chen was the name of my generation in our family, and Ning was derived from Huaining. Before I was one year old Father won an Anhui (安徽) Provincial Fellowship for studying in the USA. We had a family picture (Figure 1) taken in the courtyard outside our bedroom a few days before he left home. Father had on the traditional robe and coat, standing stiff and erect. He had probably up to that point never worn a western suit. Two years later he sent a picture (Figure 2) to Mother from the University of Chicago, in which his attire and bearing had both entered the twentieth century. Father was a handsome man. The exuberance and optimism of his youth were clearly captured in this photograph...

  7. Endometrial carcinoma stage I.

    PubMed

    Baram, A; Ron, I; Kupferminc, M; Inbar, M

    1997-01-01

    Standard staging and therapeutic approach to endometrial cancer involves lymph node sampling (LNS) at the time of total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH) and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO). Lymphadenectomy prolongs time of surgery and increases the risk of morbidity; where other predictors are available, it may not contribute important supplementary information. 185/247 women with stage I endometrial carcinoma underwent the standard surgery while 62 underwent TAH+BSO. Recurrence and survival were monitored for a mean of 6.5 years and retrospectively reviewed: the rates for groups with and without known lymph node status were alike [13.5% (25/185) recurrence for the former and 12.9% (8/62) for the latter, and 5-year survival rates of 75.7% (140/185) for the former and 74.2 (46/62) for the latter]. Myometrial invasion and histological grade appeared to have been highly accurate predictors without lymph node information. Because information on histological grade is available early and is highly predictive, its use could be incorporated into a revised management algorithm for stage I endometrial cancer which would depend upon ensuring lymphadenectomy for women with low grade histopathology and omitting it for those with high grades on the grounds that no further information is necessary to act appropriately.

  8. GALACTOSE METABOLISM I.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, T. T.; O'Kane, D. J.

    1962-01-01

    Fukuyama T. T. (University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia) and D. J. O'Kane. Galactose metabolism. I. Pathway of carbon in fermentation by Streptococcus faecalis. J. Bacteriol. 84:793–796. 1962.—The pathway by which galactose-1-C14 is fermented in Streptococcus faecalis was investigated using dried-cell preparations. Lactic acid, acetic acid, formic acid, ethanol, and carbon dioxide were the end products formed, with lactic acid representing approximately 50% of the sugar fermented. The distribution of radio-activity indicated that the fermentation follows the Embden-Meyerhof route, suggesting that the difference in the formation of the products of glucose and galactose fermentation must be attributed to alternate routes of pyruvic acid metabolism. Differences in pH did not account for the dissimilar fermentation patterns. PMID:13960210

  9. Heat illness. I. Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, F P

    1976-01-01

    Reliable information on the epidemiology of heat illness has come, until recently, mainly from the armed forces and, to a lesser extent, from some industries and civil communities. Data from the records of the British Army, Royal Navy, Royal Air Force, Indian Armed Forces, U.S. Army and forces engaged in the Arab-Israeli wars, from the South African gold mining corporations and Persian Gulf oil tankers, and from civilian communities, mainly in the U.S.A., are reviewed and discussed with particular reference to the classification of heat illness and definition of the terms used, and the effects on acclimatized and non-acclimatized personnel and on other sections of the civilian communities most at risk, i.e. the old and very young. This section concludes with an outline of the classification of acute heat illnesses from 1899 to the eighth revision of the WHO International Classification of Diseases in 1967.

  10. I've Been Stung: What Should I Do?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and a small lionfish. I saw the lionfish swimming through the anemone and thought it was going ... Eruption, Seaweed Dermatitis & Swimmers Itch Q: I was swimming for exercise out in front of my hotel ...

  11. <i>Cis>SERS: Customizable <i>in silicoi> sequence evaluation for restriction sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Richard M.; Koepke, Tyson; Harper, Artemus; Grimes, John; Galli, Marco; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Kalyanaraman, Ananth; Evans, Katherine; Kramer, David; Dhingra, Amit; Prasad, Manoj

    2016-04-12

    High-throughput sequencing continues to produce an immense volume of information that is processed and assembled into mature sequence data. Here, data analysis tools are urgently needed that leverage the embedded DNA sequence polymorphisms and consequent changes to restriction sites or sequence motifs in a high-throughput manner to enable biological experimentation. <i>Cis>SERS was developed as a standalone open source tool to analyze sequence datasets and provide biologists with individual or comparative genome organization information in terms of presence and frequency of patterns or motifs such as restriction enzymes. Predicted agarose gel visualization of the custom analyses results was also integrated to enhance the usefulness of the software. <i>Cis>SERS offers several novel functionalities, such as handling of large and multiple datasets in parallel, multiple restriction enzyme site detection and custom motif detection features, which are seamlessly integrated with real time agarose gel visualization. Using a simple fasta-formatted file as input, <i>Cis>SERS utilizes the REBASE enzyme database. Results from <i>Cis>SERSenable the user to make decisions for designing genotyping by sequencing experiments, reduced representation sequencing, 3’UTR sequencing, and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) molecular markers for large sample sets. <i>Cis>SERS is a java based graphical user interface built around a perl backbone. Several of the applications of <i>Cis>SERS including CAPS molecular marker development were successfully validated using wet-lab experimentation. Here, we present the tool <i>Cis>SERSand results from <i>in-silico> and corresponding wet-lab analyses demonstrating that <i>Cis>SERS is a technology platform solution that facilitates efficient data utilization in genomics and genetics studies.

  12. Waterborne outbreak of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:-.

    PubMed

    Kozlica, Jennifer; Claudet, Amanda L; Solomon, Deborah; Dunn, John R; Carpenter, L Rand

    2010-11-01

    Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- is an emerging serotype, and little information regarding attribution or risk factors for infection has been documented. We investigated an outbreak of Salmonella I 4,[5],12:i:- infections in a rural community and identified the community's private water system as the source of infection. Five people were ill with gastroenteritis. Water testing identified Salmonella. Contamination of the unprotected spring from an environmental source was suspected.

  13. Adding Zingers to Course I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Richard

    1996-01-01

    This article presents problems to challenge students over and above the standard curriculum problems assigned at a Course I level. Every additional problem in the article can be solved using only the tools provided by Course I. (AIM)

  14. Pearl I. Young

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Pearl I Young at the NACA Langley Instrument Research Laboratory. She was the Chief Technical Editor at Langley. Pearl Young attended Jamestowm College and the University of North Dakota, graduating in 1919 with honors, a Phi Beta Kappa key and a triple major in physics, chemistry and mathematics. She was hired by the University to teach physics, a role that typically was served by men. In 1921, there were 21 female and 864 male physicists in the United States. Most of the women were college teachers, hired by women's colleges. There was only one woman physicist working for the federal government at that time, and she worked for the National Bureau of Standards. In 1922 Young was hired as a physicist by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), and was assigned to the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory's Instrument Research Division under the direction of Henry J.E. Reid. In 1929 Reid appointed Young as Langley's Chief Technical Editor. She established a 'new' office, hired staff and formed the research reports and offical documents that communicated the extraordinary technical accomplishments of Langley. Over her twenty eight years at the NACA and NASA, Young helped define the public image of the NACA and influenced the way aeronautical engineers throughtout NACA (now NASA) communicate their ideas.

  15. Mycotoxins revisited: Part I.

    PubMed

    Berger, Kyan J; Guss, David A

    2005-01-01

    Mushrooms are ubiquitous in nature. They are an important source of nutrition; however, certain varieties contain chemicals that can be highly toxic to humans. Industrially cultivated mushrooms are historically very safe, but foraging for mushrooms or accidental ingestion of mushrooms in the environment can result in serious illness and death. The emergency department is the most common site of presentation for patients suffering from acute mushroom poisoning. Although recognition can be facilitated by identification of a characteristic toxidrome, the presenting manifestations can be variable and have considerable overlap with more common and generally benign clinical syndromes. The goal of this two-part article is to review the knowledge base on this subject and provide information that will assist the clinician in the early consideration, diagnosis and treatment of mushroom poisoning. Part I, presented in this issue of the Journal, reviews the epidemiology and demographics of mushroom poisoning, the physical characteristics of the most toxic varieties, the classification of the toxic species, and an overview of the cyclopeptide-containing mushroom class. Part II, to be published in the next issue of the Journal, will be focused on the presentation of the other classes of toxic mushrooms along with an up-to-date review of the most recently identified poisonous varieties.

  16. 'Who am I?'.

    PubMed

    Schellinski, Kristina

    2014-04-01

    The dreams and existential questions of those, who came into being in order to replace a dead person, pivot around a central cry: 'Who am I?' If conceived, born or designated as a replacement child, such an individual may suffer-even as an adult-from a rarely recognized unconscious confusion of identity, compounded by grief and survivors' guilt. From before the child is born, the archetypal forces of death and life are joined in a fateful constellation; the soul of the replacement child bears the shadow of death from the very beginning of life. Hope for the replacement child lies in an emergence of true self as soul recreates original life. Analysis can help the replacement child experience a 'rebirth into true life', not as 'the one who returned', but as a psychologically newborn individual; the path of individuation countering the replacement child's identification with the dead. Jungian analysis offers unique concepts for understanding and healing the replacement child; C.G. Jung himself was born after two stillborn babies and an infant that lived only five days.

  17. Induced QCD I: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Bastian B.; Lohmayer, Robert; Wettig, Tilo

    2016-11-01

    We explore an alternative discretization of continuum SU( N c ) Yang-Mills theory on a Euclidean spacetime lattice, originally introduced by Budzcies and Zirnbauer. In this discretization the self-interactions of the gauge field are induced by a path integral over N b auxiliary boson fields, which are coupled linearly to the gauge field. The main progress compared to earlier approaches is that N b can be as small as N c . In the present paper we (i) extend the proof that the continuum limit of the new discretization reproduces Yang-Mills theory in two dimensions from gauge group U( N c ) to SU( N c ), (ii) derive refined bounds on N b for non-integer values, and (iii) perform a perturbative calculation to match the bare parameter of the induced gauge theory to the standard lattice coupling. In follow-up papers we will present numerical evidence in support of the conjecture that the induced gauge theory reproduces Yang-Mills theory also in three and four dimensions, and explore the possibility to integrate out the gauge fields to arrive at a dual formulation of lattice QCD.

  18. How I treat cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Muchtar, Eli; Magen, Hila; Gertz, Morie A

    2017-01-19

    Cryoglobulinemia is a distinct entity characterized by the presence of cryoglobulins in the serum. Cryoglobulins differ in their composition, which has an impact on the clinical presentation and the underlying disease that triggers cryoglobulin formation. Cryoglobulinemia is categorized into two main subgroups: type I, which is seen exclusively in clonal hematologic diseases, and type II/III, which is called mixed cryoglobulinemia and is seen in hepatitis C virus infection and systemic diseases such as B-cell lineage hematologic malignancies and connective tissue disorders. Clinical presentation is broad and varies between types but includes arthralgia, purpura, skin ulcers, glomerulonephritis, and peripheral neuropathy. Life-threatening manifestations can develop in a small proportion of patients. A full evaluation for the underlying cause is required, because each type requires a different kind of treatment, which should be tailored on the basis of disease severity, underlying disease, and prior therapies. Relapses can be frequent and can result in significant morbidity and cumulative organ impairment. We explore the spectrum of this heterogeneous disease by discussing the disease characteristics of 5 different patients.

  19. Why Am I So Sad?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Why Am I So Sad? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Am I So Sad? A A A What's in this ... ON THIS TOPIC My Pet Died - How Can I Feel Better? Five Steps for Fighting Stress What ...

  20. Metabolomic profiling of the nectars of <i>Aquilegia pubescensi> and <i>A. Canadensisi>

    SciTech Connect

    Noutsos, Christos; Perera, Ann M.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Seaver, Samuel M. D.; Ware, Doreen H.; Motta, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    To date, variation in nectar chemistry of flowering plants has not been studied in detail. Such variation exerts considerable influence on pollinator–plant interactions, as well as on flower traits that play important roles in the selection of a plant for visitation by specific pollinators. Over the past 60 years the <i>Aquilegia> genus has been used as a key model for speciation studies. In this study, we defined the metabolomic profiles of flower samples of two <i>Aquilegia> species,<i> A. Canadensisi> and <i>A. pubescensi>. We identified a total of 75 metabolites that were classified into six main categories: organic acids, fatty acids, amino acids, esters, sugars, and unknowns. The mean abundances of 25 of these metabolites were significantly different between the two species, providing insights into interspecies variation in floral chemistry. Using the PlantSEED biochemistry database, we found that the majority of these metabolites are involved in biosynthetic pathways. Finally, we explored the annotated genome of <i>A. coeruleai>, using the PlantSEED pipeline and reconstructed the metabolic network of <i>Aquilegia>. As a result, this network, which contains the metabolic pathways involved in generating the observed chemical variation, is now publicly available from the DOE Systems Biology Knowledge Base (KBase; http://kbase.us).

  1. Successful I.D. Encounters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poorman, Margaret J.

    Instructional Development (I.D.) encounters are dependent for success on such variables as power, politics, promotion, and organizational placement. I.D. consultants must be aware of power bases or orientation of other personnel and clients, e.g., these four "power personalities" which affect their efforts in managing I.D. encounters: the gate…

  2. I/T/A/ News.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushnell, Margaret

    A study conducted in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, elementary schools, the first schools to adopt the Initial Teaching Alphabet (i.t.a.) approach to teaching basic reading in this country, revealed that children who started with i.t.a. had significantly less reading failure than children with traditional orthography (T.O.) training. Although the i.t.a.…

  3. MOTILE MARINE BACTERIA I.

    PubMed Central

    Leifson, Einar; Cosenza, B. J.; Murchelano, R.; Cleverdon, R. C.

    1964-01-01

    Leifson, Einar (Loyola University, Chicago, Ill.), B. J. Cosenza, R. Murchelano, and R. C. Cleverdon. Motile marine bacteria. I. Techniques, ecology, and general characteristics. J. Bacteriol. 87:652–666. 1964.—Aerobic, heterotrophic bacteria were isolated from the waters of the Long Island Sound, Narragansett Bay, Atlantic Ocean, and from the intestine of a variety of marine animals found along the shore of the Long Island Sound. A total of about 600 cultures of motile bacteria were studied morphologically and physiologically, with special emphasis on flagellar characteristics. The great majority of the bacteria isolated from the water were polar flagellate, nonfermentative, nonpigmented, and gramnegative. Most of these were straight, capsulated rods, but a considerable number were curved like vibrios. Yellow-pigmented isolates were often nonmotile, and the motile forms were most frequently subpolar flagellate. Several rosette-forming bacteria, including Caulobacter species, were isolated. Two typical spirilla and one flagellated coccus were found. Peritrichous flagellate bacteria, both gram-positive and gram-negative, were rare except in bottom mud. The normal intestinal flora of marine animals, such as fish and shellfish, consisted of polar flagellate, fermentative, non-pigmented, gram-negative, straight rods. Curved forms, like vibrios, were less common. Polar multitrichous flagellate forms were not uncommon and included all the luminescent types isolated. A considerable proportion of the polar monotrichous flagellate rods swarmed over the surface of agar media. When grown on solid media, all of these showed mixed polar and lateral flagellation; in liquid media, mainly polar flagellation was found. The ecology and general taxonomy of marine bacteria are discussed. Images PMID:14129669

  4. CULTIVATION OF LEPTOSPIRAE I.

    PubMed Central

    Stalheim, O. H. V.; Wilson, J. B.

    1964-01-01

    Stalheim, O. H. V. (University of Wisconsin, Madison), and J. B. Wilson. Cultivation of leptospirae. I. Nutrition of Leptospira canicola. J. Bacteriol. 88:48–54. 1964.—The nutrition of Leptospira canicola was investigated by use of synthetic media of suitable ionic strength. At an incubation temperature of 30 C, the minimal components were calcium, iron, magnesium, and ammonium ions, thiamine, and a fatty acid source; barium and strontium replaced calcium. Aspartic acid, glutamic acid, or methionine stimulated the rate and amount of growth; the best growth occurred in medium containing additional amino acids. Additions of cyanocobalamin or biotin permitted growth at 37 C. The stimulatory effects of added cyanocobalamin, biotin, pyridoxine, pantothenate, lipoic acid, or nicotinic acid were additive at 37 C, but not at 30 C. Fatty acids containing 14, 16, 17, or 18 carbon atoms supported growth; linoleic and linolenic acids were toxic. Glyceryl monooleate or trioleate, or Tween 40, 60, or 80 supported moderate to good growth; a mixture of monoolein and Tween 60, or Tweens 60 and 80 supported the best growth. Ten strains of L. canicola cultivated in a synthetic medium containing Tweens 60 and 80 attained cellular densities per ml of 107 to 4.0 × 107 organisms. L. canicola cells, resuspended in medium containing oleic-1-C14 acid, incorporated label primarily into cellular lipids; a lesser amount was located in the protein fraction, and only trace amounts were found in the nucleic acid fraction. The rate of incorporation was not affected by added sodium acetate. L. canicola was found to have fatty acid decarboxylase activity. PMID:14197904

  5. Find Quality Resources: How Do I Know if I Can Trust the Informaton I Find Online?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Medical Record Support family caregivers Find Quality Resources How do I know if I can trust ... Food and Drug Administration . Are the tools or resources easily usable? On a web site, is it ...

  6. ARES I-X Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-27

    NASA Ares I-X Launch Director Ed Mango, left, laughs as NASA Ares I-X Assistant Launch Director Pete Nickolenko looks out the window of Firing Room One of the Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center prior to the launch of the Ares I-X rocket from pad 39b at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Collected Reprints-1975. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    A N t ) /-E ’l ’L. E k 83 Pacific .OSdb dr - - —, P~ IEDICI\\ 20 ‘5 ‘0 Nooen ’ bso Coco a, be, MODE c~~~~~ ’-.O5db a’ ‘V ‘ ,I-”\\ .‘, ~,r P6 (REIKOI...mmu u ug m t mh u isl m of itut t i a t t umi ’ u’ . t i um s i St u-u ’s-se-s ut_ u ’ ,’ s tah l 1st m e at ! , tit ’pt-tadm ng n. - Itt? ms _ i- s

  8. {sup 129}I interlaboratory comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.L.; Caffee, M.W.; Proctor, L.D.

    1996-05-01

    An interlaboratory comparison exercise for {sup 129}I has been organized and conducted. A total of seven laboratories participated in the exercise to either a full or limited extent. In the comparison, a suite of 11 samples were used. This suite of standards contained both synthetic `standard type` materials(i.e., AgI) and environmental materials. The isotopic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio of the samples varied from 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -14}. Preliminary results of the comparison are presented.

  9. Progress in low-resolution <i>ab initioi> phasing with <i>CrowdPhase>

    SciTech Connect

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2016-03-01

    <i>Ab initioi> phasing by direct computational methods in low-resolution X-ray crystallography is a long-standing challenge. A common approach is to consider it as two subproblems: sampling of phase space and identification of the correct solution. While the former is amenable to a myriad of search algorithms, devising a reliable target function for the latter problem remains an open question. Here, recent developments in <i>CrowdPhase>, a collaborative online game powered by a genetic algorithm that evolves an initial population of individuals with random genetic make-up (<i>i.e.> random phases) each expressing a phenotype in the form of an electron-density map, are presented. Success relies on the ability of human players to visually evaluate the quality of these maps and, following a Darwinian survival-of-the-fittest concept, direct the search towards optimal solutions. While an initial study demonstrated the feasibility of the approach, some important crystallographic issues were overlooked for the sake of simplicity. To address these, the new <i>CrowdPhase> includes consideration of space-group symmetry, a method for handling missing amplitudes, the use of a map correlation coefficient as a quality metric and a solvent-flattening step. Lastly, performances of this installment are discussed for two low-resolution test cases based on <i>bona fidei> diffraction data.

  10. PESTICINS II. I and II

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Robert R.; Surgalla, Michael J.

    1962-01-01

    Brubaker, Robert R. (Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.) and Michael J. Surgalla. Pesticins. II. Production of pesticin I and II. J. Bacteriol. 84:539–545. 1962.—Pesticin I was separated from pesticin I inhibitor by ion-exchange chromatography of cell-free culture supernatant fluids and by acid precipitation of soluble preparations obtained from mechanically disrupted cells. The latter procedure resulted in formation of an insoluble pesticin I complex which, upon removal by centrifugation and subsequent dissolution in neutral buffer, exhibited a 100- to 1,000-fold increase in antibacterial activity over that originally observed. However, activity returned to the former level upon addition of the acid-soluble fraction, which contained pesticin I inhibitor. Since the presence of pesticin I inhibitor leads to serious errors in the determination of pesticin I, an assay medium containing ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in excess Ca++ was developed; this medium eliminated the effect of the inhibitor. By use of the above medium, sufficient pesticin I was found to be contained within 500 nonirradiated cells to inhibit growth of a suitable indicator strain; at least 107 cells were required to effect a corresponding inhibition by pesticin II. Although both pesticins are located primarily within the cell during growth, pesticin I may arise extracellularly during storage of static cells. Slightly higher activity of pesticin I inhibitor was found in culture supernatant fluids than occurred in corresponding cell extracts of equal volume. The differences and similarities between pesticin I and some known bacteriocins are discussed. PMID:14016110

  11. Am I Doing Anything Wrong?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Eun-Woo

    1998-04-01

    Absolutely not! Let me be more specific. Am I doing anything I do not want to do with my career? I don't think so. Am I satisfied? My initial career goal was to teach at a small four-year university and do research with undergraduate students. But I am more than satisfied with what I am doing now, and I am enjoying my job. It is true that many new and talented Ph.D.'s are currently looking for careers at two-year colleges instead of universities. Many people expect this trend will be even greater in the future. Surveys also show that younger people (20-30's) care a great deal about both family and career. Thus, a teaching job at a two-year college is ideal for them. It was quite a surprise to find that many of my friends, who are very talented in research, are now teaching at two-year colleges.

  12. A <i>cis>-regulatory module activating transcription in the suspensor contains five <i>cis>-regulatory elements

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Kelli F.; Kawashima, Tomokazu; Goldberg, Robert B.

    2015-03-22

    Little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which the embryo proper and suspensor of plant embryos activate specific gene sets shortly after fertilization. We analyzed the upstream region of the Scarlet Runner Bean (<i>Phaseolus coccineusi>) <i>G564i> gene in order to understand how genes are activated specifically in the suspensor during early embryo development. Previously, we showed that a 54-bp fragment of the <i>G564i> upstream region is sufficient for suspensor transcription and contains at least three required cis-regulatory sequences, including the 10-bp motif (5'-GAAAAGCGAA-3'), the 10 bp-like motif (5'-GAAAAACGAA-3'), and Region 2 motif (partial sequence 5'-TTGGT-3'). Here, we use site-directed mutagenesis experiments in transgenic tobacco globularstage embryos to identify two additional cis-regulatory elements within the 54-bp cis-regulatory module that are required for G564 suspensor transcription: the Fifth motif (5'-GAGTTA-3') and a third 10-bp-related sequence (5'-GAAAACCACA-3'). Further deletion of the 54-bp fragment revealed that a 47-bp fragment containing the five motifs (the 10-bp, 10-bp-like, 10-bp-related, Region 2 and Fifth motifs) is sufficient for suspensor transcription, and represents a <i>cis>-regulatory module. A consensus sequence for each type of motif was determined by comparing motif sequences shown to activate suspensor transcription. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the regulation of <i>G564i> is evolutionarily conserved. Lastly, a homologous cis-regulatory module was found upstream of the <i>G564i> ortholog in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), indicating that the regulation of <i>G564i> is evolutionarily conserved in closely related bean species.

  13. Frontiers of <i>in situi> electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Meng, Shirley Ying

    2015-01-01

    <i>In situi> transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has become an increasingly important tool for materials characterization. It provides key information on the structural dynamics of a material during transformations and the correlation between structure and properties of materials. With the recent advances in instrumentation, including aberration corrected optics, sample environment control, the sample stage, and fast and sensitive data acquisition, in situ TEM characterization has become more and more powerful. In this article, a brief review of the current status and future opportunities of in situ TEM is included. It also provides an introduction to the six articles covered by in this issue of <i>MRS Bulletini> explore the frontiers of <i>in situi> electron microscopy, including liquid and gas environmental TEM, dynamic four-dimensional TEM, nanomechanics, ferroelectric domain switching studied by <i>in situi> TEM, and state-of-the-art atomic imaging of light elements (i.e., carbon atoms) and individual defects.

  14. I-129/I-127 variations among enstatite chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. M.; Hudson, B.; Hohenberg, C. M.; Podosek, F. A.

    1988-01-01

    The iodine isotopic compositions and corresponding I-Xe ages were obtained for eight enstatite chondrites, bringing the total number of enstatite chondrites examined by the I-Xe technique to 11. Iodine isotopic compositions of these 11 chondrites indicate a well-defined hiatus correlated with the hiatus in chemical composition defining the two distinct enstatite groups: EH(4,5) and EL(6). Judging by the I-129/I-127 ratios and assuming that both the EH and EL groups originated from a reservoir with a uniform initial iodine isotopic composition, the EH(4,5) chondrites were estimated to be about 4 mln older than the El chondrites.

  15. Complete genome sequence of <i>Planctomyces brasiliensisi> type strain (DSM 5305T), phylogenomic analysis and reclassification of <i>Planctomycetes> including the descriptions of <i>Gimesia> gen. nov.,<i> Planctopirusi> gen. nov. and <i>Rubinisphaera> gen. nov. and emended descriptions of the order <i>Planctomycetales> and the family <i>Planctomycetaceae>

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuner, Carmen; Tindall, Brian J.; Lu, Megan; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Huntemann, Marcel; Liolios, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L.; Mwirichia, Romano; Rohde, Manfred; Abt, Birte; Detter, John Chris; Woyke, Tanja; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Goker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-12-08

    <i>Planctomyces brasiliensisi> Schlesner 1990 belongs to the order <i>Planctomycetales>, which differs from other bacterial taxa by several distinctive features such as internal cell compartmentalization, multiplication by forming buds directly from the spherical, ovoid or pear-shaped mother cell and a cell wall consisting of a proteinaceous layer rather than a peptidoglycan layer. The first strains of <i>P. brasiliensisi>, including the type strain IFAM 1448 T, were isolated from a water sample of Lagoa Vermelha, a salt pit near Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. This is the second completed genome sequence of a type strain of the genus <i>Planctomyces> to be published and the sixth type strain genome sequence from the family <i>Planctomycetaceae>. The 6,006,602 bp long genome with its 4,811 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. We study phylogenomic analyses that indicate that the classification within the <i>Planctomycetaceae> is partially in conflict with its evolutionary history, as the positioning of <i>Schlesneria> renders the genus <i>Planctomyces> paraphyletic. A re-analysis of published fatty-acid measurements also does not support the current arrangement of the two genera. A quantitative comparison of phylogenetic and phenotypic aspects indicates that the three <i>Planctomyces> species with type strains available in public culture collections should be placed in separate genera. Thus the genera <i>Gimesia, Planctopirusi> and <i>Rubinisphaera> are proposed to accommodate <i>P. maris, P. limnophilusi> and <i>P. brasiliensisi>, respectively. Pronounced differences between the reported G + C content of <i>Gemmata obscuriglobus, Singulisphaera acidiphilai> and <i>Zavarzinella formosai> and G + C content calculated from their genome sequences call for emendation of their species descriptions. Lastly, in addition to other features, the range of G + C values reported for

  16. 40 CFR Table I-8 to Subpart I - Table I-8 to Subpart I of Part 98-Table I-8 to Subpart I of Part 98-Default Emission Factors (1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Table I-8 to Subpart I of Part 98-Table I-8 to Subpart I of Part 98-Default Emission Factors (1-UN2O j) for N2O Utilization (UN2O j) I Table I-8 to Subpart I Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  17. Dosimetric analysis of 123I, 125I and 131I in thyroid follicle models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Radioiodine is routinely used or proposed for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes: 123I, 125I and 131I for diagnostics and 125I and 131I for therapy. When radioiodine-labelled pharmaceuticals are administered to the body, radioiodide might be released into the circulation and taken up by the thyroid gland, which may then be an organ at risk. The aim of this study was to compare dosimetric properties for 123I, 125I and 131I in previously developed thyroid models for man, rat and mouse. Methods Dosimetric calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX 2.6.0 and nuclear decay data from ICRP 107. Only the non-radiative transitions in the decays were considered. The S value was determined for the cell nuclei in species-specific thyroid follicle models for mouse, rat and man for different spatial distributions of radioiodine. Results For the species-specific single follicle models with radioiodine homogeneously within the follicle lumen, the highest S value came from 131I, with the largest contribution from the β particles. When radioiodine was homogeneously distributed within the follicle cells or the follicle cell nucleus, the highest contribution originated from 125I, about two times higher than 123I, with the largest contribution from the Auger electrons. The mean absorbed dose calculated for our human thyroid multiple follicle model, assuming homogenous distribution of for 123I, 125I, or 131I within the follicle lumens and follicle cells, was 9%, 18% and 4% higher, respectively, compared with the mean absorbed dose according to Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) formalism and nuclear decay data. When radioiodine was homogeneously distributed in the follicle lumens, our calculations gave up to 90% lower mean absorbed dose for 125I compared to MIRD (20% lower for 123I, and 2% lower for 131I). Conclusions This study clearly demonstrates the importance of using more detailed dosimetric methods and models than MIRD formalism for radioiodine

  18. Identification of absolute geometries of <i>cis> and <i>trans> molecular isomers by Coulomb Explosion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ablikim, Utuq; Bomme, Cédric; Xiong, Hui; Savelyev, Evgeny; Obaid, Razib; Kaderiya, Balram; Augustin, Sven; Schnorr, Kirsten; Dumitriu, Ileana; Osipov, Timur; Bilodeau, René; Kilcoyne, David; Kumarappan, Vinod; Rudenko, Artem; Berrah, Nora; Rolles, Daniel

    2016-12-02

    An experimental route to identify and separate geometric isomers by means of coincident Coulomb explosion imaging is presented, allowing isomer-resolved photoionization studies on isomerically mixed samples. We demonstrate the technique on <i>cis/trans> 1,2-dibromoethene (C2H2Br2). The momentum correlation between the bromine ions in a three-body fragmentation process induced by bromine 3d inner-shell photoionization is used to identify the <i>cis> and <i>trans> structures of the isomers. Lastly, the experimentally determined momentum correlations and the isomer-resolved fragment-ion kinetic energies are matched closely by a classical Coulomb explosion model.

  19. Vitamin D receptor gene Alw I, Fok I, Apa I, and Taq I polymorphisms in patients with urinary stone.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ill Young; Kang, In-Hong; Chae, Soo-Cheon; Park, Seung Chol; Lee, Young-Jin; Yang, Yun Sik; Ryu, Soo Bang; Rim, Joung Sik

    2010-04-01

    To evaluate vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms in Korean patients so as to identify the candidate genes associated with urinary stones. Urinary stones are a multifactorial disease that includes various genetic factors. A normal control group of 535 healthy subjects and 278 patients with urinary stones was evaluated. Of 125 patients who presented stone samples, 102 had calcium stones on chemical analysis. The VDR gene Alw I, Fok I, Apa I, and Taq I polymorphisms were evaluated using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were calculated to identify associations in both groups. The haplotype frequencies of the VDR gene polymorphisms for multiple loci were also determined. For the VDR gene Alw I, Fok I, Apa I, and Taq I polymorphisms, there was no statistically significant difference between the patients with urinary stones and the healthy controls. There was also no statistically significant difference between the patients with calcium stones and the healthy controls. A novel haplotype (Ht 4; CTTT) was identified in 13.5% of the patients with urinary stones and in 8.3% of the controls (P = .001). The haplotype frequencies were significantly different between the patients with calcium stones and the controls (P = .004). The VDR gene Alw I, Fok I, Apa I, and Taq I polymorphisms does not seem to be candidate genetic markers for urinary stones in Korean patients. However, 1 novel haplotype of the VDR gene polymorphisms for multiple loci might be a candidate genetic marker. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. ARES I-X Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-27

    NASA Ares I-X mission managers watch as NASA's Ares I-X rocket launches from pad 39b at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009. The flight test will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. <i>Indolestes> <i>lafaeci> sp. nov. (Odonata: Lestidae) from Timor, with comparisons to related species.

    PubMed

    Seehausen, Malte

    2017-03-17

    Indolestes lafaeci sp. nov. is described and illustrated (holotype male: vi.1929, Soe, South Central Timor Regency, West Timor, Indonesia, ex.-Coll. Le Moult; deposited at the Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique, Brussels, Belgium). Indolestes insularis comb. nov. is proposed. For comparison, illustrations of the head, synthorax, male anal appendages and genital ligula as well as of the ovipositor of I. bellax, I. gracilis and I. insularis are given.

  2. Validation Study of V. I. S. I. O. N.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Paul G.

    In an attempt to depart from the traditional process of orientating students to career awareness, a new approach is being developed at the Indiana Career Resource Center at South Bend, Indiana. The Basic concept of V. I. S. I. O. N. (Visual Imagery Selector for Indexing Occupational Needs) attempts to utilize a combination of the respondents'…

  3. ESEA Title I Projects Evaluation Report 1967, Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittsburgh Public Schools, PA.

    Reports of Pittsburgh's 1967 ESEA Title I projects are presented in two volumes. The 17 reports in Volume I, which adhere to the procedures established in an evaluation model, are of programs in communication skills, camping, vocational education, music, standard English, social development, revised class organization, remedial reading by means of…

  4. The NO<i>v>A simulation chain

    SciTech Connect

    Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Hatcher, R.; Mayer, N.; Musser, J.; Patterson, R.; Schroeter, R.; Sousa, A.

    2015-12-23

    The NO<i>v>A experiment is a two-detector, long-baseline neutrino experiment operating in the recently upgraded NuMI muon neutrino beam. Simulating neutrino interactions and backgrounds requires many steps including: the simulation of the neutrino beam flux using FLUKA and the FLUGG interface, cosmic ray generation using CRY, neutrino interaction modeling using GENIE, and a simulation of the energy deposited in the detector using GEANT4. To shorten generation time, the modeling of detector-specific aspects, such as photon transport, detector and electronics noise, and readout electronics, employs custom, parameterized simulation applications. We will describe the NO<i>v>A simulation chain, and present details on the techniques used in modeling photon transport near the ends of cells, and in developing a novel data-driven noise simulation. Due to the high intensity of the NuMI beam, the Near Detector samples a high rate of muons originating in the surrounding rock. In addition, due to its location on the surface at Ash River, MN, the Far Detector collects a large rate ((˜) 140 kHz) of cosmic muons. Furthermore, we will discuss the methods used in NO<i>v>A for overlaying rock muons and cosmic ray muons with simulated neutrino interactions and show how realistically the final simulation reproduces the preliminary NO<i>v>A data.

  5. The NIHR Invention for Innovation (i4i) Programme

    PubMed Central

    Marjanovic, Sonja; Krapels, Joachim; Sousa, Sonia; Castle-Clarke, Sophie; Horvath, Veronika; Chataway, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Invention for Innovation (i4i) programme supports the development of innovative medical technologies for patient benefit. The i4i product development stream involves collaborative projects between at least two partners from academia, the NHS and industry. Medical technology innovators apply for funding for one to three years, through a peer review-based process that includes presentation to a selection panel. The funding and business advice provided by i4i support the development of early-stage innovations, generally at proof of concept and prototype stages. Since its inception the product development stream has identified and supported 170 projects, led by 146 principal investigators (PIs). RAND Europe evaluated the programme, with the aim of identifying its outputs and impacts and examining the factors influencing performance. The evaluation findings should help inform the future of the programme. The evaluation used a multi-method approach, including a focused review of background information from i4i, scoping interviews with key informants, a survey of programme participants and case studies of projects representing diverse technologies and health needs. PMID:28083380

  6. .... 11 ,... ·ell lis IJlI I SINce

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ... " Chid Expnsllrl:' ASSt:'SSIl", ,It S .. ,'ti(lll \\\\dt~-r qual it \\' Ana1\\'sis Brandl 'ltlnitpring ;1l111 !lata SUpp"lrt DivisillJI (~':I-)'iJ) ()jlil'l' \\>\\ \\all'J K~-~ll\\.ltl ... K P ...

  7. ARES I-X Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-27

    NASA Ares I-X Launch Director Ed Mango, 3rd from left, along with other mission managers watches the launch of the Ares I-X rocket from Firing Room One of the Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Ares I Ares V Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumrall, Phil

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation is an overview of the Ares I and Ares V projects. It includes a comparison of the launch vehicles from the Saturn V, the Space Shuttle, and the planned Ares I and Ares V. In order to reduce operating cost, the Ares and V will use much of the same hardware. The elements of the Ares I and V. are reviewed and there is a view of the upper stage avionics. The elements of the J-2X engine to be used on both the Ares I and V are viewed.

  9. First record of the ant cricket <i>Myrmecophilus> (<i>Myrmecophilina>) <i>americanus >(Orthoptera: Myrmecophilidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Morales, Aldo I; Rodríguez, Quetzaly K Siller; Garza-Hernández, Javier A; Adeniran, Adebiyi A; Hernández-Triana, Luis M; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario A

    2017-04-27

    In September 2004, the New World ant cricket, Myrmecophilus americanus Saussure, 1877, was collected in association with longhorn crazy ants, Paratrechina longicornis (Latreille. 1802), in the state of Coahuila, Mexico. We are reporting the DNA barcode using the mitochrondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I for this first record of M. americanus in Mexico.

  10. How Can I Quit Smoking?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness How Can I Quit Smoking? KidsHealth > For Teens > How Can I Quit Smoking? A A A What's in this article? Where ... becoming tobacco-free. Many people don't quit smoking because they think it's too hard, and it's ...

  11. Dear microtubule, I see you

    DOE PAGES

    Nogales, Eva

    2016-11-01

    This essay summarizes my personal journey toward the atomic visualization of microtubules and a mechanistic understanding of how these amazing polymers work. During this journey, I have been witness and partaker in the blooming of a technique I love—cryo-electron microscopy.

  12. Dear microtubule, I see you

    PubMed Central

    Nogales, Eva

    2016-01-01

    This essay summarizes my personal journey toward the atomic visualization of microtubules and a mechanistic understanding of how these amazing polymers work. During this journey, I have been witness and partaker in the blooming of a technique I love—cryo-electron microscopy. PMID:27799495

  13. Seeing I to I: a pathway to interpersonal connectedness.

    PubMed

    Pinel, Elizabeth C; Long, Anson E; Landau, Mark J; Alexander, Kira; Pyszczynski, Tom

    2006-02-01

    The authors introduce the construct of I-sharing--the belief that one shares an identical subjective experience with another person--and the role it plays in liking. In Studies 1-3, participants indicated their liking for an objectively similar and an objectively dissimilar person, one of whom I-shared with them and the other of whom did not. Participants preferred the objectively similar person but only when that person I-shared with them. Studies 4 and 5 highlight the role that feelings of existential isolation and the need for closeness play in people's attraction to I-sharers. In Study 4, people with high needs for interpersonal closeness responded to I-sharers and non-I-sharers with great intensity. In Study 5, priming participants with feelings of existential isolation increased their liking for I-sharers over objectively similar others. The results highlight the importance of shared subjective experience and have implications for interpersonal and intergroup processes. Copyright 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Seeing I to I: A Pathway to Interpersonal Connectedness

    PubMed Central

    Pinel, Elizabeth C.; Long, Anson E.; Landau, Mark J.; Alexander, Kira; Pyszczynski, Tom

    2009-01-01

    The authors introduce the construct of I-sharing—the belief that one shares an identical subjective experience with another person—and the role it plays in liking. In Studies 1–3, participants indicated their liking for an objectively similar and an objectively dissimilar person, one of whom I-shared with them and the other of whom did not. Participants preferred the objectively similar person but only when that person I-shared with them. Studies 4 and 5 highlight the role that feelings of existential isolation and the need for closeness play in people’s attraction to I-sharers. In Study 4, people with high needs for interpersonal closeness responded to I-sharers and non-I-sharers with great intensity. In Study 5, priming participants with feelings of existential isolation increased their liking for I-sharers over objectively similar others. The results highlight the importance of shared subjective experience and have implications for interpersonal and intergroup processes. PMID:16536649

  15. Cyclic trinuclear copper(I), silver(I), and gold(I) complexes: a theoretical insight.

    PubMed

    Caramori, Giovanni F; Piccoli, Rafael M; Segala, Maximiliano; Muñoz-Castro, Alvaro; Guajardo-Maturana, Raul; Andrada, Diego M; Frenking, Gernot

    2015-01-07

    The metal-ligand, M-L, bonding situation in cyclic trinuclear complexes, CTCs, of copper(I), silver(I), and gold(I) was investigated in terms of the energy decomposition analysis (EDA-NOCV) and natural bond orbitals (NBOs). The anisotropy of the induced current density (ACID) and magnetic response were employed to evaluate the effect of electronic conjugation and metal-metal interactions in CTCs. The EDA-NOCV results show that the M-L bonding is stronger in gold(I) than in copper(I) or silver(I) complexes. Au(+)-L bonds present an elevated covalent character when compared with Cu(+)-L and Ag(+)-L bonds. The NBO analysis confirms the elevated covalent character observed for Au(+)-L bonds, indicating that the ligand-metal donation, L → M, and the metal-ligand back-donation, M → L, are more stabilizing in gold(I) than in copper(I) or silver(I) complexes. Both ACID and the magnetic response calculations reveal that there are cyclic conjugations in the ligands and a strong diatropic ring current indicating the presence of aromaticity. However, there is no through-bond M-L conjugation between the ligands and the metallic centers, as indicated by the absence of a continuous anisotropy boundary surface involving M-L bonds.

