Science.gov

Sample records for ir multiple-photon excitation

  1. Multiple photon excited SF6 interaction with silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared laser induced SF6-silicon interactions have been studied and the surface reaction yields have been determined as a function of the laser frequency, the laser intensity, and the gas pressure in both perpendicular and parallel beam incidences on the solid surfaces. The results clearly show that vibrationally excited SF6 molecules promoted by CO2 laser pulses are very reactive to silicon, particularly when the solid is simultaneously exposed to the intense ir radiation. The laser excitation of the Si substrate alone cannot cause the heterogeneous reaction to occur. The present gas-solid system thus provides an example which clearly establishes the direct correlation between surface reactivity and vibrational activation. Additional experimental measurements also demonstrate that the thermal fluorine atoms generated by SF6 multiple photon dissociation at high laser intensities can react with silicon to form volatile product. The study thus provides further insight into the silicon-fluorine reaction dynamics.

  2. Double resonance spectroscopy of multiple-photon excited molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.; Melzer, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Multiple infrared photon absorption is a quite general process which molecules can undergo when placed in a high flux of infrared energy, such as the focussed beam of a CO2 laser. In order to understand how this process works, one must be able to follow the evolution of the molecules through their internal states, populated by photon absorption. Double-resonance spectroscopy is the method of a choice for getting at this information. A system pumped by CO2 laser radiation can be examined with a tunable laser probe beam, such as that from a lead-salt diode laser. From such an experiment, one can directly observe Rabi modulation of the absorption lines, determine elementary state-to-state relaxation pathways, and locate higher excited vibrational states. Systems currently under investigation include SF6 and vinyl chloride. In suitable cases, the probe beam can be a tunable visible or UV source, such as a dye laser. Fluorescence spectroscopy can then be used to monitor the transient absorptions produced by multiple-photon excitation. Among the systems which can be examined are biacetyl and glyoxal.

  3. Processes of multiple photon and thermal excitation of carriers of charge in low dimensional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, V. P.; Mikhailova, G. N.

    2006-06-01

    The question of multiple photon and thermal excitation in low-dimensional nanostructures with deep holes, induced by x-radiation was considered. There are strong grounds for believing that observed thermally stimulated effective luminescence from x-irradiated porous Si (D.W. Cooke et al [1]) connected with generation by x-radiation of Dirac points in nanostructures.

  4. Intensity-resolved IR multiple photon ionization and fragmentation of C60.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Joost M; Lapoutre, Vivike J F; Redlich, Britta; Oomens, Jos; Sartakov, Boris G; Fielicke, André; von Helden, Gert; Meijer, Gerard; van der Meer, Alexander F G

    2010-02-21

    The sequential absorption of multiple infrared (IR) photons by isolated gas-phase species can lead to their dissociation and/or ionization. Using the newly constructed "Free-Electron Laser for IntraCavity Experiments" (FELICE) beam line at the FELIX facility, neutral C(60) molecules have been exposed to an extremely high number (approximately 10(23)) of photons/cm(2) for a total time duration of up to 5 micros. At wavelengths around 20 microm, resonant with allowed IR transitions of C(60), ionization and extensive fragmentation of the fullerenes are observed. The resulting photofragment distributions are attributed to absorption in fragmentation products formed once C(60) is excited to internal energies at which fragmentation or ionization takes place within the duration of the laser pulse. The high IR intensities available combined with the large interaction volume permit spatially resolved detection of the ions inside the laser beam, thereby disentangling the contributions from different IR intensities. The use of spatial imaging reveals intensity dependent mass distributions that are substantially narrower than what has been observed previously, indicating rather narrow energy distributions. A simple rate-equation modeling of the excitation process supports the experimental observations.

  5. Multiple-photon excitation imaging with an all-solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wokosin, David L.; Centonze, Victoria F.; White, John G.; Hird, Steven N.; Sepsenwol, S.; Malcolm, Graeme P. A.; Maker, Gareth T.; Ferguson, Allister I.

    1996-05-01

    Two-photon excitation imaging is a recently described optical sectioning technique where fluorophore excitation is confined to--and therefore defines--the optical section being observed. This characteristic offers a significant advantage over laser-scanning confocal microscopy; the volume of fluorophore excited in the minimum necessary for imaging, thereby minimizing the destructive effects of fluorophore excitation in living tissues. In addition, a confocal pinhole is not required for optical scattering--thus further reducing the excitation needed for efficient photon collection. We have set up a two-photon excitation imaging system which uses an all-solid-state, short-pulse, long-wavelength laser as an excitation source. The source is a diode-pumped, mode-locked Nd:YLF laser operating in the infrared (1047 nm). This laser is small, has modest power requirements, and has proven reliable and stable in operation. The short laser pulses from the laser are affected by the system optical path; this has been investigated with second harmonic generation derived from a nonlinear crystal. The system has been specifically designed for the study of live biological specimens. Two cell types especially sensitive to high-energy illumination, the developing Caenorhabditis elegans embryo and the crawling sperm of the nematode, Ascaris, were used to demonstrate the dramatic increase in viability when fluorescence is generated by two-photon excitation. The system has the capability of switching between two-photon and confocal imaging modes to facilitate direct comparison of theory of these two optical sectioning techniques on the same specimen. A heavily stained zebra fish embryo was used to demonstrate the increase in sectioning depth when fluorescence is generated by infrared two- photon excitation. Two-photon excitation with the 1047 nm laser produces bright images with a variety of red emitting fluorophores, and some green emitting fluorophores, commonly used in biological

  6. Generation of Multiple Excitons in Ag2S Quantum Dots: Single High-Energy versus Multiple-Photon Excitation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingya; Yu, Weili; Usman, Anwar; Isimjan, Tayirjan T; DGobbo, Silvano; Alarousu, Erkki; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Mohammed, Omar F

    2014-02-20

    We explored biexciton generation via carrier multiplication (or multiple-exciton generation) by high-energy photons and by multiple-photon absorption in Ag2S quantum dots (QDs) using femtosecond broad-band transient absorption spectroscopy. Irrespective of the size of the QDs and how the multiple excitons are generated in the Ag2S QDs, two distinct characteristic time constants of 9.6-10.2 and 135-175 ps are obtained for the nonradiative Auger recombination of the multiple excitons, indicating the existence of two binding excitons, namely, tightly bound and weakly bound excitons. More importantly, the lifetimes of multiple excitons in Ag2S QDs were about 1 and 2 orders of magnitude longer than those of comparable size PbS QDs and single-walled carbon nanotubes, respectively. This result is significant because it suggests that by utilizing an appropriate electron acceptor, there is a higher possibility to extract multiple electron-hole pairs in Ag2S QDs, which should improve the performance of QD-based solar cell devices.

  7. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Rockwood, S.D.; Jensen, R.J.; Lyman, J.L.; Aldridge, J.P. III.

    1987-04-07

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO[sub 2] laser light may be used to highly enrich [sup 34]S in natural SF[sub 6] and [sup 11]B in natural BCl[sub 3]. 8 figs.

  8. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; Aldridge, III, Jack P.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

  9. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; Aldridge, III, Jack P.

    1977-01-01

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, in the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

  10. Electronic excitations in γ -Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Winter, Stephen M.; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the electronic properties of the three-dimensional stripyhoneycomb γ -Li2IrO3 via relativistic density functional theory calculations as well as exact diagonalization of finite clusters and explore the details of the optical conductivity. Our analysis of this quantity reveals the microscopic origin of the experimentally observed (i) optical transitions and (ii) anisotropic behavior along the various polarization directions. In particular, we find that the optical excitations are overall dominated by transitions between jeff=1 /2 and 3/2 states and the weight of transitions between jeff=1 /2 states at low frequencies can be correlated to deviations from a pure Kitaev description. We furthermore reanalyze within this approach the electronic excitations in the known two-dimensional honeycomb systems α -Li2IrO3 and Na2IrO3 and discuss the results in comparison to γ -Li2IrO3 .

  11. CO excitation in four IR luminous galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radford, Simon J. E.; Solomon, P. M.; Downes, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    The correlation between the CO and far infrared luminosities of spiral galaxies is well established. The luminosity ration, L sub FIR/L sub CO in IR luminous active galaxies is, however, systematically five to ten times higher than in ordinary spirals and molecular clouds in our Galaxy. Furthermore, the masses of molecular hydrogen in luminous galaxies are large, M (H2) approx. equals 10(exp 10) solar magnitude, which indicates the observed luminosity ratios are due to an excess of infrared output, rather than a deficiency of molecular gas. These large amounts of molecular gas may fuel luminous galaxies through either star formation or nuclear activity. This interpretation rests on applying the M (H2)/L sub CO ratio calibrated in our Galaxy to galaxies with strikingly different luminosity ratios. But are the physical conditions of the molecular gas different in galaxies with different luminosity ratios. And, if so, does the proportionality between CO and H2 also vary among galaxies. To investigate these questions researchers observed CO (2 to 1) and (1 to 0) emission from four luminous galaxies with the Institute for Radio Astronomy in the Millimeter range (IRAM) 30 m telescope. Researchers conclude that most of the CO emission from these Arp 193, Arp 220, and Mrk 231 arises in regions with moderate ambient densities similar to the clouds in the Milky Way molecular ring. The emission is neither from dense hot cloud cores nor from the cold low density gas characteristic of the envelopes of dark clouds.

  12. CO excitation in four IR luminous galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radford, Simon J. E.; Solomon, P. M.; Downes, Dennis

    1990-07-01

    The correlation between the CO and far infrared luminosities of spiral galaxies is well established. The luminosity ration, LFIR/L sub CO in IR luminous active galaxies is, however, systematically five to ten times higher than in ordinary spirals and molecular clouds in our Galaxy. Furthermore, the masses of molecular hydrogen in luminous galaxies are large, M (H2) approx. equals 1010 solar magnitude, which indicates the observed luminosity ratios are due to an excess of infrared output, rather than a deficiency of molecular gas. These large amounts of molecular gas may fuel luminous galaxies through either star formation or nuclear activity. This interpretation rests on applying the M (H2)/LCO ratio calibrated in our Galaxy to galaxies with strikingly different luminosity ratios. But are the physical conditions of the molecular gas different in galaxies with different luminosity ratios. And, if so, does the proportionality between CO and H2 also vary among galaxies. To investigate these questions researchers observed CO (2 to 1) and (1 to 0) emission from four luminous galaxies with the Institute for Radio Astronomy in the Millimeter range (IRAM) 30 m telescope. Researchers conclude that most of the CO emission from these Arp 193, Arp 220, and Mrk 231 arises in regions with moderate ambient densities similar to the clouds in the Milky Way molecular ring. The emission is neither from dense hot cloud cores nor from the cold low density gas characteristic of the envelopes of dark clouds.

  13. A combined IR/IR and IR/UV spectroscopy study on the proton transfer coordinate of isolated 3-hydroxychromone in the electronic ground and excited state.

    PubMed

    Stamm, A; Weiler, M; Brächer, A; Schwing, K; Gerhards, M

    2014-10-21

    In this paper the excited state proton transfer (ESPT) of isolated 3-hydroxychromone (3-HC), the prototype of the flavonols, is investigated for the first time by combined IR/UV spectroscopy in molecular beam experiments. The IR/UV investigations are performed both for the electronically excited and electronic ground state indicating a spectral overlap of transitions of the 3-HC monomer and clusters with water in the electronic ground state, whereas in the excited state only the IR frequencies of the proton-transferred monomer structure are observed. Due to the loss of isomer and species selectivity with respect to the UV excitations IR/IR techniques are applied in order to figure out the assignment of the vibrational transitions in the S0 state. In this context the quadruple resonance IR/UV/IR/UV technique (originally developed to distinguish different isomers in the electronically excited state) could be applied to identify the OH stretching vibration of the monomer in the electronic ground state. In agreement with calculations the OH stretching frequency differs significantly from the corresponding values of substituted hydroxychromones.

  14. Anisotropic softening of magnetic excitations in lightly electron-doped Sr2IrO4

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Meng, Z. Y.; ...

    2016-06-10

    The magnetic excitations in electron doped (Sr1-xLax)2IrO4 with x = 0:03 were measured using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the Ir L3-edge. Although much broadened, well defined dispersive magnetic excitations were observed. Comparing with the magnetic dispersion from the undoped compound, the evolution of the magnetic excitations upon doping is highly anisotropic. Along the anti-nodal direction, the dispersion is almost intact. On the other hand, the magnetic excitations along the nodal direction show significant softening. These results establish the presence of strong magnetic correlations in electron doped (Sr1-xLax)2IrO4 with close analogies to the hole doped cuprates, further motivating the searchmore » for high temperature superconductivity in this system.« less

  15. Anisotropic softening of magnetic excitations in lightly electron-doped Sr2IrO4

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Meng, Z. Y.; Upton, M. H.; Qi, T.; Gog, T.; Cao, Y.; Lin, J. Q.; Meyers, D.; Ding, H.; Cao, G.; Hill, J. P.

    2016-06-10

    The magnetic excitations in electron doped (Sr1-xLax)2IrO4 with x = 0:03 were measured using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at the Ir L3-edge. Although much broadened, well defined dispersive magnetic excitations were observed. Comparing with the magnetic dispersion from the undoped compound, the evolution of the magnetic excitations upon doping is highly anisotropic. Along the anti-nodal direction, the dispersion is almost intact. On the other hand, the magnetic excitations along the nodal direction show significant softening. These results establish the presence of strong magnetic correlations in electron doped (Sr1-xLax)2IrO4 with close analogies to the hole doped cuprates, further motivating the search for high temperature superconductivity in this system.

  16. Magnetic and Orbital Excitations in Sr3CuIrO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, J. P.; Liu, X.; Dean, M.; Yin, W.; Tsvelik, A.; Kim, J.; Casa, D.; Upton, M. H.; Gretarsson, H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Qi, T.; Cao, G.; Hozoi, L.; Katukuri, V.; Brink, J. V. D.

    2012-02-01

    We report resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies of the one-dimensional Sr3CuIrO6 at the Ir L3 edge, with δE=40 meV. At high energies, we find peaks at 0.6 eV, 0.9 eV, 3 eV, 4 eV and 6 eV. These peaks are non-dispersive, well-defined excitations. On the basis of quantum chemistry calculations, we are able to identify the first two as excitations within the t2g manifold and the next two as between the t2g and eg manifolds, together with charge transfer excitations from the O 2p to the Ir 5d. The 6 eV feature is another t2g - eg excitation. From these we are able to determine both the spin-orbit and non-cubic crystal field splittings. We find that they are of comparable strength. In addition, magnetic excitations are observed, corresponding to excitations of the j1/2 isospin. We find these are highly dispersive along the chain direction with a bandwidth of 20 meV and a gap of 30 meV. These results allow a complete modeling of the spin and orbital degrees of freedom in this model compound and we conclude an atomic, spin-orbit coupled description works well.

  17. Vortexlike excitations in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn5

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Yongkang; Rosa, P. F. S.; Bauer, E. D.; ...

    2016-05-05

    Here, we report a systematic study of temperature- and field-dependent charge (ρ) and entropy (S) transport in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn5. Its large positive thermopower Sxx is typical of Ce-based Kondo lattice systems, and strong electronic correlations play an important role in enhancing the Nernst signal Sxy. By separating the off-diagonal Peltier coefficient αxy from Sxy, we find that αxy becomes positive and greatly enhanced at temperatures well above the bulk Tc. Compared with the nonmagnetic analog LaIrIn5, these results suggest vortexlike excitations in a precursor state to unconventional superconductivity in CeIrIn5. This study sheds light on the similarity ofmore » heavy-fermion and cuprate superconductors and on the possibility of states not characterized by the amplitude of an order parameter.« less

  18. Vortexlike excitations in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yongkang; Rosa, P. F. S.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of temperature- and field-dependent charge (ρ ) and entropy (S ) transport in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn5. Its large positive thermopower Sx x is typical of Ce-based Kondo lattice systems, and strong electronic correlations play an important role in enhancing the Nernst signal Sx y. By separating the off-diagonal Peltier coefficient αx y from Sx y, we find that αx y becomes positive and greatly enhanced at temperatures well above the bulk Tc. Compared with the nonmagnetic analog LaIrIn5, these results suggest vortexlike excitations in a precursor state to unconventional superconductivity in CeIrIn5. This study sheds light on the similarity of heavy-fermion and cuprate superconductors and on the possibility of states not characterized by the amplitude of an order parameter.

  19. Hydricity, electrochemistry, and excited-state chemistry of Ir complexes for CO2 reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Manbeck, Gerald F.; Garg, Komal; Shimoda, Tomoe; ...

    2016-12-01

    Here, we prepared electron-rich derivatives of [Ir(tpy)(ppy)Cl]+ with modification of the bidentate (ppy) or tridentate (tpy) ligands in attempt to increase the reactivity for CO2 reduction and the ability to transfer hydrides (hydricity). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that complexes with dimethyl-substituted ppy have similar hydricities to the non-substituted parent complex, and photocatalytic CO2 reduction studies show selective CO formation. Substitution of tpy for bis(benzimidazole)-phenyl or -pyridine (L3 and L4, respectively) induces changes in the physical properties much more pronounced than addition of methyl groups to ppy. Theoretical data predict [Ir(L3)(ppy)(H)] is the strongest hydride donor among complexes studiedmore » in this work, but [Ir(L3)(ppy)(NCCH3)]+ cannot be reduced photochemically because the excited state reduction potential is only 0.52 V due to the negative ground state potential of –1.91 V. The excited state [Ir(L4)(ppy)(NCCH3)]2+ is the strongest oxidant among complexes studied in this work and the singly reduced species is formed readily upon photolysis in the presence of tertiary amines. Both [Ir(L3)(ppy)(NCCH3)]+ and [Ir(L4)(ppy)(NCCH3)]2+ exhibit electrocatalytic current for CO2 reduction. While a significantly greater overpotential is needed for the L3 complex, a small amount of formate (5-10 %) generation in addition to CO was observed as predicted by the DFT calculations.« less

  20. Hydricity, electrochemistry, and excited-state chemistry of Ir complexes for CO2 reduction.

    PubMed

    Manbeck, Gerald F; Garg, Komal; Shimoda, Tomoe; Szalda, David J; Ertem, Mehmed Z; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko

    2017-03-10

    We prepared electron-rich derivatives of [Ir(tpy)(ppy)Cl](+) with modification of the bidentate (ppy) or tridentate (tpy) ligands in an attempt to increase the reactivity for CO2 reduction and the ability to transfer hydrides (hydricity). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that complexes with dimethyl-substituted ppy have similar hydricities to the non-substituted parent complex, and photocatalytic CO2 reduction studies show selective CO formation. Substitution of tpy by bis(benzimidazole)-phenyl or -pyridine (L3 and L4, respectively) induces changes in the physical properties that are much more pronounced than from the addition of methyl groups to ppy. Theoretical data predict [Ir(L3)(ppy)(H)] as the strongest hydride donor among complexes studied in this work, but [Ir(L3)(ppy)(NCCH3)](+) cannot be reduced photochemically because the excited state reduction potential is only 0.52 V due to the negative ground state potential of -1.91 V. The excited state of [Ir(L4)(ppy)(NCCH3)](2+) is the strongest oxidant among complexes studied in this work and the singly-reduced species is formed readily upon photolysis in the presence of tertiary amines. Both [Ir(L3)(ppy)(NCCH3)](+) and [Ir(L4)(ppy)(NCCH3)](2+) exhibit electrocatalytic current for CO2 reduction. While a significantly greater overpotential is needed for the L3 complex, a small amount of formate (5-10%) generation in addition to CO was observed as predicted by the DFT calculations.

  1. Sonic IR crack detection of aircraft turbine engine blades with multi-frequency ultrasound excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ding; Han, Xiaoyan; Newaz, Golam

    2014-02-18

    Effectively and accurately detecting cracks or defects in critical engine components, such as turbine engine blades, is very important for aircraft safety. Sonic Infrared (IR) Imaging is such a technology with great potential for these applications. This technology combines ultrasound excitation and IR imaging to identify cracks and flaws in targets. In general, failure of engine components, such as blades, begins with tiny cracks. Since the attenuation of the ultrasound wave propagation in turbine engine blades is small, the efficiency of crack detection in turbine engine blades can be quite high. The authors at Wayne State University have been developing the technology as a reliable tool for the future field use in aircraft engines and engine parts. One part of the development is to use finite element modeling to assist our understanding of effects of different parameters on crack heating while experimentally hard to achieve. The development has been focused with single frequency ultrasound excitation and some results have been presented in a previous conference. We are currently working on multi-frequency excitation models. The study will provide results and insights of the efficiency of different frequency excitation sources to foster the development of the technology for crack detection in aircraft engine components.

  2. Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy Of Metal Cluster-Adducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, D. M.; Kaldor, A.; Zakin, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    Recent development of the laser vaporization technique combined with mass-selective detection has made possible new studies of the fundamental chemical and physical properties of unsupported transition metal clusters as a function of the number of constituent atoms. A variety of experimental techniques have been developed in our laboratory to measure ionization threshold energies, magnetic moments, and gas phase reactivity of clusters. However, studies have so far been unable to determine the cluster structure or the chemical state of chemisorbed species on gas phase clusters. The application of infrared multiple photon dissociation IRMPD to obtain the IR absorption properties of metal cluster-adsorbate species in a molecular beam is described here. Specifically using a high power, pulsed CO2 laser as the infrared source, the IRMPD spectrum for methanol chemisorbed on small iron clusters is measured as a function of the number of both iron atoms and methanols in the complex for different methanol isotopes. Both the feasibility and potential utility of IRMPD for characterizing metal cluster-adsorbate interactions are demonstrated. The method is generally applicable to any cluster or cluster-adsorbate system dependent only upon the availability of appropriate high power infrared sources.

  3. Gas-phase infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of isolated SF6- and SF5- anions.

    PubMed

    Steill, Jeffrey D; Oomens, Jos; Eyler, John R; Compton, Robert N

    2008-12-28

    Resonantly enhanced multiple photon dissociation of gas-phase SF(6) (-) and SF(5) (-) is studied using tunable infrared light from the FELIX free electron laser. The photodissociation spectrum of the sulfur hexafluoride anion, producing SF(5) (-), is recorded over the spectral range of 250-1650 cm(-1). The infrared multiple photon dissociation cross section exhibits a strong, broad resonance enhancement at 675 cm(-1) in agreement with the calculated value of nu(3), one of the two IR-active fundamental vibrational modes predicted for the O(h)-symmetry ion. Much weaker absorption features are observed in the spectral region of 300-450 cm(-1) as well as at 580 cm(-1) that are not easily assigned to the other IR-active fundamental of SF(6) (-) since these resonances are observed at a much higher energy than the calculated values for the IR-active nu(4) mode. The potential role of binary combination bands is considered. Photodissociation from the sulfur pentafluoride anion produced only F(-), but photodetachment was also observed through SF(6) associative electron capture. The IR multiple photon dissociation spectrum of SF(5) (-) shows multiple resonances within the region of 400-900 cm(-1) and agreement with calculations is clear, including the observation of three fundamental frequencies: nu(1) at 780 cm(-1), nu(7) at 595 cm(-1), and nu(8) at 450 cm(-1). Comparisons of the measured frequencies with ab initio and density functional theory calculations confirm an SF(5) (-) anion of C(4v) symmetry. Similar comparisons for SF(6) (-) are not inconsistent with an anion of O(h) symmetry.

  4. IR excitation of contaminant water by oxygen for the space shuttle at low Earth orbit altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, D. K.; Pendleton, W. R., Jr.; Bingham, G. E.; Thompson, D. C.; Raitt, W. J.; Nadile, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    As the water outgas of a space shuttle passes through the rarefied atmosphere at orbital altitude, collisions occur between the gases with sufficient energy to excite infrared-active water molecules to various vibrational and rotational states. An infrared contaminant model (IR model) has been developed to study the shuttle-induced excitation and emission of water molecules outgassed from the space shuttle. The focus of the first application of the model is translation-to-vibration (T-V) energy transfer since estimates suggest that this process should dominate the production of vibrationally excited H2O under typical low Earth orbit conditions. Using the velocity and position distribution functions of interacting neutral gases obtained from a neutral gases interaction model, the spatial distributions of excitation and IR radiation from contaminant water are computed, and typical results are presented. Infrared spectral data (450 - 2500/cm), measured by the Cryogenic Infrared Radiance Instrumentation for Shuttle (CIRRIS-1A) sensor on STS-39 (April 28 to May 6, 1991) at an altitude near 265 km, are used to test model predictions. The dependence of the radiant emission structure and brightness on outgassing rates and altitudes is discussed. The time history of the contaminant water outgassing rate is inferred for STS-39, and it is compared with the mass-spectrometer-based results for STS-4 (June 26 to July 4, 1982). Also, estimates of H2O column density at mission elapsed time (MET) 50 hours are compared for missions STS-2, STS-3, STS-4, and STS-39.

  5. Fuel Cell Manufacturing Diagnostic Techniques: IR Thermography with Reactive Flow through Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Manak, A. J.; Ulsh, M.; Bender, G.

    2012-01-01

    While design and material considerations for PEMFCs have a large impact on cost, it is also necessary to consider a transition to high volume production of fuel cell systems, including MEA components, to enable economies of scale and reduce per unit cost. One of the critical manufacturing tasks is developing and deploying techniques to provide in‐process measurement of fuel cell components for quality control. This effort requires a subsidiary task: The study of the effect of manufacturing defects on performance and durability with the objective to establish validated manufacturing tolerances for fuel cell components. This work focuses on the development of a potential quality control method for gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs). The method consists of infrared (IR) thermography combined with reactive flow through (RFT) excitation. Detection of catalyst loading reduction defects in GDE catalyst layers will be presented.

  6. Resonant Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy of Anionic Nucleotide Monophosphate Clusters.

    PubMed

    Ligare, Marshall R; Rijs, Anouk M; Berden, Giel; Kabeláč, Martin; Nachtigallova, Dana; Oomens, Jos; de Vries, Mattanjah S

    2015-06-25

    We report mid-infrared spectra and potential energy surfaces of four anionic, 2'-deoxynucleotide-5'-monophosphates (dNMPs) and the ionic DNA pairs [dGMP-dCMP-H](1-), [dAMP-dTMP-H](1-) with a total charge of the complex equal to -1. We recorded IR action spectra by resonant IR multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) using the FELIX free electron laser. The potential energy surface study employed an on-the-fly molecular dynamics quenching method (MD/Q), using a semiempirical AM1 method, followed by an optimization of the most stable structures using density functional theory. By employing infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy in combination with high-level computational methods, we aim at a better understanding of the hydrogen bonding competition between the phosphate moieties and the nucleobases. We find that, unlike in multimer double stranded DNA structures, the hydrogen bonds in these isolated nucleotide pairs are predominantly formed between the phosphate groups. This intermolecular interaction appears to exceed the stabilization energy resulting from base pairing and directs the overall cluster structure and alignment.

  7. Photo-redox activated drug delivery systems operating under two photon excitation in the near-IR.

    PubMed

    Guardado-Alvarez, Tania M; Devi, Lekshmi Sudha; Vabre, Jean-Marie; Pecorelli, Travis A; Schwartz, Benjamin J; Durand, Jean-Olivier; Mongin, Olivier; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2014-05-07

    We report the design and synthesis of a nano-container consisting of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with the pore openings covered by "snap-top" caps that are opened by near-IR light. A photo transducer molecule that is a reducing agent in an excited electronic state is covalently attached to the system. Near IR two-photon excitation causes inter-molecular electron transfer that reduces a disulfide bond holding the cap in place, thus allowing the cargo molecules to escape. We describe the operation of the "snap-top" release mechanism by both one- and two-photon activation. This system presents a proof of concept of a near-IR photoredox-induced nanoparticle delivery system that may lead to a new type of photodynamic drug release therapy.

  8. Mapping and controlling ultrafast dynamics of highly excited H2 molecules by VUV-IR pump-probe schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, F. P.; Tong, X. M.; Palacios, A.; Wright, T. W.; Zalyubovskaya, I.; Ray, D.; Shivaram, N.; Martín, F.; Belkacem, A.; Ranitovic, P.; Weber, Th.

    2017-01-01

    We used ultrashort femtosecond vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and infrared (IR) pulses in a pump-probe scheme to map the dynamics and nonequilibrium dissociation channels of excited neutral H2 molecules. A nuclear wave packet is created in the B Σ+1u state of the neutral H2 molecule by absorption of the ninth harmonic of the driving infrared laser field. Due to the large stretching amplitude of the molecule excited in the B Σ+1u electronic state, the effective H2+ ionization potential changes significantly as the nuclear wave packet vibrates in the bound, highly electronically and vibrationally excited B potential-energy curve. We probed such dynamics by ionizing the excited neutral molecule using time-delayed VUV-or-IR radiation. We identified the nonequilibrium dissociation channels by utilizing three-dimensional momentum imaging of the ion fragments. We found that different dissociation channels can be controlled, to some extent, by changing the IR laser intensity and by choosing the wavelength of the probe laser light. Furthermore, we concluded that even in a benchmark molecular system such as H2*, the interpretation of the nonequilibrium multiphoton and multicolor ionization processes is still a challenging task, requiring intricate theoretical analysis.

  9. Prediction and identification of multiple-photon resonant ionization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; McKown, H.S.; Young, J.P.; Shaw, R.W.; Donohue, D.L.

    1988-08-01

    Many single-color, multiple-photon transitions leading to ionization are observed for lanthanide and actinide elements in experiments using resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). It is desirable both to identify the energy levels involved in observed transitions and to be able to predict in advance their location. A computer code, ETRANS, has been written to perform these functions. Examples of both types of operation are given.

  10. Hydricity, electrochemistry, and excited-state chemistry of Ir complexes for CO2 reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Manbeck, Gerald F.; Garg, Komal; Shimoda, Tomoe; Szalda, David J.; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2016-12-01

    Here, we prepared electron-rich derivatives of [Ir(tpy)(ppy)Cl]+ with modification of the bidentate (ppy) or tridentate (tpy) ligands in attempt to increase the reactivity for CO2 reduction and the ability to transfer hydrides (hydricity). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that complexes with dimethyl-substituted ppy have similar hydricities to the non-substituted parent complex, and photocatalytic CO2 reduction studies show selective CO formation. Substitution of tpy for bis(benzimidazole)-phenyl or -pyridine (L3 and L4, respectively) induces changes in the physical properties much more pronounced than addition of methyl groups to ppy. Theoretical data predict [Ir(L3)(ppy)(H)] is the strongest hydride donor among complexes studied in this work, but [Ir(L3)(ppy)(NCCH3)]+ cannot be reduced photochemically because the excited state reduction potential is only 0.52 V due to the negative ground state potential of –1.91 V. The excited state [Ir(L4)(ppy)(NCCH3)]2+ is the strongest oxidant among complexes studied in this work and the singly reduced species is formed readily upon photolysis in the presence of tertiary amines. Both [Ir(L3)(ppy)(NCCH3)]+ and [Ir(L4)(ppy)(NCCH3)]2+ exhibit electrocatalytic current for CO2 reduction. While a significantly greater overpotential is needed for the L3 complex, a small amount of formate (5-10 %) generation in addition to CO was observed as predicted by the DFT calculations.

  11. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr₂IrO₄ using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; ...

    2015-04-28

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr₂IrO₄, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edgemore » RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.« less

  12. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr₂IrO₄ using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; Hill, J. P.

    2015-04-28

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr₂IrO₄, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edge RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.

  13. On the biphoton excitation of the fluorescence of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules of purple photosynthetic bacteria by powerful near IR femto-picosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. Yu.

    2011-11-01

    The authors of a number of experimental works detected nonresonance biphoton excitation of bacteriochlorophyll molecules, which represent the main pigment in the light-absorbing natural "antenna" complexes of photosynthesizing purple bacteria, by femtosecond IR pulses (1250-1500 nm). They believe that IR quanta excite hypothetic forbidden levels of the pigments of these bacteria in the double frequency range 625-750 nm. We propose and ground an alternative triplet mechanism to describe this phenomenon. According to our hypothesis, the mechanism of biphoton excitation of molecules by IR quanta can manifest itself specifically, through high triplet levels of molecules in the high fields induced by femtosecond-picosecond laser pulses.

  14. On the biphoton excitation of the fluorescence of the bacteriochlorophyll molecules of purple photosynthetic bacteria by powerful near IR femto-picosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. Yu.

    2011-11-15

    The authors of a number of experimental works detected nonresonance biphoton excitation of bacteriochlorophyll molecules, which represent the main pigment in the light-absorbing natural 'antenna' complexes of photosynthesizing purple bacteria, by femtosecond IR pulses (1250-1500 nm). They believe that IR quanta excite hypothetic forbidden levels of the pigments of these bacteria in the double frequency range 625-750 nm. We propose and ground an alternative triplet mechanism to describe this phenomenon. According to our hypothesis, the mechanism of biphoton excitation of molecules by IR quanta can manifest itself specifically, through high triplet levels of molecules in the high fields induced by femtosecond-picosecond laser pulses.

  15. Doping Evolution of Magnetic Order and Magnetic Excitations in (Sr1 -xLax)3Ir2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xingye; McNally, D. E.; Moretti Sala, M.; Terzic, J.; Upton, M. H.; Casa, D.; Ingold, G.; Cao, G.; Schmitt, T.

    2017-01-01

    We use resonant elastic and inelastic x-ray scattering at the Ir-L3 edge to study the doping-dependent magnetic order, magnetic excitations, and spin-orbit excitons in the electron-doped bilayer iridate (Sr1 -xLax )3Ir2 O7 (0 ≤x ≤0.065 ). With increasing doping x , the three-dimensional long range antiferromagnetic order is gradually suppressed and evolves into a three-dimensional short range order across the insulator-to-metal transition from x =0 to 0.05, followed by a transition to two-dimensional short range order between x =0.05 and 0.065. Because of the interactions between the Jeff=1/2 pseudospins and the emergent itinerant electrons, magnetic excitations undergo damping, anisotropic softening, and gap collapse, accompanied by weakly doping-dependent spin-orbit excitons. Therefore, we conclude that electron doping suppresses the magnetic anisotropy and interlayer couplings and drives (Sr1 -xLax )3Ir2 O7 into a correlated metallic state with two-dimensional short range antiferromagnetic order. Strong antiferromagnetic fluctuations of the Jeff=1/2 moments persist deep in this correlated metallic state, with the magnon gap strongly suppressed.

  16. Structure Determination and Excited State Proton Transfer Reaction of 1-NAPHTHOL-AMMONIA Clusters in the S_{1} State Studied by Uv-Ir Mid-Ir Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shunpei; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Martin, Weiler; Ishikawa, Haruki; Fujii, Masaaki

    2013-06-01

    1-naphthol ammonia clusters have been studied long time as a benchmark system of the excited state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. Understanding the ESPT reaction in this system has still not been fully established. To detect the cluster size dependence of the S_{1} state properties, many researcher extensively investigated such as emission spectra, lifetime, solvents (ammonia) evaporation pattern. Curiously, cluster structure that is fundamental to discuss the reaction has not been determined for the system. Thus we applied an IR spectroscopy to the S_{1} states of the system to determine the cluster structure and to discuss the minimum size inducing the ionic dissociation of the O-H bond in the S_{1} state. IR spectra were recorded not only the O-H and N-H stretching region (3 {μ}m) but also the skeletal vibrational region (5.5-10 {μ}m). Though O-H and N-H stretching vibrations do not provide useful structural information due to the broadness, the skeletal vibrations hold the sharpness even in the S_{1} states. Changes in the skeletal vibrations due to the ammonia solvation, e.g. C-O stretching and C-O-H bending, will be discussed based on a comparison with theoretical calculations. O. Cheshnovsky and S. Leutwylar, J. Chem. Phys. 1, 4127 (1988). S. K. Kim et al., Chem. Phys. lett. 228, 369 (1994). C. Dedonder-Lardeux et al., Phys. Chem, Chem, Phys. 3, 4316 (2001).

  17. Photonics of a conjugated organometallic Pt-Ir polymer and its model compounds exhibiting hybrid CT excited states.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ahmed M; Fortin, Daniel; Zysman-Colman, Eli; Harvey, Pierre D

    2012-04-13

    Trans- dichlorobis(tri-n-butylphosphine)platinum(II) reacts with bis(2- phenylpyridinato)-(5,5'-diethynyl-2,2'-bipyridine)iridium(III) hexafluorophosphate to form the luminescent conjugated polymer poly[trans-[(5,5'-ethynyl-2,2'-bipyridine)bis(2- phenylpyridinato)-iridium(III)]bis(tri-n-butylphosphine)platinum(II)] hexafluorophosphate ([Pt]-[Ir])n. Gel permeation chromatography indicates a degree of polymerization of 9 inferring the presence of an oligomer. Comparison of the absorption and emission band positions and their temperature dependence, emission quantum yields, and lifetimes with those for models containing only the [Pt] or the [Ir] units indicates hybrid excited states including features from both chromophores.

  18. Rotationally resolved IR-diode laser studies of ground-state CO2 excited by collisions with vibrationally excited pyridine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jeremy A; Kim, Kilyoung; Mayhew, Maurine; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2008-03-27

    Relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyridine (C5NH5) by collisions with carbon dioxide has been investigated using diode laser transient absorption spectroscopy. Vibrationally hot pyridine (E' = 40,660 cm(-1)) was prepared by 248 nm excimer laser excitation followed by rapid radiationless relaxation to the ground electronic state. Pyridine then collides with CO2, populating the high rotational CO2 states with large amounts of translational energy. The CO2 nascent rotational population distribution of the high-J (J = 58-80) tail of the 00(0)0 state was probed at short times following the excimer laser pulse to measure rate constants and probabilities for collisions populating these CO2 rotational states. Doppler spectroscopy was used to measure the CO2 recoil velocity distribution for J = 58-80 of the 00(0)0 state. The energy-transfer distribution function, P(E,E'), from E' - E approximately 1300-7000 cm(-1) was obtained by re-sorting the state-indexed energy-transfer probabilities as a function of DeltaE. P(E,E') is fit to an exponential or biexponential function to determine the average energy transferred in a single collision between pyridine and CO2. Also obtained are fit parameters that can be compared to previously studied systems (pyrazine, C6F6, methylpyrazine, and pyrimidine/CO2). Although the rotational and translational temperatures that describe pyridine/CO2 energy transfer are similar to previous systems, the energy-transfer probabilities are much smaller. P(E,E') fit parameters for pyridine/CO2 and the four previously studied systems are compared to various donor molecular properties. Finally, P(E,E') is analyzed in the context of two models, one indicating that P(E,E') shape is primarily determined by the low-frequency out-of-plane donor vibrational modes, and the other that indicates that P(E,E') shape can be determined from how the donor molecule final density of states changes with DeltaE.

  19. Excitation transfer mechanism along the visible to the Near-IR in rhodamine J-heteroaggregates.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Valencia, Juan R; Toudert, Johann; González-García, Lola; González-Elipe, Agustín R; Barranco, Angel

    2010-06-28

    An enhanced fluorescent emission of the dye Rhodamine 800 in the Near-IR is observed in the presence of other xanthene dye molecules (RhX) when they are hosted in different matrices due to the formation of a new type of fluorescent J-heteroaggregates. This enhanced emission of the acceptor occurs despite the low spectral overlapping and the low quantum yield of Rh800.

  20. Visible to near IR luminescence spectrum of Radachlorin under excitation at 405 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belik, V. P.; Gadzhiev, I. M.; Petrenko, M. V.; Petrov, M. A.; Semenova, I. V.; Vasyutinskii, O. S.

    2016-11-01

    The luminescence spectrum of Radachlorin dissolved in water in the 600-1350 nm spectral range excited by 405 nm light has been recorded at the first time. The spectrum contains a wide band with peaks centered at 662, 715, 940, and 1274 nm. Relative contributions to the spectrum from different sources have been evaluated. Ratio of the singlet oxygen signal to the total signal intensity averaged over the 1240-1300 nm spectral range was determined to be 40%. Isolation of the singlet oxygen signal from the total signal at 1274 nm has been achieved by means of a spectral-resolved TCSPC detection technique.

  1. Middle UV to near-IR spectrum of electron-excited SO2

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ajello, J.M.; Aguilar, A.; Mangina, R.S.; James, G.K.; Geissler, P.; Trafton, L.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the electron impact–induced fluorescence spectrum of SO2 to provide excitation cross sections for modeling Io's emission spectrum and analyzing Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem observations. The electron-excited middle-ultraviolet visible optical near-infrared (VOIR) emission spectrum of SO2 gas was generated in the laboratory and studied from 2000 to 11,000 Å at a resolution of Δλ ∼ 2.5 Å full width at half maximum (FWHM). The VOIR laboratory spectrum longward of 6000 Å consists entirely of S I, II and O I, II multiplets for electron impact energies above ∼15 eV. Between 2000 and 6000 Å, we find previously identified molecular bands from both SO and SO2. This work represents a significant improvement in spectral resolution over our earlier work done at 18 Å FWHM. From a measurement of the medium-resolution spectrum, we provide detailed 25- and 100-eV emission cross sections for spectral features from 2000 to 11,000 Å. On the basis of these data, we suggest future ground-based and satellite telescopic observations in the VOIR that are of promise for understanding Io's atmosphere.

  2. Velocity dependent O atom IR excitation cross sections: Connections with flight data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, D. B.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.; Caledonia, G. E.; Blumberg, W. A. M.

    1994-12-01

    A fast oxygen atom source has been used to study the velocity dependence of O atom infrared excitation reactions with various molecular species in a crossed beam experiment. These short wave infrared (SWIR) measurements are performed under single collision conditions, simulating the low Earth orbit environment. Such data are fundamental to the analysis and interpretation of atmospheric oxygen atom interaction with plume exhaust species and with the local environment about structures in low Earth orbit. Measurements have been performed over the oxygen atom velocity range of 6 to 12 km/s. These are the first such experimental measurements, and they may be used to validate theoretical estimates presently used in predictive models. We specifically discuss the velocity dependent cross sections for the reaction O + N2 yields NO(v) + N. This reaction is endothermic for O atom velocities less than or equal tto 8 km/s. Preliminary data are also shown for the reaction O + CO2 yields CO2 nu(sub3) + O yields CO(v) + O2. Both band integral and spectrally resolved results will be presented. The spectrally resolved data provide information on the rotation/vibrational distribution of the excited states. Limited observations of infrared emissions resulting from atmospheric interactions have become available in recent years from both shuttle- and rocket-borne experiments. Comparisons between our experiemental database and selected data from several different flight experiments are provided. These comparisons clearly identify the kinetic mechanisms responsible for the flight observations.

  3. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  4. Optical Emission Studies of Copper Plasma Induced Using Infrared Transversely Excited Atmospheric (IR TEA) Carbon Dioxide Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Momcilovic, Milos; Kuzmanovic, Miroslav; Rankovic, Dragan; Ciganovic, Jovan; Stoiljkovic, Milovan; Savovic, Jelena; Trtica, Milan

    2015-04-01

    Spatially resolved, time-integrated optical emission spectroscopy was applied for investigation of copper plasma produced by a nanosecond infrared (IR) transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2 laser, operating at 10.6 μm. The effect of surrounding air pressure, in the pressure range 0.1 to 1013 mbar, on plasma formation and its characteristics was investigated. A linear dependence of intensity threshold for plasma formation on logarithm of air pressure was found. Lowering of the air pressure reduces the extent of gas breakdown, enabling better laser-target coupling and thus increases ablation. Optimum air pressure for target plasma formation was 0.1 mbar. Under that pressure, the induced plasma consisted of two clearly distinguished and spatially separated regions. The maximum intensity of emission, with sharp and well-resolved spectral lines and negligibly low background emission, was obtained from a plasma zone 8 mm from the target surface. The estimated excitation temperature in this zone was around 7000 K. The favorable signal to background ratio obtained in this plasma region indicates possible analytical application of TEA CO2 laser produced copper plasma. Detection limits of trace elements present in the Cu sample were on the order of 10 ppm (parts per million). Time-resolved measurements of spatially selected plasma zones were used to find a correlation between the observed spatial position and time delay.

  5. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of ciprofloxacin: Investigation of the protonation site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodo, E.; Ciavardini, A.; Giardini, A.; Paladini, A.; Piccirillo, S.; Rondino, F.; Scuderi, D.

    2012-04-01

    The vibrational spectrum of isolated protonated ciprofloxacin was recorded in the range 1100-2000 cm-1 by means of infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. The spectrum was obtained by electrospraying a methanol solution of ciprofloxacin in a Paul ion trap, coupled to the tunable IR radiation of a free electron laser. This spectroscopic study has been complemented by quantum chemical calculations at the DFT and MP2 levels of theory to identify the possible structures present under our experimental conditions. Several low-energy isomers with protonation occurring at the piperazinyl amino group and at the carbonyl group are predicted in the energy range 0-84 kJ mol-1. A good agreement between the measured IRMPD spectrum and the calculated absorption spectrum is observed for the isomer protonated at the piperazinyl amino group. This isomer is calculated at MP2 level of theory to lie about 76 kJ/mol above the most stable isomer which is protonated at the quinone carbonyl group. This discrepancy can be rationalized by assuming that the protonation at the piperazinyl amino group, typical of the zwitterionic form that is found in protic solvents, is retained in the ESI process. The vibrational bands observed in the IRMPD spectrum are assigned to normal modes of the isomer protonated at the piperazinyl amino group, with deviations of less than 20 cm-1 between measured and calculated frequencies.

  6. Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy of Sodium and Potassium Chlorate Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan P. Dain; Christopher M. Leavitt; Jos Oomens; Jeffrey D. Steill; Gary S. Groenewold; Michael J. van Stipdonk

    2010-01-01

    The structures of gas-phase, metal chlorate anions with the formula [M(ClO3)2]-, M=Na and K, were determined using tandem mass spectrometry and infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. Structural assignments for both anions are based on comparisons of the experimental vibrational spectra for the two species to those predicted by density functional theory and involve conformations that feature either bidentate or tridentate coordination of the cation by chlorate. Our results strongly suggest that a structure in which both chlorate anions are bidentate ligands is preferred for [Na(ClO3)2]-. However, for [K(ClO3)2]- the best agreement between experimental and theoretical spectra is obtained from a composite of predicted spectra for which the chlorate anions are either both bidentate or both tridentate ligands. In general, we find that the overall accuracy of DFT calculations for prediction of IR spectra is dependent on both functional and basis set, with best agreement achieved using frequencies generated at the B3LYP/6-311+g(3df) level of theory.

  7. Raman spectroscopic signature of fractionalized excitations in the harmonic-honeycomb iridates β- and γ-Li2IrO3

    PubMed Central

    Glamazda, A.; Lemmens, P.; Do, S. -H.; Choi, Y. S.; Choi, K. -Y.

    2016-01-01

    The fractionalization of elementary excitations in quantum spin systems is a central theme in current condensed matter physics. The Kitaev honeycomb spin model provides a prominent example of exotic fractionalized quasiparticles, composed of itinerant Majorana fermions and gapped gauge fluxes. However, identification of the Majorana fermions in a three-dimensional honeycomb lattice remains elusive. Here we report spectroscopic signatures of fractional excitations in the harmonic-honeycomb iridates β- and γ-Li2IrO3. Using polarization-resolved Raman spectroscopy, we find that the dynamical Raman response of β- and γ-Li2IrO3 features a broad scattering continuum with distinct polarization and composition dependence. The temperature dependence of the Raman spectral weight is dominated by the thermal damping of fermionic excitations. These results suggest the emergence of Majorana fermions from spin fractionalization in a three-dimensional Kitaev–Heisenberg system. PMID:27457278

  8. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr2IrO4 using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbăian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; Hill, J. P.

    2015-05-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr2IrO4, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edge RIXS energy resolution in the hard x-ray region is usually poor.

  9. A cyclometallated fluorenyl Ir(iii) complex as a potential sensitiser for two-photon excited photodynamic therapy (2PE-PDT).

    PubMed

    Boreham, Elizabeth M; Jones, Lucy; Swinburne, Adam N; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Hugues, Vincent; Terryn, Christine; Miomandre, Fabien; Lemercier, Gilles; Natrajan, Louise S

    2015-09-28

    A new Ir(iii) cyclometallated complex bearing a fluorenyl 5-substituted-1,10-phenanthroline ligand ([Ir(ppy)2()][PF6], ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) is presented which exhibits enhanced triplet oxygen sensing properties. The efficacy of this complex to act as a photosensitiser for altering the morphology of C6 Glioma cells that represent malignant nervous tumours has been evaluated. The increased heavy metal effect and related spin-orbit coupling parameters on the photophysical properties of this complex are evidenced by comparison with Ru(ii) analogues. The complex [Ir(ppy)2()][PF6] is shown to exhibit relatively high two-photon absorption efficiencies for the lowest energy MLCT electronic transitions with two-photon absorption cross sections that range from 50 to 80 Goeppert-Mayer units between 750 to 800 nm. Quantum yields for the complex were measured up to 23% and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant, KSV was determined to be 40 bar(-1) in acetonitrile solution, confirming the high efficiency of the complex as a triplet oxygen sensitiser. Preliminary in vitro experiments with C6 Glioma cells treated with [Ir(ppy)2()][PF6], show that the complex is an efficient sensitizer for triplet oxygen, producing cytotoxic singlet oxygen ((1)O2) by two-photon excitation at 740 nm resulting in photodynamic effects that lead to localised cell damage and death.

  10. Continuous-variable quantum teleportation with non-Gaussian entangled states generated via multiple-photon subtraction and addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Hou, Li-Li; Chen, Xian-Feng; Xu, Xue-Fen

    2015-06-01

    We theoretically analyze the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) correlation, the quadrature squeezing, and the continuous-variable quantum teleportation when considering non-Gaussian entangled states generated by applying multiple-photon subtraction and multiple-photon addition to a two-mode squeezed vacuum state (TMSVs). Our results indicate that in the case of the multiple-photon-subtracted TMSVs with symmetric operations, the corresponding EPR correlation, the two-mode squeezing degree, the sum squeezing, and the fidelity of teleporting a coherent state or a squeezed vacuum state can be enhanced for any squeezing parameter r and these enhancements increase with the number of subtracted photons in the low-squeezing regime, while asymmetric multiple-photon subtractions will generally reduce these quantities. For the multiple-photon-added TMSVs, although it holds stronger entanglement, its EPR correlation, two-mode squeezing, sum squeezing, and the fidelity of a coherent state are always smaller than that of the TMSVs. Only when considering the case of teleporting a squeezed vacuum state does the symmetric photon addition make somewhat of an improvement in the fidelity for large-squeezing parameters. In addition, we analytically prove that a one-mode multiple-photon-subtracted TMSVs is equivalent to that of the one-mode multiple-photon-added one. And one-mode multiple-photon operations will diminish the above four quantities for any squeezing parameter r .

  11. Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Action Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies of Triethyl Phosphate Complexes: Effects of Protonation and Sodium Cationization on Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fales, B. S.; Fujamade, N. O.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2011-10-01

    The gas-phase structures of protonated and sodium cationized complexes of triethyl phosphate, [TEP + H]+ and [TEP + Na]+, are examined via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy using tunable IR radiation generated by a free electron laser, a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with an electrospray ionization source, and theoretical electronic structure calculations. Measured IRMPD action spectra are compared to linear IR spectra calculated at the B3LYP/6-31 G(d,p) level of theory to identify the structures accessed in the experimental studies. For comparison, theoretical studies of neutral TEP are also performed. Sodium cationization and protonation produce changes in the central phosphate geometry, including an increase in the alkoxy ∠OPO bond angle and shortening of the alkoxy P-O bond. Changes associated with protonation are more pronounced than those produced by sodium cationization.

  12. Excitation and dissociation of molecules by femtosecond IR laser radiation in the gas phase and on dielectric surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kompanets, V O; Laptev, Vladimir B; Makarov, Aleksandr A; Pigulskii, S V; Ryabov, Evgenii A; Chekalin, Sergei V

    2013-04-30

    This paper presents an overview of early studies and new experimental data on the effect of near-IR (0.8-1.8 {mu}m) and mid-IR (3.3-5.8 {mu}m) intense femtosecond (130-350 fs) laser pulses on polyatomic molecules in the gas phase and on the surface of substrates. We examine the vibrational dynamics of nine molecules containing a C=O chromophore group, which are initiated by resonance femtosecond IR laser radiation at a wavelength of {approx}5 {mu}m, and report measured characteristic times of intramolecular vibrational redistribution. The characteristic time of molecules containing a single C=O group lies in the range 2.4-20 ps and that of the Fe(CO){sub 5} and Cr(CO){sub 6} molecules lies in the nanosecond range ({approx}1.0 and {approx}1.5 ns, respectively). Carbon structures have been observed for the first time to result from the decomposition of (CF{sub 3}){sub 2}CCO molecules on the surface of metal fluorides under the effect of femtosecond IR laser radiation in the wavelength range 3.3-5.4 {mu}m with no gas-phase decomposition of the molecules. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  13. The near-IR spectrum of NO(X˜ 2Π )-Ne detected through excitation into the Östate continuum: A joint experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłos, J.; Zhang, S. G.; Meyer, H.

    2016-03-01

    We present new measurements of the near IR spectrum of NO-Ne in the region of the first NO overtone transition. The IR absorption is detected by exciting the vibrationally excited complex to the A ˜ -state dissociation continuum. The resulting NO(A) fragment is subsequently ionized in the same laser pulse. Spectra of the two lowest bands, A and B, are recorded. The spectra are compared with calculated spectra based on bound states derived from a new set of high level ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs). For the calculation, the PESs are used with either fixed NO intermolecular distance or averaged for the vibrational states of NO (X ˜ , v = 0 or 2). Spectra based on the new PESs reproduce the experimental spectra better than theoretical spectra based on the older PESs of M. H. Alexander et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 5588 (2001)]. Especially, spectra based on the two different vibrationally averaged PESs show a marked improvement in comparison to the one based on the fixed internuclear NO-distance. A fitted set of spectroscopic constants allows to reproduce most of the finer details of the measured spectra. Monitoring simultaneously the NO fragment ion and the parent ion channels while scanning the UV wavelength through the NO A-X hot-band region enabled us to confirm the NO-Ne A ˜ -state dissociation limit of 44233 ± 5 cm-1. These measurements also confirm the absence of a structured NO-Ne spectrum involving the A ˜ -state.

  14. Vortexlike excitations in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn5

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yongkang; Rosa, P. F. S.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.

    2016-05-05

    Here, we report a systematic study of temperature- and field-dependent charge (ρ) and entropy (S) transport in the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn5. Its large positive thermopower Sxx is typical of Ce-based Kondo lattice systems, and strong electronic correlations play an important role in enhancing the Nernst signal Sxy. By separating the off-diagonal Peltier coefficient αxy from Sxy, we find that αxy becomes positive and greatly enhanced at temperatures well above the bulk Tc. Compared with the nonmagnetic analog LaIrIn5, these results suggest vortexlike excitations in a precursor state to unconventional superconductivity in CeIrIn5. This study sheds light on the similarity of heavy-fermion and cuprate superconductors and on the possibility of states not characterized by the amplitude of an order parameter.

  15. IR/UV spectroscopy on jet cooled 3-hydroxyflavone (H2O)n (n=1,2) clusters along proton transfer coordinates in the electronic ground and excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, K.; Funk, A.; Gerhards, M.

    2008-12-01

    The structure and reactivity of isolated 3-hydroxyflavone (3-HF) aggregates with one and two water molecules has been investigated by applying combined infrared/ultraviolet (IR/UV) spectroscopy in a supersonic jet both for the electronic ground and excited states. In combination with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the IR spectra of the S0 states recorded from the upper fingerprint region to the OH stretching vibrations are assigned to the most stable isomers of the clusters. For the first electronically excited (ππ∗) state of the 3-HF(H2O)2 cluster structural information are obtained from the IR spectra in combination with time-dependent-DFT (TD-DFT) calculations. No proton transfer structure is observed in the case of a low excess energy within the electronically excited state. By raising the excitation energy, additional bands appear that can be assigned to a tautomeric form indicating the induction of a proton transfer reaction.

  16. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  17. Electronic excitations and structure of Li{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} thin films grown on ZrO{sub 2}:Y (001) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Jenderka, Marcus Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius; Lorenz, Michael

    2015-01-14

    Thin films are a prerequisite for application of the emergent exotic ground states in iridates that result from the interplay of strong spin-orbit coupling and electronic correlations. We report on pulsed laser deposition of Li{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} films on ZrO{sub 2}:Y (001) single crystalline substrates. X-ray diffraction confirms preferential (001) and (10-1) out-of-plane crystalline orientations with well defined in-plane orientation. Resistivity between 35 and 300 K is dominated by a three-dimensional variable range hopping mechanism. The dielectric function is determined by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and, complemented by Fourier transform infrared transmission spectroscopy, reveals a small optical gap of ≈300 meV, a splitting of the 5d-t{sub 2g} manifold, and several in-gap excitations attributed to phonons and possibly magnons.

  18. Tritium removal from contaminated water via infrared laser multiple-photon dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J.L.; Magnotta, F.; Herman, I.P.; Aldridge, F.T.; Hsiao, P.

    1983-01-01

    Isotope separation by means of infrared-laser multiple-photon dissociation offers an efficient way to recover tritium from contaminated light or heavy water found in fission and fusion reactors. For tritium recovery from heavy water, chemical exchange of tritium into deuterated chloroform is followed by selective laser dissociation of tritiated chloroform and removal of the tritiated photoproduct, TCl. The single-step separation factor is at least 2700 and is probably greater than 5000. Here we present a description of the tritium recovery process, along with recent accomplishments in photochemical studies and engineering analysis of a recovery system.

  19. Non-linear effects of QED multiple-photon processes on cyclotron spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.