  16. Li I AND K I SCATTER IN COOL PLEIADES DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    King, Jeremy R.; Schuler, Simon C.; Hobbs, L. M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H. E-mail: sschuler@noao.ed E-mail: pinsono@astronomy.ohio-state.ed

    2010-02-20

    We utilize high-resolution (R {approx} 60,000), high signal-to-noise ratio ({approx}100) spectroscopy of 17 cool Pleiades dwarfs to examine the confounding star-to-star scatter in the lambda6707 Li I line strengths in this young cluster. Our Pleiades, selected for their small projected rotational velocity and modest chromospheric emission, evince substantial scatter in the line strengths of lambda6707 Li I feature that is absent in the lambda7699 K I resonance line. The Li I scatter is not correlated with that in the high-excitation lambda7774 O I feature, and the magnitude of the former is greater than the latter despite the larger temperature sensitivity of the O I feature. These results suggest that systematic errors in line strength measurements due to blending, color (or color-based T{sub eff}) errors, or line formation effects related to an overlying chromosphere are not the principal source of Li I scatter in our stars. There do exist analytic spot models that can produce, via line formation effects, the observed Li scatter without introducing scatter in the K I line strengths or the color-magnitude diagram. However, these models predict factor of >=3 differences in abundances derived from the subordinate lambda6104 and resonance lambda6707 Li I features; we find no difference in the abundances determined from these two features. These analytic spot models also predict CN line strengths significantly larger than we observe in our spectra. The simplest explanation of the Li, K, CN, and photometric data is that there must be a real abundance component to the Pleiades Li dispersion. We suggest that this real abundance component is the manifestation of relic differences in erstwhile pre-main-sequence Li burning caused by effects of surface activity on stellar structure. We discuss observational predictions of these effects, which may be related to other anomalous stellar phenomena.

  17. I-mode for ITER?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyte, D. G.; Marmar, E.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Dominguez, A.; Greenwald, M.

    2011-10-01

    I-mode is a recently explored confinement regime that features a temperature pedestal and H-mode energy confinement, yet with L-mode particle confinement and no density pedestal nor large ELMs. Experiments on Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX-Upgrade show this leads to a stationary collisionless pedestal that inherently does not require ELMs for core impurity and particle control, possibly making I-mode an attractive operating regime for ITER where ELM heat pulses are expected to surpass material limits. We speculate as to how I-mode could be obtained, maintained and exploited for the ITER burning plasma physics mission. Issues examined include I-mode topology and power threshold requirements, pedestal formation, density control, avoiding H-mode, and the response of I-mode to alpha self-heating. Key uncertainties requiring further investigation are identified. Supported by the US DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  18. NATO Reference Mobility Model. Edition I. Users Guide. Volume I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    hour and for bias ply tires (ICONST(i) = 1) Vtij= 70 .(Pij/h) 2 . 2 5 in miles per hour where Pij = pressure used in tires on assembly i for j = 1...element in contact with ground bi = width of tracked element Weight Factor: WF = 1.0 if Wiអ,O00 WF = 1.2 if 50,000Wiា,000 WF = 1.4 if 70 ,O00_Wi...NRMM an empirical relation between speed reduction and overall area denied is used to account for R-2058, VOLUME I Page 70 Operational Modules

  19. Application of long sequence reads to improve genomes for <i>Clostridium thermocellumi> AD2, <i>Clostridium thermocellumi> LQRI, and <i>Pelosinus fermentansi> R7

    SciTech Connect

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Bayer, Edward A.; Borovok, Ilya; Lamed, Raphael; Hurt, Richard A.; Land, Miriam L.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Elias, Dwayne; Zhou, Jizhong; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Varghese, Neha; Mikhailova, Natalia; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja; Brown, Steven D.

    2016-09-29

    Here, we and others have shown the utility of long sequence reads to improve genome assembly quality. In this study, we generated PacBio DNA sequence data to improve the assemblies of draft genomes for <i>Clostridium thermocellumi> AD2, <i>Clostridium thermocellumi> LQRI, and <i>Pelosinus fermentansi> R7.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of <i>Frankia> Strain G2, a Nitrogen-Fixing Actinobacterium Isolated from <i>Casuarina equisetifoliai> and Able To Nodulate Actinorhizal Plants of the Order <i>Rhamnales>

    SciTech Connect

    Nouioui, Imen; Gtari, Maher; Goker, Markus; Ghodhbane-Gtari, Faten; Tisa, Louis S.; Fernandez, Maria P.; Normand, Philippe; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Pillay, Manoj; Varghese, Neha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ivanova, Natalia; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans -Peter

    2016-05-26

    <i>Frankia> sp. strain G2 was originally isolated from <i>Casuarina equisetifoliai> and is characterized by its ability to nodulate actinorhizal plants of the Rhamnales order, but not its original host. It represents one of the largest <i>Frankia> genomes so far sequenced (9.5 Mbp).

  1. There is no I/O like no I/O. [Computer I/O performance

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, T.Y.

    1985-01-01

    On most computer systems the most common cause of performance degradation is I/O contention. This paper will examine some efforts that can be taken in a VM environment to reduce I/O or its effect at both the global and local levels.

  2. Genetic structure of <i>Miscanthus sinensisi> and <i>Miscanthus sacchariflorusi> in Japan indicates a gradient of bidirectional but asymmetric introgression

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Lindsay V.; Stewart, J. Ryan; Nishiwaki, Aya; Toma, Yo; Kjeldsen, Jens Bonderup; Jorgensen, Uffe; Zhao, Hua; Peng, Junhua; Yoo, Ji Hye; Heo, Kweon; Yu, Chang Yeon; Yamada, Toshihiko; Sacks, Erik J.

    2015-01-24

    Unilateral introgression from diploids to tetraploids has been hypothesized to be an important evolutionary mechanism in plants. However, few examples have been definitively identified, perhaps because data of sufficient depth and breadth were difficult to obtain before the advent of affordable high-density genotyping. Throughout Japan, tetraploid <i>Miscanthus sacchariflorusi> and diploid <i>Miscanthus sinensisi> are common, and occasionally hybridize. In this study, 667 <i>M. sinensisi> and 78 <i>M. sacchariflorusi> genotypes from Japan were characterized using 20 704 SNPs and ten plastid microsatellites. Similarity of SNP genotypes between diploid and tetraploid <i>M. sacchariflorusi> indicated that the tetraploids originated through autopolyploidy. Structure analysis indicated a gradient of introgression from diploid <i>M. sinensisi> into tetraploid <i>M. sacchariflorusi> throughout Japan; most tetraploids had some <i>M. sinensisi> DNA. Among phenotypically <i>M. sacchariflorusi> tetraploids, <i>M. sinensisi> ancestry averaged 7% and ranged from 1-39%, with introgression greatest in southern Japan. Unexpectedly, rare (~1%) diploid <i>M. sinensisi> individuals from northern Japan were found with 6-27% <i>M. sacchariflorusi> ancestry. Population structure of <i>M. sinensisi> in Japan included three groups, and was driven primarily by distance, and secondarily by geographic barriers such as mountains and straits. <i>Miscanthus> speciation is a complex and dynamic process. In contrast to limited introgression between diploid <i>M. sacchariflorusi> and <i>M. sinensisi> in northern China, selection for adaptation to a moderate maritime climate probably favoured cross-ploidy introgressants in southern Japan. Ultimately, these results will help guide the selection of <i>Miscanthus> accessions for the breeding of biomass cultivars.

  3. Genome sequence of the mud-dwelling archaeon <i>Methanoplanus limicolai> type strain (DSM 2279T), reclassification of <i>Methanoplanus petroleariusi> as <i>Methanolacinia petroleariai> and emended descriptions of the genera <i>Methanoplanus> and <i>Methanolacinia>

    SciTech Connect

    Goker, Markus; Lu, Megan; Fiebig, Anne; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla; Tice, Hope; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Cheng, Jan -Fang; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Rohde, Manfred; Detter, John C.; Bunk, Boyke; Spring, Stefan; Wirth, Reinhard; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans -Peter

    2014-06-15

    <i>Methanoplanus limicolai> Wildgruber et al. 1984 is a mesophilic methanogen that was isolated from a swamp composed of drilling waste near Naples, Italy, shortly after the Archaea were recognized as a separate domain of life. <i>Methanoplanus> is the type genus in the family <i>Methanoplanaceae>, a taxon that felt into disuse since modern 16S rRNA gene sequences-based taxonomy was established. <i>Methanoplanus> is now placed within the <i>Methanomicrobiaceae>, a family that is so far poorly characterized at the genome level. The only other type strain of the genus with a sequenced genome, <i>Methanoplanus petroleariusi> SEBR 4847T, turned out to be misclassified and required reclassification to <i>Methanolacinia>. Both, <i>Methanoplanus> and <i>Methanolacinia>, needed taxonomic emendations due to a significant deviation of the G+C content of their genomes from previously published (pregenome-sequence era) values. Until now genome sequences were published for only four of the 33 species with validly published names in the <i>Methanomicrobiaceae>. Here we describe the features of <i>M. limicolai>, together with the improved-high-quality draft genome sequence and an notation of the type strain, M3T. The 3,200,946 bp long chromosome (permanent draft sequence) with its 3,064 protein-coding and 65 RNA genes is a part of the <i>Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaeai> project.

  4. Neutral dissociation of the I, I', and I" vibronic progressions of O2.

    PubMed

    Demekhin, Ph V; Sukhorukov, V L; Schmoranzer, H; Ehresmann, A

    2010-05-28

    It is suggested that the main mechanism for neutral dissociation of the I, I('), and I(") vibronic progressions in O(2) is due to their interaction with the vibrational continuum of the 1pi(u) (-1)(A (2)Pi(u))3ssigma(g) (3)Pi(u)(v(epsilon)) Rydberg state (J state) leading to the formation of the O(2p(4) (3)P)+O( *)(2p(3)((4)S)3s (3)S) fragments. In order to justify this, the O I 2p(3)((4)S)3s (3)S-->2p(4) (3)P fluorescence emission cross section following the neutral dissociation of the O(2) 1pi(u) (-1)(a (4)Pi(u))4ssigma(g)/3ddelta(g)/3dsigma(g) (3)Pi(u)(v) Rydberg states is simulated in the exciting-photon energy range of 14.636-16.105 eV. The results of high-resolution measurements (H. Liebel et al., J. Phys. B 34, 2581 (2001)) can be reproduced if a small adjustment of the computed potential curve of the J state is applied. Non-Franck-Condon resonant intensity distributions of the I, I('), and I(") progressions observed in the experiment are qualitatively explained by the presence of the O(2) 1pi(g) (-1)(X (2)Pi(g))npsigma(u)/nfsigma(u)/nfdelta(u) (3)Pi(u) perturber states. Present calculations allow to decide between two different assignments of the I, I('), and I(") states available in literature.

  5. Comparison of image quality of different iodine isotopes (I-123, I-124, and I-131).

    PubMed

    Rault, Erwann; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Van Holen, Roel; De Beenhouwer, Jan; Staelens, Steven; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2007-06-01

    I-131 is a frequently used isotope for radionuclide therapy. This technique for cancer treatment requires a pre-therapeutic dosimetric study. The latter is usually performed (for this radionuclide) by directly imaging the uptake of the therapeutic radionuclide in the body or by replacing it by one of its isotopes, which are more suitable for imaging. This study aimed to compare the image quality that can be achieved by three iodine isotopes: I-131 and I-123 for single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and I-124 for positron emission tomography imaging. The imaging characteristics of each isotope were investigated by simulated data. Their spectrums, point-spread functions, and contrast-recovery curves were drawn and compared. I-131 was imaged with a high-energy all-purpose (HEAP) collimator, whereas two collimators were compared for I-123: low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) and medium energy (ME). No mechanical collimation was used for I-124. The influence of small high-energy peaks (>0.1%) on the main energy window contamination were evaluated. Furthermore, the effect of a scattering medium was investigated and the triple energy window (TEW) correction was used for spectral-based scatter correction. Results showed that I-123 gave the best results with a LEHR collimator when the scatter correction was applied. Without correction, the ME collimator reduced the effects of high-energy contamination. I-131 offered the worst results. This can be explained by the large amount of septal penetration from the photopeak and by the collimator, which gave a low spatial resolution. I-124 gave the best imaging properties owing to its electronic collimation (high sensitivity) and a short coincidence time window.

  6. Contrasting allelic distribution of <i>CO/>Hd1i> homologues in <i>Miscanthus sinensisi> from the East Asian mainland and the Japanese archipelago

    SciTech Connect

    Nagano, Hironori; Clark, Lindsay V.; Zhao, Hua; Peng, Junhua; Yoo, Ji Hye; Heo, Kweon; Yu, Chang Yeon; Anzoua, Kossonou Guillaume; Matsuo, Tomoaki; Sacks, Erik J.; Yamada, Toshihiko

    2015-06-18

    The genus <i>Miscanthus> is a perennial C4 grass native to eastern Asia and is a promising candidate bioenergy crop for cool temperate areas. Flowering time is a crucial factor governing regional and seasonal adaptation; in addition, it is also a key target trait for extending the vegetative phase to improve biomass potential. Homologues of <i>CONSTANS (CO)/Heading date 1(Hd1)i> were cloned from <i>Miscanthus sinensisi> and named <i>MsiHd1i>. Sequences of <i>MsiHd1i> homologues were compared among 24 wild <i>M. sinensisi> accessions from Japan, 14 from China, and three from South Korea. Two to five <i>MsiHd1i> alleles in each accession were identified, suggesting that <i>MsiHd1i> consists of at least three loci in the <i>Miscanthus> genome. Verifying the open reading frame in <i>MsiHd1i>, they were classified as putative functional alleles without mutations or non-functional alleles caused by indels. The Neighbor-Joining tree indicated that one of the multiple <i>MsiHd1i> loci is a pseudogene locus without any functional alleles. The pseudogene locus was named <i>MsiHd1bi>, and the other loci were considered to be part of the <i>MsiHd1ai> multi-locus family. Interestingly, in most Japanese accessions 50% or more of the <i>MsiHd1ai> alleles were non-functional, whereas accessions from the East Asian mainland harboured only functional alleles. Five novel miniature inverted transposable elements (MITEs) (<i>MsiMITE1-MsiMITE5i>) were observed in <i>MsiHd1a/bi>. <i>MsiMITE1i>, detected in exon 1 of <i>MsiHd1ai>, was only observed in Japanese accessions and its revertant alleles derived from retransposition were predominantly in Chinese accessions. In conclusion, these differences in <i>MsiHd1ai> show that the dependency on functional <i>MsiHd1ai> alleles is different between accessions from the East Asian mainland and Japan.

  7. I'll Be Determined

    MedlinePlus

    ... watch out for, and how to improve your quality of life. Track your IBD The NEW GI Buddy helps you track symptoms, treatments, foods, and lifestyle factors. Available as a desktop tool, iPhone ® and Android ™ ...

  8. How Do I Change Recipes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or non-fat milk + 1 Tbsp. unsaturated liquid vegetable oil. • Heavy Cream (1 cup) = 1 cup fat-free ... burgers and in casseroles. How can I use vegetable oils? Use olive, canola, corn, or safflower oil as ...

  9. Rockets in World War I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    World War I enlisted rockets once again for military purposes. French pilots rigged rockets to the wing struts of their airplanes and aimed them at enemy observation balloons filled with highly inflammable hydrogen.

  10. Total Synthesis of Solandelactone I.

    PubMed

    Eichenauer, Nils C; Tschersich, Roxanne; Pietruszka, Jörg

    2015-11-25

    Since the marine natural products solandelactones A-I were isolated from the hydroid Solanderia secunda and investigated by Seo et al. in 1996, considerable synthetic efforts toward these marine oxylipins followed. However, the structure elucidation of solandelactone I remained incomplete, and no synthesis has been reported. On the basis of our retrosynthetic analysis, the key building blocks were combined in a Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons reaction to create two common intermediates for the stereodivergent synthesis of all four diastereomers 1-4 matching the proposed structure of solandelactone I. Comparison of the published analytical data of natural product solandelactone I and data obtained from the synthetic endeavor toward diastereomers 1-4 enabled the structure assignment of isomer 3; the proposed biosynthetic pathway for marine oxylipins also supports the result.

  11. Rockets in World War I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    World War I enlisted rockets once again for military purposes. French pilots rigged rockets to the wing struts of their airplanes and aimed them at enemy observation balloons filled with highly inflammable hydrogen.

  12. Teaching with iPads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maj, Hubert

    2015-04-01

    Bilingual students in high school with bilingual units in Boguchwała have received iPads for learning English and a few subjects using CLIL (biology, basics of entrepreneurship, geography, IT and mathematics). Lessons with iPads are interesting for students for several reasons. First of all, teenagers like new technologies and using iPads for teaching helps students to learn by fun. Secondly, iPads give new possibilities of looking for knowledge about each theme. Moreover, teaching with iPads develops students' engagement. They have a chance to choose a few among over 65 000 applications for gathering and then presenting information about the lesson topic. They can easily prepare presentations, movies, cartoons, mind maps or whatever they like. Teaching students, thanks to the iPads, makes it their initiative, and the teacher can inspire them to look for the knowledge rather than disciplining pupils. But teaching with iPads is connected with many problems. For instance, there are not any examples on how to teach using these tools. It is very up-to-date technology and teachers firstly must learn the possibilities of iPads and look for new applications. It takes much time, especially at the beginning, and is difficult especially for inexperienced teachers. In addition, it is almost impossible to maintain control of the iPads for all of the students during the lesson. They can use their iPads for something unconnected with the topic of the lesson. Thirdly is lack of time - active methods (with iPads as well) are more time-consuming and it could be that they do not finish the whole program. And of course the last, but not at least, is the problem of money. Some of the applications must be paid for, and it is usually obligatory to possess a credit card. Fortunately, it is not expensive - applications usually cost a few euros and many of them are free and really good.

  13. HTLV-I Seroconversion Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    Participants were primarily young caucasion males. Of the 28 screen possitive samples, three/ (.06%) were confirmed positive for HTLV -I by Western Blot analysis...his HTLV -I seropositive Okinawan spouse showed weak reactivity to p19 and p21E only on Western Blot and gp46 on radioimmunoprecipitation. On a sample...obtained 20 months after this sample at the time of the cross-sectional survey Western Blot was strongly positive for the core p24 antibody. These

  14. ARES I-X Launch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-27

    NASA's Ares I-X rocket is seen through the windows of Firing Room One of teh Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center as it launches from pad 39b in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009. The flight test will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. ApoA-I mimetics.

    PubMed

    Stoekenbroek, R M; Stroes, E S; Hovingh, G K

    2015-01-01

    A wealth of evidence indicates that plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are inversely related to the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Consequently, HDL-C has been considered a target for therapy in order to reduce the residual CVD burden that remains significant, even after application of current state-of-the-art medical interventions. In recent years, however, a number of clinical trials of therapeutic strategies that increase HDL-C levels failed to show the anticipated beneficial effect on CVD outcomes. As a result, attention has begun to shift toward strategies to improve HDL functionality, rather than levels of HDL-C per se. ApoA-I, the major protein component of HDL, is considered to play an important role in many of the antiatherogenic functions of HDL, most notably reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), and several therapies have been developed to mimic apoA-I function, including administration of apoA-I, mutated variants of apoA-I, and apoA-I mimetic peptides. Based on the potential anti-inflammatory effects, apoA-I mimetics hold promise not only as anti-atherosclerotic therapy but also in other therapeutic areas.

  16. Genome sequence and annotation of <i>Trichoderma parareeseii>, the ancestor of the cellulase producer <i>Trichoderma reeseii>

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dongqing; Pomraning, Kyle; Kopchinskiy, Alexey; Karimi, Aghcheh Razieh; Atanasova, Lea; Chenthamara, Komal; Baker, Scott E.; Zhang, Ruifu; Shen, Qirong; Freitag, Michael; Kubicek, Christian P.; Druzhinina, Irina S.

    2015-08-13

    The filamentous fungus <i>Trichoderma parareeseii> is the asexually reproducing ancestor of <i>Trichoderma reeseii>, the holomorphic industrial producer of cellulase and hemicellulase. Here, we present the genome sequence of the <i>T. parareeseii> type strain CBS 125925, which contains genes for 9,318 proteins.

  17. Draft genome sequences of four <i>Streptomyces> isolates from the <i>Populus trichocarpai> root endosphere and rhizosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Klingeman, Dawn M.; Utturkar, Sagar; Lu, Tse -Yuan S.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Brown, Steve D.

    2015-11-12

    Draft genome sequences for four Actinobacteria from the genus <i>Streptomyces> are presented. <i>Streptomyces> is a metabolically diverse genus that is abundant in soils and has been reported in association with plants. The strains described in this study were isolated from the <i>Populus trichocarpai> endosphere and rhizosphere.

  18. <i>Fermi> Large Area Telescope third source catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Tanugi, J. Cohen-; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; Angelis, A. de; DeKlotz, M.; Palma, F. de; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Venere, L. Di; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kuss, M.; Mura, G. La; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Goumard, M. Lemoine-; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Rollins, M. Pesce-; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Salvetti, D.; Conde, M. Sánchez-; Parkinson, P. M. Saz; Schulz, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Klaveren, B. Van; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.

    2015-06-12

    Here, we present the third <i>Fermi> Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100 MeV–300 GeV range. Based on the first 4 yr of science data from the <i>Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescopei> mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the Second <i>Fermi> LAT catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data, as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse γ-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources above $4\\sigma $ significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 238 sources are considered as identified based on angular extent or correlated variability (periodic or otherwise) observed at other wavelengths. For 1010 sources we have not found plausible counterparts at other wavelengths. More than 1100 of the identified or associated sources are active galaxies of the blazar class; several other classes of non-blazar active galaxies are also represented in the 3FGL. Pulsars represent the largest Galactic source class. As a result, from source counts of Galactic sources we estimate that the contribution of unresolved sources to the Galactic diffuse emission is ~3% at 1 GeV.

  19. <i>BdCESA7i>, <i>BdCESA8i>, and <i>BdPMT> utility promoter constructs for targeted expression to secondary cell-wall-forming cells of grasses

    SciTech Connect

    Petrik, Deborah L.; Cass, Cynthia L.; Padmakshan, Dharshana; Foster, Cliff E.; Vogel, John P.; Karlen, Steven D.; Ralph, John; Sedbrook, John C.

    2016-02-04

    Utility vectors with promoters that confer desired spatial and temporal expression patterns are useful tools for studying gene and cellular function and for industrial applications. To target the expression of DNA sequences of interest to cells forming plant secondary cell walls, which generate most of the vegetative biomass, upstream regulatory sequences of the <i>Brachypodium distachyoni> lignin biosynthetic gene <i>BdPMT> and the cellulose synthase genes <i>BdCESA7i> and <i>BdCESA8i> were isolated and cloned into binary vectors designed for <i>Agrobacterium>-mediated transformation of monocots. Expression patterns were assessed using the β-glucuronidase gene <i>GUSPlus> and X-glucuronide staining. All three promoters showed strong expression levels in stem tissue at the base of internodes where cell wall deposition is most active, in both vascular bundle xylem vessels and tracheids, and in interfascicular tissues, with expression less pronounced in developmentally older tissues. In leaves, <i>BdCESA7i> and <i>BdCESA8i> promoter-driven expression was strongest in leaf veins, leaf margins, and trichomes; relatively weaker and patchy expression was observed in the epidermis. <i>BdPMT> promoter-driven expression was similar to the <i>BdCESA> promoters expression patterns, including strong expression in trichomes. The intensity and extent of GUS staining varied considerably between transgenic lines, suggesting that positional effects influenced promoter activity. Introducing the <i>BdPMT> and <i>BdCESA8i> Open Reading Frames into <i>BdPMT> and <i>BdCESA8i> utility promoter binary vectors, respectively, and transforming those constructs into <i>Brachypodium pmti> and <i>cesa8i> loss-of-function mutants resulted in rescue of the corresponding mutant phenotypes. This work therefore validates the functionality of these utility promoter binary vectors for use in Brachypodium and likely other grass species. Lastly, the identification

  20. Stability rules of icosahedral (I h or I) fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin Tang, Au; Qiang Huang, Fu

    1995-12-01

    According to the number of carbon atoms, the icosahedral (I h or I) fullerenes can be classified into two types: the first with n = 60 N, and the second with n = 60 N' + 20, where N and N' are non-negative integers determined by group properties. By means of our proposed method for Hückel chemistry calculation, we have calculated the electronic structures for 66 molecules of the first type and 87 molecules of the second type. From the calculated results, some general rules on stability and chemical reactivity have been found.

  1. Use of <i>Agrobacterium rhizogenesi> strain 18r12v and paromomycin selection for transformation of <i>Brachypodium distachyoni> and <i>Brachypodium sylvaticumi>

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, Ray; Bragg, Jennifer; Hernandez, Bryan T.; Vogel, John P.; Thilmony, Roger

    2016-05-24

    In this study, the genetic transformation of monocot grasses is a resource intensive process, the quality and efficiency of which is dependent in part upon the method of DNA introduction, as well as the ability to effectively separate transformed from wildtype tissue. <i>Agrobacterium>-mediated transformation of <i>Brachypodium> has relied mainly on <i>Agrobacterium tumefaciensi> strain AGL1. Currently the antibiotic hygromycin B has been the selective agent of choice for robust identification of transgenic calli in <i>Brachypodium distachyoni> and <i>Brachypodium sylvaticumi> but few other chemicals have been shown to work as well for selection of transgenic <i>Brachypodium> cells in tissue culture. This study demonstrates that <i>Agrobacterium rhizogenesi> strain 18r12v and paromomycin selection can be successfully used for the efficient generation of transgenic <i>B. distachyoni> and <i>B. sylvaticurni>. Additionally we observed that the transformation rates were similar to or higher than those obtained with <i>A. turnefaciensi> strain AGL1 and hygromycin selection. The <i>A. rhizogenesi> strain 18r12v harboring the pARS1 binary vector and paromomycin selection is an effective means of generating transgenic <i>Brachypodium> plants. This novel approach will facilitate the transgenic complementation of T-DNA knockout mutants of <i>B. distachyoni> which were created using hygromycin selection, as well as aid the implementation of more complex genome manipulation strategies which require multiple rounds of transformation.

  2. Characterization of Three Novel SXT/R391 Integrating Conjugative Elements ICE<i>Mfu>Ind1a and ICE<i>Mfu>Ind1b, and ICE<i>Mpr>Chn1 Identified in the Genomes of <i>Marinomonas fungiaei> JCM 18476T and <i>Marinomonas profundimarisi> Strain D104

    SciTech Connect

    Badhai, Jhasketan; Das, Subrata K.

    2016-11-25

    The genus <i>Marinomonas> comprises Gram negative bacteria which are widespread in the marine environment and there is no report on the genomic analysis of SXT/R391 ICEs derived from this group of bacteria. This study describes the genomic features of three new SXT/R391 integrating conjugating elements (ICEs) identified in the genome of <i>Marinomonas fungiaei> JCM 18476T (ICE<i>Mfu>Ind1a and ICE<i>Mfu>Ind1b) and in <i>Marinomonas profundimarisi> strain D104 (ICE<i>Mpr>Chn1). Structural organizations of the three ICEs were similar to the typical SXT/R391 family of ICEs and showed high degree of conservation in the core genes. Sequence analysis revealed ICE<i>Mfu>Ind1b and ICE<i>Mpr>Chn1 were inserted into the genome at 5'-end of an typical host prfC gene, while ICE<i>Mfu>Ind1a was inserted at 5'-end of an atypical <i>hipA>-like gene. Despite their coexistence, the ICE<i>Mfu>Ind1a and ICE<i>Mfu>Ind1b were not present in a tandem fashion in the genome of <i>M. fungiaei>. Phylogenetic analyses revealed the three ICEs either evolved independently or high degrees of recombination events had masked their evolution from a common SXT ancestor. Further, we found that the typical entry exclusion mechanism mediated by the TraG/EeX protein pair was likely defective in preventing the conjugative transfer of a second copy of the same S (SXT) group ICE into the <i>M. fungiaei> genome due to mutations. Our analysis showed the presence of 16, 25, and 27 variable genes in the hotspots of ICE<i>Mfu>Ind1a, ICE<i>Mfu>Ind1b, and ICE<i>Mpr>Chn1, respectively, many of which were not reported earlier for SXT/R391 ICEs. Sequence analysis predicted these hot spot regions were shaped by acquisition of genes through homologous recombination between the SXT and R391 related ICEs or mobile genetic elements present in disparate marine bacteria. Multidrug resistance genes which are hallmark feature of SXT/R391 ICEs were not present in

  3. Mutation of the rice XA21 predicted nuclear localization sequence does not affect resistance to <i>Xanthomonas oryzaei> pv. <i>oryzae>

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Tong; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Ho, Yuen Ting; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2016-10-05

    Background: The rice receptor kinase XA21 confers robust resistance to the bacterial pathogen<i>Xanthomonas oryzaei> pv.<i>oryzae(Xoo>). We previously reported that XA21 is cleaved in transgenic plants overexpressing XA21 with a GFP tag (<i>Ubi>-XA21-GFP) and that the released C-terminal domain is localized to the nucleus. XA21 carries a predicted nuclear localization sequence (NLS) that directs the C-terminal domain to the nucleus in transient assays, whereas alanine substitutions in the NLS disrupt the nuclear localization. Methods: To determine if the predicted NLS is required for XA21-mediated immunity<i>in plantai>, we generated transgenic plants overexpressing an XA21 variant carrying the NLS with the same alanine substitutions (<i>Ubi>-XA21nls-GFP). Results: <i>Ubi-> XA21nls-GFP plants displayed slightly longer lesion lengths, higher<i>Xoo> bacterial populations after inoculation and lower levels of reactive oxygen species production compared with the <i>Ubi-> XA21-GFP control plants. However, the <i>Ubi-> XA21nls-GFP plants express lower levels of protein than that observed in<i>Ubi-> XA21-GFP. Discussion: These results demonstrate that the predicted NLS is not required for XA21-mediated immunity.

  4. The first <i>Fermi> LAT supernova remnant catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the <i>Fermi> Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic <i>Fermi> LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.

  5. The first <i>Fermi> LAT supernova remnant catalog

    SciTech Connect

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the <i>Fermi> Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic <i>Fermi> LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.

  6. Visible light generation of iodine atoms and I-I bonds: sensitized I(-) oxidation and I(3)(-) photodissociation.

    PubMed

    Gardner, James M; Abrahamsson, Maria; Farnum, Byron H; Meyer, Gerald J

    2009-11-11

    Direct 355 or 532 nm light excitation of TBAI(3), where TBA is tetrabutyl ammonium, in CH(3)CN at room temperature yields an iodine atom, I(*), and an iodine radical anion, I(2)(-*). In the presence of excess iodide, the iodine atom reacts quantitatively to yield a second equivalent of I(2)(-*) with a rate constant of k = 2.5 +/- 0.4 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). The I(2)(-*) intermediates are unstable with respect to disproportionation and yield initial reactants, k = 3.3 +/- 0.1 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The coordination compound Ru(bpz)(2)(deeb)(PF(6))(2), where bpz is 2,2'-bipyrazine and deeb is 4,4'-(C(2)H(5)CO(2))(2)-2,2'-bipyridine, was prepared and characterized for mechanistic studies of iodide photo-oxidation in acetonitrile at room temperature. Ru(bpz)(2)(deeb)(2+) displayed a broad metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) absorption band at 450 nm with epsilon = 1.7 x 10(4) M(-1) cm(-1). Visible light excitation resulted in photoluminescence with a corrected maximum at 620 nm, a quantum yield phi = 0.14, and an excited state lifetime tau = 1.75 micros from which k(r) = 8.36 x 10(4) s(-1) and k(nr) = 5.01 x 10(5) s(-1) were abstracted. Arrhenius analysis of the temperature dependent excited state lifetime revealed an activation energy of approximately 2500 cm(-1) and a pre-exponential factor of 10(10) s(-1), assigned to activated surface crossing to a ligand field or MLCT excited state. Steady state light excitation of Ru(bpz)(2)(deeb)(2+) in a 20 mM TBAI acetonitrile solution resulted in ligand loss photochemistry with a quantum yield of 5 x 10(-5). The MLCT excited state was dynamically quenched by iodide with K(sv) = 1.1 x 10(5) M(-1) and k(q) = 6.6 +/- 0.3 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), a value consistent with diffusion-limited electron transfer. Excited state hole transfer to iodide was quantitative but the product yield was low due to poor cage escape yields, phi(CE) = 0.042 +/- 0.001. Nanosecond transient absorption was used to quantify the appearance of two

  7. [Type I interferonopathies].

    PubMed

    Munoz, J; Marque, M; Dandurand, M; Meunier, L; Crow, Y-J; Bessis, D

    2015-11-01

    Type I interferonopathies are a group of Mendelian disorders characterized by a common physiopathology: the up-regulation of type I interferons. To date, interferonopathies include Aicardi-Goutières syndrome, familial chilblain lupus, spondyenchondromatosis, PRoteasome-associated auto-inflammatory syndrome (PRAAS) and Singleton-Merten syndrome. These diseases present phenotypic overlap including cutaneous features like chilblain lupus, that can be inaugural or present within the first months of life. This novel set of inborn errors of immunity is evolving rapidly, with recognition of new diseases and genes. Recent and improved understanding of the physiopathology of overexpression of type I interferons has allowed the development of targeted therapies, currently being evaluated, like Janus-kinases or reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

  8. About Bianchi I with VSL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belinchón, José Antonio

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we study how to attack, through different techniques, a perfect fluid Bianchi I model with variable G, c and Λ, “but” taking into account the effects of a “ c-variable” into the curvature tensor. We study the model under the assumption, div( T)=0. These tactics are: Lie groups method (LM), imposing a particular symmetry, self-similarity (SS), matter collineations (MC) and kinematical self-similarity (KSS). We compare both tactics since they are quite similar (symmetry principles). We arrive to the conclusion that the LM is too restrictive and brings us to get only the flat FRW solution. The SS, MC and KSS approaches bring us to obtain all the quantities depending on ( ∫ c( t) dt). Therefore, in order to study their behavior we impose some physical restrictions like for example the condition q<0 (accelerating universe). In this way we find that c is a growing time function and Λ is a decreasing time function whose sing depends on the equation of state ω, while the exponents of the scale factor must satisfy the conditions ∑{/i=1 3} α i =1 and ∑{/i=1 3} α {/i 2}<1, ∀ ω, i.e. for all equation of state, relaxing in this way the Kasner conditions. The behavior of G depends on two parameters, the equation of state ω and ɛ, a parameter that controls the behavior of c( t), therefore G may be growing or decreasing. We also show that through the Lie method, there is no difference between to study the field equations under the assumption of a c-var affecting to the curvature tensor which the other one where it is not considered such effects. Nevertheless, it is essential to consider such effects in the cases studied under the SS, MC, and KSS hypotheses.

  9. Plant and soil effects on bacterial communities associated with <i>Miscanthus>  ×  <i>giganteus> rhizosphere and rhizomes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongfang; Voigt, Thomas B.; Kent, Angela D.

    2015-02-11

    Here, bacterial assemblages, especially diazotroph assemblages residing in the rhizomes and the rhizosphere soil of <i>Miscanthus> × <i>giganteus>, contribute to plant growth and nitrogen use efficiency. However, the composition of these microbial communities has not been adequately explored nor have the potential ecological drivers for these communities been sufficiently studied. This knowledge is needed for understanding and potentially improving <i>M.> × <i>giganteus> – microbe interactions, and further enhancing sustainability of <i>M.> × giganteus production. In this study, cultivated <i>M.> × <i>giganteus> from four sites in Illinois, Kentucky, Nebraska, and New Jersey were collected to examine the relative influences of soil conditions and plant compartments on assembly of the <i>M.> × <i>giganteus>-associated microbiome. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer (ARISA) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) targeting the <i>nifH> gene were applied to examine the total bacterial communities and diazotroph assemblages that reside in the rhizomes and the rhizosphere. Distinct microbial assemblages were detected in the endophytic and rhizosphere compartments. Site soil conditions had strong correlation with both total bacterial and diazotroph assemblages, but in different ways. Nitrogen treatments showed no significant effect on the composition of diazotroph assemblages in most sites. Endophytic compartments of different <i>M.> × <i>giganteus> plants tended to harbor similar microbial communities across all sites, whereas the rhizosphere soil of different plant tended to harbor diverse microbial assemblages that were distinct among sites. These observations offer insight into better understanding of the associative interactions between <i>M.> × <i>giganteus> and diazotrophs, and how this relationship is influenced by agronomic and edaphic factors.

  10. Models for Type I supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.; Taam, R.E.

    1980-06-17

    Two rather disjoint scenarios for Type I supernovae are presented. One is based upon mass accretion by a white dwarf in a binary system. The second involves a star having some 8 to 10 times the mass of the sun which may or may not be a solitary star. Despite the apparent dissimilarities in the models it may be that each occurs to some extent in nature for they both share the possibility of producing substantial quantities of /sup 56/Ni and explosions in stars devoid of hydrogen envelopes. These are believed to be two properties that must be shared by any viable Type I model.

  11. Operation Plan I-45 ICEBERG

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-02-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) First Marine Division 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...rCLASSIFICATION.OF WWII RECORDS. 4. ’ ’ ICEBERG FIRST MARINE DIVISION (REINF) 673-FEB.. 45-600 . RT iN 194I FIRPPT ARIND FIII RONCT 6T73 - FEB.. 45 - 800...10,000. (d) Special Map HAGUSHI Beach Area, OKINAWA, 1:5,000. TASK ORGANIZATION (a) CT - 5 ’ Col John.:H. GRIEBEL, USMC 5th Marines Co B lst Engr. Bn - Co

  12. PARKA I: Software Procedures Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-07-01

    8217 experiments wer condu(twted: wee frJaii. ECIPINO C~~~... bhase’Jin which 3 lb explosive charge~s were used as sources, and W-40 DIN; AT42- Y , R • . NUSC/NL...patience, programming the 1108 for the CALCOMP plotter. CLAIR J. BECKMR Mathematician GEORGE BOTS 4• Computer Specialist DAVID M. POTTER Mathematician Y . i...10746 61000 10711 RETURN 10747 36030 62224 .-..... RPL Y +I*W(RWT4) ........ 10750 16030 62166 STR B0*W(LTAPE) 10751 61000 10711. RETURN

  13. How I Became an Astronomer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, Stephen P.

    2001-01-01

    Life as an astronomer has taken me to view eclipses of the Sun from the Gaspe' Peninsula to the Pacific Ocean and the China and Coral Seas, and to observe the stars at observatories across the USA and as far south as Chile. I've also enjoyed working with NASA's telescopes in space, including the Hubble Space Telescope and the International Ultraviolet Explorer. It seems funny to reflect that it all began in the Sixth Grade by a fluke - the consequence of a hoax letter whose author I never identified.

  14. Saturn I (SA-4) Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The Saturn I (SA-4) flight lifted off from Kennedy Space Center launch Complex 34, March 28, 1963. The fourth launch of Saturn launch vehicles developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun, incorporated a Saturn I, Block I engine. The typical height of a Block I vehicle was approximately 163 feet and had only one live stage. It consisted of eight tanks, each 70 inches in diameter, clustered around a central tank, 105 inches in diameter. Four of the external tanks were fuel tanks for the RP-1 (kerosene) fuel. The other four, spaced alternately with the fuel tanks, were liquid oxygen tanks as was the large center tank. All fuel tanks and liquid oxygen tanks drained at the same rates respectively. The thrust for the stage came from eight H-1 engines, each producing a thrust of 165,000 pounds, for a total thrust of over 1,300,000 pounds. The engines were arranged in a double pattern. Four engines, located inboard, were fixed in a square pattern around the stage axis and canted outward slightly, while the remaining four engines were located outboard in a larger square pattern offset 40 degrees from the inner pattern. Unlike the inner engines, each outer engine was gimbaled. That is, each could be swung through an arc. They were gimbaled as a means of steering the rocket, by letting the instrumentation of the rocket correct any deviations of its powered trajectory. The block I required engine gimabling as the only method of guiding and stabilizing the rocket through the lower atmosphere. The upper stages of the Block I rocket reflected the three-stage configuration of the Saturn I vehicle. Like SA-3, the SA-4 flight's upper stage ejected 113,560 liters (30,000 gallons) of ballast water in the upper atmosphere for 'Project Highwater' physics experiment. Release of this vast quantity of water in a near-space environment marked the second purely scientific large-scale experiment. The SA-4 was the last Block I rocket

  15. Saturn I (SA-4) Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The Saturn I (SA-4) flight lifted off from Kennedy Space Center launch Complex 34, March 28, 1963. The fourth launch of Saturn launch vehicles, developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun, incorporated a Saturn I, Block I engine. The typical height of a Block I vehicle was approximately 163 feet and had only one live stage. It consisted of eight tanks, each 70 inches in diameter, clustered around a central tank, 105 inches in diameter. Four of the external tanks were fuel tanks for the RP-1 (kerosene) fuel. The other four, spaced alternately with the fuel tanks, were liquid oxygen tanks as was the large center tank. All fuel tanks and liquid oxygen tanks drained at the same rates respectively. The thrust for the stage came from eight H-1 engines, each producing a thrust of 165,000 pounds, for a total thrust of over 1,300,000 pounds. The engines were arranged in a double pattern. Four engines, located inboard, were fixed in a square pattern around the stage axis and canted outward slightly, while the remaining four engines were located outboard in a larger square pattern offset 40 degrees from the inner pattern. Unlike the inner engines, each outer engine was gimbaled. That is, each could be swung through an arc. They were gimbaled as a means of steering the rocket, by letting the instrumentation of the rocket correct any deviations of its powered trajectory. The block I required engine gimabling as the only method of guiding and stabilizing the rocket through the lower atmosphere. The upper stages of the Block I rocket reflected the three-stage configuration of the Saturn I vehicle. Like SA-3, the SA-4 flight's upper stage ejected 113,560 liters (30,000 gallons) of ballast water in the upper atmosphere for 'Project Highwater' physics experiment. Release of this vast quantity of water in a near-space environment marked the second purely scientific large-scale experiment. The SA-4 was the last Block I rocket

  16. Array I Photo Imagery Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    stereo scan Ssearcn, was -ated 2s oeina: Detectaole i-I - rti iy Detectac’e 1 - ’ ion etectaole .A ’Ile Ŕ" rating means that one is capable of detecting...tures on a ohotograph. Another term "minimum ground seoaration ," :cmes into context for tnis iiscussion. This is the ininimum distance oetween oJects...at ions sroula be notedi: 1. The brightness of the mine to be resolved; 2. The uniformity of the target background; and 3. The extent of the uniform

  17. HAWK-I Takes Off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    New Wide Field Near-Infrared Imager for ESO's Very Large Telescope Europe's flagship ground-based astronomical facility, the ESO VLT, has been equipped with a new 'eye' to study the Universe. Working in the near-infrared, the new instrument - dubbed HAWK-I - covers about 1/10th the area of the Full Moon in a single exposure. It is uniquely suited to the discovery and study of faint objects, such as distant galaxies or small stars and planets. ESO PR Photo 36a/07 ESO PR Photo 36a/07 HAWK-I on the VLT After three years of hard work, HAWK-I (High Acuity, Wide field K-band Imaging) saw First Light on Yepun, Unit Telescope number 4 of ESO's VLT, on the night of 31 July to 1 August 2007. The first images obtained impressively demonstrate its potential. "HAWK-I is a credit to the instrument team at ESO who designed, built and commissioned it," said Catherine Cesarsky, ESO's Director General. "No doubt, HAWK-I will allow rapid progress in very diverse areas of modern astronomy by filling a niche of wide-field, well-sampled near-infrared imagers on 8-m class telescopes." "It's wonderful; the instrument's performance has been terrific," declared Jeff Pirard, the HAWK-I Project Manager. "We could not have hoped for a better start, and look forward to scientifically exciting and beautiful images in the years to come." During this first commissioning period all instrument functions were checked, confirming that the instrument performance is at the level expected. Different astronomical objects were observed to test different characteristics of the instrument. For example, during one period of good atmospheric stability, images were taken towards the central bulge of our Galaxy. Many thousands of stars were visible over the field and allowed the astronomers to obtain stellar images only 3.4 pixels (0.34 arcsecond) wide, uniformly over the whole field of view, confirming the excellent optical quality of HAWK-I. ESO PR Photo 36b/07 ESO PR Photo 36c/07 Nebula in Serpens (HAWK-I

  18. Effects of <i>PHENYLALANINE AMMONIA LYASEi> (<i>PAL>) knockdown on cell wall composition, biomass digestibility, and biotic and abiotic stress responses in <i>Brachypodium>

    SciTech Connect

    Cass, Cynthia L.; Peraldi, Antoine; Dowd, Patrick F.; Mottiar, Yaseen; Santoro, Nicholas; Karlen, Steven D.; Bukhman, Yury V.; Foster, Cliff E.; Thrower, Nick; Bruno, Laura C.; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Johnson, Eric T.; Willhoit, Megan E.; Phutane, Megha; Ralph, John; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Nicholson, Paul; Sedbrook, John C.

    2015-06-19

    The phenylpropanoid pathway in plants synthesizes a variety of structural and defence compounds, and is an important target in efforts to reduce cell wall lignin for improved biomass conversion to biofuels. Little is known concerning the trade-offs in grasses when perturbing the function of the first gene family in the pathway, <i>PHENYLALANINE AMMONIA LYASEi> (<i>PAL>). Therefore, <i>PAL> isoforms in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon were targeted, by RNA interference (RNAi), and large reductions (up to 85%) in stem tissue transcript abundance for two of the eight putative <i>BdPAL> genes were identified. The cell walls of stems of <i>BdPAL>-knockdown plants had reductions of 43% in lignin and 57% in cell wall-bound ferulate, and a nearly 2-fold increase in the amounts of polysaccharide-derived carbohydrates released by thermochemical and hydrolytic enzymic partial digestion. <i>PAL>-knockdown plants exhibited delayed development and reduced root growth, along with increased susceptibilities to the fungal pathogens <i>Fusarium culmorumi> and <i>Magnaporthe oryzaei>. Surprisingly, these plants generally had wild-type (WT) resistances to caterpillar herbivory, drought, and ultraviolet light. RNA sequencing analyses revealed that the expression of genes associated with stress responses including ethylene biosynthesis and signalling were significantly altered in <i>PAL> knocked-down plants under non-challenging conditions. These data reveal that, although an attenuation of the phenylpropanoid pathway increases carbohydrate availability for biofuel, it can adversely affect plant growth and disease resistance to fungal pathogens. Lastly, the data identify notable differences between the stress responses of these monocot <i>pal> mutants versus <i>Arabidopsis> (a dicot) <i>pal> mutants and provide insights into the challenges that may arise when deploying phenylpropanoid pathway-altered bioenergy crops.

  19. Degradation of lignin β-aryl ether units in <i>Arabidopsis thalianai> expressing <i>LigD> , <i>LigF> and <i>LigG> from <i>Sphingomonas paucimobilisi> SYK-6

    SciTech Connect

    Mnich, Ewelina; Vanholme, Ruben; Oyarce, Paula; Liu, Sarah; Lu, Fachuang; Goeminne, Geert; Jorgensen, Bodil; Motawie, Mohammed S.; Boerjan, Wout; Ralph, John; Ulvskov, Peter; Moller, Birger L.; Bjarnholt, Nanna; Harholt, Jesper

    2016-10-24

    Here, lignin is a major polymer in the secondary plant cell wall and composed of hydrophobic interlinked hydroxyphenylpropanoid units. The presence of lignin hampers conversion of plant biomass into biofuels; plants with modified lignin are therefore being investigated for increased digestibility. The bacterium <i>Sphingomonas paucimobilisi> produces lignin-degrading enzymes including LigD, LigF and LigG involved in cleaving the most abundant lignin interunit linkage, the β-aryl ether bond. In this study, we expressed the <i>LigD>, <i>LigF> and <i>LigG> (<i>LigDFG>) genes in <i>Arabidopsis thalianai> to introduce postlignification modifications into the lignin structure. The three enzymes were targeted to the secretory pathway. Phenolic metabolite profiling and 2D HSQC NMR of the transgenic lines showed an increase in oxidized guaiacyl and syringyl units without concomitant increase in oxidized β-aryl ether units, showing lignin bond cleavage. Saccharification yield increased significantly in transgenic lines expressing <i>LigDFG>, showing the applicability of our approach. Additional new information on substrate specificity of the LigDFG enzymes is also provided.

  20. H I SHELLS AND SUPERSHELLS IN THE I-GALFA H I 21 cm LINE SURVEY. I. FAST-EXPANDING H I SHELLS ASSOCIATED WITH SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Park, G.; Koo, B.-C.; Gibson, S. J.; Newton, J. H.; Kang, J.-H.; Lane, D. C.; Douglas, K. A.; Peek, J. E. G.; Korpela, E. J.; Heiles, C.

    2013-11-01

    We search for fast-expanding H I shells associated with Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) in the longitude range l ≈ 32° to 77° using 21 cm line data from the Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array (I-GALFA) H I survey. Among the 39 known Galactic SNRs in this region, we find such H I shells in 4 SNRs: W44, G54.4-0.3, W51C, and CTB 80. All four were previously identified in low-resolution surveys, and three of those (excluding G54.4-0.3) were previously studied with the Arecibo telescope. A remarkable new result, however, is the detection of H I emission at both very high positive and negative velocities in W44 from the receding and approaching parts of the H I expanding shell, respectively. This is the first detection of both sides of an expanding shell associated with an SNR in H I 21 cm emission. The high-resolution I-GALFA survey data also reveal a prominent expanding H I shell with high circular symmetry associated with G54.4-0.3. We explore the physical characteristics of four SNRs and discuss what differentiates them from other SNRs in the survey area. We conclude that these four SNRs are likely the remnants of core-collapse supernovae interacting with a relatively dense (∼> 1 cm{sup –3}) ambient medium, and we discuss the visibility of SNRs in the H I 21 cm line.

  1. I'm like ... Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyburz, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    "Given that my film is exploring a punk ethos that attends DIY filmmaking, I decided that the rough nature of the video created appropriate content... these are the sorts of details that reveal the complex, cinema verite nature of the DIY experience."

  2. Community Living Skills: Nutrition I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreps, Alice Roelofs; Dreith, Rita Vallero

    One of twenty course guides in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series, this document provides guidelines and workbook activities for the course, Nutrition I. The series of courses for developmentally disabled adults is intended to supplement residential programs and to aid in orienting institutionalized persons to…

  3. Portrait - Astronaut Virgil I. Grissom

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-09-12

    S64-32343 (10 Sept. 1964) --- Astronaut Virgil I. Grissom Editor's Note: Grissom, one of the Original Seven or Mercury astronauts, lost his life in the Apollo 204 fire at Cape Kennedy on Jan. 27, 1967, along with astronauts Edward H. White II and Roger B. Chaffee.

  4. Tetraphenylphosphonium copper(I) dicyanamide.

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, J. A.; Geiser, U.; Materials Science Division

    2007-01-01

    In the title compound, {l_brace}(C{sub 24}H{sub 20}P)[Cu(C{sub 2}N{sub 3}){sub 2}]{r_brace}{sub n}, the copper(I) dicyanamide anion forms a distorted three-dimensional single diamondoid network. Templating tetraphenylphosphonium cations reside within the cavities of the polymeric anion.

  5. Teaching the iGeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Larry D.

    2011-01-01

    Children and teens today are immersed in technology. Just as we don't think about the existence of air, they don't think about technology and media. Individualized mobile devices have given them the expectation that if they conceive of something, they will be able to make it happen. Yet schools still expect these members of the iGeneration to…

  6. Title I and the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Tendre, Mary Jean

    1997-01-01

    Argues that although improving academic achievement is the crux of Title I, the arts can contribute to enhancing academic achievement in at-risk students. An example of this approach is provided via partnership between the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and Washington (DC) metropolitan school districts. (GR)

  7. Teaching the iGeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Larry D.

    2011-01-01

    Children and teens today are immersed in technology. Just as we don't think about the existence of air, they don't think about technology and media. Individualized mobile devices have given them the expectation that if they conceive of something, they will be able to make it happen. Yet schools still expect these members of the iGeneration to…

  8. Aerospace Environment. Aerospace Education I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savler, D. S.; Smith, J. C.

    This book is one in the series on Aerospace Education I. It briefly reviews current knowledge of the universe, the earth and its life-supporting atmosphere, and the arrangement of celestial bodies in outer space and their physical characteristics. Chapter 1 includes a brief survey of the aerospace environment. Chapters 2 and 3 examine the…

  9. IPNS-I chopper spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.L.; Carpenter, J.M.; Pelizzari, C.A.; Sinha, S.K.; Bresof, I.; Ostrowski, G.E.

    1982-01-01

    We briefly describe the layout and operation of the two chopper experiments at IPNS-I. The recent measurement on solid /sup 4/He by Hilleke et al. provides examples of time-of-flight data from the Low Resolution Chopper Spectrometer.

  10. Fire Officer I Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pribyl, Paul F.

    Lesson plans are provided for the Fire Officer I course. Material for each lesson is presented in this format: course title, lesson title, equipment required, training aids needed, and a content outline which details teaching points and related instructor references. These references, or suggested readings, are listed at the conclusion of each…

  11. Wastewater Treatment I. Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Water Pollution Control Association, Sacramento. Joint Education Committee.

    This instructor's manual provides an outline and guide for teaching Wastewater Treatment I. It consists of nine sections. An introductory note and a course outline comprise sections 1 and 2. Section 3 (the bulk of the guide) presents lesson outlines for teaching the ten chapters of the manual entitled "Operation of Wastewater Treatment…

  12. Iowa and World War I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the children's quarterly magazine, "The Goldfinch," focuses on World War I. A brief discussion of how the United States came to enter the War is followed by a discussion of propaganda. An article on the use of posters to encourage citizens to participate in the war effort is illustrated with reproductions of several of…

  13. Wastewater Treatment I. Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Water Pollution Control Association, Sacramento. Joint Education Committee.

    This instructor's manual provides an outline and guide for teaching Wastewater Treatment I. It consists of nine sections. An introductory note and a course outline comprise sections 1 and 2. Section 3 (the bulk of the guide) presents lesson outlines for teaching the ten chapters of the manual entitled "Operation of Wastewater Treatment…

  14. Aerospace Community. Aerospace Education I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, V. V.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education I, emphasizes the two sides of aerospace--military aerospace and civilian aerospace. Chapter 1 includes a brief discussion on the organization of Air Force bases and missile sites in relation to their missions. Chapter 2 examines the community services provided by Air Force bases. The topics…

  15. An iPad Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    In keeping with Steve Jobs' vision of transforming education, Apple has expanded its iTunes U so that professors can offer entire courses, not just lectures. So far, though, colleges and universities are not rushing to drop the platforms they use for online learning and adopt the new application from the technology heavyweight. Apple bills the…

  16. Community Living Skills: Nutrition I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreps, Alice Roelofs; Dreith, Rita Vallero

    One of twenty course guides in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series, this document provides guidelines and workbook activities for the course, Nutrition I. The series of courses for developmentally disabled adults is intended to supplement residential programs and to aid in orienting institutionalized persons to…

  17. Saturn I/IB Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Pictured is a dual position Saturn I/IB test at the T-Stand at Marshall Space Flight Center. This stand was built to test two articles at the same time, thus providing engineers at MSFC with the opportunity to compare identical burns.

  18. Learning with iLife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2007

    2007-01-01

    A podcast is audio or visual content that is automatically delivered over a network via free subscription. The advantage podcasts have over traditional oral reports is that students can edit and revise until what they say and how they say it is perfected. iLife applications are ideal for creating podcasts and other digital projects because of…

  19. An I-Search Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Carolyn Mascia

    1990-01-01

    "I-Search" reports are described as student research projects that use a first-person approach. Using the method with hearing-impaired students is described in the following steps: discussion of student responsibilities; choosing topics; exploring research possibilities; developing note taking, research, and organizational skills; oral-visual…

  20. Being an iPadist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randles, Clint

    2013-01-01

    This column offers the personal reflections of the author on being a member of the band Touch, an iPad performing ensemble composed of music education faculty members and doctoral students at the University of South Florida. The ensemble primarily performed its own arrangements of popular music selections from a number of genres including, but not…

  1. An iPad Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    In keeping with Steve Jobs' vision of transforming education, Apple has expanded its iTunes U so that professors can offer entire courses, not just lectures. So far, though, colleges and universities are not rushing to drop the platforms they use for online learning and adopt the new application from the technology heavyweight. Apple bills the…

  2. I'm like ... Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyburz, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    "Given that my film is exploring a punk ethos that attends DIY filmmaking, I decided that the rough nature of the video created appropriate content... these are the sorts of details that reveal the complex, cinema verite nature of the DIY experience."

  3. Isidor I. Rabi and CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krige, John

    2005-06-01

    Isidor I. Rabi (1898 1988) is the acknowledged “father of CERN,” today one of the most important particle-physics laboratories in the world. I explore his motives for promoting the idea in 1950 that Western Europe should build a “Brookhaven” with national governments replacing universities. I unravel the many ways in which a major accelerator facility in Geneva, Switzerland, could both stimulate European science and serve the interests of the American scientific community. Rabi was careful to avoid giving any official support to steps then under way in Europe to build a research reactor, even though Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, had one from the outset. I suggest that his main motive for doing so was that he wanted West Germany to be part of the collaborative venture. Rabi was well aware of the foreign-policy objectives of the U.S. State Department in the European theater in 1950, and he wanted to situate politically the new research center in the framework of the Marshall Plan for the postwar reconstruction of the continent, “remaking the Old World in the image of the New.”

  4. Iowa and World War I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the children's quarterly magazine, "The Goldfinch," focuses on World War I. A brief discussion of how the United States came to enter the War is followed by a discussion of propaganda. An article on the use of posters to encourage citizens to participate in the war effort is illustrated with reproductions of several of…

  5. Saturn I (SA-3) Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The Saturn I (SA-3) flight lifted off from Kennedy Space Center launch Complex 34, November 16, 1962. The third launch of Saturn launch vehicles, developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun, incorporated a Saturn I, Block I engine. The typical height of a Block I vehicle was approximately 163 feet. and had only one live stage. It consisted of eight tanks, each 70 inches in diameter, clustered around a central tank, 105 inches in diameter. Four of the external tanks were fuel tanks for the RP-1 (kerosene) fuel. The other four, spaced alternately with the fuel tanks, were liquid oxygen tanks as was the large center tank. All fuel tanks and liquid oxygen tanks drained at the same rates respectively. The thrust for the stage came from eight H-1 engines, each producing a thrust of 165,000 pounds, for a total thrust of over 1,300,000 pounds. The engines were arranged in a double pattern. Four engines, located inboard, were fixed in a square pattern around the stage axis and canted outward slightly, while the remaining four engines were located outboard in a larger square pattern offset 40 degrees from the inner pattern. Unlike the inner engines, each outer engine was gimbaled. That is, each could be swung through an arc. They were gimbaled as a means of steering the rocket, by letting the instrumentation of the rocket correct any deviations of its powered trajectory. The block I required engine gimabling as the only method of guiding and stabilizing the rocket through the lower atmosphere. The upper stages of the Block I rocket reflected the three-stage configuration of the Saturn I vehicle. During the SA-3 flight, the upper stage ejected 113,560 liters (30,000 gallons) of ballast water in the upper atmosphere for 'Project Highwater' physics experiment. The water was released at an altitude of 65 miles, where within only 5 seconds, it expanded into a massive ice cloud 4.6 miles in diameter. Release of this vast

  6. Can I tell you a secret?'

    PubMed

    Hulatt, Ian

    2016-11-23

    As a general nursing student the question I dreaded hearing was 'am I dying nurse?'. Thankfully I can't recall being asked it, but like many of my peers I worried about such situations, for which I felt poorly prepared.

  7. The Meganuclease I-SceI Containing Nuclear Localization Signal (NLS-I-SceI) Efficiently Mediated Mammalian Germline Transgenesis via Embryo Cytoplasmic Microinjection

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Peng-Ying; Wang, Lu-Lu; Tang, Huan; Xie, Fei; Li, Liang; Wei, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The meganuclease I-SceI has been effectively used to facilitate transgenesis in fish eggs for nearly a decade. I-SceI-mediated transgenesis is simply via embryo cytoplasmic microinjection and only involves plasmid vectors containing I-SceI recognition sequences, therefore regarding the transgenesis process and application of resulted transgenic organisms, I-SceI-mediated transgenesis is of minimal bio-safety concerns. However, currently no transgenic mammals derived from I-SceI-mediated transgenesis have been reported. In this work, we found that the native I-SceI molecule was not capable of facilitating transgenesis in mammalian embryos via cytoplasmic microinjection as it did in fish eggs. In contrast, the I-SceI molecule containing mammalian nuclear localization signal (NLS-I-SceI) was shown to be capable of transferring DNA fragments from cytoplasm into nuclear in porcine embryos, and cytoplasmic microinjection with NLS-I-SceI mRNA and circular I-SceI recognition sequence-containing transgene plasmids resulted in transgene expression in both mouse and porcine embryos. Besides, transfer of the cytoplasmically microinjected mouse and porcine embryos into synchronized recipient females both efficiently resulted in transgenic founders with germline transmission competence. These results provided a novel method to facilitate mammalian transgenesis using I-SceI, and using the NLS-I-SceI molecule, a simple, efficient and species-neutral transgenesis technology based on embryo cytoplasmic microinjection with minimal bio-safety concerns can be established for mammalian species. As far as we know, this is the first report for transgenic mammals derived from I-SceI-mediated transgenesis via embryo cytoplasmic microinjection. PMID:25250567

  8. <i>Coendutermes> <i>tucum> Fontes (Isoptera, Termitidae, Nasutitermitinae): description of the imago caste and additional notes.

    PubMed

    Cuezzo, Carolina

    2016-12-09

    Coendutermes Fontes, 1985 is a monotypic South American termite genus. Coendutermes tucum Fontes, 1985, was described based on morphological characters from soldiers and workers collected in Mato Grosso, Brazil, and Jodensavanne, Suriname. Herein, I describe the imago caste of C. tucum for the first time with additional notes on soldiers, workers, and new distributional records. The studied material is deposited at the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (MZUSP). I use the terminology of Fontes (1987) to describe worker mandibles, and that of Noirot (2001) for the different parts of the digestive tube of workers. I measured the imagoes morphometric characters following Roonwal (1970): LH, length of head capsule (9); WH, width of head capsule without eyes (18); OF, occipito-fontanelle distance (23); DE, diameter of eye (48); LO, length of ocellus (55); WO, width of ocellus (56); EOD, eye-ocellus distance (57); LP, length of pronotum (65); WP, width of pronotum (68); LT, length of hind tibia (85). I took photographs of all castes with a stereomicroscope (Leica M205C) attached to a video camera (Leica DFC295) and images of gizzard and enteric valve under a microscope (Leica DM750B) attached to a video camera (Leica ICC50HD), then I combined the stacks of images with the software Leica LAS EZ 2.0 or Helicon Focus 5.2.11 X64. For the scanning electron micrographs (SEM), one soldier was dried to critical point while directly mounted on a stub with double face adhesive tape, then coated with gold and photographed with the SEM (Zeiss LEO 440 ®).

  9. Quantum transport in <i>d>-dimensional lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Manzano, Daniel; Chuang, Chern; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-04-28

    We show that both fermionic and bosonic uniform <i>d>-dimensional lattices can be reduced to a set of independent one-dimensional chains. This reduction leads to the expression for ballistic energy fluxes in uniform fermionic and bosonic lattices. By the use of the Jordan–Wigner transformation we can extend our analysis to spin lattices, proving the coexistence of both ballistic and non-ballistic subspaces in any dimension and for any system size. Lastly, we then relate the nature of transport to the number of excitations in the homogeneous spin lattice, indicating that a single excitation always propagates ballistically and that the non-ballistic behaviour of uniform spin lattices is a consequence of the interaction between different excitations.

  10. 30 CFR 57.22217 - Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines... NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22217 Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). All seals, and those stoppings that separate main intake from...

  11. 30 CFR 57.22217 - Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines... NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22217 Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). All seals, and those stoppings that separate main intake from...

  12. 30 CFR 57.22217 - Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines... NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22217 Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). All seals, and those stoppings that separate main intake from...

  13. 30 CFR 57.22217 - Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). 57.22217 Section 57.22217 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). All seals, and those stoppings that separate main intake from...

  14. 30 CFR 57.22217 - Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seals and stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). 57.22217 Section 57.22217 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... stoppings (I-A, I-B, and I-C mines). All seals, and those stoppings that separate main intake from...

  15. H I Imaging Observations of Superthin Galaxies. I. UGC 7321

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uson, Juan M.; Matthews, L. D.

    2003-05-01

    We have used the Very Large Array to image the isolated ``superthin'' galaxy UGC 7321 in the H I line with a spatial resolution of 16" and a spectral resolution of 24 kHz (5.2 km s-1). We have reached a sensitivity of (0.36-0.40) mJy beam-1 channel-1, which correspond to a column density of (8-9)×1018 atoms cm-2 (1 σ). UGC 7321 has a gas-rich disk, with MHI=(1.06+/-0.01)×109 d210 Msolar and MHI/LB=1.0 (d10 is the distance to UGC 7321 in units of 10 Mpc, the value adopted in this paper), and no detectable radio continuum emission (FCONT=0.41+/-0.25 mJy). The global H I distribution of UGC 7321 is rather symmetric and extends to ~1.5 times the optical radius (DHI=8.65‧+/-0.15‧ at nHI=3×1019 atoms cm-2). An ``integral sign'' warp is observed in the H I disk, commencing near the edge of the stellar distribution and twisting back toward the equatorial plane in the outermost regions. In addition, the position-velocity diagram suggests the presence of a bar or inner arm within ~40" from the center. The rotation curve of UGC 7321 is slowly rising; it reaches its asymptotic velocity of ~110 km s-1 at ~2.5‧ from the center (about 0.9 optical radii) and declines near the edge of the H I disk. The ratio of the inferred dynamical mass to the mass in gas and stars is ~12d-110, implying that UGC 7321 is a highly dark-matter-dominated galaxy.

  16. Iodine Symporter Targeting with (124)I/(131)I Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Nagarajah, James; Janssen, Marcel; Hetkamp, Philipp; Jentzen, Walter

    2017-09-01

    Theranostics, a modern approach combining therapeutics and diagnostics, is among the most promising concepts in nuclear medicine for optimizing and individualizing treatments for many cancer entities. Theranostics has been used in clinical routines in nuclear medicine for more than 60 y-as (131)I for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in thyroid diseases. In this minireview, we provide a survey of the use of 2 different radioiodine isotopes for targeting the sodium-iodine symporter in thyroid cancer and nonthyroidal neoplasms as well as a brief summary of theranostics for neuroendocrine neoplasms and metastatic castration-refractory prostate cancer. In particular, we discuss the role of (124)I-based dosimetry in targeting of the sodium-iodine symporter and describe the clinical application of (124)I dosimetry in a patient who had radioiodine-refractory thyroid cancer and who underwent a redifferentiation treatment with the mitogen-activated extracellular signal-related kinase kinase inhibitor trametinib. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  17. Expansion and diversification of the MSDIN family of cyclic peptide genes in the poisonous agarics <i>Amanita phalloidesi> and <i>A. bisporigerai>

    SciTech Connect

    Pulman, Jane A.; Childs, Kevin L.; Sgambelluri, R. Michael; Walton, Jonathan D.

    2016-12-15

    Here, the cyclic peptide toxins of <i>Amanita> mushrooms, such as α-amanitin and phalloidin, are encoded by the “MSDIN” gene family and ribosomally biosynthesized. Based on partial genome sequence and PCR analysis, some members of the MSDIN family were previously identified in <i>Amanita bisporigerai>, and several other members are known from other species of <i>Amanita>. However, the complete complement in any one species, and hence the genetic capacity for these fungi to make cyclic peptides, remains unknown. As a result, draft genome sequences of two cyclic peptide-producing mushrooms, the “Death Cap” <i>A. phalloidesi> and the “Destroying Angel” <i>A. bisporigerai>, were obtained. Each species has ~30 MSDIN genes, most of which are predicted to encode unknown cyclic peptides. Some MSDIN genes were duplicated in one or the other species, but only three were common to both species. A gene encoding cycloamanide B, a previously described nontoxic cyclic heptapeptide, was also present in <i>A. phalloidesi>, but genes for antamanide and cycloamanides A, C, and D were not. In <i>A. bisporigerai>, RNA expression was observed for 20 of the MSDIN family members. Based on their predicted sequences, novel cyclic peptides were searched for by LC/MS/MS in extracts of <i>A. phalloidesi>. The presence of two cyclic peptides, named cycloamanides E and F with structures cyclo(SFFFPVP) and cyclo(IVGILGLP), was thereby demonstrated. Of the MSDIN genes reported earlier from another specimen of <i>A. bisporigerai>, 9 of 14 were not found in the current genome assembly. Differences between previous and current results for the complement of MSDIN genes and cyclic peptides in the two fungi probably represents natural variation among geographically dispersed isolates of <i>A. phalloidesi> and among the members of the poorly defined <i>A. bisporigerai> species complex. Both <i>A. phalloidesi> and <i>A. bisporigerai> contain two prolyl

  18. FIRE I - Marine Stratocumulus Data Sets

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-07-12

    FIRE I - Marine Stratocumulus Data Sets First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) I - Marine Stratocumulus was conducted off the southwestern coast of California. ... FIRE Project Guide FIRE I - Marine Stratocumulus Home Page SCAR-B Block:  ...

  19. FIRE I - Extended Time Observations Data Sets

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-08-01

    FIRE I - Extended Time Observations Data Sets First ISCCP Regional Experiment (FIRE) I - Extended Time Observations were conducted in Utah. Relevant Documents:  FIRE Project Guide FIRE I - Extended Time Observations Home Page SCAR-B Block:  ...

  20. Health Occupations Education I. Module No. I-A to I-G.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

    This set of 7 modules on medical and surgical asepsis is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings.…

  1. Health Occupations Education I. Module No. I-A to I-G.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunmeyer, Kathryn; And Others

    This set of 7 modules on medical and surgical asepsis is 1 of 11 sets in the Health Occupations Education I instructional package for the first year of a 2-year course of study. The materials are designed to prepare students through individualized instruction for entry-level job opportunities on health care teams in a variety of practice settings.…

  2. Reaction Hg+I/sub 2/. -->. HgI+I revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Oprysko, M.M.; Aoiz, F.J.; McMahan, M.A.; Bernstein, R.B.

    1983-03-15

    The crossed molecular beam study of Mayer et al. (1977) on the subject reaction is revisited. The present work employs a different beam configuration and thus kinematic framework, and a larger range of relative translational energies is covered (i.e., from the threshold of 1.15 to 3.75 eV). Measurements include in-plane angular distributions and relative values of integral reaction cross sections as a function of energy. At low energies, the results of the present experiments are in good agreement with the previous work. Starting at the threshold, the reaction proceeds through the formation of a long-lived complex, presumed to be IHgI. At higher energies, the c.m. angular distributions show a gradual increase of the so-called ''backscattered component.'' This is interpreted as the opening of a new reaction path: the direct-mode abstraction of I via collinear approach of the Hg atom to the I/sub 2/ molecule. The overall dynamics of this reaction are interpreted in the context of the semiempirical potential energy surfaces and electronic state correlation diagrams of Muckerman et al. (1977). From the present experimental results, the height of the barrier in the exit channel for the collinear configuration can be estimated to be in the range 2.0--2.3 eV. The excitation function rises from threshold and reaches a maximum at collision energy of 2.6 eV, falling off monotonically thereafter.

  3. Cooperation between two periplasmic copper chaperones is required for full activity of the <i>cbb>3-type cytochrome <i>c> oxidase and copper homeostasis in <i>Rhodobacter capsulatusi>

    SciTech Connect

    Trasnea, Petru -Iulian; Utz, Marcel; Khalfaoui-Hassani, Bahia; Lagies, Simon; Daldal, Fevzi; Koch, Hans -Georg

    2016-02-28

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient that functions as a cofactor in several important enzymes, like respiratory heme-copper oxygen reductases. Yet, Cu is also toxic and therefore cells engage a highly coordinated Cu uptake and delivery system to prevent the accumulation of toxic Cu concentrations. In the current work we analyzed Cu delivery to the <i>cbb>3-type cytochrome c oxidase (<i>cbb>3-Cox) of <i>Rhodobacter capsulatusi>. We identified the PCuAC-like periplasmic chaperone PccA and analyzed its contribution to <i>cbb>3-Cox assembly. Our data demonstrate that PccA is a Cu-binding protein with a preference for Cu(I), which is required for efficient <i>cbb>3-Cox assembly, in particular at low Cu concentrations. By using <i>in vivoi> and <i>in vitroi> crosslinking we show that PccA forms a complex with the Sco1-homologue SenC. This complex is stabilized in the absence of the <i>cbb>3-Cox specific assembly factors CcoGHIS. In cells lacking SenC, the cytoplasmic Cu content is significantly increased, but the simultaneous absence of PccA prevents this Cu accumulation. Lastly, these data demonstrate that the interplay between PccA and SenC is not only required for Cu delivery during <i>cbb>3-Cox assembly, but that it also regulates Cu homeostasis in <i>R. capsulatusi>.

  4. A Wolter type I LAMAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, R. C.; Joki, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    Observational objectives for the LAMAR and their influence on the instrument design are discussed. It is concluded that the most important design parameter is the angular resolution of the LAMAR modules since it so strongly influences sensitivity, optical identifications, source confusion, spectral resolution for objective gratings and the ability to resolve small extended sources. A high resolution Wolter Type I LAMAR module is described, its hardware status discussed, and the performance of a LAMAR observatory presented. A promising technique for enhancing the reflectivity of Wolter Type I X-ray optics in a selected bandpass at high energy has been investigated and the performance of the LAMAR module, utilizing this method, has been calculated.

  5. HTLV-I Seroconversion Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-25

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Annual Report covers period of November 15, 1989 - September 30, 1991 12a. DISTKIBUTION /AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE...Active Duty Marine Corps Personnel* Okinawa, Japan, 1989- 1991 Category Number Percent STD: Yes 113 5.5 No 1,952 94.5 Not reported 7 - First STD...Couples Study, Active Duty and Retired [Navy and] Marine Corps Personnel and Spouses, Okinawa, Japan, 1991 -1992 I Active Duty: N = 7 Age in years: Mean

  6. Ares I Upper Stage Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    These presentation slides review the progress in the development of the Ares I upper stage. The development includes development of a manufacturing and processing assembly that will reduce the time required over 100 days, development of a weld tool that is a robotic tool that is the largest welder of its kind in the United States, development of avionics and software, and development of logisitics and operations systems.

  7. Machine-<i>z>: Rapid machine-learned redshift indicator for <i>Swift> gamma-ray bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Wozniak, P. R.; Gehrels, N.

    2016-03-08

    Studies of high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) provide important information about the early Universe such as the rates of stellar collapsars and mergers, the metallicity content, constraints on the re-ionization period, and probes of the Hubble expansion. Rapid selection of high-z candidates from GRB samples reported in real time by dedicated space missions such as <i>Swift> is the key to identifying the most distant bursts before the optical afterglow becomes too dim to warrant a good spectrum. Here, we introduce ‘machine-z’, a redshift prediction algorithm and a ‘high-z’ classifier for <i>Swift> GRBs based on machine learning. Our method relies exclusively on canonical data commonly available within the first few hours after the GRB trigger. Using a sample of 284 bursts with measured redshifts, we trained a randomized ensemble of decision trees (random forest) to perform both regression and classification. Cross-validated performance studies show that the correlation coefficient between machine-z predictions and the true redshift is nearly 0.6. At the same time, our high-z classifier can achieve 80 per cent recall of true high-redshift bursts, while incurring a false positive rate of 20 per cent. With 40 per cent false positive rate the classifier can achieve ~100 per cent recall. As a result, the most reliable selection of high-redshift GRBs is obtained by combining predictions from both the high-z classifier and the machine-z regressor.

  8. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and haplotypes (Apa I, Bsm I, Fok I, Taq I) in Turkish psoriasis patients.

    PubMed

    Acikbas, Ibrahim; Sanlı, Berna; Tepeli, Emre; Ergin, Seniz; Aktan, Sebnem; Bagci, Huseyin

    2012-11-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease characterized by increased squamous cell proliferation and impaired differentiation. Vitamin D, Calcitriol, and its analogues are successfully used for psoriasis therapy. However, it is unknown why some psoriasis patients are resistant to Vitamin D therapy. Vitamin D mediates its activity by a nuclear receptor. It is suggested that polymorphisms and haplotypes in the VDR gene may explain the differences in response to vitamin D therapy. In this study, 102 psoriasis patients and 102 healthy controls were studied for VDR gene polymorphisms. The Fok I, Bsm I, Apa I and Taq I polymorphisms were examined by PCR-RFLP, and 50 subjects received vitamin D therapy to evaluate the association between VDR gene polymorphisms and response to vitamin D therapy. Existence of cutting site is shown by capital letters, and lack was shown by lower case. The haplotypes were analysed by CHAPLIN. There was significant difference in allele frequency of T and genotype frequency of Tt between cases and controls (p values 0.038 and 0.04, respectively). The Aa and bb genotypes were significantly higher in early onset than late onset psoriasis (p values 0.008 and 0.04, respectively). The genotypes Ff, ff and TT are significantly different between vitamin D3 therapy responders and non-responders (p values 0.04, 0.0001, 0.009, respectively). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing importance of VDR gene haplotypes in psoriasis, the significance of the Wald and LR (Likelihood Ratio) statistics (p=0,0042) suggest that FfBbAatt is a disease-susceptibility haplotype. Haplotype analysis is a recent and commonly used method in genetic association studies. Our results reveal a previously unidentified susceptibility haplotype and indicate that certain haplotypes are important in the resistance to vitamin D3 therapy and the onset of psoriasis. The haplotypes can give valuable data where genotypes unable to do.

  9. Studies of Nonlinear Problems. I

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fermi, E.; Pasta, J.; Ulam, S.

    1955-05-01

    A one-dimensional dynamical system of 64 particles with forces between neighbors containing nonlinear terms has been studied on the Los Alamos computer MANIAC I. The nonlinear terms considered are quadratic, cubic, and broken linear types. The results are analyzed into Fourier components and plotted as a function of time. The results show very little, if any, tendency toward equipartition of energy among the degrees of freedom.

  10. Extragalatic zoo. I. [New galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Schorn, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of various types of extragalactic objects are described. Consideration is given to cD galaxies, D galaxies, N galaxies, Markarian galaxies, liners, starburst galaxies, and megamasers. Emphasis is also placed on the isolated extragalatic H I region; the isolated extragalatic H II region; primeval galaxies or photogalaxies; peculiar galaxies; Arp galaxies; interacting galaxies; ring galaxies; and polar-ring galaxies. Diagrams of these objects are provided.

  11. Implementation for GREAT I Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    41 0w ~ - 0 COUt 0>0 cc (n c -4,.44-u 000 0 o 0 0 a coqrn -,.-H -4 p ci w 0 0 $4 COH l4 LD 1.’ 1 co . 41 co a) V w ,A- -,i :1Z - 0C 4 0 41 41 a) >,4. 4...At the present, con- gestion occurs only on weekends and holidays and may best be handled by providing waiting areas for recreation craft and

  12. STS-51I Mission Insignia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The crew emblem for STS-51I is based on a strong patriotic theme with the basic colors of red, white, and blue suggesting the American flag and a dominant American bald eagle in aggressive flight. The 19 stars signify the numerical sequence of the flight. The shock wave represents that formed by the orbited during the entry phase of the flight. Surnames of crew members surround the top part of the circular design.

  13. Lunar Orbiter I - Moon & Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    First view of the earth and moon from space. Published in: Spaceflight Revolution: Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, by James R. Hansen. NASA History Series. NASA SP ; 4308. p ii. Caption: 'The picture of the century was this first view of the earth from space. Lunar Orbiter I took the photo on 23 August 1966 on its 16th orbit just before it passed behind the moon. The photo also provided a spectacular dimensional view of the lunar surface.'

  14. Ventilation Surge Techniques. Volume I

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    always exist in full system modeling, and their effects should be analyzed in detail as modeling procedures are validated. For example, while surface ...8217 ’) and V. Fluid properties comprise the remaining variables. For all these variables, it is assumed that surface tension, thermal radiation, and...controlled only for some surfaces involved. Temperature distributions over other surfaces depend 11-6 ,_ _ _ _ _ I 9 * - * .-- upon the heat flow through

  15. Ares I Upper Stage Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chojnacki, Kent

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the elements that make up the Ares I launch vehicle, with particular attention devoted to the upper stage of the vehicle. The upper stage elememnts, a lunar mission profile, and the upper stage objectives are reviewed. The work that Marshall Space Flight Center is doing is highlighted: work on the full scale welding process, the vertical milling machining, and the thermal protection system.

  16. Should I Have Breast Reconstruction?

    MedlinePlus

    ... I choose not to have breast reconstruction? Many women decide that breast reconstruction is not right for them. Or they might not be able ... Reports of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) in Women with Breast Implants, January 26, 2011. Accessed at www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/Safety/AlertsandNotices/ucm240000.htm on June 1, ... Site Comments © 2017 American Cancer Society, Inc. All rights reserved. The American Cancer Society is a qualified ...

  17. <i>FERMI> LAT and <i>WMAP> observations of the supernova remnant HB 21

    SciTech Connect

    Pivato, Giovanna; Hewitt, John W.; Tibaldo, L.; Acero, F.; Ballet, J.; de Palma, F.; Giordano, F.; Janssen, G. H.; Jóhannesson, G.; Smith, D. A.

    2013-12-04

    Here, we present the analysis of <i>Fermi> Large Area Telescope γ-ray observations of HB 21 (G89.0+4.7). We detect significant γ-ray emission associated with the remnant: the flux >100 MeV is 9.4 ± 0.8 (stat) ± 1.6 (syst) × 10–11 erg cm–2 s–1. HB 21 is well modeled by a uniform disk centered at l = 88fdg75 ± 0fdg04, b = +4fdg65 ± 0fdg06 with a radius of 1fdg19 ± 0fdg06. The γ-ray spectrum shows clear evidence of curvature, suggesting a cutoff or break in the underlying particle population at an energy of a few GeV. We complement γ-ray observations with the analysis of the <i>WMAP 7i> yr data from 23 to 93 GHz, achieving the first detection of HB 21 at these frequencies. In combination with archival radio data, the radio spectrum shows a spectral break, which helps to constrain the relativistic electron spectrum, and, in turn, parameters of simple non-thermal radiation models. In one-zone models multiwavelength data favor the origin of γ rays from nucleon-nucleon collisions. A single population of electrons cannot produce both γ rays through bremsstrahlung and radio emission through synchrotron radiation. A predominantly inverse-Compton origin of the γ-ray emission is disfavored because it requires lower interstellar densities than are inferred for HB 21. In the hadronic-dominated scenarios, accelerated nuclei contribute a total energy of ~3 × 1049 erg, while, in a two-zone bremsstrahlung-dominated scenario, the total energy in accelerated particles is ~1 × 1049 erg.

  18. STS-51I Mission Insignia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The crew emblem for STS-51I is based on a strong patriotic theme with the basic colors of red, white, and blue suggesting the American flag and a dominant American bald eagle in aggressive flight. The 19 stars signify the numerical sequence of the flight. The shock wave represents that formed by the orbited during the entry phase of the flight. Surnames of crew members surround the top part of the circular design.

  19. Insights into the single cell draft genome of “<i>Candidatus> Achromatium palustre”

    SciTech Connect

    Salman, Verena; Berben, Tom; Bowers, Robert M.; Woyke, Tanja; Teske, Andreas; Angert, Esther R.