    1992-01-01

    The relativistic magnetic resonant multiple-photon processes are discussed up to order alpha(f)exp 2, in particular two-photon scattering and two-photon emission. The latter also contributes to the opacity and photon production, although more weakly than the scattering. These processes are nonlinear in the radiation field, and therefore the transfer depends sensitively on the cross sections. We show model spectra including three cyclotron harmonics for the accreting pulsar Her X-1 and the gamma-ray burster GB880205. The lines are highly polarized, and their depth is sensitive to the polarization treatment.

  20. Infrared spectroscopy of hydrated alkali metal cations: Evidence of multiple photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jordan P.; Lisy, James M.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared predissociation spectra of M+(H2O)4-7, where M = alkali metal, are presented. Hydrogen bonding O-H stretching features are strongly dependent on which fragmentation channel is monitored. Spectra recorded by monitoring the loss of multiple waters show a preference for one absorption feature in the hydrogen-bonded region centered at ˜3430-3500 cm-1, which is assigned to linear-type hydrogen bonded OH stretches. Cyclic- and bent-type hydrogen bonded OH stretches have diminished photodissociation cross sections in the multiple ligand loss channels. Evidence from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus-evaporative ensemble calculations and laser fluence dependence experiments indicates that the multiple water loss channels are primarily the result of multiple photon absorption which we propose could be due to multiple, independent oscillators within a cluster ion each absorbing a photon during a single, 10 ns laser pulse.

  1. Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Action Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies of Diethyl Phosphate Complexes: Effects of Protonation and Sodium Cationization on Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fales, B. S.; Fujamade, N. O.; Nei, Y.-W.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of deprotonated, protonated, and sodium-cationized complexes of diethyl phosphate (DEP) including [DEP - H]-, [DEP + H]+, [DEP + Na]+, and [DEP - H + 2Na]+ are examined via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy using tunable IR radiation generated by a free electron laser, a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source, and theoretical electronic structure calculations. Measured IRMPD spectra are compared to linear IR spectra calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory to identify the structures accessed in the experimental studies. For comparison, theoretical studies of neutral complexes are also performed. These experiments and calculations suggest that specific geometric changes occur upon the binding of protons and/or sodium cations, including changes correlating to nucleic acid backbone geometry, specifically P-O bond lengths and ∠OPO bond angles. Information from these observations may be used to gain insight into the structures of more complex systems, such as nucleotides and solvated nucleic acids.

  2. Molecular structures and excited states of CpM(CO)(2) (Cp = eta(5)-C(5)H(5); M = Rh, Ir) and [Cl(2)Rh(CO)(2)](-). Theoretical evidence for a competitive charge transfer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenming; Boyd, Russell J; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2002-03-20

    Molecular structures and excited states of CpM(CO)(2) (Cp = eta(5)-C(5)H(5); M = Rh, Ir) and [Cl(2)Rh(CO)(2)](-) complexes have been investigated using the B3LYP and the symmetry-adapted cluster (SAC)/SAC-configuration interaction (SAC-CI) theoretical methods. All the dicarbonyl complexes have singlet ground electronic states with large singlet-triplet separations. Thermal dissociations of CO from the parent dicarbonyls are energetically unfavorable. CO thermal dissociation is an activation process for [Cl(2)Rh(CO)(2)](-) while it is a repulsive potential for CpM(CO)(2). The natures of the main excited states of CpM(CO)(2) and [Cl(2)Rh(CO)(2)](-) are found to be quite different. For [Cl(2)Rh(CO)(2)](-), all the strong transitions are identified to be metal to ligand CO charge transfer (MLCT) excitations. A significant feature of the excited states of CpM(CO)(2) is that both MLCT excitation and a ligand Cp to metal and CO charge transfer excitation are strongly mixed in the higher energy states with the latter having the largest oscillator strength. A competitive charge transfer excited state has therefore been identified theoretically for CpRh(CO)(2) and CpIr(CO)(2). The wavelength dependence of the quantum efficiencies for the photoreactions of CpM(CO)(2) reported by Lees et al. can be explained by the existence of two different types of excited states. The origin of the low quantum efficiencies for the C-H/S-H bond activations of CpM(CO)(2) can be attributed to the smaller proportion of the MLCT excitation in the higher energy states.

  3. Herschel-PACS Observations of Far-IR CO Line Emission in NGC 1068: Highly Excited Molecular Gas in the Circumnuclear Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Sturm, E.; Fischer, J.; Sternberg, A.; Graciá-Carpio, J.; Davies, R.; González-Alfonso, E.; Mark, D.; Poglitsch, A.; Contursi, A.; Genzel, R.; Lutz, D.; Tacconi, L.; Veilleux, S.; Verma, A.; de Jong, J. A.

    2012-08-01

    We report the detection of far-IR CO rotational emission from the prototypical Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068. Using Herschel-PACS, we have detected 11 transitions in the J upper = 14-30 (E upper/kB = 580-2565 K) range, all of which are consistent with arising from within the central 10'' (700 pc). The detected transitions are modeled as arising from two different components: a moderate-excitation (ME) component close to the galaxy systemic velocity and a high-excitation (HE) component that is blueshifted by ~80 km s-1. We employ a large velocity gradient model and derive n H2 ~ 105.6 cm-3, T kin ~ 170 K, and M H2 ~ 106.7 M ⊙ for the ME component and n H2 ~ 106.4 cm-3, T kin ~ 570 K, and M H2 ~ 105.6 M ⊙ for the HE component, although for both components the uncertainties in the density and mass are ±(0.6-0.9) dex. Both components arise from denser and possibly warmer gas than traced by low-J CO transitions, and the ME component likely makes a significant contribution to the mass budget in the nuclear region. We compare the CO line profiles with those of other molecular tracers observed at higher spatial and spectral resolution and find that the ME transitions are consistent with these lines arising in the ~200 pc diameter ring of material traced by H2 1-0 S(1) observations. The blueshift of the HE lines may also be consistent with the bluest regions of this H2 ring, but a better kinematic match is found with a clump of infalling gas ~40 pc north of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). We consider potential heating mechanisms and conclude that X-ray- or shock heating of both components is viable, while far-UV heating is unlikely. We discuss the prospects of placing the HE component near the AGN and conclude that while the moderate thermal pressure precludes an association with the ~1 pc radius H2O maser disk, the HE component could potentially be located only a few parsecs more distant from the AGN and might then provide the N H ~ 1025 cm-2 column obscuring the

  4. Infrared Multiple-Photon Dissociation spectroscopy of group II metal complexes with salicylate

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan P. Dain; Gary Gresham; Gary S. Groenewold; Jeffrey D. Steill; Jos Oomens; Michael J. van Stipdonk

    2011-07-01

    Ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation, and the combination of infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to characterize singly-charged, 1:1 complexes of Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ with salicylate. For each metal-salicylate complex, the CID pathways are: (a) elimination of CO2 and (b) formation of [MOH]+ where M=Ca2+, Sr2+ or Ba2+. DFT calculations predict three minima for the cation-salicylate complexes which differ in the mode of metal binding. In the first, the metal ion is coordinated by O atoms of the (neutral) phenol and carboxylate groups of salicylate. In the second, the cation is coordinated by phenoxide and (neutral) carboxylic acid groups. The third mode involves coordination by the carboxylate group alone. The infrared spectrum for the metal-salicylate complexes contains a number of absorptions between 1000 – 1650 cm-1, and the best correlation between theoretical and experimental spectra for the structure that features coordination of the metal ion by phenoxide and the carbonyl group of the carboxylic acid group, consistent with calculated energies for the respective species.

  5. Identification of the Excited-State C═C and C═O Modes of trans-β-Apo-8'-carotenal with Transient 2D-IR-EXSY and Femtosecond Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Ragnoni, Elena; Lapini, Andrea; Kardaś, Tomasz M; Ratajska-Gadomska, Boźena; Foggi, Paolo; Righini, Roberto

    2015-05-07

    Assigning the vibrational modes of molecules in the electronic excited state is often a difficult task. Here we show that combining two nonlinear spectroscopic techniques, transient 2D exchange infrared spectroscopy (T2D-IR-EXSY) and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS), the contribution of the C═C and C═O modes in the excited-state vibrational spectra of trans-β-apo-8'-carotenal can be unambiguously identified. The experimental results reported in this work confirm a previously proposed assignment based on quantum-chemical calculations and further strengthen the role of an excited state with charge-transfer character in the relaxation pathway of carbonyl carotenoids. On a more general ground, our results highlight the potentiality of nonlinear spectroscopic methods based on the combined use of visible and infrared pulses to correlate structural and electronic changes in photoexcited molecules.

  6. Excited-state characters and dynamics of [W(CO)(5)(4-cyanopyridine)] and [W(CO)(5)(piperidine)] studied by picosecond time-resolved IR and resonance Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations: roles of W --> L and W --> CO MLCT and LF excited states revised.

    PubMed

    Zális, Stanislav; Busby, Michael; Kotrba, Tomás; Matousek, Pavel; Towrie, Mike; Vlcek, Antonín

    2004-03-08

    The characters, dynamics, and relaxation pathways of low-lying excited states of the complexes [W(CO)(5)L] [L = 4-cyanopyridine (pyCN) and piperidine (pip)] were investigated using theoretical and spectroscopic methods. DFT calculations revealed the delocalized character of chemically and spectroscopicaly relevant molecular orbitals and the presence of a low-lying manifold of CO pi-based unoccupied molecular orbitals. Traditional ligand-field arguments are not applicable. The lowest excited states of [W(CO)(5)(pyCN)] are W --> pyCN MLCT in character. They are closely followed in energy by W --> CO MLCT states. Excitation at 400 or 500 nm populates the (3)MLCT(pyCN) excited state, which was characterized by picosecond time-resolved IR and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Excited-state vibrations were assigned using DFT calculations. The (3)MLCT(pyCN) excited state is initially formed highly excited in low-frequency vibrations which cool with time constants between 1 and 20 ps, depending on the excitation wavelength, solvent, and particular high-frequency nu(CO) or nu(CN) mode. The lowest excited states of [W(CO)(5)(pip)] are W --> CO MLCT, as revealed by TD-DFT interpretation of a nanosecond time-resolved IR spectrum that was measured earlier in a low-temperature glass (Johnson, F. P. A.; George, M. W.; Morrison, S. L.; Turner, J. J. J. Chem. Soc., Chem. Commun. 1995, 391-393). MLCT(CO) excitation involves transfer of electron density from the W atom and, to a lesser extent, the trans CO to the pi orbitals of the four cis CO ligands. Optical excitation into MLCT(CO) transition of either complex in fluid solution triggers femtosecond dissociation of a W-N bond, producing [W(CO)(5)(solvent)]. It is initially vibrationally excited both in nu(CO) and anharmonicaly coupled low-frequency modes. Vibrational cooling occurs with time constants of 16-22 ps while the intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution from the v = 1 nu(CO) modes is much slower, 160-220 ps. No LF

  7. Structure Determination of Ornithine-Linked Cisplatin by Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Action Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chenchen; Kimutai, Bett; Hamlow, Lucas; Roy, Harrison; Nei, Y.-W.; Bao, Xun; Gao, Juehan; Martens, Jonathan K.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Maitre, Philippe; Steinmetz, Vincent; McNary, Christopher P.; Armentrout, Peter B.; Chow, C. S.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    Cisplatin [(NH_3)_2PtCl_2], the first FDA-approved platinum-based anticancer drug, has been widely used in cancer chemotherapy. Its pharmacological mechanism has been identified as its ability to coordinate to genomic DNA with guanine as its major target. Amino acid-linked cisplatin derivatives are being investigated as alternatives for cisplatin that may exhibit altered binding selectivity such as that found for ornithine-linked cisplatin (Ornplatin, [(Orn)PtCl_2]), which exhibits a preference for adenine over guanine in RNA. Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments and complementary electronic structure calculations are performed on a series of Ornplatin complexes to elucidate the nature of binding of the Orn amino acid to the Pt center and how that binding is influenced by the local environment. The complexes examined in the work include: [(Orn-H)PtCl_2]-, [(Orn)PtCl]+, [(Orn)Pt(H_2O)Cl]+, and [(Orn)PtCl_2+Na]+. In contrast to that found previously for the glycine-linked cisplatin complex (Glyplatin), which binds via the backbone amino and carboxylate groups, binding of Orn in these complexes is found to involve both the backbone and sidechain amino groups. Extensive broadening of the IRMPD spectrum for the [(Orn)Pt(H_2O)Cl]+ complex suggests that either multiple structures are contributing to the measured spectrum or strong intra-molecular hydrogen-binding interactions are present. The results for Ornplatin lead to an interesting discussion about the differences in selectivity and reactivity versus cisplatin.

  8. Structure Determination of Cisplatin-Amino Acid Analogues by Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Action Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chenchen; Bao, Xun; Zhu, Yanlong; Strobehn, Stephen; Kimutai, Bett; Nei, Y.-W.; Chow, C. S.; Rodgers, M. T.; Gao, Juehan; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    To gain a better understanding of the binding mechanism and assist in the optimization of relevant drug and chemical probe design, both experimental and theoretical studies were performed on a series of amino acid-linked cisplatin derivatives, including glycine-, lysine-, and ornithine-linked cisplatin, Gplatin, Kplatin, and Oplatin, respectively. Cisplatin, the first FDA-approved platinum-based anticancer drug, has been widely used in cancer chemotherapy. Its pharmacological mechanism has been identified as its ability to coordinate to genomic DNA, and guanine is its major target. In previous reports, cisplatin was successfully utilized as a chemical probe to detect solvent accessible sites in ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Among the amino-acid-linked cisplatin derivatives, Oplatin exhibits preference for adenine over guanine. The mechanism behind its different selectivity compared to cisplatin may relate to its potential of forming a hydrogen bond between the carboxylate group in Pt (II) complex and the 6-amino moiety of adenosine stabilizes A-Oplatin products. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis also indicates that different coordination sites of Oplatin on adenosine affect glycosidic bond stability. Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments were performed on all three amino acid-linked cisplatin to characterize their structures. An extensive theoretical study has been performed on Gplatin to guide the selection of the most effective theory and basis set based on its geometric information. The results for Gplatin provide the foundation for characterization of the more complex amino acid-linked cisplatin derivatives, Oplatin and Kplatin. Structural and energetic information elucidated for these compounds, particularly Oplatin reveal the reason for its alternative selectivity compared to cisplatin.

  9. Differentiation of closely related isomers: application of data mining techniques in conjunction with variable wavelength infrared multiple photon dissociation mass spectrometry for identification of glucose-containing disaccharide ions.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Sarah E; Ehsan, Mohammad; Pearson, Wright L; Aksenov, Alexander; Boginski, Vladimir; Bendiak, Brad; Eyler, John R

    2011-11-15

    Data mining algorithms have been used to analyze the infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) patterns of gas-phase lithiated disaccharide isomers irradiated with either a line-tunable CO(2) laser or a free electron laser (FEL). The IR fragmentation patterns over the wavelength range of 9.2-10.6 μm have been shown in earlier work to correlate uniquely with the asymmetry at the anomeric carbon in each disaccharide. Application of data mining approaches for data analysis allowed unambiguous determination of the anomeric carbon configurations for each disaccharide isomer pair using fragmentation data at a single wavelength. In addition, the linkage positions were easily assigned. This combination of wavelength-selective IRMPD and data mining offers a powerful and convenient tool for differentiation of structurally closely related isomers, including those of gas-phase carbohydrate complexes.

  10. Simulation of multi-photon emission isotopes using time-resolved SimSET multiple photon history generator

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Hsin-Hon; Lin, Chang-Shiun; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Jan, Meei-Ling

    2015-07-01

    Abstract-Multiple-photon emitters, such as In-111 or Se-75, have enormous potential in the field of nuclear medicine imaging. For example, Se-75 can be used to investigate the bile acid malabsorption and measure the bile acid pool loss. The simulation system for emission tomography (SimSET) is a well-known Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) code in nuclear medicine for its high computational efficiency. However, current SimSET cannot simulate these isotopes due to the lack of modeling of complex decay scheme and the time-dependent decay process. To extend the versatility of SimSET for simulation of those multi-photon emission isotopes, a time-resolved multiple photon history generator based on SimSET codes is developed in present study. For developing the time-resolved SimSET (trSimSET) with radionuclide decay process, the new MCS model introduce new features, including decay time information and photon time-of-flight information, into this new code. The half-life of energy states were tabulated from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) database. The MCS results indicate that the overall percent difference is less than 8.5% for all simulation trials as compared to GATE. To sum up, we demonstrated that time-resolved SimSET multiple photon history generator can have comparable accuracy with GATE and keeping better computational efficiency. The new MCS code is very useful to study the multi-photon imaging of novel isotopes that needs the simulation of lifetime and the time-of-fight measurements. (authors)

  11. Vibrational Signatures of Isomeric Lithiated N-acetyl-D-hexosamines by Gas-Phase Infrared Multiple-Photon Dissociation (IRMPD) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yanglan; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Jinfeng; Li, Pengfei; Stedwell, Corey N.; Yu, Long; Polfer, Nicolas C.

    2017-03-01

    Three lithiated N-acetyl-D-hexosamine (HexNAc) isomers, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), and N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc) are investigated as model monosaccharide derivatives by gas-phase infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. The hydrogen stretching region, which is attributed to OH and NH stretching modes, reveals some distinguishing spectral features of the lithium-adducted complexes that are useful in terms of differentiating these isomers. In order to understand the effect of lithium coordination on saccharide structure, and therefore anomericity, chair configuration, and hydrogen bonding networks, the conformational preferences of lithiated GlcNAc, GalNAc, and ManNAc are studied by comparing the experimental measurements with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The experimental results of lithiated GlcNAc and GalNAc show a good match to the theoretical spectra of low-energy structures adopting a 4 C 1 chair conformation, consistent with this motif being the dominant conformation in condensed-phase monosaccharides. The epimerization effect upon going to lithiated ManNAc is significant, as in this case the 1 C 4 chair conformers give a more compelling match with the experimental results, consistent with their lower calculated energies. A contrasting computational study of these monosaccharides in their neutral form suggests that the lithium cation coordination with Lewis base oxygens can play a key role in favoring particular structural motifs (e.g., a 4 C 1 versus 1 C 4 ) and disrupting hydrogen bond networks, thus exhibiting specific IR spectral features between these closely related lithium-chelated complexes.

  12. Vibrational Signatures of Isomeric Lithiated N-acetyl-D-hexosamines by Gas-Phase Infrared Multiple-Photon Dissociation (IRMPD) Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yanglan; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Jinfeng; Li, Pengfei; Stedwell, Corey N.; Yu, Long; Polfer, Nicolas C.

    2017-01-01

    Three lithiated N-acetyl-D-hexosamine (HexNAc) isomers, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc), N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc), and N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc) are investigated as model monosaccharide derivatives by gas-phase infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. The hydrogen stretching region, which is attributed to OH and NH stretching modes, reveals some distinguishing spectral features of the lithium-adducted complexes that are useful in terms of differentiating these isomers. In order to understand the effect of lithium coordination on saccharide structure, and therefore anomericity, chair configuration, and hydrogen bonding networks, the conformational preferences of lithiated GlcNAc, GalNAc, and ManNAc are studied by comparing the experimental measurements with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The experimental results of lithiated GlcNAc and GalNAc show a good match to the theoretical spectra of low-energy structures adopting a 4 C 1 chair conformation, consistent with this motif being the dominant conformation in condensed-phase monosaccharides. The epimerization effect upon going to lithiated ManNAc is significant, as in this case the 1 C 4 chair conformers give a more compelling match with the experimental results, consistent with their lower calculated energies. A contrasting computational study of these monosaccharides in their neutral form suggests that the lithium cation coordination with Lewis base oxygens can play a key role in favoring particular structural motifs (e.g., a 4 C 1 versus 1 C 4 ) and disrupting hydrogen bond networks, thus exhibiting specific IR spectral features between these closely related lithium-chelated complexes.

  13. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO{sub 2}: The effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M.; Powell, Amber L.; Mitchell, Deborah G.; Sevy, Eric T.

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO{sub 2} and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm{sup −1}) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E′ = ∼41 000 cm{sup −1} was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S{sub 1}→S{sub 0}*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO{sub 2} via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO{sub 2} using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO{sub 2} were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E′), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E′) was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E′) and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E′) and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E′). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  14. Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) cationized serine complexes: infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy and density functional theory investigations.

    PubMed

    Coates, Rebecca A; Boles, Georgia C; McNary, Christopher P; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Armentrout, P B

    2016-08-10

    The gas-phase structures of zinc and cadmium dications bound to serine (Ser) are investigated by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy using the free electron laser FELIX, in combination with ab initio calculations. To identify the structures of the experimentally observed species, [Zn(Ser-H)CH3CN](+) and CdCl(+)(Ser), the measured action spectra are compared to linear absorption spectra calculated at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level for Zn(2+) containing complexes and B3LYP/def2-TZVP levels for Cd(2+) containing complexes. Good agreement between the observed IRMPD spectra and the predicted spectra allows identification of the isomers present. The intact amino acid interacting with cadmium chloride adopts a tridentate chelation involving the amino acid backbone amine and carbonyl groups as well as the hydroxyl group of the side-chain, [N,CO,OH]. The presence of two low-energy conformers is observed for the deprotonated serine-zinc complex, with the same tridentate coordination as for the cadmium complex but proton loss occurs at both the hydroxyl side-chain, [N,CO,O(-)], and the carboxylic acid of the amino acid backbone, [N,CO(-),OH]. These results are profitably compared with the analogous results previously obtained for comparable complexes with cysteine.

  15. Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy of a Gas-Phase Oxo-Molybdenum Complex with 1,2-Dithiolene Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) in the negative ion mode was used to create anionic, gas-phase oxo-molybdenum complexes with dithiolene ligands. By varying ESI and ion transfer conditions, both doubly and singly charged forms of the complex, with identical formulas, could be observed. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the dianion generated exclusively the monoanion, while fragmentation of the monoanion involved decomposition of the dithiolene ligands. The intrinsic structure of the monoanion and the dianion were determined by using wavelength-selective infrared multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The IRMPD spectrum for the dianion exhibits absorptions that can be assigned to (ligand) C=C, C–S, C—C≡N, and Mo=O stretches. Comparison of the IRMPD spectrum to spectra predicted for various possible conformations allows assignment of a pseudo square pyramidal structure with C2v symmetry, equatorial coordination of MoO2+ by the S atoms of the dithiolene ligands, and a singlet spin state. A single absorption was observed for the oxidized complex. When the same scaling factor employed for the dianion is used for the oxidized version, theoretical spectra suggest that the absorption is the Mo=O stretch for a distorted square pyramidal structure and doublet spin state. A predicted change in conformation upon oxidation of the dianion is consistent with a proposed bonding scheme for the bent-metallocene dithiolene compounds [Lauher, J. W.; Hoffmann, R. J. Am. Chem. Soc.1976, 98, 1729−1742], where a large folding of the dithiolene moiety along the S···S vector is dependent on the occupancy of the in-plane metal d-orbital. PMID:24988369

  16. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of cationized asparagine: effects of metal cation size on gas-phase conformation.

    PubMed

    Heaton, A L; Bowman, V N; Oomens, J; Steill, J D; Armentrout, P B

    2009-05-14

    Gas-phase structures of cationized asparagine (Asn) including complexes with Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), Cs(+), and Ba(2+), as well as protonated Asn, are examined by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser. Experimental spectra for the alkali metal cation complexes exhibit systematic trends, whereas spectra for Ba(2+)(Asn) and H(+)(Asn) are more distinct. To identify the structures formed experimentally, measured IRMPD spectra are compared to spectra calculated at a B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level with several effective core potentials and basis sets evaluated for the heavy metal systems. The dominant conformation ascertained for complexes with the smaller metal cations, Li(+)(Asn) and Na(+)(Asn), is a charge-solvated, tridentate [N,CO,CO] structure that binds the metal cation with the amine group of the amino acid backbone and to the carbonyl oxygen atoms of the backbone and amino acid side chain. For the larger alkali metal cation complexes, K(+)(Asn), Rb(+)(Asn), and Cs(+)(Asn), an additional charge-solvated, tridentate [COOH,CO] structure that binds the metal cation with the two oxygen atoms of the backbone carboxylic acid group and the carbonyl oxygen atom of the Asn side chain may also be present. The Ba(2+)(Asn) spectrum is characteristic of a single charge-solvated [N,CO,CO] conformation, in contrast to Gly, Trp, Arg, Gln, Pro, Ser, Val, and Glu, which all take on a zwitterionic structure when complexed to Ba(2+). In no case do the cationized Asn complexes show definitive evidence of forming a zwitterionic structure in the complexes studied here. For H(+)(Asn), a mixture of two [N,CO] structures, which differ only in the orientation the side chain and are calculated to be nearly identical in energy, explains the experimental spectrum well.

  17. Pulsed IR inductive lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed inductive discharge is a new alternative method of pumping active gas laser media. The work presents results of experimental investigations of near, mid, and far IR inductive gas lasers (H2, HF, and CO2) operating at different transitions of atoms and molecules with different mechanisms of formation of inversion population. The excitation systems of a pulsed inductive cylindrical discharge (pulsed inductively coupled plasma) and pulsed RF inductive discharge in the gases are developed. Various gas mixtures including H2, N2, He, Ne, F2, NF3, and SF6 are used. Characteristics of near IR H2 laser radiation are investigated. Maximal pulse peak power of 7 kW is achieved. The possibility of using a pulsed inductive discharge as a new method of pumping HF laser active medium is demonstrated. The pulsed RF inductive CO2 laser is created and a total efficiency of 17% is achieved.

  18. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of cationized histidine: effects of metal cation size on gas-phase conformation.

    PubMed

    Citir, Murat; Hinton, Christopher S; Oomens, Jos; Steill, Jeffrey D; Armentrout, P B

    2012-02-16

    The gas phase structures of cationized histidine (His), including complexes with Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+), are examined by infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser, in conjunction with quantum chemical calculations. To identify the structures present in the experimental studies, measured IRMPD spectra are compared to spectra calculated at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) (Li(+), Na(+), and K(+) complexes) and B3LYP/HW*/6-311+G(d,p) (Rb(+) and Cs(+) complexes) levels of theory, where HW* indicates that the Hay-Wadt effective core potential with additional polarization functions was used on the metals. Single point energy calculations were carried out at the B3LYP, B3P86, and MP2(full) levels using the 6-311+G(2d,2p) basis set. On the basis of these experiments and calculations, the only conformation that reproduces the IRMPD action spectra for the complexes of the smaller alkali metal cations, Li(+)(His) and Na(+)(His), is a charge-solvated, tridentate structure where the metal cation binds to the backbone carbonyl oxygen, backbone amino nitrogen, and nitrogen atom of the imidazole side chain, [CO,N(α),N(1)], in agreement with the predicted ground states of these complexes. Spectra of the larger alkali metal cation complexes, K(+)(His), Rb(+)(His), and Cs(+)(His), have very similar spectral features that are considerably more complex than the IRMPD spectra of Li(+)(His) and Na(+)(His). For these complexes, the bidentate [CO,N(1)] conformer in which the metal cation binds to the backbone carbonyl oxygen and nitrogen atom of the imidazole side chain is a dominant contributor, although features associated with the tridentate [CO,N(α),N(1)] conformer remain, and those for the [COOH] conformer are also clearly present. Theoretical results for Rb(+)(His) and Cs(+)(His) indicate that both [CO,N(1)] and [COOH] conformers are low-energy structures, with different levels of theory predicting different

  19. B-side electron transfer promoted by absorbance of multiple photons in Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 reaction centers

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.; Jackson, J.A.; Taguchi, A.K.W.; Woodbury, N.W.

    1999-06-03

    Femtosecond transient absorbance spectra of quinone-depleted Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26 reaction centers in the Q{sub X} transition region have been measured at 15 K under various excitation conditions. This study focuses on the excitation wavelength dependence and excitation intensity dependence of the formation of charge-separated states on the A- and B-side of the reaction center, judging from the bleaching of the 533 nm (B-side) and 544 nm (A-side) ground-state transitions of the reaction center bacteriopheophytins (H{sub A} and H{sub B}). Upon low-intensity selective excitation directly into the bacteriopheophytin Q{sub Y} transitions (near 760 nm), bleaching of both ground-state bacteriopheophytin Q{sub X} transitions appeared immediately, showing that initially either the A- or B-side bacteriopheophytin could be excited. However, both excited states ultimately resulted in P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} formation under these conditions. Low-intensity excitation at any of the various wavelengths showed no difference in the kinetics of the A-side charge separation forming P{sup +}H{sub A}{sup {minus}} and no substantial formation of the B-side charge-separated state, P{sup +}H{sub B}{sup {minus}}. In contrast, high-intensity 595 nm excitation resulted in substantial long-lived bleaching of the B-side bacteriopheophytin ground-state transition at 533 nm. This 533 nm bleaching was formed with essentially the same time constant as the bleaching at 544 nm due to A-side charge separation. Both bleaching bands persisted at the longest times measured in quinone-removed reaction centers. The long-lived bleaching at 533 nm using high-intensity excitation most likely represents the formation of P{sup +}H{sub B}{sup {minus}} with a relative yield of nearly 40%. One possible mechanism for B-side electron transfer is that two-photon excitation of the reaction center resulting in the state P{sup *}B{sub B}{sup *} makes P{sup +}B{sub B}{sup {minus}} thermodynamically

  20. INFRARED SPECTRUM OF POTASSIUM-CATIONIZED TRIETHYLPHOSPHATE GENERATED USING TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY AND INFRARED MULTIPLE PHOTON DISSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; Christopher M. Leavitt; Ryan P. Dain; Jos Oomens; Jeff Steill; van Stipdonk, Michael J.

    2009-09-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry and wavelength selective infrared photodissociation was used to generate an infrared spectrum of gas-phase triethylphosphate cationized by attachment of K+. Prominent absorptions were observed in the region of 900 to 1300 cm-1 that are characteristic of phosphate P=O and P-O-R stretches. The relative positions and intensities of the IR absorptions were reproduced well by density functional theory (DFT) calculations performed using the B3LYP functional and the 6-31+g(d), 6-311+g(d,p) and 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis sets. Because of good correspondence between experiment and theory for the cation, DFT was then used to generate a theoretical spectrum for neutral triethylphosphate, which in turn accurately reproduces the IR spectrum of the neat liquid when solvent effects are included in the calculations.

  1. Infrared spectrum of potassium-cationized triethylphosphate generated using tandem mass spectrometry and infrared multiple photon dissociation.

    PubMed

    Groenewold, Gary S; Leavitt, Christopher M; Dain, Ryan P; Oomens, Jos; Steill, Jeffrey D; van Stipdonk, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry and wavelength-selective infrared photodissociation were used to generate an infrared spectrum of gas-phase triethylphosphate cationized by attachment of K(+). Prominent absorptions were observed in the region of 900 to 1300 cm(-1) that are characteristic of phosphate P=O and P-O-R stretches. The relative positions and intensities of the IR absorptions were reproduced well by density functional theory (DFT) calculations performed using the B3LYP functional and the 6-31+G(d), 6-311+G(d,p) and 6-311++G(3df,2pd) basis sets. Because of good correspondence between experiment and theory for the cation, DFT was then used to generate a theoretical spectrum for neutral triethylphosphate, which in turn accurately reproduces the IR spectrum of the neat liquid when solvent effects are included in the calculations.

  2. IR Windstreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    This infrared image shows windstreaks in the region between Gordii Dorsum and Amazonis Mensa.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -15.8, Longitude 215 East (145 West). 97 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. From Ultrafast Structure Determination to Steering Reactions: Mixed IR/Non-IR Multidimensional Vibrational Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-09-28

    Ultrafast multidimensional infrared spectroscopy is a powerful method for resolving features of molecular structure and dynamics that are difficult or impossible to address with linear spectroscopy. Augmenting the IR pulse sequences by resonant or nonresonant UV, Vis, or NIR pulses considerably extends the range of application and creates techniques with possibilities far beyond a pure multidimensional IR experiment. These include surface-specific 2D-IR spectroscopy with sub-monolayer sensitivity, ultrafast structure determination in non-equilibrium systems, triggered exchange spectroscopy to correlate reactant and product bands, exploring the interplay of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom, investigation of interactions between Raman- and IR-active modes, imaging with chemical contrast, sub-ensemble-selective photochemistry, and even steering a reaction by selective IR excitation. We give an overview of useful mixed IR/non-IR pulse sequences, discuss their differences, and illustrate their application potential.

  4. Differentiation of Rubidiated Methyl-d-Glycoside Stereoisomers by Infrared Multiple-Photon Dissociation Spectroscopy in the O-H and C-H Stretching Regions.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Wright L; Contreras, Cesar; Powell, David; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Bendiak, Brad; Eyler, John R

    2015-10-15

    Four isomeric sugar methylglycosides (α- and β-d-gluco- and galactopyranosides) were evaluated as rubidium cation coordination adducts in the gas phase using variable-wavelength multiple-photon dissociation in the range from 2750 to 3750 cm(-1). The adducts dissociated following photon absorption to yield neutral sugars and the rubidium cation, resulting in infrared "action" spectra. Well-resolved hydroxyl stretching bands clearly differentiate stereoisomers that vary solely in their asymmetry at single carbons. Density functional theory calculations of the lowest-energy gas-phase complexes indicate that rubidium coordinates with lone pairs of oxygen atoms as either bi- or tridentate complexes and that more than one positional coordination isomer could adequately account for most of the O-H stretch frequencies observed for each methylglycoside.

  5. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    PubMed Central

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions. PMID:26733106

  6. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization.

    PubMed

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bharati; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H; Granitzka, Patrick W; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. Our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.

  7. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    DOE PAGES

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; ...

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset andmore » at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. As a result, our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.« less

  8. Indirect excitation of ultrafast demagnetization

    SciTech Connect

    Vodungbo, Boris; Tudu, Bahrati; Perron, Jonathan; Delaunay, Renaud; Müller, Leonard; Berntsen, Magnus H.; Grübel, Gerhard; Malinowski, Grégory; Weier, Christian; Gautier, Julien; Lambert, Guillaume; Zeitoun, Philippe; Gutt, Christian; Jal, Emmanuelle; Reid, Alexander H.; Granitzka, Patrick W.; Jaouen, Nicolas; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Mitra, Ankush; Carron, Sebastian; Pfau, Bastian; von Korff Schmising, Clemens; Schneider, Michael; Eisebitt, Stefan; Lüning, Jan

    2016-01-06

    Does the excitation of ultrafast magnetization require direct interaction between the photons of the optical pump pulse and the magnetic layer? Here, we demonstrate unambiguously that this is not the case. For this we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a ferromagnetic cobalt/palladium multilayer capped by an IR-opaque aluminum layer. Upon excitation with an intense femtosecond-short IR laser pulse, the film exhibits the classical ultrafast demagnetization phenomenon although only a negligible number of IR photons penetrate the aluminum layer. In comparison with an uncapped cobalt/palladium reference film, the initial demagnetization of the capped film occurs with a delayed onset and at a slower rate. Both observations are qualitatively in line with energy transport from the aluminum layer into the underlying magnetic film by the excited, hot electrons of the aluminum film. As a result, our data thus confirm recent theoretical predictions.

  9. Cryogenic exciter

    DOEpatents

    Bray, James William [Niskayuna, NY; Garces, Luis Jose [Niskayuna, NY

    2012-03-13

    The disclosed technology is a cryogenic static exciter. The cryogenic static exciter is connected to a synchronous electric machine that has a field winding. The synchronous electric machine is cooled via a refrigerator or cryogen like liquid nitrogen. The static exciter is in communication with the field winding and is operating at ambient temperature. The static exciter receives cooling from a refrigerator or cryogen source, which may also service the synchronous machine, to selected areas of the static exciter and the cooling selectively reduces the operating temperature of the selected areas of the static exciter.

  10. Hybrid quadrupole mass filter/quadrupole ion trap/time-of-flight-mass spectrometer for infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ions

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyuz, Kerim; Stedwell, Corey N.; Wang Da; Polfer, Nick C.

    2011-05-15

    We present a laboratory-constructed mass spectrometer optimized for recording infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra of mass-selected ions using a benchtop tunable infrared optical parametric oscillator/amplifier (OPO/A). The instrument is equipped with two ionization sources, an electrospray ionization source, as well as an electron ionization source for troubleshooting. This hybrid mass spectrometer is composed of a quadrupole mass filter for mass selection, a reduced pressure ({approx}10{sup -5} Torr) quadrupole ion trap (QIT) for OPO irradiation, and a reflectron time-of-flight drift tube for detecting the remaining precursor and photofragment ions. A helium gas pulse is introduced into the QIT to temporarily increase the pressure and hence enhance the trapping efficiency of axially injected ions. After a brief pump-down delay, the compact ion cloud is subjected to the focused output from the continuous wave OPO. In a recent study, we implemented this setup in the study of protonated tryptophan, TrpH{sup +}, as well as collision-induced dissociation products of this protonated amino acid [W. K. Mino, Jr., K. Gulyuz, D. Wang, C. N. Stedwell, and N. C. Polfer, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2, 299 (2011)]. Here, we give a more detailed account on the figures of merit of such IRMPD experiments. The appreciable photodissociation yields in these measurements demonstrate that IRMPD spectroscopy of covalently bound ions can be routinely carried out using benchtop OPO setups.

  11. Exciter switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  12. Gas-phase structures of Pb(2+)-cationized phenylalanine and glutamic acid determined by infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy and computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Burt, Michael B; Fridgen, Travis D

    2013-02-14

    Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy in the 3200-3800 cm(-1) region was used to determine the gas-phase structures of bare and monohydrated [Pb(Phe-H)](+) and [Pb(Glu-H)](+). These experiments were supported by infrared spectra calculated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory as well as 298 K enthalpies and Gibbs energies determined using the MP2(full)/6-311++G(2d,2p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) method. The gas-phase structure of [Pb(Phe-H)](+) has Pb(2+) bound in a tridentate fashion between Phe's amine nitrogen, one oxygen of the deprotonated carboxyl group, and the aromatic ring. The IRMPD spectrum of [Pb(Glu-H)](+) can be assigned to a structure where the side chain carboxyl group is deprotonated. The structure of [Pb(Phe-H)H(2)O](+) is simply the hydrated analogue of [Pb(Phe-H)](+) where water attaches to Pb(2+) in the same hemisphere as the ligated amino acid. The spectrum of [Pb(Glu-H)H(2)O](+) could not be assigned a unique structure. The IRMPD spectrum shows features attributed to symmetric and antisymmetric O-H stretching of water and a broad band characteristic of a hydrogen bonded O-H stretching vibration. These features can only be explained by the presence of at least two isomers and agree with the computational results that predict the four lowest energy structures to be within 6 kJ mol(-1) of one another.

  13. Exciting Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  14. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  15. Photochemical Tuning of Tris-Bidentate Acridine- and Phenazine-Based Ir(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Deraedt, Quentin; Loiseau, Frédérique; Elias, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    Five new Ir(III) complexes of the type [Ir(ppy)2L](+) (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine, L = bidentate N^N ligand) bearing linear and elbow-shaped acridine- and phenazine-based extended planar aromatic ligands have been successfully synthesized and characterized. The electrochemical and photochemical studies revealed that all complexes allow emission in the range 589-601 nm from excited states corresponding to a charge transfer between an Ir-ppy fragment and the extended planar ligand. Luminescence quenching occurs in water for [Ir(ppy)2dpac](+) (Ir-DPAC), [Ir(ppy)2dpacF2](+) (Ir-DPACF 2 ), [Ir(ppy)2dpacF4](+) (Ir-DPACF 4 ) and [Ir(ppy)2bdppz](+) (Ir-BDPPZ), while solely partial quenching is observed for [Ir(ppy)2npp](+) (Ir-NPP). This "light-switch" effect has been ascribed to the possible formation of a non-emissive mono-hydrogen-bonded excited state for the four complexes. The "elbow shaped" of Ir-NPP is believed to prevent the non-chelating nitrogen atom of the npp ligand to form H-bond with solvent molecules. The results emphasized the potential of small chemical modifications of the extended planar ligand on the properties of the corresponding Ir(III) complexes. Their tunable properties make them ideal candidates for applications such as DNA photoprobes.

  16. IR Linearity Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2012-10-01

    These observations will be used to monitor the signal non-linearity of the IR channel, as well as to update the IR channel non-linearity calibration reference file. The non-linearity behavior of each pixel in the detector will be investigated through the use of full frame and subarray flat fields, while the photometric behavior of point sources will be studied using observations of 47 Tuc. This is a continuation of the Cycle 19 non-linearity monitor, program 12696.

  17. IR linearity monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2013-10-01

    These observations will be used to monitor the signal non-linearity of the IR channel, as well as to update the IR channel non-linearity calibration reference file. The non-linearity behavior of each pixel in the detector will be investigated through the use of full frame and subarray flat fields, while the photometric behavior of point sources will be studied using observations of 47 Tuc. This is a continuation of the Cycle 20 non-linearity monitor, program 13079.

  18. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  19. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior.

  20. IR Gain Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2012-10-01

    The gain of the IR channel of WFC3 will be measured using a series of internal flat fields. Using knowledge gained from ground testing and previous cycles, we propose to collect flat field ramps which will be used to create photon transfer curves and give a measure of the gain.

  1. IR gain monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2013-10-01

    The gain of the IR channel of WFC3 will be measured using a series of internal flat fields. Using knowledge gained from ground testing and previous cycles, we propose to collect flat field ramps which will be used to create photon transfer curves and give a measure of the gain. This continues the strategy of last cycle's gain monitor, in proposal 13080.

  2. Studying the nonlinearity in Sonic IR NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiuye; Obeidat, Omar; Han, Xiaoyan

    2017-02-01

    Sonic IR Imaging combines pulsed ultrasound excitation and infrared imaging to detect defects in materials. The sound pulse causes rubbing due to non--unison motion between faces of defects, and infrared sensors image the temperature map over the target to identify defects. It works in various materials, including metal/metal alloy, ceramics, and composite materials. Its biggest advantage is that it's a fast, wide area NDE technique. It takes only a fraction of a second or a few seconds, depending on the thermal properties of the target, for one test over a few square feet. However, due to the nonlinearity in the coupling between the ultrasound transducer and the target, the repeatability has been an issue, which affects its application. In this paper, we present our study on this issue in Sonic IR.

  3. Defect States in Copper Indium Gallium Selenide Solar Cells from Two-Wavelength Excitation Photoluminescence Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Soren A.; Dippo, Patricia; Mansfield, Lorelle M.; Glynn, Stephen; Kuciauskas, Darius

    2016-11-21

    We use two-wavelength excitation photoluminescence spectroscopy to probe defect states in CIGS thin films. Above-Eg excitation is combined with a tunable IR bias light that modulates the population of the defect states. We find that IR illumination in the range of 1400-2000 nm (0.62-0.89 eV) causes a reduction of the PL intensity, the magnitude of which scales linearly with IR power. Further, KF post deposition treatment has only a modest influence on the effect of the IR excitation. Initial data suggest that we have developed an optical characterization tool for band-gap defect states.

  4. Luminescence properties of IR-emitting bismuth centres in SiO{sub 2}-based glasses in the UV to near-IR spectral region

    SciTech Connect

    Firstova, E G; Vel'miskin, V V; Firstov, S V; Dianov, E M; Bufetov, I A; Khopin, V F; Gur'yanov, A N; Bufetova, G A; Nishchev, K N

    2015-01-31

    We have studied UV excitation spectra of IR luminescence in bismuth-doped glasses of various compositions and obtained energy level diagrams of IR-emitting bismuth-related active centres (BACs) associated with silicon and germanium atoms up to ∼5.2 eV over the ground level. A possible energy level diagram of the BACs in phosphosilicate glass has been proposed. The UV excitation peaks for the IR luminescence of the BACs in the glasses have been shown to considerably overlap with absorption bands of the Bi{sup 3+} ion, suggesting that Bi{sup 3+} may participate in BAC formation. (optical fibres)

  5. Luminescence properties of IR-emitting bismuth centres in SiO2-based glasses in the UV to near-IR spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firstova, E. G.; Bufetov, I. A.; Khopin, V. F.; Vel'miskin, V. V.; Firstov, S. V.; Bufetova, G. A.; Nishchev, K. N.; Gur'yanov, A. N.; Dianov, E. M.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied UV excitation spectra of IR luminescence in bismuth-doped glasses of various compositions and obtained energy level diagrams of IR-emitting bismuth-related active centres (BACs) associated with silicon and germanium atoms up to ~5.2 eV over the ground level. A possible energy level diagram of the BACs in phosphosilicate glass has been proposed. The UV excitation peaks for the IR luminescence of the BACs in the glasses have been shown to considerably overlap with absorption bands of the Bi3+ ion, suggesting that Bi3+ may participate in BAC formation.

  6. Quantum DOT IR Photodetectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    optics to obtain multiple spectral images. A multi-wavelength IR imager has a vast number of applications such as target detection in highly...In this section, we discuss the various electrochromic materials, their properties , and the modeling results. 4.1 ROIC Design The high-level diagram...inter- continuum DWELL any optic dependin structure thickness potential F ELL Dete new class o een propos and transitio ELL) struc 5. DWELL st

  7. The VISTA IR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Gavin B.; Caldwell, Martin; Ward, Kim; Whalley, Martin S.; Burke, Kevin; Lucas, John M.; Richards, Tony; Ferlet, Marc; Edeson, Ruben L.; Tye, Daniel; Shaughnessy, Bryan M.; Strachan, Mel; Atad-Ettedgui, Eli; Leclerc, Melanie R.; Gallie, Angus; Bezawada, Nagaraja N.; Clark, Paul; Bissonauth, Nirmal; Luke, Peter; Dipper, Nigel A.; Berry, Paul; Sutherland, Will; Emerson, Jim

    2004-09-01

    The VISTA IR Camera has now completed its detailed design phase and is on schedule for delivery to ESO"s Cerro Paranal Observatory in 2006. The camera consists of 16 Raytheon VIRGO 2048x2048 HgCdTe arrays in a sparse focal plane sampling a 1.65 degree field of view. A 1.4m diameter filter wheel provides slots for 7 distinct science filters, each comprising 16 individual filter panes. The camera also provides autoguiding and curvature sensing information for the VISTA telescope, and relies on tight tolerancing to meet the demanding requirements of the f/1 telescope design. The VISTA IR camera is unusual in that it contains no cold pupil-stop, but rather relies on a series of nested cold baffles to constrain the light reaching the focal plane to the science beam. In this paper we present a complete overview of the status of the final IR Camera design, its interaction with the VISTA telescope, and a summary of the predicted performance of the system.

  8. Effect of intense laser IR fields on triatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, S. V.; Panchenko, V. Ia.; Chugunov, A. V.

    1986-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the effect of intense laser IR fields on triatomic molecular gases are presented with particular emphasis on ozone. Experiments were conducted in single- and double-frequency IR fields at power densities ranging from 10 to the -6th to 10 GW/sq cm in the pulsed regime and 0.001 to 100 W/sq cm in the CW regime; studies were performed using a TEA CO2 laser system. Attention is given to: the nonlinear absorption spectrum; the dependence of absorption in ozone on the power density of incident radiation; results of numerical solutions; the analytical solution; two-photon resonances in the ozone absorption spectrum; the spectrum of double-frequency IR-IR absorption; cascade-excitation channels; and laser-stimulated explosion in ozone.

  9. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  10. The IRS-1 signaling system.

    PubMed

    White, M F

    1994-02-01

    IRS-1 is a principal substrate of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. It undergoes multi-site tyrosine phosphorylation and mediates the insulin signal by associating with various signaling molecules containing Src homology 2 domains. Interleukin-4 also stimulates IRS-1 phosphorylation, and it is suspected that a few more growth factors or cytokines will be added to form a select group of receptors that utilize the IRS-1 signaling pathway. More IRS-1-like adapter molecules, such as 4PS (IRS-2), may remain to be found.

  11. IR and visible luminescence studies in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of 1,2-dibromo-1,1-difluoroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushpa, K. K.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Vatsa, R. K.; Naik, P. D.; Annaji Rao, K.; Mittal, J. P.; Parthasarathy, V.; Sarkar, S. K.

    1995-07-01

    The infrared multiphoton dissociation of 1,2-dibromo-1,1-difluoroethane gives rise to IR and visible luminescence. Vibrationally excited parent molecules dissociate via two primary channels yielding bromine and vibrationally excited HBr. The strong visible emission observed between 350 to 750 nm has been assigned to electronically excited carbene CF 2Br CH.

  12. Tumor diagnostics using fiber optical IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Harald; Bindig, Uwe; Waesche, Wolfgang; Liebold, K.; Roggan, Andre; Frege, P.; Gross, U. M.; Mueller, G.

    1999-04-01

    Aim of the project is the development of an in vivo endoscopic method to differentiate between cancerous from healthy tissue. The method is based on IR spectra in which each diseased state of the tissue has its own characteristic pattern as already shown in previous experiments. Two regions (1245 - 1195) cm-1 and (1045 - 995) cm-1 within the fingerprint (less than 1500 cm-1) region were selected for analysis. This paper will present the technical design of the laboratory set up and outcome of the development as well as the experiments. Two lead-salt diode lasers were used as excitation sources. The IR-radiation was transmitted via silverhalide fibers to the tissue to be investigated. On the detection side another IR fiber was used to transmit the signal to an MCT-detector (Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride). Measurement modes are Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) and diffuse Reflection/Remission. Spatial resolution was 100 X 100 micrometer2. The tissue used for these experiments was human colon carcinoma under humidity conditions. Samples were mapped using a stepper motor powered x/y/z-translation stage with a resolution of 1 micrometer. Results were compared with measurements carried out using a FTIR-interferometer and an FTIR-microscope in the region from 4000 - 900 cm-1. Soft- and Hardware control of the experiment is done using Labwindows/CVI (National Instruments, USA).

  13. Coherent IR radar technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, A. B.; Harney, R. C.; Hull, R. J.

    Recent progress in the development of coherent IR radar equipment is reviewed, focusing on the Firepond laser radar installation and the more compact systems derived for it. The design and capabilities of Firepond as a long-range satellite-tracking device are outlined. The technological improvements necessary to make laser radar mobile are discussed: a lightweight, stable 5-10-W transmitter laser for both CW and pulsed operation, a 12-element HgCdTe detector array, an eccentric-pupil Ritchey-Chretien telescope, and a combination of near-field phase modification and anamorphic expansion to produce a fan beam of relatively uniform intensity. Sample images obtained with a prototype system are shown, and the applicability of the mobile system to range-resolved coherent DIAL measurement is found to be similar to that of a baseline DIAL system.

  14. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, H.L.

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  15. The IRS-1 signaling system.

    PubMed

    Myers, M G; Sun, X J; White, M F

    1994-07-01

    Insulin-receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) is a principal substrate of the receptor tyrosine kinase for insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1, and a substrate for a tyrosine kinase activated by interleukin 4. IRS-1 undergoes multisite tyrosine phosphorylation and mediates downstream signals by 'docking' various proteins that contain Src homology 2 domains. IRS-1 appears to be a unique molecule; however, 4PS, a protein found mainly in hemopoietic cells, may represent another member of this family.

  16. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  17. Photocycloaddition of anthracene to excited C-60

    SciTech Connect

    Gol`dshleger, N.F.; Denisov, N.N.; Lobach, A.S.

    1995-02-01

    The ability to participate in photochemical cycloaddition reactions is characteristic feature of chromophores with a carbon double bond. In this work, the authors demonstrate the formation of an adduct by cycloaddition of anthracene to the triplet-excited C-60 fullerene under anaerobic conditions, which provides a straight forward way to synthesize new derivatives of C-60 fullerenes. Reaction methods, conditions, and mechanisms are included along with the characterization of the fullerene derivative with IR, MS, and NMR methods.

  18. Molecular hydrogen in the vicinity of NGC 7538 IRS 1 and IRS 2 - Temperature and ortho-to-para ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoban, Susan; Reuter, Dennis C.; Mumma, Michael J.; Storrs, Alex D.

    1991-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the active star-forming region near NGC 7538 IRS 1 and IRS 2 were made. The relative intensities of the v = 1-0 Q(1), Q(3), and Q(5) lines of molecular hydrogen are used to calculate a rotational excitation temperature. Comparison of the measured intensity of the Q(2) transition relative to the intensity of Q(1) and Q(3) permitted the retrieval of the ratio of ortho-to-para hydrogen. It is found that an ortho-to-para ratio of between 1.6 and 2.35 is needed to explain the Q-branch line intensity ratios, depending on the excitation model used. This range in ortho-to-para ratios implies a range of molecular hydrogen formation temperature of approximately 105 K to 140 K.

  19. Cr:ZnSe planar waveguide mid-IR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willimas, J. E.; Martyshkin, D. V.; Fedorov, V. V.; Moskalev, I. S.; Camata, R. P.; Mirov, S. B.

    2011-02-01

    Middle infrared (mid-IR) chromium-doped zinc selenide (Cr:ZnSe) bulk lasers have attracted a lot of attention due to their unique combination of optical and laser properties facilitating a wide range of potential scientific, industrial, and medical applications. Utilization of thin film waveguide geometry enabling good thermal management and control of beam quality is a viable pathway for compact chip-integrated optical laser design. Cr:ZnSe thin films are also promising as saturable absorbers and mode-lockers of the cavities of solid state lasers operating over 1.3-2.1 μm. We recently reported the first successful demonstration of mid-IR Cr:ZnSe planar waveguide lasing at 2.6 μm under gain-switched short-pulse (5 ns) 1.56 μm excitation as well as the passive Q-switching of the cavity of a fiber-pumped Er:YAG laser operating at 1645 nm using a highly doped Cr:ZnSe thin film. PLD grown Cr:ZnSe waveguide were fabricated on sapphire substrates (Cr:ZnSe/sapphire) with chromium concentration of 1018-1019 cm-3. Further development of mid-IR lasing in the Cr:ZnSe planar waveguide under continuous wave excitation were investigated. In addition, deposition of Cr:ZnSe-based thin film structures on n-type GaAs substrates were also investigated for possible mid-IR electroluminescence.

  20. Collective Autoionization in Multiply-Excited Systems: A novel ionization process observed in Helium Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    LaForge, A. C.; Drabbels, M.; Brauer, N. B.; Coreno, M.; Devetta, M.; Di Fraia, M.; Finetti, P.; Grazioli, C.; Katzy, R.; Lyamayev, V.; Mazza, T.; Mudrich, M.; O'Keeffe, P.; Ovcharenko, Y.; Piseri, P.; Plekan, O.; Prince, K. C.; Richter, R.; Stranges, S.; Callegari, C.; Möller, T.; Stienkemeier, F.

    2014-01-01

    Free electron lasers (FELs) offer the unprecedented capability to study reaction dynamics and image the structure of complex systems. When multiple photons are absorbed in complex systems, a plasma-like state is formed where many atoms are ionized on a femtosecond timescale. If multiphoton absorption is resonantly-enhanced, the system becomes electronically-excited prior to plasma formation, with subsequent decay paths which have been scarcely investigated to date. Here, we show using helium nanodroplets as an example that these systems can decay by a new type of process, named collective autoionization. In addition, we show that this process is surprisingly efficient, leading to ion abundances much greater than that of direct single-photon ionization. This novel collective ionization process is expected to be important in many other complex systems, e.g. macromolecules and nanoparticles, exposed to high intensity radiation fields. PMID:24406316

  1. Excited charmed mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.; Shukla, S.

    1995-05-01

    The experimental status of excited charmed mesons is reviewed and is compared to theoretical expectations. Six states have been observed and their properties are consistent with those predicted for excited charmed states with orbital angular momentum equal to one.

  2. Portable vibration exciter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  3. Optical/IR from ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Stephen; Sargent, Wallace L. W.; Wolff, Sidney; Ahearn, Michael F.; Angel, J. Roger; Beckwith, Steven V. W.; Carney, Bruce W.; Conti, Peter S.; Edwards, Suzan; Grasdalen, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Optical/infrared (O/IR) astronomy in the 1990's is reviewed. The following subject areas are included: research environment; science opportunities; technical development of the 1980's and opportunities for the 1990's; and ground-based O/IR astronomy outside the U.S. Recommendations are presented for: (1) large scale programs (Priority 1: a coordinated program for large O/IR telescopes); (2) medium scale programs (Priority 1: a coordinated program for high angular resolution; Priority 2: a new generation of 4-m class telescopes); (3) small scale programs (Priority 1: near-IR and optical all-sky surveys; Priority 2: a National Astrometric Facility); and (4) infrastructure issues (develop, purchase, and distribute optical CCDs and infrared arrays; a program to support large optics technology; a new generation of large filled aperture telescopes; a program to archive and disseminate astronomical databases; and a program for training new instrumentalists)

  4. Multiple photon emission in heavy particle decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakimori, K.; Burnett, T. H.; Cherry, M. L.; Christl, M. J.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1994-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions, at energies above 1 TeV/nucleon, in emulsion chambers flown on high altitude balloons have yielded two events showing apparent decays of a heavy particle into one charged particle and four photons. The photons converted into electron pairs very close to the decay vertex. Attempts to explain this decay topology with known particle decays are presented. Unless both events represent a b yields u transition, which is statistically unlikely, then other known decay modes for charmed or bottom particles do not account satisfactorily for these observations. This could indicate, possibly, a new decay channel.

  5. Acoustically excited heated jets. 1: Internal excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of relatively strong upstream acoustic excitation on the mixing of heated jets with the surrounding air are investigated. To determine the extent of the available information on experiments and theories dealing with acoustically excited heated jets, an extensive literature survey was carried out. The experimental program consisted of flow visualization and flowfield velocity and temperature measurements for a broad range of jet operating and flow excitation conditions. A 50.8-mm-diam nozzle was used for this purpose. Parallel to the experimental study, an existing theoretical model of excited jets was refined to include the region downstream of the jet potential core. Excellent agreement was found between theory and experiment in moderately heated jets. However, the theory has not yet been confirmed for highly heated jets. It was found that the sensitivity of heated jets to upstream acoustic excitation varies strongly with the jet operating conditions and that the threshold excitation level increases with increasing jet temperature. Furthermore, the preferential Strouhal number is found not to change significantly with a change of the jet operating conditions. Finally, the effects of the nozzle exit boundary layer thickness appear to be similar for both heated and unheated jets at low Mach numbers.