    2016-03-23

    "<i>Candidatus> Achromatium palustre" was recently described as the first marine representative of the <i>Achromatium> spp. in the <i>Thiotrichaceae> - a sister lineage to the <i>Chromatiaceae> in the <i>Gammaproteobacteria>. <i>Achromatium> spp. belong to the group of large sulfur bacteria as they can grow to nearly 100 mu m in size and store elemental sulfur (S-0) intracellularly. As a unique feature, <i>Achromatium> spp. can accumulate colloidal calcite (CaCO3) inclusions in great amounts. Currently, both process and function of calcite accumulation in bacteria is unknown, and all <i>Achromatium> spp. are uncultured. Recently, three single-cell draft genomes of <i>Achromatium> spp. from a brackish mineral spring were published, and here we present the first draft genome of a single "<i>Candidatus> Achromatium palustre" cell collected in the sediments of the Sippewissett Salt Marsh, Cape Cod, MA. Our draft dataset consists of 3.6 Mbp, has a G + C content of 38.1 % and is nearly complete (83 %). In conclusion, the next closest relative to the <i>Achromatium> spp. genomes is <i>Thiorhodovibrio> sp. 907 of the family <i>Chromatiaceae>, containing phototrophic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria.

  20. iPAS Propulsion Subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the Integrated Power, Avionics and Software (iPAS) project is to develop a simulation facility that can be apply to various missions that use common avionics, hardware, and software architecture. The iPAS facility will model several subsystems, the EP4 contribution to the project is to design and build a low fidelity representation of the in-space propulsion system for the iPAS simulation. The system would use a pressurized bottle to provide the gas for the thrusters. Air will be used to perform the simulation to prevent a hazardous environment in the facility. Three cold gas thrusters previously used for the X-38 program will be used for the simulation because they are on hand and available for use. An incremental design-build-test approach will be taken where the X-38 thrusters may be replaced with actual flight thrusters as the flight design is matured. A pressurized system must be designed, built, and tested to reduce the 2,400psi bottle pressure to a reasonable pressure (0-800psig) to minimize the amount of noise created upon thruster activation. Once all the subsystems are completed they will be integrated together for testing.

  1. I-124 Imaging and Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Kuker, Russ; Sztejnberg, Manuel; Gulec, Seza

    2017-01-01

    Although radioactive iodine imaging and therapy are one of the earliest applications of theranostics, there still remain a number of unresolved clinical questions as to the optimization of diagnostic techniques and dosimetry protocols. I-124 as a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer has the potential to improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET/computed tomography (CT) compared to standard gamma scintigraphy can aid in the detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and provide more accurate measurements of metabolic tumor volumes. However the complex decay schema of I-124 poses challenges to quantitative PET imaging. More prospective studies are needed to define optimal dosimetry protocols and to improve patient-specific treatment planning strategies, taking into account not only the absorbed dose to tumors but also methods to avoid toxicity to normal organs. A historical perspective of I-124 imaging and dosimetry as well as future concepts are discussed. PMID:28117290

  2. I-124 Imaging and Dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kuker, Russ; Sztejnberg, Manuel; Gulec, Seza

    2016-01-05

    Although radioactive iodine imaging and therapy are one of the earliest applications of theranostics, there still remain a number of unresolved clinical questions as to the optimization of diagnostic techniques and dosimetry protocols. I-124 as a positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer has the potential to improve the current clinical practice in the diagnosis and treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer. The higher sensitivity and spatial resolution of PET/computed tomography (CT) compared to standard gamma scintigraphy can aid in the detection of recurrent or metastatic disease and provide more accurate measurements of metabolic tumor volumes. However the complex decay schema of I-124 poses challenges to quantitative PET imaging. More prospective studies are needed to define optimal dosimetry protocols and to improve patient-specific treatment planning strategies, taking into account not only the absorbed dose to tumors but also methods to avoid toxicity to normal organs. A historical perspective of I-124 imaging and dosimetry as well as future concepts are discussed.

  3. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type I.

    PubMed

    Beukes, E; Dent, D M; De Villiers, J C; Miller, J L

    1985-08-17

    During the 13-year period 1970-1983 only 7 cases of multiple endocrine neoplasia type I (MEN I) were seen at Groote Schuur Hospital, suggesting that the associated gene is rare in this area. Only 1 of these patients was black. Endocrine associations were as follows: hyperparathyroidism--6 cases, pituitary hypersecretion--6 cases (3 each involving growth hormone and prolactin), and pancreatic hypersecretion--3 cases (2 of gastrinoma and 1 of insulinoma). The presenting features were predictably diverse and depended on the component which manifested first. There was little difficulty in reaching a diagnosis on routine investigation. All patients with hyperparathyroidism underwent a 3 1/2-gland parathyroidectomy as the first treatment procedure, normocalcaemia being achieved in 5 cases, but persistent hypercalcaemia in the 6th suggested a supernumerary gland. A pituitary adenoma was removed in 4 cases, but persistent prolactinaemia necessitated bromocriptine therapy in 3. Successful distal pancreatectomy was undertaken in a patient with insulinoma and a patient with gastrinoma, and a further patient with gastrinoma awaits surgery. The overall prognosis in cases of MEN I appears to depend on the most aggressive component, often the pancreatic lesion; our patients have run a surprisingly benign course with only 1 late death, from hypertensive heart disease.

  4. Serotonin regulates voltage-dependent currents in type I(e(A)) and I(i) interneurons of Hermissenda.

    PubMed

    Jin, Nan Ge; Crow, Terry

    2011-11-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has both direct and modulatory actions on central neurons contributing to behavioral arousal and cellular-synaptic plasticity in diverse species. In Hermissenda, 5-HT produces changes in intrinsic excitability of different types of identified interneurons in the circumesophageal nervous system. Using whole cell patch-clamp techniques we have examined membrane conductance changes produced by 5-HT that contribute to intrinsic excitability in two identified classes of interneurons, types I(i) and I(eA). Whole cell currents were examined before and after 5-HT application to the isolated nervous system. A 4-aminopyridine-sensitive transient outward K(+) current [I(K(A))], a tetraethylammonium-sensitive delayed rectifier K(+) current [I(K(V))], an inward rectifier K(+) current [I(K(IR))], and a hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) were characterized. 5-HT decreased the amplitude of I(K(A)) and I(K(V)) in both type I(i) and I(eA) interneurons. However, differences in 5-HT's effects on the activation-inactivation kinetics were observed in different types of interneurons. 5-HT produced a depolarizing shift in the activation curve of I(K(V)) and a hyperpolarizing shift in the inactivation curve of I(K(A)) in type I(i) interneurons. In contrast, 5-HT produced a depolarizing shift in the activation curve and a hyperpolarizing shift in the inactivation curve of both I(K(V)) and I(K(A)) in type I(eA) interneurons. In addition, 5-HT decreased the amplitude of I(K(IR)) in type I(i) interneurons and increased the amplitude of I(h) in type I(eA) interneurons. These results indicate that 5-HT-dependent changes in I(K(A)), I(K(V)), I(K(IR)), and I(h) contribute to multiple mechanisms that synergistically support modulation of increased intrinsic excitability associated with different functional classes of identified type I interneurons.

  5. The Mirrored Hand Illusion: I Control, So I Possess?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Aibao; Zhang, Yanchi; Yin, Yulong; Yang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Certain situations may not only cause people to misjudge external information but also distort people's perception of themselves. The present study is the first to report the mirrored hand illusion which could be generated when the experimenter imitated the fist-clenching movements of the subject synchronously. The subjects formed the illusion that the experimenter's hand was "something I can control" when being imitated synchronously. In addition, a sense of ownership over the alien hand was established by integrating multisensory signals and comparing these signals with preexisting body presentations. This method might represent a new avenue for research on the formation of self-consciousness.

  6. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-03-18

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  7. Altus I aircraft on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft climbs away after takeoff from Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet. The Altus II, the first of the two craft to be completed, made its first flight on May 1, 1996. With its engine augmented by a single-stage turbocharger, the Altus II reached an altitude of 37,000 ft during its first series of development flights at Dryden in Aug., 1996. In Oct. of that year, the Altus II was flown in an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement study for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory in Oklahoma. During the course of those flights, the Altus II set a single-flight endurance record for remotely-operated aircraft of more than 26 hours. The Altus I, completed in 1997, flew a series of development flights at Dryden that summer. Those test flights culminated with the craft reaching an altitude of 43,500 ft while carrying a simulated 300-lb payload, a record for an unmanned aircraft powered by a piston engine augmented with a single-stage turbocharger. The Altus II sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the

  8. Altus I aircraft on lakebed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The remotely-piloted Altus I aircraft climbs away after takeoff from Rogers Dry Lake adjacent to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, Calif. The short series of test flights sponsored by the Naval Postgraduate School in early August, 1997, were designed to demonstrate the ability of the experimental craft to cruise at altitudes above 40,000 feet for sustained durations. On its final flight Aug. 15, the Altus I reached an altitude of 43,500 feet. The Altus I and its sister ship, the Altus II, are variants of the Predator surveillance drone built by General Atomics/Aeronautical Systems, Inc. They are designed for high-altitude, long-duration scientific sampling missions, and are powered by turbocharged piston engines. The Altus I incorporates a single-stage turbocharger, while the Altus II, built for NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology program, sports a two-stage turbocharger to enable the craft to fly at altitudes above 55,000 feet. The Altus II, the first of the two craft to be completed, made its first flight on May 1, 1996. With its engine augmented by a single-stage turbocharger, the Altus II reached an altitude of 37,000 ft during its first series of development flights at Dryden in Aug., 1996. In Oct. of that year, the Altus II was flown in an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement study for the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory in Oklahoma. During the course of those flights, the Altus II set a single-flight endurance record for remotely-operated aircraft of more than 26 hours. The Altus I, completed in 1997, flew a series of development flights at Dryden that summer. Those test flights culminated with the craft reaching an altitude of 43,500 ft while carrying a simulated 300-lb payload, a record for an unmanned aircraft powered by a piston engine augmented with a single-stage turbocharger. The Altus II sustained an altitudeof 55,000 feet for four hours in 1999. A pilot in a control station on the ground flies the

  9. Spanish listeners' perceptual patterns for English /i/ and /I/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Geoffrey Stewart

    2005-04-01

    Spanish has five monophthongs which differ only in spectral properties. General Canadian English has ten monophthongs which differ in steady-state spectral properties and duration, and many nominal monophthongs have substantial diphthongization. Unlike Spanish, Canadian English also uses duration as a cue to postvocalic obstruent voicing. The present study investigates L1-English and L1-Spanish L2-English listeners perception of a Canadian English /bIt, bit, bId, bid/ continuum varying in steady-state spectral values and duration. Several patterns emerge in the L1-Spanish listeners data, including a contrary pattern in which duration is used in the same direction as L1-English listeners but spectral properties in the opposite direction. With respect to /i/ and /I/ perception, these patterns are generally consistent with the stages of learning proposed by Escudero [Unpublished Masters Thesis, Edinburgh University, 2000]: L1-Spanish listeners cannot initially perceive the difference, next they use duration properties, later they begin to use spectral properties, and finally they have L1-English-like primary use of spectral properties and secondary use of duration. Production data adds additional insight into the relationship of the perceptual patterns to the stages of learning.

  10. <i>hhjj> production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; Nordstrom, Karl; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-08-25

    The search for di-Higgs production at the LHC in order to set limits on the Higgs trilinear coupling and constraints on new physics is one of the main motivations for the LHC high-luminosity phase. Recent experimental analyses suggest that such analyses will only be successful if information from a range of channels is included. We therefore investigate di-Higgs production in association with two hadronic jets and give a detailed discussion of both the gluon- and the weak boson-fusion (WBF) contributions, with a particular emphasis on the phenomenology with modified Higgs trilinear and quartic gauge couplings. We perform a detailed investigation of the full hadronic final state and find that <i>hhjj> production should add sensitivity to a di-Higgs search combination at the HL-LHC with 3 ab-1. Since the WBF and GF contributions are sensitive to different sources of physics beyond the Standard Model, we devise search strategies to disentangle and isolate these production modes. In addition, while gluon fusion remains non-negligible in WBF-type selections, sizeable new physics contributions to the latter can still be constrained. As an example of the latter point we investigate the sensitivity that can be obtained for a measurement of the quartic Higgs–gauge boson couplings.

  11. Research Summary No. 36-3, Volume I, Part I. Volume I, Part One

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    The Research Summary is a bimonthly report of supporting research and development conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This periodical is issued in three volumes. Volume I contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Space Sciences, Systems, Guidance and Control, and Telecommunications Divisions of the Laboratory. Volume II contains summaries of the work accomplished by the Physical Sciences, Engineering Mechanics, Engineering Facilities, and Propulsion Divisions. All work of a classified nature is contained in Volume Ill.

  12. 31 CFR 359.6 - When may I redeem my Series I bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When may I redeem my Series I bond... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.6 When may I redeem my Series I bond? (a) Bonds issued on December 1, 2002, or earlier. You may redeem your Series I savings bond issued on January 1, 2003,...

  13. 31 CFR 359.6 - When may I redeem my Series I bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When may I redeem my Series I bond... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.6 When may I redeem my Series I bond? (a) Bonds issued on December 1, 2002, or earlier. You may redeem your Series I savings bond issued on January 1, 2003,...

  14. 31 CFR 359.6 - When may I redeem my Series I bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When may I redeem my Series I bond... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.6 When may I redeem my Series I bond? (a) Bonds issued on December 1, 2002, or earlier. You may redeem your Series I savings bond issued on January 1, 2003,...

  15. 31 CFR 359.6 - When may I redeem my Series I bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false When may I redeem my Series I bond... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.6 When may I redeem my Series I bond? (a) Bonds issued on December 1, 2002, or earlier. You may redeem your Series I savings bond issued on January 1, 2003,...

  16. 31 CFR 359.6 - When may I redeem my Series I bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... thereafter. You may redeem your Series I savings bond issued on February 1, 2003, or thereafter, at any time... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When may I redeem my Series I bond... BONDS, SERIES I General Information § 359.6 When may I redeem my Series I bond? (a) Bonds issued on...

  17. Redescription, distribution and mating call of <i>Pristimantis> <i>colomai> (Lynch and Duellman, 1997) (Anura, Craugastoridae).

    PubMed

    Valencia-Zuleta, Alejandro; Jaramillo-Martínez, Andrés Felipe; Yánez-Muñoz, Mario H

    2016-11-17

    We redescribe Pristimantis colomai (Lynch & Duellman, 1997) on the basis of new specimens from Colombia and Ecuador. Also provide a new diagnosis, reassess its distribution, and describe the mating call for the first time. Besides the data in the original description, only is available for this species: (i) new records from Ecuador (Yánez-Muñoz et al. 2011) and (ii) molecular phylogenetic inferences that place this species in the Pristimantis ridens series (Hedges et al. 2008; Padial et al. 2014). Pristimantis colomai is currently classified as endangered due to its restrict distribution and habitat quality (Castro et al. 2004).

  18. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving styles in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.

  19. THE PURIFICATION OF HYPERTENSIN I

    PubMed Central

    Skeggs, Leonard T.; Marsh, Walton H.; Kahn, Joseph R.; Shumway, Norman P.

    1954-01-01

    The purification of hypertensin I has been described. The final product which is four times as powerful a pressor agent as l-arterenol, is obtained with an over-all recovery of 40 per cent. The product consists of a single component in countercurrent distribution, having a nitrogen content of 15.97 per cent and a specific activity of 7050 Goldblatt units per mg. of N or 1125 units per mg. of solid. Acid hydrolysis and paper chromatography indicate in a preliminary fashion that there are about nine amino acids present in the intact polypeptide. PMID:13201713

  20. Excited states in 129I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleanu, D.; Balabanski, D. L.; Venkova, Ts.; Bucurescu, D.; Mărginean, N.; Ganioǧlu, E.; Căta-Danil, Gh.; Atanasova, L.; Căta-Danil, I.; Detistov, P.; Filipescu, D.; Ghiţă, D.; Glodariu, T.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mărginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Negret, A.; Pascu, S.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Suliman, G.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2013-01-01

    Excited states in 129I were populated with the 124Sn(7Li,2n) reaction at 23 MeV. In-beam measurements of γ-ray coincidences were performed with an array of eight HPGe detectors and five LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detectors. Based on the γγ coincidence data, a positive parity band structure built on the 7/2+ ground state was established and the πg7/2 configuration at oblate deformation was assigned to it. The results are compared to interacting Boson-Fermion model (IBFM) and total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations.

  1. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and haplotypes (Apa I, Bsm I, Fok I, Taq I) in Turkish psoriasis patients

    PubMed Central

    Acikbas, Ibrahim; Sanlı, Berna; Tepeli, Emre; Ergin, Seniz; Aktan, Sebnem; Bagci, Huseyin

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease characterized by increased squamous cell proliferation and impaired differentiation. Vitamin D, Calcitriol, and its analogues are successfully used for psoriasis therapy. However, it is unknown why some psoriasis patients are resistant to Vitamin D therapy. Vitamin D mediates its activity by a nuclear receptor. It is suggested that polymorphisms and haplotypes in the VDR gene may explain the differences in response to vitamin D therapy. Material/Methods In this study, 102 psoriasis patients and 102 healthy controls were studied for VDR gene polymorphisms. The Fok I, Bsm I, Apa I and Taq I polymorphisms were examined by PCR-RFLP, and 50 subjects received vitamin D therapy to evaluate the association between VDR gene polymorphisms and response to vitamin D therapy. Existence of cutting site is shown by capital letters, and lack was shown by lower case. The haplotypes were analysed by CHAPLIN. Results There was significant difference in allele frequency of T and genotype frequency of Tt between cases and controls (p values 0.038 and 0.04, respectively). The Aa and bb genotypes were significantly higher in early onset than late onset psoriasis (p values 0.008 and 0.04, respectively). The genotypes Ff, ff and TT are significantly different between vitamin D3 therapy responders and non-responders (p values 0.04, 0.0001, 0.009, respectively). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing importance of VDR gene haplotypes in psoriasis, the significance of the Wald and LR (Likelihood Ratio) statistics (p=0,0042) suggest that FfBbAatt is a disease-susceptibility haplotype. Conclusions Haplotype analysis is a recent and commonly used method in genetic association studies. Our results reveal a previously unidentified susceptibility haplotype and indicate that certain haplotypes are important in the resistance to vitamin D3 therapy and the onset of psoriasis. The haplotypes can give valuable data where

  2. Why Do I Sweat So Much?

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Why Do I Sweat So Much? KidsHealth > For Teens > Why Do I Sweat So Much? A A A en español ¿ ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Hygiene Basics What Can I Do About Sweating? Feeling Fresh Why Should I ...

  3. {sup 129}I, {sup 131}I and {sup 127}I in animal thyroids after the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    SciTech Connect

    VanMiddleworth, L.; Handle, J.

    1997-10-01

    A small number of animal thyroids from Bad Hall, Austria; Ulm, Germany; and Steinkjer, Norway had {sup 131}I (half-life 8.06 d) measured between 21 and 72 d following the nuclear accident at Chernobyl on 26 April 1986. Nine years later {sup 129}I (half-life 1.57 x 10{sup 7} y) fission product and natural {sup 127}I were measured in the same thyroids. The mass ratios, {sup 129}I/{sup 131}I were calculated to the date of the Chernobyl accident and they ranged between 13 and 71. These ratios are compared to the expected ratios within an operating nuclear reactor during 2 y of operation, where the {sup 129}I/{sup 131}I{sup -1} ratio never exceeded 30. The observed ratio of {sup 129}I to natural {sup 127}I in thyroids ranged from 5 to 200 times the ratio before the accident, except that the Norwegian thyroids had {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios which were less than the ratios of pre-Chernobyl thyroids from Ulm. These studies show the {sup 129}I and {sup 131}I from the Chernobyl accident were accumulated with natural {sup 127}I in animal thyroids but the isotope ratios, calculated to the release date, had wide ranges. The {sup 131}I radioactive exposure might be estimated from a fission product mixture by measuring {sup 129}I in thyroids long after the exposure to {sup 131}I, but the results would probably show a wide range of possibilities. The determining variables should be evaluated. We know of no previous data regarding both {sup 131}I and {sup 129}I in thyroid glands during the first 3 mo after the Chernobyl accident. 16 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. An improved high-quality draft genome sequence of <i>Carnobacterium inhibensi> subsp. <i>inhibens> strain K1T

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Wayne L.; Davis, Christina L.; Shapiro, Nicole; Huntemann, Marcel; Clum, Alicia; Reddy, T. B. K.; Pillay, Manoj; Markowitz, Victor; Varghese, Neha; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Woyke, Tanja

    2016-09-08

    Despite their ubiquity and their involvement in food spoilage, the genus <i>Carnobacterium> remains rather sparsely characterized at the genome level. <i>Carnobacterium inhibensi> K1T is a member of the <i>Carnobacteriaceae> family within the class <i>Bacilli>. This strain is a Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from the intestine of an Atlantic salmon. The present study determined the genome sequence and annotation of <i>Carnobacterium inhibensi> K1T. The genome comprised 2,748,608 bp with a G+C content of 34.85 %, which included 2621 protein-coding genes and 116 RNA genes. The strain contained five contigs corresponding to presumptive plasmids of sizes: 19,036; 24,250; 26,581; 65,272; and 65,904 bp.

  5. Neuroimmunity of HTLV-I Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Yoshihisa; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Human T-lymphotrophic virus type I (HTLV-I) is an oncogenic retrovirus and its infection is associated with a variety of human diseases including HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropic spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Large numbers of epidemiological, virological, immunological, and clinical studies on HTLV-I- and HTLV-I-associated diseases have been published, although the pathogenesis of HAM/TSP remains to be fully understood. In the last several years, researchers have shown that several key factors are important in HTLV-I-associated neurologic disease including high HTLV-I proviral load and a strong immune response to HTLV-I. Here, we review pathophysiological findings on HAM/TSP and focus on viral-host immune responses to the virus in HTLV-I infected individuals. In particular, the role of HTLV-I-specific CD8+ T cell response is highlighted. PMID:20437106

  6. Structure of <i>Cryptosporidium> IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with <i>in vivoi> antiparasitic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of <i>Cryptosporidium> infections. Here, the structure of <i>C. parvumi> IMPDH (<i>Cp>IMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with <i>in vivoi> anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategy for the further optimization of <i>C. parvumi> inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.

  7. What I wish I had in my stockroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampere, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Most new teachers walk into their new classroom territory and find at least some equipment. Perhaps there are items there that you don't recognize. One way to get those types of questions answered is to post a question and/or picture on the TAP-L (Teaching Apparatus List) listserv (see: http://www.pira-online.org for more information). Within a few short minutes, the sender will receive at least a couple of responses. But what if a new teacher walks into a totally empty prep room? Now that teacher is tasked with purchasing useful equipment, and we know that the opportunity for a similar acquisition in the near future is slim. So you better choose wisely! Whether my new stockroom is well equipped or completely empty, I would make sure to have the following six items in my arsenal.

  8. Availability program: Phase I report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, S.L.; Dabiri, A.; Keeton, D.C.; Riemer, B.W.; Waganer, L.M.

    1985-05-01

    An Availability Working Group was formed within the Office of Fusion Energy in March 1984 to consider the establishment of an availability program for magnetic fusion. The scope of this program is defined to include the development of (1) a comprehensive data base, (2) empirical correlations, and (3) analytical methods for application to fusion facilities and devices. The long-term goal of the availability program is to develop a validated, integrated methodology that will provide (1) projections of plant availability and (2) input to design decisions on maintainability and system reliability requirements. The Phase I study group was commissioned to assess the status of work in progress that is relevant to the availability program. The scope of Phase I included surveys of existing data and data collection programs at operating fusion research facilities, the assessment of existing computer models to calculate system availability, and the review of methods to predict and correlate data on component failure and maintenance. The results of these investigations are reported to the Availability Working Group in this document.

  9. C3I graphical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labatt, Earl C., Jr.

    1991-09-01

    Past research efforts in the field of command, control, communications, and intelligence (C3I), have concentrated on the application and refinement of advanced artificial intelligence (AI) concepts. However, the man-machine interface to these advanced applications has experienced little improvement and does not adequately reflect some of the AI concepts embedded within these systems. The development of more advanced computing techniques requires a more sophisticated interface to the system. These enhancements cannot be adequately conceived by a user using traditional display techniques. The underlying AI concepts that help facilitate the transfer of information between acquired C3I data and an operator are revealed. Many of these concepts are discussed in regard to their application in current Tactical Air Force Research Projects. In addition, the limitations of previous program interfaces and the current advances in graphical interface techniques are discussed. The focus is on two decision aid systems that incorporate several AI concepts: the Tactical Expert Mission Planner (TEMPLAR) and the Identification of Command and Control Operations Nodes (ICON).

  10. Stacking disorder in ice I.

    PubMed

    Malkin, Tamsin L; Murray, Benjamin J; Salzmann, Christoph G; Molinero, Valeria; Pickering, Steven J; Whale, Thomas F

    2015-01-07

    Traditionally, ice I was considered to exist in two well-defined crystalline forms at ambient pressure: stable hexagonal ice (ice Ih) and metastable cubic ice (ice Ic). However, it is becoming increasingly evident that what has been called cubic ice in the past does not have a structure consistent with the cubic crystal system. Instead, it is a stacking-disordered material containing cubic sequences interlaced with hexagonal sequences, which is termed stacking-disordered ice (ice Isd). In this article, we summarise previous work on ice with stacking disorder including ice that was called cubic ice in the past. We also present new experimental data which shows that ice which crystallises after heterogeneous nucleation in water droplets containing solid inclusions also contains stacking disorder even at freezing temperatures of around -15 °C. This supports the results from molecular simulations, that the structure of ice that crystallises initially from supercooled water is always stacking-disordered and that this metastable ice can transform to the stable hexagonal phase subject to the kinetics of recrystallization. We also show that stacking disorder in ice which forms from water droplets is quantitatively distinct from ice made via other routes. The emerging picture of ice I is that of a very complex material which frequently contains stacking disorder and this stacking disorder can vary in complexity depending on the route of formation and thermal history.

  11. [Angiotensin I biosynthesis and electrolytes].

    PubMed

    Tögel, E; Jarosch, E; Rammal, E

    1983-01-01

    An influence on the production of Angiotensin-I by different ions is demonstrated. Plasma Renin activity was thereby measured by the methods of Boyd et al. (pH 7.5) and of Fyhrquist et al. (pH 6.0) at a concentration of each ion of 50 mmol/L. Ions of different size were used, ranging from Lithium to the Ammonium-ion. A definitive dependency of this effect on the Angiotensin production by the ion size could be shown. With Sodium the concentration in serum was varied at 5 levels (130-170 mmol/L) and Renin measured at Potassium concentrations in low (3.4-3.7 mmol/L) or high (4.8-5.1 mmol/L) so-called normal ranges. A marked increase of the production of Angiotensin-I with increasing sodium concentrations at a low Potassium range was observed and the opposite was true at high Potassium concentrations. These effects have to be taken into account when assaying Plasma Renin activity. In addition, they offer also an explanation of the well-known but unsolved facts of the influence of Sodium and Potassium on the pathogenesis of hypertonia.

  12. Aquarius iPhone Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Joseph C., Jr.; Arca. Jeremy M.; Ko, Michael A.; Oks, Boris

    2012-01-01

    The Office of the CIO at JPL has developed an iPhone application for the Aquarius/SAC-D mission. The application includes specific information about the science and purpose of the Aquarius satellite and also features daily mission news updates pulled from sources at Goddard Space Flight Center as well as Twitter. The application includes a media and data tab section. The media section displays images from the observatory, viewing construction up to the launch and also includes various videos and recorded diaries from the Aquarius Project Manager. The data tab highlights many of the factors that affect the Earth s ocean and the water cycle. The application leverages the iPhone s accelerometer to move the Aquarius Satellite over the Earth, revealing these factors. Lastly, this application features a countdown timer to the satellite s launch, which is currently counting the days since launch. This application was highly successful in promoting the Aquarius Mission and educating the public about how ocean salinity is paramount to understanding the Earth.

  13. Atelosteogenesis type I: autopsy findings.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Annasu; Wainwright, Helen C; Beighton, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We have documented the clinical, radiologic, and autopsy findings of 2 fetuses with atelosteogenesis type I, aged 22 and 17 weeks. This rare autosomal dominant lethal skeletal dysplasia is caused by mutation in the FNLB gene. The 17-week-old fetus had some features of atelosteogenesis type II, notably "hitchhiker thumbs," a cleft palate, and midfacial flattening. The histologic demonstration of giant cells in the growth plate cartilage confirmed the diagnosis of atelosteogenesis type I in both fetuses, thereby facilitating accurate prediction of recurrence risks for the parents of the affected fetuses. Autopsy findings included tracheal narrowing and stenosis with pulmonary hypoplasia in both fetuses. Renal microcysts and abnormal branching of the pancreatic duct were also present in 1 of the fetuses, and malrotation of the caecum and retinal dysplasia involving the optic nerve were identified in the other. Postmortem and histologic investigations play an important role in the elucidation of the genetic micromelic skeletal disorders that are lethal in the fetus and neonate.

  14. <i>Scapanoclypeus> <i>bicoloratus> new species from Hardap, Namibia (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae: Tanyproctini).

    PubMed

    Sehnal, Richard

    2017-03-30

    Scapanoclypeus Evans (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae: Tanyproctini) was established with Trichinopus aberrans Frey designated as its type species and included five additional species: S. testaceus Evans, S. carinatus Evans, S. cornutus Evans, S. brunneus Evans, and S. aulacocoleatus Evans. Scapanoclypeus, Trichinopus Waterhouse, and Oedanomerus Waterhouse are distinguished from other African Tanyproctini by their small size (12 mm or less), reduced mouthparts, and antennae with 8-10 antennomeres (Evans 1987). Species of Scapanoclypeus and Oedanomerus have simple claws without cleft or teeth at base, a slightly conical labrum, and a third antennomere that is equal in length to the fourth; while Trichinopus has bifid claws, a distinctly conical labrum with rounded end, and the third antennomere approximately as long as the fourth (Lacroix 2007). The antennal club of Scapanoclypeus is at least three times longer than the combined length of antennomeres I-IV and the clypeal surface at nearly a right angle in relation to the plane of the frons, while Oedanomerus has an antennal club about as long as the combined length of antennomeres I-IV and coplanar clypeal and frontal surfaces (Evans 1987; Lacroix 2007; Sehnal 2013). Scapanoclypeus was subsequently mentioned in Lacroix (2007), who re-drew the figures and adopted the key from Evans (1987). Three additional species have since been described from southern Africa: S. triapicalis Sehnal, S. sinepunctatus Sehnal, and S. hardap Sehnal (see Sehnal 2013, 2014).

  15. Structural Flight Loads Simulation Capability. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    2.. Ei r I U[ fJ 88 0@ 4 - 0* ...... S LLU 2 . . Z * WW W WW S WW W ~~ o w 000 -. U -. 0 U C-U4 w6 £oWaZ.wJZ Its go 0 ISO 0-10- Z .. . .. . zo XMI-C...9C 000 /...... . ....... .....I........ .... SOL_0 ........ I .... /..... I 50001 .././ ---I..,..... .... 3000

  16. Complete genome sequence of the Antarctic <i>Halorubrum lacusprofundii> type strain ACAM 34

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iain J.; DasSarma, Priya; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Bruce, David C.; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas S.; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff S.; Larimer, Frank; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Ivanova, Natalia; Richardson, Paul; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Woese, Carl R.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2016-09-10

    <i>Halorubrum lacusprofundii> is an extreme halophile within the archaeal phylum <i>Euryarchaeota>. The type strain ACAM 34 was isolated from Deep Lake, Antarctica. <i>H. lacusprofundii> is of phylogenetic interest because it is distantly related to the haloarchaea that have previously been sequenced. It is also of interest because of its psychrotolerance. We report here the complete genome sequence of <i>H. lacusprofundii> type strain ACAM 34 and its annotation. In conclusion, this genome is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse <i>Archaea>.

  17. <i>Decerns>: A framework for multi-criteria decision analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yatsalo, Boris; Didenko, Vladimir; Gritsyuk, Sergey; Sullivan, Terry

    2015-02-27

    A new framework, <i>Decerns>, for multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) of a wide range of practical problems on risk management is introduced. <i>Decerns> framework contains a library of modules that are the basis for two scalable systems: <i>DecernsMCDA> for analysis of multicriteria problems, and <i>DecernsSDSS> for multicriteria analysis of spatial options. <i>DecernsMCDA> includes well known MCDA methods and original methods for uncertainty treatment based on probabilistic approaches and fuzzy numbers. As a result, these MCDA methods are described along with a case study on analysis of multicriteria location problem.

  18. Ares I Static Tests Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, William; Lindemuth, Kathleen; Mich, John; White, K. Preston; Parker, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Probabilistic engineering design enhances safety and reduces costs by incorporating risk assessment directly into the design process. In this paper, we assess the format of the quantitative metrics for the vehicle which will replace the Space Shuttle, the Ares I rocket. Specifically, we address the metrics for in-flight measurement error in the vector position of the motor nozzle, dictated by limits on guidance, navigation, and control systems. Analyses include the propagation of error from measured to derived parameters, the time-series of dwell points for the duty cycle during static tests, and commanded versus achieved yaw angle during tests. Based on these analyses, we recommend a probabilistic template for specifying the maximum error in angular displacement and radial offset for the nozzle-position vector. Criteria for evaluating individual tests and risky decisions also are developed.

  19. Ares I Upper Stage Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhage, Marc

    2007-01-01

    The Upper Stage Element of NASA's Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) is a "clean-sheet" approach that is being designed and developed in-house, with Element management at MSFC. The Upper Stage Element concept is a self-supporting cylindrical structure, approximately 84' long and 18' in diameter. While the First Stage Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) design has changed since the CLV inception, the Upper Stage Element design has remained essentially a clean-sheet design approach. A clean-sheet upper stage design does offer many advantages: a design for increased reliability; built-in evolvability to allow for commonality/growth without major redesign; incorporation of state-of-the-art materials and hardware; and incorporation of design, fabrication, and test techniques and processes to facilitate a more operable system.

  20. PHAGOCYTOSIS INHIBITION AND REVERSAL I.

    PubMed Central

    Sbarra, Anthony J.; Shirley, William

    1963-01-01

    Sbarra, Anthony J. (St. Margaret's Hospital, Boston, Mass.) and William Shirley. Phagocytosis inhibition and reversal. I. Effect of glycolytic intermediates and nucleotides on particle uptake. J. Bacteriol. 86:259–265. 1963.—By microscopically monitoring phagocytosis and following the biochemical changes associated with this process, the inhibition of phagocytosis by fluoride or iodoacetate was shown to be partially reversed by pyruvate. This reversal occurred with both inhibitors, either aerobically or anaerobically. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) apparently increased the degree of pyruvate reversal when fluoride, but not iodoacetate, was the inhibitory agent. Lactate under some conditions was also shown to reverse the inhibition. It is suggested that pyruvate and NAD are key compounds for the phagocytic process. PMID:14058950

  1. A <i>yigP> mutant strain is a small colony variant of <i>E. colii>, and shows pleiotropic antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Tang, Qiongwei; Song, Jie; Ye, Jiang; Wu, Haizhen; Zhang, Huizhan

    2017-09-15

    Small colony variants (SCVs) are a commonly observed subpopulation of bacteria that have a small colony size and distinctive biochemical characteristics. SCVs are more resistant to some antibiotics than the wild-type, and usually cause persistent infections in the clinic. SCV studies have been very active during the past two decades, especially of <i>Staphylococcus aureusi>. However, fewer studies on <i>Escherichia coli i>SCVs exist, so we studied an <i>E. coli i>SCV during an experiment involving the deletion of the<i> yigPi> locus. PCR and DNA sequencing revealed that the SCV was attributable to a defect in the <i>yigP> function. Furthermore, we investigated the antibiotic resistance profile of the SCV and it showed increased erythromycin, kanamycin and D-cycloserine resistance, but collateral sensitivity to ampicillin, polymyxin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, rifampin, and nalidixic acid. We tried to determine the association between <i>yigP> and the pleiotropic antibiotic resistance of the SCV by analyzing biofilm formation, cellular morphology and coenzyme Q (Q8) production. Our results indicated that impaired Q8 biosynthesis was the primary factor that contributed to the increased resistance and collateral sensitivity of the SCV. This study offers a novel genetic basis for <i>E. colii> SCVs and an insight into the development of alternative antimicrobial strategies for clinical therapy.

  2. [Phase I cancer trials methodology].

    PubMed

    Le Tourneau, Christophe; Faivre, Sandrine; Raymond, Eric; Diéras, Véronique

    2007-11-01

    The main objective of phase I cancer trials is to determine precisely the recommended dose of an anticancer agent as a single agent or in a context of combinations of anticancer agents (including cytotoxic agents, immunotherapy, radiotherapy...), that is administered for the first time in man, to further proceed clinical development with phase II and III trials. The recommended dose must have the greatest efficiency with acceptable toxicity. For the anticancer agents, the ratio risk/benefit is high, since toxicities associated with many cancer therapeutic agents are substantial and because the efficacy is often limited. Thus, phase I cancer trials present unique challenges in comparison to other therapeutic areas. Indeed, it is essential to minimize the numbers of patients treated at subefficient dose levels, and in the same time not to expose the patients to unacceptable toxicity. Historically, the first method that has been used is the Fibonacci escalation. The major problems raised with this method have been the lengths of the trials and the risk to treat substantial numbers of patients at nontherapeutix doses. Thus, novel methods have been then developed modifying the numbers of patients included at each dose level and the rapidity of dose escalation. These methods include pharmacologically guided dose escalation, escalation with overdose control and the continual reassessment method which are both statistically based dose escalation methods, and the accelerated titration designs. Concerning the targeted anticancer therapies, the therapeutic effect on the target, due to their higher specificity, can be obtained using doses that have few toxicity. Using the toxicity to determine the recommended dose for phase II trials, as it is the case for "classical > anticancer agents, does not seem to be sufficient. Alternatives to determine the optimal biological dose include measurement of target inhibition, pharmacokinetic analysis and functional imaging.

  3. Nanomechanics of Type I Collagen.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Schieber, Jay D

    2016-07-12

    Type I collagen is the predominant collagen in mature tendons and ligaments, where it gives them their load-bearing mechanical properties. Fibrils of type I collagen are formed by the packing of polypeptide triple helices. Higher-order structures like fibril bundles and fibers are assembled from fibrils in the presence of other collagenous molecules and noncollagenous molecules. Curiously, however, experiments show that fibrils/fibril bundles are less resistant to axial stress compared to their constituent triple helices-the Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles are an order-of-magnitude smaller than the Young's moduli of triple helices. Given the sensitivity of the Young's moduli of triple helices to solvation environment, a plausible explanation is that the packing of triple helices into fibrils perhaps reduces the Young's modulus of an individual triple helix, which results in fibrils having smaller Young's moduli. We find, however, from molecular dynamics and accelerated conformational sampling simulations that the Young's modulus of the buried core of the fibril is of the same order as that of a triple helix in aqueous phase. These simulations, therefore, suggest that the lower Young's moduli of fibrils/fibril bundles cannot be attributed to the specific packing of triple helices in the fibril core. It is not the fibril core that yields initially to axial stress. Rather, it must be the portion of the fibril exposed to the solvent and/or the fibril-fibril interface that bears the initial strain. Overall, this work provides estimates of Young's moduli and persistence lengths at two levels of collagen's structural assembly, which are necessary to quantitatively investigate the response of various biological factors on collagen mechanics, including congenital mutations, posttranslational modifications and ligand binding, and also engineer new collagen-based materials.

  4. Characterization of a Thermostable Endoglucanase from <i>Cellulomonas fimi>i ATCC484.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Hirak; Hsu, Bryan; de Asis, Marc; Zierke, Mirko; Sim, Lyann; Withers, Stephen G; Wakarchuk, Warren

    2017-10-05

    Bacteria in the genus Cellulomonas are well known as secretors of a variety of mesophilic carbohydrate degrading enzymes (e.g. cellulases and hemicellulases), active against plant cell wall polysaccharides. Recent proteomic analysis of the mesophilic bacterium <i>Cellulomonas fimii> ATCC484 revealed uncharacterized enzymes for the hydrolysis of plant cell wall biomass. Celf_1230 (CfCel6C), a secreted protein of Cellulomonas fimi ATCC484, is a novel member of the GH6 family of cellulases which could be successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. This enzyme displayed very little enzymatic/hydrolytic activity at 30oC, but showed an optimal activity around 65oC and exhibited a thermal denaturation temperature of 74oC. In addition, it also bound strongly to filter paper despite having no recognizable carbohydrate binding module. Our experiments show that CfCel6C is a thermostable endoglucanase with activity on a variety of β-glucans produced by an organism that struggles to grow above 30oC.

  5. Mutations of Arabidopsis <i>TBL32i> and <i>TBL33i> affect xylan acetylation and secondary wall deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Youxi; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Haghighat, Marziyeh; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Ye, Zheng -Hua; Zhang, Jin -Song

    2016-01-08

    Xylan is a major acetylated polymer in plant lignocellulosic biomass and it can be monoand di-acetylated at O-2 and O-3 as well as mono-acetylated at O-3 of xylosyl residues that is substituted with glucuronic acid (GlcA) at O-2. Based on the finding that ESK1, an <i>Arabidopsis thalianai> DUF231 protein, specifically mediates xylan 2-O- and 3-O-monoacetylation, we previously proposed that different acetyltransferase activities are required for regiospecific acetyl substitutions of xylan. Here, we demonstrate the functional roles of TBL32 and TBL33, two ESK1 close homologs, in acetyl substitutions of xylan. Simultaneous mutations of <i>TBL32i> and <i>TBL33i> resulted in a significant reduction in xylan acetyl content and endoxylanase digestion of the mutant xylan released GlcA-substituted xylooligomers without acetyl groups. Structural analysis of xylan revealed that the <i>tbl32 tbl33i> mutant had a nearly complete loss of 3-O-acetylated, 2-O-GlcA-substituted xylosyl residues. A reduction in 3-Omonoacetylated and 2,3-di-O-acetylated xylosyl residues was also observed. Simultaneous mutations of <i>TBL32i>, <i>TBL33i> and <i>ESK1i> resulted in a severe reduction in xylan acetyl level down to 15% of that of the wild type, and concomitantly, severely collapsed vessels and stunted plant growth. In particular, the S2 layer of secondary walls in xylem vessels of <i>tbl33 esk1i> and <i>tbl32 tbl33 esk1i> exhibited an altered structure, indicating abnormal assembly of secondary wall polymers. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that TBL32 and TBL33 play an important role in xylan acetylation and normal deposition of secondary walls.

  6. <i>Planck> 2015 results: VI. LFI mapmaking

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-20

    This article describes the mapmaking procedure applied to Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) data. The mapmaking step takes as input the calibrated timelines and pointing information. The main products are sky maps of I, Q, and U Stokes components. For the first time, we present polarization maps at LFI frequencies. The mapmaking algorithm is based on a destriping technique, which is enhanced with a noise prior. The Galactic region is masked to reduce errors arising from bandpass mismatch and high signal gradients. We apply horn-uniform radiometer weights to reduce the effects of beam-shape mismatch. The algorithm is the same as used for the 2013 release, apart from small changes in parameter settings. We validate the procedure through simulations. Special emphasis is put on the control of systematics, which is particularly important for accurate polarization analysis. We also produce low-resolution versions of the maps and corresponding noise covariance matrices. These serve as input in later analysis steps and parameter estimation. The noise covariance matrices are validated through noise Monte Carlo simulations. The residual noise in the map products is characterized through analysis of half-ring maps, noise covariance matrices, and simulations.

  7. High-quality permanent draft genome sequence of the <i>Parapiptadenia rigidai>-nodulating <i>Cupriavidus> sp. strain UYPR2.512

    SciTech Connect

    De Meyer, Sofie E.; Fabiano, Elena; Tian, Rui; Van Berkum, Peter; Seshadri, Rekha; Reddy, T. B. K.; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Howieson, John; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Reeve, Wayne

    2015-04-11

    <i>Cupriavidus> sp. strain UYPR2.512 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming rod that was isolated from a root nodule of <i>Parapiptadenia rigidai> grown in soils from a native forest of Uruguay. Here we describe the features of <i>Cupriavidus> sp. strain UYPR2.512, together with sequence and annotation. We find the 7,858,949 bp high-quality permanent draft genome is arranged in 365 scaffolds of 369 contigs, contains 7,411 protein-coding genes and 76 RNA-only encoding genes, and is part of the GEBA-RNB project proposal.

  8. Observation of radioactive iodine ((131)I, (129)I) in cropland soil after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hideshi

    2016-10-01

    During the early stages of the Fukushima nuclear accident, the temporal variations of (131)I deposited on the ground and of (131)I accumulated in cropland soil were monitored at a fixed location in Japan. Moreover, concentrations of long-lived radioactive iodine ((129)I) in atmospheric deposits and soil were measured to examine the feasibility of retrospectively reconstructing (131)I levels from the levels of accident-derived (129)I. The exceptionally high levels of (131)I in deposits and soil were attributed to rainfall-related deposition of radionuclides. In the crop field studied, the losses of deposited (131)I and (129)I due to volatilization were small. The atomic ratio (129)I/(131)I in the topsoil corresponded to the same ratio in deposits. The (131)I concentrations measured in the topsoil were very consistent with the (131)I concentrations reconstructed from the (129)I concentrations in the soil.

  9. Structure and proposed mechanism of α-glycerophosphate oxidase from <i>Mycoplasma pneumoniae>

    SciTech Connect

    Elkhal, Callia K.; Kean, Kelsey M.; Parsonage, Derek; Maenpuen, Somchart; Chaiyen, Pimchai; Claiborne, Al; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-03-14

    In this study, the formation of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) by the FAD-dependent α-glycerophosphate oxidase (GlpO), is important for the pathogenesis of <i>Streptococcus pneumoniaei> and <i>Mycoplasma pneumoniaei>. The structurally known GlpO from <i>Streptococcus> sp. (<i>Ssp>GlpO) is similar to the pneumococcal protein (<i>Sp>GlpO) and provides a guide for drug design against that target. However, M. <i>pneumoniae> GlpO (<i>Mp>GlpO), having <20% sequence identity with structurally known GlpOs, appears to represent a second type of GlpO we designate as Type II GlpOs. Here, the recombinant His-tagged <i>Mp>GlpO structure is described at ~2.5 Å resolution, solved by molecular replacement using as a search model the <i>Bordetella pertussisi> protein 3253 (Bp3253) a protein of unknown function solved by structural genomics efforts. Recombinant <i>Mp>GlpO is an active oxidase with a turnover number of ~580 min⁻¹ while Bp3253 showed no GlpO activity. No substantial differences exist between the oxidized and dithionite-reduced <i>Mp>GlpO structures. Although, no liganded structures were determined, a comparison with the tartrate-bound Bp3253 structure and consideration of residue conservation patterns guided the construction of a model for α-glycerophosphate (Glp) recognition and turnover by <i>Mp>GlpO. The predicted binding mode also appears relevant for the type I GlpOs (such as <i>Ssp>GlpO) despite differences in substrate recognition residues, and it implicates a histidine conserved in type I and II Glp oxidases and dehydrogenases as the catalytic acid/base. This work provides a solid foundation for guiding further studies of the mitochondrial Glp dehydrogenases as well as for continued studies of <i>M. pneumoniaei> and <i>S. pneumoniaei> glycerol metabolism and the development of novel therapeutics targeting <i>Mp>GlpO and <i>Sp>GlpO.

  10. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subpart B of... - Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 I Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED.... 205, Subpt. B, App. I Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 Table I—Sample Size Code Letters Batch...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subpart B of... - Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 I Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED.... 205, Subpt. B, App. I Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 Table I—Sample Size Code Letters Batch...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix I to Subpart B of... - Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 I Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED.... 205, Subpt. B, App. I Appendix I to Subpart B of Part 205 Table I—Sample Size Code Letters Batch...

  13. Binding mode and potency of <i>N>-indolyloxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-based inhibitors targeting <i>Trypanosoma cruzii> CYP51

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, Debora F.; Choi, Jun Yong; Calvet, Claudia M.; Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; Johnston, Jonathan B.; Kellar, Danielle; Gut, Jiri; Cameron, Michael D.; McKerrow, James H.; Roush, William R.; Podust, Larissa M.

    2014-11-13

    Chagas disease is a chronic infection in humans caused by <i>Trypanosoma cruzii> and manifested in progressive cardiomyopathy and/or gastrointestinal dysfunction. Limited therapeutic options to prevent and treat Chagas disease put 8 million people infected with <i>T. cruzii> worldwide at risk. CYP51, involved in the biosynthesis of the membrane sterol component in eukaryotes, is a promising drug target in <i>T. cruzii>. We report the structure–activity relationships (SAR) of an <i>N>-arylpiperazine series of <i>N>-indolyloxopyridinyl-4-aminopropanyl-based inhibitors designed to probe the impact of substituents in the terminal <i>N>-phenyl ring on binding mode, selectivity and potency. Depending on the substituents at C-4, two distinct ring binding modes, buried and solvent-exposed, have been observed by X-ray structure analysis (resolution of 1.95–2.48 Å). Lastly, the 5-chloro-substituted analogs 9 and 10 with no substituent at C-4 demonstrated improved selectivity and potency, suppressing ≥99.8% parasitemia in mice when administered orally at 25 mg/kg, b.i.d., for 4 days.

  14. [The deconstructions of schizophrenia (I)].

    PubMed

    Moriyama, K

    1995-01-01

    Standing in the midst of this great historical change, as sometimes it is called the switch to the "post-modern", we are now confronted with the demand of paradigm change in every field of scientific knowledge. So it is the case with psychiatry. Just about 100 years ago, the trend of "social defense" (society's need to be protected from harm) was going on covering the whole civilized countries. It brought about a situation that could be generalized as "institutionalism" which made mental hospitals huge and custodial, resulting in the prevalence of nihilism with regard to treatment. It was just at this time that Dementia praecox, the preconcept of Schizophrenia, was formed by Kraepelin, E. (1896) as a mental disease resulting in peculiar dementia. After some period, Dementia praecox was transformed into Schizophrenia (Gruppe der Schizophrenien) by Bleuler, E. (1908) with a new methodology: to grasp the disease from the symptomatic viewpoint. Jaspers, K. (1912) as well as Schneider, K. (1938) followed him in the way that was psychopathologically more strict; the latter reached the formulation of the . Despite this eventful metamorphosis of the concept of Schizophrenia, its fundamental traits have remained unchanged until the late 1960's. They could be summarized as follows: 1) What patients mention is incomprehensible; 2) The prognosis leads to peculiar dementia; 3) The real cause of the disease is the brain disorder. These three are the reflection of the custodialism, curative nihilism and materialism through the institutionalized mental hospitals in those days. Now, since the 1970's, the situation has been completely changed, or at least, faced with inevitable changes. The tide of "deinstitutionalization" is covering all over the civilized countries, demanding the normalization of mentally disordered persons. Thus, deprived of its motherland (i.e. institutionalism), the concept of Schizophrenia has got into confusion or even crisis. And in

  15. Everything I know about business I learned from monopoly.

    PubMed

    Orbanes, Phil

    2002-03-01

    How do game designers approach their work? Perhaps in the same way that managers should. Here, the author, an expert in board-game design and the world's foremost authority on Monopoly, translates six tenets of game design into management principles. Three tenets focus on giving players the right level of structure. First, design simple and unambiguous rules: That also holds true in business; people engage most when responsibilities, objectives, and evaluation criteria are clear. Second, avoid frustrating the casual player. Just as not every game player aspires to be a grand master, not every employee wants to think like an executive. Third, establish a rhythm so that players know intuitively whether they are at the beginning, middle, or end of the game. Managers can also engineer such shifts of momentum and motivation for workers. Three more principles focus on providing entertainment. The most important is to tune into what's happening off the board. For many people, the real joy of a great game--or a great job--comes from the larger social experience surrounding it. Another key is to offer chances to come from behind. Even struggling employees want to believe, "The odds may be stacked against me, but just one great stroke and I'm right back in it." Finally, managers, like game designers, should provide outlets for latent talents. Games themselves can be useful in the workplace. For instance, an afternoon of game playing builds relationships and increases an organization's social capital. And simulation games can sharpen employees' business judgment. Managers may come to appreciate that games succeed depending on how well designed they are--and that many design challenges have their equivalents in the art of management.

  16. RNF122 suppresses antiviral type I interferon production by targeting RIG-I CARDs to mediate RIG-I degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendie; Jiang, Minghong; Liu, Shuo; Zhang, Shikun; Liu, Wei; Ma, Yuanwu; Zhang, Lianfeng; Zhang, Jiyan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-08-23

    The activation of retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I), a cytoplasmic innate sensor for viral RNA, is tightly regulated to maintain immune homeostasis properly and prevent excessive inflammatory reactions other than initiation of antiviral innate response to eliminate RNA virus effectively. Posttranslational modifications, particularly ubiquitination, are crucial for regulation of RIG-I activity. Increasing evidence suggests that E3 ligases play important roles in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation and antiviral innate signaling. Here we identify that E3 ubiquitin ligase RING finger protein 122 (RNF122) directly interacts with mouse RIG-I through MS screening of RIG-I-interacting proteins in RNA virus-infected cells. The transmembrane domain of RNF122 associates with the caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs) of RIG-I; this interaction effectively triggers RING finger domain of RNF122 to deliver the Lys-48-linked ubiquitin to the Lys115 and Lys146 residues of RIG-I CARDs and promotes RIG-I degradation, resulting in a marked inhibition of RIG-I downstream signaling. RNF122 is widely expressed in various immune cells, with preferential expression in macrophages. Deficiency of RNF122 selectively increases RIG-I-triggered production of type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages. RNF122-deficient mice exhibit more resistance against lethal RNA virus infection, with increased production of type I IFNs. Thus, we demonstrate that RNF122 acts as a selective negative regulator of RIG-I-triggered antiviral innate response by targeting CARDs of RIG-I and mediating proteasomal degradation of RIG-I. Our study outlines a way for E3 ligase to regulate innate sensor RIG-I for the control of antiviral innate immunity.

  17. Functional epitope mapping of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) by anti-IGF-I monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mañes, S; Kremer, L; Albar, J P; Mark, C; Llopis, R; Martínez, C

    1997-03-01

    Based on a collection of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), we have defined the IGF-I epitopes involved in the interaction with IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP) and IGF-I receptors. We have also characterized the ability of these antibodies to block IGF-I-induced survival of the IL-3-dependent Ba/F3 cell line. More than 140 hybridomas secreting IGF-I-specific mAb were characterized, of which 28 were studied in detail. They display apparent affinity constants ranging from less than 10(6) to 10(10) M-1 and varying crossreactivity with IGF-II, including 2 mAb with higher affinity for IGF-II than for IGF-I. None crossreact with insulin or any other growth factor tested. Using both enzyme immunoassays and real-time biospecific interaction analysis, we have identified 8 epitopic clusters related to the primary structure of IGF-I, according to mAb reactivity to synthetic peptides, proteolytic fragments of IGF-I, and various IGF-I mutants. The mAb panel also was used to map the IGF domains implicated in the interaction with IGFBP and IGF-I receptors. An IGF-I domain has been identified that remains exposed after IGF-I binding to IGFBP-1 or to IGFBP-3, which is recognized by 6 different mAb. The mAb in this group also bind IGF-I, when complexed to the type-1 IGF receptor on the murine pro-B cell line Ba/F3, and BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts overexpressing the human receptor. Finally, IGF-I-promoted survival can be blocked with mAb specific for target epitopes, and their potential use in tumor cell growth control is discussed.

  18. The RNA polymerase I transcription machinery.

    PubMed

    Russell, Jackie; Zomerdijk, Joost C B M

    2006-01-01

    The rRNAs constitute the catalytic and structural components of the ribosome, the protein synthesis machinery of cells. The level of rRNA synthesis, mediated by Pol I (RNA polymerase I), therefore has a major impact on the life and destiny of a cell. In order to elucidate how cells achieve the stringent control of Pol I transcription, matching the supply of rRNA to demand under different cellular growth conditions, it is essential to understand the components and mechanics of the Pol I transcription machinery. In this review, we discuss: (i) the molecular composition and functions of the Pol I enzyme complex and the two main Pol I transcription factors, SL1 (selectivity factor 1) and UBF (upstream binding factor); (ii) the interplay between these factors during pre-initiation complex formation at the rDNA promoter in mammalian cells; and (iii) the cellular control of the Pol I transcription machinery.

  19. Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy for Hyperthyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Radioactive Iodine (I-131) Therapy Radioiodine therapy is a nuclear ... thyroid cancer. When a small dose of radioactive iodine I-131 (an isotope of iodine that emits ...

  20. Stomach Flu: How Long Am I Contagious?

    MedlinePlus

    ... long am I contagious if I have the stomach flu? Answers from James M. Steckelberg, M.D. You can ... more, depending on which virus is causing your stomach flu (gastroenteritis). A number of viruses can cause ...

  1. How Can I Live with Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More How Can I Live With Heart Failure? Updated:Dec 8, ... recover. Medicine Notes: Diet Notes: Exercise Notes: How can I learn more? Call 1-800-AHA-USA1 ( ...

  2. Genome sequence of <i>Shimia> str. SK013, a representative of the <i>Roseobacter> group isolated from marine sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Kanukollu, Saranya; Voget, Sonja; Pohlner, Marion; Vandieken, Verona; Petersen, Jörn; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Shapiro, Nicole; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans -Peter; Cypionka, Heribert; Engelen, Bert

    2016-03-12

    <i>Shimia> strain SK013 is an aerobic, Gram-negative, rod shaped alphaproteobacterium affiliated with the <i>Roseobacter> group within the family <i>Rhodobacteraceae>. The strain was isolated from surface sediment (0-1 cm) of the Skagerrak at 114 m below sea level. The 4,049,808 bp genome of <i>Shimia> str. SK013 comprises 3,981 protein-coding genes and 47 RNA genes. It contains one chromosome and no extrachromosomal elements. The genome analysis revealed the presence of genes for a dimethylsulfoniopropionate lyase, demethylase and the trimethylamine methyltransferase (<i>mttB>) as well as genes for nitrate, nitrite and dimethyl sulfoxide reduction. This indicates that <i>Shimia> str. SK013 is able to switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism and thus is capable of aerobic and anaerobic sulfur cycling at the seafloor. Among the ability to convert other sulfur compounds it has the genetic capacity to produce climatically active dimethyl sulfide. Growth on glutamate as a sole carbon source results in formation of cell-connecting filaments, a putative phenotypic adaptation of the surface-associated strain to the environmental conditions at the seafloor. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a flagellum (<i>fla1i>) and a type IV pilus biogenesis, which is speculated to be a prerequisite for biofilm formation. This is also related to genes responsible for signalling such as N-acyl homoserine lactones, as well as quip-genes responsible for quorum quenching and antibiotic biosynthesis. Pairwise similarities of 16S rRNA genes (98.56 % sequence similarity to the next relative S. haliotis) and the <i>in silicoi> DNA-DNA hybridization (21.20 % sequence similarity to S. haliotis) indicated <i>Shimia> str. SK013 to be considered as a new species. In conclusion, the genome analysis of <i>Shimia> str. SK013 offered first insights into specific physiological and phenotypic adaptation mechanisms of <i>Roseobacter>-affiliated bacteria to the

  3. Metabolomics revealed an association of metabolite changes and defective growth in <i>Methylobacterium extorquensi> AM1 overexpressing <i>ecm> during growth on methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jinyu; Good, Nathan M.; Hu, Bo; Yang, Jing; Wang, Qianwen; Sadilek, Martin; Yang, Song; Berg, Ivan A.

    2016-04-26

    <i>Methylobacterium extorquensi> AM1 is a facultative methylotroph capable of growth on both single-carbon and multi-carbon compounds. The ethylmalonyl-CoA (EMC) pathway is one of the central assimilatory pathways in <i>M. extorquensi> during growth on C1 and C2 substrates. Previous studies had shown that ethylmalonyl-CoA mutase functioned as a control point during the transition from growth on succinate to growth on ethylamine. In this study we overexpressed <i>ecm>, <i>phaA>, <i>mcmAB> and found that upregulating ecm by expressing it from the strong constitutive <i>mxaF> promoter caused a 27% decrease in growth rate on methanol compared to the strain with an empty vector. Targeted metabolomics demonstrated that most of the central intermediates in the <i>ecm> over-expressing strain did not change significantly compared to the control strain; However, poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) was 4.5-fold lower and 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA was 1.6-fold higher. Moreover, glyoxylate, a toxic and highly regulated essential intermediate, was determined to be 2.6-fold higher when <i>ecm> was overexpressed. These results demonstrated that overexpressing ecm can manipulate carbon flux through the EMC pathway and divert it from the carbon and energy storage product PHB, leading to an accumulation of glyoxylate. Furthermore, untargeted metabolomics discovered two unusual metabolites, alanine (Ala)-meso-diaminopimelic acid (mDAP) and Ala-mDAP-Ala, each over 45-fold higher in the <i>ecm> overexpressing strain. These two peptides were also found to be highly produced in a dose-dependent manner when glyoxylate was added to the control strain. Overall, this work has explained a direct association of <i>ecm> overexpression with glyoxylate accumulation up to a toxic level, which inhibits cell growth on methanol. Lastly, this research provides useful insight for manipulating the EMC pathway for efficiently producing high-value chemicals in <i>M. extorquensi>.

  4. Revised morphology of <i>Pycnonemosaurus> <i>nevesi> Kellner & Campos, 2002 (Theropoda: Abelisauridae) and its phylogenetic relationships.

    PubMed

    Delcourt, Rafael

    2017-06-09

    Abelisaurid theropods were most abundant in the Gondwana during the Cretaceous Period. Pycnonemosaurus nevesi Kellner & Campos, 2002 was the first abelisaurid dinosaur described from the Bauru Group (Brazil, Upper Cretaceous). Nevertheless, its initial description was based on the comparison of a restricted number of remains with other abelisaurids. In this paper, I present a new description of the morphology of Pycnonemosaurus nevesi, including three new caudal transverse processes and a discussion of several new characteristics based on perspectives derived from recently described abelisauroids. Pycnonemosaurus nevesi differs from other abelisaurids based on the following features: a pubis with a small rounded foot and a ventrally-bowed anterior distal end; posterior caudal vertebrae with a hook-shaped transverse process that has an anterodistal expansion that is short and bowed; a strong and massive tibia with a well-developed lateral malleolus that is ventrally expanded. The unfused sutures represent signs of skeletal immaturity, but the specific ontogenetic stage is still uncertain. The current phylogenetic analysis suggests strongly relationship within Pycnonemosaurus and the most-derived abelisaurids (e.g Carnotaurus and Aucasaurus).

  5. I Think My Friend May Have an Eating Disorder. What Should I Do?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Planner I Think My Friend May Have an Eating Disorder. What Should I Do? KidsHealth > For Teens > I ... Signs of Eating Disorders How to Help About Eating Disorders Every year, thousands of teens (and adults, too) ...

  6. I Think My Friend May Have an Eating Disorder. What Should I Do?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Shyness I Think My Friend May Have an Eating Disorder. What Should I Do? KidsHealth > For Teens > I ... Signs of Eating Disorders How to Help About Eating Disorders Every year, thousands of teens (and adults, too) ...

  7. Draft genome sequence of <i>Raoultella terrigenai> R1Gly, a diazotrophic endophyte

    SciTech Connect

    Schicklberger, M.; Shapiro, N.; Loqué, D.; Woyke, T.; Chakraborty, R.

    2015-06-11

    <i>Raoultella terrigenai> R1Gly is a diazotrophic endophyte isolated from surface-sterilized roots of <i>Nicotiana tabacumi>. The whole-genome sequence was obtained to investigate the endophytic characteristics of this organism at the genetic level, as well as to compare this strain with its close relatives. To our knowledge, this is the first genome obtained from the <i>Raoultella terrigenai> species and only the third genome from the <i>Raoultella genusi>, after <i>Raoultella ornitholytici> and <i>Raoultella planticolai>. This genome will provide a foundation for further comparative genomic, metagenomic, and functional studies of this genus.

  8. I'll Never Do It Again

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Elayne

    2009-01-01

    While online teaching may be the wave of the future, it is not for this author, who writes "I trained for it, I tried it, and I'll never do it again." An instructor with years of experience successfully teaching in collegiate classrooms, she says online teaching does not compare. So she will chalk up her first and only venture to experience and…

  9. Top quark mass determination from the energy peaks of <i>b>-jets and <i>B>-hadrons at NLO QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin; Schulze, Markus

    2016-11-21

    Here, we analyze the energy spectra of <i>single bi>-jets and <i>B>-hadrons resulting from the production and decay of top quarks within the SM at the LHC at the NLO QCD. For both hadrons and jets, we calculate the correlation of the peak of the spectrum with the top quark mass, considering the “energy peak” as an observable to determine the top quarkmass. Such a method is motivated by our previous work where we argued that this approach can have reduced sensitivity to the details of the production mechanism of the top quark, whether it concerns higher-order QCD effects or new physics contributions. For a 1% jet energy scale uncertainty, the top quark mass can then be extracted using the energy peak of <i>b>-jets with an error ±(1.2(exp) + 0.6(th)) GeV. In view of the dominant jet energy scale uncertainty in the measurement using <i>b>-jets, we also investigate the extraction of the top quark mass from the energy peak of the corresponding <i>B>-hadrons which, in principle, can be measured without this uncertainty. The calculation of the <i>B>-hadron energy spectrum is carried out using fragmentation functions at NLO. The dependence on the fragmentation scale turns out to be the largest theoretical uncertainty in this extraction of top quark mass.

  10. ARES I-X Launch Prep

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-25

    NASA's Ares I-X rocket is seen on launch pad 39b at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Monday, Oct. 26, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X, scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009, will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I.

  11. Implementing RtI with Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Mary Ruth, Ed.; Johnsen, Susan K., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Implementing RtI With Gifted Students" shares how RtI can fit within the framework of gifted education programming models. This edited book will serve as a reference guide for those interested in learning more about RtI and how it might be effectively implemented to meet the needs of all gifted students. Chapters contributed by top gifted…

  12. That Awkward Moment I Became Irrelevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoops, Leah D.

    2017-01-01

    If you have ever found yourself asking, "Why don't students see the relevance in what I am teaching them?", you are not alone. I recently discovered that I had become out-of-touch with what college students find relevant. My purpose in writing this commentary is twofold: (1) to reflect on and improve my own practice, and (2) to encourage…

  13. Title I, Higher Education Act Program Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lorna M., Ed.

    The 1979 edition of the Title I, Higher Education Act Program Abstracts is presented. Directed toward state Title I, HEA administrators, the program abstracts are made available in order to encourage nationwide program replication of those tested and evaluated programs that have been conducted with Title I support by institutions of higher…

  14. I'll Never Do It Again

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Elayne

    2009-01-01

    While online teaching may be the wave of the future, it is not for this author, who writes "I trained for it, I tried it, and I'll never do it again." An instructor with years of experience successfully teaching in collegiate classrooms, she says online teaching does not compare. So she will chalk up her first and only venture to experience and…

  15. Is It iTime yet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaisdell, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    Not long after its introduction into the consumer market in October of 2001, the first iPods began turning up on college campuses nationwide. Today, there are active iPod academic programs on many campuses around the country. And where there are no formal academic programs--yet--there are countless students making their own use of the iPods in…

  16. Title I, Higher Education Act Program Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lorna M., Ed.

    The 1979 edition of the Title I, Higher Education Act Program Abstracts is presented. Directed toward state Title I, HEA administrators, the program abstracts are made available in order to encourage nationwide program replication of those tested and evaluated programs that have been conducted with Title I support by institutions of higher…

  17. How Can I Prepare for Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart Treatments + Tests How Can I Prepare for Heart Surgery? Doctors do successful heart surgery every day. But it’s normal to be concerned ... recovery to begin. How Can I Prepare for Heart Surgery? HOW CAN I LEARN MORE? Call 1-800- ...

  18. 127I and 129I/127I isotopic ratio in marine alga Fucus virsoides from the North Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Osterc, Andrej; Stibilj, Vekoslava

    2008-04-01

    The only stable iodine isotope is 127I and the natural 129I/127I ratio in the biosphere has increased from 10(-15)-10(-14) to 10(-10)-10(-9), mainly due to emissions from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. In Europe they are located at La Hague (France) and Sellafield (England), where the ratio of 129I/127I is up to 10(-4). The marine environment, i.e. the oceans, is the major source of iodine with average concentrations of around 60 mirogL(-1) iodine in seawater. Brown algae accumulate iodine at high levels of up to 1.0% of dry weight, and therefore they are an ideal bioindicator for studying the levels of 127I and 129I in the marine environment. A radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) method, developed at our laboratory, was used for 129I determination in the brown alga Fucus virsoides (Donati) J. Agardh, and the same technique of RNAA was used for total 127I determination. The samples were collected along the coast of the Gulf of Trieste and the West coast of Istria in the North Adriatic Sea in the period from 2005 to 2006. Values of the 129I/127I ratio up to 10(-9) were found, which is in agreement with the present average global distribution of 129I. The levels of stable iodine found were in the range from 235 to 506 microg g(-1) and the levels of 129I from 1.7 to 7.3 x 10(-3)Bq kg(-1) (2.6-10.9 x 10(-7) microg g(-1)), on a dry matter basis.

  19. Scarless genome editing and stable inducible expression vectors for <i>Geobacter sulfurreducensi>

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chi Ho; Levar, Caleb E.; Zacharoff, Lori; Badalamenti, Jonathan P.; Bond, Daniel R.; Loffler, F. E.

    2015-08-07

    Metal reduction by members of the <i>Geobacteraceae> is encoded by multiple gene clusters, and the study of extracellular electron transfer often requires biofilm development on surfaces. Genetic tools that utilize polar antibiotic cassette insertions limit mutant construction and complementation. In addition, unstable plasmids create metabolic burdens that slow growth, and the presence of antibiotics such as kanamycin can interfere with the rate and extent of <i>Geobacter> biofilm growth. We report here genetic system improvements for the model anaerobic metal-reducing bacterium <i>Geobacter sulfurreducensi>. A motile strain of <i>G. sulfurreducensi> was constructed by precise removal of a transposon interrupting the <i>fgrM> flagellar regulator gene using SacB/sucrose counterselection, and Fe(III) citrate reduction was eliminated by deletion of the gene encoding the inner membrane cytochrome <i>imcH>. We also show that RK2-based plasmids were maintained in <i>G. sulfurreducensi> for over 15 generations in the absence of antibiotic selection in contrast to unstable pBBR1 plasmids. Therefore, we engineered a series of new RK2 vectors containing native constitutive <i>Geobacter> promoters, and modified one of these promoters for VanR-dependent induction by the small aromatic carboxylic acid vanillate. Inducible plasmids fully complemented Δ<i>imcH> mutants for Fe(III) reduction, Mn(IV) oxide reduction, and growth on poised electrodes. A real-time, high-throughput Fe(III) citrate reduction assay is described that can screen numerous <i>G. sulfurreducensi> strain constructs simultaneously and shows the sensitivity of <i>imcH> expression by the vanillate system. Lastly, these tools will enable more sophisticated genetic studies in <i>G. sulfurreducensi> without polar insertion effects or need for multiple antibiotics.

  20. I-BasI and I-HmuI: two phage intron-encoded endonucleases with homologous DNA recognition sequences but distinct DNA specificities.

    PubMed

    Landthaler, Markus; Shen, Betty W; Stoddard, Barry L; Shub, David A

    2006-05-12

    I-HmuI and I-BasI are two highly similar nicking DNA endonucleases, which are each encoded by a group I intron inserted into homologous sites within the DNA polymerase genes of Bacillus phages SPO1 and Bastille, respectively. Here, we present a comparison of the DNA specificities and cleavage activities of these enconucleases with homologous target sites. I-BasI has properties that are typical of homing endonucleases, nicking the intron-minus polymerase genes in either host genome, three nucleotides downstream of the intron insertion site. In contrast, I-HmuI nicks both the intron-plus and intron-minus site in its own host genome, but does not act on the target from Bastille phage. Although the enzymes have distinct DNA substrate specificities, both bind to an identical 25bp region of their respective intron-minus DNA polymerase genes surrounding the intron insertion site. The endonucleases appear to interact with the DNA substrates in the downstream exon 2 in a similar manner. However, whereas I-HmuI is known to make its only base-specific contacts within this exon region, structural modeling analyses predict that I-BasI might make specific base contacts both upstream and downstream of the site of intron insertion. The predicted requirement for base-specific contacts in exon 1 for cleavage by I-BasI was confirmed experimentally. This explains the difference in substrate specificities between the two enzymes, including the observation that the former enzyme is relatively insensitive to the presence of an intron upstream of exon 2. These differences are likely a consequence of divergent evolutionary constraints.

  1. Complete genome sequence of <i>Methanospirillum hungateii> type strain JF1

    SciTech Connect

    Gunsalus, Robert; Cook, Lauren E.; Crable, Bryan R.; Rohlin, Lars; McDonald, Erin; Mouttaki, Housna; Sieber, Jessica R.; Poweleit, Nicole; Zhou, Hong; Lapidus, Alla; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Land, Miriam L.; Gilna, Paul; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyripides, Nikos; Culley, David E.; McInerney, Michael J.

    2016-01-06

    <i>Methanospirillum hungateii> strain JF1 (DSM 864) is a methane-producing archaeon and is the type species of the genus <i>Methanospirillum>, which belongs to the family <i>Methanospirillaceae> within the order <i>Methanomicrobiales>. Its genome was selected for sequencing due to its ability to utilize hydrogen and carbon dioxide and/or formate as a sole source of energy. Ecologically, <i>M. hungateii> functions as the hydrogen- and/or formate-using partner with many species of syntrophic bacteria. Its morphology is distinct from other methanogens with the ability to form long chains of cells (up to 100 m in length), which are enclosed within a sheath-like structure, and terminal cells with polar flagella. The genome of <i>M. hungateii> strain JF1 is the first completely sequenced genome of the family <i>Methanospirillaceae>, and it has a circular genome of 3,544,738 bp containing 3,239 protein coding and 68 RNA genes. Furthermore, the large genome of <i>M. hungateii> JF1 suggests the presence of unrecognized biochemical/physiological properties that likely extend to the other <i>Methanospirillaceae> and include the ability to form the unusual sheath-like structure and to successfully interact with syntrophic bacteria.

  2. Glyoxalase I retards renal senescence.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yoichiro; Inagi, Reiko; Miyata, Toshio; Nagai, Ryoji; Arai, Makoto; Miyashita, Mitsuhiro; Itokawa, Masanari; Fujita, Toshiro; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2011-12-01

    Although kidney functions deteriorate with age, little is known about the general morphological alterations and mechanisms of renal senescence. We hypothesized that carbonyl stress causes senescence and investigated the possible role of glyoxalase I (GLO1), which detoxifies precursors of advanced glycation end products in the aging process of the kidney. We observed amelioration of senescence in GLO1-transgenic aged rats (assessed by expression levels of senescence markers such as p53, p21(WAF1/CIP1), and p16(INK4A)) and a positive rate of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SABG) staining, associated with reduction of renal advanced glycation end product accumulation (estimated by the amount of carboxyethyl lysine). GLO1-transgenic rats showed amelioration of interstitial thickening (observed as an age-related presentation in human renal biopsy specimens) and were protected against age-dependent decline of renal functions. We used GLO1 overexpression or knockdown in primary renal proximal tubular epithelial cells to investigate the effect of GLO1 on cellular senescence. Senescence markers were significantly up-regulated in renal proximal tubular epithelial cells at late passage and in those treated with etoposide, a chemical inducer of senescence. GLO1 cellular overexpression ameliorated and knockdown enhanced the cellular senescence phenotypes. Furthermore, we confirmed the association of decreased GLO1 enzymatic activity and age-dependent deterioration of renal function in aged humans with GLO1 mutation. These findings indicate that GLO1 ameliorates carbonyl stress to retard renal senescence. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. <i>Planck> 2015 results: XXVIII. The <i>Planck> Catalogue of Galactic cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Pelkonen, V. -M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-20

    Here, we present the Planck Catalogue of Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCC), an all-sky catalogue of Galactic cold clump candidates detected by Planck. This catalogue is the full version of the Early Cold Core (ECC) catalogue, which was made available in 2011 with the Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and which contained 915 high signal-to-noise sources. It is based on the Planck 48-month mission data that are currently being released to the astronomical community. The PGCC catalogue is an observational catalogue consisting exclusively of Galactic cold sources. The three highest Planck bands (857, 454, and 353 GHz) have been combined with IRAS data at 3 THz to perform a multi-frequency detection of sources colder than their local environment. After rejection of possible extragalactic contaminants, the PGCC catalogue contains 13188 Galactic sources spread across the whole sky, i.e., from the Galactic plane to high latitudes, following the spatial distribution of the main molecular cloud complexes. The median temperature of PGCC sources lies between 13 and 14.5 K, depending on the quality of the flux density measurements, with a temperature ranging from 5.8 to 20 K after removing the sources with the top 1% highest temperature estimates. Using seven independent methods, reliable distance estimates have been obtained for 5574 sources, which allows us to derive their physical properties such as their mass, physical size, mean density, and luminosity.The PGCC sources are located mainly in the solar neighbourhood, but also up to a distance of 10.5 kpc in the direction of the Galactic centre, and range from low-mass cores to large molecular clouds. Because of this diversity and because the PGCC catalogue contains sources in very different environments, the catalogue is useful for investigating the evolution from molecular clouds to cores. Finally, it also includes 54 additional sources located in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds.

  4. Clustering properties of <i>g> -selected galaxies at <i>z> ~ 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Favole, Ginevra; Comparat, Johan; Prada, Francisco; Yepes, Gustavo; Jullo, Eric; Niemiec, Anna; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Klypin, Anatoly; Skibba, Ramin A.; McBride, Cameron K.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Schlegel, David J.; Nuza, Sebastián E.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Delubac, Timothée; Yèche, Christophe; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-06-21

    In current and future large redshift surveys, as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-IV/eBOSS) or the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), we will use emission-line galaxies (ELGs) to probe cosmological models by mapping the large-scale structure of the Universe in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1.7. We explore the halo-galaxy connection, with current data and by measuring three clustering properties of g-selected ELGs as matter tracers in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1: (i) the redshift-space two-point correlation function using spectroscopic redshifts from the BOSS ELG sample and VIPERS; (ii) the angular two-point correlation function on the footprint of the CFHT-LS; (iii) the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal around the ELGs using the CFHTLenS. Furthermore, we interpret these observations by mapping them on to the latest high-resolution MultiDark Planck N-body simulation, using a novel (Sub)Halo-Abundance Matching technique that accounts for the ELG incompleteness. ELGs at z ~ 0.8 live in haloes of (1 ± 0.5) × 10 12 h -1 M⊙ and 22.5 ± 2.5 per cent of them are satellites belonging to a larger halo. The halo occupation distribution of ELGs indicates that we are sampling the galaxies in which stars form in the most efficient way, according to their stellar-to-halo mass ratio.

  5. Targeted alpha therapy: part I.

    PubMed

    Elgqvist, Jorgen

    2011-07-01

    . The two final articles discuss different aspects of the dosimetry related to α-particles. The article by Sgouros et al. discusses how knowledge of the microscopic distribution of α-particle emitters is necessary to perform correct dosimetry, as well as the importance of the translation of activity distributions obtained in pre-clinical studies to the human situation, which requires micro-scale models of the source-target geometry at human dimensions according to the authors. Chouin et al. focus in the following article on the microdosimetry of α-particles. The authors present basic concepts and some applications of the microdosimetry for TAT, and conclude microdosimetry should only be considered when alternative approaches fail to provide an account of a given biological endpoint. The intention of this particular hot-topic issue is to present an up-to-date overview of key areas in the research field of TAT, i.e. radionuclides available, targeting constructs, labeling chemistry, and dosimetry. This issue will hopefully be followed by similar ones jointly produced by contributions from the research community active in the field, of which most researchers are participating in these two particular issues, i.e. Targeted Alpha Therapy - Part I and II.

  6. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-03: Dosimetric Comparison of the Hypoxia Agent Iodoazomycin Arabinoside (IAZA) Labeled with the Radioisotopes I-123, I-131 and I-124

    SciTech Connect

    Jans, H-S; Stypinski, D; Mcquarrie, S; Kumar, P; Mercer, J; McEwan, S; Wiebe, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the radiation dose to normal organs from the radio-iodinated, hypoxia-binding radiosensitizer iodoazomycin arabinoside (IAZA) for three different isotopes of iodine. Methods: Dosimety studies with normal volunteers had been carried out with [{sup 123}I]IAZA, a drug binding selectively to hypoxic sites. Two other isotopes of iodine, {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, offer the opportunity to use IAZA as an agent for radioisotope therapy and as an imaging tracer for Positron Emission Tomography. Radioisotope dosimetry for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I was performed by first deriving from the [{sup 123}I]IAZA studies biological uptake and excretion data. The cumulated activities for {sup 131}I or {sup 124}I where obtained by including their half-lives when integrating the biological data and then extrapolating to infinite time points considering a) physical decay only or b) physical and biological excretion. Doses were calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema (OLINDA1.1 code, Vanderbilt 2007). Results: Compared to {sup 123}I, organ doses were elevated on average by a factor 6 and 9 for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, respectively, if both physical decay and biological excretion were modeled. If only physical decay is considered, doses increase by a factor 18 ({sup 131}I) and 19 ({sup 124}I). Highest organ doses were observed in intestinal walls, urinary bladder and thyroid. Effective doses increased by a factor 11 and 14 for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, respectively, if biological and physical decay are present. Purely physical decay yields a 23-fold increase over {sup 123}I for both, {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I. Conclusion: Owing to the significant dose increase, caused by their longer half life and the approximately 10 times larger electronic dose deposited in tissue per nuclear decay, normal tissue doses of IAZA labeled with {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I need to be carefully considered when designing imaging and therapy protocols for clinical

  7. ARES I-X Launch Prep

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-26

    NASA Ares I-X Assistant Launch Director Pete Nickolenko, left, and NASA Ares I-X Launch Director Ed Mango monitor the launch countdown from Firing Room One of the Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center during the planned launch of the Ares I-X rocket from pad 39b at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. ARES I-X Launch Prep

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-26

    Mission managers, from left, NASA Ares I-X Assistant Launch Director Pete Nickolenko, Ground Operations Manager Philip "Pepper" Phillips, Ares I-X Launch Director Ed Mango, and Constellation Program manager Jeff Hanley review the latest weather radar from Firing Room One of the Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center during the launch countdown of the Ares I-X rocket in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. ARES I-X Launch Prep

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-26

    Mission managers, from left, NASA Constellation Program manager Jeff Hanley, Ares I-X Launch Director Ed Mango, Ares I-X mission manager Bob Ess, Ground Operations Manager Philip "Pepper" Phillips, review the latest data in Firing Room One of the Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center during the launch countdown of the Ares I-X rocket in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Nuclear magnetic moments of the ground states of sup 124 I, sup 126 I, and sup 130 I

    SciTech Connect

    Ohya, S.; Yamazaki, T.; Harasawa, T.; Katsurayama, M.; Mutsuro, N. ); Muto, S.; Heiguchi, K. )

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic moments of {sup 124}I, {sup 126}I, and {sup 130}I have been measured by the techniques of low-temperature nuclear orientation and nuclear magnetic resonance on oriented nuclei. The magnetic hyperfine splitting frequency {vert bar}{ital g}{mu}{sub {ital N}BHF}/{ital h}{vert bar} for {sup 124}I{ital Fe} was determined to be 630.2(2) MHz from a field-shift analysis of the measured resonances at the external field of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 T. The resonances for {sup 126}I{ital Fe} and {sup 130}I{ital Fe} were observed in an external magnetic field of 0.2 T at {nu}({sup 126}I{ital Fe})=627.7(2) MHz and {nu}({sup 130}I{ital Fe})=585.7(2) MHz, respectively. Using the recalculated hyperfine field of {ital B}{sub HF}({sup 131}I{ital Fe})=114.50(5) T, the magnetic moments were deduced: {vert bar}{mu}({sup 124}I,2{sup {minus}}){vert bar}=1.444(4){mu}{sub {ital N}}, {vert bar}{mu}({sup 126}I,2{sup {minus}}){vert bar}=1.436(5){mu}{sub {ital N}}, and {vert bar}{mu}({sup 130}I,5{sup +}){vert bar}=3.349(7){mu}{sub {ital N}}. The present value of the magnetic moment of {sup 124}I is very different from the value of 1.14(8){mu}{sub {ital N}} reported previously. The measured values of the magnetic moments are discussed using Lande formula.