  6. Infrared/ultraviolet quadruple resonance spectroscopy to investigate structures of electronically excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, M.; Bartl, K.; Gerhards, M.

    2012-03-21

    Molecular beam investigations in combination with IR/UV spectroscopy offer the possibility to obtain structural information on isolated molecules and clusters. One of the demanding tasks is the discrimination of different isomers, e.g., by the use of isomer specific UV excitations. If this discrimination fails due to overlaying UV spectra of different isomers, IR/IR methods offer another possibility. Here, we present a new IR/UV/IR/UV quadruple resonance technique to distinguish between different isomers especially in the electronically excited state. Due to the IR spectra, structural changes and photochemical pathways in excited states can be assigned and identified. The method is applied to the dihydrated cluster of 3-hydroxyflavone which has been investigated as photochemically relevant system and proton wire model in the S{sub 1} state. By applying the new IR/UV/IR/UV technique, we are able to show experimentally that both in the electronic ground (S{sub 0}) and the electronically excited state (S{sub 1}) two isomers have to be assigned.

  7. Single photon excimer laser photodissociation of highly vibrationally excited polyatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tiee, J.J.; Wampler, F.B.; Rice, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    The ir + uv photodissociation of SF/sub 6/ has been performed using CO/sub 2/ and ArF lasers. The two-color photolysis significantly enhances the photodissociation process over ArF irradiation alone and is found to preserve the initial isotopic specificity of the ir excitation process.

  8. Nanoscale infrared (IR) spectroscopy and imaging of structural lipids in human stratum corneum using an atomic force microscope to directly detect absorbed light from a tunable IR laser source.

    PubMed

    Marcott, Curtis; Lo, Michael; Kjoller, Kevin; Domanov, Yegor; Balooch, Guive; Luengo, Gustavo S

    2013-06-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) and a tunable infrared (IR) laser source have been combined in a single instrument (AFM-IR) capable of producing ~200-nm spatial resolution IR spectra and absorption images. This new capability enables IR spectroscopic characterization of human stratum corneum at unprecendented levels. Samples of normal and delipidized stratum corneum were embedded, cross-sectioned and mounted on ZnSe prisms. A pulsed tunable IR laser source produces thermomechanical expansion upon absorption, which is detected through excitation of contact resonance modes in the AFM cantilever. In addition to reducing the total lipid content, the delipidization process damages the stratum corneum morphological structure. The delipidized stratum corneum shows substantially less long-chain CH2 -stretching IR absorption band intensity than normal skin. AFM-IR images that compare absorbances at 2930/cm (lipid) and 3290/cm (keratin) suggest that regions of higher lipid concentration are located at the perimeter of corneocytes in the normal stratum corneum.

  9. Bond strength and electronic structures of coherent Ir /Ir3Zr interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, H. R.; Liu, Yong; Tang, Hui Ping; Xiang, Chang Shu

    2008-05-01

    First principles calculation reveals that the coherent Ir /Ir3Zr interfaces possess high values of bond strength and that interface orientation and atomic configuration have important effects on interface bonding and interface energy. Calculation also shows that the interface dipole is formed in the Ir /Ir3Zr interface due to an unequal loss of the electrons from Ir and Ir3Zr atoms, and density of states suggests that a stronger covalent bonding is formed in the interface than corresponding Ir or Ir3Zr bulks, which results in the strengthening effect of the Ir3Zr precipitation in the Ir-base superalloys from experimental observations in the literature.

  10. Spectroscopic and Raman excitation profile studies of 3-benzoylpyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sett, Pinaky; Datta, Shirsendu; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Ghosh, Manash; Mallick, Prabal Kumar

    2017-03-01

    In the present work IR, UV absorption and Raman spectra including Raman excitation profiles and structure of 3-benzoyl pyridine have been investigated. Detailed studies on the vibrational and electronic properties of the molecule have been carried out. All these studies are aided with valuable quantum chemical calculations. The structural changes encountered on excitation to the low lying excited states have been investigated. Theoretical profiles determined by the sum-over-states method based on pertinent Franck-Condon and Herzberg-Teller terms have satisfactorily simulated the experimentally measured relative Raman intensities and these are also in compliance with the structural changes and potential energy distributions.

  11. Disordered dimer state in electron-doped Sr3Ir2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Tom; Dally, Rebecca; Upton, Mary; Clancy, J. P.; Finkelstein, Kenneth; Kim, Young-June; Graf, M. J.; Wilson, Stephen D.

    2016-09-01

    Spin excitations are explored in the electron-doped spin-orbit Mott insulator (Sr1-xLax) 3Ir2O7 . As this bilayer square lattice system is doped into the metallic regime, long-range antiferromagnetism vanishes, yet a spectrum of gapped spin excitation remains. Excitation lifetimes are strongly damped with increasing carrier concentration, and the energy-integrated spectral weight becomes nearly momentum independent as static spin order is suppressed. Local magnetic moments, absent in the parent system, grow in metallic samples and approach values consistent with one J =1/2 impurity per electron doped. Our combined data suggest that the magnetic spectra of metallic (Sr1-xLax) 3Ir2O7 are best described by excitations out of a disordered dimer state.

  12. Near IR-emitting DNA-probes exploiting stepwise energy transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Bodi, Andras; Borbas, K Eszter; Bruce, James I

    2007-10-10

    The synthesis and characterisation of two new cyclen-based near IR-emitting lanthanide complexes is reported; the lanthanides are sensitised by rhodamine, which in turn is excited by energy transfer from a coumarin 2 moiety. The three lumophores function as an energy transfer cascade spanning the UV-visible-near IR region of the spectrum, resulting in large Stokes shifts. Double stranded DNA selectively switches one of the two energy transfer processes off, enabling luminescent DNA-sensing in the near IR region. The regioselective di-alkylation of the cyclen scaffold is explained with the help of DFT calculations.

  13. [Luminescence characteristics of PVK doped with Ir(ppy)3].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao-Peng; Zhang, Xue-Feng; Zhao, Su-Ling; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Fu-Jun; Yang, Ya-Ru; Li, Qing; Pang, Xue-Xia

    2008-03-01

    With the increasing development of organic light emitting devices (OLED), interest in the mechanisms of charge carrier photogeneration, separation, transport and recombination continues to grow. Electromodulation of photoluminescence has been used as an efficient probe to investigate the evolution of primary excitation in all electric field. This method can provide useful information on carrier photogeneration, the formation and dissociation of excitons, energy transfer, and exciton recombination in the presence of electric field. The operation of OLED brings electrons and holes from opposite electrodes and generates singlet and triplet excitons. However, triplet excitons are wasted because a radiative transition from triplets is spin-forbidden. Spin statistics predicts that singlet-to-triplet ratio is 1 : 3 in organic semiconductors. One way to harvest light from triplet excitons is to use phosphorescent materials. These materials incorporate a heavy metal atom to mix singlet and triplet states by the strong spin-orbit coupling. As a result, a spin forbidden transition may occur allowing an enhanced triplet emission. Among phosphorescent materials, Ir(ppy)3 has attracted much attention because of its short triplet lifetime to minimize the triplet-triplet annihilation. High quantum efficiencies have been obtained by doping organic molecules and in polymers with Ir(ppy)3. In the present paper, the photoluminescence and electroluminescence spectra of Ir(ppy)3 doped PVK film are measured at room temperature. The device structure is ITO/PEDOT : PSS/PVK Ir(ppy)3/BCP/Alq3/Al. The results show that the luminescence capabilities of devices are different when the concentration of Ir(ppy)3 is different. When the concentration of Ir(ppy)3 is suitable, the luminescence of PVK is lower but that of Ir(ppy)3 is stronger relatively, indicating that the energy transfer from the host materials to the guest materials is sufficient. It is concluded that the device with 5% of Ir(ppy)3

  14. Theoretical studies of Ir5Th and Ir5Ce nanoscale precipitates in Ir

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, James R; Averill, Frank; Cooper, Valentino R

    2014-01-01

    Experimentally, it is known that very small amounts of thorium and/or cerium added to iridium metal form a precipitate, Ir5Th / Ir5Ce, which improves the high temperature mechanical properties of the resulting alloys. We demonstrate that there are low-energy configurations for nano-scale precipitates of these phases in Ir, and that these coherent arrangements may assist in producing improved mechanical properties. One precipitate/matrix orientation gives a particularly low interfacial energy, and a low lattice misfit. Nanolayer precipitates with this orientation are found to be likely to form, with little driving force to coarsen. The predicted morphology of the precipitates and their orientation with the matrix phase provide a potential experiment that could be used to test these predictions.

  15. Giant spin gap and magnon localization in the disordered Heisenberg antiferromagnet Sr2Ir1 -xRuxO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yue; Liu, X.; Xu, Wenhu; Yin, Wei-Guo; Meyers, D.; Kim, Jungho; Casa, Diego; Upton, M. H.; Gog, Thomas; Berlijn, Tom; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Yuan, Shujuan; Terzic, Jasminka; Tranquada, J. M.; Hill, John P.; Cao, Gang; Konik, Robert M.; Dean, M. P. M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the evolution of magnetic excitations in the disordered two-dimensional antiferromagnet Sr2Ir1 -xRuxO4 . The maximum energy of the magnetic excitation remains robust up to x =0.77 , with a gap opening at low dopings and increasing to over 150 meV at x =0.77 . At these higher Ru concentrations, the dispersive magnetic excitations in Sr2IrO4 are rendered essentially momentum independent. Up to a Ru concentration of x =0.77 , both experiments and first-principles calculations show the Ir Jeff=1 /2 state remains intact. The magnetic gap arises from the local interaction anisotropy in the proximity of the Ru disorder. Under the coherent potential approximation, we reproduce the experimental magnetic excitations using the disordered Heisenberg antiferromagnetic model with suppressed next-nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic coupling.

  16. Giant spin gap and magnon localization in the disordered Heisenberg antiferromagnet Sr2Ir1-xRuxO4

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, Yue; Liu, X.; Xu, Wenhu; ...

    2017-03-06

    Here, we study the evolution of magnetic excitations in the disordered two-dimensional antiferromagnet Sr2Ir1–xRuxO4. The maximum energy of the magnetic excitation remains robust up to x = 0.77, with a gap opening at low dopings and increasing to over 150 meV at x = 0.77. At these higher Ru concentrations, the dispersive magnetic excitations in Sr2IrO4 are rendered essentially momentum independent. Up to a Ru concentration of x = 0.77, both experiments and first-principles calculations show the Ir Jeff = 1/2 state remains intact. The magnetic gap arises from the local interaction anisotropy in the proximity of the Ru disorder.more » Under the coherent potential approximation, we reproduce the experimental magnetic excitations using the disordered Heisenberg antiferromagnetic model with suppressed next-nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic coupling.« less

  17. Localized excitations in hydrogen-bonded molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, D. M.; Krumhansl, J. A.

    1986-05-01

    Localized excitations analogous to the small Holstein polaron, to localized modes in alkali halides, and to localized excitonic states, are postulated for a set of internal vibrational modes in crystalline acetanilide. The theoretical framework in which one can describe the characteristics of the ir and Raman spectroscopy peaks associated with these localized states is adequately provided by the Davydov model (formally equivalent to the Holstein polaron model). The possible low-lying excitations arising from this model are determined using a variational approach. Hence, the contribution to the spectral function due to each type of excitation can be calculated. The internal modes of chief concern here are the amide-I (CO stretch) and the N-H stretch modes for which we demonstrate consistency of the theoretical model with the available ir data. Past theoretical approaches will be discussed and reasons why one should prefer one description over another will be examined.

  18. Dust content in compact HII regions (NGC 7538-IRS1, IRS2, and IRS3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akabane, K.; Kuno, N.

    2005-02-01

    The luminosity of the central star of the compact HII regions of NGC 7538 was estimated from the solid angle of the IR sources subtended relative to the central star, and was found to be 5˜ 10 times as intense as that of IR sources. Under the single central star approximation, the luminosity gives a stellar UV photon rate NU(*) (s-1) of ˜3.0 × 1048, ˜1.5 × 1049, ˜5.1 × 1049, and ˜1.7 × 1047 for the compact HII regions of NGC 7538-IRS1(A/2), B, IRS2, and IRS3, respectively. NU (*) and the observed electron density, ne, provide the dust opacity of the ionizing photon, τSd, for the optical path out to the Strömgren sphere radius rS, assuming a gas with standard dust content. Ionizing photon opacity over the same optical path but with the actual dust content τSda is also derived from ri / rS, where ri is the radius of the ionized sphere, which is estimated from NU(*) and the observed volume emission measure ne2 (4 π ri3/3) (Spitzer \\cite{Spitzer1978}). An observational trend of γ NU(*) / 4π ri2 1/2 ˜ constant, where γ = τSda / τSd}, was obtained for the 4 compact HII regions of the NGC 7538(N). Fourteen selected compact HII regions from data catalogued by VLA observations were examined for this trend, and a similar result was obtained. A limit of γ as 15 ≥ γ ≥ 0.1 was given for the 14 selected sources. The size of the dust-depleted cavity of the NGC 7538(N) suggested by Chini et al. (\\cite{Chini1986}) coincides with that of the ionized sphere of the IRS2 of the region.

  19. Compact IR synchrotron beamline design.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Thierry

    2017-03-01

    Third-generation storage rings are massively evolving due to the very compact nature of the multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice which allows amazing decreases of the horizontal electron beam emittance, but leaves very little place for infrared (IR) extraction mirrors to be placed, thus prohibiting traditional IR beamlines. In order to circumvent this apparent restriction, an optimized optical layout directly integrated inside a SOLEIL synchrotron dipole chamber that delivers intense and almost aberration-free beams in the near- to mid-IR domain (1-30 µm) is proposed and analyzed, and which can be integrated into space-restricted MBA rings. Since the optics and chamber are interdependent, the feasibility of this approach depends on a large part on the technical ability to assemble mechanically the optics inside the dipole chamber and control their resulting stability and thermo-mechanical deformation. Acquiring this expertise should allow dipole chambers to provide almost aberration-free IR synchrotron sources on current and `ultimate' MBA storage rings.

  20. Sensitisation of Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-based luminescence by Ir(III) units in Ir/lanthanide dyads: evidence for parallel energy-transfer and electron-transfer based mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Daniel; Cankut, Ahmet J; Ali, Noorshida Mohd; Stephenson, Andrew; Spall, Steven J P; Parker, Simon C; Weinstein, Julia A; Ward, Michael D

    2014-05-07

    A series of blue-luminescent Ir(III) complexes with a pendant binding site for lanthanide(III) ions has been synthesized and used to prepare Ir(III)/Ln(III) dyads (Ln = Eu, Tb, Gd). Photophysical studies were used to establish mechanisms of Ir→Ln (Ln = Tb, Eu) energy-transfer. In the Ir/Gd dyads, where direct Ir→Gd energy-transfer is not possible, significant quenching of Ir-based luminescence nonetheless occurred; this can be ascribed to photoinduced electron-transfer from the photo-excited Ir unit (*Ir, (3)MLCT/(3)LC excited state) to the pendant pyrazolyl-pyridine site which becomes a good electron-acceptor when coordinated to an electropositive Gd(III) centre. This electron transfer quenches the Ir-based luminescence, leading to formation of a charge-separated {Ir(4+)}˙-(pyrazolyl-pyridine)˙(-) state, which is short-lived possibly due to fast back electron-transfer (<20 ns). In the Ir/Tb and Ir/Eu dyads this electron-transfer pathway is again operative and leads to sensitisation of Eu-based and Tb-based emission using the energy liberated from the back electron-transfer process. In addition direct Dexter-type Ir→Ln (Ln = Tb, Eu) energy-transfer occurs on a similar timescale, meaning that there are two parallel mechanisms by which excitation energy can be transferred from *Ir to the Eu/Tb centre. Time-resolved luminescence measurements on the sensitised Eu-based emission showed both fast and slow rise-time components, associated with the PET-based and Dexter-based energy-transfer mechanisms respectively. In the Ir/Tb dyads, the Ir→Tb energy-transfer is only just thermodynamically favourable, leading to rapid Tb→Ir thermally-activated back energy-transfer and non-radiative deactivation to an extent that depends on the precise energy gap between the *Ir and Tb-based (5)D4 states. Thus, the sensitised Tb(iii)-based emission is weak and unusually short-lived due to back energy transfer, but nonetheless represents rare examples of Tb(III) sensitisation by

  1. Two-Step Processes and IR Recording in Photorefractive Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraetzig, Eckhard; Buse, Karsten

    Two-step excitation processes have been used for hologram storage in photorefractive crystals. By this means the interference pattern can be formed with red or near-IR light and nondestructive readout of information is possible. Often shallow levels are involved in the holographic recording process in photorefractive crystals. The shallow levels can be populated by illumination with visible or UV pulses forming states with relatively long lifetimes, thus sensitizing the crystals for holographic recording with IR pulses. In LiNbO3 and LiTaO3 the most important shallow levels have been identified. They result from NbLi^5+ and TaLi^5+ antisite defects (Nb5+ or Ta5+ on Li+ site). The crystals can also be pre-illuminated with visible light from a cw argon laser or a xenon lamp and holograms can be recorded with red light from a laser diode. The sensitization process is possible for other photorefractive crystals, too. The holograms can be read nondestructively with IR light and can be erased with green light. The hologram lifetime is limited by electron tunneling or by an ionic conductivity. Lifetimes up to years can be achieved. Recording of components for telecommunication applications with IR light allows one to create reconfigurable and thus more versatile devices.

  2. IR OPTICS MEASUREMENT WITH LINEAR COUPLING'S ACTION-ANGLE PARAMETERIZATION.

    SciTech Connect

    LUO, Y.; BAI, M.; PILAT, R.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

    2005-05-16

    A parameterization of linear coupling in action-angle coordinates is convenient for analytical calculations and interpretation of turn-by-turn (TBT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. We demonstrate how to use this parameterization to extract the twiss and coupling parameters in interaction regions (IRs), using BPMs on each side of the long IR drift region. The example of TBT BPM analysis was acquired at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using an AC dipole to excite a single eigenmode. Besides the full treatment, a fast estimate of beta*, the beta function at the interaction point (IP), is provided, along with the phase advance between these BPMs. We also calculate and measure the waist of the beta function and the local optics.

  3. The excitation of O2 in auroras.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, D. C.; Trajmar, S.; Williams, W.

    1972-01-01

    Newly measured electron impact cross sections for excitation of the a super 1 Delta sub g and b super 1 Sigma (plus) sub g electronic states of O2 have been employed to predict the absolute volume emission rates from these states under auroral conditions. A secondary electron flux typical of an IBC II nighttime aurora was used, and the most important quenching processes were included in the calculations. The new excitation cross sections for the a super 1 Delta sub g and b super 1 Sigma (plus) sub g states are more than an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates and lead to correspondingly greater intensities in the atmospheric and IR atmospheric band systems. The calculated intensity ratios of the volume emission rates of 7621 A and 1.27 micron to that for 3914 A are smaller than those obtained from aircraft observations and recent rocket experiments.

  4. 8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 1 IN FOREGROUND, EXCITER No. 2., AND GENERATOR UNITS BEHIND EXCITER No. 2 IN BACKGROUND. EXCITER No. 1 GENERATOR HAS A COVER OVER TOP HALF OF COMMUTATOR ELEMENT. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  5. Dust processing in photodissociation regions. Mid-IR emission modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compiègne, M.; Abergel, A.; Verstraete, L.; Habart, E.

    2008-12-01

    Context: Mid-infrared spectroscopy of dense illuminated ridges (or photodissociation regions, PDRs) suggests dust evolution. Such evolution must be reflected in the gas physical properties through processes like photo-electric heating or H2 formation. Aims: With Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) and ISOCAM data, we study the mid-IR emission of closeby, well known PDRs. Focusing on the band and continuum dust emissions, we follow their relative contributions and analyze their variations in terms of abundance of dust populations. Methods: In order to disentangle dust evolution and excitation effects, we use a dust emission model that we couple to radiative transfer. Our dust model reproduces extinction and emission of the standard interstellar medium that we represent with diffuse high galactic latitude clouds called Cirrus. We take the properties of dust in Cirrus as a reference to which we compare the dust emission from more excited regions, namely the Horsehead and the reflection nebula NGC 2023 North. Results: We show that in both regions, radiative transfer effects cannot account for the observed spectral variations. We interpret these variations in term of changes of the relative abundance between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, mid-IR band carriers) and very small grains (VSGs, mid-IR continuum carriers). Conclusions: We conclude that the PAH/VSG abundance ratio is 2.4 times smaller at the peak emission of the Horsehead nebula than in the Cirrus case. For NGC 2023 North where spectral evolution is observed across the northern PDR, we conclude that this ratio is ~5 times lower in the dense, cold zones of the PDR than in its diffuse illuminated part where dust properties seem to be the same as in Cirrus. We conclude that dust in PDRs seems to evolve from “dense” to “diffuse” properties at the small spatial scale of the dense illuminated ridge.

  6. X-ray scattering study of pyrochlore iridates: Crystal structure, electronic, and magnetic excitations

    DOE PAGES

    Clancy, J. P.; Gretarsson, H.; Lee, E. K. H.; ...

    2016-07-06

    We have investigated the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridates Eu2Ir2O7 and Pr2Ir2O7 using a combination of resonant elastic x-ray scattering, x-ray powder diffraction, and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). The structural parameters of Eu2Ir2O7 have been examined as a function of temperature and applied pressure, with a particular emphasis on regions of the phase diagram where electronic and magnetic phase transitions have been reported. We find no evidence of crystal symmetry change over the range of temperatures (~6 to 300 K) and pressures (~0.1 to 17 GPa) studied. We have also investigated the electronic and magneticmore » excitations in single-crystal samples of Eu2Ir2O7 and Pr2Ir2O7 using high-resolution Ir L-3-edge RIXS. In spite of very different ground state properties, we find that these materials exhibit qualitatively similar excitation spectra, with crystal field excitations at ~3-5 eV, spin-orbit excitations at ~ 0.5-1 eV, and broad low-lying excitations below ~0.15 eV. In single-crystal samples of "Eu-rich" Eu2Ir2O7 (found to possess an actual stoichiometry of Eu2.18Ir1.82O7.06) we observe highly damped magnetic excitations at ~45 meV, which display significant momentum dependence. Here, we compare these results with recent dynamical structure factor calculations« less

  7. X-ray scattering study of pyrochlore iridates: Crystal structure, electronic, and magnetic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, J. P.; Gretarsson, H.; Lee, E. K. H.; Tian, Di; Kim, J.; Upton, M. H.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Islam, Z.; Jeon, Byung -Gu; Kim, Kee Hoon; Desgreniers, S.; Kim, Yong Baek; Julian, S. J.; Kim, Young -June

    2016-07-06

    We have investigated the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of the pyrochlore iridates Eu2Ir2O7 and Pr2Ir2O7 using a combination of resonant elastic x-ray scattering, x-ray powder diffraction, and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS). The structural parameters of Eu2Ir2O7 have been examined as a function of temperature and applied pressure, with a particular emphasis on regions of the phase diagram where electronic and magnetic phase transitions have been reported. We find no evidence of crystal symmetry change over the range of temperatures (~6 to 300 K) and pressures (~0.1 to 17 GPa) studied. We have also investigated the electronic and magnetic excitations in single-crystal samples of Eu2Ir2O7 and Pr2Ir2O7 using high-resolution Ir L-3-edge RIXS. In spite of very different ground state properties, we find that these materials exhibit qualitatively similar excitation spectra, with crystal field excitations at ~3-5 eV, spin-orbit excitations at ~ 0.5-1 eV, and broad low-lying excitations below ~0.15 eV. In single-crystal samples of "Eu-rich" Eu2Ir2O7 (found to possess an actual stoichiometry of Eu2.18Ir1.82O7.06) we observe highly damped magnetic excitations at ~45 meV, which display significant momentum dependence. Here, we compare these results with recent dynamical structure factor calculations

  8. Excitability dependent pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakara, Kaumudi; Gholami, Azam; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    On starvation, the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum emit the chemo-attractant cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) at specific frequencies. The neighboring amoebae sense cAMP through membrane receptors and produce their own cAMP. Soon the cells synchronize and move via chemotaxis along the gradient of cAMP. The response of the amoebae to the emission of cAMP is seen as spiral waves or target patterns under a dark field microscope. The causal reasons for the selection of one or the other patterns are still unclear. Here we present a possible explanation based on excitability. The excitability of the amoebae depends on the starvation time because the gene expression changes with starvation. Cells starved for longer times are more excitable. In this work, we mix cells of different excitabilities to study the dependence of the emergent patterns on the excitability. Preliminary results show a transition from spirals to target patterns for specific excitabilities. A phase map of the patterns for different combinations of excitability and number densities is obtained. We compare our findings with numerical simulations of existing theoretical models.

  9. Optimized IR synchrotron beamline design.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Synchrotron infrared beamlines are powerful tools on which to perform spectroscopy on microscopic length scales but require working with large bending-magnet source apertures in order to provide intense photon beams to the experiments. Many infrared beamlines use a single toroidal-shaped mirror to focus the source emission which generates, for large apertures, beams with significant geometrical aberrations resulting from the shape of the source and the beamline optics. In this paper, an optical layout optimized for synchrotron infrared beamlines, that removes almost totally the geometrical aberrations of the source, is presented and analyzed. This layout is already operational on the IR beamline of the Brazilian synchrotron. An infrared beamline design based on a SOLEIL bending-magnet source is given as an example, which could be useful for future IR beamline improvements at this facility.

  10. Low-lying excited states and primary photoproducts of [Os3(CO)10(s-cis-L)] (L=cyclohexa-1,3-diene, buta-1,3-diene)] clusters studied by picosecond time-resolved UV/Vis and IR spectroscopy and by density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Vergeer, Frank W; Matousek, Pavel; Towrie, Michael; Costa, Paulo J; Calhorda, Maria J; Hartl, Frantisek

    2004-07-19

    Combined picosecond transient absorption and time-resolved infrared studies were performed, aimed at characterising low-lying excited states of the cluster [Os(3)(CO)(10)(s-cis-L)] (L=cyclohexa-1,3-diene, 1) and monitoring the formation of its photoproducts. Theoretical (DFT and TD-DFT) calculations on the closely related cluster with L=buta-1,3-diene (2') have revealed that the low-lying electronic transitions of these [Os(3)(CO)(10)(s-cis-1,3-diene)] clusters have a predominant sigma(core)pi*(CO) character. From the lowest sigmapi* excited state, cluster 1 undergoes fast Os-Os(1,3-diene) bond cleavage (tau=3.3 ps) resulting in the formation of a coordinatively unsaturated primary photoproduct (1 a) with a single CO bridge. A new insight into the structure of the transient has been obtained by DFT calculations. The cleaved Os-Os(1,3-diene) bond is bridged by the donor 1,3-diene ligand, compensating for the electron deficiency at the neighbouring Os centre. Because of the unequal distribution of the electron density in transient 1 a, a second CO bridge is formed in 20 ps in the photoproduct [Os(3)(CO)(8)(micro-CO)(2)(cyclohexa-1,3-diene)] (1 b). The latter compound, absorbing strongly around 630 nm, mainly regenerates the parent cluster with a lifetime of about 100 ns in hexane. Its structure, as suggested by the DFT calculations, again contains the 1,3-diene ligand coordinated in a bridging fashion. Photoproduct 1 b can therefore be assigned as a high-energy coordination isomer of the parent cluster with all Os-Os bonds bridged.

  11. A spectrophotometric study of IR Gem at outburst and quiescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinswog, Laurie; Szkody, Paula; Garnavich, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Optical spectra with 2.5-A resolution obtained throughout the orbit of IR Gem during a five-day sequence beginning at an outburst state and ending at quiescence are compared with B magnitude and IUE spectra obtained throughout other quiescent-state orbits. No obvious second component is found in the emission lines. In contrast to previous results, little high-excitation He II 4686-A emission is noted, and no variation of the equivalent widths of the Balmer emission is found over the orbital cycle. The results suggest that large changes in the excitation level and in the modulation from a heated zone can take place during different quiescent states, possibly due to the interoutburst phase.

  12. 15. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 WITH EXCITER No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. POWERHOUSE INTERIOR SHOWING EXCITER No. 2 WITH EXCITER No. 1 BEHIND. OVERHEAD CRANE DANGLES AT TOP OF PHOTO. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse Exciters, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  13. Geomagnetic excitation of nutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, C.; Vondrák, J.

    2015-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis of Malkin (2013), who demonstrated that the observed changes of Free Core Nutation parameters (phase, amplitude) occur near the epochs of geomagnetic jerks. We found that if the numerical integration of Brzeziński broad-band Liouville equations of atmospheric/oceanic excitations is re-initialized at the epochs of geomagnetic jerks, the agreement between the integrated and observed celestial pole offsets is improved (Vondrák & Ron, 2014). Nevertheless, this approach assumes that the influence of geomagnetic jerks leads to a stepwise change in the position of celestial pole, which is physically not acceptable. Therefore we introduce a simple continuous excitation function that hypothetically describes the influence of geomagnetic jerks, and leads to rapid but continuous changes of pole position. The results of numerical integration of atmospheric/oceanic excitations and this newly introduced excitation are then compared with the observed celestial pole offsets, and prove that the agreement is improved significantly.

  14. High temperature Ir segregation in Ir-B ceramics: Effect of oxygen presence on stability of IrB2 and other Ir-B phases

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Zhilin; Terracciano, Anthony C.; Cullen, David A.; ...

    2015-05-13

    The formation of IrB2, IrB1.35, IrB1.1 and IrB monoboride phases in the Ir–B ceramic nanopowder was confirmed during mechanochemical reaction between metallic Ir and elemental B powders. The Ir–B phases were analysed after 90 h of high energy ball milling and after annealing of the powder for 72 h at 1050°C in vacuo. The iridium monoboride (IrB) orthorhombic phase was synthesised experimentally for the first time and identified by powder X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the ReB2 type IrB2 hexagonal phase was also produced for the first time and identified by high resolution transmission electron microscope. Ir segregation along disordered domains ofmore » the boron lattice was found to occur during high temperature annealing. Furthermore, these nanodomains may have useful catalytic properties.« less

  15. Using Graded Relevance Assessments in IR Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kekalalainen, Jaana; Jarvelin, Kalervo

    2002-01-01

    Proposes evaluation methods based on the use of nondichotomous relevance judgements in information retrieval (IR) experiments. Argues that evaluation methods should credit IR methods for their ability to retrieve highly relevant documents. This is desirable from the user point of view in modern large IR environments. (Author/AEF)

  16. A COMPARATIVE ASTROCHEMICAL STUDY OF THE HIGH-MASS PROTOSTELLAR OBJECTS NGC 7538 IRS 9 AND IRS 1

    SciTech Connect

    Barentine, John C.; Lacy, John H.

    2012-10-01

    We report the results of a spectroscopic study of the high-mass protostellar object NGC 7538 IRS 9 and compare our observations to published data on the nearby object NGC 7538 IRS 1. Both objects originated in the same molecular cloud and appear to be at different points in their evolutionary histories, offering an unusual opportunity to study the temporal evolution of envelope chemistry in objects sharing a presumably identical starting composition. Observations were made with the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph, a sensitive, high spectral resolution (R {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} {approx_equal} 100,000) mid-infrared grating spectrometer. Forty-six individual lines in vibrational modes of the molecules C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, HCN, NH{sub 3}, and CO were detected, including two isotopologues ({sup 13}CO, {sup 12}C{sup 18}O) and one combination mode ({nu}{sub 4} + {nu}{sub 5} C{sub 2}H{sub 2}). Fitting synthetic spectra to the data yielded the Doppler shift, excitation temperature, Doppler b parameter, column density, and covering factor for each molecule observed; we also computed column density upper limits for lines and species not detected, such as HNCO and OCS. We find differences among spectra of the two objects likely attributable to their differing radiation and thermal environments. Temperatures and column densities for the two objects are generally consistent, while the larger line widths toward IRS 9 result in less saturated lines than those toward IRS 1. Finally, we compute an upper limit on the size of the continuum-emitting region ({approx}2000 AU) and use this constraint and our spectroscopy results to construct a schematic model of IRS 9.

  17. VLT near- to mid-IR imaging and spectroscopy of the M 17 UC1 - IRS5 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nürnberger, Dieter E. A.; Chini, Rolf; Jiang, Zhibo; Fang, Min

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the surroundings of the hypercompact H ii region M 17 UC1 to probe the physical properties of the associated young stellar objects and the environment of massive star formation. Methods: We use diffraction-limited near-IR (VLT/NACO) and mid-IR (VLT/VISIR) images to reveal the different morphologies at various wavelengths. Likewise, we investigate the stellar and nebular content of the region with VLT/SINFONI integral field spectroscopy with a resolution R ˜ 1500 at H + K bands. Results: Five of the seven point sources in this region show L-band excess emission. A geometric match is found between the H2 emission and near-IR polarized light in the vicinity of IRS5A, and between the diffuse mid-IR emission and near-IR polarization north of UC1. The H2 emission is typical for dense photodissociation regions (PDRs), which are initially far-ultraviolet pumped and repopulated by collisional de-excitation. The spectral types of IRS5A and B273A are B3-B7 V/III and G4-G5 III, respectively. The observed infrared luminosity LIR in the range 1-20 μm is derived for three objects; we obtain 2.0 × 103 L⊙ for IRS5A, 13 L⊙ for IRS5C, and 10 L⊙ for B273A. Conclusions: IRS5 might be a young quadruple system. Its primary star IRS5A is confirmed to be a high-mass protostellar object (˜9 M⊙, ˜1 × 105 yrs); it might have terminated accretion due to the feedback from stellar activities (radiation pressure, outflow) and the expanding H ii region of M 17. The object UC1 might also have terminated accretion because of the expanding hypercompact H ii region, which it ionizes. The disk clearing process of the low-mass young stellar objects in this region might be accelerated by the expanding H ii region. The outflows driven by UC1 are running south-north with its northeastern side suppressed by the expanding ionization front of M 17; the blue-shifted outflow lobe of IRS5A is seen in two types of tracers along the same line of sight in the form of H2 emission

  18. Develop algorithms to improve detectability of defects in Sonic IR imaging NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeidat, Omar; Yu, Qiuye; Han, Xiaoyan

    2016-02-01

    Sonic Infrared (IR) technology is relative new in the NDE family. It is a fast, wide area imaging method. It combines ultrasound excitation and infrared imaging while the former to apply ultrasound energy thus induce friction heating in defects and the latter to capture the IR emission from the target. This technology can detect both surface and subsurface defects such as cracks and disbands/delaminations in various materials, metal/metal alloy or composites. However, certain defects may results in only very small IR signature be buried in noise or heating patterns. In such cases, to effectively extract the defect signals becomes critical in identifying the defects. In this paper, we will present algorithms which are developed to improve the detectability of defects in Sonic IR.

  19. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  20. Moisture map by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinzato, E.; Cadelano, G.; Bison, P.

    2010-10-01

    A new approach to moisture detection in buildings by an optical method is presented. Limits of classical and new methods are discussed. The state of the art about the use of IR thermography is illustrated as well. The new technique exploits characteristics of the materials and takes into account explicitly the heat and mass exchange between surface and environment. A set of experiments in controlled laboratory conditions on different materials is used to better understand the physical problem. The testing procedure and the data reduction are illustrated. A case study on a heritage building points up the features of this technique.

  1. Gold-black as IR Absorber and Solar Cell Enhancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peale, Robert E.; Cleary, Justin W.; Ishimaru, Manabu; Smith, C. W.; Baillie, K.; Colwell, J. E.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Joly, Alan G.; Edwards, Oliver; Fredricksen, C. J.

    2010-03-01

    Infrared absorbance and visible/near-IR excited plasmon resonances are investigated in gold-black, a porous nano-structured conducting film. A two level full factorial optimization study with evaporation-chamber pressure, boat current, substrate temperature, and degree of polymer infusion (for hardening) was performed. Polymer infusion was found generally to reduce absorbance in the long wave IR but has little effect at THz wavelengths, although for samples with the highest absorbance there is a slight improvement in the absorbance figure of merit (FOM) in both wavelength regimes. The characteristic length scales of the structured films vary considerably as a function of deposition parameters, but the IR FOM is found to be only weakly correlated with these distributions, which are determined by wavelet analysis of scanning electron micrographs images. Initial investigations of gold-black by photoelectron emission microscopy (PEEM) reveal plasmon resonances, which have potential to enhance the efficiency of thin film solar cells. For films with different characteristic length scales, the plasmon resonances appear in portions of the film with similar length scales.

  2. Xanthe Terra Landslide in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This is a daytime IR image of a chaos region within Xanthe Terra. As with earlier images, the landslide in this image is caused by the failure of steep slopes releasing material to form the landslide deposit.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 3.1, Longitude 309.7 East (50.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. Coprates Chasma Landslides in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today's daytime IR image is of a portion of Coprates Chasma, part of Valles Marineris. As with yesterday's image, this image shows multiple large landslides.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 300.2 East (59.8 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Molecular Tectonics: Design of Enantiopure Luminescent Heterometallic Ir(III)-Cd(II) Coordination Network.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaojie; Guenet, Aurélie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Planeix, Jean-Marc; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2015-11-02

    With the aim of combining luminescence and chirality in heterometallic Ir(III)-Cd(II) coordination networks, synthetic strategies for the formation of new Ir(III)-based chiral metallatectons ([Ir(dFppy)2(1)][PF6]), both as a racemic mixture of Δ and Λ enantiomers (rac-[Ir(dFppy)2(1)][PF6]) and as enantiopure complexes (Δ-[Ir(dFppy)2(1)][PF6] and Λ-[Ir(dFppy)2(1)][PF6]), were developed. The final compounds were characterized both in solution and in the crystalline phase. Notably, their crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, and their photophysical properties in solution and in the solid state were investigated. Combination of the cationic linear metallatecton with Cd(2+) iodide salt ([CdI3](-)), behaving as an anionic two-connecting node, leads to the formation of 1D chiral and neutral heterometallic Ir(III)-Cd(II) luminescent coordination networks both as a racemic mixture and as enantiomerically pure infinite architectures. The latter have been structurally studied in the solid state by X-ray diffraction both on single crystals and on microcrystalline powders. The infinite coordination networks display phosphorescence in the solid state at ca. 600 nm upon excitation at 400 nm.

  5. Excitation Methods for Bridge Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffy, T.A.; Cornwell, P.J.; Doebling, S.W.

    1999-02-08

    This paper summarizes the various methods that have been used to excited bridge structures during dynamic testing. The excitation methods fall into the general categories of ambient excitation methods and measured-input excitation methods. During ambient excitation the input to the bridge is not directly measured. In contrast, as the category label implies, measured-input excitations are usually applied at a single location where the force input to the structure can be monitored. Issues associated with using these various types of measurements are discussed along with a general description of the various excitation methods.

  6. M-M bond-stretching energy landscapes for M2(dimen)4(2+) (M = Rh, Ir; dimen = 1,8-diisocyanomenthane) complexes.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Bryan M; Villahermosa, Randy M; Exstrom, Christopher L; Hill, Michael G; Mann, Kent R; Gray, Harry B

    2012-06-18

    Isomers of Ir(2)(dimen)(4)(2+) (dimen = 1,8-diisocyanomenthane) exhibit different Ir-Ir bond distances in a 2:1 MTHF/EtCN solution (MTHF = 2-methyltetrahydrofuran). Variable-temperature absorption data suggest that the isomer with the shorter Ir-Ir distance is favored at room temperature [K = ∼8; ΔH° = -0.8 kcal/mol; ΔS° = 1.44 cal mol(-1) K(-1)]. We report calculations that shed light on M(2)(dimen)(4)(2+) (M = Rh, Ir) structural differences: (1) metal-metal interaction favors short distances; (2) ligand deformational-strain energy favors long distances; (3) out-of-plane (A(2u)) distortion promotes twisting of the ligand backbone at short metal-metal separations. Calculated potential-energy surfaces reveal a double minimum for Ir(2)(dimen)(4)(2+) (∼4.1 Å Ir-Ir with 0° twist angle and ∼3.6 Å Ir-Ir with ±12° twist angle) but not for the rhodium analogue (∼4.5 Å Rh-Rh with no twisting). Because both the ligand strain and A(2u) distortional energy are virtually identical for the two complexes, the strength of the metal-metal interaction is the determining factor. On the basis of the magnitude of this interaction, we obtain the following results: (1) a single-minimum (along the Ir-Ir coordinate), harmonic potential-energy surface for the triplet electronic excited state of Ir(2)(dimen)(4)(2+) (R(e,Ir-Ir) = 2.87 Å; F(Ir-Ir) = 0.99 mdyn Å(-1)); (2) a single-minimum, anharmonic surface for the ground state of Rh(2)(dimen)(4)(2+) (R(e,Rh-Rh) = 3.23 Å; F(Rh-Rh) = 0.09 mdyn Å(-1)); (3) a double-minimum (along the Ir-Ir coordinate) surface for the ground state of Ir(2)(dimen)(4)(2+) (R(e,Ir-Ir) = 3.23 Å; F(Ir-Ir) = 0.16 mdyn Å(-1)).

  7. Spin waves and magnetic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Borovik-Romanov, A.S.; Sinha, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book describes both simple spin waves (magnons) and complicated excitations in magnetic systems. The following subjects are covered: - various methods of magnetic excitation investigations such as neutron scattering on magnetic excitations, spin-wave excitation by radio-frequency, power light scattering on magnons and magnetic excitation observation within the light-absorption spectrum; - oscillations of magnetic electron systems coupled with phonons, nuclear spin systems and localized impurity modes: - low-dimensional magnetics, amorphous magnetics and spin glasses.

  8. Two-Photon-Excited Fluorescence-Encoded Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mastron, Joseph N; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2016-11-23

    We report on a method for performing ultrafast infrared (IR) vibrational spectroscopy using fluorescence detection. Vibrational dynamics on the ground electronic state driven by femtosecond mid-infrared pulses are detected by changes in fluorescence amplitude resulting from modulation of a two-photon visible transition by nuclear motion. We examine a series of coumarin dyes and study the signals as a function of solvent and excitation pulse parameters. The measured signal characterizes the relaxation of vibrational populations and coherences but yields different information than conventional IR transient absorption measurements. These differences result from the manner in which the ground-state dynamics are projected by the two-photon detection step. Extensions of this method can be adapted for a variety of increased-sensitivity IR measurements.

  9. Proteins of Excitable Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nachmansohn, David

    1969-01-01

    Excitable membranes have the special ability of changing rapidly and reversibly their permeability to ions, thereby controlling the ion movements that carry the electric currents propagating nerve impulses. Acetylcholine (ACh) is the specific signal which is released by excitation and is recognized by a specific protein, the ACh-receptor; it induces a conformational change, triggering off a sequence of reactions resulting in increased permeability. The hydrolysis of ACh by ACh-esterase restores the barrier to ions. The enzymes hydrolyzing and forming ACh and the receptor protein are present in the various types of excitable membranes. Properties of the two proteins directly associated with electrical activity, receptor and esterase, will be described in this and subsequent lectures. ACh-esterase has been shown to be located within the excitable membranes. Potent enzyme inhibitors block electrical activity demonstrating the essential role in this function. The enzyme has been recently crystallized and some protein properties will be described. The monocellular electroplax preparation offers a uniquely favorable material for analyzing the properties of the ACh-receptor and its relation to function. The essential role of the receptor in electrical activity has been demonstrated with specific receptor inhibitors. Recent data show the basically similar role of ACh in the axonal and junctional membranes; the differences of electrical events and pharmacological actions are due to variations of shape, structural organization, and environment. PMID:19873642

  10. Positron excitation of neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcell, L. A.; Mceachran, R. P.; Stauffer, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    The differential and total cross section for the excitation of the 3s1P10 and 3p1P1 states of neon by positron impact were calculated using a distorted-wave approximation. The results agree well with experimental conclusions.

  11. The Electric Dipole Moment of Iridium Monosilicide, IrSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh; Steimle, Timothy C.; Cheng, Lan; Stanton, John F.

    2013-06-01

    The optical spectrum of iridium monosilicide (IrSi) was recently observed using REMPI spectroscopy in the range 17200 to 23850 cm^{-1}. The observation was supported by an ab initio calculation which predicted a X^{2}Δ_{5/2} state. Here, we report on the analysis of the optical Stark effect for the X^{2}Δ_{5/2} and [16.0]1.5 (v=6) states. The (6,0)[16.0]1.5 - X^{2}Δ_{5/2} and the (7,0)[16.0]3.5- X^{2}Δ_{5/2} bands of IrSi have been recorded using high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The observed optical Stark shifts for the ^{193}IrSi and ^{191}IrSi isotopologues were analyzed to produce the electric dipole moments of -0.4139(64)D and 0.7821(63)D for the X^{2}Δ_{5/2} and [16.0]1.5 (v=6) states, respectively. The negative sign of electric dipole moment of the X^{2}Δ_{5/2} state is supported by high-level quantum-chemical calculations employing all-electron scalar-relativistic CCSD(T) method augmented with spin-orbit corrections as well as corrections due to full triple excitations. In particular, electron-correlation effects have been shown to be essential in the prediction of the negative sign of the dipole moment. A comparison with other iridium containing molecules will be made. Maria A. Garcia, Carolin Vietz, Fernando Ruipérez, Michael D. Morse, and Ivan Infante, Kimika Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko. J. Chem. Phys., (submitted)

  12. Dinuclear Ru/Ni, Ir/Ni, and Ir/Pt complexes with bridging phenanthroline-5,6-dithiolate: synthesis, structure, and electrochemical and photophysical behavior.

    PubMed

    Schallenberg, David; Neubauer, Antje; Erdmann, Elisa; Tänzler, Marco; Villinger, Alexander; Lochbrunner, Stefan; Seidel, Wolfram W

    2014-09-02

    We report the synthesis and full characterization of dinuclear complexes with the bridging ligand phenanthroline-5,6-dithiolate (phendt(2-)) featuring the [Ru(bpy)2](2+) or Ir(ppy)2](+) fragment at the diimine donor center and the [Ni(dppe)](2+) or [Pt(phen)](2+) complex moiety at the dithiolate group. The molecular structures of the mononuclear complexes [(C5H5)2Ti(S,S'-phendt)] and [(ppy)2Ir{N,N'-phendt-(C2H4CN)2}](PF6) as well as the dinuclear complex [(C5H5)(PPh3)Ru(phendt)Ni(dppe)](PF6) determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies are compared. Photophysical studies with mononuclear [(bpy)2Ru{phendt-(C2H4CN)2}](2+) and [(ppy)2Ir{phendt-(C2H4CN)2}](+) as well as dinuclear [(bpy)2Ru(phendt)Ni(dppe)](2+) and [(ppy)2Ir(phendt)Ni(dppe)](+) uncovered an effective luminescence quenching in the dinuclear complexes. Lifetime measurements at room temperature, steady-state measurements at low temperature, electrochemical investigations, and DFT calculations provide evidence for a very efficient energy transfer from the Ru/Ir to the Ni complex moiety with a rate constant k > 5 × 10(9) s(-1). In comparison, the [Ru]phendt[Ni] complex displays a higher quenching efficiency with reduced excited state lifetime, whereas the [Ir]phendt[Ni] complex is characterized by an unaltered lifetime of the thermally equilibrated excited state.

  13. IR spectral analysis for the diagnostics of crust earthquake precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umarkhodgaev, R. M.; Liperovsky, V. A.; Mikhailin, V. V.; Meister, C.-V.; Naumov, D. Ju

    2012-04-01

    In regions of future earthquakes, a few days before the seismic shock, the emanation of radon and hydrogen is being observed, which causes clouds of increased ionisation in the atmosphere. In the present work the possible diagnostics of these clouds using infrared (IR) spectroscopy is considered, which may be important and useful for the general geophysical system of earthquake prediction and the observation of industrial emissions of radioactive materials into the atmosphere. Some possible physical processes are analysed, which cause, under the condition of additional ionisation in a pre-breakdown electrical field, emissions in the IR interval. In doing so, the transparency region of the IR spectrum at wavelengths of 7-15 μm is taken into account. This transparency region corresponds to spectral lines of small atmospheric constituents like CH4, CO2, N2O, NO2, NO, and O3. The possible intensities of the IR emissions observable in laboratories and in nature are estimated. The acceleration process of the electrons in the pre-breakdown electrical field before its adhesion to the molecules is analysed. The laboratory equipment for the investigation of the IR absorption spectrum is constructed for the cases of normal and decreased atmospheric pressures. The syntheses of ozone and nitrous oxides are performed in the barrier discharge. It is studied if the products of the syntheses may be used to model atmospheric processes where these components take part. Spectra of products of the syntheses in the wavelength region of 2-10 μm are observed and analysed. A device is created for the syntheses and accumulation of nitrous oxides. Experiments to observe the IR-spectra of ozone and nitrous oxides during the syntheses and during the further evolution of these molecules are performed. For the earthquake prediction, practically, the investigation of emission spectra is most important, but during the laboratory experiments, the radiation of the excited molecules is shifted by a

  14. IR Thermography NDE of ISS Radiator Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay; Winfree, William; Morton, Richard; Wilson, Walter; Reynolds, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The presentation covers an active and a passive infrared (IR) thermography for detection of delaminations in the radiator panels used for the International Space Station (ISS) program. The passive radiator IR data was taken by a NASA astronaut in an extravehicular activity (EVA) using a modified FLIR EVA hand-held camera. The IR data could be successfully analyzed to detect gross facesheet disbonds. The technique used the internal hot fluid tube as the heat source in analyzing the IR data. Some non-flight ISS radiators were inspected using an active technique of IR flash thermography to detect disbond of face sheet with honeycomb core, and debonds in facesheet overlap areas. The surface temperature and radiated heat emission from flight radiators is stable during acquisition of the IR video data. This data was analyzed to detect locations of unexpected surface temperature gradients. The flash thermography data was analyzed using derivative analysis and contrast evolutions. Results of the inspection are provided.

  15. Further study of coupling materials on aluminum sample using sonic IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yuyang; Han, Xiaoyan

    2012-05-01

    Sonic Infrared (IR) Imaging has been proving as a very promising NDE technology even though it has not been around for very long. This technology uses acoustic/ultrasound excitation externally and infrared imaging to identify defects in materials. Typically, coupling materials are employed between the sound transducer and a target. It has been shown that this coupling has shown importance in SonicIR. We have learned that coupling materials affect the vibration and heating in cracks. More systematic study has been done quantitatively by the authors over some selected coupling materials through experimental study on aluminum samples. In this paper, we present our results over this topic.

  16. Photofragmentation of colloidal solutions of gold nanoparticles under femtosecond laser pulses in IR and visible ranges

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, P A; Zayarnyi, D A; Ionin, A A; Kudryashov, S I; Makarov, S V; Rudenko, A A; Saraeva, I N; Yurovskikh, V I; Lednev, V N; Pershin, S M

    2015-05-31

    The specific features of photofragmentation of sols of gold nanoparticles under focused femtosecond laser pulses in IR (1030 nm) and visible (515 nm) ranges is experimentally investigated. A high photofragmentation efficiency of nanoparticles in the waist of a pulsed laser beam in the visible range (at moderate radiation scattering) is demonstrated; this efficiency is related to the excitation of plasmon resonance in nanoparticles on the blue shoulder of its spectrum, in contrast to the regime of very weak photofragmentation in an IR-laser field of comparable intensity. Possible mechanisms of femtosecond laser photofragmentation of gold nanoparticles are discussed. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  17. High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging of human tissue sections towards improving pathology.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, Hari; Varma, Vishal K; Nguyen, Peter L; Davidson, Bennett; Akkina, Sanjeev; Guzman, Grace; Setty, Suman; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Walsh, Michael J

    2015-01-21

    High-definition Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging is an emerging approach to obtain detailed images that have associated biochemical information. FT-IR imaging of tissue is based on the principle that different regions of the mid-infrared are absorbed by different chemical bonds (e.g., C=O, C-H, N-H) within cells or tissue that can then be related to the presence and composition of biomolecules (e.g., lipids, DNA, glycogen, protein, collagen). In an FT-IR image, every pixel within the image comprises an entire Infrared (IR) spectrum that can give information on the biochemical status of the cells that can then be exploited for cell-type or disease-type classification. In this paper, we show: how to obtain IR images from human tissues using an FT-IR system, how to modify existing instrumentation to allow for high-definition imaging capabilities, and how to visualize FT-IR images. We then present some applications of FT-IR for pathology using the liver and kidney as examples. FT-IR imaging holds exciting applications in providing a novel route to obtain biochemical information from cells and tissue in an entirely label-free non-perturbing route towards giving new insight into biomolecular changes as part of disease processes. Additionally, this biochemical information can potentially allow for objective and automated analysis of certain aspects of disease diagnosis.

  18. Invited Article: Multiple-octave spanning high-energy mid-IR supercontinuum generation in bulk quadratic nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Binbin; Bache, Morten

    2016-08-01

    Bright and broadband coherent mid-IR radiation is important for exciting and probing molecular vibrations. Using cascaded nonlinearities in conventional quadratic nonlinear crystals like lithium niobate, self-defocusing near-IR solitons have been demonstrated that led to very broadband supercontinuum generation in the visible, near-IR, and short-wavelength mid-IR. Here we conduct an experiment where a mid-IR crystal is pumped in the mid-IR. The crystal is cut for noncritical interaction, so the three-wave mixing of a single mid-IR femtosecond pump source leads to highly phase-mismatched second-harmonic generation. This self-acting cascaded process leads to the formation of a self-defocusing soliton at the mid-IR pump wavelength and after the self-compression point multiple octave-spanning supercontinua are observed. The results were recorded in a commercially available crystal LiInS2 pumped in the 3-4 μm range with 85 fs 50 μJ pulse energy, with the broadest supercontinuum covering 1.6-7.0 μm. We measured up 30 μJ energy in the supercontinuum, and the energy promises to scale favorably with an increased pump energy. Other mid-IR crystals can readily be used as well to cover other pump wavelengths and target other supercontinuum wavelength ranges.

  19. HST WFC3/IR Calibration Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Meredith; Brammer, Gabriel; Long, Knox S.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Ryan, Russell E.; McCullough, Peter R.; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Bourque, Matthew; HST WFC3 Team

    2016-01-01

    We report on several improvements to the characterization, monitoring, and calibration of the HST WFC3/IR detector. The detector performance has remained overall stable since its installation during HST Servicing Mission 4 in 2009. We present an updated persistence model that takes into account effects of exposure time and spatial variations in persistence across the detector, new grism wavelength solutions and master sky images, and a new SPARS sample sequence. We also discuss the stability of the IR gain, the time evolution and photometric properties of IR "snowballs," and the effect of IR "blobs" on point-source photometry.

  20. Epic changes in the IRS46 mid-infrared spectrum; an inner disk chemistry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahuis, F.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W. F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Woitke, P.

    2011-05-01

    The Spitzer-IRS detection of highly abundant hot (Tex>400 K) molecular gas toward the low-mass star IRS 46 (Lahuis et al. 2006) was cause for great excitement. Strong absorption bands of gas-phase C_2H_2, HCN and CO_2 provided the first observational test of chemical models in the planet-forming zone of a circumstellar disk as well as a direct measure of the temperature and density in this zone. Subsequently, the same molecules have been observed in absorption toward the young star GV Tau (Gibb et al. 2007) and in emission (together with hot abundant H_2O and OH) toward a number of T Tauri stars (Carr & Najita 2008, Salyk et al. 2008, Pontoppidan et al. 2010). Follow-up Spitzer-IRS observations of IRS 46 at 5 epochs taken during 2008 and 2009 show dramatic changes of the mid-IR properties. The mid-IR continuum and the strength of hot water emission lines (detected in the newly reduced data) have increased (up to a factor of two) while the above mentioned absorption features have decreased (up to a factor of five) in strength (see figure below). At the same time GV Tau does not show any significant changes in flux or the strength of its molecular absorption bands. Starting with the parameters of the SED model as presented by Lahuis et al. (2006), we use the proptoplanetary disk model ProDiMo (Woitke et al. 2009, Kamp et al. 2010) to model the chemical composition of the inner few AU of the IRS 46 disk. In addition, the nature of the changes observed in the mid-IR spectra of IRS 46 are investigated using these models.

  1. Atmospheric Entry Experiments at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Endlich, P.; Herdrich, G.; Kurtz, H.; Laux, T.; Löhle, S.; Nazina, N.; Pidan, S.

    2002-01-01

    Entering the atmosphere of celestial bodies, spacecrafts encounter gases at velocities of several km/s, thereby being subjected to great heat loads. The thermal protection systems and the environment (plasma) have to be investigated by means of computational and ground facility based simulations. For more than a decade, plasma wind tunnels at IRS have been used for the investigation of TPS materials. Nevertheless, ground tests and computer simulations cannot re- place space flights completely. Particularly, entry mission phases encounter challenging problems, such as hypersonic aerothermodynamics. Concerning the TPS, radiation-cooled materials used for reuseable spacecrafts and ablator tech- nologies are of importance. Besides the mentioned technologies, there is the goal to manage guidance navigation, con- trol, landing technology and inflatable technologies such as ballutes that aim to keep vehicles in the atmosphere without landing. The requirement to save mass and energy for planned interplanetary missions such as Mars Society Balloon Mission, Mars Sample Return Mission, Mars Express or Venus Sample Return mission led to the need for manoeuvres like aerocapture, aero-breaking and hyperbolic entries. All three are characterized by very high kinetic vehicle energies to be dissipated by the manoeuvre. In this field flight data are rare. The importance of these manoeuvres and the need to increase the knowledge of required TPS designs and behavior during such mission phases point out the need of flight experiments. As result of the experience within the plasma diagnostic tool development and the plasma wind tunnel data base, flight experiments like the PYrometric RE-entry EXperiment PYREX were developed, fully qualified and successfully flown. Flight experiments such as the entry spectrometer RESPECT and PYREX on HOPE-X are in the conceptual phase. To increase knowledge in the scope of atmospheric manoeuvres and entries, data bases have to be created combining both

  2. STIRAP on helium: Excitation to Rydberg states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Deqian

    Research in optically induced transitions between dierent atomic levels has a long history. For transitions between states driven by a coherent optical eld, the theoretical eciency could be ideally high as 100% but there could be many factors preventing this. In the three state helium atom excitation process, i.e. 23S→33P→nL , the stimulated emission from intermediate state makes it hard to achieve ecient population transfer to the nal state through an intuitive excitation order. One technique to achieve a higher eciency is Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage (STIRAP) which is being studied and under research in our lab. Unlike traditional three level excitation processes, STIRAP actually uses a counter intuitive pulsed laser beams timing arrangement. The excitation objects are metastable helium atoms traveling in a vacuum system with a longitudinal velocity of ~ 1070 m/s. We are using a 389 nm UV laser to connect the 23S and the 33P state and a frequency tunable ~790 nm IR laser to connect the 33P state and the dierent Rydberg states. A third 1083 nm wavelength laser beam drives the 23S → 23P transition to transversely separate the residual metastable atoms and the Rydberg atoms for eciency measurements. The data is taken by a stainless steel detector in the vacuum system. As the Rydberg atoms will get ionized by blackbody radiation under room temperature, we can utilize this for their detection. An ion detector sitting on the eld plate is capable to collect the ion signals of the Rydberg atoms for detection. So far the whole system has not been ready for data collection and measurement, so here we are using data and results from previous theses for discussions. The highest transition frequency that has ever been achieved in our lab is around 70% after corrections.

  3. Fragmentation mechanism of UV-excited peptides in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Zabuga, Aleksandra V. Kamrath, Michael Z.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.; Rizzo, Thomas R.

    2014-10-21

    We present evidence that following near-UV excitation, protonated tyrosine- or phenylalanine–containing peptides undergo intersystem crossing to produce a triplet species. This pathway competes with direct dissociation from the excited electronic state and with dissociation from the electronic ground state subsequent to internal conversion. We employ UV-IR double-resonance photofragment spectroscopy to record conformer-specific vibrational spectra of cold peptides pre-excited to their S{sub 1} electronic state. The absorption of tunable IR light by these electronically excited peptides leads to a drastic increase in fragmentation, selectively enhancing the loss of neutral phenylalanine or tyrosine side-chain, which are not the lowest dissociation channels in the ground electronic state. The recorded IR spectra evolve upon increasing the time delay between the UV and IR pulses, reflecting the dynamics of the intersystem crossing on a timescale of ∼80 ns and <10 ns for phenylalanine- and tyrosine-containing peptides, respectively. Once in the triplet state, phenylalanine-containing peptides may live for more than 100 ms, unless they absorb IR photons and undergo dissociation by the loss of an aromatic side-chain. We discuss the mechanism of this fragmentation channel and its possible implications for photofragment spectroscopy and peptide photostability.

  4. Giant spin gap and magnon localization in the disordered Heisenberg antiferromagnet Sr2Ir1−xRuxO4

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, Yue; Liu, X.; Xu, Wenhu; ...

    2017-03-06

    Here, we study the evolution of magnetic excitations in the disordered two-dimensional antiferromagnet Sr2Ir1–xRuxO4. The maximum energy of the magnetic excitation remains robust up to x = 0.77, with a gap opening at low dopings and increasing to over 150 meV at x = 0.77. At these higher Ru concentrations, the dispersive magnetic excitations in Sr2IrO4 are rendered essentially momentum independent. Up to a Ru concentration of x = 0.77, both experiments and first-principles calculations show the Ir Jeff = 1/2 state remains intact. The magnetic gap arises from the local interaction anisotropy in the proximity of the Ru disorder.more » Under the coherent potential approximation, we reproduce the experimental magnetic excitations using the disordered Heisenberg antiferromagnetic model with suppressed next-nearest-neighbor ferromagnetic coupling.« less

  5. Northern Polar Spring in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 March 2004

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    Infrared images taken during the daytime exhibit both the morphological and thermophysical properties of the surface of Mars. Morphologic details are visible due to the effect of sun-facing slopes receiving more energy than antisun-facing slopes. This creates a warm (bright) slope and cool (dark) slope appearance that mimics the light and shadows of a visible wavelength image. Thermophysical properties are seen in that dust heats up more quickly than rocks. Thus dusty areas are bright and rocky areas are dark.

    This image was collected October 19, 2002 during the northern spring season. The top half of this daytime IR image shows the North Polar sand sea.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 76.2, Longitude 226.8 East (133.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in

  6. Magnetostrictive resonance excitation

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Ricardo B.; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    1992-01-01

    The resonance frequency spectrum of a magnetostrictive sample is remotely determined by exciting the magnetostrictive property with an oscillating magnetic field. The permeability of a magnetostrictive material and concomitant coupling with a detection coil varies with the strain in the material whereby resonance responses of the sample can be readily detected. A suitable sample may be a magnetostrictive material or some other material having at least one side coated with a magnetostrictive material. When the sample is a suitable shape, i.e., a cube, rectangular parallelepiped, solid sphere or spherical shell, the elastic moduli or the material can be analytically determined from the measured resonance frequency spectrum. No mechanical transducers are required and the sample excitation is obtained without contact with the sample, leading to highly reproducible results and a measurement capability over a wide temperature range, e.g. from liquid nitrogen temperature to the Curie temperature of the magnetostrictive material.

  7. Experiments on excitation waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, S. C.

    Recent trends in the experimentation on chemical and biochemical excitation waves are presented. In the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, which is the most suitable chemical laboratory system for the study of wave propagation in excitable medium, the efficient control of wave dynamics by electrical fields and by light illumination is illustrated. In particular, the effects of a feedback control are shown. Further new experiments in this system are concerned with three-dimensional topologies and boundary effects. Important biological applications are found in the aggregation of slime mould amoebae, in proton waves during oscillatory glycolysis, and in waves of spreading depression in neuronal tissue as studied by experiments in chicken retina. Numerical simulations with appropriate reaction-diffusion models complement a large number of these experimental findings.

  8. Excitable scale free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copelli, M.; Campos, P. R. A.

    2007-04-01

    When a simple excitable system is continuously stimulated by a Poissonian external source, the response function (mean activity versus stimulus rate) generally shows a linear saturating shape. This is experimentally verified in some classes of sensory neurons, which accordingly present a small dynamic range (defined as the interval of stimulus intensity which can be appropriately coded by the mean activity of the excitable element), usually about one or two decades only. The brain, on the other hand, can handle a significantly broader range of stimulus intensity, and a collective phenomenon involving the interaction among excitable neurons has been suggested to account for the enhancement of the dynamic range. Since the role of the pattern of such interactions is still unclear, here we investigate the performance of a scale-free (SF) network topology in this dynamic range problem. Specifically, we study the transfer function of disordered SF networks of excitable Greenberg-Hastings cellular automata. We observe that the dynamic range is maximum when the coupling among the elements is critical, corroborating a general reasoning recently proposed. Although the maximum dynamic range yielded by general SF networks is slightly worse than that of random networks, for special SF networks which lack loops the enhancement of the dynamic range can be dramatic, reaching nearly five decades. In order to understand the role of loops on the transfer function we propose a simple model in which the density of loops in the network can be gradually increased, and show that this is accompanied by a gradual decrease of dynamic range.

  9. The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Svec, Kathryn V; Budelli, Gonzalo; Chang, Elaine C; Ferrer, Anggie J; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan Dt; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-04-29

    Animals rely on highly sensitive thermoreceptors to seek out optimal temperatures, but the molecular mechanisms of thermosensing are not well understood. The Dorsal Organ Cool Cells (DOCCs) of the Drosophila larva are a set of exceptionally thermosensitive neurons critical for larval cool avoidance. Here, we show that DOCC cool-sensing is mediated by Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), a family of sensory receptors widely studied in invertebrate chemical sensing. We find that two IRs, IR21a and IR25a, are required to mediate DOCC responses to cooling and are required for cool avoidance behavior. Furthermore, we find that ectopic expression of IR21a can confer cool-responsiveness in an Ir25a-dependent manner, suggesting an instructive role for IR21a in thermosensing. Together, these data show that IR family receptors can function together to mediate thermosensation of exquisite sensitivity.

  10. The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Svec, Kathryn V; Budelli, Gonzalo; Chang, Elaine C; Ferrer, Anggie J; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan DT; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Animals rely on highly sensitive thermoreceptors to seek out optimal temperatures, but the molecular mechanisms of thermosensing are not well understood. The Dorsal Organ Cool Cells (DOCCs) of the Drosophila larva are a set of exceptionally thermosensitive neurons critical for larval cool avoidance. Here, we show that DOCC cool-sensing is mediated by Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), a family of sensory receptors widely studied in invertebrate chemical sensing. We find that two IRs, IR21a and IR25a, are required to mediate DOCC responses to cooling and are required for cool avoidance behavior. Furthermore, we find that ectopic expression of IR21a can confer cool-responsiveness in an Ir25a-dependent manner, suggesting an instructive role for IR21a in thermosensing. Together, these data show that IR family receptors can function together to mediate thermosensation of exquisite sensitivity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13254.001 PMID:27126188

  11. Harmonically excited orbital variations

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.

    1985-08-06

    Rephrasing the equations of motion for orbital maneuvers in terms of Lagrangian generalized coordinates instead of Newtonian rectangular cartesian coordinates can make certain harmonic terms in the orbital angular momentum vector more readily apparent. In this formulation the equations of motion adopt the form of a damped harmonic oscillator when torques are applied to the orbit in a variationally prescribed manner. The frequencies of the oscillator equation are in some ways unexpected but can nonetheless be exploited through resonant forcing functions to achieve large secular variations in the orbital elements. Two cases are discussed using a circular orbit as the control case: (1) large changes in orbital inclination achieved by harmonic excitation rather than one impulsive velocity change, and (2) periodic and secular changes to the longitude of the ascending node using both stable and unstable excitation strategies. The implications of these equations are also discussed for both artificial satellites and natural satellites. For the former, two utilitarian orbits are suggested, each exploiting a form of harmonic excitation. 5 refs.

  12. VIS-IR transmitting windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayya, S. S.; Chin, G. D.; Villalobos, G.; Sanghera, J. S.; Aggarwal, I. D.

    2005-05-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed two unique materials with excellent properties for various military and commercial applications in the UV-Vis-IR wavelength range. These materials are: an amorphous Barium Gallo-Germanate (BGG) glass and a polycrystalline Magnesium Aluminate Spinel. The BGG glass is made using traditional glass melting techniques, and was developed as a low cost alternative to the currently used window materials. Large prototype windows have been fabricated for a Navy reconnaissance program. BGG windows have been successfully tested for environmental ruggedness (MIL-F-48616) and rain erosion durability up to 300 mph. BGG glass is currently under development and evaluation for High Energy Laser (HEL) applications. A new process has been developed to sinter spinel to clear transparency with very high yields. This process has been used to make various sizes and shapes (flats and domes) and is readily scalable to industrial sizes to produce large windows & domes for various applications. NRL has also developed modified BGG glasses, which are compatible with Spinel and ALON substrates for bonding.

  13. IR line scanner on UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi-chao; Qin, Jie-xin; Qi, Hong-xing; Xiao, Gong-hai

    2011-08-01

    This paper introduces the designing principle and method of the IR line scanner on UAV in three aspects of optical-mechanical system, electronics system and processing software. It makes the system achieve good results in practical application that there are many features in the system such as light weight, small size, low power assumption, wide field of view, high instantaneous field of view, high noise equivalent temperature difference, wirelessly controlled and so on. The entire system is designed as follows: Multi-element scanner is put into use for reducing the electrical noise bandwidth, and then improving SNR; Square split aperture scanner is put into use for solving the image ratation distortion, besides fit for large velocity to height ratio; DSP is put into use for non-uniformity correction and background nosie subtraction, and then improving the imagery quality; SD card is put into use as image data storage media instead of the hard disk; The image data is stored in SD card in FAT32 file system, easily playbacked by processing software on Windows and Linux operating system; wireless transceiver module is put into use for wirelessly controlled.

  14. Recent catalysis measurements at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massuti-Ballester, B.; Pidan, S.; Herdrich, G.; Fertig, M.

    2015-08-01

    At the Institute of Space Systems (IRS), experiments have been performed using the high enthalpy, inductively heated plasma generator (IPG) in plasma wind tunnel 3 (PWK3), in order to assess the catalytic behaviour of different materials. Utilising the Upwind Relaxation Algorithm for Non-equilibrium Flows of the University of Stuttgart (URANUS), a methodology for determining catalytic efficiencies by obtaining atomic recombination probabilities γ for high temperature materials, has been developed. This method eliminates the inherent uncertainties produced when using catalytic properties of previously tested materials to infer those of new materials. In this work, eight different candidates for the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of an entry vehicle have been studied, of which six are ceramic materials and the other two are metallic alloys. Thermochemical properties of these specimens are given for surface temperatures between 1000 and 2000 K in pure oxygen and pure nitrogen plasmas. The high enthalpies and relatively low pressure conditions in which these material samples have been tested in PWK3 are relevant for entry applications from Low Earth Orbit (LEO).

  15. Transient mid-IR study of electron dynamics in TiO2 conduction band.

    PubMed

    Sá, Jacinto; Friedli, Peter; Geiger, Richard; Lerch, Philippe; Rittmann-Frank, Mercedes H; Milne, Christopher J; Szlachetko, Jakub; Santomauro, Fabio G; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A; Chergui, Majed; Rossi, Michel J; Sigg, Hans

    2013-04-07

    The dynamics of TiO2 conduction band electrons were followed with a novel broadband synchrotron-based transient mid-IR spectroscopy setup. The lifetime of conduction band electrons was found to be dependent on the injection method used. Direct band gap excitation results in a lifetime of 2.5 ns, whereas indirect excitation at 532 nm via Ru-N719 dye followed by injection from the dye into TiO2 results in a lifetime of 5.9 ns.

  16. Pulse excitation of bolometer bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rusk, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    Driving bolometer bridge by appropriately phased excitation pulses increases signal-to-noise ratio of bolometer sensor which operates on a chopped light beam. Method allows higher applied voltage than is possible by conventional ac or dc excitation.

  17. Apparatus for photon excited catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saffren, M. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for increasing the yield of photonically excited gas phase reactions by extracting excess energy from unstable, excited species by contacting the species with the surface of a finely divided solid.

  18. High temperature Ir segregation in Ir-B ceramics: Effect of oxygen presence on stability of IrB2 and other Ir-B phases

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhilin; Terracciano, Anthony C.; Cullen, David A.; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina

    2015-05-13

    The formation of IrB2, IrB1.35, IrB1.1 and IrB monoboride phases in the Ir–B ceramic nanopowder was confirmed during mechanochemical reaction between metallic Ir and elemental B powders. The Ir–B phases were analysed after 90 h of high energy ball milling and after annealing of the powder for 72 h at 1050°C in vacuo. The iridium monoboride (IrB) orthorhombic phase was synthesised experimentally for the first time and identified by powder X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the ReB2 type IrB2 hexagonal phase was also produced for the first time and identified by high resolution transmission electron microscope. Ir segregation along disordered domains of the boron lattice was found to occur during high temperature annealing. Furthermore, these nanodomains may have useful catalytic properties.

  19. Hydrogen intercalation under graphene on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grånäs, Elin; Gerber, Timm; Schröder, Ulrike A.; Schulte, Karina; Andersen, Jesper N.; Michely, Thomas; Knudsen, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Using high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy we study the intercalation of hydrogen under graphene/Ir(111). The hydrogen intercalated graphene is characterized by a component in C 1s that is shifted -0.10 to -0.18 eV with respect to pristine graphene and a component in Ir 4f at 60.54 eV. The position of this Ir 4f component is identical to that of the Ir(111) surface layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed, indicating that the atomic hydrogen adsorption site on bare Ir(111) and beneath graphene is the same. Based on co-existence of fully- and non-intercalated graphene, and the inability to intercalate a closed graphene film covering the entire Ir(111) surface, we conclude that hydrogen dissociatively adsorbs at bare Ir(111) patches, and subsequently diffuses rapidly under graphene. A likely entry point for the intercalating hydrogen atoms is identified to be where graphene crosses an underlying Ir(111) step.

  20. Status Of Sofradir IR-CCD Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribolet, Philippe; Radisson, Patrick

    1988-05-01

    The topics of this paper deal with the IR-CCD detectors manufactured by SOFRADIR the new French joint venture. Description of the IRCCD technology and the advantages of this approach are given. In conclusion, some IR-CCD typical results are given.

  1. The WFC3 IR "Blobs" Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirzkal, N.; Hilbert, B.

    2012-11-01

    We present new results on the WFC3 IR "Blobs" based on analysis of data acquired using the WFC3 IR channel from 2010 to 2012. In particular, we trace the date of appearance of each of the Blobs we identified in our deep IR sky flats. The number of Blobs identified in the WFC3 IR channel is now 40, and increase of a factor of 2 from our earlier 2010 ISR. We also discuss the color of the blobs, as measured using the F105W, F125W and F160W filters. We find Blobs to be more opaque to bluer light and their effect is therefore slightly stronger in the F105W and F125W filters when comparing these to the F160W filter. We find that the IR Blobs have appeared during somewhat discrete events and that there was a period a little over one year long when no new Blobs appeared.

  2. Superluminal travel, UV/IR mixing, and turbulence in a (1+1)-dimensional world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Gorbenko, Victor

    2011-11-01

    We study renormalizable Lorentz invariant stable quantum field theories in two space-time dimensions with instantaneous causal structure (causal ordering induced by the light “cone” time ordering). These models provide a candidate UV completion of the two-dimensional ghost condensate. They exhibit a peculiar UV/IR mixing—energies of all excitations become arbitrarily small at high spatial momenta. We discuss several phenomena associated with this mixing. These include the impossibility to reach a thermal equilibrium and metastability of all excitations towards decay into short-wavelength modes resulting in an indefinite turbulent cascade. In spite of the UV/IR mixing in many cases the UV physics can still be decoupled from low-energy phenomena. However, a patient observer in the Lineland is able to produce arbitrarily heavy particles simply by waiting for a long enough time.

  3. Get excited: reappraising pre-performance anxiety as excitement.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alison Wood

    2014-06-01

    Individuals often feel anxious in anticipation of tasks such as speaking in public or meeting with a boss. I find that an overwhelming majority of people believe trying to calm down is the best way to cope with pre-performance anxiety. However, across several studies involving karaoke singing, public speaking, and math performance, I investigate an alternative strategy: reappraising anxiety as excitement. Compared with those who attempt to calm down, individuals who reappraise their anxious arousal as excitement feel more excited and perform better. Individuals can reappraise anxiety as excitement using minimal strategies such as self-talk (e.g., saying "I am excited" out loud) or simple messages (e.g., "get excited"), which lead them to feel more excited, adopt an opportunity mind-set (as opposed to a threat mind-set), and improve their subsequent performance. These findings suggest the importance of arousal congruency during the emotional reappraisal process.

  4. Inter-Valence-Subband/Conduction-Band-Transport IR Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David; Gunapala, Sarath; Bandara, Sumith

    2004-01-01

    Infrared (IR) detectors characterized by a combination of (1) high-quantum-efficiency photoexcitation of inter-valence-subband transitions of charge carriers and (2) high-mobility conduction- band transport of the thus-excited charge carriers have been proposed in an effort to develop focal-plane arrays of such devices for infrared imaging. Like many prior quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs), the proposed devices would be made from semiconductor heterostructures. In order to obtain the combination of characteristics mentioned above, the proposed devices would be designed and fabricated in novel InAs/GaSb superlattice configurations that would exploit a phenomenon known in the semiconductor art as type-II broken-gap band offset.

  5. Near-IR fluorescence and reflectance confocal microscopy for imaging of quantum dots in mammalian skin

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Glazowski, Christopher E.; Zavislan, James M.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the skin penetration of nanoparticles (NPs) is an important concern due to the increasing presence of NPs in consumer products, including cosmetics. Technical challenges have slowed progress in evaluating skin barrier and NP factors that contribute to skin penetration risk. To limit sampling error and other problems associated with histological processing, many researchers are implementing whole tissue confocal or multiphoton microscopies. This work introduces a fluorescence and reflectance confocal microscopy system that utilizes near-IR excitation and emission to detect near-IR lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) through ex vivo human epidermis. We provide a detailed prediction and experimental analysis of QD detection sensitivity and demonstrate detection of QD skin penetration in a barrier disrupted model. The unique properties of near-IR lead-based QDs will enable future studies that examine the impact of further barrier-disrupting agents on skin penetration of QDs and elucidate mechanistic insight into QD tissue interactions at the cellular level. PMID:21698023

  6. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Eugenio, Paul

    2007-10-26

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  7. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Eugenio

    2007-10-01

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  8. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  9. Metastable Interactions: Dissociative Excitation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-05-01

    participate. The mercuric halide compounds HgBr2 , HgCl 2 , and HgI2 are of recent interest because of laser output achieved on the B2 E - X2 E transition in...the * respective mercuric halide radicals in the range of 400-600 nm. Population inversion has been obtained by photodissociation and electron impact...excitation in mixtures o the mercuric - halide compounds and the rare gases. Chang and -* Burnham (3) have noted Improved laser efficiency and improved

  10. Design of a mid-IR polarimeter for SOFIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packham, C.; Escuti, M.; Boreman, G.; Quijano, I.; Ginn, J. C.; Franklin, B.; Axon, D. J.; Hough, J. H.; Jones, T. J.; Roche, P. F.; Tamura, M.; Telesco, C. M.; Levenson, N.; Rodgers, J. M.; McGuire, J. P.

    2008-07-01

    Mid-infrared polarimetry remains an underexploited technique; where available it is limited in spectral coverage from the ground, and conspicuously absent from the Spitzer, JWST and Herschel instrument suites. The unique characteristics of SOFIA afford unprecedented spectral coverage and sensitivity in the mid-infrared waveband. We discuss the preliminary optical design for a 5-40μm spectro-polarimeter for use on SOFIA, the SOFIA Mid-InfraRed Polarimeter (SMIRPh). The design furthers the existing 5-40μm imaging and spectroscopic capabilities of SOFIA, and draws on experience gained through the University of Florida's mid-IR imagers, spectrometer and polarimeter designs of T-ReCS and CanariCam. We pay special attention to the challenges of obtaining polarimetric materials suitable at both these wavelengths and cryogenic temperatures. Finally, we (briefly) present an overview of science highlights that could be performed from a 5-40μm imaging- and spectro-polarimeter on SOFIA. Combined with the synergy between the possible future far-IR polarimeter, Hale, this instrument would provide the SOFIA community with unique and exciting science capabilities, leaving a unique scientific legacy.

  11. Quantifying Flaw Characteristics from IR NDE Data

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W; Philips, N R; Burke, M W; Robbins, C L

    2003-02-14

    Work is presented which allows flaw characteristics to be quantified from the transient IR NDE signature. The goal of this effort was to accurately determine the type, size and depth of flaws revealed with IR NDE, using sonic IR as the example IR NDE technique. Typically an IR NDE experiment will result in a positive qualitative indication of a flaw such as a cold or hot spot in the image, but will not provide quantitative data thereby leaving the practitioner to make educated guesses as to the source of the signal. The technique presented here relies on comparing the transient IR signature to exact heat transfer analytical results for prototypical flaws, using the flaw characteristics as unknown fitting parameters. A nonlinear least squares algorithm is used to evaluate the fitting parameters, which then provide a direct measure of the flaw characteristics that can be mapped to the imaged surface for visual reference. The method uses temperature data for the heat transfer analysis, so radiometric calibration of the IR signal is required. The method provides quantitative data with a single thermal event (e.g. acoustic pulse or flash), as compared to phase-lock techniques that require many events. The work has been tested with numerical data but remains to be validated by experimental data, and that effort is underway.

  12. Detecting explosive substances by the IR spectrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuula, J.; Rinta, Heikki J.; Pölönen, I.; Puupponen, H.-H.; Haukkamäki, Marko; Teräväinen, T.

    2014-05-01

    Fast and safe detection methods of explosive substances are needed both before and after actualized explosions. This article presents an experiment of the detection of three selected explosives by the ATR FTIR spectrometer and by three different IR hyperspectral imaging devices. The IR spectrometers give accurate analyzing results, whereas hyperspectral imagers can detect and analyze desired samples without touching the unidentified target at all. In the controlled explosion experiment TNT, dynamite and PENO were at first analyzed as pure substances with the ATR FTIR spectrometer and with VNIR, SWIR and MWIR cameras. After three controlled explosions also the residues of TNT, dynamite and PENO were analyzed with the same IR devices. The experiments were performed in arctic outdoor conditions and the residues were collected on ten different surfaces. In the measurements the spectra of all three explosives were received as pure substances with all four IR devices. Also the explosion residues of TNT were found on cotton with the IR spectrometer and with VNIR, SWIR and MWIR hyperspectral imagers. All measurements were made directly on the test materials which had been placed on the explosion site and were collected for the analysis after each blast. Measurements were made with the IR spectrometer also on diluted sample. Although further tests are suggested, the results indicate that the IR spectrography is a potential detection method for explosive subjects, both as pure substances and as post-blast residues.

  13. Visualizing Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy with Computer Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Charles B.; Fine, Leonard W.

    1996-01-01

    IR Tutor, an interactive, animated infrared (IR) spectroscopy tutorial has been developed for Macintosh and IBM-compatible computers. Using unique color animation, complicated vibrational modes can be introduced to beginning students. Rules governing the appearance of IR absorption bands become obvious because the vibrational modes can be visualized. Each peak in the IR spectrum is highlighted, and the animation of the corresponding normal mode can be shown. Students can study each spectrum stepwise, or click on any individual peak to see its assignment. Important regions of each spectrum can be expanded and spectra can be overlaid for comparison. An introduction to the theory of IR spectroscopy is included, making the program a complete instructional package. Our own success in using this software for teaching and research in both academic and industrial environments will be described. IR Tutor consists of three sections: (1) The 'Introduction' is a review of basic principles of spectroscopy. (2) 'Theory' begins with the classical model of a simple diatomic molecule and is expanded to include larger molecules by introducing normal modes and group frequencies. (3) 'Interpretation' is the heart of the tutorial. Thirteen IR spectra are analyzed in detail, covering the most important functional groups. This section features color animation of each normal mode, full interactivity, overlay of related spectra, and expansion of important regions. This section can also be used as a reference.

  14. Excitability in Dictyostelium development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David

    2013-03-01

    Discovering how populations of cells reliably develop into complex multi-cellular structures is a key challenge in modern developmental biology. This requires an understanding of how networks at the single-cell level, when combined with intercellular signaling and environmental cues, give rise to the collective behaviors observed in cellular populations. I will present work in collaboration with the Gregor lab, showing that the signal-relay response of starved cells of the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum can be well modeled as an excitable system. This is in contrast to existing models of the network that postulate a feed-forward cascade. I then extend the signal-relay model to describe how spatial gradient sensing may be achieved via excitability. One potential advantage of relying on feedback for gradient sensing is in preventing ``cheaters'' that do not produce signals from taking over the population. I then combine these models of single-cell signaling and chemotaxis to perform large-scale agent-based simulations of aggregating populations. This allows direct study of how variations in single-cell dynamics modify population behavior. In order to further test this model, I use the results of a screen for mutant cell lines that exhibit altered collective patterns. Finally, I use an existing FRET movie database of starved cell populations at varying cell densities and dilution rates to study heterogeneity in repeated spatio-temporal activity patterns.

  15. Atmospheric Effects in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 3, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image covering parts of Ius Chasma and Oudemans Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    This image is dominated by atmospheric effects. The pink/magenta colors inside the canyon show areas with a large amount of atmospheric dust. In the bottom half of the image, the patchy blue/cyan colors indicate the presence of water ice clouds out on the plains. Water ice clouds and high amounts of dust do not generally occur at the same place and time on Mars because the dust absorbs sunlight and heats the atmosphere. The more dust that is present, the warmer the atmosphere becomes, sublimating the water ice into water vapor and dissipating any clouds.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 267.9 East (92.1.West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is

  16. Gale Crater in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 4, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image of Gale Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    In the bottom of the crater, surrounding the central mound, there are extensive basaltic sand deposits. The basaltic sand spectral signature combined with the warm surface (due to the low albedo of basaltic sand) produces a very strong pink/magenta color. This color signature contrasts with the green/yellow color of soil and dust in the top of the image, and the cyan color due to the presence of water ice clouds at the bottom of the image. This migrating sand may be producing the erosional features seen on the central mound.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -4.4, Longitude 137.4 East (222.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University

  17. Melas Chasma in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 11, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image over Melas Chasma. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    There is a distinct purple/blue layer present in the northern wall of the Chasma. Although this layer likely has a composition different than the surrounding areas, it is difficult to interpret its specific composition due to the high variability of sunlit and shaded surfaces in this area, which cause a wide range of temperatures to be present within each pixel of the image. It is possible that this layer has a unique composition due to differences in the volcanic or sedimentary environment at the time that the rock formed, or it could be a layer of magma injected between two previously existing rock layers. Another possibility is that the wall is mostly covered by dust and debris, and this portion contains the only exposed bedrock. The light blue colors present in many other areas of the Chasma are due to water ice clouds.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.9, Longitude 282 East (78 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey

  18. Ice Clouds in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 9, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image in the Elysium region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    The light blue area in the center of this image is a very nice example of a water ice cloud. Water ice is frequently present in the Martian atmosphere as a thin haze. Clouds such as this one can be difficult to identify in a temperature image, but are easy to spot in the DCS images. In this case, the water ice is relatively confined and concentrated which may be due to the topography of the Elysium volcanic construct.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 23.2, Longitude 150.1 East (209.9 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed

  19. Basaltic Crater in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 6, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image near Nili Fosse in the the Isidis region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations. In many cases craters trap sand in their topographic depressions, interrupting the sand's migration across the Martian surface. This image is particularly interesting because there appears to be more than 1 type of sand in the bottom of this crater and in the hummocky terrain near the bottom of the image. The pink/magenta areas are characteristic of a basaltic composition, but there are also orange areas that are likely caused by the presence of andesite. These two compositions, basalt and andesite, are some of the most common found on Mars.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 24, Longitude 80.7 East (297.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  20. FT-IR standoff detection of thermally excited emissions of trinitrotoluene (TNT) deposited on aluminum substrates.

    PubMed

    Castro-Suarez, John R; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C; Vélez-Reyes, Miguel; Diem, Max; Tague, Thomas J; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P

    2013-02-01

    A standoff detection system was assembled by coupling a reflecting telescope to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer equipped with a cryo-cooled mercury cadmium telluride detector and used for detection of solid-phase samples deposited on substrates. Samples of highly energetic materials were deposited on aluminum substrates and detected at several collector-target distances by performing passive-mode, remote, infrared detection measurements on the heated analytes. Aluminum plates were used as support material, and 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) was used as the target. For standoff detection experiments, the samples were placed at different distances (4 to 55 m). Several target surface temperatures were investigated. Partial least squares regression analysis was applied to the analysis of the intensities of the spectra obtained. Overall, standoff detection in passive mode was useful for quantifying TNT deposited on the aluminum plates with high confidence up to target-collector distances of 55 m.

  1. Monitoring Non-Adiabatic Dynamics of the RNA Base Uracil by UV-Pump-IR-Probe Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fingerhut, Benjamin P.; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2013-01-01

    Resolving the excited state dynamics of DNA- and RNA- nucleobases has attracted considerably attention. UV irradiation of the isolated nucleobases leads to the population of an electronic excited state which is quenched by internal conversion mediated by conical intersections on an ultrafast timescale. We present non-adiabatic on-the-fly molecular dynamics simulations of the UV-pump-IR-probe signal of the pyrimidine nucleobase uracil using a novel semiclassical protocol which takes into account the path integral over the excited state vibrational dynamics and properly describes the joint temporal and spectral resolution of the technique. Simulations of vibrational motions of carbonyl fingerprint modes in the electronically excited states reveal clear signatures of different relaxation pathways on a timescale of hundreds of femtoseconds which arise from an ultrafast branching in the excited state. We show that the inherent temporal and spectral resolution of the technique is not purely instrumental but also depends on the vibrational fluctuation timescale. PMID:23914288

  2. Detection of concealed and buried chemicals by using multifrequency excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yaohui; Chen, Meng-Ku; Yang, Chia-En; Chang, Yun-Ching; Yao, Jim; Cheng Jiping; Yin, Stuart; Hui Rongqing; Ruffin, Paul; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene; Luo, Claire

    2010-08-15

    In this paper, we present a new type of concealed and buried chemical detection system by stimulating and enhancing spectroscopic signatures with multifrequency excitations, which includes a low frequency gradient dc electric field, a high frequency microwave field, and higher frequency infrared (IR) radiations. Each excitation frequency plays a unique role. The microwave, which can penetrate into the underground and/or pass through the dielectric covers with low attenuation, could effectively transform its energy into the concealed and buried chemicals and increases its evaporation rate from the sample source. Subsequently, a gradient dc electric field, generated by a Van De Graaff generator, not only serves as a vapor accelerator for efficiently expediting the transportation process of the vapor release from the concealed and buried chemicals but also acts as a vapor concentrator for increasing the chemical concentrations in the detection area, which enables the trace level chemical detection. Finally, the stimulated and enhanced vapors on the surface are detected by the IR spectroscopic fingerprints. Our theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that more than sixfold increase in detection signal can be achieved by using this proposed technology. The proposed technology can also be used for standoff detection of concealed and buried chemicals by adding the remote IR and/or thermal spectroscopic and imaging detection systems.

  3. PKCdelta-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation negatively regulates IRS-1 function.

    PubMed

    Greene, Michael W; Ruhoff, Mary S; Roth, Richard A; Kim, Jeong-A; Quon, Michael J; Krause, Jean A

    2006-10-27

    The IRS-1 PH and PTB domains are essential for insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation and insulin signaling, while Ser/Thr phosphorylation of IRS-1 disrupts these signaling events. To investigate consensus PKC phosphorylation sites in the PH-PTB domains of human IRS-1, we changed Ser24, Ser58, and Thr191 to Ala (3A) or Glu (3E), to block or mimic phosphorylation, respectively. The 3A mutant abrogated the inhibitory effect of PKCdelta on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, while reductions in insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, cellular proliferation, and Akt activation were observed with the 3E mutant. When single Glu mutants were tested, the Ser24 to Glu mutant had the greatest inhibitory effect on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation. PKCdelta-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation was confirmed in cells with PKCdelta catalytic domain mutants and by an RNAi method. Mechanistic studies revealed that IRS-1 with Ala and Glu point mutations at Ser24 impaired phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate binding. In summary, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Ser24 is a negative regulatory phosphorylation site in IRS-1.

  4. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation negatively regulates IRS-1 function

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Michael W. . E-mail: michael.greene@bassett.org; Ruhoff, Mary S.; Roth, Richard A.; Kim, Jeong-a; Quon, Michael J.; Krause, Jean A.

    2006-10-27

    The IRS-1 PH and PTB domains are essential for insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation and insulin signaling, while Ser/Thr phosphorylation of IRS-1 disrupts these signaling events. To investigate consensus PKC phosphorylation sites in the PH-PTB domains of human IRS-1, we changed Ser24, Ser58, and Thr191 to Ala (3A) or Glu (3E), to block or mimic phosphorylation, respectively. The 3A mutant abrogated the inhibitory effect of PKC{delta} on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, while reductions in insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, cellular proliferation, and Akt activation were observed with the 3E mutant. When single Glu mutants were tested, the Ser24 to Glu mutant had the greatest inhibitory effect on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation was confirmed in cells with PKC{delta} catalytic domain mutants and by an RNAi method. Mechanistic studies revealed that IRS-1 with Ala and Glu point mutations at Ser24 impaired phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate binding. In summary, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Ser24 is a negative regulatory phosphorylation site in IRS-1.

  5. Observation of the interference between the intramolecular IR-visible and visible-IR processes in the doubly resonant sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy of Rhodamine 6G adsorbed at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Deng, Gang-Hua; Guo, Yuan; Wang, Hong-fei

    2009-05-28

    Using the picosecond visible light at 532.1 nm and infrared light at 2800-3100 cm(-1), we observed the interference between the intramolecular IR-visible and visible-IR processes in the doubly resonant sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy of Rhodamine 6G adsorbed at the air/water interface. The interference phenomenon exists for both the C-H stretching vibrations in the 2800-3100 cm(-1) region and the skeleton vibrations in the 1450-1700 cm(-1) region. The relative strength of the visible-IR process at different wavelengths is the result of the electronic structure of the molecule. This is the first direct observation of the visible-IR sum frequency generation process in the electronically excited state of a model molecular system.

  6. Peptide backbone orientation and dynamics in spider dragline silk and two-photon excitation in nuclear magnetic and quadrupole resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eles, Philip Thomas

    2005-07-01

    In the first part of the dissertation, spider dragline silk is studied by solid state NMR techniques. The dependence of NMR frequency on molecular orientation is exploited using the DECODER experiment to determine the orientation of the protein backbone within the silk fibre. Practical experimental considerations require that the silk fibres be wound about a cylindrical axis perpendicular to the external magnetic field, complicating the reconstruction of the underlying orientation distribution and necess-itating the development of numerical techniques for this purpose. A two-component model of silk incorporating static b-sheets and polyglycine II helices adequately fits the NMR data and suggests that the b-sheets are well aligned along the silk axis (20 FWHM) while the helices are poorly aligned (68 FWHM). The effects of fibre strain, draw rate and hydration on orientation are measured. Measurements of the time-scale for peptide backbone motion indicate that when wet, a strain-dependent frac-tion of the poorly aligned component becomes mobile. This suggests a mechanism for the supercontraction of silk involving latent entropic springs that undergo a local strain-dependent phase transition, driving supercontraction. In the second part of this dissertation a novel method is developed for exciting NMR and nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) by rf irradiation at multiple frequencies that sum to (or differ by) the resonance frequency. This is fundamentally different than traditional NMR experiments where irradiation is applied on-resonance. With excitation outside the detection bandwidth, two-photon excitation allows for detection of free induction signals during excitation, completely eliminating receiver dead-time. A theoretical approach to describing two-photon excitation is developed based on average Hamiltonian theory. An intuition for two-photon excitation is gained by analogy to the coherent absorption of multiple photons requiring conservation of total energy and

  7. Double photon excitation of high-Rydberg atoms as a long-lived submillimeter detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, A. N. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting submillimeter or IR radiation is disclosed. A rare gas, such as xenon, is supplied at its ground state via a pressurized cylinder and an adjustable leak valve into a cryogenically cooled detection area. The ground state of xenon is double photon excited to a particularized level of the Rydberg series by a resonance lamp and a laser. The doubly excited gas is then further excited by the radiation to be measured. A field ionization and an ion measurement indicative of the radiation intensity is achieved.

  8. Occupational radiodermatitis from Ir192 exposure.

    PubMed

    Condé-Salazar, L; Guimaraens, D; Romero, L V

    1986-10-01

    3 cases of occupational radiodermatitis from Ir192 exposure in personnel handling a gamma ray projector in industrial radiography are presented. The diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The nature and use of the industrial machines are described.

  9. Competing reaction channels in IR-laser-induced unimolecular reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.R.

    1981-01-01

    The competing reaction channels in the unimolecular decomposition of two molecules, formaldehyde and tetralin were studied. A TEA CO/sub 2/ laser was used as the excitation source in all experiments. The dissociation of D/sub 2/CO was studied by infrared multiphoton dissociation (MPD) and the small-molecule nature of formaldehyde with regard to MPD was explored. The effect of collisions in MPD were probed by the pressure dependence of the MPD yield and ir fluorescence from multiphoton excited D/sub 2/CO. MPD yield shows a near cubic dependence in pure D/sub 2/CO which is reduced to a 1.7 power dependence when 15 torr of NO is added. The peak amplitude of 5 ..mu..m ir fluorescence from D/sub 2/CO is proportional to the square of the D/sub 2/CO pressure in pure D/sub 2/CO or in the presence of 50 torr of Ar. Results are explained in terms of bottlenecks to excitation at the v = 1 level which are overcome by a combination of vibrational energy transfer and rotational relaxation. The radical/molecule branching ratio in D/sub 2/CO MPD was 0.10 +- 0.02 at a fluence of 125 J/cm/sup 2/ at 946.0 cm/sup -1/. The barrier height to molecular dissociation was calculated to be 3.6 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 85.0 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state of D/sub 2/CO. In H/sub 2/CO, this corresponds to 2.5 +- 2.0 kcal/mole below the radical threshold or 83.8 +- 3.0 kcal/mole above the ground state. Comparison with uv data indicate that RRKM theory is an acceptable description of formaldehyde dissociation in the 5 to 10 torr pressure range. The unimolecular decomposition of tetralin was studied by MPD and SiF/sub 4/ - sensitized pyrolysis. Both techniques induce decomposition without the interference of catalytic surfaces. Ethylene loss is identified as the lowest energy reaction channel. Dehydrogenation is found to result from step-wise H atom loss. Isomerization via disproportionation is also identified as a primary reaction channel.

  10. IR diver vision for turbidity mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milam, Jerry A.

    2010-04-01

    Commercial, forensic, and military divers often encounter turbid conditions which reduce visibility to zero. Under such conditions, work must be performed completely blind. The darkness resulting from high levels of turbidity is complete, and can be dangerous as well as disorienting. Such darkness can even occur near the surface on a bright and sunny day. Artificial underwater lighting is of no use in such situations, as it only makes matters worse (similar to the use of high beam headlights in dense fog). Certain wavelengths of infrared (IR) light have the ability to penetrate this underwater "fog," and thus form the basis of the current development. Turbidity results from clay, silt, finely divided organic and inorganic matter, soluble colored organic compounds, plankton and microscopic organisms suspended in water. The IR Diver Vision system described herein consists of a standard commercial diving mask of any of several configurations whereby an IR light source, IR video camera, video display, and power source may be integrated within or attached to the mask. The IR light source wavelength is compatible with the spectral bandwidth of the video camera. The camera field-of-view (FOV) is matched to the video display in order to provide a unity magnification and hence prevent diver ocular fatigue. The IR video camera, video display, power source and controls are compatible with extended use in a submarine environment. Some such masks will incorporate tilt/heading sensors and video indicators. 3-D Imaging, Inc. has developed prototypes and has patents pending on such devices.

  11. Front interaction induces excitable behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Rivas, P.; Matías, M. A.; Colet, P.; Gelens, L.; Walgraef, D.; Gomila, D.

    2017-02-01

    Spatially extended systems can support local transient excitations in which just a part of the system is excited. The mechanisms reported so far are local excitability and excitation of a localized structure. Here we introduce an alternative mechanism based on the coexistence of two homogeneous stable states and spatial coupling. We show the existence of a threshold for perturbations of the homogeneous state. Subthreshold perturbations decay exponentially. Superthreshold perturbations induce the emergence of a long-lived structure formed by two back to back fronts that join the two homogeneous states. While in typical excitability the trajectory follows the remnants of a limit cycle, here reinjection is provided by front interaction, such that fronts slowly approach each other until eventually annihilating. This front-mediated mechanism shows that extended systems with no oscillatory regimes can display excitability.

  12. The repopulation of electronic states upon vibrational excitation of niobium carbide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyy, V.; Logemann, R.; Bakker, J. M.; Kirilyuk, A.

    2016-07-01

    We study the infrared (IR) resonant heating of neutral niobium carbide clusters probed through ultraviolet photoionization spectroscopy. The IR excitation not only changes the photoionization spectra for the photon energies above the ionization threshold, but also modulates ion yield for energies significantly below it. An attempt to describe the experimental spectra using either Fowler's theory or thermally populated vibrational states was not successful. However, the data can be fully modeled by vibrationally and rotationally broadened discrete electronic levels obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The application of this method to spectra with different IR pulse energies not only yields information about the excited electronic states in the vicinity of the HOMO level, populated by manipulation of the vibrational coordinates of a cluster, but also can serve as an extra indicator for the cluster isomeric structure and corresponding DFT-calculated electronic levels.

  13. Role of IRS1 and IRS2 in Modulating ErbB-induced Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    mediated tumorigenesis in transgenic mice. We identified that IRS2 had no effect on ErbB2 induced tumorigenesis as identified by not altering...mediated tumorigenesis in transgenic mice. I found that: - Overexpression of IRS2 does not alter branching morphogenesis in adult ErbB2...IRS2 levels using short-term si/shRNA in mammary cancer cells derived from MMTV-ErbB2 transgenic mice and examine effects on signaling downstream of

  14. Fission fragment excited laser system

    DOEpatents

    McArthur, David A.; Tollefsrud, Philip B.

    1976-01-01

    A laser system and method for exciting lasing action in a molecular gas lasing medium which includes cooling the lasing medium to a temperature below about 150 K and injecting fission fragments through the lasing medium so as to preferentially excite low lying vibrational levels of the medium and to cause population inversions therein. The cooled gas lasing medium should have a mass areal density of about 5 .times. 10.sup.-.sup.3 grams/square centimeter, relaxation times of greater than 50 microseconds, and a broad range of excitable vibrational levels which are excitable by molecular collisions.

  15. Optically excited states in positronium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, R. H.; Ziock, Klaus P.; Magnotta, F.; Dermer, Charles D.; Failor, R. A.; Jones, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    Optical excitation are reported of the 1 3S-2 3P transition in positronium, and a second excitation from n=2 to higher n states. The experiment used light from two pulsed dye lasers. Changes in the positronium annihilation rate during and after the laser pulse were used to deduce the excited state populations. The n=2 level was found to be saturable and excitable to a substantial fraction of n=2 positronium to higher levels. Preliminary spectroscopic measurements were performed on n=14 and n=15 positronium.

  16. Mapping Ultrafast Dynamics of Highly Excited H2by Attosecond VUV-Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Thorsten; Sturm, Felix; Wright, Travis; Ray, Dipanwita; Shivaram, Niranjan; Slaughter, Daniel; Bocharova, Irina; Ranitovic, Predrag; Belkacem, Ali

    2016-05-01

    We show how attosecond vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and femtosecond infrared (IR) radiation can be used to excite and map dynamics of a highly excited neutral hydrogen molecule. By using time-delayed, strong laser pulses and ion imaging, we map the dynamics of highly-excited, bound states of hydrogen molecules. Due to the large stretching amplitude of the B electronic state, excited by the 9th harmonic of the fundamental laser frequency, the effective ionization potential of the hydrogen molecular ion changes substantially as the nuclear wave packet (NWP) vibrates in the bound, B potential energy curve. Therefore, the probability of ionizing the neutrally-excited hydrogen molecule by the IR probe pulse changes as the NWP evolves in the B potential. We probe this dynamics by ionizing the vibrating molecule by means of time-delayed IR radiation, and identify the dissociation channels with 3D-momentum ion imaging. Supported by DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  17. Hyperhoneycomb iridate beta-Li2 IrO3 as a platform for Kitaev spin liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, Tomohiro

    Realization of quantum spin liquid has been a long-sought dream in condensed matter physics, where exotic excitations and unconventional superconductivity upon doping are expected. Honeycomb iridates recently emerged as a possible materialization of Kitaev spin liquid with frustrated `` bond - dependent ferromagnetic interaction ''. However, the real materials, α-Na2IrO3 and α-Li2IrO3, undergo antiferromagnetic ordering likely due to the presence of other dominant magnetic interactions and lattice distortion. We discovered a new form of Li2IrO3, β-Li2IrO3, which comprises a three-dimensional analogue of honeycomb lattice dubbed as ''hyperhoneycomb''. Each Ir4+ ion of the hyperhoneycomb lattice has three neighboring like ions rotated by 120° and thus the local structure is identical with 2D honeycomb, indicating that the hyperhoneycomb lattice is a new platform for Kitaev physics. β-Li2IrO3 diplays a spiral magnetic order below 38 K, which likely originates from dominance of ferromagnetic Kitaev interaction. We argure that β-Li2IrO3 locates in a close proximity to Kitaev spin liquid. We also discuss the spin liquid behavior observed in a new honeycomb iridate obtained by chemical modulation.

  18. Pump-probe scheme to study the autoionization decay of optically-forbidden H2 doubly excited states.

    PubMed

    Rivière, P; Silva, R E F; Martín, F

    2012-11-26

    A pump-probe scheme is proposed to investigate the autoionization dynamics of the optically forbidden Q(1)(1)Σ(g)(+) doubly excited states of the H(2) molecule. The scheme consists of a pump that contains an attosecond pulse train (APT) and an infrared (IR) pulse, which is phase-locked with the APT, and an IR probe identical to the former IR pulse. The dynamical information is obtained by analyzing the electron kinetic energy spectra (EKE) and proton kinetic energy spectra (PKE) as a function of the time delay between the pump and the probe. The essential requirement for an efficient population of the Q(1)(1)Σ(g)(+) states is that they are resonantly coupled to both the dipole-allowed Q(1)(1)Σ(u)(+) doubly excited states and the ground state of H(2) by the combined effect of the APT + IR fields.

  19. The Excitable Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Offner, Franklin F.

    1972-01-01

    The model of the excitable membrane assumes common channels for Na+ and K+; the two ion species interact within the pores through their electrostatic forces. The electric field varies across the membrane and with time, as a result of ionic redistribution. Ionic flow is primarily controlled by energy barriers at the two interfaces and by Ca++ adsorption at the external interface. When the membrane is polarized, the high electric field at the external interface acting on the membrane fixed charge keeps the effective channel diameter small, so that only dihydrated ions can cross the interface. The higher energy required to partially dehydrate Na+ accounts for its lower permeability when polarized. Depolarized, the channel entrance can expand, permitting quadrihydrated ions to pass; the large initial Na+ flow is the result of the large concentration ratio across the interface. The effect at the internal interface is symmetric; Na+ crosses with greater difficulty when the membrane is depolarized. Na+ inactivation occurs when the ion distribution within the membrane has assumed its new steady-state value. Calculations based on parameters consistent with physicochemical data agree generally with a wide range of experiments. The model does not obey the two fundamental Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) postulates (independence principle, ion flow proportional to thermodynamic potential). In several instances the model predicts experimental results which are not predicted by the HH equations. ImagesFIGURE 12 PMID:4655662

  20. Iridium Interfacial Stack - IrIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Interfacial Stack (IrIS) is the sputter deposition of high-purity tantalum silicide (TaSi2-400 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm)/iridium (Ir-200 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm) in an ultra-high vacuum system followed by a 600 C anneal in nitrogen for 30 minutes. IrIS simultaneously acts as both a bond metal and a diffusion barrier. This bondable metallization that also acts as a diffusion barrier can prevent oxygen from air and gold from the wire-bond from infiltrating silicon carbide (SiC) monolithically integrated circuits (ICs) operating above 500 C in air for over 1,000 hours. This TaSi2/Pt/Ir/Pt metallization is easily bonded for electrical connection to off-chip circuitry and does not require extra anneals or masking steps. There are two ways that IrIS can be used in SiC ICs for applications above 500 C: it can be put directly on a SiC ohmic contact metal, such as Ti, or be used as a bond metal residing on top of an interconnect metal. For simplicity, only the use as a bond metal is discussed. The layer thickness ratio of TaSi2 to the first Pt layer deposited thereon should be 2:1. This will allow Si from the TaSi2 to react with the Pt to form Pt2Si during the 600 C anneal carried out after all layers have been deposited. The Ir layer does not readily form a silicide at 600 C, and thereby prevents the Si from migrating into the top-most Pt layer during future anneals and high-temperature IC operation. The second (i.e., top-most) deposited Pt layer needs to be about 200 nm to enable easy wire bonding. The thickness of 200 nm for Ir was chosen for initial experiments; further optimization of the Ir layer thickness may be possible via further experimentation. Ir itself is not easily wire-bonded because of its hardness and much higher melting point than Pt. Below the iridium layer, the TaSi2 and Pt react and form desired Pt2Si during the post-deposition anneal while above the iridium layer remains pure Pt as desired to facilitate easy and strong wire-bonding to the Si

  1. Double excitations in finite systems.

    PubMed

    Romaniello, P; Sangalli, D; Berger, J A; Sottile, F; Molinari, L G; Reining, L; Onida, G

    2009-01-28

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is widely used in the study of linear response properties of finite systems. However, there are difficulties in properly describing excited states, which have double- and higher-excitation characters, which are particularly important in molecules with an open-shell ground state. These states would be described if the exact TDDFT kernel were used; however, within the adiabatic approximation to the exchange-correlation (xc) kernel, the calculated excitation energies have a strict single-excitation character and are fewer than the real ones. A frequency-dependent xc kernel could create extra poles in the response function, which would describe states with a multiple-excitation character. We introduce a frequency-dependent xc kernel, which can reproduce, within TDDFT, double excitations in finite systems. In order to achieve this, we use the Bethe-Salpeter equation with a dynamically screened Coulomb interaction W(omega), which can describe these excitations, and from this we obtain the xc kernel. Using a two-electron model system, we show that the frequency dependence of W does indeed introduce the double excitations that are instead absent in any static approximation of the electron-hole screening.

  2. Excited waves in shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  3. Vibrational excitation induces double reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Lim, Tingbin; Ning, Zhanyu; Polanyi, John C

    2014-12-23

    Electron-induced reaction at metal surfaces is currently the subject of extensive study. Here, we broaden the range of experimentation to a comparison of vibrational excitation with electronic excitation, for reaction of the same molecule at the same clean metal surface. In a previous study of electron-induced reaction by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we examined the dynamics of the concurrent breaking of the two C-I bonds of ortho-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). The energy of the incident electron was near the electronic excitation threshold of E0=1.0 eV required to induce this single-electron process. STM has been employed in the present work to study the reaction dynamics at the substantially lower incident electron energies of 0.3 eV, well below the electronic excitation threshold. The observed increase in reaction rate with current was found to be fourth-order, indicative of multistep reagent vibrational excitation, in contrast to the first-order rate dependence found earlier for electronic excitation. The change in mode of excitation was accompanied by altered reaction dynamics, evidenced by a different pattern of binding of the chemisorbed products to the copper surface. We have modeled these altered reaction dynamics by exciting normal modes of vibration that distort the C-I bonds of the physisorbed reagent. Using the same ab initio ground potential-energy surface as in the prior work on electronic excitation, but with only vibrational excitation of the physisorbed reagent in the asymmetric stretch mode of C-I bonds, we obtained the observed alteration in reaction dynamics.

  4. Tuning the Graphene on Ir(111) adsorption regime by Fe/Ir surface-alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, Jens; Sławińska, Jagoda; Abadia, Mikel; Rogero, Celia; Ortega, J. Enrique; Piquero-Zulaica, Ignacio; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Arnau, Andres; Iribas Cerdá, Jorge

    2017-03-01

    A combined scanning tunneling microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory study of graphene on a Fe-Ir(111) alloy with variable Ir concentration is presented. Starting from an intercalated Fe layer between the graphene and Ir(111) surface we find that graphene-substrate interaction can be fine-tuned by Fe-Ir alloying at the interface. When a critical Ir-concentration close to 0.25 is reached in the Fe layer, the Dirac cone of graphene is largely restored and can thereafter be tuned across the Fermi level by further increasing the Ir content. Indeed, our study reveals an abrupt transition between a chemisorbed phase at small Ir concentrations and a physisorbed phase above the critical concentration. The latter phase is highly reminiscent of the graphene on the clean Ir(111) surface. Furthermore, the transition is accompanied by an inversion of the graphene’s induced magnetization due to the coupling with the Fe atoms from antiferromagnetic when chemisorbed to weakly ferromagnetic in the physisorption regime, with spin polarizations whose magnitude may be tuned with the amount of Fe content.

  5. IR signature management for the modern navy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitekunas, David A.; Kim, Yoonsik

    2013-06-01

    A methodology for analysing the infrared (IR) signature and susceptibility of naval platforms using ShipIR/NTCS was presented by Vaitekunas (2010). This paper provides three key improvements: use of a larger climatic data set (N=100), a new target sub-image algorithm eliminating false detections from pixel-aliasing at the horizon, and a new seeker model interfacing with a line-by-line background clutter model. Existing commercial stealth technologies (exhaust stack suppression, low solar absorptive paints, extended hull film-cooling) are re-analysed using the new models and methods to produce a more rigorous and comprehensive analysis of their effectiveness based on the statistics of reduction in IR susceptibility. These methods and results combined with the cost of each stealth option should allow platform managers to select an appropriate level of infrared suppression and establish the design criteria for a new ship.

  6. Tunable mid IR plasmon in GZO nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M K; Bluet, J-M; Masenelli-Varlot, K; Canut, B; Boisron, O; Melinon, P; Masenelli, B

    2015-07-28

    Degenerate metal oxide nanoparticles are promising systems to expand the significant achievements of plasmonics into the infrared (IR) range. Among the possible candidates, Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals are particularly suited for mid IR, considering their wide range of possible doping levels and thus of plasmon tuning. In the present work, we report on the tunable mid IR plasmon induced in degenerate Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are produced by a plasma expansion and exhibit unprotected surfaces. Tuning the Ga concentration allows tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the plasmon resonance is characterized by a large damping. By comparing the plasmon of nanocrystal assemblies to that of nanoparticles dispersed in an alumina matrix, we investigate the possible origins of such damping. We demonstrate that it partially results from the self-organization of the naked particles and also from intrinsic inhomogeneity of dopants.

  7. The mid-IR and near-IR interferometry of AGNs: key results and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, M.