  11. Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy of the reactive intermediate monoiodosilylene, HSiI and DSiI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Lu; Gharaibeh, Mohammed A.; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Novick, Stewart E.

    2012-01-01

    The pure rotational spectra of three silicon isotopologues of HSiI and two isotopologues of DSiI have been recorded by pulsed-jet Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy. Neon was passed over dry ice cooled H 3SiI or D 3SiI and introduced into the pulsed valve of the FTMW spectrometer. The monoiodosilylenes HSiI and DSiI were produced in situ with a 1000 V DC-discharge nozzle. Only a-type transitions occur in monoiodosilylene from 6 to 26 GHz. We observe K a = 0 a-type transitions for H 28SiI, H 29SiI, H 30SiI, and D 29SiI, and both K a = 0 and 1 a-type transitions for D 28SiI. Rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, iodine nuclear quadrupole coupling constants, and nuclear spin-molecular rotation constants were measured.

  12. Transgenic soybean overexpressing <i>GmSAMT1i> exhibits resistance to multiple-HG types of soybean cyst nematode <i>Heterodera glycinesi>

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jingyu; Mazarei, Mitra; Zhao, Nan; Hatcher, Catherine N.; Wuddineh, Wegi A.; Rudis, Mary; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Pantalone, Vincent R.; Arelli, Prakash R.; Hewezi, Tarek; Chen, Feng; Stewart, Jr., Charles Neal

    2016-05-23

    Soybean (<i>Glycine maxi> (L.) Merr.) salicylic acid methyl transferase (GmSAMT1) catalyses the conversion of salicylic acid to methyl salicylate. Prior results showed that when <i>GmSAMT1i> was overexpressed in transgenic soybean hairy roots, resistance is conferred against soybean cyst nematode (SCN), <i>Heterodera glycinesi> Ichinohe. In this study, we produced transgenic soybean overexpressing <i>GmSAMT1i> and characterized their response to various SCN races. Transgenic plants conferred a significant reduction in the development of SCN HG type 1.2.5.7 (race 2), HG type 0 (race 3) and HG type 2.5.7 (race 5). Among transgenic lines, <i>GmSAMT1i> expression in roots was positively associated with SCN resistance. In some transgenic lines, there was a significant decrease in salicylic acid titer relative to control plants. No significant seed yield differences were observed between transgenics and control soybean plants grown in one greenhouse with 22 °C day/night temperature, whereas transgenic soybean had higher yield than controls grown a warmer greenhouse (27 °C day/23 °C night) temperature. In a 1-year field experiment in Knoxville, TN, there was no significant difference in seed yield between the transgenic and nontransgenic soybean under conditions with negligible SCN infection. We hypothesize that <i>GmSAMT1i> expression affects salicylic acid biosynthesis, which, in turn, attenuates SCN development, without negative consequences to soybean yield or other morphological traits. Furthermore, we conclude that <i>GmSAMT1i> overexpression confers broad resistance to multiple SCN races, which would be potentially applicable to commercial production.

  13. IGF-I abuse in sport.

    PubMed

    Guha, Nishan; Dashwood, Alexander; Thomas, Nicholas J; Skingle, Alexander J; Sönksen, Peter H; Holt, Richard I G

    2009-09-01

    It is widely believed that growth hormone (GH) is abused by athletes for its anabolic and lipolytic effects. Many of the physiological effects of GH are mediated by the production of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Both GH and IGF-I appear on the World Anti-Doping Agency list of prohibited substances. Little is known, however, about the prevalence of abuse with exogenous IGF-I. IGF-I has effects on carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism and some of these actions could prove beneficial to competitive athletes. No studies have demonstrated a positive effect of IGF-I on physical performance in healthy individuals but this has not yet been studied in appropriately designed trials. Two pharmaceutical preparations of IGF-I have recently become available for the treatment of growth disorders in children. This availability is likely to increase the prevalence of IGF-I abuse. Combining IGF-I with its binding protein IGFBP-3 in one preparation has the potential to reduce the side-effect profile but the adverse effects of long term IGF-I abuse are currently unknown. Detection of abuse with IGF-I is a major challenge for anti-doping authorities. It is extremely difficult to distinguish the exogenous recombinant form of the hormone from endogenously-produced IGF-I. One approach currently being investigated is based on measuring markers of GH and IGF-I action. This has already proved successful in the fight against GH abuse and, it is hoped, will subsequently lead to a similar test for detection of IGF-I abuse.

  14. Transcriptome and proteome analysis of nitrogen starvation responses in <i>Synechocystis> 6803 <i>ΔglgC>, a mutant incapable of glycogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Carrieri, Damian; Lombardi, Thomas; Paddock, Troy; Cano, Melissa; Goodney, Gabriel A.; Nag, Ambarish; Old, William; Maness, Pin -Ching; Seibert, Michael; Ghirardi, Maria; Yu, Jianping

    2016-11-17

    Molecular mechanisms that regulate carbon flux are poorly understood in algae. The <i>ΔglgC> mutant of the cyanobacterium <i>Synechocystis> sp. PCC 6803 is incapable of glycogen storage and displays an array of physiological responses under nitrogen starvation that are different from wild-type (WT). These include non-bleaching phenotype and the redirection of photosynthetically fixed carbon towards excreted organic acids (overflow metabolism) without biomass growth. To understand the role of gene/protein expression in these responses, we followed the time course of transcripts by genome-scale microarrays and proteins by shotgun proteomics in <i>ΔglgC> and WT cells upon nitrogen starvation. Compared to WT, the degradation of phycobilisome rod proteins was delayed and attenuated in the mutant, and the core proteins were less degraded; both contributed to the non-bleaching appearance despite the induction of <i>nblA> genes, suggesting the presence of a break in regulation of the phycobilisome degradation pathway downstream of <i>nblA> induction. The mutant displayed NtcA-mediated transcriptional response to nitrogen starvation, indicating that it is able to sense nitrogen status. Furthermore, some responses to nitrogen starvation appear to be stronger in the mutant, as shown by the increases in transcripts for the transcriptional regulator, <i>rre37i>, which regulates central carbon metabolism. Accordingly, multiple proteins involved in photosynthesis, central carbon metabolism, and carbon storage and utilization showed lower abundance in the mutant. Furthermore, these results indicate that the transition in the central carbon metabolism from growth to overflow metabolism in <i>ΔglgC> does not require increases in expression of the overflow pathway enzymes; the transition and non-bleaching phenotype are likely regulated instead at the metabolite level.

  15. Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    NASA's new Spitzer Space Telescope has captured an image of an unusual comet that experiences frequent outbursts, which produce abrupt changes in brightness. Periodic comet Schwassmann-Wachmann I (P/SW-1) has a nearly circular orbit just outside that of Jupiter, with an orbital period of 14.9 years. It is thought that the outbursts arise from the build-up of internal gas pressure as the heat of the Sun slowly evaporates frozen carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide beneath the blackened crust of the comet nucleus. When the internal pressure exceeds the strength of the overlying crust, a rupture occurs, and a burst of gas and dust fragments is ejected into space at speeds of 450 miles per hour (200 meters per second).

    This 24-micron image of P/SW-1 was obtained with the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer. The image shows thermal infrared emission from the dusty coma and tail of the comet. The nucleus of the comet is about 18 miles (30 kilometers) in diameter and is too small to be resolved by Spitzer. The micron-sized dust grains in the coma and tail stream out away from the Sun. The dust and gas comprising the comet's nucleus is part of the same primordial materials from which the Sun and planets were formed billions of years ago. The complex carbon-rich molecules they contain may have provided some of the raw materials from which life originated on Earth.

    Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 is thought to be a member of a relatively new class of objects called 'Centaurs,' of which 45 objects are known. These are small icy bodies with orbits between those of Jupiter and Neptune. Astronomers believe that Centaurs are recent escapees from the Kuiper Belt, a zone of small bodies orbiting in a cloud at the distant reaches of the solar system.

    Two asteroids, 1996 GM36 (left) and 5238 Naozane (right) were serendipitously captured in the comet image. Because they are closer to us than the comet and have faster orbital

  16. Posture in otoneurology. Volume I.

    PubMed

    Norré, M E

    1990-01-01

    In this study, posture is studied in the context of neuro-otological problems. In the several chapters, postural elements, postural influence upon balance aspects as well as postural components of the balance function in normal and pathological conditions are emphasized. Two main applications are put forward: rehabilitation by postural treatment techniques (REHAB) and examination techniques for the vestibulospinal aspects (posturography--PG). I. Balance function Balance is provided by automatic reflexes for stabilization of the visual field (vestibulo-ocular reflex--VOR) and for a correct posture, erect standing (vestibulo-spinal reflex--VSR) and head position (vestibulo-collic reflex--VCR). The fundamental characteristics of these reflexes are described, especially of those related to posture. The reflexes are elaborated on the basis of sensory inputs that inform about changed relations to space and environment, provided by visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems. The sensory signals are further processed by the centers to adequate reflexes and to some extent to a conscious awareness. II. Dysfunction and adaptation Dysfunction in the balance mechanisms leads to erroneous reflexes, but most importantly to frightening sensations of vertigo. The peripheral disturbances produce a sensory mismatch which is the primum movens of vertigo. Built-in adaptive mechanisms cope with this disturbance and restore global balance function. The mechanisms involved have been studied as vestibular compensation and habituation, VOR-reflex plasticity and sensory "substitutive" compensation. The mechanisms are set into action by the dysfunctional situation and constitute an error-controlled process. Emphasis is laid upon the items related to rehabilitation treatment and posturography. A survey of clinical entities of vestibular peripheral dysfunction is included. III. Examination techniques The logical approach to the patient with vertigo consists in an analysis of the complaints

  17. Improving microbial biogasoline production in <i>Escherichia colii> using tolerance engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Foo, Jee Loon; Jensen, Heather M.; Dahl, Robert H.; George, Kevin; Keasling, Jay D.; Lee, Taek Soon; Leong, Susanna; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2014-11-04

    Engineering microbial hosts for the production of fungible fuels requires mitigation of limitations posed on the production capacity. One such limitation arises from the inherent toxicity of solvent-like biofuel compounds to production strains, such as <i>Escherichia colii>. Here we show the importance of host engineering for the production of short-chain alcohols by studying the overexpression of genes upregulated in response to exogenous isopentenol. Using systems biology data, we selected 40 genes that were upregulated following isopentenol exposure and subsequently overexpressed them in <i>E. colii>. Overexpression of several of these candidates improved tolerance to exogenously added isopentenol. Genes conferring isopentenol tolerance phenotypes belonged to diverse functional groups, such as oxidative stress response (<i>soxS>, <i>fpr>, and <i>nrdH>), general stress response (<i>metR>, <i>yqhD>, and <i>gidB>), heat shock-related response (<i>ibpA>), and transport (<i>mdlB>). To determine if these genes could also improve isopentenol production, we coexpressed the tolerance-enhancing genes individually with an isopentenol production pathway. Our data show that expression of 6 of the 8 candidates improved the production of isopentenol in <i>E. colii>, with the methionine biosynthesis regulator MetR improving the titer for isopentenol production by 55%. Additionally, expression of MdlB, an ABC transporter, facilitated a 12% improvement in isopentenol production. To our knowledge, MdlB is the first example of a transporter that can be used to improve production of a short-chain alcohol and provides a valuable new avenue for host engineering in biogasoline production.

  18. Performance and breakdown characteristics of irradiated vertical power GaN <i>P-i-N> diodes

    SciTech Connect

    King, M. P.; Armstrong, A. M.; Dickerson, J. R.; Vizkelethy, G.; Fleming, R. M.; Campbell, J.; Wampler, W. R.; Kizilyalli, I. C.; Bour, D. P.; Aktas, O.; Nie, H.; Disney, D.; Wierer, Jr., J.; Allerman, A. A.; Moseley, M. W.; Kaplar, R. J.

    2015-10-29

    Electrical performance and defect characterization of vertical GaN <i>P-i-N> diodes before and after irradiation with 2.5 MeV protons and neutrons is investigated. Devices exhibit increase in specific on-resistance following irradiation with protons and neutrons, indicating displacement damage introduces defects into the p-GaN and n- drift regions of the device that impact on-state device performance. The breakdown voltage of these devices, initially above 1700 V, is observed to decrease only slightly for particle fluence <; 1013 cm-2. Furthermore, the unipolar figure of merit for power devices indicates that while the on-resistance and breakdown voltage degrade with irradiation, vertical GaN <i>P-i-Ns> remain superior to the performance of the best available, unirradiated silicon devices and on-par with unirradiated modern SiC-based power devices.

  19. Cardiac troponin I levels in canine pyometra

    PubMed Central

    Hagman, Ragnvi; Lagerstedt, Anne-Sofie; Fransson, Boel A; Bergström, Annika; Häggström, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Background Myocardial injury may contribute to unexpected deaths due to pyometra. To detect myocardial damage, measurement of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is currently the most sensitive and specific method. The aims of the present study were to evaluate presence of myocardial damage in canine pyometra by analysis of cTnI, to explore whether myocardial injury was associated with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and to evaluate whether other clinical or laboratory parameters were associated with cTnI increase. Methods Preoperative plasma levels of cTnI were investigated in 58 female dogs with pyometra and 9 controls. The value of physical examination findings, haematological, serum biochemical and pro-inflammatory (CRP and TNF-α) parameters as possible predictors of increased cTnI levels was also evaluated. Results Seven dogs with pyometra (12%) and one control dog (11%) had increased levels of cTnI. In the pyometra group, the levels ranged between 0.3–0.9 μg l-1 and in the control dog the level was 0.3 μg l-1. The cTnI levels did not differ significantly between the two groups. No cardiac abnormalities were evident on preoperative physical examinations. Four of the pyometra patients died within two weeks of surgery, of which two were examined post mortem. In one of these cases (later diagnosed with myocarditis and disseminated bacterial infection) the cTnI levels increased from 0.9 μg l-1 preoperatively to 180 μg l-1 the following day when also heart arrhythmia was also detected. The other patient had cTnI levels of 0.7 μg l-1 with no detectable heart pathology post mortem. CTnI increase was not associated with presence of SIRS. There was a trend for the association of cTnI increase with increased mortality. No preoperative physical examination findings and few but unspecific laboratory parameters were associated with increased cTnI levels. Conclusion Increased cTnI levels were observed in 12% of the dogs with pyometra. The proportions of dogs

  20. Protein geranylgeranyltransferase-I of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Kohei; Gillespie, John R.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I (PGGT-I) and protein farnesyltransferase (PFT) occur in many eukaryotic cells. Both consist of two subunits, the common αsubunit and a distinct β subunit. In the gene database of protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, a putative protein that consists of 401 amino acids with ∼20% amino acid sequence identity to the PGGT-I β of other species was identified, cloned, and characterized. Multiple sequence alignments show that the T. cruzi ortholog contains all three of the zinc-binding residues and several residues uniquely conserved in the β subunit of PGGT-I. Co-expression of this protein and the α subunit of T. cruzi PFT in Sf9 insect cells yielded a dimeric protein that forms a tight complex selectively with [3H]geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate, indicating a key characteristic of a functional PGGT-I. Recombinant T. cruzi PGGT-I ortholog showed geranylgeranyltransferase activity with distinct specificity toward the C-terminal CaaX motif of protein substrates compared to that of the mammalian PGGT-I and T. cruzi PFT. Most of the CaaX-containing proteins with X=Leu are good substrates of T. cruzi PGGT-I, and those with X=Met are substrates for both T. cruzi PFT and PGGT-I, whereas unlike mammalian PGGT-I, those with X=Phe are poor substrates for T. cruzi PGGT-I. Several candidates for T. cruzi PGGT-I or PFT substrates containing the C-terminal CaaX motif are found in the T. cruzi gene database. Among five C-terminal peptides of those tested, a peptide of a Ras-like protein ending with CVLL was selectively geranylgeranylated by T. cruzi PGGT-I. Other peptides with CTQQ (Tcj2 DNAJ protein), CAVM (TcPRL-1 protein tyrosine phosphatase), CHFM (a small GTPase like protein), and CQLF (TcRho1 GTPase) were specific substrates for T. cruzi PFT but not for PGGT-I. The mRNA and protein of the T. cruzi PGGT-I β ortholog were detected in three life-cycle stages of T. cruzi. Cytosol fractions from

  1. Expression of the <i>Acidothermus cellulolyticusi> E1 endoglucanase in <i>Caldicellulosiruptor besciii> enhances its ability to deconstruct crystalline cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Daehwan; Young, Jenna; Cha, Minseok; Brunecky, Roman; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-08-13

    The <i>Caldicellulosiruptor besciii> genome encodes a potent set of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), found primarily as multi-domain enzymes that exhibit high cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic activity on and allow utilization of a broad range of substrates, including plant biomass without conventional pretreatment. CelA, the most abundant cellulase in the <i>C. besciii> secretome, uniquely combines a GH9 endoglucanase and a GH48 exoglucanase in one protein. The most effective commercial enzyme cocktails used in vitro to pretreat biomass are derived from fungal cellulases (cellobiohydrolases, endoglucanases and a β-d-glucosidases) that act synergistically to release sugars for microbial conversion. The <i>C. besciii> genome contains six GH5 domains in five different open reading frames. Four exist in multi-domain proteins and two as single catalytic domains. E1 is a GH5 endoglucanase reported to have high specific activity and simple architecture and is active at the growth temperature of <i>C. besciii>. E1 is an endo-1,4-β-glucanase linked to a family 2 carbohydrate-binding module shown to bind primarily to cellulosic substrates. As a result, we tested if the addition of this protein to the <i>C. besciii> secretome would improve its cellulolytic activity.

  2. <i>Swift> AND <i>Fermi> observations of x-ray flares: The case of late internal shock

    SciTech Connect

    Troja, Eleonora; Piro, Luigi; Vasileiou, Vlasios; Burgess, J. M.; Cutini, S.; Connaughton, V.; McEnery, J. E.

    2015-04-07

    Simultaneous <i>Swift> and <i>Fermi> observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer a unique broadband view of their afterglow emission, spanning more than 10 decades in energy. We present the sample of X-ray flares observed by both <i>Swift> and <i>Fermi> during the first three years of <i>Fermi> operations. While bright in the X-ray band, X-ray flares are often undetected at lower (optical), and higher (MeV to GeV) energies. We show that this disfavors synchrotron self-Compton processes as the origin of the observed X-ray emission. We compare the broadband properties of X-ray flares with the standard late internal shock model, and find that in this scenario, X-ray flares can be produced by a late-time relativistic (Γ > 50) outflow at radii R ~ 1013-1014 cm. As a result, this conclusion holds only if the variability timescale is significantly shorter than the observed flare duration, and implies that X-ray flares can directly probe the activity of the GRB central engine.

  3. Structural basis for suppression of hypernegative DNA supercoiling by <i>E. colii> topoisomerase I

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Kemin; Zhou, Qingxuan; Cheng, Bokun; Zhang, Zhongtao; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Tse-Dinh, Yuk -Ching

    2015-10-20

    <i>Escherichia colii> topoisomerase I has an essential function in preventing hypernegative supercoiling of DNA. A full length structure of <i>E. colii> topoisomerase I reported here shows how the C-terminal domains bind single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to recognize the accumulation of negative supercoils in duplex DNA. These C-terminal domains of <i>E. colii> topoisomerase I are known to interact with RNA polymerase, and two flexible linkers within the C-terminal domains may assist in the movement of the ssDNA for the rapid removal of transcription driven negative supercoils. The structure has also unveiled for the first time how the 4-Cys zinc ribbon domain and zinc ribbon-like domain bind ssDNA with primarily π -stacking interactions. Finally, this novel structure, in combination with new biochemical data, provides important insights into the mechanism of genome regulation by type IA topoisomerases that is essential for life, as well as the structures of homologous type IA TOP3α and TOP3β from higher eukaryotes that also have multiple 4-Cys zinc ribbon domains required for their physiological functions.

  4. Atmospheric chemistry of i-butanol.

    PubMed

    Andersen, V F; Wallington, T J; Nielsen, O J

    2010-12-02

    Smog chamber/FTIR techniques were used to determine rate constants of k(Cl + i-butanol) = (2.06 ± 0.40) × 10(-10), k(Cl + i-butyraldehyde) = (1.37 ± 0.08) × 10(-10), and k(OH + i-butanol) = (1.14 ± 0.17) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) in 700 Torr of N(2)/O(2) diluent at 296 ± 2K. The UV irradiation of i-butanol/Cl(2)/N(2) mixtures gave i-butyraldehyde in a molar yield of 53 ± 3%. The chlorine atom initiated oxidation of i-butanol in the absence of NO gave i-butyraldehyde in a molar yield of 48 ± 3%. The chlorine atom initiated oxidation of i-butanol in the presence of NO gave (molar yields): i-butyraldehyde (46 ± 3%), acetone (35 ± 3%), and formaldehyde (49 ± 3%). The OH radical initiated oxidation of i-butanol in the presence of NO gave acetone in a yield of 61 ± 4%. The reaction of chlorine atoms with i-butanol proceeds 51 ± 5% via attack on the α-position to give an α-hydroxy alkyl radical that reacts with O(2) to give i-butyraldehyde. The atmospheric fate of (CH(3))(2)C(O)CH(2)OH alkoxy radicals is decomposition to acetone and CH(2)OH radicals. The atmospheric fate of OCH(2)(CH(3))CHCH(2)OH alkoxy radicals is decomposition to formaldehyde and CH(3)CHCH(2)OH radicals. The results are consistent with, and serve to validate, the mechanism that has been assumed in the estimation of the photochemical ozone creation potential of i-butanol.

  5. 24 CFR Appendixes I-Iv to Subpart B - Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B I Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN... Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B Appendix I—Annual Contributions Contract “Special Provisions for Turnkey...

  6. 24 CFR Appendixes I-Iv to Subpart B - Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B I Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN... Appendixes I-IV to Subpart B Appendix I—Annual Contributions Contract “Special Provisions for Turnkey...

  7. 40 CFR 267.201 - What must I do when I stop operating the tank system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... OPERATING UNDER A STANDARDIZED PERMIT Tank Systems § 267.201 What must I do when I stop operating the tank... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I do when I stop operating the tank system? 267.201 Section 267.201 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  8. 30 CFR 280.11 - What must I do before I may conduct scientific research?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Apply for a Permit or File a Notice § 280.11 What must I do before I may conduct scientific research? You may conduct G&G scientific research activities related to hard minerals on the OCS only after you... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do before I may conduct...

  9. 7 CFR 170.7 - Can I apply if I am not recruited?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Can I apply if I am not recruited? 170.7 Section 170.7 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 USDA FARMERS MARKET § 170.7 Can I apply if I am...

  10. 25 CFR 26.33 - How do I show I need job training?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How do I show I need job training? 26.33 Section 26.33 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.33 How do I show I need job training? The need for Job Placement and...

  11. 30 CFR 585.1004 - What must I do before I request an Alternate Use RUE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must I do before I request an Alternate Use RUE? 585.1004 Section 585.1004 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF... Facilities Requesting An Alternate Use Rue § 585.1004 What must I do before I request an Alternate Use...

  12. 30 CFR 285.1004 - What must I do before I request an Alternate Use RUE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do before I request an Alternate Use RUE? 285.1004 Section 285.1004 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Requesting An Alternate Use Rue § 285.1004 What must I do before I request an Alternate Use RUE? If you...

  13. 30 CFR 585.1004 - What must I do before I request an Alternate Use RUE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I do before I request an Alternate Use RUE? 585.1004 Section 585.1004 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF... Facilities Requesting An Alternate Use Rue § 585.1004 What must I do before I request an Alternate Use...

  14. 30 CFR 585.1004 - What must I do before I request an Alternate Use RUE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I do before I request an Alternate Use RUE? 585.1004 Section 585.1004 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF... Facilities Requesting An Alternate Use Rue § 585.1004 What must I do before I request an Alternate Use...

  15. 12 CFR 555.300 - Must I inform OTS before I use electronic means or facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Must I inform OTS before I use electronic means... I inform OTS before I use electronic means or facilities? (a) General. A savings association (“you”) are not required to inform OTS before you use electronic means or facilities, except as provided in...

  16. 25 CFR 26.33 - How do I show I need job training?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How do I show I need job training? 26.33 Section 26.33 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES JOB PLACEMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM Training Services § 26.33 How do I show I need job training? The need for Job Placement...

  17. 30 CFR 57.22401 - Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines). 57... MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Underground Retorts § 57.22401 Underground retorts (I-A and I-B mines). (a) Retorts shall be provided with— (1) Two independent power...

  18. 40 CFR 1048.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application? 1048.210 Section 1048.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-IGNITION ENGINES Certifying Engine Families § 1048.210 May I get preliminary approval before I complete my...

  19. 40 CFR 1048.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application? 1048.210 Section 1048.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-IGNITION ENGINES Certifying Engine Families § 1048.210 May I get preliminary approval before I complete my...

  20. 40 CFR 1048.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application? 1048.210 Section 1048.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-IGNITION ENGINES Certifying Engine Families § 1048.210 May I get preliminary approval before I complete my...

  1. 40 CFR 1051.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application? 1051.210 Section 1051.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES Certifying Engine Families § 1051.210 May I get preliminary approval before I complete my...

  2. 40 CFR 1051.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application? 1051.210 Section 1051.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES Certifying Engine Families § 1051.210 May I get preliminary approval before I complete my...

  3. 40 CFR 1048.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application? 1048.210 Section 1048.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-IGNITION ENGINES Certifying Engine Families § 1048.210 May I get preliminary approval before I complete my...

  4. 40 CFR 1051.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application? 1051.210 Section 1051.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES Certifying Engine Families § 1051.210 May I get preliminary approval before I complete my...

  5. 40 CFR 1051.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application? 1051.210 Section 1051.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES Certifying Engine Families § 1051.210 May I get preliminary approval before I complete my...

  6. 40 CFR 1048.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application? 1048.210 Section 1048.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...-IGNITION ENGINES Certifying Engine Families § 1048.210 May I get preliminary approval before I complete my...

  7. 40 CFR 1051.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application? 1051.210 Section 1051.210 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... VEHICLES Certifying Engine Families § 1051.210 May I get preliminary approval before I complete my...

  8. 30 CFR 285.831 - What incidents must I report, and when must I report them?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What incidents must I report, and when must I... must I report, and when must I report them? (a) You must report the following incidents to us... provide a written report of the following incidents to us within 15 days after the incident: (1) Any...

  9. I'm a Guy. How Can I Talk to My Female Doctor about Certain Things?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this because she might need to see or touch me down there. I've had a history of painful infections when I urinate — and I have some questions about sex. Should I tell her this? – Sam* Seeing a new doctor for the first time can be nerve-wracking. It may feel doubly difficult if your doctor is a member ...

  10. 30 CFR 203.75 - What risk do I run if I request a redetermination?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What risk do I run if I request a redetermination? 203.75 Section 203.75 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... Sulfur General § 203.75 What risk do I run if I request a redetermination? If you request a...

  11. 30 CFR 203.75 - What risk do I run if I request a redetermination?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What risk do I run if I request a redetermination? 203.75 Section 203.75 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... Sulfur General § 203.75 What risk do I run if I request a redetermination? If you request a...

  12. 30 CFR 203.75 - What risk do I run if I request a redetermination?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What risk do I run if I request a redetermination? 203.75 Section 203.75 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT... Sulfur General § 203.75 What risk do I run if I request a redetermination? If you request a...

  13. CBP PHASE I CODE INTEGRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, F.; Brown, K.; Flach, G.; Sarkar, S.

    2011-09-30

    The goal of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is to develop a reasonable and credible set of software tools to predict the structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cement barriers used in nuclear applications over extended time frames (greater than 100 years for operating facilities and greater than 1000 years for waste management). The simulation tools will be used to evaluate and predict the behavior of cementitious barriers used in near surface engineered waste disposal systems including waste forms, containment structures, entombments, and environmental remediation. These cementitious materials are exposed to dynamic environmental conditions that cause changes in material properties via (i) aging, (ii) chloride attack, (iii) sulfate attack, (iv) carbonation, (v) oxidation, and (vi) primary constituent leaching. A set of state-of-the-art software tools has been selected as a starting point to capture these important aging and degradation phenomena. Integration of existing software developed by the CBP partner organizations was determined to be the quickest method of meeting the CBP goal of providing a computational tool that improves the prediction of the long-term behavior of cementitious materials. These partner codes were selected based on their maturity and ability to address the problems outlined above. The GoldSim Monte Carlo simulation program (GTG 2010a, GTG 2010b) was chosen as the code integration platform (Brown & Flach 2009b). GoldSim (current Version 10.5) is a Windows based graphical object-oriented computer program that provides a flexible environment for model development (Brown & Flach 2009b). The linking of GoldSim to external codes has previously been successfully demonstrated (Eary 2007, Mattie et al. 2007). GoldSim is capable of performing deterministic and probabilistic simulations and of modeling radioactive decay and constituent transport. As part of the CBP project, a general Dynamic Link Library (DLL) interface was

  14. Relationship between 129I and 127I contents in bovine thyroid glands from Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, A. E.; Fernández Niello, J. O.; Wallner, A.; Arazi, A.; Steier, P.

    2013-01-01

    129I/127I ratios and iodine concentrations in bovine thyroids stemming from Argentina were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and gas chromatography (GC), respectively. From these measurements, a relationship of the 129I/127I ratio with iodine content in the gland was obtained. A weak correlation between the two isotopes was found, suggesting that 129I re-emission from the ocean is not the only process for the 129I deposition in Argentina. Moreover, contributions to the total 129I inventory in the Southern hemisphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources were theoretically studied. Surface compartments present similar contribution from natural sources and nuclear explosions fallout.

  15. The catcher in the RIG-I.

    PubMed

    Weber, Friedemann

    2015-11-01

    Retinoic-acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) is a major pattern recognition receptor of the innate immune system. RIG-I is a cytoplasmic RNA helicase that is able to bind virus-specific RNA structures. Activated RIG-I switches into a conformation that locks the ligand RNA and signals via the MAVS-IRF-3 axis, resulting in the upregulation of antiviral interferons. Recent evidence suggests that the binding of RIG-I to regulatory RNA structures of two major human pathogens, influenza A virus and hepatitis B virus, can inhibit viral replication independent of the subsequent signal transduction. Thus, RIG-I rides a two-pronged attack, with an early-hitting, direct inhibition via occupancy of viral regulatory RNA structures, and a delayed response via signaling and induction of interferons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [iPS cells in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Egusa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, which enables us to produce pluripotent stem cells by introducing a few genetic factors, commands considerable attention in the field of dentistry. These iPS cells may be of particular importance for developing innovative technologies to regenerate missing jaw bones and lost teeth, and there are expectations that several types of tissue stem cells and mucosal cells in the oral area can be used as an ideal iPS cell source. We previously reported that the gingiva, which is often resected during general dental treatments and treated as biomedical waste, is a promising source of iPS cells. In this review, the current trends in iPS cell research in dentistry are outlined, and future aspects of potential applications of the iPS cell technologies to dental treatments will be discussed.

  17. Identification and characterization of a <i>cis>-regulatory element for zygotic gene expression in <i>Chlamydomonas reinhardtiii>

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-03-26

    Upon fertilization <i>Chlamydomonas reinhardtiii> zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of <i>C. reinhardtiii> early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene <i>DMT4i> are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient to confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. Furthermore, we predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes.

  18. What Really Rigs Up RIG-I?

    PubMed

    Barik, Sailen

    2016-01-01

    RIG-I (retinoic acid-inducible gene 1) is an archetypal member of the cytoplasmic DEAD-box dsRNA helicase family (RIG-I-like receptors or RLRs), the members of which play essential roles in the innate immune response of the metazoan cell. RIG-I functions as a pattern recognition receptor that detects nonself RNA as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP). However, the exact molecular nature of the viral RNAs that act as a RIG-I ligand has remained a mystery and a matter of debate. In this article, we offer a critical review of the actual viral RNAs that act as PAMPs to activate RIG-I, as seen from the perspective of a virologist, including a recent report that the viral Leader-read-through transcript is a novel and effective RIG-I ligand.

  19. Silver iodide sodalite for 129I immobilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, E. R.; Gregg, D. J.; Grant, C.; Stopic, A.; Maddrell, E. R.

    2016-11-01

    Silver iodide sodalite was initially synthesised as a fine-grained major phase in a nominally stoichiometric composition following hot isostatic pressing at 850 °C with 100 MPa and its composition, Ag4Al3Si3O12I, was approximately verified by scanning electron microscopy. An alternative preparative method yielded a more dense and stoichiometric AgI sodalite on sintering and HIPing. As found for AgI, the I is released from AgI sodalite much more readily in reducing water than in ordinary water. Thus in normal PCT-B tests, the I release was <0.3 g/L in water, but it was ∼70 g/L under highly reducing conditions. This is an important point with regard to can material if HIPing is used for consolidation.

  20. Academic Cancer Center Phase I Program Development.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Arthur E; Flaherty, Keith T; Weiner, George J; Chen, Robert; Azad, Nilofer S; Pishvaian, Michael J; Thompson, John A; Taylor, Matthew H; Mahadevan, Daruka; Lockhart, A Craig; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; Berlin, Jordan D; Smith, David C; Sarantopoulos, John; Riese, Matthew; Saleh, Mansoor N; Ahn, Chul; Frenkel, Eugene P

    2017-04-01

    Multiple factors critical to the effectiveness of academic phase I cancer programs were assessed among 16 academic centers in the U.S. Successful cancer centers were defined as having broad phase I and I/II clinical trial portfolios, multiple investigator-initiated studies, and correlative science. The most significant elements were institutional philanthropic support, experienced clinical research managers, robust institutional basic research, institutional administrative efforts to reduce bureaucratic regulatory delays, phase I navigators to inform patients and physicians of new studies, and a large cancer center patient base. New programs may benefit from a separate stand-alone operation, but mature phase I programs work well when many of the activities are transferred to disease-oriented teams. The metrics may be useful as a rubric for new and established academic phase I programs. The Oncologist 2017;22:369-374.

  1. 30 CFR Appendix I to Subpart J of... - Appendix I to Subpart J of Part 7

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appendix I to Subpart J of Part 7 I Appendix I to Subpart J of Part 7 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Assemblies Pt. 7, Subpt. J, App. I Appendix I to Subpart J of Part 7 EC22OC91.004 EC22OC91.005...

  2. Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle Similitude to the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Smith, R. Marshall; Campbell, John R.; Taylor, Terry L.

    2009-01-01

    The Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle is the first in a series of flight test vehicles that will take the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle design from development to operational capability. Ares I-X is scheduled for a 2009 flight date, early enough in the Ares I design and development process so that data obtained from the flight can impact the design of Ares I before its Critical Design Review. Decisions on Ares I-X scope, flight test objectives, and FTV fidelity were made prior to the Ares I systems requirements being baselined. This was necessary in order to achieve a development flight test to impact the Ares I design. Differences between the Ares I-X and the Ares I configurations are artifacts of formulating this experimental project at an early stage and the natural maturation of the Ares I design process. This paper describes the similarities and differences between the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle and the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle. Areas of comparison include the outer mold line geometry, aerosciences, trajectory, structural modes, flight control architecture, separation sequence, and relevant element differences. Most of the outer mold line differences present between Ares I and Ares I-X are minor and will not have a significant effect on overall vehicle performance. The most significant impacts are related to the geometric differences in Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle at the forward end of the stack. These physical differences will cause differences in the flow physics in these areas. Even with these differences, the Ares I-X flight test is poised to meet all five primary objectives and six secondary objectives. Knowledge of what the Ares I-X flight test will provide in similitude to Ares I - as well as what the test will not provide - is important in the continued execution of the Ares I-X mission leading to its flight and the continued design and development of Ares I.

  3. Under-detection of endospore-forming <i>Firmicutes> in metagenomic data

    SciTech Connect

    Filippidou, Sevasti; Junier, Thomas; Wunderlin, Tina; Lo, Chien -Chi; Li, Po -E; Chain, Patrick S.; Junier, Pilar

    2015-04-25

    Microbial diversity studies based on metagenomic sequencing have greatly enhanced our knowledge of the microbial world. However, one caveat is the fact that not all microorganisms are equally well detected, questioning the universality of this approach. <i>Firmicutes> are known to be a dominant bacterial group. Several <i>Firmicutes> species are endospore formers and this property makes them hardy in potentially harsh conditions, and thus likely to be present in a wide variety of environments, even as residents and not functional players. While metagenomic libraries can be expected to contain endospore formers, endospores are known to be resilient to many traditional methods of DNA isolation and thus potentially undetectable. In this study we evaluated the representation of endospore-forming <i>Firmicutes> in 73 published metagenomic datasets using two molecular markers unique to this bacterial group (<i>spo0Ai> and <i>gpr>). Both markers were notably absent in well-known habitats of <i>Firmicutes> such as soil, with <i>spo0Ai> found only in three mammalian gut microbiomes. A tailored DNA extraction method resulted in the detection of a large diversity of endospore-formers in amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA and <i>spo0Ai> genes. However, shotgun classification was still poor with only a minor fraction of the community assigned to <i>Firmicutes>. Thus, removing a specific bias in a molecular workflow improves detection in amplicon sequencing, but it was insufficient to overcome the limitations for detecting endospore-forming <i>Firmicutes> in whole-genome metagenomics. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of understanding the specific methodological biases that can contribute to improve the universality of metagenomic approaches.

  4. Characterization of novel sorghum <i>brown midribi> mutants from an EMS-mutagenized population

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, Scott E.; Saballos, Ana; Xin, Zhanguo; Funnell-Harris, Deanna L.; Vermerris, Wilfred; Pedersen, Jeffrey F.

    2014-09-02

    Reducing lignin concentration in lignocellulosic biomass can increase forage digestibility for ruminant livestock and saccharification yields of biomass for bioenergy. In sorghum (<i>Sorghum bicolori> (L.) Moench) and several other C4 grasses, <i>brown midribi> (<i>bmr>) mutants have been shown to reduce lignin concentration. Putative <i>bmr> mutants isolated from an EMS-mutagenized population were characterized and classified based on their leaf midrib phenotype and allelism tests with the previously described sorghum <i>bmr> mutants <i>bmr2i>, <i>bmr6i>, and <i>bmr12i>. These tests resulted in the identification of additional alleles of <i>bmr2i>, <i>bmr6i>,and <i>bmr12i>, and, in addition, six <i>bmr> mutants were identified that were not allelic to these previously described loci. Further allelism testing among these six <i>bmr> mutants showed that they represented four novel <i>bmr> loci. Based on this study, the number of <i>bmr> loci uncovered in sorghum has doubled. The impact of these lines on agronomic traits and lignocellulosic composition was assessed in a 2-yr field study. Most of the identified <i>bmr> lines showed reduced lignin concentration of their biomass relative to wild-type (WT). Effects of the six new <i>bmr> mutants on enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic materials were determined, but the amount of glucose released from the stover was similar to WT in all cases. Like <i>bmr2i>, <i>bmr6i>, and <i>bmr12i>, these mutants may affect monolignol biosynthesis and may be useful for bioenergy and forage improvement when stacked together or in combination with the three previously described <i>bmr> alleles.

  5. New organically templated photoluminescence iodocuprates(I)

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Qin; Zhao Jinjing; Zhao Tianqi; Jin Juan; Yu Jiehui; Xu Jiqing

    2011-07-15

    Two types of organic cyclic aliphatic diamine molecules piperazine (pip) and 1,3-bis(4-piperidyl)propane (bpp) were used, respectively, to react with an inorganic mixture of CuI and KI in the acidic CH{sub 3}OH solutions under the solvothermal conditions, generating finally three new organically templated iodocuprates as 2-D layered [(Hpip)Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D chained [tmpip][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 (tmpip=N,N,N',N'-tetramethylpiperazinium) and dinuclear [H{sub 2}bpp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 5}] I.2H{sub 2}O 3. Note that the templating agent tmpip{sup 2+} in compound 2 originated from the in situ N-alkylation reaction between the pip molecule and the methanol solvent. The photoluminescence analysis indicates that the title compounds emit the different lights: yellow for 1, blue for 2 and yellow-green for 3, respectively. - Graphical abstract: The solvothermal self-assemblies of CuI, KI and pip/bpp in acidic CH{sub 3}OH solutions created three iodocuprates 2-D layered [(Hpip)Cu{sub 3}I{sub 4}] 1, 1-D chained [tmpip][Cu{sub 2}I{sub 4}] 2 and dinuclear [H{sub 2}bpp]{sub 2}[Cu{sub 2}I{sub 5}] I.2H{sub 2}O 3. Highlights: > A new layered iodocuprate(I) with 20-membered rings was hydrothermally prepared. > A simple approach to prepare the new organic templating agent was reported. > Photoluminescence analysis indicates the emission for iodocuprate(I) is associated with the Cu...Cu interactions.