    2015-09-01

    Infrared interferometry has been very productive in directly probing the structure of AGNs at sub-pc scales. With tens of objects already probed in the mid-IR and near-IR, I will summarize the key results and im- plications from this direct exploration. The Keck interferometry in the near-IR and VLTI in the mid-IR shaped the luminosity dependence of the torus size and structure, while the latter also revealed an equatorial structure at several Rsub (dust sublimation radius), and a polar-elongated region at a few tens of Rsub. Notably, this polar component seems to dominate the compact mid-IR flux. This component can persuasively be attributed to a polar outflow. However, interferometry, through emissivity estimations, also indicates that it is not a UV-optically-thin cloud but participating in the obscuration of the nucleus. I will discuss how to accommodate all these facts to build a consistent picture.

  8. Ir-induced activation of Au towards CO adsorption: Ir films deposited on Au{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Driver, Stephen M.; Pratt, Stephanie J.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; King, David A.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the interaction of CO with Ir/Au{111} bimetallic surfaces, and the influence of morphology changes as Ir moves sub-surface into the Au bulk, using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). The presence of Ir stabilises CO on exposed regions of the Au surface at temperatures up to around 200 K: we attribute this to low-coordinated Au sites, probably associated with lifting of the clean-surface 'herringbone' reconstruction by Ir deposition. The highest density of active Au sites is obtained after annealing the bimetallic surface to 500-600 K: we attribute this to morphology changes associated with the movement of Ir into bulk Au.

  9. Substantiation of the mechanism of biphoton nonresonance excitation of molecules of bacteriochlorophyll of purple bacteria by femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. Yu.

    2010-11-01

    In a series of published experimental works, there has been observed nonresonance biphoton excitation, by femtosecond IR pulses (1250-1500 nm) of molecules of bacteriochlorophyll-a and the pigment in the composition of light-absorbing natural "antenna" complexes of photosynthesizing purple bacteria. The authors of these works believe that IR quanta excite hypothetical forbidden levels of pigments of these bacteria in the dual frequency range of 625-750 nm. In this study, an alternative mechanism of intramolecular electron transport apparently responsible for this phenomenon is suggested and substantiated. The mechanism should manifest itself in powerful electric fields, which are achieved in the pulses of picofemtosecond lasers.

  10. IR Spectroscopy of PAHs in Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamandola, Louis; Bernstein, Max; Mattioda, Andrew; Sandford, Scott

    2007-05-01

    Interstellar PAHs are likely to be a component of the ice mantles that form on dust grains in dense molecular clouds. PAHs frozen in grain mantles will produce IR absorption bands, not IR emission features. A couple of very weak absorption features in ground based spectra of a few objects embedded in dense clouds may be due to PAHs. Additionally spaceborne observations in the 5 to 8 ?m region, the region in which PAH spectroscopy is rich, reveal unidentified new bands and significant variation from object to object. It has not been possible to properly evaluate the contribution of PAH bands to these IR observations because the laboratory absorption spectra of PAHs condensed in realistic interstellar mixed-molecular ice analogs is lacking. This experimental data is necessary to interpret observations because, in ice mantles, the interaction of PAHs with the surrounding molecules effects PAH IR band positions, widths, profiles, and intrinsic strengths. Furthermore, PAHs are readily ionized in pure H2O ice, further altering the PAH spectrum. This laboratory proposal aims to remedy the situation by studying the IR spectroscopy of PAHs frozen in laboratory ice analogs that realistically reflect the composition of the interstellar ices observed in dense clouds. The purpose is to provide laboratory spectra which can be used to interpret IR observations. We will measure the spectra of these mixed molecular ices containing PAHs before and after ionization and determine the intrinsic band strengths of neutral and ionized PAHs in these ice analogs. This will enable a quantitative assessment of the role that PAHs can play in determining the 5-8 ?m spectrum of dense clouds and will directly address the following two fundamental questions associated with dense cloud spectroscopy and chemistry: 1- Can PAHs be detected in dense clouds? 2- Are PAH ions components of interstellar ice?

  11. IGF-IR Targeted Therapy: Past, Present and Future.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Joseph A M J L; Varewijck, Aimee J

    2014-01-01

    The IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) has been studied as an anti-cancer target. However, monotherapy trials with IGF-IR targeted antibodies or with IGF-IR specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors have, overall, been very disappointing in the clinical setting. This review discusses potential reasons why IGF-I R targeted therapy fails to inhibit growth of human cancers. It has become clear that intracellular signaling pathways are highly interconnected and complex instead of being linear and simple. One of the most potent candidates for failure of IGF-IR targeted therapy is the insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A). Activation of the IR-A by insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) bypasses the IGF-IR and its inhibition. Another factor may be that anti-cancer treatment may reduce IGF-IR expression. IGF-IR blocking drugs may also induce hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, which may further stimulate cell growth. In addition, circulating IGF-IRs may reduce therapeutic effects of IGF-IR targeted therapy. Nevertheless, it is still possible that the IGF-IR may be a useful adjuvant or secondary target for the treatment of human cancers. Development of functional inhibitors that affect the IGF-IR and IR-A may be necessary to overcome resistance and to make IGF-IR targeted therapy successful. Drugs that modify alternative downstream effects of the IGF-IR, so called "biasing agonists," should also be considered.

  12. Pulsed infrared radiation excites cultured neonatal spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons by modulating mitochondrial calcium cycling.

    PubMed

    Lumbreras, Vicente; Bas, Esperanza; Gupta, Chhavi; Rajguru, Suhrud M

    2014-09-15

    Cochlear implants are currently the most effective solution for profound sensorineural hearing loss, and vestibular prostheses are under development to treat bilateral vestibulopathies. Electrical current spread in these neuroprostheses limits channel independence and, in some cases, may impair their performance. In comparison, optical stimuli that are spatially confined may result in a significant functional improvement. Pulsed infrared radiation (IR) has previously been shown to elicit responses in neurons. This study analyzes the response of neonatal rat spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons in vitro to IR (wavelength = 1,863 nm) using Ca(2+) imaging. Both types of neurons responded consistently with robust intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) transients that matched the low-frequency IR pulses applied (4 ms, 0.25-1 pps). Radiant exposures of ∼637 mJ/cm(2) resulted in continual neuronal activation. Temperature or [Ca(2+)] variations in the media did not alter the IR-evoked transients, ruling out extracellular Ca(2+) involvement or primary mediation by thermal effects on the plasma membrane. While blockage of Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) plasma membrane channels did not alter the IR-evoked response, blocking of mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling with CGP-37157 or ruthenium red reversibly inhibited the IR-evoked [Ca(2+)]i transients. Additionally, the magnitude of the IR-evoked transients was dependent on ryanodine and cyclopiazonic acid-dependent Ca(2+) release. These results suggest that IR modulation of intracellular calcium cycling contributes to stimulation of spiral and vestibular ganglion neurons. As a whole, the results suggest selective excitation of neurons in the IR beam path and the potential of IR stimulation in future auditory and vestibular prostheses.

  13. FT-IR analysis of phosphorylated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshihashi, Sachiko S.; Chihara, Kunihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-09-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which are the most remarkable posttranslational modifications, are considered to be important chemical reactions that control the activation of proteins. We examine the phosphorylation analysis method by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group that observed at about 1070cm-1 (9.4μm) with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FT-IR). This study indicates that it is possible to identify a phosphorylation by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group observed at about 1070 cm-1 with FT-IR method. As long as target peptides have the same amino acid sequence, it is possible to identify the phosphorylated sites (threonine, serine and tyrosine).

  14. Photodissociation of Peroxynitric Acid in the Near-IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roehl, Coleen M.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Zhang, Hui; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2002-01-01

    Temperature-dependent near-IR photodissociation spectra were obtained for several vibrational overtone transitions of peroxynitric acid (HNO4) with a tunable OPO photolysis/OH laser-induced-fluorescence system. Band-integrated photodissociation cross-sections (definity integral of sigma(sub diss)), determined relative to that for the 3nu(sub 1), OH stretching overtone, were measured for three dissociative bands. Assuming unit quantum efficiency for photodissociation of 3nu(sub 1), we find 2nu(sub 1) + nu(sub 3)(8242/cm) = (1.21 x 10(exp -20) (independent of temperature), 2nu(sub 1) (6900/cm) = 4.09 x 10(exp 18) * e(sup (-826,5/T)) (295 K greater than T greater than 224 K), and nu(sub 1) + 2nu(sub 3) (6252/cm) = 1.87 x 10(exp -19) * e(sup (- 1410.7/T)) (278 K greater than T greater than 240 K) sq cm/molecule cm. The photodissociation cross-sections are independent of pressure over the range 2 to 40 Torr. Temperature-dependent quantum yields (phi) for these transitions were obtained using integrated absorption cross-sections (definity integral of sigma(sub abs)) of HNO4 overtone vibrations measured with a FTIR spectrometer. In the atmosphere, photodissociation in the infrared is dominated by excitation of the first overtone of the OH stretching vibration (2nu((sub 1)). Inclusion of all dissociative HNO4 overtone and combination transitions yields a daytime IR photolysis rate of approximately 1 x 10(esp -1)/s. This process significantly shortens the estimated lifetime of HNO4 in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere.

  15. Trapped Hydronium Radical Produced by Ultraviolet Excitation of Substituted Aromatic Molecule.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Federico J; Capello, Marcela C; Naito, Ayumi; Manita, Shun; Tsukada, Kohei; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki; Broquier, Michel; Gregoire, Gilles; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Pino, Gustavo A

    2015-12-24

    The gas phase structure and excited state dynamics of o-aminophenol-H2O complex have been investigated using REMPI, IR-UV hole-burning spectroscopy, and pump-probe experiments with picoseconds laser pulses. The IR-UV spectroscopy indicates that the isomer responsible for the excitation spectrum corresponds to an orientation of the OH bond away from the NH2 group. The water molecule acts as H-bond acceptor of the OH group of the chromophore. The complexation of o-aminophenol with one water molecule induced an enhancement in the excited state lifetime on the band origin. The variation of the excited state lifetime of the complex with the excess energy from 1.4 ± 0.1 ns for the 0-0 band to 0.24 ± 0.3 ns for the band at 0-0 + 120 cm(-1) is very similar to the variation observed in the phenol-NH3 system. This experimental result suggests that the excited state hydrogen transfer reaction is the dominant channel for the non radiative pathway. Indeed, excited state ab initio calculations demonstrate that H transfer leading to the formation of the H3O(•) radical within the complex is the main reactive pathway.

  16. Femtosecond two-photon-excited fluorescence of melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuchner, Klaus; Mueller, Susanne; Freyer, Wolfgang; Leupold, Dieter; Altmeyer, Peter; Stuecker, Markus; Hoffmann, Klaus

    2003-02-01

    Spectral and time-resolved fluorescence studies of different eumelanins (natural, synthetic, enzymatic) in solution have been carried out by two-photon excitation at 800 nm, using 80 fs pulses with photon flux densities <= 1027 cm-2.s-1. Whereas all samples show monotonously decreasing absorption between near UV and near IR, their fluorescence behavior indicates strong heterogeneity. With respect to the also measured one-photon excited fluorescence (OPF) of melanin at 400 nm, the overall spectral shape of the two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF) is red-shifted. Both OPF and TPF exhibit three-exponential decay with a shortest component # 200 ps. As is also shown, the fluorescence properties of melanin are dependent on the micro-environment. This allows the hypothesis, that the process of malignant transformation in skin tissue could be reflected in the fluorescence, provided the melanin in skin is selectively excited. The latter is realized by the described stepwise absorption of two 800 nm photons. In this way, indeed characteristic differences between the TPF spectra of healthy tissue, nevus cell nevi and malignant melanoma have been found.

  17. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors IR64a and IR8a Form a Functional Odorant Receptor Complex In Vivo in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Steven; Park, Jin-Yong; Min, Soohong; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons express either odorant receptors or ionotropic glutamate receptors (IRs). The sensory neurons that express IR64a, a member of the IR family, send axonal projections to either the DC4 or DP1m glomeruli in the antennal lobe. DC4 neurons respond specifically to acids/protons, whereas DP1m neurons respond to a broad spectrum of odorants. The molecular composition of IR64a-containing receptor complexes in either DC4 or DP1m neurons is not known, however. Here, we immunoprecipitated the IR64a protein from lysates of fly antennal tissue and identified IR8a as a receptor subunit physically associated with IR64a by mass spectrometry. IR8a mutants and flies in which IR8a was knocked down by RNAi in IR64a+ neurons exhibited defects in acid-evoked physiological and behavioral responses. Furthermore, we found that the loss of IR8a caused a significant reduction in IR64a protein levels. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, IR64a and IR8a formed a functional ion channel that allowed ligand-evoked cation currents. These findings provide direct evidence that IR8a is a subunit that forms a functional olfactory receptor with IR64a in vivo to mediate odor detection. PMID:23804096

  18. Ionotropic glutamate receptors IR64a and IR8a form a functional odorant receptor complex in vivo in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ai, Minrong; Blais, Steven; Park, Jin-Yong; Min, Soohong; Neubert, Thomas A; Suh, Greg S B

    2013-06-26

    Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons express either odorant receptors or ionotropic glutamate receptors (IRs). The sensory neurons that express IR64a, a member of the IR family, send axonal projections to either the DC4 or DP1m glomeruli in the antennal lobe. DC4 neurons respond specifically to acids/protons, whereas DP1m neurons respond to a broad spectrum of odorants. The molecular composition of IR64a-containing receptor complexes in either DC4 or DP1m neurons is not known, however. Here, we immunoprecipitated the IR64a protein from lysates of fly antennal tissue and identified IR8a as a receptor subunit physically associated with IR64a by mass spectrometry. IR8a mutants and flies in which IR8a was knocked down by RNAi in IR64a+ neurons exhibited defects in acid-evoked physiological and behavioral responses. Furthermore, we found that the loss of IR8a caused a significant reduction in IR64a protein levels. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, IR64a and IR8a formed a functional ion channel that allowed ligand-evoked cation currents. These findings provide direct evidence that IR8a is a subunit that forms a functional olfactory receptor with IR64a in vivo to mediate odor detection.

  19. Photoexcited states of the harmonic honeycomb iridate γ -Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, J. P.; Patankar, S.; Thewalt, E.; Ruiz, A.; Lopez, G.; Breznay, N.; Vishwanath, A.; Analytis, J.; Orenstein, J.; Koralek, J. D.; Kimchi, I.

    2015-09-01

    We report equilibrium and nonequilibrium optical measurements on the recently synthesized "harmonic" honeycomb iridate γ -Li2IrO3 (LIO), as well as the layered honeycomb iridate Na2IrO3 (NIO). Using Fourier transform infrared microscopy we performed reflectance measurements on LIO, from which we obtained the optical conductivity below 2 eV. In addition, we measured the photoinduced changed in reflectance Δ R , as a function of time t , temperature T , and probe field polarization in both LIO and NIO. In LIO, Δ R (t ,T ) is anisotropic and comprises three T -dependent components. Two of these components are related to the onset of magnetic order and the third is related to a photoinduced population of metastable electronic excited states. In NIO, Δ R (t ,T ) has a single T -dependent component that is strikingly similar to the electronic excitation component of Δ R in LIO. Through analysis and comparison of Δ R (t ,T ) for two compounds, we extract information on the onset of magnetic correlations at and above the transition temperature in LIO, the bare spin-flip scattering rate in equilibrium, the lifetime of low-lying quasiparticle excitations, and the polarization dependence of optical transitions that are sensitive to magnetic order.

  20. Systematic modeling for the insulin signaling network mediated by IRS(1) and IRS(2).

    PubMed

    Huang, Can; Wu, Ming; Du, Jun; Liu, Di; Chan, Christina

    2014-08-21

    The hepatic insulin signaling mediated by insulin receptor substrates IRS1 and IRS2 plays a central role in maintaining glucose homeostasis under different physiological conditions. Although functions of individual components in the signaling network have been extensively studied, our knowledge is still limited with regard to how the signals are integrated and coordinated in the complex network to render their functional roles. In this study, we construct systematic models for the insulin signaling network mediated by IRS1 and IRS2, through the integration of current knowledge in the literature into mathematical models of insulin signaling pathways. We hypothesize that the specificity of the IRS signaling mechanisms emerges from the wiring and kinetics of the entire network. A discrete dynamic model is first constructed to account for the numerous dynamic features in the system, i.e., complex feedback circuits, different regulatory time-scales and cross-talks between pathways. Our simulation shows that the wiring of the network determines different functions of IRS1 and IRS2. We further collate and reconstruct a kinetic model of the network as a system of ordinary differential equations to provide an informative model for predicting phenotypes. A sensitivity analysis is applied to identify essential regulators for the signaling process.

  1. Laser reflexotherapy in UV and IR wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokretsov, V. V.; Utz, Sergei R.; Vinichenko, N. V.; Barabanov, Alexander Y.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this work was the investigation of the effects of UV and IR laser irradiation on the central and regional hemodynamics of agricultural mechanization workers with border limited arterial hypertension, whose arterial pressure was within the limits from 140 to 90 mm of mercury column up to 159 and 94 mm mercury column.

  2. IR laser-induced protein crystal transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefersauer, Reiner Grandl, Brigitte; Krapp, Stephan; Huber, Robert

    2014-05-01

    A novel method and the associated instrumentation for improving crystalline order (higher resolution of X-ray diffraction and reduced mosaicity) of protein crystals by precisely controlled heating is demonstrated. Crystal transformation is optically controlled by a video system. A method and the design of instrumentation, and its preliminary practical realisation, including test experiments, with the object of inducing phase changes of biomolecular crystals by controlled dehydration through heating with infrared (IR) light are described. The aim is to generate and select crystalline phases through transformation in the solid state which have improved order (higher resolution in X-ray diffraction experiments) and reduced mosaic spread (more uniformly aligned mosaic blocks) for diffraction data collection and analysis. The crystal is heated by pulsed and/or constant IR laser irradiation. Loss of crystal water following heating and its reabsorption through equilibration with the environment is measured optically by a video system. Heating proved superior to traditional controlled dehydration by humidity change for the test cases CODH (carbon monoxide dehydrogenase) and CLK2 (a protein kinase). Heating with IR light is experimentally simple and offers an exploration of a much broader parameter space than the traditional method, as it allows the option of varying the rate of phase changes through modification of the IR pulse strength, width and repeat frequency. It impacts the crystal instantaneously, isotropically and homogeneously, and is therefore expected to cause less mechanical stress.

  3. Wide-angle conformal IR transceiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liepmann, Till W.; Randall, Michael R.; Shapiro, Alan R.

    1993-08-01

    Accessing a large field-of-regard (FOR) from an aircraft-mounted infrared system imposes significant structural and aerodynamic penalties. A novel conformal infrared (IR) transceiver concept is presented which is currently under development. A trial design of this concept can access a 160 deg FOR without a gimbal mirror or 'fish eye' lens. A fiber optic bundle is used to allow a wide range of beamsteering technologies with small steering angles (i.e., +/- 5 degree(s)) to access the large FOR (+/- 80 deg) through a single, conformal aperture. The output lens size is less than a factor of three times larger than the input/output IR beam, yet provides near diffraction limited polychromatic collimation over the full FOR. The concept is applicable over a wide spectral band (ultraviolet to far IR), however, it is being developed for the mid-IR (2 - 6 micron) band. The challenging technical aspects of the fiber optics in this spectral band are discussed.

  4. Interactive Response Systems (IRS) Socrative Application Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslan, Bilge; Seker, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    In globally developing education system, technology has made instructional improved in many ways. One of these improvements is the Interactive Response Systems (IRS) that are applied in classroom activities. Therefore, it is "smart" to focus on interactive response systems in learning environment. This study was conducted aiming to focus…

  5. IR laser-induced protein crystal transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kiefersauer, Reiner; Grandl, Brigitte; Krapp, Stephan; Huber, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A method and the design of instrumentation, and its preliminary practical realisation, including test experiments, with the object of inducing phase changes of biomolecular crystals by controlled dehydration through heating with infrared (IR) light are described. The aim is to generate and select crystalline phases through transformation in the solid state which have improved order (higher resolution in X-ray diffraction experiments) and reduced mosaic spread (more uniformly aligned mosaic blocks) for diffraction data collection and analysis. The crystal is heated by pulsed and/or constant IR laser irradiation. Loss of crystal water following heating and its reabsorption through equilibration with the environment is measured optically by a video system. Heating proved superior to traditional controlled dehydration by humidity change for the test cases CODH (carbon monoxide dehydrogenase) and CLK2 (a protein kinase). Heating with IR light is experimentally simple and offers an exploration of a much broader parameter space than the traditional method, as it allows the option of varying the rate of phase changes through modification of the IR pulse strength, width and repeat frequency. It impacts the crystal instantaneously, isotropically and homogeneously, and is therefore expected to cause less mechanical stress. PMID:24816092

  6. Panel discussion: The future of IR astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caroff, Lawrence J.

    1995-01-01

    A panel discussion was held on the future of IR astronomy. The chairman gave a brief introduction to current planned programs for NASA and other space agencies, followed by short contributions from the six panel members on a variety of special topics. After that, a short question and answer session was held.

  7. IR "Snowballs": Long-Term Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, M. J.; Bourque, M.; Baggett, S.

    2015-03-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the properties of the WFC3/IR anomalies known as "snowballs", using all in- ight WFC3/IR data through July 2014. The source of snowballs is unclear at present, but is hypothesized to be radionuclides in the detector or bonding material. Nearly 7400 unique snowball events have been identied from the search of 5 years of WFC3/IR images (over 6200 hours of exposure time), translating to a mean rate of about 1.2 snowballs per hour of IR exposure time. Typical snowballs a ect about 10 pixels and saturate 2-5 of those, and deposit about 200,000 to 500,000 electrons on the detector. We nd no trend over 5 years in the rates of snowball occurrences, consistent with the hypothesis that the uranium-238 decay chain is the source of snowballs. We also publish a table of all hitherto identied snowballs, available at http://www.stsci.edu/hst/wfc3/insperformance/anomalies/irsnowballtable.txt.

  8. IR sensors and imagers in networked operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Rainer; Cabanski, Wolfgang

    2005-05-01

    "Network-centric Warfare" is a common slogan describing an overall concept of networked operation of sensors, information and weapons to gain command and control superiority. Referring to IR sensors, integration and fusion of different channels like day/night or SAR images or the ability to spread image data among various users are typical requirements. Looking for concrete implementations the German Army future infantryman IdZ is an example where a group of ten soldiers build a unit with every soldier equipped with a personal digital assistant (PDA) for information display, day photo camera and a high performance thermal imager for every unit. The challenge to allow networked operation among such a unit is bringing information together and distribution over a capable network. So also AIM's thermal reconnaissance and targeting sight HuntIR which was selected for the IdZ program provides this capabilities by an optional wireless interface. Besides the global approach of Network-centric Warfare network technology can also be an interesting solution for digital image data distribution and signal processing behind the FPA replacing analog video networks or specific point to point interfaces. The resulting architecture can provide capabilities of data fusion from e.g. IR dual-band or IR multicolor sensors. AIM has participated in a German/UK collaboration program to produce a demonstrator for day/IR video distribution via Gigabit Ethernet for vehicle applications. In this study Ethernet technology was chosen for network implementation and a set of electronics was developed for capturing video data of IR and day imagers and Gigabit Ethernet video distribution. The demonstrator setup follows the requirements of current and future vehicles having a set of day and night imager cameras and a crew station with several members. Replacing the analog video path by a digital video network also makes it easy to implement embedded training by simply feeding the network with

  9. Coulomb excitations of monolayer germanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Po-Hsin; Chiu, Yu-Huang; Wu, Jhao-Ying; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2017-01-01

    The feature-rich electronic excitations of monolayer germanene lie in the significant spin-orbit coupling and the buckled structure. The collective and single-particle excitations are diversified by the magnitude and direction of transferred momentum, the Fermi energy and the gate voltage. There are four kinds of plasmon modes, according to the unique frequency- and momentum-dependent phase diagrams. They behave as two-dimensional acoustic modes at long wavelength. However, for the larger momenta, they might change into another kind of undamped plasmons, become the seriously suppressed modes in the heavy intraband e–h excitations, keep the same undamped plasmons, or decline and then vanish in the strong interband e–h excitations. Germanene, silicene and graphene are quite different from one another in the main features of the diverse plasmon modes.

  10. Coulomb excitations of monolayer germanene

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Po-Hsin; Chiu, Yu-Huang; Wu, Jhao-Ying; Shyu, Feng-Lin; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2017-01-01

    The feature-rich electronic excitations of monolayer germanene lie in the significant spin-orbit coupling and the buckled structure. The collective and single-particle excitations are diversified by the magnitude and direction of transferred momentum, the Fermi energy and the gate voltage. There are four kinds of plasmon modes, according to the unique frequency- and momentum-dependent phase diagrams. They behave as two-dimensional acoustic modes at long wavelength. However, for the larger momenta, they might change into another kind of undamped plasmons, become the seriously suppressed modes in the heavy intraband e–h excitations, keep the same undamped plasmons, or decline and then vanish in the strong interband e–h excitations. Germanene, silicene and graphene are quite different from one another in the main features of the diverse plasmon modes. PMID:28091555

  11. Visible-light-excited and europium-emissive nanoparticles for highly-luminescent bioimaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongquan; Shi, Mei; Zhao, Lingzhi; Feng, Wei; Li, Fuyou; Huang, Chunhui

    2014-07-01

    Europium(III)-based material showing special milliseconds photoluminescence lifetime has been considered as an ideal time-gated luminescence probe for bioimaging, but is still limited in application in luminescent small-animal bioimaging in vivo. Here, a water-soluble, stable, highly-luminescent nanosystem, Ir-Eu-MSN (MSN = mesoporous silica nanoparticles, Ir-Eu = [Ir(dfppy)2(pic-OH)]3Eu·2H2O, dfppy = 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine, pic-OH = 3-hydroxy-2-carboxypyridine), was developed by an in situ coordination reaction to form an insoluble dinuclear iridium(III) complex-sensitized-europium(III) emissive complex within mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) which had high loading efficiency. Compared with the usual approach of physical adsorption, this in-situ reaction strategy provided 20-fold the loading efficiency (43.2%) of the insoluble Ir-Eu complex in MSNs. These nanoparticles in solid state showed bright red luminescence with high quantum yield of 55.2%, and the excitation window extended up to 470 nm. These Ir-Eu-MSN nanoparticles were used for luminescence imaging in living cells under excitation at 458 nm with confocal microscopy, which was confirmed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the Ir-Eu-MSN nanoparticles were successfully applied into high-contrast luminescent lymphatic imaging in vivo under low power density excitation of 5 mW cm(-2). This synthetic method provides a universal strategy of combining hydrophobic complexes with hydrophilic MSNs for in vivo bioimaging.

  12. Growth and termination of a rutile IrO2(100) layer on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Rahul; Li, Tao; Liang, Zhu; Kim, Minkyu; Asthagiri, Aravind; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the oxidation of Ir(111) by gas-phase oxygen atoms at temperatures between 500 and 625 K using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (LEISS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that a well-ordered surface oxide with (√ 3 × √ 3)R30° periodicity relative to Ir(111) develops prior to the formation of a rutile IrO2(100) layer. The IrO2(100) layer reaches a saturation thickness of about four oxide layers under the oxidation conditions employed, and decomposes during TPD to produce a single, sharp O2 desorption peak at 770 K. Favorable lattice matching at the oxide-metal interface is likely responsible for the preferential growth of the IrO2(100) facet during the initial oxidation of Ir(111), with the resulting coincidence lattice generating a clear (6 × 1) moiré pattern in LEED. Temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS) experiments reveal that CO and H2O molecules bind only weakly on the IrO2(100) surface and LEISS measurements show that the oxide surface is highly enriched in O-atoms. These characteristics provide strong evidence that the rutile IrO2(100) layer is oxygen-terminated, and thus lacks reactive Ir atoms that can strongly bind molecular adsorbates. Oxygen binding energies predicted by DFT suggest that on-top O-atoms will remain adsorbed on IrO2(100) at temperatures up to 625 K, thus supporting the conclusion that the rutile IrO2 layer grown in our experiments is oxygen-terminated. As such, the appearance of only a single O2 TPD peak indicates that the singly coordinate, on-top O-atoms remain stable on the IrO2(100) surface up to temperatures at which the oxide layer begins to thermally decompose.

  13. ISO FAR-IR Spectroscopy of IR-Bright Galaxies and Ulirgs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    ISO FAR-IR SPECTROSCOPY OF IR-BRIGHT GALAXIES AND ULIRGS J. FISCHER AND M.L. LUHMAN Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA S. SATYAPAL AND...flux ratios than in normal and less luminous IR-bright galaxies by an order of magnitude ( Luhman et al., 1998; 1999). This has been interpreted as an...line ratio is unexpectedly low (Fischer et al., 1997; Luhman et al., 1998). Implicit in this interpretation is the assumption that the [O I]145µm upper

  14. projective variational study on low-temperature quantum magnetism in Na4Ir3O8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindou, Ryuichi

    2015-03-01

    Na4Ir3O8 is one of candidate materials of three-dimensional quantum spin liquid Mott isnulator, where Ir J=1/2 spin forms a hyperkagome lattice, a corner-sharing triangle network lattice with spin frustration. Due to lack of spatial inversion symmetries and heavy atom nature of Iridium, the system possesses larger anisotropic exchange interactions. In fact, preceding theories based on ab-initio band calculation show that Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction is on order of 10 percent of isotropic exchange interaction, which could play vital role of highly competing grand state energetics in Na4Ir3O8. From transport experiments, the system is also known to be in weak Mott insulating regime, where charge fluctuation cause larger multiple-spin interactions. Employing variational analyses based on projective(fermionic) construction of many-body spin wavefunctions, we will reconsider possible quantum spin ground states in the hyperkagome antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model with anisotropic exchange and multiple-spin interactions of Na4Ir3O8. Starting from these states, we will discuss possible magnetic excitations and compare them with reported experiments.

  15. The structure and nature of NGC 2017 IRS. 1: High-resolution radio continuum maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Beck, Sara C.

    1994-01-01

    We have observed the star formation cluster NGC 2071 IRS 1, 2, and 3, with 0.14 sec spatial resolution at 2 cm. The strong source IRS 1 breaks up into a bright peak sitting on a narrow line emission extending over about 400 AU, with three much weaker peaks. This ridge, which has a p.a. = 100 deg, is not aligned with any of the other structures that have previously been seen around IRS 1: its orientation is about 55 deg from the CO outflow direction, and 35 deg from a hypothetical disk direction. The spectral and spatial results, combined with earlier radio and infrared observations, indicate that most likely the radio and infrared emission from the exciting source, IRS 1, is produced by a dense wind hidden by at least 100 visual magnitudes of extinction; the extended ridge of emission comes from an optically thin H II region with characteristic dimensions of approximately AU and which may result from a clumpy distribution of local gas and dust.

  16. Excitations of strange bottom baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woloshyn, R. M.

    2016-09-01

    The ground-state and first-excited-state masses of Ωb and Ω_{bb} baryons are calculated in lattice QCD using dynamical 2 + 1 flavour gauge fields. A set of baryon operators employing different combinations of smeared quark fields was used in the framework of the variational method. Results for radial excitation energies were confirmed by carrying out a supplementary multiexponential fitting analysis. Comparison is made with quark model calculations.

  17. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  18. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  19. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  20. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  1. 46 CFR 111.12-3 - Excitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Generator Construction and Circuits § 111.12-3 Excitation. In general, excitation must meet... generator unless it is provided with a permanent magnet or a residual-magnetism-type exciter that has...

  2. Biological oxygen sensing via two-photon absorption by an Ir(III) complex using a femtosecond fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritomo, Hiroki; Fujii, Akinari; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Kawamata, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Near-infrared two-photon absorption of the phosphorescent Ir(III) complex (2,4-pentanedionato-κO 2,κO 4)bis[2-(6-phenanthridinyl-κN)benzo[b]thien-3-yl-κC]iridium (BTPHSA) was characterized. It exhibited a 800-1200 nm two-photon absorption band, and thus could be electronically excited by 1030-nm femtosecond Ti:sapphire and Yb-doped fiber lasers. By using BTPHSA, oxygen concentrations in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells were imaged. These results demonstrate two-photon oxygen sensing of live tissues via easily operable excitation sources.

  3. Electrostatic Tuning of Cellular Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Börjesson, Sara I.; Parkkari, Teija; Hammarström, Sven; Elinder, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Voltage-gated ion channels regulate the electric activity of excitable tissues, such as the heart and brain. Therefore, treatment for conditions of disturbed excitability is often based on drugs that target ion channels. In this study of a voltage-gated K channel, we propose what we believe to be a novel pharmacological mechanism for how to regulate channel activity. Charged lipophilic substances can tune channel opening, and consequently excitability, by an electrostatic interaction with the channel's voltage sensors. The direction of the effect depends on the charge of the substance. This was shown by three compounds sharing an arachidonyl backbone but bearing different charge: arachidonic acid, methyl arachidonate, and arachidonyl amine. Computer simulations of membrane excitability showed that small changes in the voltage dependence of Na and K channels have prominent impact on excitability and the tendency for repetitive firing. For instance, a shift in the voltage dependence of a K channel with −5 or +5 mV corresponds to a threefold increase or decrease in K channel density, respectively. We suggest that electrostatic tuning of ion channel activity constitutes a novel and powerful pharmacological approach with which to affect cellular excitability. PMID:20141752

  4. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs.

  5. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  6. The Path to a UV/optical/IR Flagship: ATLAST and Its Predecessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Clampin, Mark; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Oegerle, William; Postman, Marc; Rioux, Norman; Stahl, H. Philip; Stapelfeldt, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The recently completed study for the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Telescope (ATLAST) was the culmination of three years of work that built upon earlier engineering designs, science objectives, and sustained recommendations for technology investments. Since the mid-1980s, multiple teams of astronomers, technologists, and engineers have developed concepts for a large-aperture UV/optical/IR space observatory to follow the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Especially over the past decade, technology advances and exciting scientific results has led to growing support for development in the 2020s of a large UVOIR space observatory. Here we summarize the history of major mission designs, scientific goals, key technology recommendations, community workshops and conferences, and recommendations to NASA for a major UV/optical/IR observatory to follow HST. We conclude with a capsule summary of the ATLAST reference design developed over the past three years.

  7. Laser action in chromium-activated forsterite for near infrared excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petricevic, V.; Gayen, S. K.; Alfano, R. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on laser action in chromium-doped forsterite (Cr:Mg2SiO4) for 1064-nm excitation of the crystal's double-hump absorption band spanning the 850-1200-nm wavelength range. The cavity arrangement used for obtaining laser action in Cr:Mg2SiO2 was similar to that described by Petricevic et al. (1988). The fundamental and second harmonic emissions from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at a 10-Hz repetition rate were used for excitation of the NIR and visible bands, respectively. Pulsed laser action was readily observed for both the 1064-nm and 532-nm pumping at or above the respective thresholds. The laser parameters of the 532-nm and 1064-nm excitations were similar, indicating that the IR band is responsible for laser action for both excitations.

  8. Photochemistry of 2-naphthoyl azide. An ultrafast time-resolved UV-vis and IR spectroscopic and computational study.

    PubMed

    Kubicki, Jacek; Zhang, Yunlong; Vyas, Shubham; Burdzinski, Gotard; Luk, Hoi Ling; Wang, Jin; Xue, Jiadan; Peng, Huo-Lei; Pritchina, Elena A; Sliwa, Michel; Buntinx, Guy; Gritsan, Nina P; Hadad, Christopher M; Platz, Matthew S

    2011-06-29

    The photochemistry of 2-naphthoyl azide was studied in various solvents by femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy with IR and UV-vis detection. The experimental findings were interpreted with the aid of computational studies. Using polar and nonpolar solvents, the formation and decay of the first singlet excited state (S(1)) was observed by both time-resolved techniques. Three processes are involved in the decay of the S(1) excited state of 2-naphthoyl azide: intersystem crossing, singlet nitrene formation, and isocyanate formation. The lifetime of the S(1) state decreases significantly as the solvent polarity increases. In all solvents studied, isocyanate formation correlates with the decay of the azide S(1) state. Nitrene formation correlates with the decay of the relaxed S(1) state only upon 350 nm excitation (S(0) → S(1) excitation). When S(n) (n ≥ 2) states are populated upon excitation (λ(ex) = 270 nm), most nitrene formation takes place within a few picoseconds through the hot S(1) and higher singlet excited states (S(n)) of 2-naphthoyl azide. The data correlate with the results of electron density difference calculations that predict nitrene formation from the higher-energy singlet excited states, in addition to the S(1) state. For all of these experiments, no recovery of the ground state was observed up to 3 ns after photolysis, which indicates that both internal conversion and fluorescence have very low efficiencies.

  9. Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy using lanthanide centred near-IR emission.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhiyu; Tropiano, Manuel; Mantulnikovs, Konstantins; Faulkner, Stephen; Vosch, Tom; Sørensen, Thomas Just

    2015-02-11

    The narrow, near infrared (NIR) emission from lanthanide ions has attracted great interest, particularly with regard to developing tools for bioimaging, where the long lifetimes of lanthanide excited states can be exploited to address problems arising from autofluorescence and sample transparency. Despite the promise of lanthanide-based probes for near-IR imaging, few reports on their use are present in the literature. Here, we demonstrate that images can be recorded by monitoring NIR emission from lanthanide complexes using detectors, optical elements and a microscope that were primarily designed for the visible part of the spectrum.

  10. Mid-IR Transition Metal Lasers (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    alexandrite was demonstrated in 1979. [2] Cr4+ and Cr2+ infrared laser materials took even longer to be discovered. However, transition metal laser...already been mentioned. Other transition metal laser ions such as Cr3+ in alexandrite [19] and Ti3+ in YAlO3 [20] have excited state absorption (ESA...Washington, DC. 19. Shand, M.L., J.C. Walling, and R.C. Morris, Excited-state absorption in the pump region of alexandrite , Journal of Applied Physics

  11. Modeling Turbine Blade Crack Detection in Sonic IR Imaging with a Method of Creating Flat Crack Surface in FEA (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    After the LS - DYNA file produced in ANSYS is imported into Hypermesh, we can follow the typical simulation procedures to define the crack and...excitation source and thermal properties, the simulation of this blade can proceed with LS - DYNA . The cylinder in Figures 4 and 5 represents an ultrasound...on Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Aircraft Composite Panels With Sonic IR," in Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation, edited by D

  12. Excitation with quantum light. I. Exciting a harmonic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreño, J. C. López; Laussy, F. P.

    2016-12-01

    We present a two-part study of the excitation of an optical target by quantum light. In this first part, we introduce the problematic and address the first case of interest, that of exciting the quantum harmonic oscillator, corresponding to, e.g., a single-mode passive cavity or a noninteracting bosonic field. We introduce a mapping of the Hilbert space that allows to chart usefully the accessible regions. We then consider the quantum excitation from single-photon sources in the form of a two-level system under various regimes of (classical) pumping: incoherent, coherent, and in the Mollow triplet regime. We close this first part with an overview of the material to be covered in the subsequent work.

  13. New honeycomb iridium(V) oxides: NaIrO3 and Sr3CaIr2O9.

    PubMed

    Wallace, David C; McQueen, Tyrel M

    2015-12-21

    We report the structures and physical properties of two new iridates, NaIrO3 and Sr3CaIr2O9, both of which contain continuous two-dimensional honeycomb connectivity. NaIrO3 is produced by room temperature oxidative deintercalation of sodium from Na2IrO3, and contains edge-sharing IrO6 octahedra that form a planar honeycomb lattice. Sr3CaIr2O9, produced via conventional solid-state synthesis, hosts a buckled honeycomb lattice with novel corner-sharing connectivity between IrO6 octahedra. Both of these new compounds are comprised of Ir(5+) (5d(4)) and exhibit negligible magnetic susceptibility. They are thus platforms to investigate the origin of the nonmagnetic behavior exhibited by Ir(5+) oxides, and provide the first examples of a J = 0 state on a honeycomb lattice.

  14. Born Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics calculation of the νO-H IR spectra for acetic acid cyclic dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Amine Benmalti, Mohamed; Krallafa, Abdelghani; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Both ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on the Born-Oppenheimer approach calculations and a quantum theoretical model are used in order to study the IR spectrum of the acetic acid dimer in the gas phase. The theoretical model is taking into account the strong anharmonic coupling, Davydov coupling, multiple Fermi resonances between the first harmonics of some bending modes and the first excited state of the symmetric combination of the two vO-H modes and the quantum direct and indirect relaxation. The IR spectra obtained from DFT-based molecular dynamics is compared with our theoretical lineshape and with experiment. Note that in a previous work we have shown that our approach reproduces satisfactorily the main futures of the IR experimental lineshapes of the acetic acid dimer [Mohamed el Amine Benmalti, Paul Blaise, H. T. Flakus, Olivier Henri-Rousseau, Chem Phys, 320(2006) 267-274.].

  15. Theoretical IR spectra of ionized naphthalene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauzat, F.; Talbi, D.; Miller, M. D.; DeFrees, D. J.; Ellinger, Y.

    1992-01-01

    We report the results of a theoretical study of the effect of ionization on the IR spectrum of naphthalene, using ab initio molecular orbital theory. For that purpose we determined the structures, band frequencies, and intensities of neutral and positively ionized naphthalene. The calculated frequencies and intensities allowed an assignment of the most important bands appearing in the newly reported experimental spectrum of the positive ion. Agreement with the experimental spectrum is satisfactory enough to take into consideration the unexpected and important result that ionization significantly affects the intensities of most vibrations. A possible consequence on the interpretation of the IR interstellar emission, generally supposed to originate from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is briefly presented.

  16. Automated IR-weld seam control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balle, Michel

    1990-03-01

    In 1975 the concept of visualizing, measuring and studying the thermal condition of welded seams was investigated by a laboratory of the French ministry of defense (at the request of a metal constructor). Gilbert Gaussorgues, the founding father of the company HGH was at the time in charge of the infrared laboratory in question, a department of the general administration of Armament in Toulon, France. His idea was to apply military IR-Technology to above mentioned welding application. Having developed a prototype, tests readily confirmed the validity of using IR-emission from the weld seam close to the actual moment of welding as an indicator of the quality of the fmal assembly. Nearly ten years later, in 1984, HGH decided, due to an increasing demand, to develop above preliminary tests to a complete product/application package designed specifically for welding process-control. The inspection oftubing and of the integrity welds of barrels with hazardous content, were the first applications.

  17. Ir spectra of preparations of ozonized pyrocatechin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khovratovich, N. N.; Novikova, T. M.; Khmel'Nitskii, A. I.; Cherenkevich, S. N.; Loban, V. A.

    1998-03-01

    We investigate IR spectra of the solid phase of products obtained at different stages in the process of ozonizing aqueous solutions of pyrocatechin. We found that melanin structures are formed in the process of pyrocatechin ozonization. The existence of intra- and intermolecular interactions in the melanin preparations formed, leading to the formation of molecular associates, is shown. Thorough treatment of preparations with ozone leads to destruction of polymer systems and formation of water-soluble products of acid type.

  18. Methane Line Intensities: Near and Far IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Linda R.; Devi, V. Malathy; Wishnow, Edward H.; Sung, Keeyoon; Crawford, Timothy J.; Mantz, Arlan W.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Benner, D. Chris

    2014-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of line intensities is crucial input for radiance calculations to interpret atmospheric observations of planets and moons. We have therefore undertaken extensive laboratory studies to measure the methane spectrum line-by-line in order to improve theoretical quantum mechanical modeling for molecular spectroscopy databases (e. g. HITRAN and GEISA) used by planetary astronomers. Preliminary results will be presented for selected ro-vibrational transitions in both the near-IR (1.66 and 2.2 - 2.4 microns) and the far-IR (80 - 120 microns) regions. For this, we have recorded high-resolution spectra (instrumental resolving power: 1,300,000 (NIR) and 10,000 (FIR)) with the Bruker 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer at JPL using isotopically-enriched 12CH4 and 13CH4, as well as normal methane samples. For the NIR wavelengths, three different absorption cells have been employed to achieve sample temperatures ranging from 78 K to 299 K: 1) a White cell set to a path length of 13.09 m for room temperature data, 2) a single-pass 0.2038 m cold cell and 3) a new coolable Herriott cell with a fixed 20.941 m optical path and configured for the first time to a FT-IR spectrometer. For the Far-IR, another coolable absorption chamber set to a 52 m optical path has been used. These new experiments and intensity measurements will be presented and discussed.Part of the research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, the University of California, Berkeley, Connecticut College, and NASA Langley under contracts and grants with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A. Predoi-Cross and her research group have been supported by the National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  19. Laterally-Biased Quantum IR Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-23

    Sistemas Optoelectronicos y Microtecnologia Calle Ramiro de Maeztu 7 Madrid 28040 SPAIN EOARD Grant 12-3006 Report Date: October 2013 Final...Universidad Politecnica de Madrid Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectronicos y Microtecnologia Calle Ramiro de Maeztu 7 Madrid 28040 SPAIN 8. PERFORMING...Z39-18 Laterally-biased quantum IR detectors – Report Nov 2013 1 EOARD - Award No. FA8655-12-1-3006 Instituto de Sistemas Optoelectrónicos

  20. Advances in handheld FT-IR instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnó, Josep; Cardillo, Len; Judge, Kevin; Frayer, Maxim; Frunzi, Michael; Hetherington, Paul; Levy, Dustin; Oberndorfer, Kyle; Perec, Walter; Sauer, Terry; Stein, John; Zuidema, Eric

    2012-06-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy is the technology of choice to identify solid and liquid phase unknown samples. The challenges of ConOps (Concepts of Operation) in emergency response and military field applications require a significant redesign of the stationary FT-IR bench-top instruments typically used in laboratories. Specifically, field portable units require high levels of resistance against mechanical shock and chemical attack, ease of use in restrictive gear, quick and easy interpretation of results, and reduced size. In the last 20 years, FT-IR instruments have been re-engineered to fit in small suitcases for field portable use and recently further miniaturized for handheld operation. This article introduces the advances resulting from a project designed to overcome the challenges associated with miniaturizing FT-IR instruments. The project team developed a disturbance-corrected permanently aligned cube corner interferometer for improved robustness and optimized opto-mechanical design to maximize optical throughput and signal-to-noise ratios. Thermal management and heat flow were thoroughly modeled and studied to isolate sensitive components from heat sources and provide the widest temperature operation range. Similarly, extensive research on mechanical designs and compensation techniques to protect against shock and vibration will be discussed. A user interface was carefully created for military and emergency response applications to provide actionable information in a visual, intuitive format. Similar to the HazMatID family of products, state-of-the-art algorithms were used to quickly identify the chemical composition of complex samples based on the spectral information. This article includes an overview of the design considerations, tests results, and performance validation of the mechanical ruggedness, spectral, and thermal performance.

  1. Symbolic fusion of MMW and IR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, Peter A.; Kohl, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the software architecture used to construct a multisensor knowledge-based Autonomous Target Recognizer (ATR). An Intermediate Symbolic Representation (SR) of processed data is employed to provide a very powerful method of associative access over data events and their features, thereby supporting data fusion algorithms at the symbolic level. This architecture supports data fusion from multiple sensors, and its operation is described here using MMW range and IR intensity data.

  2. Symbolic Fusion Of MMW And IR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, Peter A.; Kohl, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the software architecture used to construct a multi-sensor knowledge-based Autonomous Target Recognizer (ATR). An Intermediate Symbolic Representation (ISR) of processed data is employed to provide a very powerful method of associative access over data events and their features, thereby supporting data fusion algorithms at the symbolic level. This architecture supports data fusion from multiple sensors, and its operation is described here using MMW range and IR intensity data.

  3. Broadband Near IR Laser Hazard Filters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-10

    the first quarter of this program, we procured high quality gelatin and ammonium dichromate . It is well known that there are several kinds of...composition of gelatin, ammonium dichromate and water. We attempted to find the optimum coating thickness for 50 nm and 90 nm bandwidth range filters. Annual...fabrication is based on volume Bragg holography using photopolymers and dichromated gelatins. The successful performance of broad- band IR filters

  4. CUBISM: CUbe Builder for IRS Spectra Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sings Irs Team; Smith, J. D.; Armus, Lee; Bot, Caroline; Buckalew, Brent; Dale, Danny; Helou, George; Jarrett, Tom; Roussel, Helene; Sheth, Kartik

    2011-11-01

    CUBISM, written in IDL, constructs spectral cubes, maps, and arbitrary aperture 1D spectral extractions from sets of mapping mode spectra taken with Spitzer's IRS spectrograph. CUBISM is optimized for non-sparse maps of extended objects, e.g. the nearby galaxy sample of SINGS, but can be used with data from any spectral mapping AOR (primarily validated for maps which are designed as suggested by the mapping HOWTO).

  5. Signatures of spin-glass behaviour in PrIr2B2 and heavy fermion behaviour in PrIr2B2C.

    PubMed

    Anupam; Anand, V K; Hossain, Z; Adroja, D T; Geibel, C

    2011-09-21

    CEF-split singlet and the first excited state singlet is situated 15 K above the ground state. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ∼300 mJ mol(-1) K(-2) of PrIr(2)B(2)C is very high and reflects a heavy fermion behaviour in this compound. We believe that the heavy fermion state in PrIr(2)B(2)C has its origin in low lying crystal field excitations as has been observed in PrRh(2)B(2)C.

  6. Sadomasochism, sexual excitement, and perversion.

    PubMed

    Kernberg, O F

    1991-01-01

    Sadomasochism, an ingredient of infantile sexuality, is an essential part of normal sexual functioning and love relations, and of the very nature of sexual excitement. Sadomasochistic elements are also present in all sexual perversions. Sadomasochism starts out as the potential for erotic masochism in both sexes, and represents a very early capacity to link aggression with the libidinal elements of sexual excitement. Sexual excitement may be considered a basic affect that overcomes primitive splitting of love and hatred. Erotic desire is a more mature form of sexual excitement. Psychoanalytic exploration makes it possible to uncover the unconscious components of sexual excitement: wishes for symbiotic fusion and for aggressive penetration and intermingling; bisexual identifications; the desire to transgress oedipal prohibitions and the secretiveness of the primal scene, and to violate the boundaries of a teasing and withholding object. The relation between these wishes and the development of erotic idealization processes in both sexes is explored in the context of a critical review of the pertinent psychoanalytic literature.

  7. Illumination analysis of LAPAN's IR micro bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustanul, A.; Irwan, P.; Andi M., T.

    2016-10-01

    We have since 2 years ago been doing a research in term of an IR Micrometer Bolometer which aims to fulfill our office, LAPAN, desire to put it as one of payloads into LAPAN's next micro satellite project, either at LAPAN A4 or at LAPAN A5. Due to the lack of experience on the subject, everything had been initiated by spectral radiance analysis adjusted by catastrophes sources in Indonesia, mainly wild fire (forest fire) and active volcano. Based on the result of the appropriate spectral radiance wavelength, 3.8 - 4 μm, and field of view (FOV), we, then, went through the further analysis, optical analysis. Focusing in illumination matter, the process was done by using Zemax software. Optical pass Interference and Stray light were two things that become our concern throughout the work. They could also be an evaluation of the performance optimization of illumination analysis of our optical design. The results, graphs, show that our design performance is close diffraction limited and the image blur of the geometrical produced by Lapan's IR Micro Bolometer lenses is in the pixel area range. Therefore, our optical design performance is relatively good and will produce image with high quality. In this paper, the Illumination analysis and process of LAPAN's Infra Red (IR) Micro Bolometer is presented.

  8. Choices for Tissue Visualization with IR Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gough,K.; Rak, M.; Bookatz, A.; Del Bigio, M.; Mai, S.; Westaway, D.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we address some of the issues associated with infrared (IR) imaging, with reference to our work on brain tissue from the TgCRND8 mouse, a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is the most common cause of dementia in the aging population. One of the characteristic hallmarks of this chronic neurodegenerative disorder is the accumulation of plaques in the brain, usually visualized with histochemistry and immunostaining. Although these methods are extremely useful, they illustrate only certain aspects of the sample, require a great amount of tissue processing, and are highly dependent on experimental protocols and reagent quality. IR imaging provides information on multiple components, with a minimal amount of sample processing. However, in order to interpret the data successfully, the issues of spectral acquisition parameters, pre-processing, and spectral artifacts need to be considered. The methods commonly used to process the data, such as uni- and bi-variate spectral analysis, and multivariate methods, such as hierarchical cluster analysis, and some issues concerning the use of second derivatives of IR spectra are discussed.

  9. New Cross Section Data for Production of the Therapeutic Radionuclides 64Cu, 140Nd, and 192Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgers, K.; Qaim, S. M.; Coenen, H. H.

    2005-05-01

    For production of the therapeutic radionuclides 64Cu, 140Nd and 192Ir new cross section data are reported, all measured using the stacked-foil technique. In the case of 64Cu, the 66Zn(d,α)64Cu reaction was investigated radiochemically over the energy range of 5 to 14 MeV using highly enriched target material. From the measured excitation function the thick target yield of 64Cu was calculated as 6.6 MBq/μAṡh. A comparison with other production routes is given. For production of 140Nd, both natCe(3He,xn)140Nd and 141Pr(p,2n)140Nd processes were studied. For the 141Pr(p,2n)140Nd reaction the results are consistent with the literature data in the early rising part of the excitation function; at higher energies, however, our values differ considerably. The yields of 140Nd via these reactions amount to 22 and 128 MBq/μAṡh, respectively. The excitation function of the 192Os(p,n)192Ir reaction was measured from 6 to 20 MeV and the yield of 192Ir was calculated to be 0.16 MBq/μAṡh.

  10. Near-IR Photoluminescence of Pr/Cu/Sn Tridoped Phosphate Glass: Nonplasmonic Material System Versus Plasmonic Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, José A.; Sendova, Mariana

    2015-04-01

    An optical spectroscopy study of Pr2O3, CuO, and SnO tridoped barium phosphate glass prepared by the melt-quenching technique has been carried out, emphasizing near-infrared (IR) emission properties. The material is studied in its nonplasmonic state (as synthesized) and plasmonic form (heat-treated), aiming to elucidate the effects of Cu nanoparticles. The data indicate that Cu+ ions and Sn centers are stabilized in the melt-quenched glass. Broad ultraviolet excitations of both species can lead to near-IR emission of Pr3+ ions via energy transfer. The plasmonic nanocomposite is produced upon heat treatment as Sn2+ reduces Cu+ to Cu0 atoms, ultimately precipitating as Cu nanoparticles sustaining the surface plasmon resonance. Consequently, depletion of primarily Cu+ modified the ultraviolet excitation properties for the sensitized near-IR Pr3+ emission. Further, suppression of the Pr3+ emission from near-IR emitting states 1D2 and 1G4 was observed in the Cu nanocomposite in accord with a "plasmonic diluent" role of the nanoparticles.

  11. Effects of Multiple Photon Scattering in Deciduous Tree Canopies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YY) 2...results in the ground and receiver planes. We then authenticated the validity of the model by illuminating a test forest at an 80° angle, collecting...We run the simulation for 80o illumination and report on the results in the ground and receiver planes. We then authenticate the validity of the model

  12. Stochastic excitation of stellar oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, Reza

    2001-05-01

    Since more than about thirty years, solar oscillations are thought to be excited stochastically by the turbulent motions in the solar convective zone. It is currently believed that oscillations of stars lower than 2 solar masses - which possess an upper convective zone - are excited stochastically by turbulent convection in their outer layers. Providing that accurate measurements of the oscillation amplitudes and damping rates are available it is possible to evaluate the power injected into the modes and thus - by comparison with the observations - to constrain current theories. A recent theoretical work (Samadi & Goupil, 2001; Samadi et al., 2001) supplements and reinforces the theory of stochastic excitation of star vibrations. This process was generalized to a global description of the turbulent state of their convective zone. The comparison between observation and theory, thus generalized, will allow to better know the turbulent spectrum of stars, and this in particular thanks to the COROT mission.

  13. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bement, Matthew T; Bewley, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  14. Recurrent Excitation in Neocortical Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Rodney J.; Koch, Christof; Mahowald, Misha; Martin, Kevan A. C.; Suarez, Humbert H.

    1995-08-01

    The majority of synapses in the mammalian cortex originate from cortical neurons. Indeed, the largest input to cortical cells comes from neighboring excitatory cells. However, most models of cortical development and processing do not reflect the anatomy and physiology of feedback excitation and are restricted to serial feedforward excitation. This report describes how populations of neurons in cat visual cortex can use excitatory feedback, characterized as an effective "network conductance," to amplify their feedforward input signals and demonstrates how neuronal discharge can be kept proportional to stimulus strength despite strong, recurrent connections that threaten to cause runaway excitation. These principles are incorporated into models of cortical direction and orientation selectivity that emphasize the basic design principles of cortical architectures.

  15. Modeling excitable systems: Reentrant tachycardia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Jarrett L.; Hellen, Edward H.; Leise, Esther M.

    2010-01-01

    Excitable membranes are an important type of nonlinear dynamical system, and their study can be used to provide a connection between physical and biological circuits. We discuss two models of excitable membranes important in cardiac and neural tissues. One model is based on the Fitzhugh-Nagumo equations, and the other is based on a three-transistor excitable circuit. We construct a circuit that simulates reentrant tachycardia and its treatment by surgical ablation. This project is appropriate for advanced undergraduates as a laboratory capstone project or as a senior thesis or honors project and can also be a collaborative project, with one student responsible for the computational predictions and another for the circuit construction and measurements.