  6. Experimental Breeder Reactor I Preservation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Braun

    2006-10-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR I) is a National Historic Landmark located at the Idaho National Laboratory, a Department of Energy laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The facility is significant for its association and contributions to the development of nuclear reactor testing and development. This Plan includes a structural assessment of the interior and exterior of the EBR I Reactor Building from a preservation, rather than an engineering stand point and recommendations for maintenance to ensure its continued protection.

  7. Leading a successful iGEM team.

    PubMed

    Materi, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    The International Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) competition allows undergraduate teams to develop projects in synthetic biology within the context of a large, international Jamboree. Organizing and managing a successful iGEM team is an exercise in advanced agile project development. While many of the principles applicable to such teams are derived from management of agile software teams, iGEM presents several unique challenges.

  8. ARES I-X Launch Prep

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-26

    NASA's Ares I-X rocket is seen on launch pad 39b at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009 shortly after NASA scrubbed the launch attempt due to weather. The flight test of Ares I-X, now scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009, will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. ARES I-X Launch Prep

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-25

    NASA's Ares I-X rocket is seen on launch pad 39b at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Monday, Oct. 26, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X, scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009, will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. 129I in archived seawater samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, Henrietta N.; Smith, John N.; Livingston, Hugh D.; Kilius, Linas R.; Edmond, John M.

    1998-07-01

    Anthropogenic 129I (t1/2=15.7 My) discharged by the nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities at Sellafield (UK) and La Hague (France) is a promising tracer of physical and biogeochemical processes in the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans. To improve understanding of its releases and dispersal, 129I was measured in archived seawater samples that had been collected as part of previous tracer studies, thus allowing direct comparison of 129I with other anthropogenic radionuclides. A sample collected in the eastern subtropical North Atlantic in 1969 was selected in order to directly measure the impact of weapons-fallout 129I in the oceans. The measured 129I/127I ratio of the sample is 0.53±0.08×10-10 (0.53±0.08IU: 1IU≡129I/127I=10-10), compared to the pre-anthropogenic ratio of ∼10-12 (0.01 IU). The ratio of 129I to 137Cs is 2.0±0.6 (atom ratio), 1.6±0.6 when corrected for 7 yr of radioactive decay from the bomb-input peak. This observed ratio is ten times higher than predicted from fission yields, possibly reflecting the greater volatility of iodine relative to cesium. 129I/137Cs ratios in Scottish and Norwegian Coastal waters, sampled in 1976 and 1978, are in good agreement with predictions based on the available release data. Reprocessing 129I is clearly seen in the northern Greenland Sea (>6 IU) and in Denmark Straits Overflow Water (1.4 IU) in samples collected during the TTO/NAS program in 1981. The strength of the tracer signal in the overflow water - the ratio of the concentration in the overflow core to its minimum value in the station profile - is approximately four times higher for 129I than for the other tracers measured (137Cs, 90Sr, and 3H).

  11. Annual Progress Report FY-82. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    behavioral modification techniques directed at im- proving fitness in the Carlisle War College population. DCI also made arrangements to accommodate the...Aging Female Rat. (FY-81 SP P I) 1329-81 Prolactin Secretion from Dispersed 103 Anterior Pituitary Cells in Culture and the Effect of Aging on this... Secretion . (FY-B1 I) 1330-81 Utilization of Hybidoma Antibodies as a 104 Physiologic Probe of Thyrotropin (TSH) Action. (FY-Bi I) 1331-81 The Effect of

  12. Expression of Renal Aquaporins in Aristolochic Acid I and Aristolactam I-Induced Nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Ji; Zhang, Liang; Jiang, ZhenZhou; He, XiuQin; Zhang, LuYong; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to aristolochic acid (AA) can cause AA nephropathy, which is characterized by extensive proximal tubular damage and polyuria. To test the hypothesis that polyuria might be induced by altered regulation of aquaporins (AQPs) in the kidney, different doses of AA-I or aristolactam I (AL-I) were administered intraperitoneally to Sprague-Dawley rats, and urine, blood, and kidney samples were analyzed. In addition, AQP1, AQP2, AQP4 and AQP6 expression in the kidney were determined. The results showed dose-dependent proximal tubular damage and polyuria in the AA-I- and AL-I-treated groups, and the nephrotoxicity of AL-I was higher than that of AA-I. The expression of renal AQP1, AQP2 and AQP4, but not AQP6 were significantly inhibited by AA-I and AL-I. Comparison of the inhibition potencies of AA-I and AL-I showed that AL-I was a stronger inhibitor of AQP1 expression than AA-I, while there was no difference in their effects on AQP2 and AQP4. These results suggested that AA induced renal damage and polyuria were associated with a specific decrease in the expression of renal AQP1 AQP2 and AQP4, and AL-I showed higher nephrotoxicity than AA-I, which might be attributable to the differences in their inhibition of AQP1. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Protozoan Parasites and Type I IFNs.

    PubMed

    Silva-Barrios, Sasha; Stäger, Simona

    2017-01-01

    For many years, the role of interferon (IFN)-I has been characterized primarily in the context of viral infections. However, regulatory functions mediated by IFN-I have also been described against bacterial infections and in tumor immunology. Only recently, the interest in understanding the immune functions mediated by IFN-I has dramatically increased in the field of protozoan infections. In this review, we discuss the discrete role of IFN-I in the immune response against major protozoan infections: Plasmodium, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Toxoplasma.

  14. Heterologous expression of family 10 xylanases from <i>Acidothermus cellulolyticusi> enhances the exoproteome of <i>Caldicellulosiruptor besciii> and growth on xylan substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun -Ki; Chung, Daehwan; Himmel, Michael E.; Bomble, Yannick J.; Westpheling, Janet

    2016-08-22

    The ability to deconstruct plant biomass without conventional pretreatment has made members of the genus <i>Caldicellulosiruptor> the target of investigation for the consolidated processing of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and bioproducts. These Gram-positive bacteria are hyperthermophilic anaerobes and the most thermophilic cellulolytic organisms so far described. They use both C5 and C6 sugars simultaneously and have the ability to grow well on xylan, a major component of plant cell walls. This is an important advantage for their use to efficiently convert biomass at yields sufficient for an industrial process. For commodity chemicals, yield from substrate is perhaps the most important economic factor. In an attempt to improve even further the ability of <i>C. besciii> to use xylan, we introduced two xylanases from Acidothermus cellulolyticus. Acel_0180 includes tandem carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM2 and CBM3) located at the C-terminus, one of which, CBM2, is not present in C. bescii. Also, the sequences of Xyn10A and Acel_0180 have very little homology with the GH10 domains present in <i>C. besciii>. For these reasons, we selected these xylanases as potential candidates for synergistic interaction with those in the <i>C. besciii> exoproteome. As a result, heterologous expression of two xylanases from <i>Acidothermus cellulolyticusi> in <i>Caldicellulosiruptor> bescii resulted in a modest, but significant increase in the activity of the exoproteome of <i>C. besciii> on xylan substrates. Even though the increase in extracellular activity was modest, the ability of <i>C. besciii> to grow on these substrates was dramatically improved suggesting that the xylan substrate/microbe interaction substantially increased deconstruction over the secreted free enzymes alone. In conclusion, we anticipate that the ability to efficiently use xylan, a major component of plant cell walls for conversion of plant biomass to products of interest, will allow

  15. Search for a pentaquark decaying to <i>pK>0S in <i>γN>

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J. M.; Yager, P. M.; Anjos, J. C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A. A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Pepe, I. M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A. C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Uribe, C.; Vázquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J. P.; Frisullo, V.; O'Reilly, B.; Segoni, I.; Stenson, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chiodini, G.; Gaines, I.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garren, L. A.; Gottschalk, E.; Kasper, P. H.; Kreymer, A. E.; Kutschke, R.; Wang, M.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F. L.; Pacetti, S.; Zallo, A.; Reyes, M.; Cawlfield, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Rahimi, A.; Wiss, J.; Gardner, R.; Kryemadhi, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Kang, J. S.; Ko, B. R.; Kwak, J. W.; Lee, K. B.; Cho, K.; Park, H.; Alimonti, G.; Barberis, S.; Boschini, M.; Cerutti, A.; D'Angelo, P.; DiCorato, M.; Dini, P.; Edera, L.; Erba, S.; Inzani, P.; Leveraro, F.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Mezzadri, M.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Pontoglio, C.; Prelz, F.; Rovere, M.; Sala, S.; Davenport, T. F.; Arena, V.; Boca, G.; Bonomi, G.; Gianini, G.; Liguori, G.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Merlo, M. M.; Pantea, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Vitulo, P.; Göbel, C.; Olatora, J.; Hernandez, H.; Lopez, A. M.; Mendez, H.; Paris, A.; Quinones, J.; Ramirez, J. E.; Zhang, Y.; Wilson, J. R.; Handler, T.; Mitchell, R.; Engh, D.; Givens, K. M.; Hosack, M.; Johns, W. E.; Luiggi, E.; Nehring, M.; Sheldon, P. D.; Vaandering, E. W.; Webster, M.; Sheaff, M.

    2006-08-01

    We present a search for a pentaquark decaying strongly to <i>pK>0S in <i>γN> collisions at a center-of-mass energy up to 25 GeV/c2. Finding no evidence for such a state in the mass range of 1470 MeV/c2 to 2200 MeV/c2, we set limits on the yield and on the cross section times branching ratio relative to Σ* (1385)± and K* (892) +.

  16. Electronic structure, transport, and phonons of SrAg<i>Ch>F (<i>Ch> = S,Se,Te): Bulk superlattice thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Gudelli, Vijay Kumar; Kanchana, V.; Vaitheeswaran, G.; Singh, David J.; Svane, Axel; Christensen, Niels Egede; Mahanti, Subhendra D.

    2015-07-15

    Here, we report calculations of the electronic structure, vibrational properties, and transport for the p-type semiconductors, SrAg<i>Ch>F (<i>Ch> = S, Se, and Te). We find soft phonons with low frequency optical branches intersecting the acoustic modes below 50 cm–1, indicative of a material with low thermal conductivity. The bands at and near the valence-band maxima are highly two-dimensional, which leads to high thermopowers even at high carrier concentrations, which is a combination that suggests good thermoelectric performance. These materials may be regarded as bulk realizations of superlattice thermoelectrics.

  17. iMAST FY2007 Annual Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    testers for spur and helical gears , Single Tooth Impact tester, and worm gear testers with 1.75- and 4-inch center distances. Extensive metallurgical...the other is based on the optical gear tooth measuring system, being developed at ARL. M e c h a n i c a l D r i v e Tr a n s m i s s i o n...in support of high-performance transmission technology. Rolling Contact Fatigue (RCF) testers for simulating gear tooth contact, Single Tooth Fatigue

  18. Protozoan Parasites and Type I IFNs

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Barrios, Sasha; Stäger, Simona

    2017-01-01

    For many years, the role of interferon (IFN)-I has been characterized primarily in the context of viral infections. However, regulatory functions mediated by IFN-I have also been described against bacterial infections and in tumor immunology. Only recently, the interest in understanding the immune functions mediated by IFN-I has dramatically increased in the field of protozoan infections. In this review, we discuss the discrete role of IFN-I in the immune response against major protozoan infections: Plasmodium, Leishmania, Trypanosoma, and Toxoplasma. PMID:28154565

  19. ARES I-X Launch Prep

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-26

    NASA Ares I-X Launch Director Ed Mango monitors the launch countdown from Firing Room One of the Launch Control Center (LCC) at the Kennedy Space Center during the planned launch of the Ares I-X rocket from pad 39b at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009. The flight test of Ares I-X will provide NASA with an early opportunity to test and prove flight characteristics, hardware, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Mod I automotive Stirling engine mechanical development

    SciTech Connect

    Simetkosky, M.

    1984-01-01

    The Mod I Stirling engine was the first automotive Stirling engine designed specifically for automotive application. Testing of these engines has revealed several deficiencies in engine mechanical integrity which have been corrected by redesign or upgrade. The main deficiencies uncovered during the Mod I program lie in the combustion, auxiliary, main seal, and heater head areas. This paper will address each of the major area deficiencies in detail, and describe the corrective actions taken as they apply to the Mod I and the next Stirling-engine design, the Upgraded Mod I (a redesign to incorporate new materials for cost/weight reduction and improved performance).

  1. Trilinos I/O Support (Trios)

    DOE PAGES

    Oldfield, Ron A.; Sjaardema, Gregory D.; Lofstead II, Gerald F.; ...

    2012-01-01

    Trilinos I/O Support (Trios) is a new capability area in Trilinos that serves two important roles: (1) it provides and supports I/O libraries used by in-production scientific codes; (2) it provides a research vehicle for the evaluation and distribution of new techniques to improve I/O on advanced platforms. This paper provides a brief overview of the production-grade I/O libraries in Trios as well as some of the ongoing research efforts that contribute to the experimental libraries in Trios.

  2. Recurrent thyrotoxicosis after I-131 induced hypothyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Borowski, G.D.; Shtasel, P.; Rose, L.I.

    1984-01-01

    The first clinically and biochemically documented case of recurrent thyrotoxicosis after I-131 induced hypothyroidism in a patient with Graves' disease is reported. Two months after the administration of 9.2 mCi of I-131, the subject developed hypothyroidism. One month later, the patient became euthyroid. Then, nine months following ablation, the patient again developed thyrotoxicosis. A second dose of I-131 of 12.5 mCi was required to finally produce permanent hypothyroidism. This case illustrates the recurrence of hypothyroidism after what had seemed to have been adequate I-131 radiation.

  3. Number of spin I states for bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L. H.; Zhao, Y. M.; Jia, L. Y.; Arima, A.

    2008-01-15

    We study number of spin I states for bosons in this article. We extend Talmi's recursion formulas for number of states with given spin I to boson systems, and we prove empirical formulas for five bosons by using these recursions. We obtain number of states with given spin I and F spin for three and four bosons by using sum rules of six-j and nine-j symbols. We also present empirical formulas of states for d bosons with given spin I and F=F{sub max}-1 and F{sub max}-2.0.

  4. File concepts for parallel I/O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    The subject of input/output (I/O) was often neglected in the design of parallel computer systems, although for many problems I/O rates will limit the speedup attainable. The I/O problem is addressed by considering the role of files in parallel systems. The notion of parallel files is introduced. Parallel files provide for concurrent access by multiple processes, and utilize parallelism in the I/O system to improve performance. Parallel files can also be used conventionally by sequential programs. A set of standard parallel file organizations is proposed, organizations are suggested, using multiple storage devices. Problem areas are also identified and discussed.

  5. <i>NifH>-Harboring Bacterial Community Composition across an Alaskan Permafrost Thaw Gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Penton, C. Ryan; Yang, Caiyun; Wu, Liyou; Wang, Qiong; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Feifei; Qin, Yujia; Deng, Ye; Hemme, Christopher L.; Zheng, Tianling; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong

    2016-11-24

    Since nitrogen (N) is often limiting in permafrost soils, we investigated the N2-fixing genetic potential and the inferred taxa harboring those genes by sequencing <i>nifH> gene fragments in samples taken along a permafrost thaw gradient in an Alaskan boreal soil. Samples from minimally, moderately and extensively thawed sites were taken to a depth of 79 cm to encompass zones above and below the depth of the water table. <i>NifH> reads were translated with frameshift correction and 112,476 sequences were clustered at 5% amino acid dissimilarity resulting in 1,631 OTUs. Sample depth in relation to water table depth was correlated to differences in the <i>NifH> sequence classes with those most closely related to group I <i>nifH>-harboring Alpha- and Beta-Proteobacteria in higher abundance above water table depth while those related to group III <i>nifH>-harboring Delta Proteobacteria more abundant below. The most dominant below water table depth <i>NifH> sequences, comprising 1/3 of the total, were distantly related to <i>Verrucomicrobia-Opitutaceae>. Overall, these results suggest that permafrost thaw alters the class-level composition of N2-fixing communities in the thawed soil layers and that this distinction corresponds to the depth of the water table. These <i>nifH> data were also compared to <i>nifH> sequences obtained from a study at an Alaskan taiga site, and to those of other geographically distant, non-permafrost sites. The two Alaska sites were differentiated largely by changes in relative abundances of the same OTUs, whereas the non-Alaska sites were differentiated by the lack of many Alaskan OTUs, and the presence of unique halophilic, sulfate- and iron-reducing taxa in the Alaska sites.

  6. Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle similitude to the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebner, Lawrence D.; Smith, R. Marshall; Campbell, John R.; Taylor, Terry L.

    2009-12-01

    The Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle is the first in a series of flight test vehicles that will take the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle design from development to operational capability. Ares I-X is scheduled for a 2009 flight date, early enough in the Ares I design and development process so that data obtained from the flight can impact the design of Ares I before its Critical Design Review. Decisions on Ares I-X scope, flight test objectives, and FTV fidelity were made prior to the Ares I systems requirements being baselined. This was necessary in order to achieve a development flight test to impact the Ares I design. Differences between the Ares I-X and the Ares I configurations are artifacts of formulating this experimental project at an early stage and the natural maturation of the Ares I design process. This paper describes the similarities and differences between the Ares I-X Flight Test Vehicle and the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle. Areas of comparison include the outer mold line geometry, aerosciences, trajectory, structural modes, flight control architecture, separation sequence, and relevant element differences. Most of the outer mold line differences present between Ares I and Ares I-X are minor and will not have a significant effect on overall vehicle performance. The most significant impacts are related to the geometric differences in Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle at the forward end of the stack. These physical differences will cause differences in the flow physics in these areas. Even with these differences, the Ares I-X flight test is poised to meet all five primary objectives and six secondary objectives. Knowledge of what the Ares I-X flight test will provide in similitude to Ares I—as well as what the test will not provide—is important in the continued execution of the Ares I-X mission leading to its flight and the continued design and development of Ares I.

  7. Three new active members of the I-OnuI family of homing endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Bilto, Iman M; Guha, Tuhin K; Wai, Alvan; Hausner, Georg

    2017-08-01

    In vitro characterization of 3 LAGLIDADG-type homing endonucleases (HEs) (I-CcaI, I-CcaII, and I-AstI) that belong to the I-OnuI family showed that they are functional HEs that cleave their respective cognate target sites. These endonucleases are encoded within group ID introns and appear to be orthologues that have inserted into 3 different mitochondrial genes: rns, rnl, and cox3. The endonuclease activity of I-CcaI was tested using various substrates, and its minimum DNA recognition sequence was estimated to be 26 nt. This set of HEs may provide some insight into how these types of mobile elements can migrate into new locations. This study provides additional endonucleases that can be added to the catalog of currently available HEs that may have various biotechnology applications.

  8. Tanker Avionics/Aircrew Complement Evaluation (TAACE). Phase I. Simulation Evaluation. Volume I. Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    This report docUlmenllt s a Com kp i t s i 11l11 at ion1 study conduc ted to va 1 i datc tile pilot oseab i Iity of’ a 3-man (pilot, copilot, bOoml...ockup studies inl whi ich the Crew usa i /ceta iivof* the three or igCinalI desi gns was assessed. Wh ile all threce des ignis remla i ned res poi is...new Iocatoi 3’ ’ utut art I nl,4 Iv tol"I1ht Figure 6. Boom Operatoru% All Station 10 L4 so that the boom operator could spend more time in full contact

  9. 21 CFR 803.40 - If I am an importer, what kinds of individual adverse event reports must I submit, when must I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adverse event reports must I submit, when must I submit them, and to whom must I submit them? 803.40... importer, what kinds of individual adverse event reports must I submit, when must I submit them, and to whom must I submit them? (a) Reports of deaths or serious injuries. You must submit a report to us, and...

  10. 21 CFR 803.40 - If I am an importer, what kinds of individual adverse event reports must I submit, when must I...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... adverse event reports must I submit, when must I submit them, and to whom must I submit them? 803.40... importer, what kinds of individual adverse event reports must I submit, when must I submit them, and to whom must I submit them? (a) Reports of deaths or serious injuries. You must submit a report to us, and...

  11. Synthesis, radiolabeling, and biological evaluation of (<i>R>)- and (<i>S>)-2-amino-5-[18F]fluoro-2-methylpentanoic acid ((<i>R>)-, (<i>S>)-[18F]FAMPe) as potential positron emission tomography tracers for brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhlel, Ahlem; Zhou, Dong; Li, Aixiao; Yuan, Liya; Rich, Keith M.; McConathy, Jonathan

    2015-04-06

    In this paper, a novel 18F-labeled α,α-disubstituted amino acid-based tracer, 2-amino-5-[18F]fluoro-2-methylpentanoic acid ([18F]FAMPe), has been developed for brain tumor imaging with a longer alkyl side chain than previously reported compounds to increase brain availability via system L amino acid transport. Both enantiomers of [18F]FAMPe were obtained in good radiochemical yield (24–52% <i>n> = 8) and high radiochemical purity (>99%). In vitro uptake assays in mouse DBT gliomas cells revealed that (<i>S>)-[18F]FAMPe enters cells partly via sodium-independent system L transporters and also via other nonsystem A transport systems including transporters that recognize glutamine. Biodistribution and small animal PET/CT studies in the mouse DBT model of glioblastoma showed that both (<i>R>)- and (<i>S>)-[18F]FAMPe have good tumor imaging properties with the (<i>S>)-enantiomer providing higher tumor uptake and tumor to brain ratios. Finally, comparison of the SUVs showed that (<i>S>)-[18F]FAMPe had higher tumor to brain ratios compared to (<i>S>)-[18F]FET, a well-established system L substrate.

  12. Advances in molecular serotyping and subtyping of <i>Escherichia colii>

    SciTech Connect

    Fratamico, Pina M.; DebRoy, Chitrita; Liu, Yanhong; Needleman, David S.; Baranzoni, Gian Marco; Feng, Peter

    2016-05-03

    <i>Escherichia colii> plays an important role as a member of the gut microbiota; however, pathogenic strains also exist, including various diarrheagenic <i>E. colii> pathotypes and extraintestinal pathogenic <i>E. colii> that cause illness outside of the GI-tract. <i>E. colii> have traditionally been serotyped using antisera against the ca. 186 O-antigens and 53 H-flagellar antigens. Phenotypic methods, including bacteriophage typing and O- and H- serotyping for differentiating and characterizing <i>E. colii> have been used for many years; however, these methods are generally time consuming and not always accurate. Advances in next generation sequencing technologies have made it possible to develop genetic-based subtyping and molecular serotyping methods for <i>E. colii>, which are more discriminatory compared to phenotypic typing methods. Furthermore, whole genome sequencing (WGS) of <i>E. colii> is replacing established subtyping methods such as pulsedfield gel electrophoresis, providing a major advancement in the ability to investigate food-borne disease outbreaks and for trace-back to sources. Furthermore, a variety of sequence analysis tools and bioinformatic pipelines are being developed to analyze the vast amount of data generated by WGS and to obtain specific information such as O- and H-group determination and the presence of virulence genes and other genetic markers.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies to the major Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen Lol p I (Rye I).

    PubMed

    Kahn, C R; Marsh, D G

    1986-12-01

    Thirteen monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against Lol p I (Rye I), the major Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen. Spleen cells from A/J and SJL mice immunized with highly purified Lol p I (Lol I) were allowed to fuse with cells from the non-secreting Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma cell line. Each MAb was analyzed for antigenic specificity by radioimmunoassay (RIA) using 125I-Lol I. The epitope specificities of seven of the MAbs were examined by competitive binding against a labelled standard MAb for the Lol I antigen (Ag). The dissociation constant, Kd, of one MAb (No. 3.2) that was studied most extensively was determined by double Ab RIA to be 3.5 X 10(-6) L/M. This MAb recognized the related 27,000-30,000 Group I glycoproteins found in the pollens of nine other species of grass pollens tested, including weak binding to Bermuda grass Group I (Cyn d I), which by conventional analysis using polyclonal anti-Lol I serum shows no detectable binding. Monoclonal antibody No. 3.2 was coupled covalently to Sepharose 4B and used to prepare highly purified Lol I from a partially purified rye pollen extract. Finally, an RIA was developed which permitted the analysis of the Group I components in rye grass and nine other grass pollen species. The latter assay is likely to prove useful in the standardization of grass pollen extracts according to their Group I contents.

  14. Diamond-<i>c>BN alloy: A universal cutting material

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pei; He, Duanwei; Wang, Liping; Kou, Zili; Li, Yong; Xiong, Lun; Hu, Qiwei; Xu, Chao; Lei, Li; Wang, Qiming; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-08

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (<i>c>BN) as conventional superhard materials have found widespread industrial applications, but both have inherent limitations. Diamond is not suitable for high-speed cutting of ferrous materials due to its poor chemical inertness, while <i>c>BN is only about half as hard as diamond. Because of their affinity in structural lattices and covalent bonding character, diamond and <i>c>BN could form alloys that can potentially fill the performance gap. However, the idea has never been demonstrated because samples obtained in the previous studies were too small to be tested for their practical performance. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of transparent bulk diamond-<i>c>BN alloy compacts whose diameters (3 mm) are sufficiently large for them to be processed into cutting tools. The testing results show that the diamond-<i>c>BN alloy has superior chemical inertness over polycrystalline diamond and higher hardness than single crystal <i>c>BN. In conclusion, high-speed cutting tests on hardened steel and granite suggest that diamond-<i>c>BN alloy is indeed a universal cutting material.

  15. Binding of IGF I and IGF I-stimulated phosphorylation in canine renal basolateral membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerman, M.R.; Gavin, J.R. III

    1986-07-01

    To characterize the interaction of the renal proximal tubular cell with insulin like growth factor I (IGF I), we measured binding of /sup 125/I-IGF I to proximal tubular basolateral membranes from dog kidney and induced IGF I-stimulated phosphorylation of basolateral membranes. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-IGF I to basolateral membranes was observed that was half-maximal at between 10(-9) and 10(-8) M IGF I. /sup 125/I-IGF I was affinity cross-linked to a 135,000 Mr protein in basolateral membranes that was distinct from the alpha-subunit of the insulin receptor and from the IGF II receptor. IGF I-stimulated phosphorylation of a 92,000 Mr protein was effected in detergent-solubilized membranes incubated with 100 microM (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP. The /sup 32/P-labeled protein was distinct from the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor, the /sup 32/P phosphorylation of which was stimulated by insulin. We conclude that specific receptors for IGF I are present in the basolateral membrane of the renal proximal tubular cell. Physiological actions of IGF I at this nephron site may occur through the binding of this peptide circulating in plasma, to specific basolateral membrane receptors, followed by IGF I stimulated phosphorylation.

  16. Thiosulfate oxidation by <i>Thiomicrospira thermophilai>: Metabolic flexibility in response to ambient geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, J. L.; Foustoukos, D. I.; Flynn, T. M.; Vetriani, C.; Bradley, Alexander S.; Fike, D. A.

    2016-03-21

    Previous studies of the stoichiometry of thiosulfate oxidation by colorless sulfur bacteria have failed to demonstrate mass balance of sulfur, indicating that unidentified oxidized products must be present. Here the reaction stoichiometry and kinetics under variable pH conditions during the growth of <i>Thiomicrospira thermophilai> strain EPR85, isolated from diffuse hydrothermal fluids at the East Pacific Rise, is presented. At pH 8.0, thiosulfate was stoichiometrically converted to sulfate. At lower pH, the products of thiosulfate oxidation were extracellular elemental sulfur and sulfate. Here, we were able to replicate previous experiments and identify the missing sulfur as tetrathionate, consistent with previous reports of the activity of thiosulfate dehydrogenase. Tetrathionate was formed under slightly acidic conditions. Genomic DNA from <i>T. thermophilai> strain EPR85 contains genes homologous to those in the Sox pathway (<i>soxAXYZBCDL>), as well as rhodanese and thiosulfate dehydrogenase. No other sulfur oxidizing bacteria containing <i>sox(CD)2i> genes have been reported to produce extracellular elemental sulfur. If the apparent modified Sox pathway we observed in <i>T. thermophilai> is present in marine <i>Thiobacillus> and <i>Thiomicrospira> species, production of extracellular elemental sulfur may be biogeochemically important in marine sulfur cycling.

  17. (Meta)genomic insights into the pathogenome of <i>Cellulosimicrobium cellulansi>

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Anukriti; Gilbert, Jack A.; Lal, Rup

    2016-05-06

    Despite having serious clinical manifestations, <i>Cellulosimicrobium cellulansi> remain under-reported with only three genome sequences available at the time of writing. Genome sequences of <i>C. cellulansi> LMG16121, <i>C. cellulansi> J36 and <i>Cellulosimicrobium> sp. strain MM were used to determine distribution of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) across <i>C. cellulansi>, which revealed 49 potential marker genes with known association to human infections, e.g. Fic and VbhA toxin-antitoxin system. Oligonucleotide composition-based analysis of orthologous proteins (n = 791) across three genomes revealed significant negative correlation (P < 0.05) between frequency of optimal codons (<i>Fopt>) and gene G+C content, highlighting the G+C-biased gene conversion (gBGC) effect across <i>Cellulosimicrobium> strains. Bayesian molecular-clock analysis performed on three virulent PAI proteins (Fic; D-alanyl-D-alanine-carboxypeptidase; transposase) dated the divergence event at 300 million years ago from the most common recent ancestor. Synteny-based annotation of hypothetical proteins highlighted gene transfers from non-pathogenic bacteria as a key factor in the evolution of PAIs. Additonally, deciphering the metagenomic islands using strain MM's genome with environmental data from the site of isolation (hot-spring biofilm) revealed (an)aerobic respiration as population segregation factor across the <i>in situi> cohorts. Furthermore, using reference genomes and metagenomic data, our results highlight the emergence and evolution of PAIs in the genus <i>Cellulosimicrobium>.

  18. Learning Chinese Idioms through iPads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chunsheng; Xie, Ying

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on an action research study using iPads during the teaching of Chinese idioms to heritage learners. A class of 12 second-year Chinese learners were engaged in a self-generated learning process focused on learning abstract and concrete idioms using iPads. Students' short-term and long-term learning was measured; feedback from a…

  19. Sports participation with Chiari I malformation.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Geh, Ndi; Selzer, Béla J; Bower, Regina; Himedan, Mai; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with Chiari I malformation (CM-I). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with the imaging finding of CM-I. METHODS A prospective survey was administered to 503 CM-I patients at 2 sites over a 46-month period. Data were gathered on imaging characteristics, treatment, sports participation, and any sport-related injuries. Additionally, 81 patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry and were included in a prospective group, with a mean prospective follow-up period of 11 months. RESULTS Of the 503 CM-I patients, 328 participated in sports for a cumulative duration of 4641 seasons; 205 of these patients participated in contact sports. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. One patient had temporary extremity paresthesias that resolved within hours, and this was not definitely considered to be related to the CM-I. In the prospective cohort, there were no permanent neurological injuries. CONCLUSIONS No permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries were observed in CM-I patients participating in athletic activities. The authors believe that the risk of such injuries is low and that, in most cases, sports participation by children with CM-I is safe.

  20. In iPod We Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaisdell, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    Beloved by students worldwide, iPod is becoming a presence in the classroom as teachers discover its many educational uses. At heart, the iPod's appeal is about its easily accessible audio and visual content in an attractive and conveniently sized package. Mechanically, the product is mostly a hard disk drive (although some models use only flash…

  1. Genetics Home Reference: trichorhinophalangeal syndrome type I

    MedlinePlus

    ... TRPS I may have a misalignment of the hip joints (hip dysplasia), which often develops in early adulthood but can occur in infancy or childhood. Children with TRPS I often have an unusually large range of movement ( hypermobility ) in many of their joints. Over time, however, the joints may break down ( ...

  2. Using iPads to Your Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakrzewski, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, middle school mathematics teacher Jennifer Zakrzewski describes how she successfully incorporated iPads and Apple TV (for projection of iPad screens) into her classroom while having her students solve a problem about mangoes. As Zakrzewski began a unit on multiplying and dividing fractions, she chose to start with the Mangoes…

  3. 10 CFR 140.109 - Appendix I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appendix I. 140.109 Section 140.109 Energy NUCLEAR... Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.109 Appendix I. Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance Association master policy no. __ Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance (Secondary Financial Protection) Named Insured: Each person...

  4. 10 CFR 140.109 - Appendix I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appendix I. 140.109 Section 140.109 Energy NUCLEAR... Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.109 Appendix I. Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance Association master policy no. __ Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance (Secondary Financial Protection) Named Insured: Each person...

  5. 10 CFR 140.109 - Appendix I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appendix I. 140.109 Section 140.109 Energy NUCLEAR... Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.109 Appendix I. Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance Association master policy no. __ Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance (Secondary Financial Protection) Named Insured: Each person...

  6. 10 CFR 140.109 - Appendix I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appendix I. 140.109 Section 140.109 Energy NUCLEAR... Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.109 Appendix I. Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance Association master policy no. __ Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance (Secondary Financial Protection) Named Insured: Each person...

  7. 10 CFR 140.109 - Appendix I.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appendix I. 140.109 Section 140.109 Energy NUCLEAR... Appendixes to Part 140 § 140.109 Appendix I. Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance Association master policy no. __ Nuclear Energy Liability Insurance (Secondary Financial Protection) Named Insured: Each person...

  8. Hawaiian Performance Cartography of Kaua'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akana, Kalani

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a discussion that examines Hawaiian performance cartography as described by Oliveira--but only as it relates to the island of Kaua'i. Section I begins with a chant asking permission to "enter" into the cultural landscape described in "mele" (songs) and "hula" (dance). Section II looks briefly at…

  9. Hello, I am not an NHS number.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jane

    2016-09-14

    I was handed a request to return a patient's call and given a name, signs and symptoms and a number with ten digits, starting with a seven. There was no preceding zero, and assuming it must be a mistake I stuck one on, and dialled. The number was unobtainable.

  10. A multiplet table for Mn I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Svatek, G. F.; Van Winkler, K.; Warren, W. H., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A mulitplet table of the atomic spectral lines of Mn I has been prepared. All of the known lines and many predicted lines of Mn I are included in the table. The methodology used to prepare the table is outlined and a sample page of the table is given.

  11. Evaluating Title I Parent Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurchak, Mary Jane; Stix, Susan

    This booklet describes the goals and organization of many early childhood Title I (ECT-I) parent programs and suggests evaluation methods. The information is intended for program planners, evaluation personnel, and teachers. Only activities that involve parents in the education of their child so as to improve his academic competence are discussed.…

  12. Connect the Book. I Face the Wind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    This month's feature is Vicki Cobb's "I Face the Wind" (Illus. by Julia Gorton. HarperCollins, 2003) which introduces the wind's characteristics and actions through experiments and observations complemented with Gorton's creative illustrations. "I Face the Wind" was a 2004 Sibert Honor Book. The Sibert Award and Honor books are awarded annually to…

  13. Synthesis and bioactivity of Luffarin I.

    PubMed

    Urosa, Aitor; Marcos, Isidro S; Díez, David; Lithgow, Anna; Plata, Gabriela B; Padrón, José M; Basabe, Pilar

    2015-04-20

    The first synthesis of Luffarin I, sesterterpenolide isolated from sponge Luffariella geometrica, has been accomplished from commercially available sclareol. The key strategy involved in this synthesis is the diastereoselective reduction of an intermediate ketone. Luffarin I against human solid tumor cell lines showed antiproliferative activities (GI50) in the range 12-17 μM.

  14. Synthesis and Bioactivity of Luffarin I

    PubMed Central

    Urosa, Aitor; Marcos, Isidro S.; Díez, David; Lithgow, Anna; Plata, Gabriela B.; Padrón, José M.; Basabe, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The first synthesis of Luffarin I, sesterterpenolide isolated from sponge Luffariella geometrica, has been accomplished from commercially available sclareol. The key strategy involved in this synthesis is the diastereoselective reduction of an intermediate ketone. Luffarin I against human solid tumor cell lines showed antiproliferative activities (GI50) in the range 12–17 μM. PMID:25903281

  15. Why Do I Need X-Rays?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to your desktop! more... Why Do I Need X-Rays? Article Chapters Why Do I Need X-Rays? print full article print this chapter email this article Radiographic, or X-ray, examinations provide your dentist with an important tool ...

  16. Complete genome sequence of <i>Bacillus amyloliquefaciensi> strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium of <i>Calendula officinalisi>

    SciTech Connect

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; Spanberger, Nora; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-13

    The genome sequence of <i>Bacillus amyloliquefaciensi> strain Co1-6, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) with broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against plant-pathogenic fungi, bacteria, and nematodes, consists of a single 3.9-Mb circular chromosome. The genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol and PGP properties.

  17. 10 CFR 205.199I - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Remedies. 205.199I Section 205.199I Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Notice of Probable Violation, Remedial Order, Notice... person to whom it is directed to roll back prices, to make refunds equal to the amount (plus...

  18. 10 CFR 205.199I - Remedies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Remedies. 205.199I Section 205.199I Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Notice of Probable Violation, Remedial Order, Notice... person to whom it is directed to roll back prices, to make refunds equal to the amount (plus...

  19. Connect the Book. I Face the Wind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2005-01-01

    This month's feature is Vicki Cobb's "I Face the Wind" (Illus. by Julia Gorton. HarperCollins, 2003) which introduces the wind's characteristics and actions through experiments and observations complemented with Gorton's creative illustrations. "I Face the Wind" was a 2004 Sibert Honor Book. The Sibert Award and Honor books are awarded annually to…

  20. Structures of TraI in solution.

    PubMed

    Clark, Nicholas J; Raththagala, Madushi; Wright, Nathan T; Buenger, Elizabeth A; Schildbach, Joel F; Krueger, Susan; Curtis, Joseph E

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial conjugation, a DNA transfer mechanism involving transport of one plasmid strand from donor to recipient, is driven by plasmid-encoded proteins. The F TraI protein nicks one F plasmid strand, separates cut and uncut strands, and pilots the cut strand through a secretion pore into the recipient. TraI is a modular protein with identifiable nickase, ssDNA-binding, helicase and protein-protein interaction domains. While domain structures corresponding to roughly 1/3 of TraI have been determined, there has been no comprehensive structural study of the entire TraI molecule, nor an examination of structural changes to TraI upon binding DNA. Here, we combine solution studies using small-angle scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy with molecular Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations to assess solution behavior of individual and groups of domains. Despite having several long (>100 residues) apparently disordered or highly dynamic regions, TraI folds into a compact molecule. Based on the biophysical characterization, we have generated models of intact TraI. These data and the resulting models have provided clues to the regulation of TraI function.

  1. Three-dimensional carbon allotropes comprising phenyl rings and acetylenic chains in <i>sp+sp>2 hybrid networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian -Tao; Chen, Changfeng; Li, Han -Dong; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-04-18

    Here, we here identify by <i>ab initioi> calculations a new type of three-dimensional (3D) carbon allotropes that consist of phenyl rings connected by linear acetylenic chains in <i>sp+sp>2 bonding networks. These structures are constructed by inserting acetylenic or diacetylenic bonds into an all <i>sp>2-hybridized rhombohedral polybenzene lattice, and the resulting 3D phenylacetylene and phenyldiacetylene nets comprise a 12-atom and 18-atom rhombohedral primitive unit cells R-3m symmetry, which are characterized as the 3D chiral crystalline modification of 2D graphyne and graphdiyne, respectively. Simulated phonon spectra reveal that these structures are dynamically stable. Electronic band calculations indicate that phenylacetylene is metallic, while phenyldiacetylene is a semiconductor with an indirect band gap of 0.58 eV. The present results establish a new type of carbon phases and offer insights into their outstanding structural and electronic properties.

  2. Listening Habits of iPod Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Michael; Marozeau, Jeremy; Cleveland, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate real-environment iPod listening levels for listeners in 4 environments to gain insight into whether average listeners receive dosages exceeding occupational noise exposure guidelines as a result of their listening habits. Method: The earbud outputs of iPods were connected directly into the inputs of a digital recorder to make…

  3. Use of <i>De Novoi> transcriptome libraries to characterize a novel oleaginous marine <i>Chlorella> species during the accumulation of triacylglycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Richter, Lubna V.; Ahner, Beth A.; Cochlan, William P.; Richardson, Ruth E.; Chen, Shilin

    2016-02-03

    Here, marine chlorophytes of the genus <i>Chlorella> are unicellular algae capable of accumulating a high proportion of cellular lipids that can be used for biodiesel production. In this study, we examined the broad physiological capabilities of a subtropical strain (C596) of <i>Chlorella> sp. “SAG-211-18” including its heterotrophic growth and tolerance to low salt.We found that the alga replicates more slowly at diluted salt concentrations and can grow on a wide range of carbon substrates in the dark.We then sequenced the RNA of <i>Chlorella> strain C596 to elucidate key metabolic genes and investigate the transcriptomic response of the organism when transitioning from a nutrient-replete to a nutrient-deficient condition when neutral lipids accumulate. Specific transcripts encoding for enzymes involved in both starch and lipid biosynthesis, among others, were up-regulated as the cultures transitioned into a lipid-accumulating state whereas photosynthesis-related genes were down-regulated. Transcripts encoding for two of the up-regulated enzymes—a galactoglycerolipid lipase and a diacylglyceride acyltransferase—were also monitored by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The results of these assays confirmed the transcriptome-sequencing data. The present transcriptomic study will assist in the greater understanding, more effective application, and efficient design of <i>Chlorella>-based biofuel production systems.