  16. Is the ``IR Coincidence'' Just That?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Wilms, Jörn; Heinz, Sebastian; Pooley, Guy; Pottschmidt, Katja; Corbel, Stephane

    2005-06-01

    Previous work by Motch et al. suggested that in the low/hard state of GX 339-4 the soft X-ray power law extrapolated backward in energy agrees with the IR flux level. Corbel & Fender later showed that the typical hard-state radio power law extrapolated forward in energy meets the backward-extrapolated X-ray power law at an IR spectral break, which was explicitly observed twice in GX 339-4. This IR coincidence has been cited as further evidence that synchrotron radiation from a jet might make a significant contribution to the observed X-rays in hard-state black hole systems. We quantitatively explore this hypothesis with a series of simultaneous radio/X-ray observations of GX 339-4, taken during its 1997, 1999, and 2002 hard states. We fit these spectra, in detector space, with a simple, but remarkably successful, doubly broken power-law model that indeed requires an IR spectral break. For these observations, the break position and the integrated radio/IR flux have stronger dependences upon the X-ray flux than the simplest jet model predictions. If one allows for a softening of the X-ray power law with increasing flux, then the jet model can agree with the observed correlation. We also find evidence that the radio flux-X-ray flux correlation previously observed in the 1997 and 1999 GX 339-4 hard states shows a parallel track for the 2002 hard state. The slope of the 2002 correlation is consistent with observations taken in prior hard states; however, the radio amplitude is reduced. We then examine the radio flux-X-ray flux correlation in Cyg X-1 through the use of 15 GHz radio data obtained with the Ryle radio telescope and Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data from the All-Sky Monitor and pointed observations. We again find evidence of parallel tracks, and here they are associated with ``failed transitions,'' or the beginning of a transition, to the soft state. We also find that for Cyg X-1 the radio flux is more fundamentally correlated with the hard, rather than the

  17. Is the `IR Coincidence' Just That?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M.

    2005-09-01

    Previous work by Motch (1985) suggested that in the low/hard state of GX 339-4 the soft X-ray power-law extrapolated backward in energy agrees with the IR flux level. Corbel & Fender (2002) later showed that the typical hard state radio power-law extrapolated forward in energy meets the backward extrapolated X-ray power-law at an IR spectral break, which was explicitly observed twice in GX 339-4. This `IR coincidence' has been cited as further evidence that synchrotron radiation from a jet might make a significant contribution to the observed X-rays in hard state black hole systems. We quantitatively explore this hypothesis with a series of simultaneous radio/X-ray observations of GX 339-4, taken during its 1997, 1999, and 2002 hard states. We fit these spectra, in detector space, with a simple, but remarkably successful, doubly broken power-law model that indeed requires an IR spectral break. For these observations, the break position and the integrated radio/IR flux have stronger dependences upon the X-ray flux than the simplest jet model predictions. If one allows for a softening of the X-ray power law with increasing flux, then the jet model can agree with the observed correlation. We also find evidence that the radio flux/X-ray flux correlation previously observed in the 1997 and 1999 GX 339-4 hard states shows a `parallel track' for the 2002 hard state. The slope of the 2002 correlation is consistent with observations taken in prior hard states; however, the radio amplitude is reduced. We then examine the radio flux/X-ray flux correlation in Cyg X-1 through the use of 15 GHz radio data, obtained with the Ryle radio telescope, and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data, from the All Sky Monitor and pointed observations. We again find evidence of `parallel tracks', and here they are associated with `failed transitions' to, or the beginning of a transition to, the soft state. We also find that for Cyg X-1 the radio flux is more fundamentally correlated with the hard

  18. Monitoring Persistence in WFC3/IR after scanned grism observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbi, Elena

    2013-10-01

    This is a calibration program designed to put full frame IR darks exposures immediately following ALL visits with WFC3/IR spatially scanned spectra. This will allow us to measure the persistence and its early decay characteristics.

  19. IR decoys modeling method based on particle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun-yu; Wu, Kai-feng; Dong, Yan-bing

    2016-10-01

    Due to the complexity in combustion processes of IR decoys, it is difficult to describe its infrared radiation characteristics by deterministic model. In this work, the IR decoys simulation based on particle system was found. The measured date of the IR decoy is used to analyze the typical characteristic of the IR decoy. A semi-empirical model of the IR decoy motion law has been set up based on friction factors and a IR decoys simulation model has been build up based on particle system. The infrared imaging characteristic and time varying characteristic of the IR decoy were simulated by making use of the particle feature such as lifetime, speed and color. The dynamic IR decoys simulation is realized with the VC++6.0 and OpenGL.

  20. Calculation of molecular excitation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, George

    1993-01-01

    State-to-state collisional excitation rates for interstellar molecules observed by radio astronomers continue to be required to interpret observed line intensities in terms of local temperatures and densities. A problem of particular interest is collisional excitation of water which is important for modeling the observed interstellar masers. In earlier work supported by a different NASA Grant, excitation of water in collisions with He atoms was studied; after many years of successively more refined calculations that problem now seems to be well understood, and discrepancies with earlier experimental data for related (pressure broadening) phenomena are believed to reflect experimental errors. Because of interstellar abundances, excitation by H2, the dominant interstellar species, is much more important than excitation by He, although it has been argued that rates for excitation by these are similar. Under the current grant theoretical study of this problem has begun which is greatly complicated by the additional degrees of freedom which must be included both in determining the interaction potential and also in the molecular scattering calculation. We have now computed the interaction forces for nearly a thousand molecular geometries and are close to having an acceptable global fit to these points which is necessary for the molecular dynamics calculations. Also, extensive modifications have been made to the molecular scattering code, MOLSCAT. These included coding the rotational basis sets and coupling matrix elements required for collisions of an asymmetric top with a linear rotor. A new method for numerical solution of the coupled equations has been incorporated. Because of the long-ranged nature of the water-hydrogen interaction it is necessary to integrate the equations to rather large intermolecular separations, and the integration methods previously available in MOLSCAT are not ideal for such cases. However, the method used by Alexander in his HIBRIDON code is

  1. Ngc7538 Irs1 - A Highly Collimated Ionized Wind Source Powered By Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandell, Goran H. L.; Wright, M.; Goss, W.; Corder, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent images show that NGC7538 IRS1 is not a conventional Ultracompact or Hypercompact HII region, but is completely wind-excited (other broad recombination line hypercompact HII regions may be similar to IRS1). NGC 7538 IRS1 is a well studied young high-mass star (L 2 10^5 L_Sun).VLA images at 6 and 2 cm (Cambell 1984; ApJ, 282, L27) showed a compact bipolar core (lobe separation 0.2") with more extended faint lobes. Recombination line observations (Gaume et al. 1995, ApJ, 438, 776) show extremely wide line profiles indicating substantial mass motion of the ionized gas. We re-analyzed high angular resolution VLA archive data from 6 cm to 7 mm, and measured the flux from the compact core and the extended (1.5 - 2") bipolar lobes. We find that the compact core has a spectral index, alpha 0.6, which could be explained by an optically thick hypercompact core with a density gradient. However, the size of the core shrinks with increasing frequency; from 0.24" at 6 cm to 0.1" at 7 mm, consistent with that expected for a collimated jet (Reynolds 1986, ApJ, 304, 713). If we do a crude size correction so that we compare emission from the optically thick inner part of the jet for a set of 2 cm and 7 mm observations we get alpha 1.6, i.e. close to the optically thick value. BIMA and CARMA continuum observations at 3 mm show some dust excess, while. HCO+ J=1-0 observations combined with FCRAO single dish data show a clear inverse P Cygni profile towards IRS1. These observations confirm that IRS1 is heavily accreting with an accretion rate 2 10^-4 M_Sun/year, sufficient to quench the formation of an HII region.

  2. Excited-to-excited-state scattering using weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U, Satya Sainadh; Narayanan, Andal

    2015-11-01

    Weak measurements are a subset of measurement processes in quantum mechanics wherein the system, which is being measured, interacts very weakly with the measuring apparatus. Measurement values of observables undergoing a weak interaction and their amplification are concepts that have sharpened our understanding of interaction processes in quantum mechanics. Recent experiments show that naturally occurring processes such as resonance fluorescence from excited states of an atom can exhibit weak value amplification effect. In this paper we theoretically analyze the process of elastic resonance fluorescence from a V -type three-level atomic system, using the well-known Weiskopff-Wigner (WW) theory of spontaneous emission. Within this theory we show that a weak interaction regime can be identified and for suitable choices of initial and final excited states the mean scattering time between these states show an amplification effect during interaction with the vacuum bath modes of the electromagnetic field. We thus show that a system-bath interaction can show weak value amplification. Using our theory we reproduce the published experimental results carried out in such a system. More importantly, our theory can calculate scattering time scales in elastic resonance scattering between multiple excited states of a single atom or between common excited state configurations of interacting multiatom systems.

  3. Structure and elementary properties of the new Ir hollandite Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Schoop, Leslie M.; Krizan, Jason W.; Gibson, Quinn D.; Cava, R.J.

    2014-01-15

    We report the synthesis and structural characterization of the new Ir holladite, Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2}. Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2} crystallizes in the tetragonal hollandite structure. In contrast to the previously reported monoclinic Ir hollandite K{sub 0.25}IrO{sub 2}, we do not observe a difference in Ir–O bond lengths in Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2} and thus find Ir in an average oxidation state of + 3.83. We also report and compare the electronic and magnetic properties of Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2} and K{sub 0.25}IrO{sub 2}, finding that they are both metallic and Pauli paramagnets further supporting that the electrons are delocalized in the Ir 5d states. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2} (right), and the SEM image of Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2}, showing the growth of thin needles (left). Display Omitted - Highlights: • New iridium hollandite. • Naturally grows in very thin wires. • Elementary physical properties of Ir holladites reported for the first time metallic conductor and paramagnetic.

  4. Directional excitation without breaking reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezani, Hamidreza; Dubois, Marc; Wang, Yuan; Shen, Y. Ron; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-09-01

    We propose a mechanism for directional excitation without breaking reciprocity. This is achieved by embedding an impedance matched parity-time symmetric potential in a three-port system. The amplitude distribution within the gain and loss regions is strongly influenced by the direction of the incoming field. Consequently, the excitation of the third port is contingent on the direction of incidence while transmission in the main channel is immune. Our design improves the four-port directional coupler scheme, as there is no need to implement an anechoic termination to one of the ports.

  5. Time-resolved observation of interatomic excitation-energy transfer in argon dimers.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Tomoya; Cörlin, Philipp; Miteva, Tsveta; Gokhberg, Kirill; Kuleff, Alexander; Cederbaum, Lorenz S; Pfeifer, Thomas; Fischer, Andreas; Moshammer, Robert

    2017-03-14

    The ultrafast transfer of excitation energy from one atom to its neighbor is observed in singly charged argon dimers in a time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV)-pump IR-probe experiment. In the pump step, bound 3s-hole states in the dimer are populated by single XUV-photon ionization. The excitation-energy transfer at avoided crossings of the potential-energy curves leads to dissociation of the dimer, which is experimentally observed by further ionization with a time-delayed IR-probe pulse. From the measured pump-probe delay-dependent kinetic-energy release of coincident Ar(+) + Ar(+) ions, we conclude that the transfer of energy occurs on a time scale of about 800fs. This mechanism represents a fast relaxation process below the energy threshold for interatomic Coulombic decay.

  6. IR Cards: Inquiry-Based Introduction to Infrared Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jacqueline; Forster, Tabetha

    2010-01-01

    As infrared spectroscopy (IR) is frequently used in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, an inductive introduction to IR spectroscopy that uses index cards printed with spectra, structures, and chemical names is described. Groups of students are given an alphabetized deck of these "IR cards" to sort into functional groups. The students then…

  7. OHANA: Eta Carinae's Variability in the Near-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehner, Andrea; de Wit, Willem-Jan; Rivinius, Thomas; Rivinius

    2015-01-01

    Near-IR photometry of η Car since 1972 revealed a long-term trend towards hotter temperatures and a cycloidal behavior of its near-IR colors around periastron passages. Both effects are likely triggered by the companion. We used VLTI AMBER observations from 2004-2014 to investigate η Car's variabilities in the near-IR.

  8. TAX ADMINISTRATION: IRS Undercover Operations Management Oversight Should Be Strengthened.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    stemmed from concerns with IRS’ management of an undercover operation, called Project Layoff , carried out in 1984 and 1985 during which IRS agents... Layoff more specifically in a separate report. An undercover operation is a potentially risky investigative technique. IRS’ Criminal Investigation

  9. Molecular tectonics: heterometallic (Ir,Cu) grid-type coordination networks based on cyclometallated Ir(III) chiral metallatectons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaojie; Guenet, Aurélie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Planeix, Jean-Marc; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2015-10-11

    A chiral-at-metal Ir(III) organometallic metallatecton was synthesised as a racemic mixture and as enantiopure complexes and combined with Cu(II) to afford a heterobimetallic (Ir,Cu) grid-type 2D coordination network.

  10. Laser-based excitation and diagnostics of planar fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, T. E.; Van Wijk, K.; Snieder, R.; Willis, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    Faults are of interest not only to earth science, but also at different scales in the non-destructive testing (NDT) community. Remote sensing of faults is of interest to both communities, with the idea of inverting for the fracture properties in a non-invasive way. Alternatively, the wave field directly excited at the fracture is of interest to both communities because the waves thus radiated are equivalent to those emitted by acoustic emissions or micro-earthquakes. Much can be learned from recording of elastic waves excited at the the fracture. Based on technology developed for NDT, we use laser ultrasonics in the laboratory to excite and detect elastic waves, in order to determine the properties of fractures or faults in laboratory rock and synthetic samples. We show examples of wave propagation in a clear Poly(methyl methacrylate) cylinder. By focusing a high power infrared (IR) laser inside the cylinder we create a visible single disk-shaped fracture near the center of the sample. The laser generates a short pulse (~20 ns) of infrared light that is absorbed by the sample material at the focal point and is converted into heat. The sudden thermal expansion generates stress and forms a fracture parallel to the cylindrical axis. We excite elastic waves at the surface of the sample using the same high-power pulsed laser, but at a much lower energy setting, and with an unfocused beam. We measure the direct and scattered wave field from the fracture with a laser interferometer, and also excite the fracture directly with a fraction of the source laser energy impinging directly on the fracture. A comparison of the direct excitation and the elastic scattered wavefields, including studies of the tip diffractions from the fracture, shows strong agreement. The measured tip diffractions carry information about the stress concentration near the crack tips, which is crucial for understanding rupture processes. This novel laboratory technique allows us to measure the source

  11. Pseudorandom selective excitation in NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Jamie D.; Coomes, Alexandra

    2011-09-01

    In this work, average Hamiltonian theory is used to study selective excitation under a series of small flip-angle θ-pulses θ ≪ {π}/{3} applied either periodically [corresponding to the DANTE pulse sequence] or aperiodically to a spin-1/2 system. First, an average Hamiltonian description of the DANTE pulse sequence is developed that is valid for frequencies either at or very far from integer multiples of {1}/{τ}, where τ is the interpulse delay. For aperiodic excitation, a single resonance, νsel, can be selectively excited if the θ-pulse phases are modulated in concert with the interpulse delays. The conditions where average Hamiltonian theory can be accurately applied to describe the dynamics under aperiodic selective pulses, which are referred to as pseudorandom-DANTE or p-DANTE sequences, are similar to those found for the DANTE sequence. Signal averaging over different p-DANTE sequences improves the apparent selectivity at νsel by reducing the excitations at other frequencies. Experimental demonstrations of p-DANTE sequences and comparisons with the theory are presented.

  12. Predictions for Excited Strange Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Ishara P.; Goity, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    An assessment is made of predictions for excited hyperon masses which follow from flavor symmetry and consistency with a 1/N c expansion of QCD. Such predictions are based on presently established baryonic resonances. Low lying hyperon resonances which do not seem to fit into the proposed scheme are discussed.

  13. Elementary Excitations in Quantum Liquids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, David

    1981-01-01

    Discusses elementary excitations and their role in condensed matter physics, focusing on quantum plasma, helium liquids, and superconductors. Considers research primarily conducted in the 1950s and concludes with a brief survey of some closely related further developments. (Author/JN)

  14. Pattern Formation in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    1997-03-01

    In this talk I give a short review of the history and the current state of theoretical research on spiral wave patterns in excitable media. I start with the theoretical model of wave propagation in excitable media proposed in 1946 by Wiener and Rosenblueth(N. Wiener and A. Rosenblueth, The mathematical formulation of the problem of conduction of impulses in a network of connected excitable elements, specifically in cardiac muscle, Arch. Inst. Cardiol. Mexico 16 (1946) 205). This model describes spiral waves rotating around obstacles. I show how, by taking additionally into account curvature effects and gradual recovery of the medium after passage of an excitation wave, the model is generalized to describe freely rotating spiral waves and the breakup which produces spirals. In the context of this kinematic model, complex dynamics of spiral waves, i.e. their meandering, drift and resonance, is discussed. Instabilities of spiral waves in confined geometries, i.e. inside a circular region and on a sphere, are analyzed. At the end, I show how spiral waves in such systems can be efficiently controlled by application of a delayed global feedback. The talk is based on the review paper(A. S. Mikhailov, V. A. Davydov, and V. S. Zykov, Complex dynamics of spiral waves and motion of curves, Physica D 70 (1994) 1) and the monograph(A. S. Mikhailov, Foundations of Synergetics I, 2nd revised edition (Springer, Berlin, 1994)).

  15. Launch Excitement with Water Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Juan Carlos; Penick, John

    2007-01-01

    Explosions and fires--these are what many students are waiting for in science classes. And when they do occur, students pay attention. While we can't entertain our students with continual mayhem, we can catch their attention and cater to their desires for excitement by saying, "Let's make rockets." In this activity, students make simple, reusable…

  16. Fast excitation variable period wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    van Steenbergen, A.; Gallardo, J.; Romano, T.; Woodle, M.

    1991-01-01

    The design of an easily stackable, variable period length, fast excitation driven wiggler, making use of geometrically alternating substacks of Vanadium Permandur ferromagnetic laminations, interspaced with conductive, non magnetic, laminations which act as eddy current induced field reflectors,'' is discussed and experimental results obtained with short wiggler models are presented.

  17. Fast excitation variable period wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    van Steenbergen, A.; Gallardo, J.; Romano, T.; Woodle, M.

    1991-12-31

    The design of an easily stackable, variable period length, fast excitation driven wiggler, making use of geometrically alternating substacks of Vanadium Permandur ferromagnetic laminations, interspaced with conductive, non magnetic, laminations which act as eddy current induced ``field reflectors,`` is discussed and experimental results obtained with short wiggler models are presented.

  18. Perceptual Load Alters Visual Excitability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmel, David; Thorne, Jeremy D.; Rees, Geraint; Lavie, Nilli

    2011-01-01

    Increasing perceptual load reduces the processing of visual stimuli outside the focus of attention, but the mechanism underlying these effects remains unclear. Here we tested an account attributing the effects of perceptual load to modulations of visual cortex excitability. In contrast to stimulus competition accounts, which propose that load…

  19. Communicating the Excitement of Science

    ScienceCinema

    Michael Turner

    2016-07-12

    In this talk (which will include some exciting science) I will discuss some lessons I have learned about communicating science to scientists (in my own field and others), students, the public, the press, and policy makers in giving 500+ colloquia and seminars, 300+ public lectures and many informal presentations (including cocktail parties).

  20. Exciting cytoskeleton-membrane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomovitz, R.; Gov, N. S.

    2008-10-01

    Propagating waves on the surface of cells, over many micrometers, involve active forces. We investigate here the mechanical excitation of such waves when the membrane is perturbed by an external oscillatory force. The external perturbation may trigger the propagation of such waves away from the force application. This scheme is then suggested as a method to probe the properties of the excitable medium of the cell, and learn about the mechanisms that drive the wave propagation. We then apply these ideas to a specific model of active cellular membrane waves, demonstrating how the response of the system to the external perturbation depends on the properties of the model. The most outstanding feature that we find is that the excited waves exhibit a resonance phenomenon at the frequency corresponding to the tendency of the system to develop a linear instability. Mechanical excitation of membrane waves in cells at different frequencies can therefore be used to characterize the properties of the mechanism underlying the existence of these waves.

  1. ToO IRS Observations of Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Charles; Black, John; Bode, Michael; Evans, Aneuryn; Geballe, Thomas; Gehrz, Robert; Greenhouse, Matthew; Hauschildt, Peter; Helton, Andrew; Krautter, Joachim; Liller, William; Lyke, James; Lynch, David; Rudy, Richard; Salama, Alberto; Schwarz, Greg; Shore, Steve; Starrfield, Sumner; Truran, Jim; Vanlandingham, Karen; Wagner, R. Mark

    2006-05-01

    Stars are the engines of energy production and chemical evolution in our Universe. They deposit radiative and mechanical energy into their environments and enrich the ambient interstellar medium with elements synthesized in their interiors and dust grains condensed in their atmospheres. Classical novae (CN) contribute to this cycle of chemical enrichment through explosive nucleosynthesis and the violent ejection of material dredged from the white dwarf progenitor and mixed with the accreted surface layers. Using Spitzer (+IRS), we propose a 25.8 hrs no-impact ToO program to study (in temporal detail) the evolutionary stages of CN by targeting 4 Galactic and 2 Magellanic Cloud (MC) novae. Spitzer is a unique facility that enables us to investigate aspects of the CN phenomenon including the in situ formation and astromineralogy of nova dust, the elemental abundances resulting from thermonuclear runaway, the correlation of ejecta masses with progenitor type, the bolometric luminosities of the outburst, and the kinematics and structure of the ejected envelopes. Synoptic, high signal-to-noise IRS spectra permit: 1) determination of the grain size distribution and mineral composition of nova dust; 2) estimation of chemical abundances of nova ejecta from coronal and other emission line spectroscopy; 3) measurement of the density and masses of the ejecta; 4) characterization of the geometry and structure of ejected shells at early stages during which the initial mixing of the chemical abundances can be studied in detail; and 5) exploration of the characteristics of CN in low metallicity systems (MC) at mid- to far-IR wavelengths. Observations of CN with Spitzer will be complemented by extensive ground-based, as well as space-based (e.g., Chandra, Swift, XMM-Newton), DDT and ToO programs led by team CoIs.

  2. Stabilizing Ir(001) Epitaxy on Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Using a Thin Ir Seed Layer Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Lisha; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; ...

    2016-11-18

    In this paper, we demonstrate the reproducible epitaxial growth of 100 nm thick Ir(001) films on a heteroepitaxial stack consisting of 5 nm Ir and 100 nm yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) grown on Si(001) substrates. It is shown that a 5 nm thick Ir layer grown by pulsed laser deposition in the same chamber as the YSZ film without breaking the vacuum is the key to stabilizing Ir(001) epitaxial growth. Growth of the Ir seed layer with pure (001) orientation occurs only in a narrow growth temperature window from 550 to 750 °C, and the fraction of Ir(111) increases at substratemore » temperatures outside of this window. The Ir seed layer prevents exposure of the YSZ film to air during sample transfer and enables highly reproducible Ir(001) heteroepitaxy on YSZ buffered Si(001). In contrast, if Ir is grown directly on a bare YSZ layer that was exposed to ambient conditions, the films are prone to change orientation to (111). These results reveal that preserving the chemical and structural purity of the YSZ surface is imperative for achieving Ir(001) epitaxy. The narrow range of the mosaic spread values from eight experiments demonstrates the high yield and high reproducibility of Ir(001) heteroepitaxy by this approach. Lastly, the improved Ir(001) epitaxial growth method is of great significance for integrating a variety of technologically important materials such as diamond, graphene, and functional oxides on a Si platform.« less

  3. Stabilizing Ir(001) Epitaxy on Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Using a Thin Ir Seed Layer Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Lisha; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Eres, Gyula

    2016-11-18

    In this paper, we demonstrate the reproducible epitaxial growth of 100 nm thick Ir(001) films on a heteroepitaxial stack consisting of 5 nm Ir and 100 nm yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) grown on Si(001) substrates. It is shown that a 5 nm thick Ir layer grown by pulsed laser deposition in the same chamber as the YSZ film without breaking the vacuum is the key to stabilizing Ir(001) epitaxial growth. Growth of the Ir seed layer with pure (001) orientation occurs only in a narrow growth temperature window from 550 to 750 °C, and the fraction of Ir(111) increases at substrate temperatures outside of this window. The Ir seed layer prevents exposure of the YSZ film to air during sample transfer and enables highly reproducible Ir(001) heteroepitaxy on YSZ buffered Si(001). In contrast, if Ir is grown directly on a bare YSZ layer that was exposed to ambient conditions, the films are prone to change orientation to (111). These results reveal that preserving the chemical and structural purity of the YSZ surface is imperative for achieving Ir(001) epitaxy. The narrow range of the mosaic spread values from eight experiments demonstrates the high yield and high reproducibility of Ir(001) heteroepitaxy by this approach. Lastly, the improved Ir(001) epitaxial growth method is of great significance for integrating a variety of technologically important materials such as diamond, graphene, and functional oxides on a Si platform.

  4. Near-IR imaging toward a puzzling young stellar object precessing jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paron, S.; Fariña, C.; Ortega, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: The study of jets that are related to stellar objects in formation is important because it enables us to understand the history of how the stars have built up their mass. Many studies currently examine jets towards low-mass young stellar objects, while equivalent studies toward massive or intermediate-mass young stellar objects are rare. In a previous study, based on 12CO J = 3-2 and public near-IR data, we found highly misaligned molecular outflows toward the infrared point source UGPS J185808.46+010041.8 (IRS) and some infrared features suggesting the existence of a precessing jet. Methods: Using near-IR data acquired with Gemini-NIRI at the JHKs broad- and narrowbands centered on the emission lines of [FeII], H2 1-0 S(1), H2 2-1 S(1), Brγ, and CO 2-0 (bh), we studied the circumstellar environment of IRS with an angular resolution between 0.̋35 and 0.̋45. Results: The emission in the JHKs broadbands shows in great detail a cone-shaped nebula extending to the north-northeast of the point source, which appears to be attached to it by a jet-like structure. In the three bands the nebula is resolved in a twisted-shaped feature composed of two arc-like features and a bow-shock-like structure seen mainly in the Ks band, which strongly suggests the presence of a precessing jet. An analysis of proper motions based on our Gemini observations and UKIDSS data additionally supports the precession scenario. We present one of the best-resolved cone-like nebula that is most likely related to a precessing jet up to date. The analysis of the observed near-IR lines shows that the H2 is collisionally excited, and the spatially coincidence of the [FeII] and H2 emissions in the closer arc-like feature suggests that this region is affected by a J shock. The second arc-like feature presents H2 emission without [FeII], which suggests a nondissociated C shock or a less energetic J shock. The H2 1-0 S(1) continuum-subtracted image reveals several knots and filaments at a larger

  5. IR beamline at the Swiss Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ph, Lerch; L, Quaroni; J, Wambach; J, Schneider; B, Armstrong D.; D, Rossetti; L, Mueller F.; P, Peier; V, Schlott; L, Carroll; P, Friedli; H, Sigg; S, Stutz; M, Tran

    2012-05-01

    The infrared beamline at the Swiss light source uses dipole radiation and is designed to transport light to four experimental stations, A, B, C, D. Branch A is dedicated to far IR work in vacuum; branch B is a micro-spectrometer; branch C is dedicated to high resolution spectroscopy in the gas phase; branch D is a pump and probe set-up. This contribution describes the optical layout and provides a brief survey of currently available experimental stations. The beamline is in regular user operation since 2009.

  6. Standoff imaging of chemicals using IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on a standoff spectroscopic technique for identifying chemical residues on surfaces. A hand-held infrared camera was used in conjunction with a wavelength tunable mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) to create hyperspectral image arrays of a target with an explosive residue on its surface. Spectral signatures of the explosive residue (RDX) were extracted from the hyperspectral image arrays and compared with a reference spectrum. Identification of RDX was achieved for residue concentrations of 20 g per cm2 at a distance of 1.5 m, and for 5 g per cm2 at a distance of 15 cm.

  7. Types of Research Bias Encountered in IR.

    PubMed

    Gabr, Ahmed; Kallini, Joseph Ralph; Desai, Kush; Hickey, Ryan; Thornburg, Bartley; Kulik, Laura; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2016-04-01

    Bias is a systemic error in studies that leads to inaccurate deductions. Relevant biases in the field of IR and interventional oncology were identified after reviewing articles published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology. Biases cited in these articles were divided into three categories: preinterventional (health care access, participation, referral, and sample biases), periinterventional (contamination, investigator, and operator biases), and postinterventional (guarantee-time, lead time, loss to follow-up, recall, and reporting biases).

  8. IR laser ablation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    An overview of the basic mechanisms of IR laser ablation of dental enamel is presented. Enamel is a highly structured tissue consisting of an heterogeneous distribution of water, mineral, protein and lipid. Absorption bands of water and carbonated hydroxyapatite can be selectively targeted from 2.7 to 11-micrometer via several laser wavelengths. Mechanistic differences in the nature of ablation and the varying surface morphology produced can be explained by the microstructure of the tissue. Suggested criteria for the choice of the optimum laser parameters for clinical use, the influence of plasma shielding and the role of exogenous water on the mechanism of ablation are discussed.

  9. IR Spectroscopy of PANHs in Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamandola, Louis; Mattioda, Andrew; Sandford, Scott

    2008-03-01

    Interstellar PAHs are likely to be frozen into ice mantles on dust grains in dense clouds. These PAHs will produce IR absorption bands, not emission features. A couple of very weak absorption features in ground based spectra of a few objects in dense clouds may be due to PAHs. It is now thought that aromatic molecules in which N atoms are substituted for a few of the C atoms in a PAH's hexagonal skeletal network (PANHs) may well be as abundant and ubiquitous throughout the interstellar medium as PAHs. Spaceborne observations in the 5 to 8 um region, the region in which PAH spectroscopy is rich, reveal unidentified new bands and significant variation from object to object. It is not possible to analyze these observations because lab spectra of PANHs and PAHs condensed in realistic interstellar ice analogs are lacking. This lab data is necessary to interpret observations because, in ice mantles, the surrounding molecules affect PANH and PAH IR band positions, widths, profiles, and intrinsic strengths. Further, PAHs (and PANHs?) are readily ionized in pure H2O ice, further altering the spectrum. This proposal starts to address this situation by studying the IR spectra of PANHs frozen in laboratory ice analogs that reflect the composition of the interstellar ices observed in dense clouds. Thanks to Spitzer Cycle-4 support, we are now measuring the spectra of PAHs in interstellar ice analogs to provide laboratory spectra that can be used to interpret IR observations. Here we propose to extend this work to PANHs. We will measure the spectra of these interstellar ice analogs containing PANHs before and after ionization and determine the band strengths of neutral and ionized PANHs in these ices. This will enable a quantitative assessment of the role that PANHs can play in the 5-8 um spectrum of dense clouds and address the following two fundamental questions associated with dense cloud spectroscopy and chemistry: 1- Can PANHs be detected in dense clouds? 2- Are PANH ions

  10. ROC Analysis of IR Segmentation Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    WrOChtAnattysisoRSgetton Ti’oc aechnique Gpro edo g’bia K lay e;ru Dseciutond LiutnanUA AFIT/GE/ENG/94D-15 ROC Analysis of IR Segmentation Techniques THESIS...classification systems was measured by the percentage of correct decisions, but that "percent correct" does not account for the false-positive and...false-negative errors involved [13]. For example, if 5% of people have a particular disease, then a system can be 95% accurate by calling everyone

  11. Gated IR Images of Shocked Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    S. S. Lutz; W. D. Turley; P. M. Rightley; L. E. Primas

    2001-06-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several geometries were modeled using CTH, a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  12. Gated IR images of shocked surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, S. S.; Turley, W. D.; Rightley, P. M.; Primas, L. E.

    2001-01-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several geometries were modeled using CTH, a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  13. Low Power Polysilicon Sources for IR Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, N. C.; Jhabvala, M.; Shu, P.

    1998-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated polysilicon thin film infrared (IR) sources by micromachining technology. These sources are made with a lightly doped middle region for light emission and heavy doping of the supporting legs. The sources are fabricated on a 10 mm thick, low temperature process parameters in the fabrication of these silicon dioxide layer. Different doping levels were used to achieve various source resistances. From the power requirement to reach the required light emission versus source resistance curve it is seen that there exists a resistance value which minimizes the necessary input power.

  14. Synthesis and photophysical properties of Ir(iii)/Re(i) dyads: control of Ir→Re photoinduced energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Saad, Suad T; Metherell, Alexander J; Baggaley, Elizabeth; Ward, Michael D

    2016-07-28

    A series of dinuclear Ir(iii)/Re(i) complexes has been prepared based on a family of symmetrical bridging ligands containing two bidentate N,N'-chelating pyrazolyl-pyridine termini, connected by a central aromatic or aliphatic spacer. The Ir(iii) termini are based on {Ir(F2ppy)2}(+) units (where F2ppy is the cyclometallating anion of a fluorinated phenylpyridine) and the Re(i) termini are based on {Re(CO)3Cl} units. Both types of terminus are luminescent, with the Ir-based unit showing characteristic strong, structured phosphorescence in the blue region (maximum 452 nm) with a triplet excited state energy of 22 200 cm(-1) and the Re-based unit showing much weaker and lower-energy phosphorescence (maximum 530 nm) with a triplet excited state energy of 21 300 cm(-1). The energy gradient between the two excited states allows for partial Ir→Re photoinduced energy-transfer, with substantial (but incomplete) quenching of the higher-energy Ir-based emission component and sensitised emission - evidenced by an obvious grow-in component - on the lower-energy Re-based emission. The Ir→Re energy-transfer rate constants vary over the range 1-8 × 10(7) s(-1) depending on the bridging ligand: there is no simple correlation between bridging ligand structure and energy-transfer rate, possibly because this will depend substantially on the conformation of these flexible molecules in solution. To test the role of ligand conformation further, we investigated a complex in which the bridging chain is a (CH2CH2O)6 unit whose conformation is known to be solvent-polarity dependent, with such chains adopting an open, elongated conformation in water and more compact, folded conformations in organic solvents. There was a clear link between the rate and extent of Ir→Re energy-transfer which reduced in polar solvents as the chain became elongated and the Ir/Re separation was larger; and increased in less polar solvents as the chain adopted a more compact conformation and the Ir

  15. Mechanism of pain relief by low-power infrared irradiation: ATP is an IR-target molecule in nociceptive neurons.

    PubMed

    Yachnev, Igor L; Plakhova, Vera B; Podzorova, Svetlana A; Shelykh, Tatiana N; Rogachevsky, Ilya V; Krylov, Boris V

    2012-01-01

    Effects of infrared (IR) radiation generated by a low-power CO2-laser on the membrane of cultured dissociated nociceptive neurons of newborn rat spinal ganglia were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Low-power IR radiation diminished the voltage sensitivity of activation gating machinery of slow sodium channels (Na(v)1.8). Ouabain known to block both transducer and pumping functions of Na+,K+-ATPase eliminated IR irradiation effects. The molecular mechanism of interaction of CO2-laser radiation with sensory membrane was proposed. The primary event of this interaction is the process of energy absorption by ATP molecules. The transfer of vibrational energy from Na+,K+- ATPase-bound and vibrationally excited ATP molecules to Na+,K+-ATPase activates this enzyme and converts it into a signal transducer. This effect leads to a decrease in the voltage sensitivity of Na(v)1.8 channels. The effect of IR-radiation was elucidated by the combined application of a very sensitive patch-clamp method and an optical facility with a controlled CO2-laser. As a result, the mechanism of interaction of non-thermal low-power IR radiation with the nociceptive neuron membrane is suggested.

  16. Letter : NIR FT-Raman microspectroscopy of fluid inclusions: Comparisons with VIS Raman and FT-IR microspectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pironon, J.; Sawatzki, J.; Dubessy, J.

    1991-12-01

    The first Raman spectra of hydrocarbon inclusions using Fourier transform (FT) Raman microspectroscopy were obtained with a 1064 nm laser excitation in the near-infrared range (NIR FT-Raman). Some inclusions reveal the typical CH vibrational bands of organic compounds, but most of the inclusions that are fluorescent during visible Raman microspectroscopy (514 nm excitation) are still fluorescent in the NIR range. These Raman spectra are presented and compared to the conventional visible (VIS) Raman and FT-IR spectra. For spectra obtained on the same nonfluorescent inclusion, the signal/background ratio is lower in NIR FT-Raman than in VIS Raman. This ratio should be improved by application of more sensitive detectors. The increase of the power density (laser power/impact laser area) could be a future improvement in the limit of thermal background excitation and pyrolysis of the oils trapped in inclusions.

  17. IR Spectroscopic signs of malignant neoplasms in the thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Butra, V. A.

    2012-03-01

    We use Fourier transform IR spectroscopy to study thyroid tumor tissues which were removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the tissues with pathological foci are compared with data from histologic examination. In the region of N-H, C-H, and C = O stretching vibrations, the IR spectra of the tissues for thyroid cancer are different from the IR spectra of tissues without malignant formations. We identify the spectral signs of thyroid cancer. We show that IR analysis is promising for identification of thyroid pathology at the molecular level.

  18. C-H Hot Bands in the Near-IR Emission Spectra of Leonids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, F. T.; Scoville, J.; Holm, R.; Seelemann, R.; Freund, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    The reported infrared (IR) emission spectra from 1999 Leonid fireballs show a 3.4 micron C-H emission band and unidentified bands at longer wavelengths. Upon atmospheric entry, the Leonid meteorites were flash-heated to temperatures around 2400K, which would destroy any organics on the surface of the meteorite grains. We propose that the nu(sub )CH emission band in the Leonid emission spectra arises from matrix-embedded C(sub n)-H-O entities that are protected from instant pyrolysis. Our model is based on IR absorption nu(sub )CH bands, which we observed in laboratory-grown MgO and natural olivine single crystals, where they arise from C(sub n)-H-O units imbedded in the mineral matrix, indicative of aliphatic -CH2- and -CH3 organics. Instead of being pyrolyzed, the C(sub n)-H-O entities in the Leonid trails become vibrationally excited to higher levels n = 1, 2, 3 etc. During de-excitation they emit at 3.4 microns, due to the (0 => 1) transition, and at longer wavelengths, due to hot bands. As a first step toward verifying this hypothesis we measured the C-H vibrational manifold of hexane (C6H14). The calculated positions of the (2 => l ) , (3 => 2), and possibly (4 => 3) hot bands agree with the Leonid emission bands at 3.5, 3.8 and 4.l microns.

  19. Optical element for full spectral purity from IR-generated EUV light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Boogaard, A. J. R.; Louis, E.; van Goor, F. A.; Bijkerk, F.

    2009-03-01

    Laser produced plasma (LLP) sources are generally considered attractive for high power EUV production in next generation lithography equipment. Such plasmas are most efficiently excited by the relatively long, infrared wavelengths of CO2-lasers, but a significant part of the rotational-vibrational excitation lines of the CO2 radiation will be backscattered by the plasma's critical density surface and consequently will be present as parasitic radiation in the spectrum of such sources. Since most optical elements in the EUV collecting and imaging train have a high reflection coefficient for IR radiation, undesirable heating phenomena at the resist level are likely to occur. In this study a completely new principle is employed to obtain full separation of EUV and IR radiation from the source by a single optical component. While the application of a transmission filter would come at the expense of EUV throughput, this technique potentially enables wavelength separation without loosing reflectance compared to a conventional Mo/Si multilayer coated element. As a result this method provides full spectral purity from the source without loss in EUV throughput. Detailed calculations on the principal of functioning are presented.

  20. Comparison of the Photoacoustic Effect in the IR and the UV Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preukschat, T.; Angster, J.; Miklós, A.

    2015-09-01

    The photoacoustic effect has been studied intensively using light sources emitting in the infrared (IR) region. Corresponding photons lead to excitations of vibrational-rotational energy levels. Subsequent de-excitations by collisions with the surrounding molecules can increase the translational energy of these molecules. Consequently, by irradiating a gas sample with amplitude- or wavelength-modulated light, an acoustic wave can be created and recorded by means of microphones. In the case of light absorption in the ultraviolet (UV) region, however, the photon energy is too large for the before-mentioned transitions. Instead, photon absorption can induce electronic transitions or even molecule dissociation. While experiments reveal that these effects lead to a photoacoustic signal as well (see, e.g. Cvijin et al. in Appl Spectrosc 42:770, 1988; Dóka et al. in Appl Spectrosc 54:1405, 2000; Gondal and Mastromarino in Appl Opt 40:2010, 2001; Böttger et al. in Appl Phys B 113:227, 2013), investigations concerning the reason have been hardly published to date. By means of a 266 nm UV laser and an IR optical parametric oscillator (OPO) setup, photoacoustic measurements were carried out with a synthetic air-acetone gas mixture. In this paper, both measurements are compared with each other and the fundamental processes of photoacoustic signal production in the UV region are discussed.

  1. Role of IRS1 and IRS2 in Modulating ErbB-induced Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    moderate I C50 between 4 µM a nd 14µM, r esistant: IC50>14µM Table 1 . Summary of the effect of BMS-754807 on cells lines with an unknown IC50 Cell...Number: W81XWH-08- 1 -0220 TITLE: Role of IRS1 and IRS2 in Modulating ErbB-induced Tumorigenesis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Beate Litzenburger...DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response

  2. Band Excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian

    2015-03-13

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. In conclusion, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  3. Band Excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; ...

    2015-03-13

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standardmore » ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. In conclusion, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.« less

  4. Dust processing in photodissociation regions Mid-IR emission modelling of NGC2023N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compiègne, M.; Abergel, A.; Verstraete, L.; Habart, E.

    2008-11-01

    This study is done in the context of dust evolution and its interaction with the gaseous phase throughout the interstellar medium evolution cycle. We focus on the mid-IR spectral variations of the dust emission across photodissociation regions, observed with both ISO and Spitzer satellites. We use a dust emission model coupled with a radiative transfer model in order to study the excitation effects on these spectral variations. We show that in NGC2023N, radiative transfer effects cannot account for the observed spectral variations. Thus, we interpret these variations in term of changes of the relative abundance between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, mid-IR bands carriers) and very small grains (VSGs, mid-IR continuum carriers). We conclude that the PAH/VSG abundance ratio is about 5 times lower in the dense deep part than in the diffuse illuminated part of the PDR where dust properties seem to be the same as in the diffuse high galactic latitude medium. Consequently, we conclude that dust must evolve from "dense properties" to "diffuse properties" at the small spatial scale of the dense illuminated ridge.

  5. Reprocessing WFC3/IR Exposures Affected by Time-Variable Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brammer, G.

    2016-11-01

    The background seen in WFC3/IR observations frequently shows strong time-dependent behavior above the constant flux expected for zodiacal continuum light. This is often caused by an emission line of helium at 1.083 μm excited in the sun-illuminated upper atmosphere, when seen in the filters (F105W, F110W) and grisms (G102, G141) sensitive to the feature. The default behavior of the calwf3 pipeline assumes constant source-plus-background fluxes when it performs up-the-ramp fitting to identify cosmic rays and determine the average count rate within a MULTIACCUM IR exposure. calwf3 provides undesirable results in the presence of strongly variable backgrounds, primarily in the form of elevated and non-Gaussian noise in the FLT products. Here we describe methods to improve the noise properties of the reduced products. In the first, we simply turn off the calwf3 crcorr step, treating the IR detector as if it were a CCD, i.e., accumulating flux and reading it out at the end of the exposure. Next, we artificially flatten the ramps in the IMA products and then allow calwf3 to proceed as normal fitting the ramp and identifying CRs. Either of these procedures enable recovery of datasets otherwise corrupted beyond repair and have no discernible effects on photometry of sources in deep combined images.

  6. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Timothy; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele; Finlay, Jarod; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles; Friedberg, Joseph; Cengel, Keith

    2015-03-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 - 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light dose uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method.

  7. Earth's Atmospheric CO2 Saturated IR Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Ernst

    2008-10-01

    Using the on-line SpectraCalc IR absorption simulator, the amount of IR absorption by the 15 μ line of the current atmospheric CO2 was obtained and compared with that of twice the amount of CO2. The simulation required a fixed density equivalent for the atmospheric path length. This was obtained by numerically integrating the NOAA Standard Atmospheric model. While the current line is saturated, doubling the CO2 will cause a slight width increase. Using this and the blackbody radiation curve plus considering the effects of water vapor, the temperature rise of the Earth will be less than 2.5 deg. C. Integrating a NASA Martian atmospheric model, we find that the Martian atmosphere has 45 times more CO2 to penetrate than Earth, and yet, the Martian diurnal temperature swings exceed those of the Sahara desert. I.e., large amounts of CO2 alone do not necessarily cause planetary warming. As the oceans warm from any cause, more CO2 is boiled out, but if they cool, they will absorb more CO2 just as a carbonated drink does, so that temperature and CO2 density will correlate. It is to be noted that the Earth's known petroleum reserves contain only enough CO2 to increase the atmospheric CO2 by some 15%.

  8. Active IR-applications in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggenhauser, H.

    2002-06-01

    Applications of IR-thermography in civil engineering are not limited to the identification of heat losses in building envelopes. As it is well known from other areas of non-destructive testing, active IR-thermographic methods such as cooling down or lock-in thermography improves the results in many investigations. In civil engineering these techniques have not been used widely. Mostly thermography is used in a quasi-static manner. The interpretation of moisture measurements with thermography on surfaces can be very difficult due to several overlapping effects: emissivity changes due to composition, heat transfer through wet sections of the specimen, cooling through air flow or reflected spurious radiation sources. These effects can be reduced by selectively measuring the reflection in two wavelength windows, one on an absorption band of water and another in a reference band and then combining the results in a moisture index image. Cooling down thermography can be used to identify subsurface structural deficiencies. For building materials like concrete these measurements are performed on a much longer time scale than in flash lamp experiments. A quantitative analysis of the full cooling down process over several minutes can reliably identify defects at different depths. Experiments at BAM have shown, that active thermography is capabale of identifying structural deficiencies or moist areas in building materials much more reliable than quasi-static thermography.

  9. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Timothy C; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele M; Finlay, Jarod C; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles B; Friedberg, Joseph S; Cengel, Keith A

    2015-03-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 - 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light fluence uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method.

  10. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele M.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles B.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 – 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light fluence uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method. PMID:25995987

  11. IR DIAGNOSTICS FOR DYNAMIC FAILURE OF MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    McElfresh, M; DeTeresa, S

    2006-02-13

    This project explores the thermodynamics of dynamic deformation and failure of materials using high-speed spatially-resolved infrared (IR) measurements of temperature. During deformation mechanical work is converted to different forms of energy depending on the deformation processes. For example, it can be dissipated as heat in purely plastic deformation, stored as strain energy in dislocations in metals and in oriented polymeric molecular structures, and expended during the generation of new surfaces during damage and fracture. The problem of how this work is converted into these various forms is not well understood. In fact, there exists a controversy for the relatively simple case regarding the amount of work dissipated as heat during uniform plastic deformation. The goals of this work are to develop dynamic IR temperature measurement techniques and then apply them to gain a better understanding of the dynamic failure processes in both metals and polymeric composite materials. The experimental results will be compared against predictions of existing constitutive models and guide the development of higher fidelity models if needed.

  12. MEMS-based IR-sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Sebastian; Steinbach, Bastian; Biermann, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    The series JSIR350 sources are MEMS based infrared emitters. These IR sources are characterized by a high radiation output. Thus, they are excellent for NDIR gas analysis and are ideally suited for using with our pyro-electric or thermopile detectors. The MEMS chips used in Micro-Hybrid's infrared emitters consist of nano-amorphous carbon (NAC). The MEMS chips are produced in the USA. All Micro-Hybrid Emitter are designed and specified to operate up to 850°C. The improvements we have made in the source's packaging enable us to provide IR sources with the best performance on the market. This new technology enables us to seal the housings of infrared radiation sources with soldered infrared filters or windows and thus cause the parts to be impenetrable to gases. Micro-Hybrid provide various ways of adapting our MEMS based infrared emitter JSIR350 to customer specifications, like specific burn-in parameters/characteristic, different industrial standard housings, producible with customized cap, reflector or pin-out.

  13. Qualification tests for 192Ir sealed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iancso, Georgeta; Iliescu, Elena; Iancu, Rodica

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the results of qualification tests for 192Ir sealed sources, available in Testing and Nuclear Expertise Laboratory of National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering "Horia Hulubei" (I.F.I.N.-HH), Romania. These sources had to be produced in I.F.I.N.-HH and were tested in order to obtain the authorization from The National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). The sources are used for gammagraphy procedures or in gammadefectoscopy equipments. Tests, measurement methods and equipments used, comply with CNCAN, AIEA and International Quality Standards and regulations. The qualification tests are: 1. Radiological tests and measurements: dose equivalent rate at 1 m; tightness; dose equivalent rate at the surface of the transport and storage container; external unfixed contamination of the container surface. 2. Mechanical and climatic tests: thermal shock; external pressure; mechanic shock; vibrations; boring; thermal conditions for storage and transportation. Passing all tests, it was obtained the Radiological Security Authorization for producing the 192Ir sealed sources. Now IFIN-HH can meet many demands for this sealed sources, as the only manufacturer in Romania.

  14. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory, and Madelung potential analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Köhler, Jürgen; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3, both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axis directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. The spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed.

  15. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory and Madelung potential analyses

    DOE PAGES

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Koehler, Jurgen; ...

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of DFT calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3,more » both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axes directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. As a result, the spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed lately.« less

  16. Mean excitation energies for molecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Phillip W. K.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Oddershede, Jens; Sabin, John R.

    2017-03-01

    The essential material constant that determines the bulk of the stopping power of high energy projectiles, the mean excitation energy, is calculated for a range of smaller molecular ions using the RPA method. It is demonstrated that the mean excitation energy of both molecules and atoms increase with ionic charge. However, while the mean excitation energies of atoms also increase with atomic number, the opposite is the case for mean excitation energies for molecules and molecular ions. The origin of these effects is explained by considering the spectral representation of the excited state contributing to the mean excitation energy.

  17. IR camera temperature resolution enhancing using computer processing of IR image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2016-05-01

    As it is well-known, application of the IR camera for the security problems is very promising way. In previous papers, we demonstrate new possibility of the passive THz camera using for a temperature difference observing on the human skin if this difference is caused by different temperatures inside the body. For proof of validity of our statement we make the similar physical experiment using the IR camera. We show a possility of viewing the temperature trace on a human body skin, caused by temperature changing inside the human body due to water drinking. We use new approach, based on usung a correlation function, for computer processing of IR images. Its application results in a temperature resolution enhancing of cameras. We analyze IR images of a person, which drinks water. We follow a temperature trace on human body skin, caused by changing of temperature inside the human body. Some experiments were made with measurements of a body temperature covered by shirt. We try to see a human body temperature changing in physical experiments under consideration. Shown phenomena are very important for the detection of forbidden objects, cancelled under clothes or inside the human body, by using non-destructive control without using X-rays.

  18. Intercalation of IR absorber into layered double hydroxides: Preparation, thermal stability and selective IR absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haifeng; Tang, Pinggui; Feng, Yongjun; Wang, Lijing; Li, Dianqing

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PMIDA anions were intercalated into Mg{sub 2}Al-NO{sub 3} LDH by anion-exchange method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prepared material has highly selective IR absorption property in 9-11 {mu}m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained material has practical applications as heat-retaining additive. -- Abstract: N-phosphonomethyl aminodiacetic acid (PMIDA) was intercalated into the interlayer spacing of layered double hydroxides (LDH) by an anion-exchange method. The intercalated LDHs were characterized by various techniques such as powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and simultaneous thermogravimetric and mass spectrometry (TG-MS) in details. The results show the formation of Mg{sub 2}Al-PMIDA LDH based on the expansion of d-spacing from 0.89 nm to 1.22 nm and the disappearance of the characteristic IR absorption band at 1384 cm{sup -1} for NO{sub 3}{sup -} anions. The incorporation of Mg{sub 2}Al-PMIDA LDH into the low density polyethylene (LDPE) as an additive enhances the selectivity of IR absorption in the main wavelength region 9-11 {mu}m for radiant heat loss at night. Mg{sub 2}Al-PMIDA LDH as a heat-retaining additive has practical application in agricultural plastic films.

  19. Optical Properties of Iridium(III) Cyclometalates: Excited State Interaction with Small Molecules and Dynamics of Light-Harvesting Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Kyle Robert

    The research presented in this thesis concerns the use and understanding of luminescent Ir(III) cyclometalates. Areas of research involve the design, synthesis, and characterization of novel luminescent Ir(III) cyclometalates, including photophysical investigation of their phosphorescent excited states using steady-state and time resolved absorption/luminescence spectroscopies. This broad research description may be further separated into two subareas: study of excited state interaction with small molecules and excited-state dynamics of metal-organic light harvesting dyads. Interaction of Ir(III) cyclometalates with the small molecule carbon dioxide (CO2) is the subject of Chapter One. Most optical detection schemes previously developed for CO2 use indirect detection methods, which rely upon measuring changes in pH brought about by hydrolysis of CO 2 on of CO2 were accomplished through development of a system where hydrazine, a simple amino ligand, when coupled into the coordination sphere of an Ir(III) cyclometalate reacts with CO2. The result of this reaction provides a shift in the luminescence wavelength, a previously unobserved optical response for CO2 detection. Chapter Two investigates phosphorescent excited states and their ability to function as triplet sensitizers for the generation of singlet oxygen ( 1O2) and luminescent probes for molecular oxygen (O 2) concentration. Interaction of phosphorescent excited states with O2 results in energy transfer from the luminescent probe to O 2, quenching the phosphorescent excited state. Energy transfer also generates the reactive oxygen species (ROS) 1O2. We have used this duality to develop an analytical methodology to follow the serendipitously discovered photoreactivity of 1O2 with common organic solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) using the luminescence profile of Ir(III) and Ru(II) phosphors. In Chapter Three a detailed study involving the design, synthesis, and characterization of the electrochemical and

  20. Light baryons and their excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot; Fischer, Christian S.; Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios

    2016-11-01

    We study ground states and excitations of light octet and decuplet baryons within the framework of Dyson-Schwinger and Faddeev equations. We improve upon similar approaches by explicitly taking into account the momentum-dependent dynamics of the quark-gluon interaction that leads to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. We perform calculations in both the three-body Faddeev framework and the quark-diquark approximation in order to assess the impact of the latter on the spectrum. Our results indicate that both approaches agree well with each other. The resulting spectra furthermore agree one-to-one with experiment, provided well-known deficiencies of the rainbow-ladder approximation are compensated for. We also discuss the mass evolution of the Roper and the excited Δ with varying pion mass and analyze the internal structure in terms of their partial wave decompositions.

  1. Receiver-exciter controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansma, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    A description of the general design of both the block 3 and block 4 receiver-exciter controllers for the Deep Space Network (DSN) Mark IV-A System is presented along with the design approach. The controllers are designed to enable the receiver-exciter subsystem (RCV) to be configured, calibrated, initialized and operated from a central location via high level instructions. The RECs are designed to be operated under the control of the DMC subsystem. The instructions are in the form of standard subsystem blocks (SSBs) received via the local area network (LAN). The centralized control provided by RECs and other DSCC controllers in Mark IV-A is intended to reduce DSN operations costs from the Mark III era.

  2. Synthesis, one- and two-photon photophysical and excited-state properties, and sensing application of a new phosphorescent dinuclear cationic iridium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Juan; Liu, Shu-Juan; Zhao, Xin; Zhao, Ning; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Xu, Hang; Liang, Hua; Zhao, Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2013-01-07

    A new phosphorescent dinuclear cationic iridium(III) complex (Ir1) with a donor-acceptor-π-bridge-acceptor-donor (D-A-π-A-D)-conjugated oligomer (L1) as a N^N ligand and a triarylboron compound as a C^N ligand has been synthesized. The photophysical and excited-state properties of Ir1 and L1 were investigated by UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and molecular-orbital calculations, and they were compared with those of the mononuclear iridium(III) complex [Ir(Bpq)(2)(bpy)](+)PF(6)(-) (Ir0). Compared with Ir0, complex Ir1 shows a more-intense optical-absorption capability, especially in the visible-light region. For example, complex Ir1 shows an intense absorption band that is centered at λ=448 nm with a molar extinction coefficient (ε) of about 10(4) , which is rarely observed for iridium(III) complexes. Complex Ir1 displays highly efficient orange-red phosphorescent emission with an emission wavelength of 606 nm and a quantum efficiency of 0.13 at room temperature. We also investigated the two-photon-absorption properties of complexes Ir0, Ir1, and L1. The free ligand (L1) has a relatively small two-photon absorption cross-section (δ(max) =195 GM), but, when complexed with iridium(III) to afford dinuclear complex Ir1, it exhibits a higher two-photon-absorption cross-section than ligand L1 in the near-infrared region and an intense two-photon-excited phosphorescent emission. The maximum two-photon-absorption cross-section of Ir1 is 481 GM, which is also significantly larger than that of Ir0. In addition, because the strong B-F interaction between the dimesitylboryl groups and F(-) ions interrupts the extended π-conjugation, complex Ir1 can be used as an excellent one- and two-photon-excited "ON-OFF" phosphorescent probe for F(-) ions.

  3. Studies of Highly Excited Atoms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-02

    collisions with photoions produced by the absorption of two blue laser photons or to an effect varying as the square of the number of excited atoms. Since...Physique Atomique , F-91191. (4). Our calculations indicate values of a = 3x 108 Gif-sur-Yvette. France. ., (d Permanent address: Fakultat fur Physik...collisions with points of particular importance for this experi- photoions produced by the absorption of two blue- -- ment. First, the atomic beam is

  4. Ultrafast excited-state dynamics in vitamin B12 and related cob(III)alamins.

    PubMed

    Shiang, Joseph J; Cole, Allwyn G; Sension, Roseanne J; Hang, Kun; Weng, Yuxiang; Trommel, Jenna S; Marzilli, Luigi G; Lian, Tianquan

    2006-01-25

    Femtosecond transient IR and visible absorption spectroscopies have been employed to investigate the excited-state photophysics of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin, CNCbl) and the related cob(III)alamins, azidocobalamin (N3Cbl), and aquocobalamin (H2OCbl). Excitation of CNCbl, H2OCbl, or N3Cbl results in rapid formation of a short-lived excited state followed by ground-state recovery on time scales ranging from a few picoseconds to a few tens of picoseconds. The lifetime of the intermediate state is influenced by the sigma-donating ability of the axial ligand, decreasing in the order CNCbl > N3Cbl > H2OCbl, and by the polarity of the solvent, decreasing with increasing solvent polarity. The peak of the excited-state visible absorption spectrum is shifted to ca. 490 nm, and the shape of the spectrum is characteristic of weak axial ligands, similar to those observed for cob(II)alamin, base-off cobalamins, or cobinamides. Transient IR spectra of the upper CN and N3 ligands are red-shifted 20-30 cm(-1) from the ground-state frequencies, consistent with a weakened Co-upper ligand bond. These results suggest that the transient intermediate state can be attributed to a corrin ring pi to Co 3d(z2) ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) state. In this state bonds between the cobalt and the axial ligands are weakened and lengthened with respect to the corresponding ground states.