  4. Listening Habits of iPod Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Michael; Marozeau, Jeremy; Cleveland, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate real-environment iPod listening levels for listeners in 4 environments to gain insight into whether average listeners receive dosages exceeding occupational noise exposure guidelines as a result of their listening habits. Method: The earbud outputs of iPods were connected directly into the inputs of a digital recorder to make…

  5. Learning Chinese Idioms through iPads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chunsheng; Xie, Ying

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on an action research study using iPads during the teaching of Chinese idioms to heritage learners. A class of 12 second-year Chinese learners were engaged in a self-generated learning process focused on learning abstract and concrete idioms using iPads. Students' short-term and long-term learning was measured; feedback from a…

  6. FOUNDATIONS OF THAI. BOOK I, PART 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ANTHONY, EDWARD M.; AND OTHERS

    THIS BEGINNING TEXT PRESENTS THE ESSENTIALS OF THAI PRONUNCIATION AND GRAMMAR IN A FORMAT GEARED TO REGULAR COLLEGE LANGUAGE COURSE SCHEDULING. THE COURSE CONSISTS OF TWO VOLUMES, BOOK I, PART 1 (LESSONS 1-14) AND BOOK I, PART 2 (LESSONS 15-25), PROVIDING MATERIAL FOR TWO UNIVERSITY SEMESTERS OF CLASSROOM AND LABORATORY WORK. BASED ON A…

  7. Benzo[g,h,i]perylene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzo [ g , h , i ] perylene ; CASRN 191 - 24 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonc

  8. Investigation of structural heterogeneity at the SPE site using combined <i>P>–wave travel times and <i>Rg> phase velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Charlotte A.; Patton, Howard J.

    2015-10-01

    Here, we present analyses of the 2D seismic structure beneath Source Physics Experiments (SPE) geophone lines that extended radially at 100 m spacing from 100 to 2000 m from the source borehole. With seismic sources at only one end of the geophone lines, standard refraction profiling methods cannot resolve seismic velocity structures unambiguously. In previous work, we demonstrated overall agreement between body-wave refraction modeling and <i>Rg> dispersion curves for the least complex of the five lines. A more detailed inspection supports a 2D reinterpretation of the structure. We obtained <i>Rg> phase velocity measurements in both the time and frequency domains, then used iterative adjustment of the initial 1D body-wave model to predict <i>Rg> dispersion curves to fit the observed values. Our method applied to the most topographically severe of the geophone lines is supplemented with a 2D ray-tracing approach, whose application to P-wave arrivals supports the <i>Rg> analysis. In addition, midline sources will allow us to refine our characterization in future work.

  9. First Graders with iPads?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getting, Sara; Swainey, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Giving iPads to first graders is a leap of faith that many teachers are understandably hesitant to take, especially if their students need immediate reading intervention and school leaders want guaranteed results. This article discusses how the authors took on the challenge of improving elementary reading using iPads, found surprising success for…

  10. Reading Charts & Tables. E & I. Pipefitter. Millwright.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greater Baton Rouge Chamber of Commerce, LA.

    Developed by the ABCs of Construction National Workplace Literacy Project, these curriculum materials for the areas of electrical and instrumentation (E&I), pipefitter, and millwright contain a lesson that deals with reading charts and tables. The lesson consists of these components: objective, instruction, 10 exercises for E&I, 5 for…

  11. iTOUGH2 Sample Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, Stefan

    2002-06-18

    iTOUGH2 is a program for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation analysis. It is based on the TOUGH2 simulator for non-isothermal multiphase flow in fractured and porous media. This report contains a collection of iTOUGH2 sample problems.

  12. Ares I First Stage: Powering Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiller, Bruce K.

    2009-01-01

    I. Ares First Stage design is on schedule. a) Avionics; b) Major Structures; c) Motor; and d) Deceleration System II. Ares I-X hardware is complete and assembly at KSC is underway. Launch scheduled for October 31. III. Recovery system testing is on schedule a) Drogue; b) Main chute; and c) Cluster. DM-1 static firing is scheduled for August 25, 2009

  13. iPods: Informative or Invasive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Donald P.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how iPods are being used in a variety of teacher-centered and student-centered ways. Since today's students are characterized as social, highly competent multitaskers, who expect immediate results and feedback and seek stimulation and interaction, iPod and podcasting are seen as tools for teaching such…

  14. Predicting Student Success in Intermediate Accounting I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Robert G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to find some quantitative predictors of student success in Intermediate Accounting I that an advisor can use as an aid in student counseling. The AICPA Level I Form C test and the average grade in principles courses proved to be reasonable predictors of success. (CT)

  15. Say "I Can" and Use Research Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Karen S.; Wenner, Jenny; O'Reilly, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Children at Alcott Elementary in Westerville, Ohio, have a new habit of saying, "I can!" In the last few years, educators in the district have carefully translated the standards in their elementary courses of study into "I Can" statements. During the fourth and fifth graders' recent study of government, the authors of this…

  16. Using iPads to Your Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakrzewski, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, middle school mathematics teacher Jennifer Zakrzewski describes how she successfully incorporated iPads and Apple TV (for projection of iPad screens) into her classroom while having her students solve a problem about mangoes. As Zakrzewski began a unit on multiplying and dividing fractions, she chose to start with the Mangoes…

  17. In iPod We Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaisdell, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    Beloved by students worldwide, iPod is becoming a presence in the classroom as teachers discover its many educational uses. At heart, the iPod's appeal is about its easily accessible audio and visual content in an attractive and conveniently sized package. Mechanically, the product is mostly a hard disk drive (although some models use only flash…

  18. Title I Comparability: One Year Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badger, Daniel; Browning, R. Stephen

    The 1970 amendments to ESEA Title I were designed to ensure that Title I expenditures would actually be "extra" Federal resources for disadvantaged school children and went into effect on July 1, 1972. Two months following that date, the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law reported widespread violations of the comparability…

  19. Learning English with iPods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacina, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Across the world, technology is part of the social and academic lives of students. In particular, iPods are one of the most popular forms of technology. Wikipedia, an excellent online source for information, notes that Apple has sold more than 119 million of these portable media players as of October 2007. With iPods, students can listen to, or…

  20. Photoregenerative I-/I3- couple as a liquid cathode for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Yadong; Ai, Xinping; Tu, Wenmao; Pan, Mu

    2014-10-01

    A photoassisted oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) through I-/I3- redox couple was investigated for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell cathode reaction. The I-/I3--based liquid cathode was used to replace conventional oxygen cathode, and its discharge product I- was regenerated to I3- by photocatalytic oxidation with the participation of oxygen. This new and innovative approach may provide a strategy to eliminate the usage of challenging ORR electrocatalysts, resulting in an avenue for developing low-cost and high-efficiency PEM fuel cells.

  1. Structural, functional and immunogenic insights on Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase pathogenic virulence factors from <i>Neisseria meningitidisi> and <i>Brucella abortusi>

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Ashley J.; DiDonato, Michael; Shin, David S.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Bruns, Cami K.; Belzer, Carol A.; Gorringe, Andrew R.; Langford, Paul R.; Tabatabai, Louisa B.; Kroll, J. Simon; Tainer, John A.; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.

    2015-10-12

    Bacterial pathogens <i>Neisseria meningitidisi> and <i>Brucella abortusi> pose threats to human and animal health worldwide, causing meningococcal disease and brucellosis, respectively. Mortality from acute <i>N. meningitidisi> infections remains high despite antibiotics, and brucellosis presents alimentary and health consequences. Superoxide dismutases are master regulators of reactive oxygen, general pathogenicity factors and therefore therapeutic targets. Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases (SODs) localized to the periplasm promote survival by detoxifying superoxide radicals generated by major host antimicrobial immune responses. We discovered that passive immunization with an antibody directed at <i>N. meningitidisi> SOD (NmSOD) was protective in a mouse infection model. To define the relevant atomic details and solution assembly states of this important virulence factor, we report high-resolution and X-ray scattering analyses of NmSOD and SOD from <i>B. abortusi> (BaSOD). The NmSOD structures revealed an auxiliary tetrahedral Cu-binding site bridging the dimer interface; mutational analyses suggested that this metal site contributes to protein stability, with implications for bacterial defense mechanisms. Biochemical and structural analyses informed us about electrostatic substrate guidance, dimer assembly and an exposed C-terminal epitope in the NmSOD dimer. In contrast, the monomeric BaSOD structure provided insights for extending immunogenic peptide epitopes derived from the protein. These collective results reveal unique contributions of SOD to pathogenic virulence, refine predictive motifs for distinguishing SOD classes and suggest general targets for anti-bacterial immune responses. The identified functional contributions, motifs, and targets distinguishing bacterial and eukaryotic SOD assemblies presented here provide a foundation for efforts to develop SOD-specific inhibitors or vaccines against these harmful pathogens.

    IMPORTANCE By

  2. Association of Taq I, Fok I and Apa I polymorphisms in Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) gene with leprosy.

    PubMed

    Neela, Venkata Sanjeev Kumar; Suryadevara, Naveen Chandra; Shinde, Vidya Gouri; Pydi, Satya Sudheer; Jain, Suman; Jonnalagada, Subbanna; Singh, Surya Satyanarayana; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi; Anandaraj, M P J S

    2015-06-01

    Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) is a transacting transcription factor which mediates immunomodulatory function and plays a key role in innate and adaptive immune responses through its ligand and polymorphisms in VDR gene may affect its regulatory function. To investigate the association of three VDR gene polymorphisms (TaqI rs731236, FokI rs2228570 and ApaI rs7975232) with leprosy. The study group includes 404 participants of which 222 were leprosy patients (paucibacillary=87, multibacillary=135) and 182 healthy controls. Genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP technique. Statistical analysis was performed using SNP Stats and PLINK software. The VDR FokI (rs2228570) ff genotype, ApaI (rs7975232) AA, Aa genotype and haplotype T-f-a, T-F-A were positively associated with leprosy when compared to healthy controls. The two variants at Fok and Apa positions in VDR gene are significantly associated with leprosy. Genotypes at FokI (ff), ApaI (aa) and haplotype (T-F-a, T-f-a) may contribute to the risk of developing leprosy by altering VDR phenotype/levels subsequently modulation of immune response. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An H I view of galaxy conformity: H I-rich environment around H I-excess galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Serra, Paolo; Józsa, Gyula I. G.; Koribalski, Bärbel; van der Hulst, Thijs; Kamphuis, Peter; Li, Cheng; Fu, Jian; Xiao, Ting; Overzier, Roderik; Wieringa, Mark; Wang, Enci

    2015-11-01

    Using data taken as part of the Bluedisk project, we study the connection between neutral hydrogen (H I) in the environment of spiral galaxies and that in the galaxies themselves. We measure the total H I mass present in the environment in a statistical way by studying the distribution of noise peaks in the H I data cubes obtained for 40 galaxies observed with Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. We find that galaxies whose H I mass fraction is high relative to standard scaling relations have an excess H I mass in the surrounding environment as well. Gas in the environment consists of gas clumps which are individually below the detection limit of our H I data. These clumps may be hosted by small satellite galaxies and/or be the high-density peaks of a more diffuse gas distribution in the intergalactic medium. We interpret this result as an indication for a picture in which the H I-rich central galaxies accrete gas from an extended gas reservoir present in their environment.

  4. AC-DC Power Processor, Type I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    LLI- >- Crto C) UU- LIJj LLJLJ Q 0d CC LJ CC LA exLLIW LL-13- c c. System Waveforms. Figure 6 shows the control system waveforms which includes the...C mJJ9 aJ mi oli o. o o a, aO ~ ~ ’ ’ 0 C. 1.0 r-.J a, 0) a, m- a, 00 00.0 0% (-> ) V - C - q r I 0D 0 0DC < cc 1.0 W 000 a LO~ r- LO Ul) U) Lo UO...o tt ; q ; t .. .. .. I -- ... ...... 0.. .. . . .. . . ~i31b~dI1Ik. ... ... LodA 3dV~~~~.. ....2 ..ZLI ~ ~O 63l t iJ w il. 4 N ... ... . . 4

  5. The STScI HST Astrometry Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, John J.; Goldstein, Philip; Hyde, Pete; Rose, Mary Alice; Steuerman, Keneth; Baum, John; Perrine, Rick; Swade, Daryl A.

    An Astrometry Data Processing Pipeline has been developed and deployed at th e Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). This pipeline is responsible for producing Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Astrometry Data Sets used to analyze astrometry observations and the operation of the HST Fine Guidance Sensors (FGS). Prior to the STScI Astrometry Data Processing Pipeline becoming operational, HST Astrometry Data Sets were produced by the Astrometry and Engineering Data Processing (AEDP) System at Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC). This paper describes the processing performed by the STScI Astrometry Pipeline and how the pipeline was designed and developed to reuse existing software components from the STScI OPUS system. OPUS is an STScI developed automated data pipeline system providing a distributed processing environment used to control and monitor applications executing in a sequential order. OPUS is described in detail in other htmladdnormallinkfoot{papers} {http://www.dpt.stsci.edu/dpt_papers/opus_bib.html}.

  6. Bacterial group I introns: mobile RNA catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Group I introns are intervening sequences that have invaded tRNA, rRNA and protein coding genes in bacteria and their phages. The ability of group I introns to self-splice from their host transcripts, by acting as ribozymes, potentially renders their insertion into genes phenotypically neutral. Some group I introns are mobile genetic elements due to encoded homing endonuclease genes that function in DNA-based mobility pathways to promote spread to intronless alleles. Group I introns have a limited distribution among bacteria and the current assumption is that they are benign selfish elements, although some introns and homing endonucleases are a source of genetic novelty as they have been co-opted by host genomes to provide regulatory functions. Questions regarding the origin and maintenance of group I introns among the bacteria and phages are also addressed. PMID:24612670

  7. H I and dust in Kutner's cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batrla, W.; Wilson, T. L.; Rahe, J.

    1981-01-01

    A map in the 1.420 GHz line of H I, with an angular resolution of 9.1 arcmin, is made toward Kutner's Cloud and the region between Kutner's Cloud and Heiles' Cloud. It is assumed that the cold H I in the clouds is located only in front of, and absorbs the H I background; the column density of cold H I, N(H I), is obtained from this absorption. The visual extinction for this region is determined from star counts on red and blue POSS prints. It is noted that most of the gas in the cloud is in the form of H2. The column density of H2 is obtained from the visual extinction and the extinction-to-gas ratio given by Bohlin et al. (1978).

  8. Complex I function in mitochondrial supercomplexes.

    PubMed

    Lenaz, Giorgio; Tioli, Gaia; Falasca, Anna Ida; Genova, Maria Luisa

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses the functional properties of mitochondrial Complex I originating from its presence in an assembled form as a supercomplex comprising Complex III and Complex IV in stoichiometric ratios. In particular several lines of evidence are presented favouring the concept that electron transfer from Complex I to Complex III is operated by channelling of electrons through Coenzyme Q molecules bound to the supercomplex, in contrast with the hypothesis that the transfer of reducing equivalents from Complex I to Complex III occurs via random diffusion of the Coenzyme Q molecules in the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, another property provided by the supercomplex assembly is the control of generation of reactive oxygen species by Complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory Complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  9. Molecular simulation and modeling of complex I.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Gerhard; Wikström, Mårten

    2016-07-01

    Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations play an important role in the functional characterization of complex I. With its large size and complicated function, linking quinone reduction to proton pumping across a membrane, complex I poses unique modeling challenges. Nonetheless, simulations have already helped in the identification of possible proton transfer pathways. Simulations have also shed light on the coupling between electron and proton transfer, thus pointing the way in the search for the mechanistic principles underlying the proton pump. In addition to reviewing what has already been achieved in complex I modeling, we aim here to identify pressing issues and to provide guidance for future research to harness the power of modeling in the functional characterization of complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  10. Chondromodulin I Is a Bone Remodeling Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nakamichi, Yuko; Shukunami, Chisa; Yamada, Takashi; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Kawano, Hirotaka; Sato, Takashi; Nishizaki, Yuriko; Yamamoto, Yoko; Shindo, Masayo; Yoshimura, Kimihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Hiraki, Yuji; Kato, Shigeaki

    2003-01-01

    Chondromodulin I (ChM-I) was supposed from its limited expression in cartilage and its functions in cultured chondrocytes as a major regulator in cartilage development. Here, we generated mice deficient in ChM-I by targeted disruption of the ChM-I gene. No overt abnormality was detected in endochondral bone formation during embryogenesis and cartilage development during growth stages of ChM-I−/− mice. However, a significant increase in bone mineral density with lowered bone resorption with respect to formation was unexpectedly found in adult ChM-I−/− mice. Thus, the present study established that ChM-I is a bone remodeling factor. PMID:12509461

  11. Parvalbumins from coelacanth muscle. I. General survey.

    PubMed

    Jauregui-Adell, J; Pechere, J F

    1978-09-26

    Parvalbumins from coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) myogen have been isolated by gel filtration of Sephadex G-75 and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Disc electrophoresis and cellulose acetate electrophoresis showed the homogeneity of the three first major parvalbumin peaks (pI = 5.44, pI = 4.95 and pI = 4.52). The fourth component was partially resolved into two more parvalbumins (pI = 3.78 and pI = 3.50) by preparative gel electrophoresis. Amino acid analyses and tryptic peptide maps separated the five components in two major categories. The two less acidic components differ only in the presence or absence of an N-terminal blocking group. The three more acidic components constitute the second category; in spite of this heterogeneity, they share the same amino acid sequence.

  12. [Latest advances of SLA class I genes].

    PubMed

    Tao, Xuan; Li, Hua; Li, Xue-Wei; Yu, Hui; Zuo, Qi-Zhen

    2007-11-01

    The Swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class I genes encode multi-glycoproteins on cell surface, which present endogenous antigenic peptides to T cells and thus initiate specific immune responses. In this article, latest advances on molecular structure, expression in tissues, regulation of expression, genotyping, polymorphism, and evolution of SLA class I genes were introduced, in which genotyping and polymorphism were emphasized. Molecular typing methods of SLA class I genes include serological method, DNA sequencing, PCR-SSP, PCR-SSOP and MS, of which PCR-SSP is frequently used in genotyping of SLA class I genes as a simple and rapid method. Future directions for the study and application of SLA class I genes on gene functions, peptide vaccine, xenotransplantation were also discussed.

  13. Complex I deficiencies in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Papa, Sergio; De Rasmo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Complex I is the point of entry in the mitochondrial electron transport chain for NADH reducing equivalents, and it behaves as a regulatable pacemaker of respiratory ATP production in human cells. Defects in complex I are associated with several human neurological disorders, including primary mitochondrial diseases, Parkinson disease (PD), and Down syndrome, and understanding the activity and regulation of complex I may reveal aspects of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Complex I is regulated by cyclic AMP (cAMP) and the protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction pathway, and elucidating the role of the cAMP/PKA system in regulating complex I and oxygen free radical production provides new perspectives for devising therapeutic strategies for neurological diseases.

  14. Interaction of external <i>n> = 1 magnetic fields with the sawtooth instability in low-<i>q> RFX-mod and DIII-D tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Piron, C.; Martin, P.; Bonfiglio, D.; Hanson, J.; Logan, N. C.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Piovesan, P.; Turco, F.; Bialek, J.; Franz, P.; Jackson, G.; Lanctot, M. J.; Navratil, G. A.; Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E.; Terranova, D.; Turnbull, A.

    2016-08-11

    External <i>n> = 1 magnetic fields are applied in RFX-mod and DIII-D low safety factor Tokamak plasmas to investigate their interaction with the internal MHD dynamics and in particular with the sawtooth instability. In these experiments the applied magnetic fields cause a reduction of both the sawtooth amplitude and period, leading to an overall stabilizing effect on the oscillations. In RFX-mod sawteeth eventually disappear and are replaced by a stationary <i>m> = 1, <i>n> = 1 helical equilibrium without an increase in disruptivity. However toroidal rotation is significantly reduced in these plasmas, thus it is likely that the sawtooth mitigation in these experiments is due to the combination of the helically deformed core and the reduced rotation. The former effect is qualitatively well reproduced by nonlinear MHD simulations performed with the PIXIE3D code. The results obtained in these RFX-mod experiments motivated similar ones in DIII-D L-mode diverted Tokamak plasmas at low q 95. These experiments succeeded in reproducing the sawtooth mitigation with the approach developed in RFX-mod. In DIII-D this effect is correlated with a clear increase of the <i>n> = 1 plasma response, that indicates an enhancement of the coupling to the marginally stable <i>n> = 1 external kink, as simulations with the linear MHD code IPEC suggest. A significant rotation braking in the plasma core is also observed in DIII-D. Finally, numerical calculations of the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) carried out with PENT identify this torque as a possible contributor for this effect.

  15. Interaction of external <i>n> = 1 magnetic fields with the sawtooth instability in low-<i>q> RFX-mod and DIII-D tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Piron, C.; Martin, P.; Bonfiglio, D.; Hanson, J.; Logan, N. C.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Piovesan, P.; Turco, F.; Bialek, J.; Franz, P.; Jackson, G.; Lanctot, M. J.; Navratil, G. A.; Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E.; Terranova, D.; Turnbull, A.

    2016-08-11

    External <i>n> = 1 magnetic fields are applied in RFX-mod and DIII-D low safety factor Tokamak plasmas to investigate their interaction with the internal MHD dynamics and in particular with the sawtooth instability. In these experiments the applied magnetic fields cause a reduction of both the sawtooth amplitude and period, leading to an overall stabilizing effect on the oscillations. In RFX-mod sawteeth eventually disappear and are replaced by a stationary <i>m> = 1, <i>n> = 1 helical equilibrium without an increase in disruptivity. However toroidal rotation is significantly reduced in these plasmas, thus it is likely that the sawtooth mitigation in these experiments is due to the combination of the helically deformed core and the reduced rotation. The former effect is qualitatively well reproduced by nonlinear MHD simulations performed with the PIXIE3D code. The results obtained in these RFX-mod experiments motivated similar ones in DIII-D L-mode diverted Tokamak plasmas at low q 95. These experiments succeeded in reproducing the sawtooth mitigation with the approach developed in RFX-mod. In DIII-D this effect is correlated with a clear increase of the <i>n> = 1 plasma response, that indicates an enhancement of the coupling to the marginally stable <i>n> = 1 external kink, as simulations with the linear MHD code IPEC suggest. A significant rotation braking in the plasma core is also observed in DIII-D. Finally, numerical calculations of the neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) carried out with PENT identify this torque as a possible contributor for this effect.

  16. Mitochondrial complex I-linked disease.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, Richard J

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most frequently encountered single mitochondrial single enzyme deficiency in patients with a mitochondrial disorder. Although specific genotype-phenotype correlations are very difficult to identify, the majority of patients present with symptoms caused by leukodystrophy. The poor genotype-phenotype correlations can make establishing a diagnosis a challenge. The classical way to establish a complex I deficiency in patients is by performing spectrophotometric measurements of the enzyme in a muscle biopsy or other patient-derived material (liver or heart biopsy, cultured skin fibroblasts). Complex I is encoded by both the mtDNA and nuclear DNA and pathogenic mutations have been identified in the majority of the 44 genes encoding the structural subunits of complex I. In recent years, the increasing possibilities for diagnostic molecular genetic tests of large gene panels, exomes, and even entire genomes has led to the identification of many novel genetic defects causing complex I deficiency. Complex I mutations not only result in a reduced enzyme activity but also induce secondary effects at the cellular level, such as elevated reactive oxygen species production, altered membrane potential and mitochondrial morphology. At this moment there is no cure for complex I deficiency and the treatment options for complex I patients are restricted to symptomatic treatment. Recent developments, amongst others based on the treatment of the secondary effects of complex I deficiency, have shown to be promising as new therapeutic strategies in vitro and have entered clinical trials. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt.

  17. <i>Sost>, independent of the non-coding enhancer ECR5, is required for bone mechanoadaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Robling, Alexander G.; Bullock, Whitney A.; Foster, William H.; Murugesh, Deepa; Loots, Gabriela G.; Genetos, Damian C.

    2016-09-04

    Here, sclerostin (<i>Sost>) is a negative regulator of bone formation that acts upon the Wnt signaling pathway. <i>Sost> is mechanically regulated at both mRNA and protein level such that loading represses and unloading enhances <i>Sost> expression, in osteocytes and in circulation. The non-coding evolutionarily conserved enhancer <i>ECR5i> has been previously reported as a transcriptional regulatory element required for modulating <i>Sost> expression in osteocytes. Here we explored the mechanisms by which <i>ECR5i>, or several other putative transcriptional enhancers regulate <i>Sost> expression, in response to mechanical stimulation. We found that <i>in vivoi> ulna loading is equally osteoanabolic in wildtype and <i>Sost>–/– mice, although Sost is required for proper distribution of load-induced bone formation to regions of high strain. Using Luciferase reporters carrying the <i>ECR5i> non-coding enhancer and heterologous or homologous h<i>SOST> promoters, we found that <i>ECR5i> is mechanosensitive in vitro and that <i>ECR5i>-driven Luciferase activity decreases in osteoblasts exposed to oscillatory fluid flow. Yet, <i>ECR5i>–/– mice showed similar magnitude of load-induced bone formation and similar periosteal distribution of bone formation to high-strain regions compared to wildtype mice. Further, we found that in contrast to <i>Sost>–/– mice, which are resistant to disuse-induced bone loss, <i>ECR5i>–/– mice lose bone upon unloading to a degree similar to wildtype control mice. <i>ECR5i> deletion did not abrogate positive effects of unloading on <i>Sost>, suggesting that additional transcriptional regulators and regulatory elements contribute to load-induced regulation of <i>Sost>.

  18. Thermodynamic and Spectroscopic Studies of Trivalent <i>f> -element Complexation with Ethylenediamine- <i>N,N> '-di(acetylglycine)- <i>N,N> '-diacetic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Heathman, Colt R.; Grimes, Travis S.; Zalupski, Peter R.

    2016-03-21

    In this study, the coordination behavior and thermodynamic features of complexation of trivalent lanthanides and americium by ethylenediamine-<i>N,N'i>-di(acetylglycine)-N,N'>-diacetic acid (EDDAG-DA) (bisamide-substituted-EDTA) were investigated by potentiometric and spectroscopic techniques. Acid dissociation constants (Ka) and complexation constants (β) of lanthanides (except Pm) were determined by potentiometric analysis. Absorption spectroscopy was used to determine stability constants for the binding of trivalent americium and neodymium by EDDAG-DA under similar conditions. The potentiometry revealed 5 discernible protonation constants and 3 distinct metal–ligand complexes (identified as ML, MHL, and MH2L+). Time-resolved fluorescence studies of Eu-(EDDAG-DA) solutions (at varying pH) identified a constant inner-sphere hydration number of 3, suggesting that glycine functionalities contained in the amide pendant arms are not involved in metal complexation and are protonated under more acidic conditions. The thermodynamic studies identified that f-element coordination by EDDAG-DA is similar to that observed for ethylenediamine-<i>N,N,N',N'>-tetraacetic acid (EDTA). However, coordination via two amidic oxygens of EDDAG-DA lowers its trivalent f-element complex stability by roughly 3 orders of magnitude relative to EDTA.

  19. Skeletal troponin I cross-reactivity in different cardiac troponin I assay versions.

    PubMed

    Hyytiä, Heidi; Heikkilä, Taina; Hedberg, Pirjo; Puolakanaho, Tarja; Pettersson, Kim

    2015-03-01

    To study the skeletal troponin I (skTnI) cross-reactivity of four different commercially available antibodies in four cardiac troponin I (cTnI) research assay versions having the same epitope specificity as evidenced by peptide mapping. The four research assays all use two solid phase antibodies and one detection antibody attached to intrinsically fluorescent nanoparticles. Two alternative antibodies were used for one capture antibody and two for the detector antibody. The assays were evaluated in terms of analytical sensitivity and by determining assay cross-reactivity to skTnI. Additionally, regression analysis was performed by measuring a sample panel (n=101) with all of the four assay versions. A false-positive cTnI concentration of >7000ng/L was measured with one of the assay versions, when serum was spiked with 500,000ng/L skTnI. The corresponding observed cTnI values for the other three assay versions varied from 616ng/L to 727ng/L. Out of the 101 clinical samples assayed, five showed spuriously (3- to 148-fold) elevated cTnI values with the skTnI interference prone assay setup, but not with the other assay versions. According to our investigational skTnI assay, all five samples contained measurable amounts of skTnI (range: 5500-702,000ng/L). Two out of four cTnI antibodies tested cross-reacted vastly with skTnI but did not cause any notable interference unless paired together. Therefore, skTnI cross-reactivity should be carefully assessed when cTnI assay antibodies claimed to be cTnI specific are selected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Flood-Frequency Estimates for Streams on Kaua`i, O`ahu, Moloka`i, Maui, and Hawai`i, State of Hawai`i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.; Rosa, Sarah N.; Yeung, Chiu W.

    2010-01-01

    This study provides an updated analysis of the magnitude and frequency of peak stream discharges in Hawai`i. Annual peak-discharge data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during and before water year 2008 (ending September 30, 2008) at stream-gaging stations were analyzed. The existing generalized-skew value for the State of Hawai`i was retained, although three methods were used to evaluate whether an update was needed. Regional regression equations were developed for peak discharges with 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year recurrence intervals for unregulated streams (those for which peak discharges are not affected to a large extent by upstream reservoirs, dams, diversions, or other structures) in areas with less than 20 percent combined medium- and high-intensity development on Kaua`i, O`ahu, Moloka`i, Maui, and Hawai`i. The generalized-least-squares (GLS) regression equations relate peak stream discharge to quantified basin characteristics (for example, drainage-basin area and mean annual rainfall) that were determined using geographic information system (GIS) methods. Each of the islands of Kaua`i,O`ahu, Moloka`i, Maui, and Hawai`i was divided into two regions, generally corresponding to a wet region and a dry region. Unique peak-discharge regression equations were developed for each region. The regression equations developed for this study have standard errors of prediction ranging from 16 to 620 percent. Standard errors of prediction are greatest for regression equations developed for leeward Moloka`i and southern Hawai`i. In general, estimated 100-year peak discharges from this study are lower than those from previous studies, which may reflect the longer periods of record used in this study. Each regression equation is valid within the range of values of the explanatory variables used to develop the equation. The regression equations were developed using peak-discharge data from streams that are mainly unregulated, and they should not be used to

  1. Process for depositing I-125 onto a substrate used to manufacture I-125 sources

    DOEpatents

    McGovern, James J.; Olynyk, Joseph M.

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a process for depositing I-125 on a substrate which comprises contacting a predetermined surface area of substrate with Xe-125 gas, whereby the Xe-125 decays to I-125 and the I-125 in turn deposits as a solid on the surface of the substrate, the contact being for a time sufficient to deposit at least about 1 microcurie of I-125. I-125 is thereby deposited in a relatively uniform amount over the surface area of the substrate. The substrate is then assayed to determine how much I-125 has been deposited. The substrate is then divided into pieces of measured surface area, each piece therefore containing a measured amount of deposited I-125, and each piece can then be used in the manufacture of an I-125 source.

  2. 43 CFR 3192.7 - What must I do with Federal assistance I receive?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS AND CONTRACTS FOR OIL AND GAS INSPECTION Cooperative Agreements § 3192.7 What must I do with Federal assistance I receive? You must use Federal assistance that you receive only for costs...

  3. 43 CFR 3264.10 - What must I submit to BLM after I complete a well?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RESOURCE LEASING Reports-Drilling Operations § 3264.10 What must I submit to BLM after I complete a well... all logs; (c) Copies of all directional surveys; and (d) Copies of all mechanical, flow, reservoir...

  4. 40 CFR 1039.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certifying Engine Families § 1039.210 May I get preliminary approval before I..., auxiliary emission-control devices, deterioration factors, testing for service accumulation,...

  5. 40 CFR 1039.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certifying Engine Families § 1039.210 May I get preliminary approval before I..., auxiliary emission-control devices, deterioration factors, testing for service accumulation,...

  6. 40 CFR 1039.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certifying Engine Families § 1039.210 May I get preliminary approval before I..., auxiliary emission-control devices, deterioration factors, testing for service accumulation,...

  7. 40 CFR 1039.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certifying Engine Families § 1039.210 May I get preliminary approval before I..., auxiliary emission-control devices, deterioration factors, testing for service accumulation,...

  8. 40 CFR 1039.210 - May I get preliminary approval before I complete my application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Certifying Engine Families § 1039.210 May I get preliminary approval before I..., auxiliary emission-control devices, deterioration factors, testing for service accumulation,...

  9. 30 CFR 1218.305 - How do I pay advanced royalties I owe under BLM regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue COLLECTION OF MONIES AND PROVISION FOR GEOTHERMAL CREDITS AND INCENTIVES Geothermal Resources § 1218.305 How do I pay advanced royalties I owe under...

  10. 30 CFR 218.305 - How do I pay advanced royalties I owe under BLM regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT COLLECTION OF MONIES AND PROVISION FOR GEOTHERMAL CREDITS AND INCENTIVES Geothermal Resources § 218.305 How do I pay advanced royalties I owe under BLM regulations? If you...

  11. Re-evaluating DSM-I.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R; Blashfield, R K

    2016-02-01

    The DSM-I is currently viewed as a psychoanalytic classification, and therefore unimportant. There are four reasons to challenge the belief that DSM-I was a psychoanalytic system. First, psychoanalysts were a minority on the committee that created DSM-I. Second, psychoanalysts of the time did not use DSM-I. Third, DSM-I was as infused with Kraepelinian concepts as it was with psychoanalytic concepts. Fourth, contemporary writers who commented on DSM-I did not perceive it as psychoanalytic. The first edition of the DSM arose from a blending of concepts from the Statistical Manual for the Use of Hospitals of Mental Diseases, the military psychiatric classifications developed during World War II, and the International Classification of Diseases (6th edition). As a consensual, clinically oriented classification, DSM-I was popular, leading to 20 printings and international recognition. From the perspective inherent in this paper, the continuities between classifications from the first half of the 20th century and the systems developed in the second half (e.g. DSM-III to DSM-5) become more visible.

  12. Invited perspective: Why I am an optimist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burges, Stephen J.

    2011-03-01

    I address a range of topics that provide the sociopolitical-technological setting for my professional life. I discuss some influential features of post-World War II world geopolitics, landmark technological developments of that era, and the resulting follow-up technologies that have made it possible to approach various problems in hydrology and water resources. I next address societal needs that have driven developments in hydrology and water resources engineering and follow with a discussion of the modern foundations of our science and what I think are the principal issues in hydrology. I pose three community challenges that when accomplished should advance hydrologic science: data network needs for improving the water budgets at all scales, characterizing subsurface water flow paths, and the information archiving and mining needs from instruments that will generate substantially richer data detail than have been used for most hydrologic work to the present. I then discuss several hydrologic and water resource risk-based decision issues that matter to society to illustrate how such risks have been addressed successfully in the past. I conclude with a long-term community "grand challenge," the coupled modeling of the ocean-atmosphere-landform hydrologic cycle for the purpose of long-lead time hydrologic prediction.

  13. Tumor suppressor activity of RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Yang; Guo, He-Zhou; Zhu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I), named for the observation that its mRNA expression is highly upregulated in the progression of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-induced maturation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells, has been well documented as a pivotal virus-associated molecular pattern recognition receptor (PRR) responsible for triggering innate immunity. Upon recognizing viral RNA ligands, RIG-I experiences a series of programmed conformational changes and modifications that unleash its activity through the formation of complexes with various binding partners. Such partners include the mitochondria membrane-anchored protein IPS-1 (also named MAVS/VISA/Cardif) that activates both the IRF3/7 and NF-κB pathways. These partnerships and resulting pathway activations underlie the synthesis of type I interferon and other inflammatory factors. Recent studies have demonstrated that RIG-I is also involved in the regulation of basic cellular processes outside of innate immunity against viral infections, such as hematopoietic proliferation and differentiation, maintenance of leukemic stemness, and tumorigenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this review, we will highlight recent studies leading up to the recognition that RIG-I performs an essential function as a tumor suppressor and try to reconcile this activity of RIG-I with its well-known role in protecting cells against viral infection. PMID:27308362

  14. Extinct I-129 in C3 chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabb, J.; Lewis, R. S.; Anders, E.

    1982-12-01

    Eight C3 chondrites were examined by the I-129 to Xe-129 dating method to determine whether their initial I-129/I-127 ratios, or R(0), correlate with any other properties. The R(0)'s range from 1.60 x 10 to the -4th to 1.09 x 10 to the -4th, corresponding to I to Xe ages from 2.0 Myr before to 6.7 Myr after the Murchison magnetite. Three C30's have essentially indistinguishable R(0)'s, while a fourth is undatable. Four C3V's show a distinct spread, ranging from 1.60 + or 0.07 x 10 to the -4th to 1.09 + or - 0.10 x 10 to the -4th. These R(0)'s correlate inversely with four other properties: I, Br, and Cd content, olivine composition, both percent mean deviation, and proportion of iron-poor olivine grains. The simplest model that accounts for the correlations with R(0) involves mixing of two iodine components in the solar nebula, associated with gas and grains, respectively. The second, of lower I-129/I-127 ratio, predominated at later times and thus became enriched in late-formed meteorites.

  15. Illustration of Ares I During Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The NASA developed Ares rockets, named for the Greek god associated with Mars, will return humans to the moon and later take them to Mars and other destinations. In this early illustration, the Ares I is illustrated during lift off. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Orion crew vehicle and its launch abort system. With a primary mission of carrying four to six member crews to Earth orbit, Ares I may also use its 25-ton payload capacity to deliver resources and supplies to the International Space Station (ISS), or to 'park' payloads in orbit for retrieval by other spacecraft bound for the moon or other destinations. Ares I uses a single five-segment solid rocket booster, a derivative of the space shuttle solid rocket booster, for the first stage. A liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen J-2X engine, derived from the J-2 engine used on the second stage of the Apollo vehicle, will power the Ares I second stage. Ares I can lift more than 55,000 pounds to low Earth orbit. The Ares I is subject to configuration changes before it is actually launched. This illustration reflects the latest configuration as of September 2006.

  16. Elucidating central metabolic redox obstacles hindering ethanol production in <i>Clostridium thermocellumi>

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R. Adam; Layton, Donovan S.; Guss, Adam M.; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R.; Trinh, Cong T.

    2015-10-21

    <i>Clostridium thermocellumi> is an anaerobic, Gram-positive, thermophilic bacterium that has generated great interest due to its ability to ferment lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. However, ethanol production is low due to the complex and poorly understood branched metabolism of <i>C. thermocellumi>, and in some cases overflow metabolism as well. In this work, we developed a predictive stoichiometric metabolic model for <i>C. thermocellumi> which incorporates the current state of understanding, with particular attention to cofactor specificity in the atypical glycolytic enzymes and the complex energy, redox, and fermentative pathways with the goal of aiding metabolic engineering efforts. We validated the model s capability to encompass experimentally observed phenotypes for the parent strain and derived mutants designed for significant perturbation of redox and energy pathways. Metabolic flux distributions revealed significant alterations in key metabolic branch points (e.g., phosphoenol pyruvate, pyruvate, acetyl-CoA, and cofactor nodes) in engineered strains for channeling electron and carbon fluxes for enhanced ethanol synthesis, with the best performing strain doubling ethanol yield and titer compared to the parent strain. <i>In silicoi> predictions of a redox-imbalanced genotype incapable of growth were confirmed <i>in vivoi>, and a mutant strain was used as a platform to probe redox bottlenecks in the central metabolism that hinder efficient ethanol production. The results highlight the robustness of the redox metabolism of <i>C. thermocellumi> and the necessity of streamlined electron flux from reduced ferredoxin to NAD(P)H for high ethanol production. The model was further used to design a metabolic engineering strategy to phenotypically constrain <i>C. thermocellumi> to achieve high ethanol yields while requiring minimal genetic manipulations. Furthermore, the model can be applied to design <i>C. thermocellumi> as a platform microbe for

  17. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Counter, Douglas; Houston, Janice

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I liftoff acoustic environments and to determine the acoustic reduction gained by using an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model and Mobile Launcher with tower. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by over 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to Ares I-X flight data.

  18. Genetic tools for advancement of <i>Synechococcus> sp. PCC 7002 as a cyanobacterial chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffing, Anne M.; Jensen, Travis J.; Strickland, Lucas M.

    2016-11-10

    Successful implementation of modified cyanobacteria as hosts for industrial applications requires the development of a cyanobacterial chassis. The cyanobacterium <i>Synechococcus> sp. PCC 7002 embodies key attributes for an industrial host, including a fast growth rate and high salt, light, and temperature tolerances. Here, this study addresses key limitations in the advancement of <i>Synechococcus> sp. PCC 7002 as an industrial chassis.

  19. Mapping of epitopes on Poa p I and Lol p I allergens with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z W; Ekramoddoullah, A K; Jaggi, K S; Dzuba-Fischer, J; Rector, E; Kisil, F T

    1990-01-01

    Allergen Poa p I isolated from the dialysed aqueous extract of Kentucky blue grass pollen by affinity chromatography with an anti-Lol p I murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) 290A-167 was previously shown to consist of a 35.8-kilodalton (kD) component with a pI of 6.4, designated as Poa p Ia, and a 33-kD component with a pI of 9.1, designated as Poa p Ib. The present study reports on the comparative antigenic analyses of these two components, using MAbs produced separately against Poa p I and Lol p I. Thus, anti-Poa p I MAbs 60 and 61 and anti-Lol p I MAb 290A-167 recognized Poa p Ia and Poa p Ib whereas anti-Poa p I MAbs 62, 63 and 64 and anti-Lol p I MAb 348A-6 recognized only Poa p Ia. The specificities of the MAbs were further resolved by comparing their respective abilities to inhibit the binding of 125I-Poa p I or 125I-Lol p I to the different MAbs prepared in the form of solid phase. These studies revealed that at least 4 distinct epitopes (designated as E1, E2, E3 and E4) were shared by both Poa p I and Lol p I. All 4 epitopes were present on Poa p Ia whereas only E1 and E3 were detected on Poa p Ib. E1 was recognized by MAbs 60 and 61, E2 by MAbs 62, 63 and 64, E3 by MAb 290A-167 and E4 by MAb 348A-6.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. A new i, i + 3 peptide stapling system for α-helix stabilization.

    PubMed

    Shim, So Youn; Kim, Young-Woo; Verdine, Gregory L

    2013-12-01

    We have previously shown that the incorporation of an 8-atom all-hydrocarbon 'staple' at positions i and i + 3 of a synthetic peptide results in substantial stabilization of the α-helical conformation. As part of our ongoing effort to explore the scope and utility of all-hydrocarbon stapling systems, we have investigated and report herein the properties of a new i, i + 3 stapling system that employs a 6-carbon cross-link.