  5. Phase dependent excitation of Rydberg atoms in non-zero average fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnuson, Eric; Carrat, Vincent; Gallagher, Tom

    2016-05-01

    The final energy of an electron excited to a high lying Rydberg state in the presence of a microwave (MW) field shows a dependence on the phase of the field at which the excitation occurs. This phase dependence is comparable to that seen in strong field experiments using attosecond pulses to probe systems perturbed by intense infrared (IR) fields. In zero average field, final energies exhibit a phase dependence at twice the frequency of the MW field. We show a phase dependence at the same frequency as the MW field emerges in the presence of a non-zero average field, parallel to the MW polarization. To isolate phase dependence at the MW frequency, we amplitude modulate the IR excitation laser and phase lock this modulation to the MW field. Li atoms are excited to states near the ionization limit in the presence of a MW field, and bound Rydberg states (n>150) are detected. In an applied average field, we observe modulation of the Rydberg signal at the MW frequency. This modulation vanishes as the average field is zeroed, but persists even in fields large enough to ionize most of the population. We compare these results to symmetry arguments and a model of classical Rydberg orbits. An experiment to determine the absolute phase of the modulation relative the MW field is discussed. This work is supported by the US Department of Energy.

  6. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  7. Synaptic Control of Motoneuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Rekling, Jens C.; Funk, Gregory D.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Dong, Xiao-Wei; Feldman, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization, and membrane properties, both passive and active. We then describe the general anatomical organization of synaptic input to motoneurons, followed by a description of the major transmitter systems that affect motoneuronal excitability, including ligands, receptor distribution, pre- and postsynaptic actions, signal transduction, and functional role. Glutamate is the main excitatory, and GABA and glycine are the main inhibitory transmitters acting through ionotropic receptors. These amino acids signal the principal motor commands from peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal structures. Amines, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, and neuropeptides, as well as the glutamate and GABA acting at metabotropic receptors, modulate motoneuronal excitability through pre- and postsynaptic actions. Acting principally via second messenger systems, their actions converge on common effectors, e.g., leak K+ current, cationic inward current, hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ca2+ channels, or presynaptic release processes. Together, these numerous inputs mediate and modify incoming motor commands, ultimately generating the coordinated firing patterns that underlie muscle contractions during motor behavior. PMID:10747207

  8. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  9. Self-excited multifractal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, V.; Sornette, D.

    2011-05-01

    We introduce the self-excited multifractal (SEMF) model, defined such that the amplitudes of the increments of the process are expressed as exponentials of a long memory of past increments. The principal novel feature of the model lies in the self-excitation mechanism combined with exponential nonlinearity, i.e. the explicit dependence of future values of the process on past ones. The self-excitation captures the microscopic origin of the emergent endogenous self-organization properties, such as the energy cascade in turbulent flows, the triggering of aftershocks by previous earthquakes and the "reflexive" interactions of financial markets. The SEMF process has all the standard stylized facts found in financial time series, which are robust to the specification of the parameters and the shape of the memory kernel: multifractality, heavy tails of the distribution of increments with intermediate asymptotics, zero correlation of the signed increments and long-range correlation of the squared increments, the asymmetry (called "leverage" effect) of the correlation between increments and absolute value of the increments and statistical asymmetry under time reversal.

  10. Entanglement entropy of electronic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasser, Felix

    2016-05-01

    A new perspective into correlation effects in electronically excited states is provided through quantum information theory. The entanglement between the electron and hole quasiparticles is examined, and it is shown that the related entanglement entropy can be computed from the eigenvalue spectrum of the well-known natural transition orbital (NTO) decomposition. Non-vanishing entanglement is obtained whenever more than one NTO pair is involved, i.e., in the case of a multiconfigurational or collective excitation. An important implication is that in the case of entanglement it is not possible to gain a complete description of the state character from the orbitals alone, but more specific analysis methods are required to decode the mutual information between the electron and hole. Moreover, the newly introduced number of entangled states is an important property by itself giving information about excitonic structure. The utility of the formalism is illustrated in the cases of the excited states of two interacting ethylene molecules, the conjugated polymer para-phenylene vinylene, and the naphthalene molecule.

  11. High-performance supported Ir-oxohydroxide water oxidation electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Massue, Cyriac; Pfeifer, Verena; Huang, Xing; Noack, Johannes; Tarasov, Andrey; Cap, Sebastien; Schlögl, Robert

    2017-02-05

    The synthesis of a highly active and yet stable electrocatalyst for the anodic oxygen evolution reaction (OER) remains a major challenge for acidic water splitting on an industrial scale. Addressing this challenge, we obtained an outstanding high-performance OER-electrocatalyst by loading Ir on conductive antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO)-nanoparticles via a microwave (MW)-supported hydrothermal route. The obtained Ir-phase was identified as an XRD-amorphous, highly hydrated Ir(III/IV)-oxohydroxide. In order to identify chemical and structural features responsible for the high activity and exceptional stability under acidic OER-conditions at loadings as low as 20 μg(Ir) cm-2, we used stepwise thermal treatment to gradually alter the XRD-amorphous Ir-phase via dehydroxylation and crystallization of IrO2. This resulted in dramatic depletion of OER-performance, indicating that the outstanding electrocatalytic properties of the MW-produced Ir(III/IV)-oxohydroxide are prominently linked to the nature of the produced Ir-phase. This finding is in contrast with the often reported stable but poor OER-performance of crystalline IrO2-based compounds produced via more classical calcination routes. Our investigation demonstrates the immense potential of Ir-oxohydroxide-based OER electrocatalysts for stable high-current water electrolysis under acidic conditions.

  12. Watson-Crick base pairing controls excited-state decay in natural DNA.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Dominik B; Schlueter, Alexander; Carell, Thomas; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2014-10-13

    Excited-state dynamics are essential to understanding the formation of DNA lesions induced by UV light. By using femtosecond IR spectroscopy, it was possible to determine the lifetimes of the excited states of all four bases in the double-stranded environment of natural DNA. After UV excitation of the DNA duplex, we detected a concerted decay of base pairs connected by Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. A comparison of single- and double-stranded DNA showed that the reactive charge-transfer states formed in the single strands are suppressed by base pairing in the duplex. The strong influence of the Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds indicates that proton transfer opens an efficient decay path in the duplex that prohibits the formation or reduces the lifetime of reactive charge-transfer states.

  13. Raman scattering of IrTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alexander; Thorsmolle, Verner; Artyukhin, Sergey; Yang, Jun; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Blumberg, Girsh

    2014-03-01

    IrTe2 presents a layered compound with a triangular lattice. It is known to exhibit a first order structural phase transition at approximately 260 K which is of a first order, corresponding to a formation of a superstructure with a period of five unit cells. Using polarized Raman spectroscopy we have studied the temperature dependence of 14 observed Raman allowed phononic modes. These phonons couple strongly to this transition and one additional first order transition at approximately 170 K. In the high-temperature phase only 3 modes are observed, while below approximately 280 K all 14 modes become visible. Below approximately 170 K only 11 modes are observed. Our results shed light on the possible mechanism driving the transitions. ACL, VKT and GB acknowledge support by NSF DMR-1104884.

  14. Cobalt sites in zeolites FAU - IR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra-Marek, Kinga; Mrowiec, Halina; Walas, Stanisław

    2009-04-01

    The properties of Co 2+ in zeolites CoX and CoY and their interaction with CO, NO, and propene were followed. The IR experiments of CO and NO informed on the electron acceptor properties of Co 2+ sites and the influence of framework composition and of geometry of Co 2+ environment on the properties of Co 2+. It has been found, that the activation of CO and NO is realized mostly by π back donation, on the other hand, the activation of C dbnd C double bond in propene is realized by π donation. The strength of molecules to Co 2+ bonding was followed in desorption experiments. It has been found, that σ donation in the case of CO and π donation has more important impact to the strength of molecule to Co 2+ bonding.

  15. WFC3 SS IR Flat Field Uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    2012-10-01

    Part of side switch activities.We will assess the uniformity and stability of the low-frequency flat fields on the IR detector. This will be accomplished using observations of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae {NGC104} at multiple pointings with multiple filters. By placing the same star at multiple locations on the detector and measuring the relative changes in its brightness, it will be possible to determine spatial variations in the response of the detector. Based on previous work with other instruments, a set of 9 pointings should be sufficient to characterize the stability of the flat field. For each filter to be tested, this set of 9 pointings will form an 3x3 box pattern on the detector, with steps of 20% of the FOV in the x and y directions between observations. The complement of filters to be tested will be F105W, F125W, F140W, and F160W.ID: WF40

  16. Camouflage in thermal IR: spectral design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Anna; Fagerström, Jan; Kariis, Hans; Lindell, Roland; Hallberg, Tomas; Högström, Herman

    2016-10-01

    In this work a spectral designed coating from SPECTROGON is evaluated. Spectral design in this case means that the coating has a reflectivity equal to one at 3-5 and 8-12 microns were sensors operate and a much lower reflectivity in the other wave length regions. Three boxes are evaluated: one metallic, one black-body and one with a spectral designed surface, all with a 15 W radiator inside the box. It is shown that the box with the spectral designed surface can combine the two good characteristics of the other boxes: low signature from the metallic box and reasonable inside temperature from the black-body box. The measurements were verified with calculations using RadThermIR.

  17. Tellurium halide IR fibers for remote spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xhang H.; Ma, Hong Li; Blanchetiere, Chantal; Le Foulgoc, Karine; Lucas, Jacques; Heuze, Jean; Colardelle, P.; Froissard, P.; Picque, D.; Corrieu, G.

    1994-07-01

    The new family of IR transmitting glasses, the TeX glasses, based on the association of tellurium and halide (Cl, Br, or I) are characterized by a wide optical window extending from 2 to 18 micrometers and a strong stability towards devitrification. Optical fibers drawn from these glasses exhibit low losses in the 7 - 10 micrometers range (less than 1 dB/m for single index fibers, 1 - 2 dB/m for fibers having a core-clad structure). The TeX glass fibers have been used in a remote analysis set-up which is mainly composed of a FTIR spectrometer coupled with a HgCdTe detector. This prototype system permits qualitative and quantitative analysis in a wide wavelength region lying from 3 to 13 micrometers , covering the fundamental absorption of more organic species. The evolution of a lactic and an alcoholic fermentation has been monitored by means of this set-up.

  18. Micro cryogenic coolers for IR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Ryan; Wang, Yunda; Cooper, Jill; Lin, Martin M.; Bright, Victor M.; Lee, Y. C.; Bradley, Peter E.; Radebaugh, Ray; Huber, Marcia L.

    2011-06-01

    Joule-Thomson micro cryogenic coolers (MCCs) are a preferred approach for small and low power cryocoolers. With the same heat lift, MCC's power input can be only 1/10 of a thermoelectric cooler's input, and MCC's size can be only 1/10 of a Stirling cooler's size. With futuristic planar MCC and with high frequency MEMS compressors to be developed, its size can be reduced another order of magnitude. Such "invisible" cryocoolers may revolutionize future IR imaging systems. We will review our studies on the feasibility of MCC with an emphasis on: 1) high thermal isolation levels reaching 89,000 K/W; 2) custom-designed gas mixtures with refrigeration capabilities increased by 10X and pressure ratio reduced to only 4:1; 3) compressors with low pressure ratios; and 4) excellent scalability for further size reduction.

  19. Feeding of the 1 1/2- isomers in stable Ir and Au isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Fotiadis, Nikolaos; Nelson, Ronald O; Devlin, Matthew; Holloway, Shannon T; Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick; Chadwick, Mark B; Becker, John A; Garrett, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Excited states were studied and absolute partial {gamma}-ray cross sections were measured using the ({eta}, {eta}'{gamma}) reaction in {sup 191}Ir, {sup 193}Ir and {sup 197}Au. A Compton-suppressed germanium-detector array (GEANIE) for {gamma}-ray spectroscopy and the broad-spectrum pulsed neutron source of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's WNR facility were used for the measurement. The energy of the incident neutrons was determined using the time-of-flight technique. Absolute partial {gamma}-ray cross sections were measured up to incident neutron energy of 20 MeV for several transitions feeding directly the 1 1/2- isomers and ground states in {sup 191}Ir, {sup 193}Ir and {sup 197}Au. The feeding of the 1 1/2- isomers, which originate from the odd proton occupying the h{sub 1 1/2} orbital, was found for the three targets to be very similar and increasing relative to the feeding of the corresponding ground state with increasing neutron energy up to E{sub n} {approx} 10 MeV. Above this neutron energy the opening of the (n, 2{sub n}) reaction channel strongly affects the population of the isomers and leads to a decrease of their relative population compared to the population of the ground states. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions from the GNASH reaction model calculation implementing a version of the spin distribution for the pre-equilibrium reaction piece with either a compound nucleus spin distribution (CN-GNASH) or a Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin (FKK-GNASH) quantum mechanical spin distribution. The effects of the spin cutoff parameter values on the population of states are examined. Evidence is presented that FKK-GNASH provides a description of the experimental data that mitigates the need for adjustment of the level density parameter to fit the data.

  20. On Diversity of Configurations Generated by Excitable Cellular Automata with Dynamical Excitation Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Excitable cellular automata with dynamical excitation interval exhibit a wide range of space-time dynamics based on an interplay between propagating excitation patterns which modify excitability of the automaton cells. Such interactions leads to formation of standing domains of excitation, stationary waves and localized excitations. We analyzed morphological and generative diversities of the functions studied and characterized the functions with highest values of the diversities. Amongst other intriguing discoveries we found that upper boundary of excitation interval more significantly affects morphological diversity of configurations generated than lower boundary of the interval does and there is no match between functions which produce configurations of excitation with highest morphological diversity and configurations of interval boundaries with highest morphological diversity. Potential directions of future studies of excitable media with dynamically changing excitability may focus on relations of the automaton model with living excitable media, e.g. neural tissue and muscles, novel materials with memristive properties and networks of conductive polymers.

  1. Understanding the two-dimensional ionization structure in luminous infrared galaxies. A near-IR integral field spectroscopy perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colina, Luis; Piqueras López, Javier; Arribas, Santiago; Riffel, Rogério; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Rodriguez-Ardila, Alberto; Pastoriza, Miriani; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Sales, Dinalva

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the two-dimensional excitation structure of the interstellar medium (ISM) in a sample of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) and Seyferts using near-IR integral field spectroscopy. This study extends to the near infrared the well-known optical and mid-IR emission line diagnostics used to classify activity in galaxies. Based on the spatially resolved spectroscopy of prototypes, we identify in the [FeII]1.64 μm/Brγ- H22.12 μm/Brγ plane regions dominated by the different heating sources, i.e. active galactic nuclei (AGNs), young main-sequence massive stars, and evolved stars i.e. supernovae. The ISM in LIRGs occupy a wide region in the near-IR diagnostic plane from -0.6 to +1.5 and from -1.2 to +0.8 (in log units) for the [FeII]/Brγ and H2/Brγ line ratios, respectively. The corresponding median(mode) ratios are +0.18(0.16) and +0.02(-0.04). Seyferts show on average larger values by factors ~2.5 and ~1.4 for the [FeII]/Brγ and H2/Brγ ratios, respectively. New areas and relations in the near-IR diagnostic plane are defined for the compact, high surface brightness regions dominated by AGN, young ionizing stars, and supernovae explosions, respectively. In addition to these high surface brightness regions, the diffuse regions affected by the AGN radiation field cover an area similar to that of Seyferts, but with high values in [FeII]/Brγ that are not as extreme. The extended, non-AGN diffuse regions cover a wide area in the near-IR diagnostic diagram that overlaps that of individual excitation mechanisms (i.e. AGN, young stars, and supernovae), but with its mode value to that of the young star-forming clumps. This indicates that the excitation conditions of the extended, diffuse ISM are likely due to a mixture of the different ionization sources, weighted by their spatial distribution and relative flux contribution. The integrated line ratios in LIRGs show higher excitation conditions i.e. towards AGNs, than those measured by the spatially resolved

  2. Far-Ir Action Spectroscopy of Aminophenol and Ethylvanillin: Experiment and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Feifel, Raimund; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali; Bakker, Daniël; Rijs, Anouk

    2015-06-01

    Investigations of molecular structure and conformational isomerism are at the forefront of today's biophysics and biochemistry. In particular, vibrations excited by far-IR radiation can be highly sensitive to the molecular 3D structure as they are delocalized over large parts of the molecule. Current theoretical predictions of vibrational frequencies in the far-IR range are not accurate enough because of the non-local character and anharmonicity of these vibrations. Therefore experimental studies in the far-IR are vital to guide theory towards improved methodology. In this work we present the conformer-specific far-IR spectra of aminophenol and ethylvanillin molecules in the range of 220-800 wn utilizing ion-dip action spectroscopy carried out at the free electron laser FELIX in Nijmegen, Netherlands. The systems studied are aromatic molecules with important functional groups such as the hydroxyl (OH) and amino (NH_2) groups in aminophenol, and the hydroxyl, ethoxy (OCH_2CH_3) and formyl (CHO) groups in ethylvanillin. The experimental spectra show well resolved conformer-specific vibrational bands. In the case of ethylvanillin only two planar conformers have been observed under supersonic jet expansion conditions. Despite the fact that these conformers differ only in the position of oxygen of the formyl group with respect to ethoxy group, they are well distinguishable in far-IR spectra. The capability of numerical methods based on density functional theory (DFT) for predicting vibrational frequencies in this spectral region within the harmonic approximation has been investigated by using several hybrid-functionals such as B3LYP, PBE0, B2PLYP and CAM-B3LYP. An anharmonic correction based on vibrational second order perturbation theory approach was also applied. We have found that the methods we considered are well suited for the assignment of far-IR vibrational features except the modes which are strongly anharmonic, like the NH_2 wagging mode in aminophenol which

  3. Novel cross talk between IGF-IR and DDR1 regulates IGF-IR trafficking, signaling and biological responses.

    PubMed

    Malaguarnera, Roberta; Nicolosi, Maria Luisa; Sacco, Antonella; Morcavallo, Alaide; Vella, Veronica; Voci, Concetta; Spatuzza, Michela; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Iozzo, Renato V; Vigneri, Riccardo; Morrione, Andrea; Belfiore, Antonino

    2015-06-30

    The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR), plays a key role in regulating mammalian development and growth, and is frequently deregulated in cancer contributing to tumor initiation and progression. Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen receptor tyrosine-kinase, is as well frequently overexpressed in cancer and implicated in cancer progression. Thus, we investigated whether a functional cross-talk between the IGF-IR and DDR1 exists and plays any role in cancer progression.Using human breast cancer cells we found that DDR1 constitutively associated with the IGF-IR. However, this interaction was enhanced by IGF-I stimulation, which promoted rapid DDR1 tyrosine-phosphorylation and co-internalization with the IGF-IR. Significantly, DDR1 was critical for IGF-IR endocytosis and trafficking into early endosomes, IGF-IR protein expression and IGF-I intracellular signaling and biological effects, including cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. These biological responses were inhibited by DDR1 silencing and enhanced by DDR1 overexpression.Experiments in mouse fibroblasts co-transfected with the human IGF-IR and DDR1 gave similar results and indicated that, in the absence of IGF-IR, collagen-dependent phosphorylation of DDR1 is impaired.These results demonstrate a critical role of DDR1 in the regulation of IGF-IR action, and identify DDR1 as a novel important target for breast cancers that overexpress IGF-IR.

  4. IR-780 Loaded Phospholipid Mimicking Homopolymeric Micelles for Near-IR Imaging and Photothermal Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangjun; Li, Zuhong; Wang, Haibo; Wang, Yin; Han, Haijie; Jin, Qiao; Ji, Jian

    2016-03-23

    IR-780 iodide, a near-infrared (near-IR) fluorescent dye, can be utilized as an effective theranostic agent for both imaging and photothermal therapy. However, its lipophilicity limits its further biomedical applications. Herein, we synthesized a phospholipid mimicking amphiphilic homopolymer poly(12-(methacryloyloxy)dodecyl phosphorylcholine) (PMDPC) via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The amphiphilic homopolymer PMDPC can be self-assembled into micelles and used for the encapsulation of IR-780. The IR-780 loaded micelles (PMDPC-IR-780) exhibited low cytotoxicity in the dark, whereas remarkable photothermal cytotoxicity to pancreatic cancer cells (BxPC-3) was observed upon near-IR laser irradiation. We further investigated in vivo biodistribution of PMDPC-IR-780 micelles. Higher accumulation of PMDPC-IR-780 than that of free IR-780 in tumor tissue was verified, which might be ascribed to the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and long circulation time benefiting from the zwitterionic phosphorylcholine surface. Therefore, the IR-780 loaded phospholipid mimicking homopolymeric micelles could have great potential for cancer theranostics.

  5. Control of excitation in the fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Lea, D J; Ward, D J

    1979-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy image brightness and contrast and the rate of fading depend upon the intensity of illumination of the specimen. An iris diaphragm or neutral density filters may be used to reduce fluorescence excitation. Also the excitation bandwidth may be varied by using a broad band exciter filter with a set of interchangeable yellow glass filters at the lamphouse.

  6. Quantum well intersubband lifetimes measured by mid-IR pump-probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, G.L.; Sung, B.; Proctor, M.

    1995-12-31

    Semiconductor quantum wells exhibit quantum-confined electronic energy levels, or subbands, that are similar to one-dimensional {open_quotes}particle in a box{close_quotes} wavefunctions. The light effective mass of electrons allows large spatial extents of the wavefunctions and concomitantly large dipole overlaps between states. These large dipoles have been exploited in a variety of experiments including nonlinear frequency conversion, infrared photodetection, and lasing. A key parameter for many devices is the upper state lifetime. The decay of carriers in the upper state is believed to be dominated by optical phonon scattering and lifetimes on-the order of 1ps are expected. While Raman and saturation measurements have shown good agreement with theory, direct pump-probe measurements have reported longer lifetimes, partially due to carrier heating. In this paper, we discuss our mid-IR (5{mu}m) pump-probe measurements of intersubband lifetimes, performed at the Stanford Picosecond Free Electron Laser Center. At low excitation densities we observe lifetimes of about 1.5 ps, in good agreement with phonon theory. At high excitation densities the lifetime increases to 3.5 ps, demonstrating the transition from the low- to high-excitation agree.

  7. Rovibrational-state-selected photoionization of acetylene by the two-color IR+VUV scheme: observation of rotationally resolved Rydberg transitions.

    PubMed

    Qian, X-M; Kung, A H; Zhang, Tao; Lau, K C; Ng, C Y

    2003-12-05

    We have demonstrated a rovibrational-state-selected photoionization experiment using an IR laser and high-resolution VUV-synchrotron radiation. The VUV photoionization of acetylene [C2H2(Xtilde; (1)Sigma(+)(g);nu(3)=1,J(')=8 or 10)] prepared by IR excitation reveals three strong autoionizing Rydberg series converging to C2H+2(Xtilde; (2)Pi(u);nu(+)(3)=1) with little ion background interference. Rotational transitions resolved for the Rydberg states provide an estimate of approximately 1.8 ps for their lifetimes. This experiment opens the way for state-selective photoionization studies of polyatomic molecules using VUV-synchrotron radiation.

  8. The low-spin states in the doubly odd 182Ir nucleus and the influence of the proton-neutron interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, J.; Hojman, D.; Ibrahim, F.; Roussière, B.; Kilcher, P.; Le Blanc, F.; Oms, J.; Libert, J.; Isocele Collaboration

    1995-02-01

    Low-spin states of 182Ir populated through the {β +}/{EC} decay of 182Pt were studied using the ISOCELE facility. A low-spin level scheme has been established. Using a semi-microscopic rotor-plus-two-quasiparticle model developed in the context of the HF + BCS approximation, the influence of the Vpn interaction on the relative energy location of excited states has been studied and the low-spin states located at low energy in 182Ir have been identified. The α-decay energy of 186Au has been corrected to 4907 ± 16 keV.

  9. New Ir Bis-Carbonyl Precursor for Water Oxidation Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Daria L; Beltrán-Suito, Rodrigo; Thomsen, Julianne M; Hashmi, Sara M; Materna, Kelly L; Sheehan, Stafford W; Mercado, Brandon Q; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2016-03-07

    This paper introduces Ir(I)(CO)2(pyalc) (pyalc = (2-pyridyl)-2-propanoate) as an atom-efficient precursor for Ir-based homogeneous oxidation catalysis. This compound was chosen to simplify analysis of the water oxidation catalyst species formed by the previously reported Cp*Ir(III)(pyalc)OH water oxidation precatalyst. Here, we present a comparative study on the chemical and catalytic properties of these two precursors. Previous studies show that oxidative activation of Cp*Ir-based precursors with NaIO4 results in formation of a blue Ir(IV) species. This activation is concomitant with the loss of the placeholder Cp* ligand which oxidatively degrades to form acetic acid, iodate, and other obligatory byproducts. The activation process requires substantial amounts of primary oxidant, and the degradation products complicate analysis of the resulting Ir(IV) species. The species formed from oxidation of the Ir(CO)2(pyalc) precursor, on the other hand, lacks these degradation products (the CO ligands are easily lost upon oxidation) which allows for more detailed examination of the resulting Ir(pyalc) active species both catalytically and spectroscopically, although complete structural analysis is still elusive. Once Ir(CO)2(pyalc) is activated, the system requires acetic acid or acetate to prevent the formation of nanoparticles. Investigation of the activated bis-carbonyl complex also suggests several Ir(pyalc) isomers may exist in solution. By (1)H NMR, activated Ir(CO)2(pyalc) has fewer isomers than activated Cp*Ir complexes, allowing for advanced characterization. Future research in this direction is expected to contribute to a better structural understanding of the active species. A diol crystallization agent was needed for the structure determination of 3.

  10. ATR-IR spectroscopy as applied to nucleic acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanyugin, Andriy V.; Samijlenko, Svitlana P.; Martynenko, Olena I.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2005-07-01

    For the first time the ATR technique was applied to obtain IR absorption spectra of DNA and RNA dry films. There was worked out procedure of the nucleic acid removal from germanium plate, which obviously was a main obstacle to application of ATR-IR spectroscopy to nucleic acids. This technique of IR spectroscopy was applied to confirmation of RNA tropism of aurin tricarboxylic acid observed by molecular biological methods.

  11. Stepwise Solvation Effects on the Excited States of a Weakly Coupled Bichromophore: 1,2-DIPHENOXYETHANE-(H_{2}O)_N (N=2-4) Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Patrick S.; Buchanan, Evan G.; Gord, Joseph R.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2013-06-01

    1,2-Diphenoxyethane (DPOE) is a prototypical flexible bichromophore which was shown to consist of two conformers in the gas phase with the first two excited states split by 1 cm^{-1} or less. Last year, we reported on the remarkable effects of asymmetric binding of a single H_{2}O molecule to DPOE, localizing the electronic excitation, and producing OH stretch IR spectra that report on the mixed electronic character of the excited state vibronic levels. Here, we extend that work to DPOE-(H_2O)_n clusters with n=2-4 with the goal of seeing how the degree of asymmetry and electronic coupling evolve as the number of water molecules bound to DPOE increases. Ground state IR spectra in the OH stretch region (3300-3750 cm^{-1}) sensitively probe the H-bonding networks present in the clusters. In the excited states, the stepwise addition of water molecules significantly changes the solvent-induced splitting of the excited states. Excited state IR spectroscopy is used to identify the (nominal) S_{1} and S_{2} origins, and to track the degree of S_{1}/S_{2} character via the OH stretch transitions observed. The spectra provide novel insight to the way in which solvent molecules redistribute the electronic energy as the density of intermolecular vibrational modes grows with cluster size. E. G. Buchanan, et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, submitted E. G. Buchanan, et al., 67^{th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy}, 2012, WG08

  12. Novel mid-IR quantum cascade laser waveguide coupling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, David; Choa, Fow-Sen; Chen, Xing; Trivedi, Sudhir

    2011-02-01

    Signal modulations and coherent signal detections are important for both communications and remote sensing applications. Photonic integration reduces size, weight, cost, and improves the performance of these systems as demonstrated by integrated DFB-laser modulators, receivers and transceivers at near-IR wavelength regions. However, due to the difficulties of waveguide coupling, photonic integration in the mid-IR wavelength range is under-developed. We developed a technique that can monitor mid-IR coupling based on the negative photoconductivity in quantum cascaded (QC) materials that can simplify and optimize laser waveguide coupling in the mid-IR wavelength range.

  13. Role of IRS-2 in insulin and cytokine signalling.

    PubMed

    Sun, X J; Wang, L M; Zhang, Y; Yenush, L; Myers, M G; Glasheen, E; Lane, W S; Pierce, J H; White, M F

    1995-09-14

    The protein IRS-1 acts as an interface between signalling proteins with Src-homology-2 domains (SH2 proteins) and the receptors for insulin, IGF-1, growth hormone, several interleukins (IL-4, IL-9, IL-13) and other cytokines. It regulates gene expression and stimulates mitogenesis, and appears to mediate insulin/IGF-1-stimulated glucose transport. Thus, survival of the IRS-1-/- mouse with only mild resistance to insulin was surprising. This dilemma is provisionally resolved with our discovery of a second IRS-signalling protein. We purified and cloned a likely candidate called 4PS from myeloid progenitor cells and, because of its resemblance to IRS-1, we designate it IRS-2. Alignment of the sequences of IRS-2 and IRS-1 revealed a highly conserved amino terminus containing a pleckstrin-homology domain and a phosphotyrosine-binding domain, and a poorly conserved carboxy terminus containing several tyrosine phosphorylation motifs. IRS-2 is expressed in many cells, including tissues from IRS-1-/- mice, and may be essential for signalling by several receptor systems.

  14. Local Mode Analysis: Decoding IR Spectra by Visualizing Molecular Details.

    PubMed

    Massarczyk, M; Rudack, T; Schlitter, J; Kuhne, J; Kötting, C; Gerwert, K

    2017-02-08

    Integration of experimental and computational approaches to investigate chemical reactions in proteins has proven to be very successful. Experimentally, time-resolved FTIR difference-spectroscopy monitors chemical reactions at atomic detail. To decode detailed structural information encoded in IR spectra, QM/MM calculations are performed. Here, we present a novel method which we call local mode analysis (LMA) for calculating IR spectra and assigning spectral IR-bands on the basis of movements of nuclei and partial charges from just a single QM/MM trajectory. Through LMA the decoding of IR spectra no longer requires several simulations or optimizations. The novel approach correlates the motions of atoms of a single simulation with the corresponding IR bands and provides direct access to the structural information encoded in IR spectra. Either the contributions of a particular atom or atom group to the complete IR spectrum of the molecule are visualized, or an IR-band is selected to visualize the corresponding structural motions. Thus, LMA decodes the detailed information contained in IR spectra and provides an intuitive approach for structural biologists and biochemists. The unique feature of LMA is the bidirectional analysis connecting structural details to spectral features and vice versa spectral features to molecular motions.

  15. An EW technology research of jamming IR imaging guided missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiu-qin; Rong, Hua; Liang, Jing-ping; Chen, Qi; Chen, Min-rong

    2009-07-01

    The IR-Imaging-Guided Weapons have been playing an important role in the modern warfare by means of select attacking the vital parts of targets with the features of highly secret attacking, high precision, and excellent anti-jamming capability ,therefore, they are viewed to be one of the promising precisely guided weapons ,receiving great concern through out the world. This paper discusses the characteristics of IR-Imaging guidance systems at the highlight of making a study of correlated technologies of jamming IR-Imaging-Guided Weapons on the basis of elaborating the operational principles of IR-Imaging-guided Weapons.

  16. Turbulent swirling jets with excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi, Rahmat; Farokhi, Saeed

    1988-01-01

    An existing cold-jet facility at NASA Lewis Research Center was modified to produce swirling flows with controllable initial tangential velocity distribution. Two extreme swirl profiles, i.e., one with solid-body rotation and the other predominated by a free-vortex distribution, were produced at identical swirl number of 0.48. Mean centerline velocity decay characteristics of the solid-body rotation jet flow exhibited classical decay features of a swirling jet with S - 0.48 reported in the literature. However, the predominantly free-vortex distribution case was on the verge of vortex breakdown, a phenomenon associated with the rotating flows of significantly higher swirl numbers, i.e., S sub crit greater than or equal to 0.06. This remarkable result leads to the conclusion that the integrated swirl effect, reflected in the swirl number, is inadequate in describing the mean swirling jet behavior in the near field. The relative size (i.e., diameter) of the vortex core emerging from the nozzle and the corresponding tangential velocity distribution are also controlling factors. Excitability of swirling jets is also investigated by exciting a flow with a swirl number of 0.35 by plane acoustic waves at a constant sound pressure level and at various frequencies. It is observed that the cold swirling jet is excitable by plane waves, and that the instability waves grow about 50 percent less in peak r.m.s. amplitude and saturate further upstream compared to corresponding waves in a jet without swirl having the same axial mass flux. The preferred Strouhal number based on the mass-averaged axial velocity and nozzle exit diameter for both swirling and nonswirling flows is 0.4.

  17. Isotropic and anisotropic regimes of the field-dependent spin dynamics in Sr2IrO4: Raman scattering studies

    DOE PAGES

    Gim, Y.; Sethi, A.; Zhao, Q.; ...

    2016-01-11

    A major focus of experimental interest in Sr2IrO4 has been to clarify how the magnetic excitations of this strongly spin-orbit coupled system differ from the predictions of an isotropic 2D spin-1/2 Heisenberg model and to explore the extent to which strong spin-orbit coupling affects the magnetic properties of iridates. Here, we present a high-resolution inelastic light (Raman) scattering study of the low energy magnetic excitation spectrum of Sr2IrO4 and doped Eu-doped Sr2IrO4 as functions of both temperature and applied magnetic field. We show that the high-field (H > 1.5 T) in-plane spin dynamics of Sr2IrO4 are isotropic and governed bymore » the interplay between the applied field and the small in-plane ferromagnetic spin components induced by the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. However, the spin dynamics of Sr2IrO4 at lower fields (H < 1.5 T) exhibit important effects associated with interlayer coupling and in-plane anisotropy, including a spin-flop transition at Hc in Sr2IrO4 that occurs either discontinuously or via a continuous rotation of the spins, depending upon the in-plane orientation of the applied field. Furthermore, these results show that in-plane anisotropy and interlayer coupling effects play important roles in the low-field magnetic and dynamical properties of Sr2IrO4.« less

  18. Excited states in 129I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleanu, D.; Balabanski, D. L.; Venkova, Ts.; Bucurescu, D.; Mărginean, N.; Ganioǧlu, E.; Căta-Danil, Gh.; Atanasova, L.; Căta-Danil, I.; Detistov, P.; Filipescu, D.; Ghiţă, D.; Glodariu, T.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mărginean, R.; Mihai, C.; Negret, A.; Pascu, S.; Sava, T.; Stroe, L.; Suliman, G.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2013-01-01

    Excited states in 129I were populated with the 124Sn(7Li,2n) reaction at 23 MeV. In-beam measurements of γ-ray coincidences were performed with an array of eight HPGe detectors and five LaBr3(Ce) scintillation detectors. Based on the γγ coincidence data, a positive parity band structure built on the 7/2+ ground state was established and the πg7/2 configuration at oblate deformation was assigned to it. The results are compared to interacting Boson-Fermion model (IBFM) and total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations.

  19. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  20. High Frequency Chandler Wobble Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Stuck, J.; Thomas, M.

    2003-04-01

    Variations of Earth rotation on sub-daily to secular timescales are caused by mass redistributions in the Earth system as a consequence of geophysical processes and gravitational influences. Forced oscillations of polar motion are superposed by free oscillations of the Earth, i.e. the Chandler wobble and the free core nutation. In order to study the interactions between externally induced polar motion and the Earth's free oscillations, a non-linear gyroscopic model has been developed. In most of the former investigations on polar motion, the Chandler wobble is introduced as a damped oscillation with predetermined frequency and amplitude. However, as the effect of rotational deformation is a backcoupling mechanism of polar motion on the Earth's rotational dynamics, both period and amplitude of the Chandler wobble are time-dependent when regarding additional excitations from, e.g., atmospheric or oceanic mass redistributions. The gyroscopic model is free of any explicit information concerning amplitude, phase, and period of free oscillations. The characteristics of the Earth's free oscillation is reproduced by the model from rheological and geometrical parameters and rotational deformation is taken into account. This enables to study the time variable Chandler oscillation when the gyro is forced with atmospheric and oceanic angular momentum from the global atmospheric ECHAM3-T21 general circulation model together with the ocean model for circulation and tides OMCT driven by ECHAM including surface pressure. Besides, mass redistributions in the Earth's body due to gravitational and loading deformations are regarded and external torques exerted by Moon and Sun are considered. The numerical results of the gyro are significantly related with the geodetically observed time series of polar motion published by the IERS. It is shown that the consistent excitation is capable to counteract the damping and thus to maintain the Chandler amplitude. Spectral analyses of the ECHAM

  1. Peculiarities of collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskiy, A. V.

    2007-09-15

    We report an experimental discovery of deviations from the known regularities in collisional excitation transfer processes for metal atoms. The collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of thulium and dysprosium atoms is studied. The selecting role of the screening 6s shell in collisional excitation transfer is shown.

  2. Role of IRS1 and IRS2 in Modulating ErbB-induced Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    effectors. IRSs m odulate and coordinate multiple signaling cascades involved in norm al growth, metabolism and survival suggesting that they may...signaling from upstream activators to multiple do wnstream e ffectors to m odulate norm al growth, m etabolism, survival, and differentiation. IRSs can...To more completely characteri ze the role of IR S2 in m odulating ErbB2 based upon our results from Specific Aim 4 (a nd this was commented on in

  3. Gene circuit designs for noisy excitable dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rué, Pau; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2011-05-01

    Certain cellular processes take the form of activity pulses that can be interpreted in terms of noise-driven excitable dynamics. Here we present an overview of different gene circuit architectures that exhibit excitable pulses of protein expression, when subject to molecular noise. Different types of excitable dynamics can occur depending on the bifurcation structure leading to the specific excitable phase-space topology. The bifurcation structure is not, however, linked to a particular circuit architecture. Thus a given gene circuit design can sustain different classes of excitable dynamics depending on the system parameters.

  4. Deep-blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode with external quantum efficiency over 30% using novel Ir complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Hideko; Yamada, Yui; Ohsawa, Nobuharu; Seo, Satoshi; Hosoumi, Shunsuke; Watabe, Takeyoshi; Mitsumori, Satomi; Kido, Hiromitsu

    2016-09-01

    We report a newly developed deep-blue phosphorescent iridium complex exhibiting a narrow emission spectrum. The use of this complex resulted in a deep-blue organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) exceeding 30%. Two iridium complexes with a 4H-1,2,4-triazole ligand which has an adamantyl group at the 4-position were synthesized, with the resulting effects of the adamantyl group on photoluminescence (PL) behavior investigated. [Ir(Adm1)3] having a 1-adamantyl group did not exhibit any emissions at room temperature, whereas [Ir(Adm2)3] having a 2-adamantyl group exhibited a blue emission with a peak wavelength of 459 nm and a high PL quantum yield of 0.94. Structural transformations between the ground state and excited state were estimated by molecular orbital calculations, which suggests that [Ir(Adm1)3] undergoes a considerably more extensive change than [Ir(Adm2)3]. It is therefore probable that [Ir(Adm1)3] ultimately experiences thermal deactivation owing to structural relaxation. Furthermore, an OLED was fabricated using [Ir(Adm2)3] as a dopant. The associated electroluminescence spectrum had an emission peak at 457 nm and a relatively small shoulder peak at 485 nm, which are consistent with the PL spectrum. A narrowed emission spectrum with a full width at half maximum of 58 nm was obtained, leading to a deep-blue emission with high color purity (CIE, x = 0.15, y = 0.22). This device ultimately exhibited an extremely high EQE of 32% at 2 mA/cm2, which was likely attributable to an increase in outcoupling efficiency via molecular orientation.

  5. Spin-torque-driven excitations in magnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Seinige, H.; Staudacher, T.; Tsoi, M.

    2011-03-01

    Spin transfer torque (STT) refers to a novel method to control and manipulate magnetic moments using an electrical current. For the past decade it has proven to be a fascinating domain of research with a number of manifestations in various systems interesting both from fundamental science's point of view as well as for technological applications. In ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic (F/N) multilayers a dc electrical current can switch and/or drive its constituent F parts into high-frequency precession which is of interest for microwave and magnetic recording technologies. Interestingly, application of high-frequency currents can also drive the multilayer, e.g., into ferromagnetic resonance (STT-FMR) precession. In our experiments we use point contacts to inject high microwave currents into a variety of magnetic thin films including NiFe/Cu/NiFe/IrMn and NiFe/Cu/Co spin valves, and single ferromagnetic (NiFe or Co) films. The resulting magnetodynamics are detected electrically when a small rectified dc voltage appears across the contact at resonance. We find that in addition to a standard FMR, the microwave currents can excite other resonance modes in our point contacts. We study the behavior of the excitations as a function of applied magnetic field, dc bias current, and microwave frequency. Supported in part by NSF grants DMR-06-45377.

  6. More on molecular excitations: Dark matter detection in ice

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    2016-08-10

    In this paper we investigate di-atomic molecules embedded in ice crystals under strain. In this environment coherent vibrations of many OH-bonds may be generated by one WIMP collision. The detection of such multiple-photon signals may provide a signature of a 100 GeV/c2 WIMP. To do a proper lab test of “WIMP-induced” multi-photon emission is very difficult. As a result, we suggest that Ice Cube make a search for multi-photon events, and investigate whether the rate of such events exhibits yearly modulation.

  7. More on molecular excitations: Dark matter detection in ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Va'vra, J.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we investigate di-atomic molecules embedded in ice crystals under strain. In this environment coherent vibrations of many OH-bonds may be generated by one WIMP collision. The detection of such multiple-photon signals may provide a signature of a 100 GeV/c2 WIMP. To do a proper lab test of "WIMP-induced" multi-photon emission is very difficult. We suggest that Ice Cube make a search for multi-photon events, and investigate whether the rate of such events exhibits yearly modulation.

  8. More on molecular excitations: Dark matter detection in ice

    DOE PAGES

    Va'vra, J.

    2016-08-10

    In this paper we investigate di-atomic molecules embedded in ice crystals under strain. In this environment coherent vibrations of many OH-bonds may be generated by one WIMP collision. The detection of such multiple-photon signals may provide a signature of a 100 GeV/c2 WIMP. To do a proper lab test of “WIMP-induced” multi-photon emission is very difficult. As a result, we suggest that Ice Cube make a search for multi-photon events, and investigate whether the rate of such events exhibits yearly modulation.

  9. Three-photon excitation in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hell, Stefan W.; Bahlmann, Karsten; Schrader, Martin; Soini, Aleksi; Malak, Henryk; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    1996-01-01

    We show experiments proving the feasibility of scanning fluorescence microscopy by three-photon excitation. Three-photon excitation fluorescence axial images are shown of polystyrene beads stained with the fluorophore 2,5- bis(4-biphenyl)oxazole (BBO). Three-photon excitation is performed at an excitation wavelength of 900 nm and with pulses of 130 fs duration provided by a mode-locked titanium-sapphire laser. Fluorescence is collected between 350 and 450 nm. The fluorescence image signal features a third-order dependence on the excitation power, also providing intrinsic 3-D imaging. The resolution of a three-photon excitation microscope is increased over that of a comparable two-photon excitation microscope.

  10. Combination of transient 2D-IR experiments and ab initio computations sheds light on the formation of the charge-transfer state in photoexcited carbonyl carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Di Donato, Mariangela; Segado Centellas, Mireia; Lapini, Andrea; Lima, Manuela; Avila, Francisco; Santoro, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Chiara; Righini, Roberto

    2014-08-14

    The excited state dynamics of carbonyl carotenoids is very complex because of the coupling of single- and doubly excited states and the possible involvement of intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) states. In this contribution we employ ultrafast infrared spectroscopy and theoretical computations to investigate the relaxation dynamics of trans-8'-apo-β-carotenal occurring on the picosecond time scale, after excitation in the S2 state. In a (slightly) polar solvent like chloroform, one-dimensional (T1D-IR) and two-dimensional (T2D-IR) transient infrared spectroscopy reveal spectral components with characteristic frequencies and lifetimes that are not observed in nonpolar solvents (cyclohexane). Combining experimental evidence with an analysis of CASPT2//CASSCF ground and excited state minima and energy profiles, complemented with TDDFT calculations in gas phase and in solvent, we propose a photochemical decay mechanism for this system where only the bright single-excited 1Bu(+) and the dark double-excited 2Ag(-) states are involved. Specifically, the initially populated 1Bu(+) relaxes toward 2Ag(-) in 200 fs. In a nonpolar solvent 2Ag(-) decays to the ground state (GS) in 25 ps. In polar solvents, distortions along twisting modes of the chain promote a repopulation of the 1Bu(+) state which then quickly relaxes to the GS (18 ps in chloroform). The 1Bu(+) state has a high electric dipole and is the main contributor to the charge-transfer state involved in the dynamics in polar solvents. The 2Ag(-) → 1Bu(+) population transfer is evidenced by a cross peak on the T2D-IR map revealing that the motions along the same stretching of the conjugated chain on the 2Ag(-) and 1Bu(+) states are coupled.

  11. Spitzer Space Telescope IRS Spectral Mapping of Photoionized Columns in M16 and the Carina HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotera, Angela; Simpson, J. P.; Sellgren, K.; Stolovy, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Photoevaporated columns of dust and gas - also called elephant trunks, pillars or fingers - are found in the periphery of many H II regions. They have been observed within the Galaxy, the SMC and the LMC. These features are thought to be sites of current star formation, but the question remains whether the columns persist because stars formed in the denser regions prior to interactions with the UV radiation and stellar winds of nearby massive stars, or because of core collapse resulting from these interactions. We have obtained Spitzer IRS spectral maps of three columns within M 16 and three columns within the Carina nebula, to test our understanding of the impact on these transitory features of differing stellar populations and initial conditions. We use the wealth of molecular, atomic and PAH emission lines located within the spectral range of the high resolution IRS modes (9.9-37.2 micron) to determine the excitation state, dust and gas temperatures, and probe the shock characteristics within the columns as a function of location. Using the IRS spectral mapping mode, in conjunction with the CUBISM tool and the CLOUDY H II region model code, we have constructed detailed maps of the accessible emission lines and derived parameters for each column. Mapping the distribution of the physical states of the dust and gas in these columns is enhancing our understanding of the competing processes within these dynamic objects. The data presented here represent the only IRS spectral maps of photoionized pillars.

  12. Implementation of Time-Resolved Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy Using a kHz Repetition Rate Pump Laser

    PubMed Central

    MAGANA, DONNY; PARUL, DZMITRY; DYER, R. BRIAN; SHREVE, ANDREW P.

    2011-01-01

    Time-resolved step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy has been shown to be invaluable for studying excited-state structures and dynamics in both biological and inorganic systems. Despite the established utility of this method, technical challenges continue to limit the data quality and more wide ranging applications. A critical problem has been the low laser repetition rate and interferometer stepping rate (both are typically 10 Hz) used for data acquisition. Here we demonstrate significant improvement in the quality of time-resolved spectra through the use of a kHz repetition rate laser to achieve kHz excitation and data collection rates while stepping the spectrometer at 200 Hz. We have studied the metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state of Ru(bipyridine)3Cl2 in deuterated acetonitrile to test and optimize high repetition rate data collection. Comparison of different interferometer stepping rates reveals an optimum rate of 200 Hz due to minimization of long-term baseline drift. With the improved collection efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio, better assignments of the MLCT excited-state bands can be made. Using optimized parameters, carbonmonoxy myoglobin in deuterated buffer is also studied by observing the infrared signatures of carbon monoxide photolysis upon excitation of the heme. We conclude from these studies that a substantial increase in performance of ss-FT-IR instrumentation is achieved by coupling commercial infrared benches with kHz repetition rate lasers. PMID:21513597

  13. Structural, phase stability, electronic, elastic properties and hardness of IrN2 and zinc blende IrN: First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhaobo; Zhou, Xiaolong; Zhang, Kunhua

    2016-12-01

    First-principle calculations were performed to investigate the structural, phase stability, electronic, elastic properties and hardness of monoclinic structure IrN2 (m-IrN2), orthorhombic structure IrN2 (o-IrN2) and zinc blende structure IrN (ZB IrN). The results show us that only m-IrN2 is both thermodynamic and dynamic stability. The calculated band structure and density of states (DOS) curves indicate that o-IrN2 and ZB Ir-N compounds we calculated have metallic behavior while m-IrN2 has a small band gap of 0.3 eV, and exist a common hybridization between Ir-5d and N-2p states, which forming covalent bonding between Ir and N atoms. The difference charge density reveals the electron transfer from Ir atom to N atom for three Ir-N compounds, which forming strong directional covalent bonds. Notable, a strong N-N bond appeared in m-IrN2 and o-IrN2. The ratio of bulk to shear modulus (B/G) indicate that three Ir-N compounds we calculated are ductile, and ZB IrN possesses a better ductility than two types IrN2. m-IrN2 has highest Debye temperature (736 K), illustrating it possesses strongest covalent bonding. The hardness of three Ir-N compounds were also calculated, and the results reveal that m-IrN2 (18.23 GPa) and o-IrN2 (18.02 GPa) are ultraincompressible while ZB IrN has a negative value, which may be attributed to phase transition at ca. 1.98 GPa.

  14. On the Excitation and Formation of Circumstellar Fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; Jones, A. P.; Micelotta, E.; Groenewegen, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we reported the first detection of fullerenes (C60, C70) in space, specifically in Tc1, a young planetary nebulae (PNe). Once injected into the ISM, these stable species survive and are thus probably widespread in the Galaxy where they contribute to interstellar extinction, heating processes, and complex chemical reactions. Following our discovery, fullerenes have now been detected in a wide range of sources (post-AGBs, PNe, reflection nebula, HII regions, H-poor stars, and YSOs), showing that when conditions are favorable, fullerenes are formed in large quantities. The challenge resides now in determining its excitation mechanisms (fluorescence vs. thermal), as this sets their diagnostic value. To this end we have analyzed the mid-IR spectrum of three fullerene-rich PNe Tc1, SMP SMC 16, and SMP LMC 56 and compared them with thermal and fluorescence models. The strength of the fullerene bands in the three planetary nebulae is very similar, while the strength of the radiation field, is markedly different. Additionally, the spatial profile of different dust components in Tc1 indicates that the fullerene emission (C60) peaks far away from the central source. All this is hard to reconcile with a thermal origin for the fullerene excitation, and thus favors fluorescence as the excitation mechanism. In addition, the spectra in the three PNe show a strong broad plateau with substructure in the 6-9um range, and which is likely related to the fullerene formation mechanism. We present model spectra for 3 nm radius HAC particles and show that these can reproduce the 6-9um plateau, which may imply that fullerenes are formed by photo-chemical processing of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) nano-particles.

  15. WFC3/IR Dark Current Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, B.; Petro, L.

    2012-06-01

    Examination of the dark current behavior of the WFC3/IR channel over a span of almost 1000 days shows that the mean dark current has remained unchanged since launch. Image-to-image variation in mean dark current is 16% of the total mean dark rate. This variation appears to occur in a spatially-dependent but consistent manner, with the bottom and right edges displaying dark rates which increase more quickly than those elsewhere on the detector. Pixel-to-pixel variations in the dark current across the dataset imply that the 1σ uncertainty associated with the standard pipeline dark current subtraction is roughtly 20%-33% of the mean dark current rate. We have also identified a population of ~2500 pixels (0.25% of the science pixels) which are inconsistently hot over time. In a separate search, we find 2000-4000 pixels (0.2% - 0.4%) in most SPARS200 ramps which have dark rates more than 3σ from their nominal mean level. We find no correlation of mean dark rate with bias level, but an anti-correlation of the number of hot pixels with bias level. The measured dark current also does not appear to be correlated with instrument temperatures or voltages, or sun angle relative to HST.

  16. Evaluating uniformity of IR reference sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrat, Catherine; Violleau, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Infrared reference sources such as blackbodies are used to calibrate and test IR sensors and cameras.. Applications requiring a high thermal uniformity over the emissive surface become more and more frequent compared to the past applications. Among these applications are non uniformity correction of infrared cameras focused at short distance and simultaneous calibration of a set of sensor facing a large area blackbody. Facing these demanding applications requires to accurately measuring thee thermal radiation of each point of the emissive surface of the reference source. The use of an infrared camera for this purpose turns out to be absolutely inefficient since the uniformity off response of this camera is usually worse than the uniformity of thee source to bee measured. Consequently, HGH has developed a testing bench for accurate measurement of uniformity of infrared sources based on a low noise radiometer mounted of translating stages and using an exclusive drift correction method. This bench delivers a reliable thermal map of any kind of infrared reference source.

  17. Corrosion detection on pipelines by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bison, P.; Marinetti, S.; Cuogo, G.; Molinas, B.; Zonta, P.; Grinzato, E.

    2011-05-01

    IR thermography is applied to detect hidden corrosion on carbon steel pipelines for oil transportation. The research is oriented to set up a robust technique to carry out in situ the early detection of corroded zones that may evolve either towards leakage or failure. The use of thermography associated with a transient thermal technique is investigated on 12.2 mm thick samples, machined to artificially create a reduction of wall thickness that simulates the effect of real corrosion in pipes. The extension and depth of the artificial defects is controlled by ultrasounds which represents the reference for the results obtained by thermography. Two approaches are proposed: the first is based on the processing of a single thermogram taken at the optimum time after a finite pulse heating of a large area of the external surface; the second technique is carried out by scanning the pipeline by means of a device composed of a linear lamp and a thermographic camera which move jointly over the surface to test. A suitable reconstruction provides a map of the tested surface with possible hot spots in correspondence with the corroded areas. The analysis of the thermal problem by Finite Element Method is used to optimize the experimental parameters. The experimental results demonstrate a detection capability starting from 15 % of wall thickness reduction.

  18. Strong anisotropy within a Heisenberg model in the Jeff=1/2 insulating state of Sr2Ir0.8Ru0.2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, S.; Kim, J. W.; Taylor, A. E.; Upton, M. H.; Casa, D.; Cao, Guixin; Mandrus, D.; Lumsden, M. D.; Christianson, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    The dispersive magnetic excitations in Sr2IrO4 have previously been well described within an isospin-1/2 Heisenberg model on a square lattice that revealed parallels with La2CuO4 . Here we investigate the inelastic spectra of Sr2Ir0.8Ru0.2O4 with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Ir L3 edge. The results are well described using linear spin-wave theory within a similar Heisenberg model applicable to Sr2IrO4 ; however, the disorder induced by the substitution of 20 %Ir4 + ions for Ru4 + removes longer range exchange interactions. A large spin gap (40 meV) is measured indicating strong anisotropy from spin-orbit coupling that is manifest due to the altered magnetic structure in Sr2Ir0.8Ru0.2O4 with c -axis aligned moments compared to the basal plane moments in the parent. Collectively the results indicate the robustness of a Heisenberg model description even when the magnetic structure is altered and the Jeff=1 /2 moments are diluted.

  19. Strong anisotropy within a Heisenberg model in the Jeff=12 insulating state of Sr2Ir0.8Ru0.2O4

    DOE PAGES

    Calder, Stuart A.; Kim, J. W.; Taylor, Alice E.; ...

    2016-12-28

    The dispersive magnetic excitations in Sr2IrO4 have previously been well described within an isospin-1/2 Heisenberg model on a square lattice that revealed parallels with La2CuO4. In this paper, we investigate the inelastic spectra of Sr2Ir0.8Ru0.2O4 with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Ir L3 edge. The results are well described using linear spin-wave theory within a similar Heisenberg model applicable to Sr2IrO4; however, the disorder induced by the substitution of 20% Ir4+ ions for Ru4+ removes longer range exchange interactions. A large spin gap (40 meV) is measured indicating strong anisotropy from spin-orbit coupling that is manifest due tomore » the altered magnetic structure in Sr2Ir0.8Ru0.2O4 with c-axis aligned moments compared to the basal plane moments in the parent. Finally, collectively the results indicate the robustness of a Heisenberg model description even when the magnetic structure is altered and the Jeff = 1/2 moments are diluted.« less

  20. A Simulation Program for Dynamic Infrared (IR) Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoerb, Matthew C.; Harris, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    A free program for the simulation of dynamic infrared (IR) spectra is presented. The program simulates the spectrum of two exchanging IR peaks based on simple input parameters. Larger systems can be simulated with minor modifications. The program is available as an executable program for PCs or can be run in MATLAB on any operating system. Source…

  1. Bringing NMR and IR Spectroscopy to High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonjour, Jessica L.; Hass, Alisa L.; Pollock, David W.; Huebner, Aaron; Frost, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Development of benchtop, portable Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectrometers has opened up opportunities for creating university-high school partnerships that provide high school students with hands-on experience with NMR and IR instruments. With recent changes to the international baccalaureate chemistry…

  2. Testing a Model of IR Radiative Losses: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Vignola, F.; Long, C. N.; Reda, I.

    2009-08-01

    Thermopile pyranometers exhibit IR radiative losses that affect global and diffuse shortwave measurements made with first class thermopile based instruments. Pyrgeometers can be used to measure the sky temperature and are used to calculate the pyranometer?s IR radiative losses.

  3. New Directions for IR, the DQP, and Tuning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowski, Natasha A.; Marshall, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This concluding essay provides a glimpse to the future and alerts IR professionals to related initiatives as well as provides an update to ongoing work with DQP and Tuning. Pulling from the prior chapters it provides some implications for IR offices to consider, not only in their work with the DQP and Tuning, but in terms of general decision…

  4. IR keeps coal miners safe and reduces downtime

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, L.G.

    2009-01-15

    Infrared (IR) cameras can inspect the direct current trolley system that powers mantrips and locomotives that transport men and supplies to an underground mine. If trolley insulators become shorted or electrically leaky they can heat the roof and cause a fire or cave-in. The article explains how IR inspection works and describes typical problems that can be identified by thermograms. 8 figs.

  5. Multiphoton excitation of fluorescent DNA base analogs.

    PubMed

    Katilius, Evaldas; Woodbury, Neal W

    2006-01-01

    Multiphoton excitation was used to investigate properties of the fluorescent DNA base analogs, 2-aminopurine (2AP) and 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6MI). 2-aminopurine, a fluorescent analog of adenine, was excited by three-photon absorption. Fluorescence correlation measurements were attempted to evaluate the feasibility of using three-photon excitation of 2AP for DNA-protein interaction studies. However, high excitation power and long integration times needed to acquire high signal-to-noise fluorescence correlation curves render three-photon excitation FCS of 2AP not very useful for studying DNA base dynamics. The fluorescence properties of 6-methylisoxanthopterin, a guanine analog, were investigated using two-photon excitation. The two-photon absorption cross-section of 6MI was estimated to be about 2.5 x 10(-50) cm(4)s (2.5 GM units) at 700 nm. The two-photon excitation spectrum was measured in the spectral region from 700 to 780 nm; in this region the shape of the two-photon excitation spectrum is very similar to the shape of single-photon excitation spectrum in the near-UV spectral region. Two-photon excitation of 6MI is suitable for fluorescence correlation measurements. Such measurements can be used to study DNA base dynamics and DNA-protein interactions over a broad range of time scales.

  6. Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

  7. Near- and mid-IR morphology of the water maser emitting planetary nebula K 3-35

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, M. W.; Guerrero, M. A.; Miranda, L. F.; Lagadec, E.; Suárez, O.

    2014-01-01

    The shaping process of planetary nebulae (PNe) takes place during the short transition from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase to the white dwarf stage. The young PN K 3-35 represents a unique case where a small-sized water maser ring has been linked to the launch of collimated outflows that shape the nebula. The contrasting optical and radio continuum morphologies of K 3-35 indicate that they disclose different structural components that are apparently unconnected. To bridge the gap between optical and radio continuum observations, we present here new broadband and narrowband near- and mid-IR images of K 3-35. These images, and their comparison with optical and radio continuum images, are revealing. The radio continuum and mid-IR images are dominated by a compact source at the core of K 3-35 whose emission gives evidence of very dense ionized material embedded within a dust cocoon. The emission from the core, obscured at optical wavelengths, is faintly detected in the Ks band. We suggest that the dust may shield the water molecules at the inner ring from the central star ionizing radiation. The precessing collimated outflows, very prominent in radio continuum, are also detected in mid-IR, very particularly in the [S iv] image. The mid-IR emission from these outflows consist mostly of ionized material, although the broadband filter at 11.85 μm seems to imply that a small amount of dust may be carried out by the outflow. The interactions of these outflows with the nebular shell result in shocks that excite the emission of H2 as well as low-excitation lines from ionized species, such as [N ii] at the tips of the outflows. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile. Program: 085.D-0256(A).

  8. Excitation of interstellar hydrogen chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufild, David A.; Green, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    We have computed new rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of HCl by He, in the close-coupled formalism and using an interaction potential determined recently by Willey, Choong, & DeLucia. Results have been obtained for temperatures between 10 K and 300 K. With the use of the infinite order sudden approximation, we have derived approximate expressions of general applicability which may be used to estimate how the rate constant for a transition (J to J prime) is apportioned among the various hyperfine states F prime of the final state J prime. Using these new rate coefficients, we have obtained predictions for the HCl rotational line strengths expected from a dense clump of interstellar gas, as a function of the HCl fractional abundance. Over a wide range of HCl abundances, we have found that the line luminosities are proportional to abundance(exp 2/3), a general result which can be explained using a simple analytical approximation. Our model for the excitation of HCl within a dense molecular cloud core indicates that the J = 1 goes to 0 line strengths measured by Blake, Keene, & Phillips toward the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) imply a fractional abundance n(HCl)/n(H2) approximately 2 x 10(exp -9), a value which amounts to only approximately 0.3% of the cosmic abundance of chlorine nuclei. Given a fractional abundance of 2 x 10(exp -9), the contribution of HCl emission to the total radiative cooling of a dense clump is small. For Orion, we predict a flux approximately 10(exp -19) W/sq cm for the HCl J = 3 goes to 2 line near 159.8 micrometers, suggesting that the strength of this line could be measured using the Infrared Space Observatory.

  9. Statistical dynamo theory: Mode excitation.

    PubMed

    Hoyng, P

    2009-04-01

    We compute statistical properties of the lowest-order multipole coefficients of the magnetic field generated by a dynamo of arbitrary shape. To this end we expand the field in a complete biorthogonal set of base functions, viz. B= summation operator_{k}a;{k}(t)b;{k}(r) . The properties of these biorthogonal function sets are treated in detail. We consider a linear problem and the statistical properties of the fluid flow are supposed to be given. The turbulent convection may have an arbitrary distribution of spatial scales. The time evolution of the expansion coefficients a;{k} is governed by a stochastic differential equation from which we infer their averages a;{k} , autocorrelation functions a;{k}(t)a;{k *}(t+tau) , and an equation for the cross correlations a;{k}a;{l *} . The eigenfunctions of the dynamo equation (with eigenvalues lambda_{k} ) turn out to be a preferred set in terms of which our results assume their simplest form. The magnetic field of the dynamo is shown to consist of transiently excited eigenmodes whose frequency and coherence time is given by Ilambda_{k} and -1/Rlambda_{k} , respectively. The relative rms excitation level of the eigenmodes, and hence the distribution of magnetic energy over spatial scales, is determined by linear theory. An expression is derived for |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} in case the fundamental mode b;{0} has a dominant amplitude, and we outline how this expression may be evaluated. It is estimated that |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} approximately 1/N , where N is the number of convective cells in the dynamo. We show that the old problem of a short correlation time (or first-order smoothing approximation) has been partially eliminated. Finally we prove that for a simple statistically steady dynamo with finite resistivity all eigenvalues obey Rlambda_{k}<0 .

  10. Atmospheric Trace Gas Abundances and Stable Isotope Ratios via IR-LIF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    We propose to develop new technologies with support provided by PIDDP that will enable the in situ measurements of abundances and stable isotope ratios in important radiatively and biogenically active gases such as carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, water, methane, nitrous oxide, and hydrogen sulfide to very high precision (0.1 per mil or better for the isotopic ratios, for example). Such measurements, impossible at present, could provide pivotal new constraints on the global (bio)geochemical budgets of these critical species, and could also be used to examine the dynamics of atmospheric transport on Mars, Titan, and other solar system bodies. We believe the combination of solid state light sources with imaging of the IR laser induced fluorescence (IR-LIF) via newly available detector arrays will make such in situ measurements possible for the first time. Even under ambient terrestrial conditions, the LIF yield from vibrational excitation of species such as water and carbon dioxide should produce emission measures well in excess of ten billion photons/sec from samples volumes of order 1 c.c. These count rates can, in principle, yield detection limits into the sub-ppt range that are required for the in situ isotopic study of atmospheric trace gases. While promising, such technologies are relatively immature, but developing rapidly, and there are a great many uncertainties regarding their applicability to in situ IR-LIF planetary studies. We therefore feel PIDDP support will be critical to developing these new tools, and propose a three-year program to combine microchip near-IR lasers with low background detection axes and state-of-the-art HgCdTe detectors developed for astronomical spectroscopy to investigate the sensitivity of IR-LIF under realistic planetary conditions, to optimize the optical pumping and filtering schemes for important species, and to apply the spectrometer to the non-destructive measurement of stable isotopes in a variety of test samples. These

  11. The IR emission features - Emission from PAH molecules and amorphous carbon particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Barker, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Techniques for the assessment of the importance of the various forms of PAHs, and recent infrared observations concerning the PAH problem, are considered. Spectroscopic data suggest that the observed interstellar spectrum is due to both free molecule-sized PAHs producing the narrow features, and amorphous carbon particles contributing to the broad underlying components. Explanations for the multicomponent emission spectrum are discussed. A model of the emission mechanism for the example of chrysene is presented, and an exact treatment of the IR fluorescence from highly vibrationally excited large molecules shows that species containing 20-30 carbon atoms are responsible for the narrow features, although the spectra more closely resemble those of amorphous carbon particles. It is suggested that future emphasis should be placed on the spatial characteristics of the component spectra.

  12. The IR emission features - Emission from PAH molecules and amorphous carbon particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Barker, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Given the current understanding of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the spectroscopic data suggest that are at least two components which contribute to the interstellar emission spectrum: (1) free molecule-sized PAHs producing the narrow features and (2) amorphous carbon particles (which are primarily composed of an irregular 'lattice' of PAHs) contributing to the broad underlying components. An exact treatment of the IR fluorescence from highly vibrationally excited large molecules demonstrates that species containing between 20 and 30 carbon atoms are responsible for the narrow features, although the spectra match more closely with the spectra of amorphous carbon particles. It is concluded that, since little is known about the spectroscopic properties of free PAHs and PAH clusters, much laboratory work is required along with an observational program focusing on the spatial characteristics of the spectra.

  13. First: Florida Ir Silicon Immersion Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Zhao, B.; Wang, J.; Wan, X.; Powell, S.

    2012-01-01

    The FIRST silicon immersion grating spectrometer is being developed at UF to search for habitable Earth-like planets around M dwarfs and giant planets around young active stars. This compact cryogenic IR instrument is designed to have a spectral resolution of R=72,000 at 1.4-1.8 µm with a silicon immersion grating and R=60K at 0.8-1.35 µm with an R4 echelle. The goal is to reach a long term Doppler precision of 1-3 m/s for bright M dwarfs. The FIRST silicon immersion grating, with 54.74 degree blaze angle and 16 l/mm groove density, has been fully characterized in the lab. The 50x50 mm square grating entrance pupil is coated with a single layer of anti-reflection coating resulting in a 2.1% measured reflection loss. The grating surface was coated with a gold layer to increase grating surface reflectivity. It has produced R=110,000 diffraction limited spectral resolution at 1.523 micron in a lab test spectrograph with 20 mm pupil diameter. The integrated scattered light is less than 0.2\\% and grating has no visible ghosts down to the measuring instrument noise level. The grating efficiency is 69\\% at the peak of the blaze. This silicon immersion grating is ready for scientific observations with FIRST. FIRST is scheduled to be integrated in the lab during the spring of 2012 and see the first light at an astronomical telescope (TBD) the summer of 2012.

  14. Successful synthesis and thermal stability of immiscible metal Au-Rh, Au-Ir and Au-Ir-Rh nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Shubin, Yury; Plusnin, Pavel; Sharafutdinov, Marat; Makotchenko, Evgenia; Korenev, Sergey

    2017-04-06

    We successfully prepared face-centred cubic nanoalloys in systems of Au-Ir, Au-Rh and Au-Ir-Rh, with large bulk miscibility gaps, in one-run reactions under thermal decomposition of specially synthesised single-source precursors, namely, [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6], [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6]х[Rh(NO2)6]1-х and [AuEn2][Rh(NO2)6]. The precursors employed contain all desired metals "mixed" at the molecular level, thus providing significant advantages for obtaining alloys. The observations using HR TEM show that the nanoalloy structures are composed of well-dispersed aggregates of crystalline domains with a mean size of 5±3 nm. EDX and XRD measurements confirm the formation of AuIr, AuRh, AuIr0.75Rh0.25, AuIr0.50Rh0.50 and AuIr0.25Rh0.75 metastable solid solutions. In-situ real-time synchrotron XRD was used to study the formation mechanism of nanoalloys. The observed transformations are described by the "conversion chemistry" mechanism characterised by the primary development of particles comprising atoms of only one type, followed by a chemical reaction resulting in the final formation of a nanoalloy. The obtained metastable nanoalloys exhibit essential thermal stability. Exposure to 180 ºC for 30 h does not cause any dealloying process.

  15. A highly active and stable IrOx/SrIrO3 catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Linsey C; Dickens, Colin F; Nishio, Kazunori; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Montoya, Joseph; Doyle, Andrew; Kirk, Charlotte; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Hwang, Harold Y; Norskov, Jens K; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2016-09-02

    Oxygen electrochemistry plays a key role in renewable energy technologies such as fuel cells and electrolyzers, but the slow kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) limit the performance and commercialization of such devices. Here we report an iridium oxide/strontium iridium oxide (IrOx/SrIrO3) catalyst formed during electrochemical testing by strontium leaching from surface layers of thin films of SrIrO3 This catalyst has demonstrated specific activity at 10 milliamps per square centimeter of oxide catalyst (OER current normalized to catalyst surface area), with only 270 to 290 millivolts of overpotential for 30 hours of continuous testing in acidic electrolyte. Density functional theory calculations suggest the formation of highly active surface layers during strontium leaching with IrO3 or anatase IrO2 motifs. The IrOx/SrIrO3 catalyst outperforms known IrOx and ruthenium oxide (RuOx) systems, the only other OER catalysts that have reasonable activity in acidic electrolyte.

  16. Jamming efficiency evaluation of the IR smoke screen against high-orbit IR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gui-qing; Li, Yong-xiang

    2011-08-01

    In order to lower the orientating capability of the DSP satellite, at first the paper analyzes early warning missile satellite detective system, introduces the jamming mechanism of infrared smoke screen, and a model of jamming efficiency evaluation of the IR smoke screen against early warning satellite was built from three sides of absorbency of smoke screen to infrared radiation, dispersion ability and infrared radiation from smoke screen self. At last the correlative conclusion was got based on the brief depiction of Early-warning Satellite.

  17. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  18. Dynamic modification of the fragmentation of CO{sup q+} excited states generated with high-order harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, W.; De, S.; Singh, K. P.; Chen, S.; Laurent, G.; Ray, D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Cocke, C. L.; Schoeffler, M. S.; Belkacem, A.; Osipov, T.; Rescigno, T.; Alnaser, A. S.; Bocharova, I. A.; Zherebtsov, S.; Kling, M. F.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2010-10-15

    The dynamic process of fragmentation of CO{sup q+} excited states is investigated using a pump-probe approach. EUV radiation (32-48 eV) generated by high-order harmonics was used to ionize and excite CO molecules and a time-delayed infrared (IR) pulse (800 nm) was used to influence the evolution of the dissociating multichannel wave packet. Two groups of states, separable experimentally by their kinetic-energy release (KER), are populated by the EUV and lead to C{sup +}-O{sup +} fragmentation: direct double ionization of the neutral molecule and fragmentation of the cation leading to C{sup +}-O*, followed by autoionization of O*. The IR pulse was found to modify the KER of the latter group in a delay-dependent way which is explained with a model calculation.

  19. Striking differences in properties of geometric isomers of [Ir(tpy)(ppy)H](+): Experimental and computational studies on their hydricities, interaction with CO2, and photochemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Garg, Komal; Fujita, Etsuko; Matsubara, Yasuo; ...

    2015-11-16

    Here, we prepared two geometric isomers of [Ir(tpy)(ppy)H]+, previously proposed as a key intermediate in the photochemical reduction of CO2 to CO, and characterized their notably different ground- and excited-state interactions with CO2 and their hydricities using experimental and computational methods. Only one isomer, C-trans-[Ir(tpy)(ppy)H]+, reacts with CO2 to generate the formato complex in the ground state, consistent with its calculated hydricity. Under photocatalytic conditions in CH3CN/TEOA, a common reactive C-trans-[Ir(tpy)(ppy)]0 species, irrespective of the starting isomer or monodentate ligand (such as hydride or Cl), reacts with CO2 and produces CO with the same catalytic efficiency.

  20. Striking Differences in Properties of Geometric Isomers of [Ir(tpy)(ppy)H](+): Experimental and Computational Studies of their Hydricities, Interaction with CO2, and Photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Garg, Komal; Matsubara, Yasuo; Ertem, Mehmed Z; Lewandowska-Andralojc, Anna; Sato, Shunsuke; Szalda, David J; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko

    2015-11-16

    We prepared two geometric isomers of [Ir(tpy)(ppy)H](+), previously proposed as a key intermediate in the photochemical reduction of CO2 to CO, and characterized their notably different ground- and excited-state interactions with CO2 and their hydricities using experimental and computational methods. Only one isomer, C-trans-[Ir(tpy)(ppy)H](+), reacts with CO2 to generate the formato complex in the ground state, consistent with its calculated hydricity. Under photocatalytic conditions in CH3CN/TEOA, a common reactive C-trans-[Ir(tpy)(ppy)](0) species, irrespective of the starting isomer or monodentate ligand (such as hydride or Cl), reacts with CO2 and produces CO with the same catalytic efficiency.

  1. The sequence measurement system of the IR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Ai-hui; Han, Hong-xia; Zhang, Hai-bo

    2011-08-01

    Currently, the IR cameras are broadly used in the optic-electronic tracking, optic-electronic measuring, fire control and optic-electronic countermeasure field, but the output sequence of the most presently applied IR cameras in the project is complex and the giving sequence documents from the leave factory are not detailed. Aiming at the requirement that the continuous image transmission and image procession system need the detailed sequence of the IR cameras, the sequence measurement system of the IR camera is designed, and the detailed sequence measurement way of the applied IR camera is carried out. The FPGA programming combined with the SignalTap online observation way has been applied in the sequence measurement system, and the precise sequence of the IR camera's output signal has been achieved, the detailed document of the IR camera has been supplied to the continuous image transmission system, image processing system and etc. The sequence measurement system of the IR camera includes CameraLink input interface part, LVDS input interface part, FPGA part, CameraLink output interface part and etc, thereinto the FPGA part is the key composed part in the sequence measurement system. Both the video signal of the CmaeraLink style and the video signal of LVDS style can be accepted by the sequence measurement system, and because the image processing card and image memory card always use the CameraLink interface as its input interface style, the output signal style of the sequence measurement system has been designed into CameraLink interface. The sequence measurement system does the IR camera's sequence measurement work and meanwhile does the interface transmission work to some cameras. Inside the FPGA of the sequence measurement system, the sequence measurement program, the pixel clock modification, the SignalTap file configuration and the SignalTap online observation has been integrated to realize the precise measurement to the IR camera. Te sequence measurement

  2. IGF-IR signaling in epithelial to mesenchymal transition and targeting IGF-IR therapy: overview and new insights.

    PubMed

    Li, Heming; Batth, Izhar Singh; Qu, Xiujuan; Xu, Ling; Song, Na; Wang, Ruoyu; Liu, Yunpeng

    2017-01-30

    The insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) signaling induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) program and contributes to metastasis and drug resistance in several subtypes of tumors. In preclinical studies, targeting of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) showed promising anti-tumor effects. Unfortunately, high expectations for anti-IGF-IR therapy encountered challenge and disappointment in numerous clinical trials. This review summarizes the regulation of EMT by IGF-I/IGF-IR signaling pathway and drug resistance mechanisms of targeting IGF-IR therapy. Most importantly, we address several factors in the regulation of IGF-I/IGF-IR-associated EMT progression that may be potential predictive biomarkers in targeted therapy.

  3. IR laser power transmission through silver halide crystals and polycrystalline fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Nagli, L.; Burstein, D.; Shalem, S.; German, A.

    1997-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds in AgC{sub x},Br{sub 1-x} crystals and fibers were studied under CO{sub 2} laser pulsed and CW excitation. The value of LIB threshold P{sub c} of the bulk crystals is about 7.2{center_dot}10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2} for AgCl and 4{center_dot}10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2} for AgBr under 60 ns TEA laser excitation. The LIB threshold in fibers is much smaller; about 2{center_dot}10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}. The absorption of the crystals at 10.6 {mu}m changes from 8{center_dot}10{sup -5} cm{sup -1} for AgCl to 2{center_dot}10{sup -5 }cm{sup -1} for AgBr; for fibers with the same composition absorption is much greater (3{center_dot}10{sup -4 }cm{sup -1} for AgCl; 2{center_dot}10{sup -4} cm{sup -1} for AgBr). The dependence of the LIB and IR absorption on composition, and mechanical and temperature treatments suggests that the LIB in silver halide crystals and fibers is due to the avalanche electrons in a high electric field. The initial free electrons for this process are supplied by ionization of the cation vacancy - charged dislocation complexes. The relatively lower optical stability of the fibers is due to the increased concentration of defects formed in the hot extrusion of the crystal. A simple thermal annealing method for reduction of the IR absorption is proposed.

  4. Ultrafast UV-vis and IR studies of p-biphenylyl acetyl and carbomethoxy carbenes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Burdzinski, Gotard; Kubicki, Jacek; Platz, Matthew S

    2008-08-20

    The photochemistry of a p-biphenylyl diazo ester (BpCN2CO2CH3) and diazo ketone (BpCN2COCH3) were studied by ultrafast time-resolved UV-vis and IR spectroscopies. The excited states of these diazo compounds were detected and found to decay with lifetimes of less than 300 fs. The diazo ester produces singlet carbene with greater quantum efficiency than the ketone analogue due to competing Wolff rearrangement (WR) in the excited state of the diazo ketone. Carbene BpCCO2CH3 has a singlet-triplet gap that is close to zero in cyclohexane, but the triplet is the ground state. The two spin states are in rapid equilibrium in this solvent relative to reaction with cyclohexane. There is (for a carbene) a slow rate of singlet to triplet intersystem crossing (isc) in this solvent because the orthogonal singlet must rotate to a higher energy orientation prior to isc. In acetonitrile and in dichloromethane BpCCO2CH3 has a singlet ground state. Ketocarbene BpCCOCH3 has a singlet ground state in cyclohexane, in dichloromethane, and in acetonitrile and decays by WR to form a ketene detected by ultrafast IR spectroscopy in these solvents. Ketocarbenes have more stable singlet states, relative to carbene esters, because of the superior conjugation of the filled hybrid orbital of the carbene with the pi system of the carbonyl group, the same factor that makes methyl ketones more acidic than the analogous esters. The rate of WR of BpCCOCH3 is faster in cyclohexane than in dichloromethane and acetonitrile because of intimate solute-solvent interactions between the empty p orbital of the carbene and nonbonding electron pairs of heteroatoms of the solvent. These interactions stabilize the carbene and retard the rate of WR.

  5. Excitement in shame: the price we pay.

    PubMed

    Aledort, Stewart L

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the role of excitement in shame, extending the theoretical underpinnings of my work (Aledort, 2002, 2003, 2008, 2009) on narcissism and the omnipotent child syndrome. Shame, excitement, and early narcissistic self-states are complexly intermingled, each influencing the other. Empathy alone is insufficient; the passion connected to shame can be easily hidden. Detailed case studies describe a model for working with the excitement in shame, how it functions, and how it gets resolved.

  6. Collisional energy transfer from excited nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O.

    1991-05-01

    The radiative lifetimes of gaseous nitrogen dioxide excited by pulsed, tunable dye laser radiation are determined for excitation wavelengths ranging from 400 to 750 nm. When the data are expressed in the form of zero-pressure radiative rate constants (k{sub 0}/s{sup {minus}1}), they fit a linear equation with respect to excitation energy. This fit predicts a radiative lifetime of 64 {mu}s for 400 nm excitation and 102 {mu}s at 750 nm. The effects of pressure, observation delay time, and wavelength range of the fluorescence detection apparatus are determined for both radiative lifetime and quenching constant. Dispersed fluorescence spectra from excited nitrogen dioxide are analyzed into three-parameter functions that approximate the corresponding excited state population distributions. Energy transfer from nitrogen dioxide excited at 532 nm and colliding with thirteen buffer gases is studied by this population deconvolution method. The energy removal rate constants increase in the order Ne < Ar < Kr < Xe < He < CO < N{sub 2} < O{sub 2} < NO < NO{sub 2} < CO{sub 2} < SF{sub 6} < SO{sub 2}. The energy transfer rate constant is strongly correlated with the number of degrees of freedom of the buffer molecule and with low vibrational frequencies of the buffer molecule. Population deconvolution from excited nitrogen dioxide fluorescence spectra is again employed to find energy removal rate constants for the NO {sub 2}{sup *}-NO{sub 2} collisions, excited by dye laser at 475.34, 435.04, and 400.00 nm. The energy transfer rate constant increases with decreasing excitation wavelength. The energy removal rate constant between 400 and 532 nm excitation increases as the (3.6 {plus minus} 0.4) power of the excitation photon energy. 76 refs., 67 figs., 16 tabs.

  7. Broad band nonlinear optical absorption measurements of the laser dye IR26 using white light continuum Z-scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Soumyodeep; Bongu, Sudhakara Reddy; Bisht, Prem Ballabh

    2017-03-01

    We study the nonlinear optical response of a standard dye IR26 using the Z-scan technique, but with the white light continuum. The continuum source of wavelength from 450 nm to 1650 nm has been generated from the photonic crystal fiber on pumping with 772 nm of Ti:Sapphire oscillator. The use of broadband incident pulse enables us to probe saturable absorption (SA) and reverse saturable absorption (RSA) over the large spectral range with a single Z-scan measurement. The system shows SA in the resonant region while it turns to RSA in the non-resonant regions. The low saturation intensity of the dye can be explained based on the simultaneous excitation from ground states to various higher energy levels with the help of composite energy level diagram. The cumulative effects of excited state absorption and thermal induced nonlinear optical effects are responsible for the observed RSA.

  8. Spatially encoded multiple-quantum excitation.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Clark D; Borvayeh, Leila; Walls, Jamie D

    2013-05-28

    In this work, we present a simple method to spatially encode the transition frequencies of nuclear spin transitions and to read out these frequencies within a single scan. The experiment works by combining pulsed field gradients with an excitation sequence that selectively excites spin transitions within certain sample regions. After the initial excitation, imaging the resulting ẑ-magnetization is used to determine the locations where the excitations occurred, from which the corresponding transition frequencies are determined. Simple experimental demonstrations of this technique on one- and two-spin systems are presented.

  9. Laser Excited Fluorescence Studies Of Black Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of black liquor was investigated as a possible monitoring technique for pulping processes. A nitrogen pumped dye laser was used to examine the fluorescence spectrum of black liquor solutions. Various excitation wavelengths were used between 290 and 403 nm. Black liquor fluorescence spectra were found to vary with both excitation wavelength and black liquor concentration. Laser excited fluorescence was found to be a sensitive technique for measurement of black liquor with good detection limits and linear response over a large dynamic range.

  10. Quasiparticle excitations in superdeformed [sup 192]Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Fallon, P. ); Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P. ); Cederwall, B.; Clark, R.M. ); Crowell, B. ); Deleplanque, M.A.; Diamond, R.M. ); Gall, B.; Hannachi, F. ); Henry, R.G.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Khoo, T.L. ); Korichi, A. ); Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O. (Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence

    1995-04-01

    For the first time, two excited superdeformed (SD) bands have been observed in the double closed shell superdeformed nucleus [sup 192]Hg. One of the SD bands exhibits a pronounced peak in the dynamic moment of inertia which is interpreted as a crossing between two excited SD configurations involving the [ital N]=7 intruder and the [512]5/2 orbitals. This is only the second occurrence of such a crossing in a SD nucleus around [ital A]=190. The second excited SD band has near identical transition energies to an excited SD band in [sup 191]Hg.

  11. 3.3 micron emission from ultraviolet excitation of some aromatic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shan, Jun; Suton, Masako; Lee, L. C.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared emissions are observed from photoexcitation of benzene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene, and their methyl derivatives in the gas phase at 193 nm using an ArF laser as a light source. An emission band with peak at 3.3 microns is observed from all the molecules studied. This band is attributed to the aromatic C-H stretching vibrational modes. In addition to the 3.3-microns band, an emission band at 3.4-3.6 microns is observed from photoexcitation of the methyl derivatives, which is attributed to the C-H stretching vibrational modes of the CH3 group. The observed spectra are compared with the IR emission bands observed in many astronomical objects. The current laboratory data lend support to a model in which PAH molecules are responsible for the 'unidentified' interstellar IR emissions. IR emissions from the 193-nm excitation of several interstellar molecules other than PAHs are also observed, but they are quite different from the interstellar IR bands.

  12. Competition between photochemistry and energy transfer in ultraviolet-excited diazabenzenes. II. Identifying the dominant energy donor for ''supercollisions''

    SciTech Connect

    Sevy, Eric T.; Michaels, Chris A.; Tapalian, H. Charles; Flynn, George W.

    2000-04-01

    CO{sub 2} bath molecules scattered into J=72 of the 00{sup 0}0 vibrational state at short times after 248 or 266 nm UV excitation of pyrazine are probed using high resolution time resolved IR diode laser spectroscopy as a function of UV laser fluence from {approx}3 to 80 mJ/cm2. The implications of pyrazine photodissociation for the interpretation of these collisional energy transfer experiments are considered. Specifically, the possibility that translationally hot HCN resulting from pyrazine dissociation may be the source of excitation for collisions that impart a large amount of rotational and translational energy to CO{sub 2} molecules is examined. Transient absorption measurements probing rotationally and translationally excited CO{sub 2} molecules produced following excitation of pyrazine are analyzed within the context of a kinetic scheme incorporating pyrazine photodissociation, as well as excitation of CO{sub 2} by both translationally hot HCN and vibrationally excited pyrazine. This analysis indicates that vibrationally hot pyrazine, which has sufficient energy to dissociate, is the source of excitation in collisions imparting large amounts of rotational and translational energy to CO{sub 2}. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Orienting molecules via an ir and uv pulse pair: Implications for coherent Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Alexei V.; Lehmann, Kevin K.; Scully, Marlan O.; Herschbach, Dudley

    2009-05-01

    Spatial orientation of molecules is a pervasive issue in chemical physics and, by breaking inversion symmetry, has major consequences in nonlinear optics. In this paper, we propose and analyze an approach to molecular orientation. This extracts from an ensemble of aligned diatomic molecules (equally AB and BA , relative to the E vector) a subensemble that is oriented (mostly AB or BA ). Subjecting an aligned molecule to a tailored infrared (ir) laser pulse creates a pair of coherent wave packets that correlate vibrational phase with the AB or BA orientation. Subsequent, suitably phased ultraviolet (uv) or visible pulses dissociate one of these vibrational wave packets, thereby “weeding out” either AB or BA but leaving intact the other orientation. Molecular orientation has significant implications for coherent Raman spectroscopy. In the absence of orientation, coherence between vibrational levels is generated by a pair of laser pulses off which a probe pulse is scattered to produce a signal. Orientation allows direct one-photon ir excitation to achieve (in principle) maximal Raman coherence.

  14. The ir emission features: Emission from PAH (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) molecules and amorphous carbon particles

    SciTech Connect

    Allamandola, L.J.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.; Barker, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    PAHs can have several forms in the interstellar medium. To assess the importance of each requires the availability of a collection of high quality, complete mid-ir interstellar emission spectra, a collection of laboratory spectra of PAH samples prepared under realistic conditions and a firm understanding of the microscopic emission mechanism. Given what we currently know about PAHs, the spectroscopic data suggests that there are at least two components which contribute to the interstellar emission spectrum: free molecule sized PAHs producing the narrow features and amorphous carbon particles (which are primarily made up of an irregular ''lattice'' of PAHs) contributing to the broad underlying components. An exact treatment of the ir fluorescence from highly vibrationally excited large molecules shows that species containing between 20 and 30 carbon atoms are responsible for the narrow features, although the spectra match more closely with the spectra of amorphous carbon particles. Since little is known about the spectroscopic properties of free PAHs and PAH clusters, much laboratory work is called for in conjunction with an observational program which focuses on the spatial characteristics of the spectra. In this way the distribution and evolution of carbon from molecule to particle can be traced. 38 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Thermoplasmonic Study of a Triple Band Optical Nanoantenna Strongly Coupled to Mid IR Molecular Mode

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Dihan; Ho, Chong Pei; Pitchappa, Prakash; Yang, Bin; Yang, Chunsheng; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-01-01

    We report the first thermal study of a triple band plasmonic nanoantenna strongly coupled to a molecular mode at mid IR wavelength (MW IR). The hybrid plasmonic structure supports three spatially and spectrally variant resonances of which two are magnetic and one is dipolar in nature. A hybridized mode is excited by coupling the structure’s plasmonic mode with the vibrational mode of PMMA at 5.79 μm. Qualitative agreement between the spectral changes in simulation and experiment clearly indicates that resistive heating is the dominant mechanisms behind the intensity changes of the dipolar and magnetic peaks. The study also unveils the thermal insensitivity of the coupled mode intensity as the temperature is increased. We propose a mechanism to reduce the relative intensity change of the coupled mode at elevated temperature by mode detuning and surface current engineering and demonstrate less than 9% intensity variation. Later, we perform a temperature cycling test and investigate into the degradation of the Au-PMMA composite device. The failure condition is identified to be primarily associated with the surface chemistry of the material interface rather than the deformation of the nanopatterns. The study reveals the robustness of the strongly coupled hybridized mode even under multiple cycling. PMID:26916549

  16. Hot electron detectors and energy conversion in the UV and IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Tao; Krayer, Lisa; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-09-01

    Semiconductor materials are well suited for power conversion when the incident photon energy is slightly larger than the bandgap energy of the semiconductor. However, for photons with energy significantly greater than the bandgap energy, power conversion efficiencies are low. Further, for photons with energy below the bandgap energy, the absence of absorption results in no power conversion. Here we describe photon detection and power conversion of both high energy and sub-bandgap photons using hot carrier effects. For the absorption of high-energy photons, excited electrons and holes have excess kinetic energy, which results in the generation of hot electrons and holes. Energy is typically lost through a thermalization process between the carriers and the lattice. However, collection of carriers before thermalization allows for reduced power loss. Devices consisting of a three-layer stack (transparent conductor - insulator - metal) can be used to generate and collect these hot carriers. Alternatively, when a semiconductor is used, photons with energy below the semiconductor bandgap energy generally do not generate electrons and holes; however, hot carrier collection is still possible in semiconductor devices with a metal layer when a Schottky junction is formed at the semiconductor-metal interface. Such structures enable IR detection based on sub-bandgap photon absorption. Combining these concepts, hot carrier generation and collection and be exploited over a large range of incident wavelengths spanning the UV, visible, and IR.

  17. Near-IR imaging of occlusal dental decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, Christopher M.; Fried, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Dental enamel manifests high transparency in the near-IR. Previous work demonstrated that near-IR light at 1310-nm is ideally suited for the transillumination of interproximal dental caries (dental decay in between teeth) [1]. However, most new dental decay occurs in the pits and fissures of the occlusal (biting) surfaces of posterior teeth. These caries lesions cannot be detected by x-rays during the early stages of decay due to the overlapping topography of the crown of the tooth. In this study, a near-IR imaging system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire occlusal images by launching the near-IR light into the buccal surface of the tooth just above the gingival margin (gum-line). The near-IR light diffuses through the highly scattering dentin providing uniform back illumination of the enamel of the crowns allowing imaging of the occlusal surfaces. The near-IR images show high contrast between sound and demineralized areas. Demineralization (decay) can be easily differentiated from stains and pigmentation. Moreover, the high transparency of the enamel enables imaging at greater depth for the detection of subsurface decay hidden under the enamel. These early images suggest that the near-IR offers significant advantages over conventional visual, tactile and radiographic caries detection methods.

  18. Near-IR imaging of demineralization under sealants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that near-IR reflectance and transillumination imaging can be used to acquire high contrast images of early caries lesions and composite restorative materials. The aim of the study was to determine the optimum near-IR wavelengths for imaging demineralized areas under dental sealants. Fifteen natural human premolars and molars with occlusal lesions were used in this in vitro study. Images before and after application of sealants were acquired using near-IR reflectance and near-IR transillumination at wavelengths of 1300 nm, 1460 nm, and 1500 - 1700 nm. Images were also acquired using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography for comparison. The highest contrast for near- IR reflectance was at 1460 nm and 1500 - 1700 nm. These near-IR wavelengths are coincident with higher water absorption. The clear Delton sealant investigated was not visible in either co-polarization or crosspolarization OCT images. The wavelength region between 1500-1700-nm yielded the highest contrast of lesions under sealants for near-IR reflectance measurements.

  19. Graphitic carbon nitride C{sub 6}N{sub 9}H{sub 3}.HCl: Characterisation by UV and near-IR FT Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Paul F.; Lees, Victoria; Quirico, Eric; Sella, Andrea; Reynard, Bruno; Simon, Patrick; Bailey, Edward; Deifallah, Malek; Cora, Furio

    2009-10-15

    The graphitic layered compound C{sub 6}N{sub 9}H{sub 3}.HCl was prepared by reaction between melamine and cyanuric chloride under high pressure-high temperature conditions in a piston cylinder apparatus and characterised using SEM, powder X-ray diffraction, UV Raman and near-IR Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy with near-IR excitation. Theoretical calculations using density functional methods permitted evaluation of the mode of attachment of H atoms to nitrogen sites in the structure and a better understanding of the X-ray diffraction pattern. Broadening in the UV and near-IR FT Raman spectra indicate possible disordering of the void sites within the graphitic layers or it could be due to electron-phonon coupling effects. - Graphical abstract: The graphitic layered compound C{sub 6}N{sub 9}H{sub 3}.HCl was prepared by reaction between melamine and cyanuric chloride under high pressure-high temperature conditions in a piston cylinder apparatus and characterised using SEM, powder X-ray diffraction, UV Raman and near-IR Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy using near-IR excitation. Theoretical calculations using density functional methods permitted evaluation of the mode of attachment of H atoms to nitrogen sites around the C{sub 12}N{sub 12} voids within the layered structure and also led to better understanding of the X-ray diffraction pattern. Sharp peaks in the UV Raman spectra are due to C{sub 3}N{sub 3} triazine ring units in the structure, that may be enhanced by resonance Raman effects. Broadening in the UV and near-IR FT Raman spectra indicate possible disordering within the graphitic layers or electron-phonon coupling effects.

  20. Deciphering IR Excess Observed by the Spitzer Space Telescope in Short Period Interacting Cataclysmic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Howard; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Ciardi, David; Hoard, Don; Howell, Steve; Stefaniak, Linda; Thomas, , Beth

    2006-03-01

    During the first year of the Spitzer Space Telescope Observing Program for Students and Teachers, our team observed a small sample of short orbital period interacting white dwarf binaries. Our scientific investigation was aimed at detection and characterization of the low mass, cool, brown dwarf-like mass donors in these systems. We used the Infrared Array Camera to obtain photometric observations of the polars EF Eri, GG Leo, V347 Pav, and RX J0154.0-5947 at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 microns. In all our targets, we detected excess emission in the 3-8 micron region over that expected from a brown dwarf alone. One of the exciting discoveries we made with our IRAC observations is that the star EF Eri was found to be unexpectedly bright in the mid-IR (compared to its 2MASS magnitudes). This fact highlights an opportunity for us to observe EF Eri with the IRS as a follow-up proposal. EF Eri has a flux level of ~700 ?Jy at 8 microns. Thus, we are asking for time to obtain IRS data for only this star, our brightest source. We plan to obtain SL1 (7.4-14.5 microns) and SL2 (5.2-8.7 microns) spectroscopy only. We know the IRAC fluxes so our integration toies are well constrained and the spectral region covered by SL1, SL2 will yield sufficient S/N to differentiate between cool dust (rising BB like spectrum with PAH and other molecular features allowing us to determine dust size, temperature, and disk extent) and a T type dwarf showing characteristic spectral signatures and a falling Rayleigh-Jeans tail.

  1. Plant Sunscreens in Nature: UV and IR Spectroscopy of Sinapate Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Jacob C.; Walsh, Patrick S.; Zwier, Timothy S.; Allais, Florent

    2013-06-01

    Plants are exposed to prolonged amounts of UV radiation, with elevated levels of UV-B (280-320 nm) as the ozone layer is depleted. When UV-B radiation penetrates the leaf epidermis, substantial oxidative damage can occur to plant tissues and plant growth can be inhibited. Sinapate esters, particularly sinapoyl malate, have been shown to efficiently prevent such damaging effects. By studying a series of molecules in this unique class under the isolated, cold conditions of a supersonic expansion, the fundamental UV-spectroscopic properties and photophysical aspects following UV absorption can be interrogated in detail. Sinapic acid and neutral sinapoyl malate were brought into the gas phase by laser desorption and detected via resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI). IR-UV double resonance methods were employed to obtain single-conformation UV and IR spectra. As the UV chromophore of interest is the sinapoyl moiety, sinapic acid served as the simplest model to compare directly to the more functionalized sinapoyl malate. It has a spectrum much like most aromatics, with a strong {ππ}^* origin, and well-resolved vibronic structure. By contrast, the spectrum for sinapoyl malate displays a large, broad absorption with little resolved vibronic structure, reflecting its role in nature as a pivotal and efficient UV protectant for plants, serving as the plant's sunscreen. Using conformer-specific IR spectroscopy, the individual conformations of both species were assigned and used as the basis for further ab initio calculations of the excited states that give rise to the observed behavior. Landry, L.G.; Chapple, C.S.; Last, R.L. Plant Physiol. {1995}, 109, 1159-1166.

  2. Arsia Mons Collapse Pits in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found on the flank of Arsia Mons and are related to lava tube collapse.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.8, Longitude 240.4 East (119.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal

  3. Small pixel pitch MCT IR-modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, H.; Breiter, R.; Eich, D.; Figgemeier, H.; Fries, P.; Rutzinger, S.; Wendler, J.

    2016-05-01

    It is only some years ago, since VGA format detectors in 15μm pitch, manufactured with AIM's MCT n-on-p LPE standard technology, have been introduced to replace TV/4 format detector arrays as a system upgrade. In recent years a rapid increase in the demand for higher resolution, while preserving high thermal resolution, compactness and low power budget is observed. To satisfy these needs AIM has realized first prototypes of MWIR XGA format (1024x768) detector arrays in 10μm pitch. They fit in the same compact dewar as 640x512, 15μm pitch detector arrays. Therefore, they are best suited for system upgrade purposes to benefit from higher spatial resolution and keep cost on system level low. By combining pitch size reduction with recent development progress in the fields of miniature cryocoolers, short dewars and high operating temperatures the way ahead to ultra-compact high performance MWIR-modules is prepared. For cost reduction MBE grown MCT on commercially available GaAs substrates is introduced at AIM. Recently, 640x512, 15μm pitch FPAs, grown with MBE have successfully passed long-term high temperature storage tests as a crucial step towards serial production readiness level for use in future products. Pitch size reduction is not limited to arrays sensitive in the MWIR, but is of great interest for high performance LWIR or 3rd Gen solutions. Some applications such as rotorcraft pilotage require superior spatial resolution in a compact design to master severe weather conditions or degraded visual environment such as brown-out. For these applications AIM is developing both LWIR as well as dual band detector arrays in HD-format (1280x720) with 12μm pitch. This paper will present latest results in the development of detector arrays with small pitch sizes of 10μm and 12μm at AIM, together with their usage to realize compact cooled IR-modules.

  4. Phosphorescence bioimaging using cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    You, Youngmin

    2013-08-01

    Recent advances in the development of the phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes have made it possible to implement the phosphorescence modality in bioimaging applications. A variety of phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes have been synthesized and assessed in the context of in vitro and in vivo imaging, especially in subcellular organelle staining and the sensing of biologically important analytes. The examples presented here demonstrate that Ir(III) complexes provide attractive alternatives to fluorescent organic compounds in the construction of biolabels and biosensors. The complexes are particularly advantageous with respect to fluorescent compounds in their compatibility with time-gated bioimaging techniques that completely eliminate background signals due to autofluorescence.

  5. Test chamber for low-background IR focal plane testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staller, Craig; Capps, Richard W.; Butler, Douglas; Moss, Nancy; Norwood, Wynn

    1989-01-01

    A unique and versatile vacuum chamber has been designed for JPL's IR Focal Plane Technology Group. This chamber is equipped with multiple ports for cryogen and electrical vacuum feedthroughs, pumping units, vacuum gages, sources, and detector camera heads. The design incorporates a liquid-nitrogen-cooled optical table and radiation shield for low-background IR detector testing. Focal planes can be tested at temperatures ranging from 300 K to that of liquid helium. This paper describes the design and construction of this low-background IR focal plane test chamber and discusses some of its distinctive features. An analysis of the test chamber's performance is also presented.

  6. Local pair natural orbitals for excited states.

    PubMed

    Helmich, Benjamin; Hättig, Christof

    2011-12-07

    We explore how in response calculations for excitation energies with wavefunction based (e.g., coupled cluster) methods the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced by means of truncated pair natural orbital (PNO) expansions and localized occupied orbitals. Using the CIS(D) approximation as a test model, we find that the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced dramatically with minor impact on the accuracy if the excited state wavefunction is expanded in state-specific PNOs generated from an approximate first-order guess wavefunction. As for ground states, the PNO truncation error can also for excitation energies be controlled by a single threshold related to generalized natural occupation numbers. The best performance is found with occupied orbitals which are localized by the Pipek-Mezey localization. For a large test set of excited states we find with this localization that already a PNO threshold of 10(-8)-10(-7), corresponding to an average of only 40-80 PNOs per pair, is sufficient to keep the PNO truncation error for vertical excitation energies below 0.01 eV. This is a significantly more rapid convergence with the number doubles amplitudes than in domain-based local response approaches. We demonstrate that the number of significant excited state PNOs scales asymptotically linearly with the system size in the worst case of completely delocalized excitations and sub-linearly whenever the chromophore does not increase with the system size. Moreover, we observe that the flexibility of state-specific PNOs to adapt to the character of an excitation allows for an almost unbiased treatment of local, delocalized and charge transfer excited states.

  7. Local pair natural orbitals for excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmich, Benjamin; Hättig, Christof

    2011-12-01

    We explore how in response calculations for excitation energies with wavefunction based (e.g., coupled cluster) methods the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced by means of truncated pair natural orbital (PNO) expansions and localized occupied orbitals. Using the CIS(D) approximation as a test model, we find that the number of double excitation amplitudes can be reduced dramatically with minor impact on the accuracy if the excited state wavefunction is expanded in state-specific PNOs generated from an approximate first-order guess wavefunction. As for ground states, the PNO truncation error can also for excitation energies be controlled by a single threshold related to generalized natural occupation numbers. The best performance is found with occupied orbitals which are localized by the Pipek-Mezey localization. For a large test set of excited states we find with this localization that already a PNO threshold of 10-8-10-7, corresponding to an average of only 40-80 PNOs per pair, is sufficient to keep the PNO truncation error for vertical excitation energies below 0.01 eV. This is a significantly more rapid convergence with the number doubles amplitudes than in domain-based local response approaches. We demonstrate that the number of significant excited state PNOs scales asymptotically linearly with the system size in the worst case of completely delocalized excitations and sub-linearly whenever the chromophore does not increase with the system size. Moreover, we observe that the flexibility of state-specific PNOs to adapt to the character of an excitation allows for an almost unbiased treatment of local, delocalized and charge transfer excited states.

  8. SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN THE HOSTS OF LOW-EXCITATION RADIO GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, Cameron; Salim, Samir E-mail: salims@indiana.edu

    2016-02-10

    The feedback from radio-loud active galactic nuclei (R-AGNs) may help maintain low star-formation (SF) rates in their early-type hosts, but the observational evidence for this mechanism has been inconclusive. We study systematic differences of aggregate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of various subsets of ∼4000 low-redshift R-AGNs from Best and Heckman with respect to (currently) inactive control samples selected to have matching redshift, stellar mass, population age, axis ratio, and environment. Aggregate SEDs, ranging from the ultraviolet (UV) through mid-infrared (mid-IR, 22 μm), were constructed using a Bayesian method that eliminates biases from non-detections in Galaxy Evolution Explorer and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. We study rare high-excitation sources separately from low-excitation ones, which we split by environment and host properties. We find that both the UV and mid-IR emission of non-cluster R-AGNs (80% of sample) are suppressed by ∼0.2 dex relative to that of the control group, especially for moderately massive galaxies (log M{sub *} ≲ 11). The difference disappears for high-mass R-AGNs and for R-AGNs in clusters, where other, non-AGN quenching/maintenance mechanisms may dominate, or where the suppression of SF due to AGNs may persist between active phases of the central engine, perhaps because of the presence of a hot gaseous halo storing AGN energy. High-excitation (high accretion rate) sources, which make up 2% of the R-AGN sample, do not show any evidence of SF suppression (their UV is the same as in controls), but they exhibit a strong mid-IR excess due to AGN dust heating.

  9. Nuclear excitations and reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Fallieros, S.; Levin, F.S.

    1990-08-01

    The main theme of this report is the study and interpretation of the sequence of events that occur during the collisions of nuclear particles. Some of the processes discussed in parts A and B involve short range interactions; others involve interactions of long range. In most of part A one of the particles in the initial or in the final state (or in both) is a photon, which serves as a probe of the second particle, which may be a nucleus, a proton, a pion or any other hadron. The complexity of the processes taking place during the collisions makes it necessary to simplify some aspects of the physical problem. This leads to the introduction of modals which are used to describe a limited number of features in as much detail as possible. The main interest is the understanding of the hadronic excitations which result from the absorption of a photon and the determination of the fundamental structure constants of the target particle. In part B, all the particles are hadrons. The purpose here is to develop and apply optimal quantal methods appropriate for describing the interacting systems. Of particular interest are three-particle collision systems in which the final state consists of three free particles. Part B also considers the process of nuclear fusion as catalyzed by bound muons.

  10. Multi-photon excitation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-01-01

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments. PMID:16756664

  11. Multi-photon excitation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo; Vicidomini, Giuseppe; Faretta, Mario; Ramoino, Paola; Usai, Cesare

    2006-06-06

    Multi-photon excitation (MPE) microscopy plays a growing role among microscopical techniques utilized for studying biological matter. In conjunction with confocal microscopy it can be considered the imaging workhorse of life science laboratories. Its roots can be found in a fundamental work written by Maria Goeppert Mayer more than 70 years ago. Nowadays, 2PE and MPE microscopes are expected to increase their impact in areas such biotechnology, neurobiology, embryology, tissue engineering, materials science where imaging can be coupled to the possibility of using the microscopes in an active way, too. As well, 2PE implementations in noninvasive optical bioscopy or laser-based treatments point out to the relevance in clinical applications. Here we report about some basic aspects related to the phenomenon, implications in three-dimensional imaging microscopy, practical aspects related to design and realization of MPE microscopes, and we only give a list of potential applications and variations on the theme in order to offer a starting point for advancing new applications and developments.

  12. Insulin receptor substrates Irs1 and Irs2 coordinate skeletal muscle growth and metabolism via the Akt and AMPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Long, Yun Chau; Cheng, Zhiyong; Copps, Kyle D; White, Morris F

    2011-02-01

    Coordination of skeletal muscle growth and metabolism with nutrient availability is critical for metabolic homeostasis. To establish the role of insulin-like signaling in this process, we used muscle creatine kinase (MCK)-Cre to disrupt expression of insulin receptor substrates Irs1 and Irs2 in mouse skeletal/cardiac muscle. In 2-week-old mice, skeletal muscle masses and insulin responses were slightly affected by Irs1, but not Irs2, deficiency. In contrast, the combined deficiency of Irs1 and Irs2 (MDKO mice) severely reduced skeletal muscle growth and Akt→mTOR signaling and caused death by 3 weeks of age. Autopsy of MDKO mice revealed dilated cardiomyopathy, reflecting the known requirement of insulin-like signaling for cardiac function (P. G. Laustsen et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 27:1649-1664, 2007). Impaired growth and function of MDKO skeletal muscle were accompanied by increased Foxo-dependent atrogene expression and amino acid release. MDKO mice were resistant to injected insulin, and their isolated skeletal muscles showed decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Glucose utilization in MDKO mice and isolated skeletal muscles was shifted from oxidation to lactate production, accompanied by an elevated AMP/ATP ratio that increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)→acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. Thus, insulin-like signaling via Irs1/2 is essential to terminate skeletal muscle catabolic/fasting pathways in the presence of adequate nutrition.

  13. What Gets a Cell Excited? Kinky Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin and Huxley's (5) revealing the origins of cellular excitability is one of the great triumphs of physiology. In an extraordinarily deft series of papers, they were able to measure the essential electrical characteristics of neurons and synthesize them into a quantitative model that accounts for the excitability of neurons and other…

  14. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope

    PubMed Central

    Favreau, Peter F.; Hernandez, Clarissa; Heaster, Tiffany; Alvarez, Diego F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging is a versatile tool that has recently been applied to a variety of biomedical applications, notably live-cell and whole-tissue signaling. Traditional hyperspectral imaging approaches filter the fluorescence emission over a broad wavelength range while exciting at a single band. However, these emission-scanning approaches have shown reduced sensitivity due to light attenuation from spectral filtering. Consequently, emission scanning has limited applicability for time-sensitive studies and photosensitive applications. In this work, we have developed an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope that overcomes these limitations by providing high transmission with short acquisition times. This is achieved by filtering the fluorescence excitation rather than the emission. We tested the efficacy of the excitation-scanning microscope in a side-by-side comparison with emission scanning for detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing endothelial cells in highly autofluorescent lung tissue. Excitation scanning provided higher signal-to-noise characteristics, as well as shorter acquisition times (300  ms/wavelength band with excitation scanning versus 3  s/wavelength band with emission scanning). Excitation scanning also provided higher delineation of nuclear and cell borders, and increased identification of GFP regions in highly autofluorescent tissue. These results demonstrate excitation scanning has utility in a wide range of time-dependent and photosensitive applications. PMID:24727909

  15. Excitation of helium ion by positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, P.; Ghosh, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    Three (1s,2s,2p) and five (1s,2s,2p,3s-bar,3p-bar) -state close-coupling methods have been employed to calculate the n = 2 excitation cross sections of helium ion by positron impact. The effect of pseudostate is found to be very pronounced in the case of 1s-2s excitation.

  16. Multimode optical fibers: steady state mode exciter.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, M; Sugimura, A; Ikegami, T

    1976-09-01

    The steady state mode power distribution of the multimode graded index fiber was measured. A simple and effective steady state mode exciter was fabricated by an etching technique. Its insertion loss was 0.5 dB for an injection laser. Deviation in transmission characteristics of multimode graded index fibers can be avoided by using the steady state mode exciter.

  17. Coulomb excitation of radioactive {sup 79}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C.J.; Blumenthal, D.; Davids, C.N.

    1995-08-01

    The technical challenges expected in experiments with radioactive beams can already be explored by using ions produced in primary reactions. In addition, the re-excitation of these ions by Coulomb excitation allows a sensitive search for collective states that are well above the yrast line. We are building an experiment to study Coulomb excitation of radioactive ions which are separated from beam particles by the Fragment Mass Analyzer. An array of gamma detectors will be mounted at the focal plane to measure the gamma radiation following re-excitation. Five Compton-suppressed Ge detectors and five planar LEPS detectors will be used. The optimum experiment of this type appears to be the study of {sup 79}Rb following the {sup 24}Mg ({sup 58}Ni,3p) reaction. We calculate that about 5 x 10{sup 5} {sup 79}Rb nuclei/second will reach the excitation foil. This rubidium isotope was selected for study as it is strongly produced and is highly deformed, so easily re-excited. The use of a {sup 58}Ni re-excitation foil offers the best yields. After re-excitation the ions will be subsequently transported into a shielded beamdump to prevent the accumulation of activity.

  18. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope.

    PubMed

    Favreau, Peter F; Hernandez, Clarissa; Heaster, Tiffany; Alvarez, Diego F; Rich, Thomas C; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J

    2014-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a versatile tool that has recently been applied to a variety of biomedical applications, notably live-cell and whole-tissue signaling. Traditional hyperspectral imaging approaches filter the fluorescence emission over a broad wavelength range while exciting at a single band. However, these emission-scanning approaches have shown reduced sensitivity due to light attenuation from spectral filtering. Consequently, emission scanning has limited applicability for time-sensitive studies and photosensitive applications. In this work, we have developed an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope that overcomes these limitations by providing high transmission with short acquisition times. This is achieved by filtering the fluorescence excitation rather than the emission. We tested the efficacy of the excitation-scanning microscope in a side-by-side comparison with emission scanning for detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing endothelial cells in highly autofluorescent lung tissue. Excitation scanning provided higher signal-to-noise characteristics, as well as shorter acquisition times (300  ms/wavelength band with excitation scanning versus 3  s/wavelength band with emission scanning). Excitation scanning also provided higher delineation of nuclear and cell borders, and increased identification of GFP regions in highly autofluorescent tissue. These results demonstrate excitation scanning has utility in a wide range of time-dependent and photosensitive applications.

  19. Multiphoton excited fluorescence spectroscopy of biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David J. S.

    2001-09-01

    Recent work on the emerging application of multiphoton excitation to fluorescence studies of biomolecular dynamics and structure is reviewed. The fundamental principles and experimental techniques of multiphoton excitation are outlined, fluorescence lifetimes, anisotropy and spectra in membranes, proteins, hydrocarbons, skin, tissue and metabolites are featured, and future opportunities are highlighted.

  20. Study of excited nucleons and their structure

    SciTech Connect

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of excited nucleons are discussed. Much of the progress has been achieved due to the availability of high precision meson production data in the photoproduction and electroproduction sectors, the development of multi-channel partial wave analysis techniques, and advances in Lattice QCD with predictions of the full excitation spectrum.